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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00032
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola, Fla.
Publication Date: June 25, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00032
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
        Page B 9
        Page B 10
Full Text























Franklin School District's B grade snaps string of ('s


ABC Schoo Ian thAr n

in last seven years


Hea th department conslaers closing LCarranelle clinic


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 9


physical, emotional, and orga-
nizational challenges over the
past months. The consistent
hard work established an initial
consolidated school foundation,
a school grade of C. We'll take it.
"Improvements occurred in
2009 as the newfound focus on
the students became evident all
over campus," she said. "Who
knows how we'll we will do next
year when we meet new chal-
lenges with even more deter-
mination, commitment, and
support for one another?"
Apalachicola Bay Charter
School Principal Don Hun-
gerford was elated with the
news the school had earned


575 points, for a solid A.
"We're very, very pleased,"
he said. "I'm very proud of our
students and our staff. We had a
number of students make great
gains. We put a lot of effort into
increasing our intensity, particu-
larly more for math and science,
because we already had a lot of
intensity for reading. Obviously
it paid off."
Marks echoed Hungerford's
pride. "They're our kids too,"
she said. "The district on an av-
erage is a B, and I think as long
as everybody views it that way,
we'll be fine."
Further confirmation that the
two schools have grown alike


was evidenced in the popula-
tions of free and reduced lunch
students, an indicator of low
income, and the numbers of mi-
nority students, reported in the
state's "grade card."
The percentage of minor-
ity students at the ABC School,
which in its earliest years had
just a handful of minorities,
now numbers 17 percent, 1 per-
centage point greater than the
16 percent at the consolidated
school.
In addition, 58 percent of the
ABC School student body is on

See SCHOOLS AS


County

jobless

rate inches


upward

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Government jobs, still
relatively unscathed by
the ongoing recession,
helped Franklin County
main ain the stat 's third
rat in May.
According to prelimi-
nry la orsmare stdatibs-
the Florida Agency for
Workforce Innovation,
the county's overall job-
Is rate iched upads
tes6.4 perenntinu Maras
309 people out of a l bor
force of 4,855 were without
work.
TI e jobless rate was
four-tenths of a percent-

percent, with 288 people
looking for employment
out of smaller labor force
of 4783.
Despite the rise, Frank-
lin's numbers placed it be-
hind only Liberty County,
at 5.0 percent, and Mon-
roe County, at 6.2 percent,
among the state's 67 coun-
ties. Trailing just behind
Franklin were Alachua,
Leon, and Walton coun-
ties, each at 6.6 percent,
and Jackson County, at 6.8
percent.
State officials said
many of the counties with
low unemployment rates
have a relatively high per-
ce:tk of government
Franklin's unemploy-
ment numbers placed it
well above the 8.5 percent
average for the three coun-
ties that comprise the Gulf
Coast Workforce Region.
Bay County posted an 8.6
percent jobless rate, just
slightly better than the 8.4
percent in Gulf County.
Still, the region's job-
less numbers were 1.7
percentage points better
than the state rate of 10.2
percent and nearly 1 per-
centage point lower that
the national rate at 9.4.
"Our area's unemploy-
ment rate is flat in com-
parison to last month,
however; outside of the
last six months, our un-

See JOBLESS A6


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The school grade news was
all good for Franklin County last
week when the state issued its
school accountability report re-
sults.
The tide of educational suc-
cess lifted all boats, as the
district ended five years as a
C county to earn its first ever
B grade.


The Apalachicola Bay Char-
ter School climbed two grade
levels, from a C last year, to
earn its third A grade in the last
seven years.
The consolidated school
earned a solid C, up from last
year's D grade, and its best
performance since 2002.
"I was thrilled," said Super-
intendent Nina Marks. "Every-
body's real excited. We were
well into a C. We have faced


By Lojs Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

The FAA said it will take back
"19,0M0 it hs awarded t oh ocoeunty t
county commission does not act by
Aug. 15
Conemmisdsioni st have d aadlocko
Municipal Airport all spring. Earlier
this month, Bill Ferris, airport im-
provement program manager for the
Federal Aviation Authority in Florida
said the FAA would withdraw the
funds on July 31 if the commission
did not act
After a conference with Dan Gar-
lick and Ted Mosteller, chairman of the

airpot~t adilsort board, he ai;~ougrd to ;:
cocmmnission mu st; hale 'the$ gran tap-
licatIonl In theI oftiice by\ mid .IAugust.'"
sad 1(Jim Petters.an F.L\ pokesdm~n
The commission \otedl not to
buy the 21 acres of land on May! i,
and agaid-on June 2. At both meet-
ings, Clm missio~ners~ Pi nki Ja~ckl t~
and C'heryl Sa~nctder \tored no,
and C'omm Issionlerd Bel In PutnIal I
and Noa~h Lockclley\ \latec In talol:
with ChIaIrmIIan Smoke~t\ Parrish
recusine himselt


"You have to think
about what's down r
the road. You have to

p T~otet yO~uTft~c22lityJfO T
~fture dlevelop~me~nt.
IMnn~- pilOts re11/
uOt land wzethout
illsflcllientsf; a~nd for
largferplanes the~yare a


D00010 DUCg
Spo~se501, F Oildo Department


said he plans to recuse himself from
voting on the airport issue at least
until he can appear before the state
ethics commission on July 24.
In a June 17 e-mail, Kathleen Ber-
Sern,thae puble Info maion s caias
Atlanta office wrote that it is the de-
cision of the commission, as the air-
portl's s onsor, whether or not to buy
"The FAA encourages, but does
not require, the acquisition of Run-
way Protection Zone land," she
wrote. "We have told the sponsor
that it needs to decide if it is going to
buy the land. If not, then the FAA will
cancel the grant. If they are not going
to buy the land then the grant will be
I'sC~i ndl~l"Ed:-semen war ~t


Parrisi h c~itedt th tac~t his rm.
p~lloier~ Is a par1t owner of'Cl th '1
acre't par1cetI.l, bt at thet Junet 2 meet- ~t
Ing, he sd31 ownershpllll oft theland 11
had recently changed The land
nol\\ belone s tol Gar1'lick C:EO: of
Gar~lick Emirocnme~ntal Seti~\ce~ In
.4pala.c~hicola 3
Parns~uh hLas it tt ten th Sttate lt
Flonda Cocmmissionl on Ethilcs to ask
It he ca~n now\ late on the matter He


Shorten runway
The acre~ase wouldl b, sec~ured to
CreaBte a pro'Ctettl ion zonet at the~ endl lt
runway 13-31. the airport's prilc~iple r
rumnray If the land is not purIIcha1Sed
byu the cocunty a~nd Is later delet~loped,
tithe usle31t -leng-thl of thet main runitay 3\
\\ ouldl be shor~tened l

