• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Section A
 Section B
 overleaf advertisement














Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00033
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola, Fla.
Publication Date: July 2, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00033
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

PDF ( 59 MBs ) ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
        Page A 9
        Page A 10
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
    overleaf advertisement
        Section 1
        Section 2
Full Text


















Thursday, JULY 2, 2009 www.apalachtimes.com 50(




School board weig hs quarter-mill tax shift


St. George Island tour guides clash over land use


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 10


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The Franklin County School
Board is examining details this
week of an option, newly created
by the Florida legislature, that
would enable it to shift a quarter-
mill in property taxes from its
capital outlay budget to cover
operating expenditures.
The board was scheduled to
meet at 4 p.m. June 30 in a work-


shop to discuss the proposal,
which would require at least a su-
permajority 4-1 vote by the board
to be approved for one year. To be
continued, it would be subject to
voters' approval as a referendum
on the ballot in November 2010.
Faced with an expected de-
cline of as much as 30 percent in
local property tax money, and a
decline of about 6.6 percent in the
base student allocation in state
funding, the district is looking for


a way to supplement its operat-
ing revenue.
If approved, the quarter-mill
shift would add an estimated
$638,586 to the general fund,
which would help shore up the
amount of money the district
holds in reserve, which right now
is below the state-mandated min-
imum.
In addition, it would ensure no
modifications need to be made
in the district's plan to provide


teachers and staff raises of 8 per-
cent next year and 6 percent the
following year.
These raises, part of an over-
all 24 percent hike between July
2008 and June 2011, were granted
by the board following approval in
June 2008 of a four-year half-mill
tax levy, earmarked for salaries
and benefits, by county voters.
At this week's workshop,
school board members plan to re-
view details of funding scenarios


provided them by Sam Carnley,
the district's director of financial
services.
The scenarios incorporate a
drop in the state's per pupil fund-
ing of about $255, or from $3,885
this year to $3,630 next year.
Even with no action by the
board, the amount of property
tax millage levied on county
taxpayers will rise next year,
See SCHOOL BOARD A6


'Every day is a new d~ay.
Wh~atev~er yo~u did yesterday,
that wacs yesterday. You
don't hold the past over the
kcid's head.

Mike Emerson
1000)1 Of the Seahawks baseball program


p.


--7


By Lojs Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Journeys of St. George Is-
land has agreed to make some
changes in response to allega-
tions of land misuse.
At the May 19 meeting of
the county commission, Da-
vid Avant, a resident of Pat-
ton Street on the island, com-
plained about what he said
was commercial use of resi-
dential property.
He said he was a 15-year
resident of the area, and that
Journeys, an island guide
service, was using a block
of land at 331 Patton St. as a
marina and campground. He


water at the site in violation
of Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection rules.
He said Journeys had created
stormwater drainage prob-
lems on the street by filling
in retainment ditches in the
public right of way to create
additional parking.
Avant said the county
should be responsible for en-
forcing ordinances and codes
that he said prohibit the com-
mercial use of the property.
"We don't want to sue our
neighbors and we don't want
to sue the county and waste
everyone's time and money,
but nothing's going to happen
until I sue and force them to

TABLE OF CONTENTS


enforce their ordinances and
codes," Avant said.
Commissioner Pinki Jackel
said her mother owned a piece
of property on Patton, and that
she believed the commission
needed to step in and be in
compliance with the law.
The commission voted
unanimously to have County
Attorney Michael Shuler re-
search Avant's allegations.
They also sent a county road
crew to Patton to clean out
drainage ditches and facilitate
runoff management.
At the June 16 meeting,
Justin Macmillan, owner of
See LAND USE AS


BETTY LOU
DOUGLAS


DAVID
AVANT


also claimed that the business
activities were causing noise
pollution, interfering with the
public right of way, polluting
the canal with dead fish and
creating an eyesore.
Avant said a 500-gallon gas
storage container was posi-
tioned only 20 feet from the


Phone: 850-653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews~,starfl.com
Fax: 850-653-8036


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:

Casrifedd Dirpa idr a day aill1a.mn.
Classified Line Ad Monday ai5 p.mn.


Letter to the Editor .. ..... ... A4
Sheriff's Report. .......... ... B5
ChurchNews......................... B3


SocietyNews.. ............. 2
Tide Chart ................... ........ BS
Classifieds ............. ..... ........ Bl


A palachicola

Carrabelle


S


BI


.colston

thanks sewage


problem

for the birds

By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
A local environmental engineer be-
lieves seagulls, not people, may be at the
bottom of St. George Island's frequent
beach closures and he has data to support
his idea.
St. George Island resident Newt
Colston is a retired environmental engi-
neer and an expert on groundwater con-
tamination. At the June 16 county com-
mission meeting, he said that based on
several studies, he did not believe human
waste could be the source of coliform bac-
teria contaminating the beach.
He said that the amount of contamina-
tion found on island beaches is more likely
to come from wildlife than from tourists.
He told commissioners that the Flor-
ida Department of Health performed a
study on the island in 1999 using tracers
and wells to determine the flow rate of
groundwater to the bay and Gulf. Because
the island is so flat, the researchers found
that water moved at a rate of only one to
15 inches a day.
Colston said another study done by the
University of Florida demonstrated that
coliform bacteria levels in groundwater
were reduced by 90 percent every six days.
Since, with a 30-foot setback, it would take
water from a properly functioning septic
system at least 24 days to reach the Gulf,
the concentration of bacteria remaining
in the groundwater could not be sufficient
to elevate bacteria levels at the beach.
What does Colston think is causing el-
evated coliform readings? Seabirds.
He said that bird droppings could cause
the elevated bacteria count and, given the
large number of birds on the island and
the fact that begging gulls are attracted to
beach crowds, he could be right.
Without more concrete evidence, how-
ever, not everyone is willing to accept his
theory. Andy Smith of the Apalachicola
Riverkeeper pointed out that many of the
rental houses on the island are housing
more people than their septic tanks were
intended to handle.
"There could be a lot of improperly op-
erated septic systems out there," he said.
Kevin Begos, director of the Oyster
and Seafood Task Force, said he would
wait for DNA testing before he made up
his mind.
But, he also asked, given a positive re-
sult for human contamination, "How do
you know it's from a septic tank and not
a swimmer?"


SHAPIYG




80Y5'




L VE

neW Sealiawk skipper plans


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
If Mike Emerson succeeds with
Seahawks baseball like he did as a
college outfielder, then local fans
of the great American game have
some exciting seasons in store.
And if he, together with his fel-
low teachers and coaches, can
shape the achievements, and
sharpen the ambitions, of local
boys like he did at a privately-run
all-boys alternative school in Bay
County, then plenty of Seahawks
have some fulfilling years ahead.
Emerson, newly hired as the
high school ESE teacher, and
coach of the Seahawks baseball
program, boils down his philoso-
phy on turning around kids' lives
to a simple imperative.
"Every day is a new day. What-
ever you did yesterday, that was
yesterday," he said. "You don't hold
the past over the kid's head."
And that's the same type of
thinking he plans to use in rejuve-
nating the baseball program. Put-
ting the yesterdays in the past, and
focusing on the future.
"It's not going to be 'put your
cleats on and go out to play.' It's go-
ing to be organized baseball," said
Emerson, on a tour of the Frank-
lin County High School baseball
diamonds. "I see it as an opportu-
nity to start something, and build a
See SHAPING LIVES A6


~FREEDOM
NWPA ERS NTER CT V


-






































































IT'S GOING TO BE A MAGICAL SUMMER@YOUR LIBRARY!
The Apalachicola Municipal Library is working it's mag ic:


Amnesty for Overdue Materials!
No questions asked!


Join PALS, the New Friends Group
$40.00 donation includes membership &
purchase of backpack full of school supplies


Summer Reading Club
For kids completing K-5 thru July 23


Magic is everywhere @ Your Library!
74 6th Street, Apalachicola/call 653-8436
Caty Greene, Librarian AM L


JIMMIE CROWPDER EXCAVATING & LAND CLEARING, INC.
COMPLETE SITE: DEVELOPMENT
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
ASPHALT GRADING & PAVING LOT CLEARING
DEMOLITION WORK UTILITY CONTCRACT`OR
FILL DIRT TOP SOIL GRAVEL MASON SAND DELIVERED
POND BUILDING
C & D DEBRIS ROIL OFF CONTAINERS
FULL ~ICEN~SED & INSUREBD
SERVING YOU SINCE 1964


850-697-8403 850-528-6933 850-528-5122

L OFFIE aoDIEa CEL IMMIE CELL


runal.cun..~ouletllul IAIIII AVICVV C~laUUIUll DUHall!!! UMEal UCAL l13llD IMID
thislargecolonialclrcal900 10'cellngs, This 1.46 acres has a pond and APALACHICOLA $99,000
heart pine floors and lead pane windows is across the street from the Bay! Charming 2BR/2bath home
Zoned for commercial/residential use so PorhaaDWM Sedndewyeovtdon corner lot.
callforpossbilties Coer lcaton i pey ,All wood interior with loft. Lovely
the heart of the business district, 1/ block a Carport on it. back deck surrounded by native
off Hwy 98 Also available for lease, MVLS#235739 .... ........$1 99,000 landscaping, just a few blocks
entire home or Individual offices from the river!
M ILS# 209022 ...............$899,900 MVLS# 235782.................$99,000
Please call us for a complete selection of properties for
sale in the Apalachicola Bay area! St. Gll~F'"" n ".28

www.ficklingofflorida.com Q 850.927.2255


Thursday, July 2, 2009


A2 | The Times


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Time Staff Reporter

Sportsman's Lodge
owner Bob Allen denies
wrongdoing in the face of
state accusations that he
infringed on public land
when he expanded his
waterfront restaurant.
On May 18, the Florida
De artment of Environ-
mental Protection cited
Allen for constructing
a pier and deck without
state permission and
for dredging and filling
without authorization.
The state agency has or-
dered him to remove the
structure and is seeking
at least a $10,000 regula-
tory penalty assessment
against Allen.
Andy Smith, attor-
ney for the Apalachicola
Riverkeeper, said the
state acted at the urging
of his organization. He
said he discovered aerial
photographs showing
that no structure was in
place in 1991, but that by
1998 photographs showed
a pier and other struc-
tures encroaching on
public property.
The DEP contends
that during a Jan. 25 in-
spection of The Sports-
man's Lodge, at 97 North
Bayshore in Eastpoint
department staff discov'
ered a 776-square foot
L-sh ped pier a 2,400-
square footr covered
porch and a 796-square
foot deck that they say
are unauthorized and
extend beyond the mean
high water line into East
B ay.


that extended beyond the
mean high water mark.
"By deed, in 1934 and
in 1960, the prior owners
of the real property grant-
ed the State of Florida the
right to make certain uses
of the submerged land at
issue not the other way
around," wrote Allen's
attorney in his June 10
petition for evidentiary
hearing'
He said the preexist-
ing structure was dam-
aged in 1985, and altered
in 1986 under permits
issued by the county.
The structure was reno-
vated in 2002 and con-
verted to a restaurant
at that time. After the
Hurricane Dennis storm
surge damaged the build-
ing in 2005, the structure
was repaired under a
general permit issued by
the county.
But the DEP contends
that at some point Allen
expanded the structure,
which was not allowed
under the permit. The
Riverkeeper believes this
happened in the 1990s.
"The last permit the
county issued to Allen
was only for storm dam-
age repair after Hur-
ricane Dennis in 2005,"
said County Planner Alan
Pierce. "It is possible (Al-
len) also obtained a per-
mit to make repairs after
Hurricane Opal in 1995."
J. Layne Smith said he
hopes the matter can be
settled in mediation but,
if all else fails; an eviden-
tiary hearing has been
scheduled in July before
a hearing officer from
either the DEP or the
Department of Adminis-
trative Hearing. J. Layne
Smith said he expects
ta e ari r dae, ulre-
for later in the year.


PHOTO BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN


have the Sportsman's
Lodge," Allen's attorney
said. "It's good for the
Franklin County Seafood
Workers Association.
They can walk out there
and wet a hook or even
meet there,"
DEP ordered Allen to
remove the pier, porch
and deck and pay fines
amounting to at least
$10,000. The notice of vio-
lation ordered the remov-
al of the structures by
June 7 but Allen filed an
order of estoppel so the
structures can remain in
place and in use until his
day in court.
Allen contends that,
prior to his buying the

lotdhen 4; p eeexias ig
structures was on pilings


A view of the pier and deck at Sportsman's Lodge.


They also contend Al-
len filled in nearly 4,000
square feet within East
Bay to allow expansion of
his restaurant, the White
Eagle Lodge.
Allen said he has done
nothing but lawfully re-
pair preexisting struc-
tures that were damaged
by a series of storms. He
said that he was not re-
quired to apply for a DEP
permit to repair his prop-
erty after a storm and
that, if he had applied for
the permit, it would have
been granted. He denies


that he has dredged or
filled around his prop-
erty.
"It's not like this guy
went about this willy-
nilly," said Allen's attor-
ney, J. Layne Smith, of
Tallahassee, in a June 26
telephone interview. "He
didn't throw this together
over the weekend. It took
over a year. He gave East-
point something in six
figures to get water and
sewer down there. He got
permits, paid taxes and
did all of the things you
could reasonably expect


a property owner to do.
"There were struc-
tures in the same area
the DEP is complaining
about in the 1970s, maybe
not in the same configura-
tion. The pilings were still
out there but the struc-
ture had been removed,"
J. Layne Smith said.
Allen's attorney also
stressed DEP had vis-
ited the site regularly
in the past, and weekly
over the last two years,
as part of negotiations to
purchase property from
Allen for construction of
Indian Creek Park. Why,
he asked, did they allow
Allen to construct the
buildings if they were out

ofn 9ouan vw, it's im-
portant for Eastpoint to


Travis Stanley
850.653.6477
Grayson Shepard Jackie Golden
850.653.6718 850.899.8433
Mike Howze Jamie Crum
:506 3112 850.899.8758
Ki ai E ice


OVER FIVE ACRES in Carrabelle!
One mile north of town on Hwy
67. If you are looking for privacy
and plenty of room, this is the deal!
But still convenient to town and the
river.
MVLS# 236210.................$75,000


Cozy 2BR/2BA Florida cottage in 2 bedroom 1 bath fixer-upper in
the heart of Apalach's South Historic Apalach's historic north side! Home
district! This home underwent has9' ceilings, hardwood floors and
complete renovation in 1995. Open heart pine exterior walls. Corner lot
floor plan w/ large kitchen. Roomy with 12 X 24 carport convenient to
loft offers additional storage/office. everything!
Overlooks Battery Park! MVLS# 235630 ...............$1 79,000
MVLS# 236170 ...............$275,000
di~lmW~uILL, W" If II ""tlti~sllu~lil~l


State challenges Sportsman's Lodge pier construction


~ ID~P& COMPANY


8n MS653675 850.653.5772
A Full Service Real Estate Company iggp6T 656 50. 3C m3


























...., u w o ..... ..... ., ... 4
Young people from the summer reading program at
the Carrabelle Branch create coil pots with help from
lirary assistant Tonia Granger. Tis year's teme is
Be Creative @ Your Library.


Thursday, July 2, 2009


Local


The Franklin County
Public Library Eastpoint
and Carrabelle Branch will
be closed Friday and Sat-
urday in observance of the
Fourth of July.
The book drop is always
available for patrons use
after hours. Books can also
be renewed by phone, 670-
8151 in Eastpoint, or in Car-
rabelle, 697-2366, a good
way to prevent overdues
during the holidays.
The summer reading
program Be Creative ea
Your Library resumes next
week. The theme for the
third week of the program
is Colorful Science. Meet a
mad scientist at the library
and prepare to be slimed,
along with some great sci-


Activity

Boat Haul and Repair Yard
Water Sewer and Electrical repair
Piling and Dock Repair
Dock Offloading area, boat to truck
Seafood Market and Public restrooms
Ice Making and Loading for boats
Additional Dockage development
Administration


Budget
(Approximately)
$756,000
$68,000
$168,000
$350,000
$435,000
$340,000
$100,000
$75,000


LMI %b
(Approximately)
>51
>51
>51
>51
>51
>51
>51
>51


ence books. Children ages
5-12 are invited to partici-
pate at no charge. Regis-


tration is ongoing, and
summer guests are also
invited.


The annual Water Quality
Report for Apalachicola was
released in June, and local
water quality is excellent. All
tested contaminants were at
acceptable levels, and only
one potential source of con-
tamination was identified.
Under the state Source
Water Assessment and Pro-
tection Plan, drinking water
resources are constantly
monitored, and a biannual
report on water quality is
produced.
In 2008, the Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion performed a Source
Water Assessment on our
system. The evaluation was
conducted to provide infor-
mation about any potential
sources of contamination in
the vicinity. Except where
indicated otherwise, the re-
port is based on the results
of monitoring for the period
of Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2008.