See AIRPORT A6


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
As the 2009-10 budget de-
bate nears, the county health
department has served notice
it is considering whether to shut
down its primary care clinic in
Carrabelle.
Wesley Tice, who over-
sees the health department,
told county commissioners
June 16 the health care needs
it has filled on the eastern end
of the county over the past two
years are now partially being met
by the Weems East medical offic-
es in the Carrabelle city complex.
"We filled a gap two years ago
and now the gap is not there," he
said. "They (Weems East) is see-
ing patients, and in that sense
they're competing with us. We
see patients with Medicaid, pa-


tients on a sliding fee scale and
some folks who don't have the
ability to pay at all, and in that
sense we see a different type of
patient.
"Three years ago we expand-
ed services there to fill in a gap
because there wasn't a medical
provider in the eastern end of
the country," said Tice. "Because
Weems East is operational, the
gap should be filled by them so I
can pool my resources."
Tice said reductions in state
funding over the past three
years, and a $35,000 reduction
slated for the upcoming year,
have forced the health depart-
ment to further streamline its
operation.
County funding for the health
department has been reduced
$87,000 over three years, Tice
said, making it even more im-


PHOTO BY LOIS SWOBODA
A view of the county health department's annex in Carrabelle.


portant to generate greater cost
efficiencies.
"I can't afford to keep the Car-
rabelle clinic open any longer,"
he told commissioners. "I want


TABLE OF CONTENTS


to pull back and integrate more
of our services to Apalachicola.

See CLINIC AS


Phone: 850-653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews~,starfl.com
Fax: 850-653-8036


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:

Casrifedd Dirpa idr a day aill1a.mn.
(lassified Line Ad Monday ai5 p.mn.


Letter to the Editor .. ..... ... A4
Sheriff'sReport. .......... ... B6
ChurchNews......................... B3


SocietyNews.. ............. 2
Tide Chart ................... ........ Bl
Classifieds ................... ..... B8-B9


A palachicola

Carrabelle


les loves
to dance


S


FOUNDING


F~;~U~AY'





Feds threaten to pull grant for airport buffer


o! Tras~o!~fS~~a~~~~i-i.).'i~il~i;


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NWPA ERS NTER CT V


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Franklin County Tourist Development Council

2009-2010 GRANT APPLICATION

RELEASE NOTICE

All FCTDC Off-Season and Sustaining Grant Applications will be released on Friday,
July 3, 2009.

The DEADLINE FOR RETURNING APPLICATIONS WILL BE
5:00 pm, Monday, August 3, 2009.

$80,000 has been allocated for 2009-2010 Off-Season Grant awards in the following
categories:

Festival Grants are provided to support organizations in producing and promoting large events
that result in high tourist demand and economic return. These are multi-day events. Each
festival grant award is $7,500. A total of three (3) festival grants may be awarded for the
2009-2010 cycle. Sustaining Grant recipients are not eligible for this award. Anticipated
attendance should be in excess of 5,000 people.

Sponsorship Grants are provided to support organizations in producing and promoting mid-
size events that result in high tourist demand and economic return. These are multi-day
events. Anticipated attendance for these events should be a minimum of 2,000 people. Each
sponsorship grant award is $5,000. A total of six (6) Sponsorship Grants may be awarded for
the 2009-2010 cycle.

Assistance Grants are provided to assist organizations in producing and promoting events that
are full day, recurring events which generate strong tourist demand and economic benefits.
The anticipated attendance for these events should be a minimum of 400 people. Each
assistance grant award is $2,000. A total of eleven (11) Assistance Grants may be awarded in
the 2009-2010 cycle.

Please note: Sustaining Grant recipients are limited to one (1) application for either a $5,000
Sponsorship Grant or a $2,000 Assistance Grant.

Special Request Grants will be accepted by the FCTDC on an individual case basis throughout
the year. A total of $5,500 will be allocated for the 2009-2010 season and may be awarded as
eleven (11) separate $500 awards.

Note: The total allocation in all categories is subject to the availability of funds. The FCTDC
may revise category allocations without notice prior to making awards.

$100,000 has been allocated for 2009-2010 Sustaining Grants and will be divided among
award recipients.

To Request an Off Season or Sustaining grant application
please call 850-653-8678
or Email camelliarose2@aol.com
FaX: 850-653-8319
Visit the FCTDC website at www.anaturalescape.com to download a copy.
Or visit the TDC Office at 17-1/2 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida


Thursday, June 25, 2009


A2 | The Times


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

The pavement sizzled
and sprinklers steamed
this week as Apalachicola
experienced five consecu-
tive days of record high
temperatures, with the
thermometer hovering sev-
en to nine degrees above
average.
The month of June be-
gan normally enough, with
the first seven days at or
near the normal high-low
range of 88 to 72 degrees
Fahrenheit. On June 16,
temperatures began to
climb.
On Wednesday, June
17, the heat wave began in
earnest. The temperature
topped out at 99 degrees,
beating the old record for
that date, 97, set in 1981.
The temperature fell to
76 degrees that night but
surged up to 96 the next
day, tying the record.
A 98 degree high on
Saturday once again tied
the record for that day,
and Sunday's 100 degree
high broke the standing
record from 1998 by two
degrees. The temperature
bottomed out at a toasty 80
degrees on Sunday night
and soared back to 100 on
Monday, beating the previ-
ous record of 95 set in 1998
by five degrees.
According to Iry Watson,
science officer for Tallahas-
see's NOAA office, the un-
usual weather is the result
of an upper high pressure
system situated just to the
west of Franklin County.
"We were very close to
the upper ridge of the sys-
tem for the last week, which
meant the air flow was
Clockwise off the land mass


instead of a sea breeze off
the water. I was amazed
to see the 100 degree tem-
perature at Apalachicola's
airport yesterday because
it is so close to the beach,"
he said in a telephone in-
terview Tuesday.
He explained that with a
steady air flow off the land,
the air is dry, so there is no
precipitation and no cloud
cover to cool things off. The
temperatures just built and
built.
Watson said the system
is now drifting west and
will probably wind up situ-
ated over the southwestern
United States. This will lead
to cooler air in our area
and increase the chance of
showers.
Although nighttime tem-
peratures are predicted to
remain on the high side,
79 to 80 for most of the
week, daytime tempera-
tures should drop to the
lower 90s by Thursday,
June 25.
What does this mean for
hurricane season? While
the temperature of the Gulf
of Mexico is running three
degrees above normal
down south in Naples, at 89,
Pensacola's Gulf water is
currently 77 degrees, seven
degrees below June's aver-
age of 84 degrees.
Watson said that, while
we are not currently in a
drought, the upper soil is
dry and we are in need of
precipitation.
For area drought and
wildfire information up-
dated daily, visit http://
www.srh.noaa.gov/tae/fire
wx.php.
For water temperatures
in the Gulf of Mexico, go to
http ://www.nodc.noaa.gov/
dsdt/cwtg/egof~html.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN


More than 60 children, several
from the Project Impact program,
started the summer off with books
Tuesday morning as they attended
the first day of the Apalachicola Mu-
nicipal Library's Summer Reading
Program.
The program, free and open to the
public, runs through July 23 at the li-
brary, 74 Sixth St., and is held every
Tuesday and Thursday morning from
9:30-10:30 a.m. The program targets
young people who have completed
kindergarten through fifth grade.
Students who attend or come by
the library to sign up to count the
number of minutes they read over


the course of the summer or check
out books will receive a golden
ticket, which goes in a box for the
grand prize of a bicycle, donated by
ACE hardware in Apalachicola. The
drawing, at the end of the five-week
program, is to be done by Mayor Van
Johnson at an ice cream party on
Tuesday, July 28.
Readers can also win free books.
Or over the course on the summer,
if they read 600 minutes (20 minutes
per day), they can win a backpack
filled with school supplies. Just stop
by the library for details.
This is the first year for the li-
brary's summer reading program,


created with the sponsorship of Trin-
ity Episcopal Church and the Rotary
Club, plus the generous support of
two Texas librarians, Karen Kessel
and her prot~g6, Mary Pruitt, who
donated their expertise in getting
the program off the ground.
In photo above, Kessel reads to
the students in Benedict Hall at Trin-
ity Episcopal Church, which served
to welcome the large group of stu-
dents. For more information on the
program, which features a story, ac-
tivity and a snack at each meeting, or
Other opportunities at the Apalachic-
ola library, call librarian Caty Greene
at 653-8436.


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ofFranklin County
Improving the Quality of Life for
Seniors in Franklin County
Seeking ages 60+ on Ilmited Income
Interestedl In becoming active and
Involved In their community.
(850)245-5935 or (892150)92-55


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1
-I


Thursday, June 25, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Federal stimulus money is
funding summer job training
for more than a dozen Franklin
County youth, through the county
library's TIGERS program.
TIGERS, which stands for
"Teens in Gear Enjoy, Realize,
Succeed," is now in its ninth year
and has long been able to enroll
students in on-the-job training
programs funded through a con-
tract with the Gulf Coast Work-
force Board.
But this summer, said Carol


Barfield, program specialist with
the library's youth development
programs, the TIGERS have been
allocated additional money from
the American Recovery and Rein-
vestment Act 2009.
Barfield said the money is in-
tended to provide intensive train-
ing to youth with an emphasis on
the 18 to 24 age group.
In a May 1 letter from Annie
Ball, who directs the youth pro-
gram, she wrote that "it is the
goal of this program to provide
long-range career opportunities
for youth, ranging from perma-
nent employment at the end of the


summer training period to further
advanced education and appren-
ticeships."
Barfield said Apalachicola,
Eastpoint and Carrabelle were
originally allotted 10 slots, but
when half of Apalachicola's 26
TIGERs indicated interest, the
Workforce increased the number
of slots in the county to 15.
Participants can make $300
every two weeks in incentive sti-
pends, and can work a maximum
a 20 hours per week, which trans-
lates to a wage of $7.50 per hour.
Money earned does not count
against food stamp allocations.


Businesses must make the train-
ing available, but do not have to
fund the youths' on-the-job train-
ing.
"It's an incentive, not an em-
ployment," she said. "It's an out-
standing program."
So far, there are two TIGERs
working for the city of Apalachic-
ola, Ann Richards and Jeffrey
Banks, and in Eastpoint, Tomeika
Ford, is working for the county
solid waste department.
Ashley Williams is working at
the Apalachee Center in Apala-
chicola, while Denisha Allen and
Avie Porter are training at the


Apalachicola Riverkeeper.
The Apalachicola Chamber of
Commerce is receiving assistance
from Adreenah Wynn, while Gar-
dens Inc. is utilizing the services
of Ladaedrean Williams, and the
Gibson Inn's Caf6 Momi that of
Rahkeim Pierce.
The Apalachicola Municipal Li-
brary has brought in Sandrianna
Rhodes for training.
In Carrabelle, Nina Fox is work-
ing at the Boys and Girls Clubs,
and Samantha Creamer is at the
St. James Bay Nursing home.
Barfield said she is continuing
to place young people at sites.


Early on the morning of
June 11, Susan Bassett, a vol-
unteer turtler on St. George
Island, had the experience of a
lifetime when, during her usual
rounds marking new nests, she
came on a female turtle in the
process of laying her eggs.
"I came up on this mama
turtle just finishing up her nest
and got to watch her pack down
the sand with her body, throw
sand over the nest site and head
on back out to the water," she
wrote.
Bassett took the required
measures of the female; her
shell is 37 inches long, 34 inches
across.
"What a treat is all I can say;
she was gorgeous. Dead quiet
except for the surf, which you
can see was low, and you could
hear the thump thump thump
as she packed the sand down
with her whole body," she wrote.
"Lots of long quiet sighs, too, as
she was finishing up. They al-
ways seem so tired at the end of
the nesting.'
Bassett said she hopes ev-
eryone seeing these pictures


Susan Bassett, a volunteer turtler on St. George Island, came on
the turtle in the process of laying her eggs and framed against
the sunrise.


will remember to take every-
thing in off of the beach at night
during turtle nesting season,
which runs through Oct. 31.
The biggest hazard is parapher-
nalia left on the beach in the
turtles' way, and of course dis-


tracting lights.
"Please turn out your lights,"
she said. "It's especially a prob-
lem in the business district.
Turning off your lights at the end
on a business day could save a
life and some energy, too."


Photos courtesy of SUSAN BASSETT


Bassett says goodbye to her miracle.


Feder al stimulus money tor gets 1 8- to 24-year-olds


Volunteer turtler witnesses




miracle in the morning



















No sweat finding fresh peas and beans


~ j:C;
A .:

; 0

I aiu a


Letter to the Editor


Thursday, June 25, 2009


A4 | The Times


Perhaps the heat will
have broken by the time
the paper goes to press,
but for me right now, it's all
about avoiding being hot


and butter beans. They
weren't cheap, but shelled
peas and beans never are.
The prices ranged from
$6.50 to $8 a quart. I got
$10 worth of white acres


Alabama after the Civil War.
My grandmother used to
tell me stories of growing
up on a farm in the early
part of the 20th century
- no electricity, no ice, no
refrigeration.
I was reminded of
her old-Florida tales as I
watched an elderly fellow
quietly shelling peas at
the market. I figured
most peas were shelled
by machine these days.
Then I got to thinking
about surviving the heat
and remaining productive.
It makes a great deal
of sense to find a task
that requires minimum
movement, may be
conducted in the shade
where a welcome breeze
might venture, and a cool
drink will be close at hand.
Despite those moments
of cool respite and big noon-
day dinners of just-picked
vegetables, back in Nana's
day preserving the harvest
meant having enough to
eat throughout the year.
Imagine billowing plumes
of steam as carefully saved
jars were sterilized in boiling
water. Vegetables, pickles,
relishes, jams and jellies
had to be handled in the
heat of summer when they
were harvested, not when it
was convenient. I imagine
those ladies also did a bit of


and sweaty.
Yup, I said
sweat. I know
Southern ladies are
said to merely glow
with a fine sheen
of perspiration. My
recent foray to the
Farmer's Market
in Tallahassee put
that myth firmly to
rest.
I had spent
Friday night in
Tallahassee with


with lots of snaps
(just the way I like
them). I looked for
tomatoes with a
few imperfections
because I wanted
to make sure they
were home-grown.
I loaded up with
green beans and
new potatoes. I
found some small
and tender okra.