The city is supplied with
ground water from three
wells. The wells draw from
the Floridan Aquifer. The
only treatment required is
chlorine for disinfection pur-
poses,
Water is monitored for
various chemical and bio-
logical contaminants from
both natural and manmade
sources including radium
barium, fluoride, sodium,
chlorine, haloacetic acids,
trihalomethanes, copper and
lead.
All contaminants fell
within acceptable levels dur-
ing the 2008 test period.
Because of an adminis-
trative oversight, the city
collected only four of the five
required samples for Febru-
ary and March resulting in a
monitoring and reporting vi-
olation for those months. On
the average, water systems
nationwide receive more


than one violation per year.
The only potential source
of contamination identified
was a disused petroleum
storage tank at the National
Weather Service Office at
the Apalachicola Airport.
The tank has the potential to
affect only one of the three
wells, and the level of con-
cern is listed as high.
The report is now avail-
able online at www.cityof
apalachicola.com.
If you have any questions
about this report or concern-
ing your water utility, please
contact Betty Webb, city ad-
ministrator, or Janelle Paul,
utilities clerk, at 653-9319,
or attend any of regularly
scheduled water bureau
meetings held on the first
'lI~esday after the first Mon-
day of each month at 6 p.m.
at the Apalachicola Commu-
nity Center, 1 Bay Ave.
By Lois Swoboda


The City has an adopted anti-displacement and relocation plan; however, no displacement
of persons is anticipated at this time. If relocation assistance is required as a result of the project,
the City will provide assistance as indicated in the policy.
A public hearing to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the application
w ill be held at City Hall, located at Apalachicola City Hall, 1Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, FL on
Wednesday July 8th, 2009, commencing at 5:00pm. A draft copy of parts of the application will
be made available for review at that time. A final copy of the application will be made available
at the Apalachicola City Hall, office of the City Grants Manager, Monday through Friday, from
8:00am to 4:00pm upon completion of the application on or about August 15th. The application
w ill be submitted to DCA on or around September 1st, (or later, if necessary). To obtain additional
information concerning the application and public hearing, contact Cindi Giametta, City Grants
Manager, at the City Hall, 1Bay Avenue, or by phone at (850) 653-9319.
The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Any
handicapped person requiring special mobility accommodation at this meeting should contact
Cindi Giametta at the City Hall, or by phone at (850) 653-9319, at least five calendar days prior
to the meeting. Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend the public hearing should
contact Cindi Giametta at the City Hall, or by phone at (850) 653-9319 at least five calendar days
prior to the meeting and a language interpreter will be provided.
A RAIR HOUSING/ EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, HANDICAP ACCESS COhihUNITY


Unlimited nationwide calling that connects you even during power outages'

Voice mail, caller ID and call waiting plus 5 additional calling features

Standard high-speed Internet with a dedicated connection

IPTV Expanded (includes Basic), HD Free Tier with supporting
set top box equipment

Save every day with a low bundled price!


I


Start saving now! Call 877.954.8510 to ask about
this and other bundle offers.


HIGH-SPEED INTERNET PHONE TELEVISION


The Times | A3


Library HAPPENINGS


Public Hearing Notice
1st CDBG Public Hearing

The City of Apalachicola is considering applying to the Florida Department of
Community Affairs (DCA) for a grant under the Economic Development category for an amount
up to $700,000 under the Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-ED)
Program. For each activity that is proposed, a minimum of 51 percent of the beneficiaries will be
low to moderate income households. The proposed Scipio Creek Boat Basin project will construct
new dock facilities, provide for the loading of ice and the offloading of seafood, construct a heavy
lift boat haul and repair yard, install repairs at the existing dock facilities, and construct a public
retail seafood open air market and public restrooms. As this project will assist the community
in retaining its existing seafood workforce and allow the creation of additional jobs, this is an
Economic Development grant. In addition to CDBG funding, the Economic Development
Administration will contribute up to 80% of the following projected area costs;


Apalachicola water ea rns good gr ades


communications


We Want Your Information, Not Your Name 1

Big Bend Crime Stoppers
Working to Keep Our Communities Safe
Report Drug Dealers, Gangs, Guns, Violent Criminals, Sex Offenders and Wanted Fugitives





The \tlear ;lEdind cl\~l In a~ modt
Inglanousl tashiln
King Georget III of Englandl had, .

I Jusdt beforel't theclenda C. unied13 oll'ler( Cl
a net\\ \'eal:declaredl'( thet Anllanean 1
cclcniesd In rebel~tliocn.a reelo he~tIICI I
Insisted w\oulldb I,\nlanquhedl b. wh~t

I "as then the mightlest military on the
p~lanet
The ensuing, months would ~e
~illedc w\ith Intrigue, attacksi and
cocunterat3ta~cks~ as theC Colonlies
for~medc the secocndl Cocntinental I
Cocngressd -- the fist. cocn~nlened in
1775 estab3lished a uIlted( lI oloIeII s
a~ndl an a~m\' -- tol ccnsider~ how~ be~st
toI answedraconia measures1131 Ilt3ll f~rom
the Kn. sulch as thet Stamp11 -c~t
~hic~h ttteditel\ y\ taxed~c eter.1 sheet jf
written word~c In the cclcnies
The massa3crest at LexSIng'tonI and (
Concor~d in.-lu ApI 77 II~a ru telt aC1 dre
of tr~eedlom that stilll burnsll morel' than 1
22n years later
The Continental C'ongress the
folllow~ing !ear c~harged a~ die-m~n
commit tee with dr~afting a~ dclaraI~L~tion
telling the King, in effect. to jum, In
a lake
Of course. the~ language~ that
Thom~a Jefferson. ther p~rimary
author of the document though~ the
memb~ers at that nasdcetnt Ccngress
madle solme jll re\asions, mostly~ minor
wi~th the xcep~tioln oft the deleltion of
a paragrap31h assailing the King tcor
the pox' oflat er.\.' \\as mu1IchI m1o'e
-- scnny andl dlivnitde tha~n 'lum, In
the lake"' but the eftec~t wa-s the same
The colonies ha~d ha~d enough. the\
insisted ocn their~ Inde~pendncet frocm
their~ mas3dtersd acrossl thet ocean,1 tlrom

bs~ilLrl:?j'sJ


~m


Thursday, July 2, 2009


\\ there nian\ of tholse cclcnis~- ts fld to
the pmisc'ud alt treedocm andc a tresh 1
start onI diltteven~lt conltinenlt
The push folr indlepenlenc~e and
If \\as a di\~rl 1de nation IBack then l
wi~th mIan.\' soca.llr( d Tonesr wanting
nolthing moret tha~n to retmain under
the tollld o th Ki~n risked~t the li\es
alt the tcundilne brocthers and~ their
SI Ike- minded~c cocu n tr ~me~n i n tron t of
a tinnyI qudC11( orI In thet hangman191's
noose thorough their~ --treasdcnolu;"
actions
And the.\ rea11'(((ll dn't halet a
country: Ilust an1 idea. a cncepC~lt
conce~ived b\ ordlnary\ men \\ he
undlertook; extraordi~clnari\ ettorlts
to for~ge a slicet alt treedolcm andc a
republic unli ke~ an! seetn before~t In
history.
That country. In tac~t. Ilooked~ Ilke a
long shot in the !ear~ we t cetltlebrate this

The representab~les~ at the
Continental Colnress hd si((dgned the
Decla~ration of Incl~~~depndene in the
Jul! heat. though not technically all
signed on Jul -1. but it waRs nothing
mores than paper, ink; and language
that wroull ri ng, for two cen turies a nd

O~n the farms ani fieldls of the
colonies, the British were routing a
rag-tag band of colonial militiamen,
typcl~lyBI\ lightl\-armedl men tr~om
evr\y\ da3\. wa1lk f life, IJBlCksmiths.
c~ar~pnters. tamers andI tavern
k~teepers,' man! w\ho hadl n\evr takllen

\\'hle Georg~e \\ashingtoln had
ea~rned somethi ng or a name dlunng
the F~rnc~h a nd In~i~anI \\a : and l


bI, that time createLt~l d something
alt a toceIC. a~ rular~11 arms11: hlis top )
lI eu tena~n ts werel' twmn \ C lthel ha IC 1(
hlttle to not t~lexperincet w\ith ba3ttle or '

\\ashinet ton ~c~tuall spetnt modt
alt 1776, on the run. rett~treatin frcm
Bosdton. Ne\ i~l lor a~nd nor~ther~n New \
Jerse.! w\hilet tacln a~ cla ck t suppl~lies.
an ar~mi tha3t \\as8 InexpenenltIced~ and
lacked properI~~ eqcuipmeInt, a~ndl olne
that seemedl tol d\idndle da~ily~ due to
det~ser~tionsandl the Intent or ma~ny
In t his ta ux '-rm\"' to serve t heir
six-mo~nth initial e~nlistme~nt and o
home.
But stunning liCtoriesd at Tren~lton
andl Princetotcn caLm latte In the \'ear,
won w~hen Hashilngtoln. against all
oddts.dclnded~c his aiallablet troopsl~ and 1
sur~pnsdt c the Bnltldsh, roulting' them ll
in the 6etld a~ndl etabllishine tha~t this
rebe~tllioln woculdl nolt bet easll' pult to a
losee by! the King. his arm! and naly ?
Ther~e w~ouldl be~ hardships ahead
andl live more~ !ears of bloodlshed
befsores the British surrendered. t
'lko !ears later would come from
the C'ontinentall Congress.. a Bill of
Rights andi a C'onstitution.
The 9sactiices of those sele~n
\ears are remainders~ of the foundation
laid for this country' that remains a
b~eac~on of freedom andl democracy
for~ much ofi the worlld, a Counlltry tha1t
cetleb,~arates, ut tooc often fogts,'t~d the
sacr~itic~e tha~t mereI' ordinary.\ morlltals
halne madel In the~ splln of those i
folundling brocthersd in a~rms a~ndl pen
TheI saCnlliCes~ at womenlt~l Ilike
ApaIlachicola's 11lonica C'onter ~
Ben ning an men ll~l Iike herlatel 1


husbaLndl Barney\ BEtnnine. bth

Pearl Harborll th1at btckonedl( thet
cocuntry\ intol \1Yorld \\ar II
Bennine continues to Ille wi~th
the imagesd at \\ hat shet sa\\ th1at
De)tcetmbe~ dla' In I -11.Just as doC
the ma n.\ men and( wome ofll~l thet
"(Greatest~t Genera1'tlion.'" \\h slow dlC\I


unity~ andc braw ry' w\hen the nation' s
\.alues \ wre~ at stake
The sa~tcrdas of a mIanI liker
C'ongresioalcnI Medral ofi Honorcl
retcipiernt C'litiord Sims frocm Gulf
Cocunt\: embracedt in death bI, a
r.teion th1at bareI\ .CC~lyrcnizedI him
In Ilt. ,but \\ he Illedc and dliedl for~
his b~andl at br~othersd on the Beclds of'
cocmbat~ In anoCther~l tar-elun dct oln the

SaCnllices~ Ilike thosedt beingl'- made(


women alt all ages and demo graphi'~13 11cs.
w~ho continue tol battle. an enem.1ll\
in thes Aliddle East even through tar
tooc many! of us hale targotte~n there~~
evet~n is a lear' In IIRaq or A~fghanl~tIsan
so caught up are~ \ver In our everydayt b
litecs andi the i mpacts of a sinki ng

So,. enjoyl! a basrbec~ue, a lisit tromlI
thle pIra';tes, a dla) at tht bach andc
dreworksll'~ as thet sunl sets on July~ -1.
2-,,,-
But doc sol w\hle rememberin
all thoset \\ hcl madelt psIbledJ~t this
ce~tlebrat ion oft the bi rt hday\ of the
finest country, e\.en ulth all our
tolblesd andc tnblula.tiolns, on the elobe~t


I grew up with Connie
McGinnis, of course,
she was Connie Meyer
back then. We attended
Trinity Episcopal in
Apalachicola, went to


talked mostly about boys,
and we both had crushes
on some of the Army
guys stationed in town.
Remember, this was
during the Vietnam War


a girl could dream.
We especially liked
nighttime choir practice.
Once Connie got her
license, her mom,
Jeanette, would let us
take the black Dodge
station wagon to attend.
We allowed plenty of
time so that could have a
good 15 minutes or so to
ride around before and
after practice. We had
an old crumpled pack
of Kent Cigarettes that
we shared between us.
It lasted for weeks. We
thought we were way
cool.
EYC was hip back
in the day. The priest,
Father Jean Chance,
had three good-looking
teenage boys. Attendance
was mandatory for them.
The Methodist minister's
son, Steve Mullis, also
came. With a core group
like that, the girls flocked
like bees to honey. EYC
was in charge of the
annual Shrove Tuesday
pancake dinner. We used
those funds to rent two
beach cottages at Indian
Pass Beach for the
annual EYC weekend.
We were also in charge
of the Epiphany service
_ a beautiful, candlelit
ceremony held after
Christmas.
EYC weekend was
always a blast. We were
heavily chaperoned,
but the adults let us go
down to the shore by
ourselves after dark. We
built a bonfire, enjoyed
life, and our privileged
youth. It was magic
with no liquor or drugs.
Certain participants still
get a light in their eyes

ismnnE ned.I'm nndt
revealing anymore than
that.
After college Connie
and I lost touch. I knew
she lived in San Antonio,
Texas. Every now and
then we would bump into
each other in the grocery
store when either of us


Sunday School,
sang in the
choir and were
members of a
vibrant young
people's group,
Episcopal Young
Churchmen
(EYC) .
She was a year RI
behind me inA
school, and had O
her own crowd, but
we became BFF
(Best friends forever)
around 10th and 11th
grade. Our houses were
within walking distance
by Sixties' standards,
and we burned up the
pavement trading visits
and sleepovers. We


and Fort Rucker
had a helicopter
temporary
training base at
the Apalachicola
airport. The guys
lived in small
apartments all
over town. My
special heartthrob
lived on the route
to Connie's house.
He just happened
to spend most


of his off time outdoors
detailing his brand
new gold Pontiac GTO
muscle car. It was quite
convenient to stop for a
friendly chat on my way
to visit. Believe me, it
was unrequited love, but


PHOTO COURTESY OF JODY FORTUNES
The confirmation class at Trinity Episcopal, conducted by the bishop in the
1960s, included, from left, Lisa Barber, Carolyn Saffran, Jody Fortunas, Denise
Roux, Joni Jones, Connie Meyer and Tom Daly.


was home for a visit.
After the death of her
husband, she moved
home and entered the
school system. We
started sitting next to
each other at meetings,
and she gave me a ride
to work when I had car
problems. We always had
too much to say to each
Other and never enough
time.
The students were
fascinated that we had
known each other as
teens. I think their brain
cells worked overtime
imagining Ms. Roux and
Ms. McGinnis in their
salad years.
In her 18 months
back home, Connie
reconnected with old
friends, met new ones,
went to church, sang in
the choir, and created
a safe haven for her
special students. I
Is Ihe doirnsg ei e
had.
The closing hymn at
her memorial service
was Amazing Grace. I
think about the quality
of grace often, because
it embodies my religious
belief. I believe it is
the perfect good, given


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
APALACHICOLA, FL 32329
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$230 Ter OF C1 UiN mnths
$33 year $20 six mont s


Connie Meyer, during her high school years.


freely with no thought of
reward, and charity done
privately, with no public
recognition.
I ignored being self-
conscious as I joined in
at the recessional. I sang
as loudly as I could for


the amazing grace of
Connie Meyer McGinnis.
Denise Roux is a
regular columnist for
the Apalachicola and
Carrabelle Times. To
reach her, e-mail her at
rouxwhita mchsi.com.


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement,

Thoueu so er word is giveoksen wtetin ahes pise er d word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


A4 | The Times O~n o


EDITORIAL





s~h**&7 Ju


Remembering a friend for life


ED WHITE
NIDROUX
lenise Roux


.4paIlar1chicola T IE
arra l~lbelle




USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors





















































FOOD, FUN AND
ENJTE RTAI NM ENJT

The City of Apalachicola would
like to invite everyone to the open
house celebration of the Apalachicola
Recreational Complex on July 17, 2009
from 3:00-6:00 PM.

SPONSORED BY:
THE APALACHICOLA
SUMMER RECREATION/
PROJECT IMPACT
PROGRAM


Franklin Heallth Department to highlight
SMOke-free businesses
The Franklin County Health Department's Tobacco
Prevention Program plans to highlight area businesses
in the local media who have a written "Smoke Free Pol-
icy" in place.
If you have a written smoke-free policy and would like
your business to be highlighted, contact David Walker at
the Franklin County Health Department at 653-2111, ext.
123, or via e-mail david~walkere doh. state.fl.us.


I. -u


STI M ULUS M ON EY
NOWM AVA ILA BLE!i

IF YOU HAVE A MORTGAGE OR
NOT, AND NEED MONEY FOR HOME
IMPROVEMENTS, CREDIT CARD
DEBT, MEDICAL BILLS OR MONTHLY
EXPENSES. YOU CAN QUALIFY.







7 DIFFERENT GOVERNMENT
STIMULUS PROGRAMS
TO CHOOSE FROM

*CALL FOR FREE BENEFIT ANALYSIS*


TOLL FREE {888-827-6289}

FEDERALLY APPROVED PROVIDER
AAX MTG---BRINGING STIMULUS
MONEYTO NWFLORIDA


IV


Thursday, July 2, 2009


LALND USE

from page Al


Local


The Times | AS


Journeys, appeared before the com-
mission and contended that Avant's
allegations were, "without truth or
erit."
He said Avant was complaining be-
cause he had opened an ecotour busi-
ness of his own and was in competition
with Journeys. He said Avant also op-
erated his business out of his Patton
Street home.
Several residents of Pat-
ton Street neighborhood spoke
in support of Macmillan and
Journeys.
"I don't recall Mr. Avant living on
Patton Street until this last year,"
said Betty Lou Douglas of 609 West
Bayshore. "I live within 300 feet of the
Macmillan property and I don't hear
anything."
She said the neighborhood was
mixed use with several people
operated businesses from their
homes.
"If it's a residential area, what are
the five vacation rentals doing on the
street?" she asked.
Another neighbor, David Harbaugh,
of 319 Patton, said he believed the
drainage problems were due to fill on
neighboring lots.
Macmillan said he would voluntari-
ly ovet e E g ne Dan Rothwell
said that one end of Patton was
blocked by a fence that needed to be
removed.
Macmillan said his mother had
erected the fence to prevent people
from dumping trash at the end of the
street.
The board instructed him that he
could not block the right of way for any
reason and he agreed to remove the
fence.