The blueberries and
blackberries were huge,
but I resisted since my
berry jones has been sated
recently.
I could have stayed much
longer, but I started having
vision problems. The sweat
was literally streaming
into my eyes and down my
cheeks. The ends of my hair
were dripping. It took me
forever to select five ears of
corn, because I had to keep
stopping to wipe my face.
I may have grown up
without air-conditioning,
but that native gene for
withstanding heat has
evidently atrophied. My not-
so-long-ago ancestors lived
in south central Florida,
migrating there from


old, dear friends, Renn and
Gary Edenfield. We visited
the market in Timberlane
Square a little after eight
on Saturday morning. The
place was bustling, and
I was impressed. This
market has been around
for many years; now, they
even accept food stamps.
The produce is evenly
priced with each vendor
The search is not for price,
but rather quality.
We walked around,
perusing all of the offerings
before making our
purchases. I was on a quest
for fresh peas and found an
abundance white acres,
crowders, zippers, and
black-eyes; plus baby limas


PHOTO FROM THE FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPHIC COLLECTION
This photo, taken in 1939, shows Mrs. J.C. Waldron, of Aucilla, with preserves
in her pantry.


sweating.
The ongoing
conversation at my house
lately has been about how
controlling the temperature
of our immediate
environment has been
essential to the advance of
society.
I do know that once
I returned home to
wonderful refrigerated air,
I had plenty of energy to
cook. I boiled a ham bone
with my peas, and scraped
corn cobs. We ate so much
out of the pots during the


preparation process that
I doubt there is enough
for dinner tonight. Not a
problem. I will fry my okra,
make hoecake, and slice up
a tomato.
I won't be doing any
canning or preserving.
The IGA and the Piggly
Wiggly are just down the
street, so I believe I will
make it through winter. I
do, however, plan to gorge
on what is fresh right now.
I will be going to the local
market in Apalachicola
on Friday afternoons to


mingle with the folks who
grow vegetables and fruit
locally. I don't want food
flown in from Chile or Peru.
With our seafood and the
produce all around us, it's
the time to eat locally and
seasonally.
We don't even have to
sweat for it. How lucky is
that?
Denise Roux is a
regular columnist for
the Apalachicola and
Carrabelle Times. To reach
her, email her at rouxwhit@
mchsi.com.


the scientific research
examining the
consequences oflow-flow
conditions, primarily
caused by extended
drought in recent years,
has focused on the
Apalachicola River and
the estuary system of
Apalachicola Bay, the
Florida State researchers
instead examined the effect
of unusually low and high
flows over the wide western
Florida continental shelf.
A number of important
reef fish, such as grouper,
spawn on the outer shelf
edge and use the inner
shelf areas as nursery
habitat.
"This work shows that
variations in the river flow
can have implications on
marine ecosystems over a
much broader geographic
region, namely much of the
continental shelf extending
out several hundred miles,"
Morey said. "This now
suggests that there might
be a link between the river
flow variations and offshore
fisheries."
Morey, Dmitry
Dukhovskoy, also of
COAPS, and Mark
Bourassa, an associate
professor of meteorology


PHOTO COURTESY OF STEVE MORE
Authors of the Florida State University study are, from left, Steve Morey, Dmitry Dukhovskoy and Mark Bourassa.


at FSU, examined the
seasonal and year-to-
year variability of the
river flow caused by
changes in precipitation
over the watershed
encompassing much of
western Georgia and parts
of eastern Alabama and
the Florida Panhandle.
The researchers used
satellite ocean color data
and computer models
of ocean circulation to
identify a region extending
about 125 miles offshore
of Apalachicola Bay in
which the changes in ocean
color, which is indicative
of the abundance of
phytoplankton and other
organic material in the
water, is linked to changes
in the river flow.
The researchers
outlined their findings in
an article, "Connectivity
of the Apalachicola River
flow variability and the
physical and bio-optical


oceanic properties of the
northern West Florida
Shelf," published in the
journal Continental Shelf
Research.
The findings broaden
the environmental
considerations of
managed flow reductions
in the Apalachicola-
Chattahoochee-Flint
(ACF) river system.
The Apalachicola River,
the final leg of the river
system, has been the
focus of nearly 20-year
legal battle between
Florida, Georgia and
Alabama, known as the
'It~i-State Water War. At
the heart of the dispute is
Georgia's desire to divert
water from the ACF river
system to the burgeoning
population of the Atlanta
metropolitan area, and
Florida and Alabama's
contention that this flow
reduction could have
negative consequences


for the downstream river
environment.
The Apalachicola River
is considered a "hot spot"
of ecological biodiversity,
and Apalachicola Bay
supports extensive finfish
and shellfish communities
dependent on the regular
flow of freshwater from
the river. The river is
a source of nutrients
that can contribute
to the abundance of
phytoplankton, which
are consumed by small
zooplankton, thus feeding
the marine food web in
the region. The strongest
connection between the
river flow rate and the
offshore water properties
is seen during the late
winter and early spring
months, which coincide
with the spawning period
of several reef fish species.
"It is possible that if the
natural flow of the river is
reduced by water being


diverted to reservoirs
upstream, it could reduce
the natural nutrient supply
to the local food web,"
Morey said. "That could
potentially result in a
reduction offood available
for larger plankton, like fish
larvae."
The study sheds
some light on potential
effects of climate change
scenarios altering
precipitation patterns over
the southeastern United
States, Morey said, but
further study is needed to
determine if the proposed
man-made flow reductions
at the center of the water
wars will have a significant
impact on the offshore
marine systems, especially
during abnormally dry
years.

Jill Elish is a writer
for the News and Public
Afcairs Ofice ofthe Florida
State University.


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
APALACHICOLA, FL 32329
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SU BSC RIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$230 Ter OF C1 UiN mnths
$33 year $20 six months


beyond any procedural protocol. In
this age of impersonalized medicine,
it is medicinal in and of itself to
he taken care of by people who
know you as a whole person and a
member of their community.
If you or your loved ones
have had a similar experience


to mine, please let your county
commissioners know. We cannot
afford to lose this brand new facility
and the exceptional people who
work there.
Thank you,
Melonje |-Ubl~e
Carrabelle


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Health department in
Carrabelle exceptional
I would like to thank the staff of
the Carrabelle branch of the health
department for their care. They
have treated me and my family with
a compassion that goes above and


O~in *


l~4 a

.4
RED WHITE
ANIDROUX
Denise! Rollx


Troubled waters: Low river flow hurts Gulf fishery


By Jill Elish

Reductions in the
flow of the Apalachicola
River have far-reaching
effects that could prove
detrimental to grouper and
other reef fish populations
in the northeastern Gulf of
Mexico, according to a new
Florida State University
study that might provide
new ammunition for states
engaged in a nearly two-
decade water war.
The Florida State
researchers found that
in years with low river
flow, the concentration
of phytoplankton the
microscopic plant-like
organisms that feed
into the food chain
- decreased over a large
area of the continental
shelf. This is significant
because scientists have
hypothesized that year-
to-year changes in the
phytoplankton can alter
the availability of food for
the very young fish larvae,
according to research
scientist Steven Morey
of the Center for Ocean-
Atmospheric Prediction
Studies (COAPS) at Florida
State.
Although much of


.41 palac-h ic ola
Cll'a rrabelle


THE TIE

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors

















































































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Thursday, June 25, 2009


Local


The Times | AS


"We saw the need," he
said. "The need's still there
but not the money."
Commissioner Cheryl
Sanders pressed Tice on
what it would take to avoid
closing the clinic. At pres-
ent, Dana Whaley, an ad-
vanced registered nurse
fporactilt oer, s~eeeskpatints
rabelle, while pediatrician
Dr. Michael Wilder sees
them one day a week and
volunteer gynecologist Dr.
Ivan Backerman on an
as-needed basis.
"Tell us what it's going
to take to keep that clinic
open," said Sanders. "I
want to see numbers be-
cause I believe Carrabelle
is paying its own way."
Tice said $150,000 is
needed to cover the clinic's
expenses for one year, and
stressed that the finan-
cial picture is larger than
just the situation at the
Carrabelle clinic.
"It's not Carrabelle. It's
the whole health depart-
ment," he said. "You can't
single out Carrabelle as
self sufficient. You have to
look at the entire health
department as one pie.
And when you look at that
as a whole, that's when
you see the entire funding
picture."
Tice noted the depart-
ment is mandated by law to
keep 8 percent of its entire
budget in reserve in trust
fund. "When you're operat-
ing below that threshold,
that's not good," he said.
"We're teetering on the
brink of 6 percent."
Sanders stressed that
Weems East being located
in the city complex is a
temporary situation. "The
majority of the people that
use Carrabelle clinic can't
get to Apalachicola," she
said.
Clerk of Courts Marcia
Johnson said that she un-
derstood numbers were
down in Carrabelle. "Nor-


yet have a cost estimate for
the facility. "After we get
the site at the height level
we want it, then we'll get
an artist's rendering," he
said, noting that he expect-
ed groundbreaking within
the next 60 days.
Mark Friedman, amem-
b of their hemse hoeiad

that although sales tax rev-
enue is down because of
the recession, there will be
enough funds to complete
construction of the new
facility, on land adjacent to
the Carrabelle annex of the
health department.
"One thing we have to
go back to is we promised
there would be an urgent
care facility in Carrabelle,"
he said. "We have made a
commitment to build an
urgent care facility and
my personal opinion is
that there's no way we
could now add on to that
building.
"We could use it as cost-
saving measure, but could
not use it to be the solo fa-
cility," Friedman said. "We
promised more and they
need more. There's no ra-
diology or lab in that build-
ing, and not enough exam
rooms."
Colvert said the Weems
East doctor's practice is
doing well at the Carra-
belle municipal complex.
"We started with three-
and-one-half days open
with Dr. Chorba and the
demand was so great we
have added another day,"
he said.
Dr. Todd West now
goes on Thursdays, while
Dr. Nancy Chorba goes in
on Monday, Fridays, and
a half-day Wednesday. "It's
just like any other physi-
cian's office," said Colvert,
noting that sees private in-
surance patients, Medicare
and Medicaid patients and


See GUIIC A6


tO keep the




Wesley Tice
Health Department
mally health departments
are not doing primary
health care," she said. "We
should put Weems in the
health department build-
ing and save the money for
the new building."

Weems on track with
HOW construction
In an interview Monday,
Weems Memorial Hospital
CEO Chuck Colvert said
the hospital board would
consider any proposals
presented it by the county
commission regarding
facility use in Carrabelle.
"We have a plan and
we're moving forward," he
said. "But we would cer-
tainly look at that. I think
if the county commission
came to us and said the
health department has giv-
en us the building, I think
our board would work with
the county commission and
look at it."
Colvert said architects
Clemons-Rutherford, who
have done a lot of work for
Tallahassee Memorial Hos-
pital as well as designed
the new consolidated
school, drew up three plans
for the new Carrabelle fa-
cility. The hospital board
has selected the interior
design it preferred for a
5,500-square-foot facility.
Engineers are now
working on doing soil com-
paction studies, Colvert
said, and some preliminary
work has begun. "We've
cleared trees out of there
and put in fill dirt and done
some site work," he said.
Colvert said he does not


SCHOOLS from page Al

free and reduced lunch, just 7 percent-
age points below the 65 percent at the
consolidated school.

More and more stu ents
meeting liigli stanslads
With 477 points, the consolidated

h, buark~s sa Intthe distsiet ad gna
plans to lodge an appeal.
"I don't see the point in us doing all
that," she said, adding that "next year
when we're really close to that A, then
I will challenge it."
With 63 percent meeting high stan-
dards in reading, 68 percent in math,
and 76 percent in writing, the district's
results were the best in each of these
three main categories since 2003, when
the roots of consolidation began. Stu-
dents meet high standards when they
score at least 3,4 or 5 on the FCAT test,
meaning they are performing at grade
level or better.
The ABC School's percentage meet-
ing high standards in these three sub-
jects paced the district, with no fewer
than three-fourths of its students
achieving that distinction in each
subject area.
In science, the ABC School had 58
percent of its students meeting high
standards, 25 percentage points better
than last year. "Last year our sciences
scores were poor," he said. "This year
we've made gains."
At the consolidated school, 35 per-
cent of the students met high standards
in science, 11 percentage points bet-
ter than last year, but below the 2006-
07 results, when 44 percent met high
standards in science.
Better than three-fourths of the
consolidated school students met
high standards in writing, as strong a
showing as at any time since 2002.
In math, 64 percent of the students
met high standards in math, and
59 percent in math, both best-ever
results since 2001.