Fresh from the district championship
in Marianna last week, the Franklin
County All-Stars Dixie Belles girls soft-
ball team, for ages 13 to 15, is at this
week's state tourney in Brooksville.
The Franklin County team lost to the
Marianne Belles Monday night, June
22 16-6 and then roared back for con-
secutive wins, 17-15 on June 23 and 17-7


June 24 in five innings, securing their title
as 2009 District 2 Dixie Softball Belles
Champions.
Coaches include Jim and Pat Mcwhin-
nie, Link Carroll and Barbara Mathis.
Players are Ashley Carroll, Devon Young,
Marilyn Lee, Jece Hatfield, Savannah
Boone, Haleigh Ming, Christina Col-
lins, Anne Lee, Bailey Lee, Rebecca


Prickett, Ashley Moore and Meagan
McClain.
The state championship will be held
in Brooksville on Thursday, July 2. The
team still needs to come up with at least
$800 more in order to cover the cost of the
tournament. If you have any questions or
would like to make a donation, please call
coach Link Carroll at 653-6240.


Dynamic Dixie Belies


MO~HAN 50%~9~~

OF RESPONDENTS ID HAT IF TH AW

A NEWT APER AD F R.A PRODUCT THE}

ALREADY I NE~ ABOUT-' FROM THE- INTERNEJ

THEY _WER MORE L EY T PURCHASE



















BRRI LL MILLER EATY
850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658

SACRIF ICE
1.16 AC. LOT GULFVIEW & ACCESS

LANARK BCH. $27,50000

FOREC LOS URE
60'X100' LOT 2 BLKS. 70 BANK 4BR/
1 .5 BA HOM E AT CTY. APPR. $79,5000
RENTED $6500" MTH.
BEACH COTTAG E 50'WH ITE SAN D
$189,5000" ZONED C1


CARRA8ELLE LIGHTHOUSE ASSOCIATION
CELEBRATES ITS 10TH N IERSARY!








A THANK YOU TO OUR
SSUPPORTIVE COMMUNITY!


Wear sport shoes and
~ r~~---C (enjoy the 103ft climb!
Visit our playground,
Museum & gift shop.
~ y ~ YBirthday cake tool
ALSO
Meet the Winchesters-
local authors of seafood
*RECIPES FROM THE
FORGOTTEN COAST"
Sample some "Low Country Boil*
AND DON'T FORGET....


Ad funded by Franklin countyy Tourist Development (ouncil


-- CafS Fixed Right!

850-763-0555
James Auto Center
1301 E.11lm St.* Panama City, FL 32401

www.jamesautocenter.com
website coupons

Approved IBB .
i Auto Repair









Are You Leaving your

Company?





Wht o n mi$to Kn t

Imor ant nancra etsosy ov FL3240sd ha
wrl y s o p 0rt shoney wfveaccmlsors xom ou
Inestimentandlnuancerdcs NTDnue N~n~aate > A~s~le|
I ,oAd Mebe SPCs regrw wh yo o a atrlbed brokr deal and tak sarteonbkafhtofWlsFgo&om ny


PUBLIC NOTICE!

The Apalachicola City Commission has
adopted a new speed limit within the City
Of Apalachicola. The speed limit will be
reduced to 25 miles per hour on all streets
within the city limits unless otherwise
posted. New signage is being installed and
eRTorcement will begin July 15, 2009.











648-1035
125 Rosie Lane, Whitfield Landing Rd. Overstreet, Florida


Let our professional & affordable design service
by a former Ethan Allen Designer
can transform your home
into a work of beauty & function.

Visit our showroom at:
20720 Panama City Beach Parkway
PANAMA CITY BEACH
Convenilent to 30A/Rosemary Beach
850.249.7666
Thursday -Monday 10:00 -5:30, Sunday 1:00 -4:00
Manhattan Style Boutique Located Within


IV


Thursday, July 2, 2009


A6 | The Times


Local


program people can be proud of."
He plans to schedule games
against squads from bigger schools,
like Rutherford, Mosley, Florida High
and Maclay, teams with well-known
baseball programs.
"We'll learn from our losses too,"
he said. "I want the kids to see good
pitching. I want them to see the guys
from 4A and SA programs. To me
these programs are well-known and
well-established, and they get those
kids who can pitch.
"I want that caliber of baseball
here," said Emerson. "I want to teach
the pitchers to hit locations, to throw
off-speed. I want to get kids to throw
the strikes when they need to.
"Anybody can hit a fastball," he
said. "Hitting spots is probably the
most important thing you can get."
And he ought to know baseball,
because that's a game he's already
proved he can play.


BelieVOS in hitting
to the opposite field
While Emerson also expects to
serve as an assistant to head foot-
ball coach Josh Wright, with whom
he'll be sharing a house in Magnolia
Bluffs, Emerson is emphatic as to
which sport is number one.
"I'm a baseball guy," he said.
A native of Panama City, Emerson
graduated in 1991 from Mosley High
School. He started off playing third
base but in his junior year, switched
to the outfield.
"I made one diving catch and I
never saw the infield again," he said.
In high school Emerson stood 6'
and weighed 188 pounds, but by col-
lege he had grown two inches and
packed on 220 pounds.
"I was a late bloomer, I guess," he
said.
After graduation Emerson first
went to George Wallace Commu-
nity College, in Dothan, AL, and
then played one year, one very dis-
tinguished year, in 1995 at Brewton-
Parker, a private Christian Baptist


College in Mount Vernon, GA.
As right fielder for the Brewton-
Parker Barons, a team affiliated with
the NAIA (National Association of In-
tercollegiate Athletics), Emerson was
first team All-Conference, first team
All-American and Player of the Year.
He batted .399, with 98 runs bat-
ted in, nine triples, and 18 home runs,
with slugging percentage over.800.
To what does he attribute his
breakthrough at the plate?
"I learned how to hit to the oppo-
site field," he said, explaining that
his batting average grew by close
to 100 points once he became better
schooled at hitting to where oppo-
nents weren't expecting.
"That's where most of my power
was, to right center," he said. "That's
what I need to teach the kids. If you
open up and hit to right field, that
makes you a.400 hitter. That's the ba-
sics I need to teach them"
In 1996, Emerson went on to
play for the University of West Flor-
ida Argonauts, again proving his
prowess with a .344 batting aver-
age, as he started 54 of 55 games.
That season he had a 14-game hit-
ting streak, still among the best in
school history, had 95 total bases and
smacked five home runs and 95 runs
batted in.
But with his many plate appear-
ances, he also made the record books
by striking out 41 times that season,
second highest in school history.
Emerson played independent ball
over the summer for three seasons,
eying a shot at professional baseball
as he played for the semi-pro Valdos-
ta Red Sox, before ultimately return-
ing to school to finish his degree and
embark on a teaching career.
"I gave it a good shot. I could hit,
I could throw, but when you look at
speed..." he said, his voice trailing
off into the red dust of the Seahawks
infield.
The lesson Emerson wants to
impart to the students he will work
with is that he is an example of how
they can put the pieces together and
shape their own careers.


"I was an average student, middle
of the class," he said. "I wasn't going
to go to college on academics. I had
athletics."


FOCUSing On reaching boys
Emerson earned a bachelor's in
physical education and health from
the University of West Florida in
2001, where he served as assistant
baseball coach from August 1999 un-
til June 2002.
He taught three years at Panama
City's Rutherford High School, where
he also was assistant coach for both
baseball and football.
For the last five years, he was at
the private Emerald Bay Academy,
where he served as a learning com-
munity instructional leader, a type
of dean position, at this alterna-
tive school serving middle and high
school boys.
Emerson is proud of his years
at Emerald Bay, where 70 percent
passed the FCATs in 10th grade in
high school, nearly double the per-
centage at A.D. Harris, Bay County's
leading alternative school.
He plans to focus on truancy,
grades and behavior, and provide the
patient focus so necessary in these
young peoples' lives. "I'm willing to
sit down with a kid, even if he's being
a behavior problem," he said. "They
come with an attitude."
Emerson said he likes the all-boys
format ("It takes out some of the ju-
venile stuff. There's no showing off.")
but recognizes that the challenges at
Franklin County will confront both
genders as they work to shrug off,
in some cases, years of generational
poverty.
"I want to tell them 'Surprise peo-
ple. Do something they thinkyou can't
do.."' he said. "They may not choose
to leave, but I want them to see other
opportunities outside of school., and
ifyou're willing to make the sacrifice,
to bring some of the knowledge back
to town.
"We'll look at each kid individually
and see," he said.


because the Florida Legis-
lature this spring decided
to shift more of the funding
burden to local taxpayers.
Carnley said last year's
required local effort, which
is the millage the state man-
dates local taxpayers must
pay, stood at 1.48 mills, and
raised about $5.14 million,
with an additional local dis-
cretionary millage, at 0.532
mills, which raised another
$1.7 million.
But next year, based
on state funding rules,
the required local effort
will rise to 2.187 mills, and
raise about $5.59 million,
and the local discretionary
millage will rise to 0.748
mills, and add another
$1.91 million.
Together with other
direct state funding, plus
$388,000 in new federal fis-
cal stabilization money, the


district will have a founda-
tion of about $9.4 million in
local, state and federal an-
nual funding to work with,
up from last year's $9.1 mil-
lion.


Drop in hallf-mill levy
receipts for salaries
Because of the decline
in property values, the ad-
ditional half-mill operating
levy money earmarked for
raises is expected to yield
about $1.28 million next
year, a good half-million
dollars less than the $1.73
million it brought in this
year.
Prior to approval by
voters, initial estimates
had been the four-year
levy would yield at least
$1.5 million to $1.8 mil-
lion each year until it


expires June 30, 2012.
While all of last year's
half-mill salary money
wasn't spent to fund the 10
percent pay hike granted
in the first year of a three-
year contract, declining
property values will con-
tinue to yield less revenue
in the next two years. This
will make it less likely
the district will be able to
fund any yet-to-determined
raise in the last year of
the four-year span of the
levy.
"It's not as much, so we
can't give as much," said
Chairman Jimmy Gander.
"If it falls short, we can ei-
ther renegotiate (with the
union) or it's all over at the
end of three years."
In addition, the dis-
trict needs to bolster the
district's fund reserve bal-
ance, which currently is


only about $100,000, with
the state requiring the dis-
trict have at least a $1 mil-
lion cushion.
Board Member David
Hinton asked that Carnley
present to the workshop
numbers on whether the
district can achieve its re-
quired fund balance with-
out having to shift the quar-
ter-mill out of capital outlay
funds.
Cathy Wood, speaking
on behalf of the teachers
union, told the board that
"the Legislature failed
once again to provide need-
ed resources" to Florida
schools.
She urged the board to
look to the quarter-mill op-
tion as "a source to replen-
ish your reserves," adding
that "25 cents will not be
too much to ask taxpayers
for education."


Rose Buskens: Susie Eppley: Jenni Calvarese:
Owner/Cosmetologist Cosmetologist/Micro- Manicure/Pedicure and
dermabrasion Certified Acrylic Nalls
Cet gs alndle


Mon Fri 8:00 5:00 CST Sat 8:00 Noon CST
Flexible/Walk-Ins Welcome


L~ittr e~sSHAPING LIVES from page Al


II '


SCHOOL BOARD from pane Al


L ~C LL- I_


Doesn't Have To Be Expensive





















F5U grad students top 5K Sizzler race


STAT E BAN K*1897
A Division of Coastal Commnunity Bank.

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint ISt. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 1200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


11111111111111111111~


NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER
ADOPTION OF AN ORDINANCE
AMENDING ORDINANCE 2004-36
WHICH CREATED THE SOUTH
SHOAL VILLAGE PLANNED UNIT
DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT AND
ESTABLISHING DEVELOPMENT
STANDARDS FOR THE SOUTH
SHOAL VILLAGE PLANNED UNIT
DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT
On Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at 10:30 a.m. (ET) t the County Commission Meeting
Room in the Courthouse Annex at 34 Forbes Street in Apalachicola, Florida, the Franklin
County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider enacting the
following ordinances.
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ORDINANCE 2004-36 WHICH AMENDED
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY ZONING ORDINANCE TO CREATE THE SOUTH SHOAL
VILLAGE PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT AND ESTABLISHING
DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS FOR THE SOUTH SHOAL VILLAGE PLANNED UNIT
DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT.
Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed
ordinance. Persons who may desire to appeal any decision made at such meeting should make
arrangements to have a verbatim record of the proceedings made.
The proposed ordinance may be inspected in the office of the Clerk of Court in the
Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola. Florida.
Those persons needing special accommodations to attend the meeting should call
Marcia Johnson, Clerk of Court, at 850-653-8861 at least three days in advance of the meeting.
Publication Dates: July 2, 2009


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

By definition, runners
are quick to the finish.
But being quick to the
start led to a bout of heart-
burn in what otherwise
was an immensely suc-
cessful 5K Sizzler race
Saturday evening on St.
George Island, drawing
the largest field in the
event's 11-year history.
Traditionally, the Sizzler
gets underway sometime
between 7 and 7:30 p.m.,
soon after the conclusion
of the one-mile EAn Run,
which drew 32 runners
and was won this year by
14-year-old Mason Brown,
vacationing with his fam-
ily from Springfield, MO,
in 7:12.
And so, on Saturday
evening, a siren got the
field of more than 200 run-
ners off the starting line
at about 7:22 p.m. for the
Sizzler.
For most of the run-
ners, this was as expected.
But for a few, including a
handful of topnotch en-
trants from Tallahassee,
this was about eight min-
utes prior to the 7:30 p.m.
time posted on some of the
publicity.
Thus, they ran too late,
before ever setting foot on
the course.
Eastpoint veterinarian
Dr. Hobson EAlmer, long-
time organizer of the race
which has grown into a
regional draw and a Gulf


At left, Sizzler winner Jay Robida. At
center, Zack Winkler, 4, from Loganville,
GA, takes a swig of water after finishing
the Fun Run with his grandparents, Linda
and Don Gunther, of Signal Mountain,
TN. At right, Lilly Unger, 6, of Tallahassee,
gets help putting in her Fun Run time of
8:30 from her mom, Lisa Unger.


Winds Track Club Grand
Prix event, said he mis-
takenly used some public-
ity from earlier years that
specified a 7:30 p.m. start-
ing time.
Volunteers who handled
registration Saturday told
entrants the start would
follow the EAn Run, and
runners are traditionally
eager to get started once
they've warmed up.
Still, in light of the post-


ed 7:30 p.m. time, EAlmer
apologized profusely to
those runners who missed
the start.
"I was pretty embar-
rassed about that," he
said. "I'm trying to fix it
the best I can."
He is awaiting word
from a proposal he sent to
the Gulf Winds Track Club
that could mean running
another Sizzler later this
summer, sanctioned by


the track club, at EAlmer's
expense.

Temperatures cool
(0WH f0r start of race
With more than two
dozen volunteers helping
out, people like Bob and
Susan Pruitt who sprayed
the runners with water at


the two-mile mark, last
weekend's race raised
over $9,000 for the Franklin
County Humane Society.
The island's first respond-
ers unit was on hand, as
were deputies from the
sheriffs' office.
"The turnout was the
most we've ever had," said
EAlmer. "Everybody had a


good time, and everyone
raved about the party at
Harry A's afterwards."
About 95 percent of the
232 runners registered for
the Sizzler took part, with
two Florida State Univer-
sity graduate students
winning top honors.
See SIZZLER A8


BAY POINT~

I N V ITlATrI ONA L


The 40/40 Shootout is a "Tournament Within a
Tournament" featuring 40 boats, 40 feet or less
in length, fishing for tuna, wahoo and dolphin.
Participants may attend all Billfish Invitational


Tournament events and parties
and may depart with the fleet
on Thursday evening, or Friday
morning, but the 40/40 has a
separate registration,- entry fee,
optional categories, weigh-in
and awards.


a slepahaatse
registration,
entry fee,
optional
categories
and awards.


Want to be a sponsor
Sponsorship opportunities are still available.
For more information, please contact
Chris Mliller at 850-233-1633
or chris@baypointbillfish.com


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A
Section


~F~S JT -


CBAY POINT










www.apalchtimes com SIZZLER from paoe Al


FL License #CRC057203 ' '


NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER

CONDITIONAL ABANDONM\/ENT OF A

PORTION OF ALLIGATOR DRIVE

On Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at 10:30 a.m. (ET) at the County Commission
Meeting Room in the Courthouse Annex at 34 Forbes Street in Apalachicola, Florida,
the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to
consider the conditional abandonment of that part of Alligator Drive lying South
of Lots 1-11, South Shoals subdivision recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 21, Official
Records of Franklin County, Florida. A copy of an unsealed drawing of that part of
the road proposed for abandonment is attached.

Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be herd with respect to the
proposed conditional abandonment. Persons who may desire to appeal any decision
made at such meeting should make arrangements to have a verbatim record of the
proceedings made.

The proposed resolution may be inspected in the office of the Clerk of Court
in the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Florida.

Those persons needing special accommodations to attend the meeting should
call Marcia Johnson, Clerk of Court, at 850-653-81861 at least three days in advance
of the meeting.

Publication Dates: July 2,2009


Franklin County Tourist Development Council

2009-2010 GRANT APPLICATION

RELEASE NOTICE

All FCTDC Off-Season and Sustaining Grant Applications will be released on Friday,
July 3, 2009.

The DEADLINE FOR RETURNING APPLICATIONS WILL BE
5:00 pm, Monday, August 3, 2009.

$80,000 has been allocated for 2009-2010 Off-Season Grant awards in the following
categories:

Festival Grants are provided to support organizations in producing and promoting large events
that result in high tourist demand and economic return. These are multi-day events. Each
festival grant award is $7,500. A total of three (3) festival grants may be awarded for the
2009-2010 cycle. Sustaining Grant recipients are not eligible for this award. Anticipated
attendance should be in excess of 5,000 people.

Sponsorship Grants are provided to support organizations in producing and promoting mid-
size events that result in high tourist demand and economic return. These are multi-day
events. Anticipated attendance for these events should be a minimum of 2,000 people. Each
sponsorship grant award is $5,000. A total of six (6) Sponsorship Grants may be awarded for
the 2009-2010 cycle.