ABC School does well
with lann an
A big part of the point totals comes
when students make learning gains in
reading and math. At the ABC School,
better than 71 percent of students did
so in each subject, while at the con-
solidated school, 58 percent made


reading gains and 66 percent made
gains in math. All of these percentages
were among the best results for these
categories in the last eight years.
The school grades also award points
for learning gains made by students
who have performed in the lowest
quarter of those tested. At the ABC
Stcu ool, hett~er tehanh7 perry nt of hlesde
ing a huge 29 percentage point leap
in regards to reading by these lower
performing students.
At the consolidated school, 57 per-
cent of these lower performing stu-
dents made gains in reading, 10 points
better than last year. But only 61 per-
cent of these students made gains in
math, 7 percentage points worse than
the consolidated school's showing last
year.
Hungerford said that ABC School
teachers will soon meet to determine
how they plan to divvy up amongst
themselves and other staffers
$100 per student in bonus money, or
about $30,000, for having earned an A.
This week the ABC School complet-
ed its move to the campus of the former
Chapman Elementary School.
"We are hoping to move the
classrooms in about a month," he said.
Hungerford said the 2009-10 staff
is complete, with the exception of a
kindergartner teacher.
He said next year, when the school
becomes a Title I school and there is
a change in how the school handles its
finances, it should be in slightly better
financial shape than it was this year,
when several teacher assistants had to
be laid off midyear.
"A number will come back, but it will
be less than we were when we were
fully funded," he said.
He said he has laid down a challenge
to the faculty to shoot for two consecu-
tive years as an A school, something it
has yet to do because of the difficulty
in sustaining large strides in learning
gains in consecutive years.
"We've never done that, it's more
difficult," he said. "It's a toughie."
Marks said the district plans to
complete nearly all of its staffing at
this week's special meeting, Thursday
June 25 at 6 p.m. at the Willie Speed
board room in Eastpoint.
"We've rewritten job descriptions
for the deans," she said. "The goal is to
get everything done before July 1."


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Thursday, June 25, 2009


A6 | The Times


Local


IIFE~


employment rate hasn't been in the 8 percent range
since early 1998," said Kim Bodine, executive direc-
tor for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. "We do see
signs of improvement, and we are faring better than
the nation, and the state; even better than most parts
of Florida."
Franklin's jobless rate continued its pattern of be-
ing 2.5 percentage points worse than one year ago,
before the start of the current recession. In May
2008, the county had 191 people out of work from a
similar sized workforce, for a 3.9 jobless rate.
Bodine said that throughout the Gulf Coast region,
job declines over the past year have now spread to
most of the major industries including mining log-
ging and construction, down 18.3 percent; manu-
facturing, down 16.2 percent; trade, transportation,
and utilities, down 4.8 percent; retail trade, down 5.6
percent; transportation, warehousing and utilities,
down 7.7 percent; financial activities, down 5.6 per-
cent; professional and business services down 8.4
percent; and education and health services, down 1.3
percent.
The only regional industry sectors that have not
declined are wholesale trade and information, both
with flat job growth rates; leisure and hospitality, up
1.6 percent; and government, up 1.4 percent, due to
additional federal jobs.
To assist local unemployed residents, the work-
force board is administering $1.7 million in federal
stimulus funding for local workforce programs. "The
board has contracted funds with Gulf Coast Com-
munity College and the Workforce Center to provide
intensive services to those looking for jobs includ-
ing training, and we have seen good results," said
Bodine. "We have at least 100 folks in the pipeline for
training and employment placement right now, and
more are signing up every day."
Individuals interested in assistance should con-
tact Michelle Weiss at the Workforce Center, 850-872-
4340 ext. 145.







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CARRASELLE LIGHTHOUSE ASSOCIATION
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Donnie Duce, spokes-
man for the Florida De-
partment of transportationn
(FDOT) said if a 30-foot tall
structure were to be built at
the fence line 800 feet from
the end of the existing run-
way, it would shorten the
usable length of runway 13
by 500 feet.
He said that the protec-
tion zone will become even
more important when,
in the future, the airport
implements precision ap-
proach landing procedures.
Currently, planes landing
at the airport make a vi-
sual approach but an in-
strument-based approach
system, or precision ap-
proach, is featured in the
airport's comprehensive
development plans.
"You have to think about
what's down the road," he
said. "You have to protect
your facility for future de-
velopment. Many pilots
will not land without instru-
ments and for larger planes
they are a necessity."
Opponents say most of
the land is not suitable for
development because it is
wetland, and take issue with
the appraised value.
Garlick, an expert on
wetlands delineation, said
he has investigated the site
scientifically and contends
that while some of the soils
in the area are wetland
soils, others are not.
"If you review the Frank-
lin County Natural Resoure-
es Conservation (NRCS)
Service Atlas it does map


the subject area as hydric
(wetland), according to the
U.S. Hydric Soils Index.
However, the soils are only
an indicator and do not
characterize or identify the
subject site as wetlands,"
he wrote in an e-mail. "The
criteria for identifying wet-
lands involve an association
of wetland soils, water lov-
ing plants and hydrology.
The criteria are identified
by state and federal rule. In
this case, Franklin County
relies on the state rule."
Under state rule, Gar-
lick said, much of the area
does not qualify as wetland
because the plants vegetat-
ing much of the area saw
palmetto, sand hill blue-
berry and smooth gallberry
among others do not
qualify as wetland plants.
He said several of the lots
are buildable, and a lot adja-
cent to the contested prop-
erty recently sold for $18,000
with a residence now under
construction there.

Jackel believeS

alppraised value
t00 hi h
A vocal critic of the
land purchase, Jackel said
the initial asking price of
$10,000 per acre, and the
counteroffer of $9,000 an
acre, which was below the
lowestappraisal, were both
too high.
"The day that (Property
Appraiser) Doris Pendleton
came into the meeting and


announced that property
values across the county
had dropped 30 percent
across-the-board, it made
an indelible impression on
me," Jackel said. "'Twenty
minutes later, we hear that
the airport land was ap-
praised at $9,800 year ago.
I would say 30 percent less
than that is fair. You do the
math, $6,800 an acre.
"I am not opposed to
protecting the runway. My
hang-up has always been
the price," she said. "With
Dan Garlick having now
been transferred into the
mix of owners, I think that
some of the things that have
happened around this air-
port property are unusual."
The land has undergone
two appraisals by the same
company, Bell, Griffith and
Associates, Inc. of Tallahas-
see, and a review. Duce said
this is normal procedure for
appraisals ordered for his
department or the FAA.
The first appraisal took
place in April 2008 and the
second was released in
March 2009 after the first
appraisal was reviewed by
Ketchum and Associates.
In 2008, Bell Griffith set the
range of value after adjust-
ment at $9,415 to $14,999
per acre. The more recent
range of values went from
$9,038 to $12,749 per acre, a
reduction of 15 percent on
the high end but a reduc-
tion of only 4 percent on the
low end.
Garlick, whose company
is housed in a building at


the airport, said he bought
the land for $9,000 an acre
because he feared the for-
mer owners would walk
away from the deal. He said
he plans to offer the land
to the commission at the
same price he paid.
On July 1, at the end of
the state's fiscal year, the
county will forfeit $10,500
in state matching funds
when the joint participation
agreement between the
county and the state runs
out.
Since the commission's
next meeting is July 7, it
seems certain that the state
money will be lost.
Duce said the money
rolls back into the state
general fund and may or
may not be reallocated to
FDOT. He said if the money
was returned, his depart-
ment would try re allocating
it back to the Apalachicola
airport project, but noted
the FDOT is struggling
with budget cuts.
A grant to build a com-
mercial paint hanger at
the airport was reduced by
$150,000 earlier this month.
County Planner Alan Pierce
said that, if the work had al-
ready been under contract
the state could not have
withdrawn the funds.
If the state funds are lost
or the reallocation comes
too late to provide the coun-
ty with the required 10 per-
cent in matching funds, the
county will have to raise the
$10,500 in order to receive
the FAA award.


CLINIC frm page AS

uninsured patients, although there is
no sliding scale.
Tice said the health department's
Carrabelle clinic will not close July 1,
but the matter remains on the table,
with a possible reduction in service
hours also under consideration.
"Right now it's left up in the air.
No decision's been made," he said.
"We're looking at streamlining, ef-
ficiency, and generating more ad-
ditional revenue, and consolidating
human resources.
"We need to be fiscally respon-


sible and at some point in times it's
going to come up and I can wait until
September. Everybody's been los-
ing funding or has lost funding," he
said.
"Right now we're still open and
maybe there's something that will
happen that can keeps us open," he
said. "I don't want to close it. I ex-
panded services because I recog-
nized there was a need ,. That was
three years ago and so I don't want
to take a step back, but that's the way
it is.


"Ijust wanted them to be aware of
what the situation is, so when they go
into budget discussions they may look
more favorably on us," Tice said.
He stressed that even if the clinic
is forced to shut its doors, "there's
still going be a public heath piece
there."
Tice cited an outreach to curb
sexually transmitted diseases, family
planning, immunizations, and pre-
natal care are just come of the core
public health programs he would
expect to continue at the annex.


?Jtlei ~e~tLe~z~!


TUESDAY, JULY 14
11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

THURSDAY, JULY 16
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.


Coastal Grill


JOBLESS from paae Al


AIRPORT from page Al


-


SAd funded by Franklin countyy Tourist Development (ouncil I















ThurdayJune25, 009w ww. apalach times com Pg




Junior r ecor ds f all at Big Bend Saltwater Classic


_____~ __


BAY POIN\TT

I N V ITlATrI ONA L

26thld-se/8m,,i~,: Po~int Javitatll~ione~~~~~d~ B llflSunmCen


BETTY SASNETT|ISpecial to the Times
Awesome AII-Stars
The Franklin County AA All Star team has closed out its memorable 2009 season
and wants to thank all the parents and supporters who came out to cheer them
on. They want to extend a big Thank You to the coaches and a special thank you
to Mrs. Ava Amison for a splashing good time at their All-Star party. Coaches in
back row, from left, are Eddie Moses, Ottice Amison, Greg Sasnett, Brian Kent and,
not pictured, TJ Pendleton. Middle row, from left, are All Stars Jacob Pendleton,
Christian Amison, Bryce Kent, Tonner Segree, Lucas Sasnett, Christopher Newell,
and Tyrell Green. Front row, from left, are All Stars Elan Blitch, Micah McLeod,
Ethan Riley, Ethan Moses and Matthew Gay.





@( H I9 L
STATE BANK*1897l
A Division of Coastal Comrmunity Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint ISt. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 1200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


11111111111111111111


A Mexico Beach charter
boat captain led the Masters
Division at this year's 21st
annual Bug Bend Saltwater
Classic, headquartered once
again at the Carrabelle Boat
Club.
Team Ventafish out
of Tallahassee led the
recreational team division
with 461 points.
Captain Chuck Guilford
and Team Koldtogo won
the Master's Division this
year with 238 points. A
fourth generation charter
boat captain from Mexico
Beach who pilots the
Charisma, Guilford fished
the tournament on the
Arrowhead, aboathbelonging
to teammate Langdon
Flowers, of Flower's
Bakery.
This year's tournament
produced many new
records, especially in the
juniors division. Macey
Musgrove's 3.85-pound
flounder set a new high
mark for the juniors. Junior
angler Judson Upshaw set a
record with his 23.25-pound
grouper.
Caleb Bickerstaff's first
place king mackerel set
a junior's record at 28.15
pounds. This is Bickerstaff's
second big year in the
tourney. Last year he took
first place in the black sea
bass category and fifth place
for grouper. Wtenton Fewox
set a new junior's record
with a 6.6-pound Spanish
mackerel. Last year he
took second place for a 1.25-
pound whiting.
Ben Munroe broke his
own recreational division
record from last year with


his 7.5-pound sheephead.
This year he also won the
jackpot money. Last year
he was not entered in the
jackpot. Clay Cantley set
a tournament record for
flounder in the recreational
division with his 6.15-pound
catch.
Steve Petty won the
$1,000 Big Ass Fish prize,
sponsored by Skybox
Liquors, for his 66.35-pound
wahoo. This year for the
first time, SeaTow offered
an additional $1,000 for the
biggest fish if the angler
subscribed to SeaTow's
emergency service. Since
Petty did not, the prize rolls
over and, if next year's Big
Ass Fish winner is a SeaTow
customer, he or she will win
an additional $2,000.
John Buckner, of
Tallahassee, was this year's
Bob Deaton Memorial
'Itophy winner, awarded
each year to the angler who
scores the most individual
points.
Once again this year
Century boats provided a
boat as a door prize anglers
entered in the Saltwater
Classic. The 1801 center
console Yamaha with a 115-
horsepower motor and a
Magic Tilt trailer went to
Alan Whitfield, of Macon'
GA.
The Saltwater Classic has
become family tradition for
many fishermen and several
families fished as teams
this year. The Vatter family
had three generations on
the water: Grandpa Dave
of Wakulla Station fished
with son John and grandson
'Itavis of Crawfordville.