Assistance Grants are provided to assist organizations in producing and promoting events that
are full day, recurring events which generate strong tourist demand and economic benefits.
The anticipated attendance for these events should be a minimum of 400 people. Each
assistance grant award is $2,000. A total of eleven (11) Assistance Grants may be awarded in
the 2009-2010 cycle.

Please note: Sustaining Grant recipients are limited to one (1) application for either a $5,000
Sponsorship Grant or a $2,000 Assistance Grant.

Special Request Grants will be accepted by the FCTDC on an individual case basis throughout
the year. A total of $5,500 will be allocated for the 2009-2010 season and may be awarded as
eleven (11) separate $500 awards.

Note: The total allocation in all categories is subject to the availability of funds. The FCTDC
may revise category allocations without notice prior to making awards.

$100,000 has been allocated for 2009-2010 Sustaining Grants and will be divided among
award recipients.

To Request an Off Season or Sustaining grant application
please call 850-653-8678
or Email camelliarose2@aol.com
FaX: 850-653-8319
Visit the FCTDC website at www.anaturalescape.com to download a copy.
Or visit the TDC Office at 17-1/2 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida


Thursday, July 2, 2009


Sports


ida StteR iaddas udan Flin
biology doing research on
hepatitis C, cruised to vic-
tory overall, finishing in
16:52, a solid minute ahead
of the second place run-
ner.
Robida's time was about
seven seconds slower than
his second place finish last
year.
"After the first 400 me-
ters, there were a couple
younger kids who were
with me and then they fell
off and I was by myself," he
said. "The last mile-and-a-
half was just cruising."
Now an avid marathon
runner, the Buffalo, NY na-
tive said he initially liked
the gentle wind, which
cooled down runners af-
ter temperatures dropped
about 20 degrees by race
time from their noon day
high.
But, the wind "was bru-
tal in my face on the back
half," he said.
Taking top prize for fe-
male runners was Kelsey
Scheitlin, 25, a doctoral
student in geography at
FSU, who covered the
course in 19:45.
"It was hot," she said.
"The last straightaway
was a killer."
It was Scheitlin's first
raceontheisland,although
she has done academic re-
search on the probabilities
a hurricane will reoccur,
and St. George Island has
been one of the locations
studied.
She hoped to race
against her Gulf Winds
running partner, Micah
Adriani, a grad student in
psychology, but it was not
to be.
Adriani missed the start
of the race, as she had just
completed her warm-ups
and was on her way to the
starting line when she saw
some of the runners zoom-
ing down the course.
"I was extremely disap-


Kelsey Scheitlin, the Sizzler's top female runner.


pointed," she said. "We're
competitive, but in a fun
way. I would have liked to
run with her."
Several local runners
took part, including Mi-
chael Shuler, who ran a
23:25, slower than his best
of 22:40 but better than
his time last year, when
he was recuperating from
surgery.
The island's John Shel-
by, at 55, was pleased with
his time of 26:57, although
"I've done much better and
I've done worse. I have the
dubious honor of finishing
last once.
"The race has really
grown," he said, reflecting
on the 10 Sizzlers he has
run. "Thank God it has.
I don't have to finish last
anymore."
Apalachicola's Jay Kan-
nuck was pleased with his
effort as well. "I just start-


ed again two weeks ago,
after a couple of years," he
said.
Cassie Gary had a big
smile on her face as she
cooled down after the
race, especially since run-
ning is part of a health
program that follows her
quitting smoking three
months ago after 20 years
of the habit.
"I smoked a lot," she
said, recalling how she
went cold turkey after a
brief bout with the patch
"I was just done. I had
smoked up all the ciga-
rettes that were allotted
me in my lifetime."
Avid runner Shaun Do-
nahoe declined to share
his times, but was satis-
fied with another success-
ful Sizzler race under his
belt. "I was thrilled," he
said. "Ninety-five percent
of life is just showing up."


Got FairPoint phone? Get 3 months of Internet
for $9.95 a month!
H A dedicated connection that's not shared with
your neighbors as cable can be"
FREE self-installation and 24/7 tech support
FREE security package with anti-virus and
firewall ($50 value)
a 100MB of email storage
Support for email files up to 25MB
(great for photos and music)
FREE activation and use of modem
FREE monthly el~ewsletter
NO COntraCt to sign


Plus, you'II have:
Phone service that can bring help to your door in a 911 emergency
H A phone line that works when the power goes out'

Don't miss out on this great opportunity! .
Call 877.342.7097 now. Paggg" (
... .. ... .. ... .. .. ... .. ... .. ... .. ..colm aunioations
HIGH-SPEED INTERNET a PHONE a TELEVISION www.FairPoint.com
'Offer required FairPoint local phone service. After promotional penixi, rtantiani rate for high-speed Internet applied. For I~mitel time only. Limitel to Stantiard rer
vice. F~airPoint delivery a dedicated connection to your home from our high-speed Internet nmtwork. Unfortunately, cable Internet service can hare a conner
tion with other cable mmium customers in the neighborhtxi. tOnly phoner that do not require electricity work during power outage. HIGH-5PEED INTERNET:
Spe oan unnerpe revc ar n ganted. Taxer arus aditional charger may apply. Not all rervicer available in all area. Services subject to change.


A8 | The Times


America's Home Place Is Your #1
On-Your-Lot Gustom Home Builders Established 1972
90+ CUSTOM FLOOR PLANS FROM 900-3000 SF TO FIT YOUR LIFESTYLE & BUDGET


(850) 30910800


TE CAINBRIDGE





The Coolest Place
on the Beach!
MEXICO BEACH, FLORIDA






Free Draft Beer
With any purchase
Valed anytime. Must submic coupon. Only one
coupon per person. May not be combined
with[ any other courpon.


50% OFF Meal
Second person's meal
with purchase of first meal
Mujt jubm~Ic coupon Only one coupon per
1grouo Alconol not .ncluded. D~scount soplied
to IO~er OrlCed meal.
Valid 11a-4p









Radioons hack~C


W;~" Total Pride `W ~
Pest Control Inc.
(850) 229-8720
(850) 229-7825 Fax
P.O. Box 356
Port St. Joe, FL 32457








.h~! .. A 5 I li1:1.-\M s PMl EST


(850) 22-SWEET
145 West Hwy. 98, Port St. Joe
Port City Shopping Center
www. mys pace.co m/Lu Lu ssweetexpectati ons


eoW B C Mon~da Frida0 30 6
Closed Sunday
Food Dowvntown Port St Joe
Trent, Q 302B Reid Ave
Toy~s *
ena Pet Freindly
BEAMI WEarer ye-' r ( Establishment




tl. Dol~&8P~" i stuff~ .4
306 Reid Avenat'
Port St. Joe,
Florida 324C56
850-22 9- 9277





Antiques and olects les
~na~ -Perry MVcFarland, owner
308 4th St
P0rt St Joe, FL 32456

( sli8 -2-2E-SL8,s~ Emtail: pjmiracler@gicom.net




Bayside Lumber
& Building Supply
272 Conunerce Blvd
Port St. Joe, Florida
(850) 229-8232 or 229-8233
St. Joe Conunerce Park Fax (850) 227-7435



THfE PEARL 019 WAT~ER SYRKET

High Cotton Marketplace
230-B Water Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: 850-653-1520
Email: pearl@waterstreetpearl.com



ggGROUPI ux- AL


I


2S27 w e SrO ee A Ic icola, FTL
"It's not inst seafood. it's a tradition."


The Area's

Largest Selection
of Spirits, Fine
Wines, Cigars &

229-4 3 iosCoveFINE WINE SPIRITS
Port St. Joe, FL CIGARS SUNDRIES


I~ ___


* Homemade Fudge
* Bulk Candy
* Gourmet Coffee
* Wedding Cakes
* All Occasion Cakes
* Custom Gilt Baskets


HIlNI-STORAGE AND OFFICE COMPLEx


OPEN
Mon-Fri 9 -6
Sat 9:30 5:30


,B


DOWNTOWN Port St Joe
202 Reid Ave
(850) 227-9414


Open Monday Friday 7:30 am 6 pm Saturday 10 am 5 pm
306 Reid Avenue, Port St Joe, Florida 229-9277


w ww. americasmimls torageanlottice. com


1pm 2pm CT18&U



Relay Races:
2pm CT
Volleyball Tournament-
10 am till?
($25.00 Entrance Feey \\
Sandcastle Building Contestf
10 am 5 pm CT
Baggo Games:.
AHl Day ~
Beach Bop Dance:
6 pm Close CT
on the Tiki Deck


Glenda Neel McLemore


Badcock~amnore
HOME FURNITURE~
515 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd.
Pt. St. Joe, FL 32456
850-229-6195
Fax 850-229-5329
---- --- '- - - - ,r


MB~UiO


THE NO N AM CAFC



















Thursday, July 2, 2009 w ww. a pala ch t i me s. com Page l


B
Section


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Top left, Tomilee Dowden, left, and Chelsea Soderholm, thank the library for their wonderful experiences as TIGERS at Sunday's recognition dinner.
Top center, Sybil Kemper, from the county's tobacco prevention program, left, presents a present to Patrick Jones, while Eileen Annie Ball looks on. At
top, right, Majken Peterzen. At bottom, left, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson. Bottom center, Kenneth Turner shares a duet with the library's Carol
Barfield, as drummer Joe Lehning looks on, following Sunday's recognition dinner.


seniors


to see and do," said Dowden.
"You really enriched my life
and lots of others."
Kenneth Turner on key-
boards and vocals, and Joe
Lehning on percussion, part
of the band New Breed, pro-
vided live musical entertain-
ment while the guest enjoyed
a multi-course dinner along
with dessert.
The Franklin County De-
partment of Health Tobacco
Prevention Program spon-
sored the ceremony, with
Sybil Kemper on hand to
present goodies bags to the
graduates. Also recognized at
the ceremony were the many
volunteers who help make the
program a success.
The Library's Tigers pro-
gram is funded through a
grant from the Gulf Coast
Workforce Board and the Kit
program is funded by a Title
II grant from the Florida De-
partment of Juvenile Justice.
The youth program staff in-
cludes Ball, Bijan Neshat and
Suzanne Creamer in East-
point, Carol Barfield and Bet-
ty Prince in Apalachicola, and
Bonny Ball and Joan Matey in
Carrabelle..


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Never has a streak of tigers
brought so many tears.
But they weren't tears of
fear caused by this group of
nine tigers, they were tears
of joy, the joy in watching nine
young adults leave the com-
fort of their youth and venture
out into a world of new adven-
tures.
The fourth annual special
awards ceremony dinner for
the Friends of the Franklin
County Public Library's TI-
GERS program drew a robust
and enthusiastic audience
Sunday.
Seven of the nine graduates
of the program, which stands
for "Teens In Gear Enjoy Re-
alize Succeed," were seated
at the head table: Brianna
Gordon, Tomilee Dowden,
Chelsea Soderholm, Andrew
Gurganus, Patrick Jones,
Ka'Trisha Williams, and Sarah
Hadsock.
The two others, Charles
Goggins and Asenath Thom-
as, were absent due to other
commitments as they prepare
for college in the fall.


All the seniors received
scholarship awards from the
library, with Gordon, Hadsock
and Gurganus receiving the
three highest awards for their
participation in the program.
Highlighting the evening's
dinner, emceed by Eileen An-
nie Ball, the former county li-
brarian who worked to create
the TIGERS program several
years ago, were two keynote
speakers.
Majken Peterzen, an ac-
complished artist out of Talla-
hassee, spoke first, beginning
her remarks by questioning
the graduating seniors on
their future plans.
Hadsock said she enjoyed
working at the library, while
Williams said she planned on
a nursing career and Gordon
one as an x-ray technician.
Jones plans a career in busi-
ness, while Gurganus has his
sights set on becoming a fire-
fighter, Soderholm on being a
victim advocate, and Dowden
a teacher.
"We live in a community
where we have a problem
with good teachers," she said.
"I want to be the person who
changes that."


Peterson went on to speak
about a favorite story of hers,
"The Haberdasher's Holi-
day," in which a man named
Charles Van der Vaan, the 24th
son in his family's lineage and
born to incredible riches as a
cobbler, decides that making
hats is what truly makes him
happy.
"Follow your heart. Do
what you're supposed to do,"
she said. "Life isn't about find-
ing yourself. It's about creat-
ing yourself."
Next to speak was Apala-
chicola Mayor Van Johnson,
who began with a story of how
Alice, from the fantasy novel
"Alice in Wonderland," met
the Cheshire Cat after falling
through the rabbit hole. When
the cat asked her, from its
perch in the tree, where she
was headed, Alice replied that
"I really don't know. I suppose
it doesn't really matter."
The cat replied, "Well, then
I suppose it doesn't matter
what road you take."
Johnson urged the young
people to build on their hopes,
"Your destination depends
on your ability to dream," he
said.


The next step, he said, was
to use persistence and de-
termination to achieve their
goals and "not allow anyone
to discourage you."
Johnson then recalled his
second bid for the Apalachic-
ola city commission in 1997,
following an unsuccessful run
in 1993. He said that after be-
ing discouraged by influential
people that his odds were un-
likely of success, he went on
to emerge victorious in a field
of five candidates, and was
re-elected twice before being
voted mayor.
"Don't be afraid to dream.
There's not such thing as an
impossible dream," he said.
"Naysayers will place obsta-
cles in your path to make you
stumble and fall. Nothing in
the world can take the place
of persistence."
After a delicious potluck
dinner, complete with a cake
featuring all the seniors' pho-
tographs in icing, Gurganus,
Hadsock, Dowden and Soder-
holm all rose to give thanks
to the TIGERS advisors that
shaped their experiences over
the past several years.
"There's so much stuff I got


"
;a

---


PHOTOS COURTESY OF COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION.
The Will. S. Kendrick Sports Complex east of Carrabelle has been expanded in recent weeks, as part of an effort overseen by the county parks and recreation
department. Nikki Millender, a coordinator with the department, said the park now sports a tribute to famed Carrabelle native Buck O'Neil, a star of the Negro
Leagues who went on to major league fame as a coach, at left; a handicap accessible playground, at center; a tennis court, at right; and a nature trail that leads
from the baseball park over to Sands football field.


LIFE


TI~ES


Banquet bids farewell to TIGER


NEW BLOOMS AT KENDRK(K PARK









Bir-thdays


LET US HELP YOU WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS!
CRIBSTABLES WEDDING ARCHES
HIHCHAIRS CHAIRS CANDELABRAS
TENTs LINENS PuncH BowLS
OINNEWARE BEACH WHEELCHAIR CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN





CHANGING JOBS?
RETIRING?

Heather McCurley-Noyes, CFP@
COMPASS POINT

RAYMON1 JAME~S

Invites you to attend an informative lunch
or dinner engagement to discuss:
Advantages of a Rollover IRA
SLeading reasons for a retirement plan distribution

Tax and penalty strategies


PET OF THE
WEEK I


JrE MAMA'S
WOOD FIRED P Z ZA

Authentic hearth
baked pies in the
style of Naples
!- . II .: 1. 1 I I I.: ~1 1-


1- 1..II .- ~ I .- 11- .
.....I ".. .. ... I ..._


Kittens, kitten and more kittens
If you are looking for a cute, cuddly, sweet,
affectionate companion who doesn't care what you
look like in the morning, come visit us at the Humane
Society and adopt a kitten. We have all sizes and
colors and we will reduce our adoption fee. We also
have some wonderful adult cats.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more details or visit
the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State
Route 65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the website
at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable

peslemember, when you adopt a friend for life, you
not only save the life of that pet, you make room for
us to save the life of one more abandoned dog or cat!









4- '. .
DON'T PAY TOO MUCH!
$50 Quarterly
Saves YOU $C100 a year!

Aloha Bul~s Post Manatmet
Franklin County s ONLY LOCAL Pest control company
Call Lois at (850) 653-5857 (


S(850) 229-6262


Reserve your seat today. Call Kris Ross 785-9614


Thursday, July 2, 2009







It's a girl!
A baby shower
will be held for
Ashley Creamer
on Saturday, July
11.
The shower will
be held at 4 p.m. at
the Apalachicola
Masonic Lodge
#76, at 1 Center
Street, located be-
hind the Red Top
restaurant.
All family and
friends are invit-
ed.


B2 | The Times


Society


S


ew\vs


Dan Sanga-
ree, of Apala-
chicola, wishes
to thank the
many friends
who remem-
bered him with
cards, cakes
and phone calls
on his 97th
birthday. He is
pictured on his
birthday with
his friend, Paris
Janos, news an-
chor for Pana-
ma City's Chan-
nel 7.


The Florida Sea-
food Festival board
of directors is seek-
ing all young ladies
interested in vying
for the prestigious
title of Ms. Florida
Seafood 2009-10.
Contestants must
meet the following
criteria: A Franklin
County resident, age
16 to 18, a junior or
senior for the 2009-
10 school year, never
been married, and
have no children nor
be pregnant.
Please go to www.
floridaseafoodfes-
tival.com under
"Royalty" to obtain a
pageant application.
A pageant meeting
will be held on Fri-
day, July 17, at Pam
Nobles Studios in
Apalachicola to be-
gin pageant prepara-
tion.
For more infor-
mation, please con-
tact Monica Moron
at (850) 323-0099 or
monicalane65@ya-
hoo.com.


Victor and Tamra Car-
ranza, of Crawfordville, are
proud to announce the birth
of their son, Colby Victor
Carranza.
Colby was born on Thurs-
day, May 21, 2009 at 2:23 p.m.
at Capital Regional Medical
Center in Tallahassee. He
weighed pounds, 150ounces
and was 20 %/ inches long.
Grandparents are David


and Tammy Sasnett, and Je-
sus and Rosa Carranza, all
of Eastpoint. Great-grand-
parents are Roger and Ag-
nes Keene, of Eastpoint,
and Eloise Enfinger, of Pen-
sacola.
Colby is the 14th grand-
child of Jesus and Rosa Car-
ranza, and the first grand-
child of David and Tammy
Sasnett.