LOIS 5WOBODA | The Times
As part of their "take a soldier fishing program," Company
Commander Scott Barry of Tallahassee fished with the Freedom Boat
Club this year. Barry, who is a reservist, said he has helped Gerald
Floyd, the program's founder, arrange for other soldiers to fish but
this is his first visit to the tournament.


Redfish
1) CuatroAmigos 6. 15 2)
Bluewater Bandit 6.05 and 3)
Ebci Fishing Team 4.35

Spanish or Cero Mackerel
1) Cuatro Amigos 3.80 2-
tie) Carrabelle Marine and
Team Young Gunz 3.50, 4)
Team Ventafish 3.05 and 5-tie)
R.E. Bass Construction Inc and
Barnacle Bill's 1.20


Spotted Sea Trout
1) Barnacle Bill's 2.65 2) R.E.
Bass Construction Inc 2.35 and
3) Cuatro Amigos 2.25 and
4-tie) Carrabelle Marine and
Bluewater Bandit 1.75

Wahoo
1) Barnacle Bill's 20.00 2)
R.E. Bass Construction Inc 17.45
3) Bluewater Bandit 14.90 and
4) Team Ventafish 14.55


Barnacle Bill's 9.70

The Hope family of
Crawfordville also brought
three generations to
Carrabelle: Daughter
Brittany, who took fourth
place for black sea bass,
fished with her mom and


dad, Leslie and Joe, and her
grandfathers, Dale Hope of
Crawfordville, and Wayne
Branlau, who traveled down
from South Carolina for the
contest.
Proceeds from the


Saltwater Classic benefit
OAR, the Organization
for Artificial Reefs, Inc. a
private, 501(c) (3) nonprofit
group of marine enthusiasts
and artificial reef advocates
based in Tallahassee.


Founded in 1985, OAR
serves the recreational
saltwater fishing industry
of Florida's Big Bend Gulf
Coast by promoting the
professional development of
public artificial reefs.


The 40/40 Shootout is a "Tournamnent Within a
Tournament" featuring 40 boats, 40 feet or less
in length, fishing for tuna, wahoo and dolphin.
Participants may attend all Billfish Invitational


Tournament events and parties
and may depart with the fleet
on T hursd ay evening or F rid ay
morning, but the 40/40 has a
separate registration, entry fee,
optional categories, weigh-in
and awards.


40/40 has
a separate
registration,
entry fee,
optional
categories
and awards.


Want to be a sponsor?
Sponsorship opportunities are still available.
For more information, please contact
Chris Mliller at 850-233-1633
or chris@baypointbillfish.com


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A
Section


Recreation Team Challenge
Leaderboard
Points Leaders
1) Tam Ventafish 461 2)
Bluewater Bandit 393 3)
Carrabelle Marine 386 4)
Barnacle Bill's 377 and 5)
Cuatro Amigos 375

Amberjack
1) Iron Dukes 29.20 2) Team
Ventafish 23.15 and 3) R.E.
Bass Construction Inc 20.30

Dol hin
1) Iron Dukes 40. 15 and 2)
Carrabelle Marine 17.30

Flounder
Cuatro Amigos 5.95

Grouper
1) Bluewater Bandit 28.65
2) Iron Dukes 19.65 3)
Team Ventafish 19.30 and 4)
Carrabelle Marine 16.60

King Mackerel
1) Team Ventafish 25.90 2)
Sids Pub 24.65 3)Barnacle Bill's
19.45 4) R.E. Bass Construction
Inc. 1 8.55 and 5) Ebci Fishing
Team 17.45

Man rove or Red sna ~er
1) Carrabelle Marine and 5)


~F~sr,


C ?BAYIION




































































































































Cash ~bY~Reads lga1000j

We Want Your Information, Not Your Name

Big Bend Crime Stoppers
Working to Keep Our Communities Safe
Report Drug Dealers, Gangs, Guns, Violent Criminals, Sex Offenders and Wanted Fugitives


Dear Fien~cis:

.-*Th~anit yOtI for allowIIIC n e! to represents youI In the! Floricia Houlse of Repre~s~entatlve~s.

I am humbled by the responsibility you have given me to serve as your representative in our state capital.
What happens in the Florida Legislature has serious implications to our daily lives and those of our children
and grandchildren. I take this responsibility very seriously as your State Representative.

The 2009 Legislative Session was in a word challenging. The fragile nature of our economy and the shortfalls
in our state revenue have made providing for the needs of our communities difficult. And, frankly, the Legislature
missed some opportunities to reprioritize our spending and run a more responsible, accessible and accountable
state government.


Thursday, June 25, 2009


Richardson


0000Un(65




FOrrner rep to run
fO F Orida Senate
On May 22, former state
Rep. Curtis Richardson offi-
cially announced his candi-
dacy for the Florida Senate,
District 6,
seeking the
seat being
vacated by
long-term
legislator
Al Lawson.
After
28 years of (URTIS
public ser- RKCHARDSONI
vice, Law-
son must leave the Legisla-
ture because of term limits.
District 6 encompasses all
or parts of 11 counties from
Madison to Bay.
"Senator Lawson has
been a superb legislator
and has done an outstand-
ing job representing the
citizens of North Florida.
His absence will leave a
tremendous void in our lo-
cal delegation," Richardson
said.
Richardson said that
because of his experience
and proven leadership, he
will be able to immediately
fill that void. He said he will
use his almost 20 years in
public service to provide
the exemplary level of rep-
resentation citizens have
come to expect.
"I'd like to return to the
Legislature to continue to
be a voice for all Floridians
and shape public policy to
make Florida a great state
for all of its citizens," Rich-
ardson said. "I will continue
to fight for children and
families, advocate for public
education, look out for the
interests of our rural com-
mumities and be a champi-
on for state employees, the
elderly and the disabled."
Richardson's experi-
ence includes work as a
scah ol psyc olo ist in the
and service as an aide to
former Commissioner of
Education Betty Castor and
the late Gov. Lawton Chil-
es. For the past 10 years,
he has been a consultant
for the University of South
Florida's Shared Services
Network Project.
Richardson was first
elected to public office in
1990 as a member of the
Leon County School Board.
He served on the school
board for six years, two as
chairman.
In 2000, he was elected to
the Florida House of Rep-
resentatives, representing
District 8, and served for
eight years, until he had
to leave in 2008 because of
term limits. As a legisla-
tor, he served on a wide
variety of committees and
was a champion for public
education, an advocate of
quality affordable health
cre,hia staunch d feder
and a strong voice for state
employees. He was widely
recognized for his legisla-
tive leadership and accom-
plishments.
Richardson is a 35-year
resident of Tallahassee
with an extensive history of
community service. He is
married to Judge Nina Ash-
enafi Richardson, and they
have two daughters, Ca-
rina, 8, a student at Florida
High, and Aida, 3, who at-
tends Creative Preschool in
Tallahassee. They are long-