M0f 00(10 (0atne
to celebrate 18'
hirthda
Maranda Coatney,
of Eastpoint, will cel-
ebrate her 18th birth-
day on Wednesday, July
8, 2009 in Bristol, TN
while competing in the
2009 National Hot Rod
Association's Jr. Drag
Racing League Eastern
Conference Finals.
She will be competing
along with her brother,
Colton Sapp, represent-
ing South Georgia Mo-

trGpooo luacrkkand happy
birthday,
Love Mama, Jim-
my, Erica, Colton and
Aunt Jody


Sweeter than flow-
ers, and more special
too, are a bride and
groom about to say I
DO.
Cookie and Beth
Dearinger, of Apala-
chicola, are pleased to
announce the upcom-
ing marriage of their
daughter, Courtney E.
Dearinger, to Zachery
E. McAnally.
He is the son of Earl
and LaDale McAnally,
of Carrabelle.
They will be married
on Saturday, July 11,
2009, at 6 p.m. at Gully


Branch recreation area
in Tate's Hell State For-
est, on County Road 67,
Carrabelle. The recep-
tion will follow at the C-
Quarters in Carrabelle.
She is the grand-
daughter of David and
Edwina Paul, and Le-
roy and Katie Dearing-
er, of Apalachicola.
Zach is the grand-
son of Earl and Von-
cille McAnally, of Car-
rabelle, and C.L. and
Merle Odom, of East-
point.
All family and
friends are invited.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Sara Ward, the 2008 Florida
Seafood Festival queen, receives
her crown from Parrish Johnson, the
2007 Ms. Florida Seafood, at last
summer's pageant.


Paul and Arlene Oehler cele-
brated their 50th wedding anni-
versary on Saturday, June 20, by
repeating their marriage vows
at St. John the Baptist Roman
Catholic Church, in Kenmore,
N.Y
Father Richard Reina per-
formed the ceremony, which
was held 50 years after they
were married on June 20, 1959.
Their children who were able
to come to the ceremony were
Cathy Curran, and her daugh-
ter, Courtney, who traveled from
Blanchester, Ohio, and son, Jon,
and his wife, Pattricia, who tray-
eled from Philadelphia, PA.
Paul and Arlene have four
children, nine grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren.
Both retired educators, they
have been living in Carrabelle
since July 2000.


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Celebrating the Oehlers' golden anniversary are, from left, Cathy Curran,
Courtney Curran, Arlene and Paul Oehler, Pattricia Oehler and Jon
Oehler.


Lunch

Dnne


TUESDAY, JULY 14
11:00 a.m. to1:00 p.m.

THURSDAY, JULY 16
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.


ulwww n eleco~odagnI I.com


.11 111


ma king n


Seafood Festival plans pageant meeting


Mlarriagfe


CoIby LaffanZa DOrn


-z 0"28~

C0Urtney Dearinger,
Zachery McAnally to wed


Anniversary

PaUI and Arlene 0ehler mark golden anniversary










Obituaries


1~M Iuk ru itt lim








First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services



St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcathefairpoint. net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www. stpatricksmas s. com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATUDA ................. M

ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
\SUNDAY ............................ .........83AM



The United Methodist Churches

Sof Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672

Eastpoint snie dMplh dist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


VlktPamkr MC Ar'r-r1~ -n

379 BrOWIISVille Road, Apalachicola
850-653-9372 or 850-653-9373

July 6 10, 2009 ..
6 9pm. ~ Ages 4 12

















Registration @ the Church Monday, July 6 @ 5pm.
REGISTER ON-LINE i!!!
http: //www. groupvbs.com/w ebtoybox/myvbs /FPH C
FFOO FOod & Drinks Provided


Thursday, July 2, 2009


The Times | B3


Leroy Lambert
Dearinger, 74, a lifelong
resident of Apalachicola,
died Thursday, June 25,
2009 at Gulf Coast Medical
Center in Panama City.
He was born Sept.
15, 1934 to the late Leon
and Annie Dearinger in
Apalachicola. He served
his country during the
Korean Conflict as part of
the U.S. Army. He was a
retired secretary and was
a member of Eastpoint
Church of God.
Preceding him in death
watsehis grandson, Justin
He is survived by his
beloved wife of 51 years,
Katie L. Dearinger, of


Apalachicola; a son, Leroy
"Cookie" Dearinger, of
Apalachicola; a daughter,
Angela K. Pate, of Baton
Rouge, LA; and four
grandchildren: Anthony
Pate, Jared Pate, Garrett
Dearinger and Courtney
Dearinger.
General services were
held June 28 at Eastpoint
Church of God with Rev.
Casey Smith officiating.
Burial followed in Magnolia
Cemetery, in Apalachicola.
Expressions of
sympathy may be
sbitdh Id dfwe lat
com. Arrangements by
Southerland Family Ekneral
Homes, Port St. Joe.


"Tina" Larsen, 67,Eetn r
died June 20, 2009
at Treasure Coast
Hospice in Stuart. .
Born in Pike ra
County, KYshe
moved to Stuart in
1971, coming from
Tampa. LA
She was
a retired
deli hostess for Publix
Supermarkets, working
at the Cove Road and
Downtown Stuart locations.
Survivors include
her daughters, Bev
Larsen, of Stuart; Missy
McCuen, of Apalachicola;
son, Harry Larsen, of
Carrabelle; sisters, Lucy
Stanley, of Stuart; Judy
Smith, of Maryland;
Freida Hunnicutt, of
Michigan; Pamela
Kirk, of South Carolina;
brothers, Greg Roberts,
of Michigan; 'Itavis
Roberts, of Kentucky; two
grandsons, Garry Larsen,
of Carrabelle; and Jordan


Haddad, of Stuart;
., and several
Nieces and
nephews.
She was
preceded in
death by her son,
Garry Larsen;
sister, Annette
RSEN Dougdale; and
brothers, Pierce
Roberts and
David Roberts.
In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions
may e made to 'Iteasure
Coast Hospice, Inc., 1201
SE Indian St., Stuart, FL
34997; (772) 403-4500; http://
www.tchospice.org.
A Celebration of Life
Service will be held at 11
a.m. on Saturday, July 11
at Sandsprit Park in Port
Salerno, with a covered
dish luncheon to follow.
Arrangements are
under the direction of
Forest Hills Young & Prill
Chapel in Stuart. A guest
registry may be signed at
www~youngandprill.com.


Ascension Episcopal
Church in Carrabelle is
proud to announce the
selection of Mother Teri
Monica as the new Priest-
in--Charge
She will also be serv-
i St. Te es's E 1 op
Church in esa fo di opa
The Rev Te Mo a
grdueted from St. nica
g ad's Schoolm f The l
ngy in Albany, Now York in
Dec. 2007 with a master's
of arts in pastoral studies

us mst r'sso sciec i
education and taught as a
special education teacher
in New York State.
She arrived in Tallahas-
see in February along with
her husband, The Rev. Ted
Monica and her young-
est daughter, Therese
Whichello. Her husband is
the rector of Holy Comfort-
er Episcopal Church in Tal-
lahassee and her daughter
is studying music educa-
tion at Florida State Uni-
versity. Mtr. Teri's oldest
daughter, Tara, is a dental
ceramist in Norfolk.


St. Paul AME to hst
Women's Day
The St. Paul A.M.E.
Church, at 81 Avenue I in
Apalachicola, will host its
annual Woman's Day pro-
gram on Sunday, July 12
at 4 p.m.
Please come join us in
cel rating tis occasion.

call 653-9164 or 653-9454.

Love Center debutS
new Social Time
Love Center Ministries
offers friendly compan-
ionship, food and fellow-
ship and a great chance to






.' !






;l I


Lucille Thompson
passed away Sunday, June
28, 2009.
Services will be held


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH









WELCOMES YOU

*hrc

Of the

As cension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AlI :


Tuesday, June 30 at Kelley
General Home Chapel.
Kelley Ekneral Home
handled arrangements.

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE REV. TERI MONKCA
The Mission Board
and congregation warmly
welcome Mother Teri and
urge the Carrabelle com-
munity to join us in wor-
ship any Sunday morning
at 10 a.m. and meet Mother
Teri Monica.
For more information
contact Tamara Allen at
697-8380.


Juanita "Nita" P Foster,
69, of Port St. Joe, went
to be with the Lord on
Thursday, June 25, 2009.
She was born on May 28,
1940 in Munford, Alabama
to the late Marion G. Parnell
and Mertie Davis Parnell.
Nita was a graduate of
Sylacauga Hospital School
of Nursing in Sylacauga,
Alabama, and for 46 years,
she served others as a
caring and compassionate
nurse. Her gentleness and
kindness touched everyone
she met.
Nita leaves behind her
devoted daughter, Eleanor

Jgags [gg
James Lee Guernsey
passed away Friday
evening June 26, 2009, in

He was born June 22,
1923, in Henryville, Indiana.
Lee grew up on the family
dairy farm and graduated
from Henryville High
School in 1941.
He received his
bachelor's of science from
Indiana Teachers College
in 1947, his master's of arts
from Indiana University in
1948, and his doctorate from
Noodhwestern Universi y
His teaching career
began at the University of
Louisville and he retired
professor emeritus of
geography from Indiana
State University in
1988. Other professional
accomplishments include
establishing state and
national land use policies,
co-authoring two books
and making numerous
contributions to textbooks,
encyclopedias and
periodicals.
SHe es edm rnteUn tdm
1943 until 1945. He was a
licensed private pilot as
flying was one of his great
passions.
Lee and Ruth Guernsey


Foster, of Port St. Joe; her
brother, Luke (M/argaret)
Parnell, of Crossett,
Arkansas; and many other
friends and relatives who
will miss her, but cherish
her memory.
She was preceded in
death by her loving husband
of 46 years, J. Wayne Foster.
A graveside service
to celebrate her life will
be held on Wednesday,
July 1 at 11 a.m. at the
Montgomery Memorial
Cemetery in Montgomery,
Alabama. Arrangements
by Kent Forrest Lawn,
Panama City.

GUefHSey
lived and raised their
family in Terre Haute,

198 hyo 1g alun bught
a vacation home on St.
George Island in 1971, and
retired permanently to the
island in 1988, becoming on
integral part of the island
community and attending
the First Baptist Church.
Lee treasured his life
and relationships. A true
humanitarian, he inspired
and touched the lives of
his family, friends, and
stde ts. He will be greatly

A devoted husband
and father, he is survived
by his wife of 63 years,
Ruth Guernsey; his sister,
Mary Basham; son,
Ernest Thomas Guernsey,
and wife Stefanie, of
Tampa; daughter, Carol
June Bate and husband ,
Bruce of Hartwell, GA;
granddaughters, Dinelle
Pettitt and Annette
Karlsberg; great-grandson,
Daylin Pettitt; and great-
granddaughter, Aubrey
P e celebration of his life
is planned for Monday,
June 29 at 11 a.m. at the
First Baptist Church of St.
George Island with Rev
Mike Whaley officiating.


Recently, as Weems
Memorial Hospital CEO
Chuck Colvert reflected
these past four months
on the hospital's "first
ever" organized and
authorized Chaplaincy
Group, he expressed his
sincere gratitude to those
Franklin County cler-
gypersons who accepted
his initial "call to minis-
try" for pastoral support
to Weems' patients and
their families, as well as
to the hospital's medical,
administrative and sup-

Thus far, of the 44
Franklin County church-
es and their clergyper-
sons, the following seven
have come forward to be-
come Weems-certified in
its countywide hospital's
cooperative and caring
ministry: Rev. Ron Barks,
First Assembly of God,


Carrabelle; Pastor James
E. Lee, Franklin County
Church of Christ, East-
point; Rev. Casey Smith,
Eastpoint Church of God;
Ministers Valentina and
Thomas Webb, Taberna-
cle of Faith International
Ministry, Apalachicola;
Rev. Kay Wheeler, retired
deacon, Trinity Episcopal
Church, Apalachicola;
and Rev. Dr. John D. Sink,
retired senior pastor, The
United Methodist Church
and organizer of the
Wecms rHospital Chap-
If any of the county's
other clergy are interest-
ed in identifying and as-
sisting with this new and
unique medical/pastoral
ministry, please contact
Weems Human Resource
Director Ginny Griner at
653-8853 ext. 107 or Rev.
Sink at 323-0718.


Trnmty
EST. 1836

Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


socialize at its new Social
Time activity, on Tuesday
and Thursdays.
Coffee time begins at
7:30 a.m., with breakfast
at 8:30 a.m., through 10
a.m. Following Bible study
at 10:15 a.m., there will be
a great chance to connect
with friends throughout
the mrig
emc ni 11 be featured
from noon to 2 p.m., fol-
lowed by such activities
as bingo, movies, sing-
alaongs and mo 1 clThe
dy s ac iiies wil cose
at 4 p.m.
Donations are accept-
ed. For more info, call 653-
2203.


Church


Monica to lead Carrabelle's


Ascension Episcopal


Ernestine Larsen


Leroy Dearinger


LUtille filompson


Nita Foster


Weems (lioplaincy Group


00ok 5 1 expand outreamIk L


Church BR IE F S





NOTICE OF TRANMITTAL OF

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT S

NOTICE OF L AND USE CHANGE

The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing, pursuant to
Section 163.3184, Florida Statutes, to consider transmitting proposed changes to the Franklin
County Comprehensive Plan and the Future Land Use Map Series to the Florida Department
of Community Affairs for review. The proposed changes include:

Delete Policy 2.2(n) of the Future Land Use Element: Mrn ilg etr h neto


ICOLLLUILLIII~


Ajl ~ l I U I I I I I allo w al e I I I I I U s e w i h n t e a i a V i l g e n e a d s h l l b t d t 1


The perfounance standards for the Marina Village C
Area Ratio: .30, Residential Density: 2.0 Du/gross acres, Maximum IDR .00, Minimum com-


I


Clbeigi loe spoie yteFaki onyZnn oeo y
flmo U ilColoraa Cdiano fU ).T o inmu l szoThtaplis Te lu-
coi ~ ~ ~ b' dovolgrac shal to domica sod azI IIUheII VVoo aigl U III inlw.Th zza ora

f 1 dwlln uni almo wihi a cl r do lp 1: sal r: oveco 1h :atr o l l-


111g ulllts alluwred ulderl this5 lalld USej categool A ejaS WhIIIh LUe IIot IIIclUded sWItIIII ltS o


adb a k~f Pe s ino co sideratin iclsterig o de elomet.
Krftske ~ ~ skt $
emovffax manyt mme syeumwdlb dine u opl mhte end
us umm ands loid e, ofW).~
Col Po ftheE dU DoteloE 1 ho iy22a tor o mnt Crr stViag: s atgo
sni tts ~~Kgall ided oeftsail-usann ortuiywt eitr ffnanlye-
fegiaedand uses anchored yaVlaeCetr hsctgoywlcmlmetteeaog
conintyo Cribll nde ateplaef to ie okadshpi h oc o fpooik
moet matel rie hu ing ndecoomc e ttlopmen pouitie.Cmlmntr cv-
cics fortheagsntcrofvlago s resiearicudn ciccoakiue uluareiiu
adeducffnalacivti-efs ar14e as cmat6 fti itrc.Tesierilcmae
ffhe vilae wllincud vrios ensiy ne andhuigtyebrte vrl esiyi h
caeor il e be~twet~en ad delln nts e rs ce.Vlaersdetacra
teietia, ndesmtam/oeftva ttio esieni potunte wl e rae i ane
maxmie vtehicla nd edeianlikaesto hpig mlyet erainladoh
corlsaar ciiis whleas hosaco iske yanngcnpciiiyasoglndu
Charm~fingdvlpsct on pt oo st h ono eehg cvxnaaalsniiiy






of Wot~rship.v~tk



Ther perfounancer standualds fo ur; th allatllr; East vlllage; landu use; categol air.




Ther Callatellr; Lase vlllage; Iland USej 51LUhajSjlll be servd b caal Waresl and~ WaSleWa-

Clusoigi a VL Vlllljll wod alls pl~~ vIdo t~lYll SUhe Frnkn olY2:InsCdat laadUn
chlltt ocnod t hmn e spn ,Ft ntf.Th eca nmt dwles n
a~tllowed wihin cluterdvlomn salnt eed thenme fdeliguialwd
unerthislad seaegoo Aras hic ae no~t incue wft ot fuedfrrada-

A omwaercrunagmet sysitemwl edsge ocml ihtesadr




Amend the Future Land Use Map for the following two parcels:

Parcel 1: Change 1000 acres on Ochlockonee Bay in Sections 13, 14, 15, 16, 21, 22 and 23,
Township 6 South, Range 2 West, as shown in the attached map, from Marina Village Center
to Agricultural.

Parcel 2: Change 200 acres east of Carrabelle in Sections 16, 21 and 28, Township 7 South,
Range 4 West, as shown in the attached map, from Carrabelle East Village to Agricultural.

A public hearing on the proposed changes will be held on Tuesday, July 7, 2009, at 10:30 a.m.
at the County Commission Meeting Room in the Courthouse Annex at 34 Forbes Street in
Apalachicola. More information can be obtained and the proposed changes may be inspected
at the Franklin County Planning Department, 34 Forbes Street, Suite 1, Apalachicola, Florida
(telephone 850-653-9783).

Persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or in writing to the
Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola,
Florida 32320. Transactions of this public hearing will not be recorded. Persons who may
wish to appeal any action resulting from this hearing should make the necessary arrangements
to assure that a verbatim record is made, including testimony and evidence, if any, upon which
the appeal is to be based.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis_
tance. Please contact Marcia Johnson, Clerk, Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida 32320
or (850)653-8861, extension 100, within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice, if you
are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771


Bill Miller, District II commander of the American Legion, right, presents a
check for $500 to the Rev. Mark Collins, chaplain of the Franklin County
Senior Center in Carrabelle, at the regular Thursday luncheon held
June 1 8. The donation to the center is a gift from the Sons of the American
Legion Camp Gordon Johnston Post 82.


PUBLIC NO TICE

Coastal Barrier Resources System
Virtual Public Meeting July 15, 2009

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is soliciting public input on its
Report to Congress: John H. Chafee Coastal Barrier Resources System Digi-
tal Mapping Pilot Project and draft maps during a 120-day public comment
period that closes on August 5, 2009. The report highlights the benefits of
updating Coastal Barrier Resources System (CBRS) maps with more accurate
and precise digital maps to better protect people, coastal areas, and natural



The Service will hold a virtual public meeting to address the North Florida
pilot project units on July 15, 2009, from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. The pur-
pose of the meeting is to provide an overview of the pilot project effort and
to offer an opportunity for questions and answers. The North Florida pilot
project units are located in Nassau, St. Johns, Volusia, Brevard, Manatee,
Hillsborough, Pinellas, Dixie, Franklin, Bay, and Walton Counties. Members
of the public planning to participate in the virtual public meeting must register
at http://iwww.fws.gov/habitatconservation/coastalbrirhm by July 10,
2009. Participants must have access to a computer and telephone to fully
participate. Registrants will be provided with instructions for participation
via e-mail.

For more information, please visit http://iwww. fw s.gov/ habitatconservation/
coastal_barrier. html, or e-mail CBRAcomments efivs.gov.



NO TICE OF INTENDED AC TION

FRANKLIN DISTRICT SCHOOL BO ARD

Purpose and Effect: The Franklin District School Board proposes to amend
and adopt polices, as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the
purpose of bringing said policies into compliance with Florida Statutes and
State Board of Education Rules.

Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal change:

Franklin County School District
*Student Progression Plan
*Code of Conduct
*School Board Policy Manual


Statutory Authority: Section 230.22(2), Florida Statutes

These proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School
Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Franklin County Willie
Speed School Board meeting room at 85 School Road, Suite One, Eastpoint,
Florida no earlier than 28 days after the original date of this notice.

The above Policy Manual, Code of Conduct and Student Progression Plan
may be reviewed at the Franklin County School Board District Office, located
at 85 School Road, Suite One, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 7:30 AM
until 5:00 PM, Monday Thursday.


I _


Thursday, July 2, 2009


YIIILL~C IIILLY ~VIIILUII LL IIIIAIUIC VI ICILLICU LL~IIYIIICO III~IUUIII~ ICILLII) VIII~C) IIVICI)


I\r;alur;llrlal, \II vlll~r;, \Ivl I\r;~lr;arlvll, \III I uvll~ LUIIII IIVal~j VLlllll~jJ) all1l \ILl VLll~jl 511111-
~ttgReefft~45t~t-J~eas~-sr


Don't forget now: Every- the car will be drawn. What
one is welcome to join us at a day we will have!
Legion Post 82, for Thanks to the
the Fourth of July members of The
service, starting at Legion, The Ladies
1 p.m. Stay for the Auxiliary and the
rib dinner following I Sons for all their
the service. Your work in preparing
donation of $7 will the dinner, and a
be collected at the big thanks to all
door. who came out and
While you're LANIARK NEWS supported the din-
waiting for all that ]im Welsh ner.
delicious food, enjoy The regular
your favorite bever- membership meet-
age, play shuffleboard or ing of The Legionnaires
pool or just visit. Then at 4 will be held Tuesday in
p.m., the winning ticket for the Legion hall. The gavel


falls at 7 p.m. following the
executive board meeting.
Members of the Lanark
Boat Club will have the an-
nual Fourth of July picnic
on the grounds of the club.
Things will get going at
noon Saturday. Bring a dish
to share. There will be a $3
donation for non-members.
Be kind to one another,
and check in on the sick and
housebound. Don't drink a
fifth on the fourth.
Until next time, God
Bless America, our troops,
the poor, homeless, and
hungry.


B4 | The Times


Local


SONS OF LEGIONNAIRES HELP SENIORS





































































Builders By The Sea, Inc.

Gary Bartlett
I~i~l)Additions
zz New Homes Ph. 850-927-3628
~L~V ~ ~~ir~Remodeling Mobile 850-425-8620
850-229-9663 R.R. 0067644 Licensed & Insured
Steam Cleaning & Remediation
24 Hour Water Extraction
IICRC Certified Technicians
SRemediation, Tile & Grout Cleaning, AKO'
Carpet & Upholstery Building Su plies
LA Licensed & Insured


Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: (850) 653-8122
Cell: (850) 653-7654




Remodel
Re.,air
New
consteatcti'on
Family
87e~edd

In redd

#CFC1426645
state certified


&~ Auto Repair
Carrabelle 697-3333 '
We Deliver Anywhere

1IC Hardware andVsaDcoean
anroe Paint Center Aeia~ s


Don Lively General Contractors
LICENSED AND INSURED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE


C=*-. .



ROBERT APPLIANCE

- ALL MAJOR BRANDS -


DENTURE
LAB ON PREMISES
Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines

Laban Bontrager, DND ~

3Lonica Bontrager, DND



12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417


Colson f ined, rif le


forfeited, for killing bear
A Franklin County man who illegally killed a black
bear last winter is finding out that justice can be costly.
Larry Joe Colson, 55, of Apalachicola, appeared before
Gulf County Judge Fred Witten last week and pleaded no
contest to the misdemeanor charge. He must pay a $1,150
fine; forfeit his .30-06 rifle and scope to the state; serve six
months probation and see his hunting and fishing privi-
leges suspended for three years.
His license suspension will apply not only to Florida
but also in 26 other states who are members of the Inter-
state Wildlife Violators Compact.
Colson was charged last January after Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission law enforcement
officers found a dead bear on his hunting lease in Gulf
County. He later admitted killing the bear.
The leased land is owned by the St. Joe Company. The
company has since notified Colson he is banned from
hunting on any of their lands for the next five years.




Emergency management

Seeks ham radio enthusiasts

Franklin County Emergency Management, in con-
junction with the American Radio Relay League (ARRL),
is looking actively for individuals interested in ham radio
operations.
No matter what age, they are looking for:
*Those who don't have a license, but who would
like to study and obtain one.
*Those who presently hold a license and wish to
upgrade or renew it.
*Those who hold a general license or better who
wish to instruct and train new students.
*'Old timers' who would be willing to share their
time, knowledge and experience with a new generation of
amateur radio operators.
Hams range in age from six to more than 100 years
old. While some are technically skilled, holding positions
as scientists, or technicians, all walks of life are repre-
sented on the airwaves. Musicians, such as country mu-
sic superstar Patti Loveless, Eagles guitarist Joe Walsh,
and retired major league outfielder and MVP Joe Rudi,
and more are all ham radio enthusiasts.
It's not only a fun hobby, but when the chips are down,
ham radio is looked to for emergency communications
and public service.
Anyone interested should contact Mike Rundel or
Ron Page at the Franklin County Emergency Operations
Center at 653-8977.



OVieS Ill tne retra


COntinue Jul 2

The Franklin County Sheriff's Office's S.A.EE. Pro-
gram (Student And Family Events) invites students and
families to come and enjoy "Movies in the Park."
Enjoy a free family movie on a 12-foot movie screen,
along wtih free popcorn.
The following is the schedule, with all events begin-
ning at 8:30 p.m.:
*Thursday, July 2 at Battery Park in Apalachico-
*Thursday, July 9 at Lighthouse Park on St.
George Island
*Thursday, July 30 at Kendrick Field in Carra-
belle
*Tuesday, Aug. 4 National Night Out at Vrooman
Park in Eastpoint


- Y= =~-


IV


Thursday, July 2, 2009


Law Enforcement


The Times | B5


The following report is provided by
the Frankclin County Sheriff's Offece.
Arrests are made by officers from the
following city, county, and state law
enforcement agencies: Apalachicola
(APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida High-
way Patrol (FHP), Frankclin County
Sheriff's Office (FCSO), Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC), Florida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection (FDEP), Florida
Division oflnsurance Fraud (DIF) and
Florida Department ofAgriculture and
Consumer Services (FLDOACS).
All defendants are considered inno-
cent until proven guilty in a court of law.

Jimmy Ward, 40, Southport, violation
of probation (FCSO)

June 21
Alex Ramirez, 20, Apalachicola, leav-
ing the scene of an accident and no valid
driver's license (APD)

June 23
William D. Holton, 62, Carrabelle,


20 counts of obtaining or attempting to
obtain controlled substance by fraud
(FCSO)

June 24
Oscar J. Orcutt, 41, Eastpoint, tres-
pass on property after warning (FCSO)

JUne 25
Pamela McLaughlin, 35, Carrabelle,
driving while license suspended (CPD)

June 27
Patrick L. Poteete, 21, Lanark Vil-
lage, two counts of supplying alcohol to
a minor and two counts of contributing
to the delinquency of a minor (CPD)

June 28
Edward A. Bosket, 34, Lake City, DUI
and leaving the scene of an accident
(FHP)

Loreal L. Daniels, 28, Apalachicola,
driving while license suspended or re-
voked (FDEP)


A 40-year-old Franklin
County deputy sheriff is
recuperating at home after
suffering injuries in an ear-
ly morning collision Friday
in St. Teresa.
Anthony W. Sapp, 40, of
Carrabelle, was the only
individual hurt in the 12:30
a.m. mishap on June 19.
The accident occurred on
U.S. 98, west of the fork at
U.S. 319, near the former
location of Lorenzo's Res-
taurant.
"He has some cuts and
bruises, a possible frac-
tured collarbone, but he
was released from Talla-
hassee Memorial Hospital
and is at home," said Un-
dersherriff Joel Norred.
According to the Florida
Highway Patrol's media re-


lease, Sapp was driving his
patrol car, a 2005 Dodge Du-
rango, eastbound on U.S. 98
and following behind a Car-
rabelle Police Department
patrol car. Both vehicles
were en route to a call for
service.
According to Norred,
the two cars were respond-
ing to a complaint in St. Te-
resa of possible gunshots.
As they rushed to the
scene, the Carrabelle of-
f icer received a call of sui-
cide threats in Carrabelle,
and slowed his vehicle.
Sapp then swerved to avoid
hitting the Carrabelle pa-
trol car, Norred said.
'lt~ooper Charles
Cook wrote that Sapp's ve-
hicle left the roadway onto
the north shoulder of U.S.


98. The front left of the vehi-
cle hit a tree, and continued
eastbound on the shoulder
before entering a culvert
and becoming airborne.
Sapp's vehicle then
rotated upside down and
counter-clockwise, before
the front of it hit a dirt em-
bankment before stopping
in the north shoulder the
road, upside down in a cul-
vert.
Sapp was wearing his
seatbelt, alcohol was not in-
volved in the crash and no
charges are pending, ac-
cording to the report.
Damage to the vehicle
was estimated by FHP at
$8,000, although Norred
said it appears to be to-
taled. "He's a lucky man,"
Norred said.


DON WILLSON'S
SEPTC TNK

County Residential/

Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or night
653-9406


Have Grinder Will Travel
Stump and Root Grinding.

Call Clarence Dewade
in Lanark Village
697-2562
FREE ESTIMATES


Mold


-


Plumbing New Construction Roofing
Pressure Washing Additions Vinyl Siding
Painting and More No Job Too Small


RCOO66499
RGOO65255


P.O. Box 439
Carrabelle, FL 32322
697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603


Sheriff's REPORT


Franklin deputy recuperating


after flipping patrol car


~ 8~1*
I AL


(OE'S IAWN CARE

"I;~~~~ r~~ai
N o oB


ALWAYS ONLINE


Find more local cover

at apalachtimes.com











FWC hosts open house to seek input on St. Vincent Refuge


Community CALENDAR


*


Thursday, July 2, 2009


Local


observation, biking, nature
photography, and hiking.
Public use facilities include
trails,a intebrpre atv eigu

ing and fishing opportuni-
ties are permitted on some
areas of the refuge, accord-
ing to specific refuge regu-
lations. As required by the
National Wildlife Refuge
System Improvement Act
of 1997, wildlife resources
must be given first priority
with recreational uses avail-
able to the public as long as
these activities are compat-
ible with the mission of the
Service and the purpose for
which the refuge was estab-
lished.
If you or someone you
know cannot attend the
open house and would like
to submit written com-
ments, they can be sent to
St. Vincent National Wildlife
Refuge, PO. Box 447, Apala-
chicola 32329. Comments
may also be sent via email
to Stvincenteepafws.gov
Please feel free to contact
the Refuge Office at 653-
8808 with any questions.


serve. The refuge's 12,490
acres include two islands
(St. Vincent Island and Pig
Island oaned an an land

C30. The refuge supports a
unique mix of upland and
wetland habitat types. St.
Vincent provides habitat for
thousands of birds, includ-
ing wading and water birds
such as herons, egrets,
and wood storks, as well
as shorebirds like snowy
plovers, American oyster-
catchers, and red knots.
Many neo-tropical mi-
grant songbirds breed on
the refuge and use the
refuge during migration.
Since 1990 the refuge has
supported the recovery of
the endangered red wolf
by establishing St. Vincent
Island as a propagation
site. Other species like deer,
squirrel, raccoon, and nu-
merous amphibians and
reptiles such as alligators,
snakes and sea turtles can
be found on the refuge.
The refuge is open year-
round for wildlife-related
activities such as wildlife


The U.S. Fish and Wild-
life Service will host two
open house meetings this


Comprehensive Conserva-
tion Plan for St. Vincent Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge.
The open houses will be
held at St. Joe Bay Buffer
Preserve, 3915 Highway
C30, front 6-9 p.m., Wednes-
day, July 15, with presenta-
tion at 6:45 p.m., and from
6-9 p.m., Thursday, July 16
at the Apalachicola Com-
munity Building (City Hall),
1 ay Avenue, with presen-
tatiea 6 nseration plan
will set wildlife, habitat,
and public use priorities
and guide management
decisions on the Refuge
for the next 15 years. The
open house meetings will
provide an opportunity for
interested members of the
public, agencies, neighbors,
public interest groups, and
local governments to par-
ticipate in the Refuge plan-
ning process from the very
beginning.


The purpose of the meet-
ings is to find out what the
public's ideas are on man-
sh ymn nobetheddRefg s n
the planning process. Each
meeting will consist of the
same information and con-
tent.
Interested citizens may
stop by any time to submit
comments. Refuge staff and
maps and exhibits will be
present. At 6:45 p.m., Ref-
uge staff then will present
an overview of the Refuge,
including its history, key
wildlife and habitats, pub-
lic' us potnte, d
cal eng s. pr etaainn
on the planning and envi-
ronmental compliance pro-
cesses will then be given by
Natural Resource Planner
from the Service.
Immediately after the
presentations, attendees
will be given the opportuni-
ty to express their thoughts
and ideas on Refuge man-
agement. In addition, com-
ment forms will be made
available so that written
comments can be submit-


PHOTO BY LOIS SWOBODA

A group of children learn about the outdoors at the
St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge's open house.


ted at the meeting or mailed
in to the Refuge later.
The service invites the
public to provide comments
to the following questions,
as well as any other issue,
opportunity or concern you
may have for the Refuge.
1. What makes St.
Vincent NWR special or
unique for you?


2. What do you val-
ue most about St. Vincent
NWR?
3. What would you
like to see in the future for
St. Vincent NWR?
The Refuge, estab-
lished in 1968, is part of the
Apalachicola River and Bay
Watershed as well as St.
Joseph Bay Aquatic Pre-


brary offers Kids Wii from
9 to 11 a.m. For more info,
call 697-2366.
filUfrday, July 9
Carrabelle Public Li-
brary, 311 St. James Ave.
offers Adults Wii from 9 to
11 a.m. Yoga at 4:30 p.m.
For more info, call 697-
2366.
Eastpoint Public Li-
brary offers Story Hour
at 10 a.m., and individual
computer instruction
from 10 a.m.-noon. For
more info, call 670-8151.
Wandering Star Quilt-
i Club. Chilly Hall
Lanark Village. 1-3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County
Senior Center in Carra-
belle. Noon. $3 donation.
Call 697-3760.


p.m. For more info, call
Tamara Allen at the Car-
rabelle Historical Society
697-2141.
Sat rda July 4
The new Carrabelle
History Museum, at 106
B Street, SE (Old City
Hall) will be open from10
a.m.-4 p.m. For more info
contact Tamara Allen at
697- 2141.
Monday, July 6
Apalachicola Library
Board meets at 5 p.m. at
Apalachicola Municipal
Library. For more info,
call 653-8436.
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village.
9 to 10 a.m. Open to all


and free.
Carrabelle Public Li-
brary yoga at 4:30 p.m. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Bingo at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Early bird at
6 p.m., regular bingo at
7 p.m. Cards begin at $4.
Call 697-3760.
Tues ay, Juy 7
Franklin County Com-
mission meets at 9 a.m.
at courthouse annex in
Apalachicola. For more
info, call 653-8861 ext. 100.
Apalachicola City Com-
mission meets at 6 p.m. at
City Hall. For more info,
call 653-8715.
Apalachicola Library
summer reading pro-
gram, from 9:30-10:30
a.m. For more info, call
653-8436.
Carrabelle Public
Library story time at 2
p.m. For more info, call


697-2366.
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Coffee at
7:30 a.m., meal at 8 a.m.
$2 suggested donation.
Call 697-3760.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Dept. 25 cents
per card. Families wel-
come. Proceeds go to St.
George Island Civic Club.
Call 927-4654.
WednesdaF July 8
Community Devel-
opment Block Grant
workshop at 5:30 p.m. at
Apalachicola's City Hall.
Workshop to discuss pos-
sible grant application
for renovations to Scipio
Creek Marina. For more
info, call 653-8715.
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village.
9 to 10 a.m. Open to all
and free.
Carrabelle Public Li-


community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County
Senior Center in Carra-
belle. Noon. $3 donation.
Call 697-3760.
Friday July 3
ALL CITY AND C OUN-
TY GOVERNMENT OF-
FICES CLOSED
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village.
9-10 a.m. Open to all and
free.
Summer reading at
Eastpoint and Carrabelle
libraries, from 10 a.m.-
noon.
The new Carrabelle
History Museum, at 106 B
Street, SE (Old City Hall)
will be open 10 a.m. to 4


filUfsday, Juy 2
Apalachicola Library
summer reading pro-
gram, from 9:30-10:30 a.m.
For more info, call 653-
8436.
Carrabelle Public Li-
brary, 311 St. James Ave.
offers Adults Wii from 9-11
a.m. Yoga at 4:30 p.m. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Eastpoint Public Li-
brary offers Story Hour
at 10 a.m., and individual
computer instruction
from 10 a.m. to noon. For
more info, call 670-8151.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall
Lanark Village. 1-3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.


I I 1









I~
1)


PersonalityParade
Q
?''~'~L?i' Y.:-i.:;J ,; II. I. r: r.

L' ~~
II II
-i I .
I I
Q:i: ~: : :- .~;~~; -
r. '' ' '
'''
'' '
'' '' '
'~~"
''''
''~' "'' ~" ~~~~ ~;~~I -~~ ,,
a;:?~ I~
a "~; -:
,
_
~ Q::-.i~:I~; --
"~' L:,' .... n,~i *II-~
"~';1: r. 1
LilLIII :Ii..LI~ ~.I I~ I ~ I
F ~-
'; '51- --~--
n.,
rl Iu I~ ,

'I~'*
ip

'I '.... Want m.re rt~rr all lr..k7 Ilnd W~LIEI SCOTryo.,,
.(SI.Ll~l P.;J ;I ~. a~ PJraJr tom 9urrllon
Y~ j~i .~


B6 | The Times





1100 -Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
110Anamincements
r10-dpapon s
1160 -Lost
'1170- Found


|1100
2804
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL

FRAN NIN A DU R

GENERAL JURISDICTION

GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC
PLAINTIFF

VS

BILLY F OWENS; DONNA
OWNES; ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED IN-
DIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS.
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION Ill; JOHN
DOE AND JANE DOE AS
ENKOSTOTENANTS IN
DEFENDANTS)


| 1100 ||1100 || o1100 | | 410 | 610 ||6140 || Y8120
All other creditors of the Florida described as: Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Pre-K Teacher1,2&3,b
dhe Inn lon r d Lot Forten (4) iften u loidaTeacher need for Bay Apalachicola, FL. hevy Don Sub /ontlre s
mands havg ainst deceden Lt s (1) ndSteen (16), ofte By:kll M ony chl awll . .. Community School In Apa- Call 850-643-7740. $4,900 Total. Daylight Auto
estatehmsust fi thi cam3 Boc 1S1TeonK U7 (w lsDuyD yC rk EMLYET t cobnee a Fd9ann 1-16 a

MONTS ATERTHESECOND ADDITION, 4100 Help Wanted Please call (850) 323-0385 pet OK, $600/mo + first,
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB- 4130 Employment to set up an Interview. last & deposit. Call Lanark 5br 3ba, Large
LICATION OF THIS NO- a/k/a 312 NE Avenue H, Information 85-9-00home w/ great Gulf view
TICE. Carrabelle, Florida. Other homes avall. Large lot $1,000 monthly

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED at Public Sale, to the high- | 4130 257 Prado 1 br, 1 ba, apt 850-545-8813 nthecor
WITHIN THE TIME PERl- est bidder for cash, at the 410W/S/G Incl. $575 month, + Lnr ilg ntecr
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC- steps of the Franklin POTL&GVTJB $0 eoi Call ner of Carlking & Oak St.
TION 733.702 OF THE County Courthouse, Apa- INFO FOR SALE? 850-653-6735 2br, 1ba, spacious kitchen,
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE lachicola, Florida, at 11:00 so utility room, $700 mo.
WILL BE FOREVER a.m. on August 6, 2009. .First, last & sec. Call
BARRED. AICaution 850-697-8138 Nissan Pathfinder 1995,
Any person claiming an In- 2100 Peas Installation/Maint/Repair$45Dw.0 Inest
NOTWITHSTANDING THE terest In the surplus from 2110 Pels: Free to ,$290TtlDalgtAo
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH the sale, If any, other than Good Home InStallers You NEVER have to pay Finaeila ~ ~i~ ~ $,0 oancin 215-1769 9am

ABOEV T EYCSLC MDL t epoperty wner~anIf Co t-etons ye odur Ifreeato abb cAadm n ose a t tp 9pm.

B REDOF DEATH IS w iln 60 days after the wanted The tnh liar est catbl "g~uarantee",contact the f orN C rcmesi IHIC .lriro~om tiebaflo rs
States and covering The Federal Trade units. Some rental assis-l blinds, curtains, new
The date of first publica- WITNESS my hand and over 23 states, has an Commission tance may be available. IIkitchen, carport, laundry
tro 20f his notice Is June t~he sedaa of thusnCourt this | 11 mediate op onrg In smnacoue updedVouaclher 0-6- desr nhwa herclaand
*Installer 9277. TDT/TTY 711. Ing shed, large beautifully
Personal Representative: CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT Kittens No technical experience www.ftc.gov/jobscams Equal Housing landscaped yard. Lanark
Susan Valentine COURT Assorted colors, 2 month necessary. Performs In- 1-877-FTC-HELP Opportunity on 98. $850 mo, Includes
1160 Austin Court By: Michele Maxwell old, male and female, free stalls for cable and high wtrspi.$0 eu
Sugar Hills, GA 30515 Deputy Clerk to good homes only. speed Internet. Must A public service Lanark Village rity. Available 06/01. Call
Attorneys for Personal Cat Coalition have a valid Driver's 11- message from the FTC 1 br, 1 ba, Renovated/ fur- 697-3115 day or night. | 83
Representative Steve M. Watkins, Ill cense. Mediacom offers and The News Herald nished end unit, new
BARBARA SANDERS FBN: 0794996 Help save our local cats competitive pay and ClassifiedAdvertising kitchen &bath, minimum 4 ,;Ford F-150 X/Cab 4X4,
ATTORNEY AT LAW 41 Commerce Street and kittens. Call 653-1430 great benefits along Department month lease $495/mo + 1998 $995 Down,
80 MARKET STREET Aplcioa L330 Karen, Leave message with advancement dep., no smoking, pet con- Tonoe interestt, $4,500 Total.
APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 opportunities. For Im- n elde-red. (850) 653-3838 JoeHmstd-on Daylight Auto Financing
Telephone: (850) 653-8976 July 2, 9,2009 mediate consideration' ," eoaPns is ot 215-1769 9am tp 9pm.
Florida Bar No. 442178 25 please visit our website Lanark Village, 1 br renfreea with eps. it aond
Jue2, uy2,20 25T1at I -, .1 W/D, C/H/A, yard I e fe t poi n
IN TE CRCUT CURT arers~edicomc. g. 5 mo 1st& lst.Ask 12 month lease. 2 br and 3
Jue2777 OFy2,209 THE SECUTCON JUDI- caer~com cc 1.:.iO Jmo 850-697-2788sk br units available. Call
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND Eqa Opotnt g. . . 850-227-9732
OF THE SECOND JUDI- FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, Employer '' Studio Apt. -
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FLORIDA Web Id #34042063 RA SAEFRRN
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY s Furnished o z
VLORID TIO 119R6E FORkF TVURE of 61oo B oiesrse Upstairs studio

SUTRSTMOTGGE #2S3TAO2C9T6402906 ses IntalatonMant/epirh ls ICOullcat on, water &
INC., NOTICE OF FORFEITURE 32 Artsi& Csrafts ru w s n 700m6u ett w!2b H on d XCab St as te e9s5
Plaintiff PROCEEDIGS 3140 Baby Ites PerS~n 6150 Roommale Wanted 85-7-18frap. river w/ private dock. Zero $4,500 Total. Daylight Auto
vs. TO: JESSICA M. VANDER- uilid Buines~upis HV & SV of 610~M eH m/nLot 80 509 2 60 mo. CalFiacg21-76 a

ELIZABETH G. CHILD so~nR almnn a thre sn 3170 ul ecmi es A~p rmets ut e vaa n Retals tp 9pm.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
A/K/A ELIZABETH CHILD, the described property: 36 oemptet medaeoenn or| 62
e ndat Th Sheiff f Frnkll3200 Firewood maintenance person. 40Bec
(s.County has filed a Comn i20 F rsesitur On hts erwek thbee-61o Rentals-Sales
CASE NO.: plaint of Judgment of For- 3230 Garage/Yard Sales lmi R ltn FrLaeB WE
-DISO9-CA-00023 InwiFhratnhkn eC ntof 25 GodThings to Eat electrical and carpentry Commercial VstBahelye
S3260 Health & Fiiness needed. Drug free
Florida, seeking forfeiture 3270 Jeweiry/Clothing workplace. Valid dr II- Building REAL oESTAEFRSL
NOTICE OF ACTION oftefloigpoet: 38 ahnr/ cense & transportation Approx 1100 sq ft. 1o-nmsMud Bo gr!
TO:KAENTOLISON 196 uzkiSUV(Gee) 29 -E~qeiplenuiment rquilred. ESome Otravel Available now corner 7110 Beach Home/ odRne 19,lcl
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: Tag No. 636JZP 3300 Miscellaneous 'qued Equa Opp o w 8&1t tet S.Gorge 710 ommentyal lentl 5seed $29,90 To-
160 Avenue C Apalachl- #2S3TAO2C9T6402906 330Muscal nSthmmbens 8u5t 65 m~ployer. Call 850-653-9788 or |Sland 7130 -Condolrownhouse tal. 0% Interest, $695
cola, FI 32320 Supplies 8500 61 0058 $10wee, aeltnd Ar~ea e Down Daylight Auto Fl-
The Franklin County 3330 Restaurant/Hotel Gabge Included. pool 7160 Mobile Homes/Lots nancing 215-1769 9am to
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN- Sheriff's Office seized the 3340 Sporting Goods A alach loa Bay Charter School table.12'X65' deck with 7170 Waterfront 9pm.
KNOWN above property on March 3350 -Tickets (Buy & Sell) CO Beautiful view. call 71so Investment
24, 2009, n Frankln isacpigrsmsfr850-653-5114 11 Property
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN County, Florida. The prop- S Cetg SH SOr7190 Out-of-Town
PRE HC LAIMNM GA erldy s pesehnely Snhtehre cu | 3 1 10(01wn oitos70 Riea Ettee
AGAINST THE HEREIN Franklin County.
NAMED INDIVIDUAL fOr file 2009-2010 SC11001 year! I oao
DETE NSW WTHO AE cAuen.r fDni tng Clam Phyi)Scal education deacher Rssistant: catndidate 7 too
DEAD OR ALIVE, ant to Respond has been 10(11V R ft1dcticainada
WHETHER SAID UN- Issued by the Court. You Used Washers $150.00 shudhv Pfrtadcriiainada 2 br, 2 ba, 1200sf Twnhm,
KNOWN PARTIES MAY are required to file a copy Used Dryers $100.00 background in exercise and athletics, Carrabelle, large deck Do Island Gulf Front
CAMSAN HNT E ES Ithoyoue Cwntten Cdefenses Please Call 850-653-5307 $6lt811C8C5t01 CaliaeSl0(1R6Ralmo /0160 Cap Hoe. Flly In community | 84

ESER CG OR S rit en defa sn noory bakrudinarcniioigadbecpbeo an appt. 850-562-4996. boa ss$225K -$32p an part Dodge Conversion Van,

LASKNKWOW ADRSS dpau3 armth ais light plumbing, ane 0 vb51 rahloo Coal t92u67e8Ku iles, New tire

CURRENT ADDRESS: UN- Cut IShe rfrs OFrank, B bosBrc Please send resumes to Don Hungerford Lanark Villae 1 it co Wh et Dog a, 91Fl
KNOWN ~~~Avenue D, Apalachicola,98-1tStetAplhioaFL330o $50m +$30dpszew/2trvlraer

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that fFIl r ur3 2efnse eil rto T-o seo e-mail to ABCSchool~fairpoint~net 843659WOhwen oBura~nadn b hsfor se2 rteOBPleas
an action to foreclose a sult In a default judgment freaSUfeS FX(5)6315 To wnhouse /Barr ler New Home? call 850-899-0442
mortgage on the following being entered against you. inX the0 Bebo85 Dunes, Cape San Blas,
property In FRANKLIN INCLUDE SALARY R QUIREMENTS Port St. Joe Fl. 6 mo mn- TE AEUS a
County, Florida: WITNESS my hand and Folk Art Imum term, 3 br, 3 ba, Ex- KEOUGH s LANDING.TotaVn15,$0
the Seal of the Court this G l eln odtocso re etfe n O on0 neet$,0
TSCIFXATNOSNVENT Mah ayof ay,200. 1 ThuseS I FRANKLINBCOAURNDTY SCHOOL furnish ns Pand pdecor approved Affrdtableo Tbal 116 -an
CITY OF APALACHICOLA, Clr fteCici or 9:30 am- 6:00 Om wireless hardware set-up 3 bdrm, 2 bath homes 2516gmpm
FRANKLIN COUNTY, By: Michele Maxwell pm 85 School Road, Suite 1 available, Renter ref's and ranging from 1250-20^0
FLORIDA. Deputy Clerk I Sunday EspitFL328credit check required. sqft In Carrabelle's Newes
July 2, 9, 2009 12:00 pm-4:00 pm I 80 7-80$1,100 mo. Please Call Subdivision only %/ mil
has been filed against you 2884T Upcoming July (80 7-80850-425-8505 from the Carrabelle River
an eau are re urdw IN THE SECOND JUDI- 4th weekend!! ANNOUNCEMENT OF Prcnfote100s
ten defenses within 30 ALFRCU OU BkSaead I P IT NA DP SILEPlck your Lot.
days afte the firt public- FLORID Sidewalk Sale POSITIONS I so |Choose Your Model.
tin fany months F uloria D- FOI I Crafts, local handmade l 5 rd, r a Only 8 lots left!
ntifuwatto w SUPERIOR BANK, I temcshlart, ewely ct byl Positions:Instructional: W/S/G Incl., $850 month, (5)656-Com8pnIc
dress s 919 Coepo~r saintiff e-acul c thing, re1Plitif M ddle S hol Math (1)80-063eotCl

Tampa, Florida 33634, and Igift Items! Pampered K-12 Teachers Eastpoint New 3 bed- 7150 |8210
file the original with this O. LEE MULLIS and Chef products & house-i room, 2 ba, $850 mo+

dP o er Ce ARLOTTE S. MULLIS, h m r ~ Location: Frlokllin County Consolidated 0ep 6 sOc king or pets 1.2~mfrs r 1986 Se blRay e5.701
wise a default will be en- 9 w 7et asse au rv 3tauiu rle
teed adgaunst yeodu fr te OS E SALE9C ,Salary: FCSB Salary Schedule ~1j~$C ,0b0e0dAsdk 6g $2 b (8 es18200o
Complaint or petition. Cnrc:091SholY HOUSE SITTER or6377
Th~Dadie tul hal b09 ub NOIE S HEEY NEEDED! 4 city lots In Apalachicola
Ilshe dnc a weekefor two GIVEN 3pursuant to aoFinae 30Daln:uy6 09 onLoa eietpas12B006 dde

Te Alcehlwol kims. ste ded enC221 Ato aNnod Silk flowers for Sale, Plan- Job description and application may be 3 byeab-Tefromt luxuNnce I n23prdva~ ng3h79h2ood
09-000009-CA, of the Clr- ning a summer or fall wed- obtained from Franklmn County School Magnolla Ridge. Extremely 653-7777 E9
WITNESS my hand the cutCuto h wedding? Assortment of beau- Board Finance Office. Applications must reasonable rent for home
sel Of ts 2nd day of nuiilCrutI o3an no lU stlfo es e otpr n d tr1a)n rihigh sholc 1 ,lo ad 2 et roert manenen

Marla ohnon the Plaintiff, SUPERIOR ding arrangements con- three letters of recommendation Successful (800)766-0310 or Eastpoint, 706 CC Land
Clerk of the Court BNadteDfn-taining shades of Coral & applicants must agree to a criminal history kanders@wildfireaftermar- Rd, 3 br, 2 ba, DW at-
By: Michele Maxwell atOLEMUISndWhite. Original cost over check (includes FDLE processing fee) and ket.com. tached carport w/ utility
FlsorDept fCtrLaw roup, A TEeS gMh L dS rt t1 0 lG at deal mur adudb Hcetehing iat the Franklin County room, back ptrhch,c3 eom 6ris j

PL., b 1 drEores tIqie2 Bd, 2 Ba upper ap rment. sieakan xrtr n Lhurs Open
PO.Box2508 o th 6t da ofAugstPlese etun apliatins o te atenion Washer, drer, stove, refrigerator Bay View. $149,900. Motl- Fisherman Boat
Tampa, Florid 2009, at the front steps of of Morna Smith, personnel specialist, included. $700 per month + vated seller, bring offers.
3362-508 te Fankln Cunt Cort-security deposit. Person(s) 850-879-6496 34' 1983
0245J~u~ 2, 009 hous, Aplacicol, F "Franklin County School Board is an need to be qouiet clean and Moie oe 466 b 81.2 BDetrolt D t-
Je2853T fol wigdscie reae |da 310 Equal Opportunity Employer. (850)653-1 240 orhi(850)670-1211 2 ba, Spa, porch, utility Riggers, Diesel Gnera-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT property as set forth Inaleecrcfu-tr(w)fllabn
OF THE SECOND JUDI- said Final Judgment of nished. Lot 121 ftol xn 75 fmt, Galleyato, lTfrim TasBath
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND Foreclosure: R4, welding shop, with Sain ltomwt
FORFDRAANLNCUT That certain condominium Baldwin Baby Grand. Pl 4 All Shifts 750e1 2M lal sr, Bootdom n
unit of Water Street Hotel, Ideal for church or home. DIT R TGood! Will Tradel Ask-
GULF STATE COMMU- a hotel condominium, $3600. Living Waters As- ( Ing $39,000 OBO At
NITY BANK, composed of Unit Number sembly of God In Apalachl- IEAB PT, OT I' .. ama City Marina slip
Plaintiff, 303, and the undivided cola. Call 653-8015 or ,- m := Call 850-871-9300
1/30 Interest In the com- 323-0219 CUI/ L F, IT, ,,Y .150-258-0996
vs. mon elements appurtenant WYe believe in ability, no~t disability. Our residents swnn
THOAS RANANtahneretI accorhdaea tah ilD rtwith dolphins and enjog growing t eir own garden .,
and IDA RENEE tron of Condominlum es- gea e. 5 Iletllhlili.U lfelli il TO TVEM IE
BRANNAN, hunsbnd and tablih ng of Water Street Eggs Qg a l lihlclilaei llddt il eiet.RCETOA
wife, Hotel, A Hotel Condomin- IIW U M c'le |ggrtic 11@ 10 I~ gleM OI Ileadig (IC itakCIl allilI loIngII 8100 Antique&8 Collectibles COMPLETE PACKAGES
Defendant(s). lum, recorded In Official .10Cr al@ P utltyeice
CASE NEO. FOSA00148-CA 8423 uVl reod of H EO-an A P... Al e, Am

NOIE FSAE The successful bidder at 11850-653-5610 rl nl *Pls soats

Nht I rsun stohemOre den tdhame nal b uiie sdate Ilo cOf Irrr C~ r 4 ft rr I f atecft BOAT SHOW
ment of Foreclosure In this the Certificate of Title. OliefT alN 1IO e lrein nI 8240 Boat & MarineFR.&S T


cause, In the Circuit Court DT ti 3 d o ; Retres sent are julst a1 lek of( flee hessel'irS offerI rd) Supp ies 80nifay Rtlid
ofw srne nh puo Dunne0ths 3d a ofria Il|Halifiedl srhrlatilrr s~f. 3 AV Ra Veicles www.xtremeindustries.com
ated In Franklin County, I:'.: Inc _~r rr l~r 1~3 C~aob:esmpeliers &Talr


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


CASE
2008-000027-CA
RE-NOTICE OF
CLOSURE SALE


FORE-


NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
drsGtrantong thoesMotion a
dated June 8, 2009 en-
tered In Civil Case No.
2008-000027-CA of the Cir-
cult Court of the 2ND Judl-
clal Circuit In and for
FRAN LIN lounty wlall

to the hl hest ad best
bidder for cash ntFRONT
STEPS of the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse, 33
Market Street, Apalachl-
cola, Florida at 11 a.m. on
the 22nd day of July, 2009
the following described

ment, to-wit:


EDITION, CITY OF
CARRABELLE, FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA. TO-
GIENTGHLEERWIDEWIMOVILA
HOME VIN#H55765G

An esn husran oanI-

Spdraopetyt onr ns o
ens, must file a claim
w thn 60 days after the

Dated this 9th day of June
2009
Marcla M. Johnson

er: Mch le Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons with disabllties need-
tlg ai spsehc Idacccomma
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse at
904-995 0 a8F r

Relay Service.
LAW OFFICE OF DAVID J.
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND
ROAD, 9U E 400,FL


(954) 233-8000
07-24786(GMAP)
June 25, July 1, 2009

2N74T E CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVESOON

Jeffrey W. Daugherty
Deceased.

File No. 08-0U0067-CP

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of Jeffrey W.
wos dtae of eteh a
July 2nd, 2008, and whose
social security number Is
285-52-4455, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Frank-
tenC vty cFloa dPros
of which Is 33 Market
Street, Apalachicola, FL
32320. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal
representative and the per-
sonald r peentatlye' at-

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate

ntreed Is rehcuitre tt rr

WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
OTH HAFTE TH

TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE
NOTI ECOPTHEOF THIS


The Times Thursday, July, 2, 2009 7B










Always online |www.apalachti mes.com


TIDE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
Cat Point Minus0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03
APALACHICOLA
07/02 Thu 11:13AM 1.7 H 08:34PM -0.1 L
07/03 Fri 11:54AM 1.7 H 09:24PM -0.2 L
07/04 Sat 12:42PM 1.7 H 10:09PM -0.3 L


CARRAB ELL E
07/02 Thu 09:48AM 2.7 H 06:21PM -0.2 L


SOLU NAR
m = Minor M = Major add 1 hour for daylight savings
Date Day AM PM Rise/Set Moon
07/02 Thu m 12:45 m 1:00 5:03AM
M 6:50 M 7:15 7:05PM
07/03 Fri m 1:30 m 1:50 5:04AM
M 7:35 M 8:00 7:04PM
07/04 Sat m 2:15 m 2:30 5:04AM
M 8:20 M 8:45 7:04PM
07/05 Sun m 3:00 m 3:20 5:05AM
M 9:10 M 9:35 7:04PM
07/06 Mon m 3:50 m 4:10 5:05AM
M 9:55 M 10:20 7:04PM
07/07 Tue m 4:35 m 4:50 5:06AM
M 10:40 M 11:05 7:04PM
07/08 Wed m 5:20 m 5:40 5:06AM
M 11:30 M 7:04PM


I


-ULZ~L~i~LLiiy ~ ~ I


Thursday, July 2, 2009


Local


Temperatr
High Low
900 810
930 800
930 800
900 800
890 800
900 800
920 800


Date
Thu, July 2
Fri, July 3
Sat, July 4
Sun, July 5
Mo n, July 6
Tue, July 7
Wed, July 8


% Precip
40 %
30%
40 %
40 %
40 %
30%
60 %


Chef Eddie's Magnolia Grill
is bringing in a trio of acclaimed
jazz artists for a night of Cajun
food and music.
The musical event will be held
Friday, July 10 beginning at 6
p.m., with both indoor and outdoor
seating. A portion of all beverage
proceeds will go to benefit
Franklin's Promise Food Pantry.
The New South Jazz Trio
features three illustrative
veterans of the music world, a
bluesy song stylist, a veteran
guitarist who has performed with
some of the greats, and a world
renowned bass player.
Bobbie Storm, an iconic jaZZ
singer from the Carolinas' Low
Country, continues to thrill
audiences with a unique blend of
jazz and blues. A regular at the
famous Spoleto Jazz Series for
many years, Storm can be earthy,
bluesy, and tenderly sophisticated
as she performs from her heart.
Guitarist Jimmy Ward, who
now teaches, performs and
records in Panama City Beach,
has performed locally, nationally
and internationally, from New
York to Denver, Los Angeles
to Key West, and Bermuda to
Holland. He has shared the stage
with Blood, Sweat and Tears,


~~]~ iY

1998 3 br/2 ba, 28X(68 Cavalier MH
on 100x142 lot Living room, separate family
room w/stone fireplace. Kitchen and dining
room have wood floors

$85,000 for more
information
call (850) 653-2083 or
(850) 323-0107
ask for Sam.


BOBBIE STORM


John Lee Hooker, George Benson,
Clark Terry, Stephen Stills,
Brubeck and Sons, Jean-Luc
Ponty, Larry Graham and many
more.
World-renowned bassist Steve
Gilmore has played with some
of the greatest, including Phil
Woods, Mose Allison, Jim Hall
and Gene Bertoncini. "And that's
just a teaser," said Ward. "The


list is so long it freaks me out.
Don't miss the opportunity to hear
one of the most important jazz
bassists in America playing in
peak form. He is utterly amazing
and does things on the bass most
of us can't even imagine."
Ticket prices for the concert
buffet are $24.95. Reservations
are suggested and can be made
by calling 653-8000.


07/05 Sun
07/06 Mon
07/07 Tue
07/08 Wed


06:22AM
01:34PM
06:40AM
02:26PM
06:57AM
03:15PM
07:13AM
04:02PM


08:53AM 1.4
10:50PM -0.3
09:45AM 1.4
11:25PM -0.2
10:29AM 1.3
11:55PM -0.2
11:10AM 1.2


07/03 Fri


NeWS BR IE F S


10:29AM 2.7 H 07:11PM -0.3 L


07/04 Sat 11:17AM 2.7 H 07:56PM -0.5 L


Clerk questions TDC
spending
On June 16, Clerk of
Court Marcia Johnson
expressed her concerns
to the commission re-
garding allocation of
Tourist Development
Council (TDC) funds.
She said that the county
has invested TDC money
on projects that are not
related to tourism cit-
ing the construction of
sports facilities like ball
fields and skate parks
within local neighbor-
hoods.
"I am concerned
about the 60 percent in-
frastructure/40 percent
promotional allocation
of funds," she said. "It is
my opinion that you can-


not spend TDC funds on
a ballpark. I've been con-
cerned over the last year
about some of the checks
I've signed."
Her remarks were
met with loud applause
from the audience.
Commissioners di-
rected County Attorney
Michael Shuler to re-
search Johnson's con-
tentions.
By Lois Swoboda

Night meeting rURS
00@g, (ifw OW COWd
June 16 was the first of
promised quarterly night
meetings of the county
commission. The meet-
ing was well attended
with about 50 in the au-
dience but the crowd had


thinned considerable by
the time public comment
had concluded around
9:30 p.m., four-and-a-half
hours from the opening
gavel at 5 p.m.

$250,000 stricken
ifrm tax roll
On June 16, Clerk of
Courts Marcia Johnson
told county commission-
ers that Tax Collector
James Harris had cer-
tified the list of errors,
insolvencies, double as-
sessments and discounts
on the Assessment Roll.
Errors and insolven-
cies totaled $4,300, sub-
tractions totaled $276,000
and additions amounted
to $23,000. In summa-
ry, about $257,000 was


stricken from the roll.
The commission voted
unanimously to approve
the report.

FEMA si ns off on
local projects
At the June 16 com-
mission meeting, Emer-
gency Management Di-
rector Pam Brownell
told commissioners that
she met with FEMA on
May 28. At that meeting,
repair projects were ap-
proved for Owl Creek
Road, Power Line Road,
Jeff Sanders Road, West
Road, Smith Creek Road,
Duvall Road, Black Creek
Road, Hickory Landing
Road, Brickyard Road
and damaged streets on
St. George Island.


07/05 Sun 04:57AM
12:09PM
07/06 Mon 05:15AM
01:01PM
07/07 Tue 05:32AM
01:50PM
07/08 Wed 05:48AM
02:37PM


06:40AM 2.2
08:37PM -0.5
07:32AM 2.2
09:12PM -0.3
08:16AM 2.1
09:42PM -0.3
08:57AM 1.9
10:07PM -0.2


(MLS#235009


$349,000 St. George Island`


PROFESSIONAL
RENOVATED


All New in 2005!
-, MM --- New roof, New
doors, New
windows, All to
current building
codes. New kitchen cabinets, appliances,
ceramic tile, 1,500 h/c sq. ft. (1,932
s.f. total), 3 BR, 2 BA. Furnished.
Landscaped, circular driveway. Large
under house storage. Easy beach access.
709 East Gulf Beach Drive


John Shelby, Broker
800-344-7570
aso-927-4777
www.sgirealty.com


B8 | The Times


(( 0 imed 0az tri 0 1 ZI





play Mag nolia Gr ill


JIMMY WARD


Our local real estate experts have identified

what they feel are the best values around

and are offering them to you in Real Estate

Picks! (In this section), Discover the best

real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St.

Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George

Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas.


St. George Island
C8 -





I I


We consign one Diece,
or an entire home!
203 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL 32328
850-670-8811
1046 West 23rd Street Panama City, FL 32405
850-747-9413


Consignment
From Foreclosures
FarammammmuT~
mumm





~~~ Franklin County f


1


I ,,,,,


~ -k -a- -a- ~-


Port St. Joe
The 11th annual Independence
on the Coast celebration will begin
Saturday, July 4, at 10 a.m. ET in
Frank Pate Park.
The free, family-oriented event
will feature children's activities,
live entertainment, a parade, clas-
sic car show, petting zoo, great
food and fireworks.
The Kid's Kitty Car and Golf
Parade begins at 11 a.m. in front
of the tennis courts. Judges will
determine winners in six catego-
ries: boy's bike, girl's bike, tricy-
cles, motorized, floats, on foot and
most comical.
A duck race will entertain
crowds from 3-4 p.m., followed by
the popular Kid's Pirate Costume.
Pirates invade Frank Pate Park at 5
p.m. and will share a special pirate
feast with kids from 6-6:45 p.m.
Live music begins at 6 p.m., with
Tommy and limmy Curry, followed
by a patriotic concert by Reggie
Grantham.
Evening activities begin at 9
p.m., with a lighted boat parade
sponsored by the Port St. Joe
Yacht Club.
Fireworks will illuminate the sky
at approximately 30 minutes after
dark. Those viewing the show
from letty Park or St. Joe Marina
will enjoy the best view.
Wewahitchka
On July 4, the Wewahitchka
Dixie Youth baseball/softball teams
will be hosting carnival activities
and concessions at the T.L. James
Sports Complex, located at 521
Catalta Street.
Proceeds will help the teams pay
for expenses as they advance to
the state playoffs.
The fun begins at 5 p.m. CT,
with fireworks at dark.


Cape San Blas
The Cape San Blas lighthouse
will host its first Arts and Crafts
Fair on July 3-4, from 10 a.m. 6
p.m. and July 5 from noon 6
p.m. ET.
Th roughout the th ree-day event,
vendors will sell a variety of offer-
ings, including paintings, photog-
raphy, wood carvings and stained
glass. Local authors will sell auto-
graphed copies of their books.
Booths will teach visitors inter-
esting facts about local history,
including the Tupelo honey and
turpentine industries.
There will also be drinks and hot
dogs for sale.
For a $5 admission price, visi-
tors can also climb the lighthouse
tower. Children under 10 will climb
for free, with adult supervision.
Mexico Beach
Dubbed the "Best Blast on the
Beach," Mexico Beach's July 4 cel-
ebration begins with a Firecracker
5K run/walk under the Palms Park.
The start time is 7 a.m. CT, with
entrants paying a $10 fee. The
first 300 participants win a free
T-shirt.
A Kid's Fishing Tournament will
be held from 9-10:30 a.m. at the
Mexico Beach Canal. The event
is free for kids ages 2-13. Bait,
snacks and drinks will be provided,
but participants should bring their
own fishing poles.
Fireworks will be launched from
the Mexico Beach pier at 8:15
p.m. (right at dark).
Remember: the pier will be
closed on July 4.


Apalachicola
Apalachicola will kick off the
weekend on Friday, July 3, where
the Apalachicola Rotary Club,
Apalachicola Bay Chamber of
Commerce, and a host of down-
town businesses have once again
come together to coordinate the
annual old Apalach Independence
Day Parade and Ice Cream Social.
Children will begin decorating their
bicycles downtown around 6 p.m.
ET and then organize at Lafayette
Park around 6:30 p.m. to ready
for the parade. Participants will
gather, donning red, white, and
blue while riding bicycles, pulling
wagons, driving golf carts and
walking.
The flag waving procession will
leave Lafayette Park and make
its way down Avenue B to Water
Street along the river to Riverfront
Park, where at 7 p.m. there will
be an ice cream social along with
entertainment.
New this year, and starting at
7:30 p.m., will be a Rubber Duck
Race, under the Gorrie Bridge,
sponsored by the Rotary Club.
The club, to raise money to
fight polio, is selling rubber ducks
at all branches of the Gulf State
Community Bank and Apalachicola
State Bank.
For $2 each, people can buy as
many race tickets as they wish,
with each ticket corresponding to
one of the rubber ducks entered
in the July 3 race event.
The ducks will be taken to the
big hump of the Apalachicola
bridge, to be dumped into the
river onto a track made of float-
ing oil barrier booms. Current will
float the ducks downstream to a
boat waiting to grab the first, sec-
ond and third place winners. First
prize carries a $500 prize, second
place wins $300 and third place
takes home $100.


St. George Island
On Saturday morning, July 4,
the weekend's festivities will con-
tinue in the heart of St. George
Island for the annual Indepen-
dence Day Parade.
Anyone can enter a float, ve-
hicle or themselves in this parade,
which starts mid-morning, about
10 a.m. ET at the center of St.
George Island.
At nightfall, fireworks will be
launched in front of the Blue Par-
rot Restaurant.

Ca rra bel le
The Crooked River Lighthouse
will be open for climbing, with free
admission, during regular hours
from 1 to 4 p.m. ET on July 4.
The Camp Gordon Johnston
museum, at the city's municipal
complex, will be open all day July
4 as well. For more info, call 697
8575.
Carrabelle will play host to the
city's annual community Fourth of
July picnic at Tilly Miller Park. It's
BYOB (bring your own basket) and
begins at 5 p.m.
There will be lots of fun events,
including a community jam fest,
sack races, relays, games, cake-
walk and pie baking contest. For
more info call the chamber at
697-2585, the library at 697-2366
or City Hall at 697-2727.
The day's festivities will close
with two firework displays in the
county, both beginning at "dark-
thirty."
In Carrabelle, fireworks will be
on Davis Island, visible from the
waterfront.

Lanark Village
The Lanark Village boat club will
host its 4th of July picnic at noon
ET. All are welcome, and encour-
aged to bring a covered dish for
the affair. For more info, call lanet
Dorrier at 528-9359.


I


j~~~tGulf County J--


I


1




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs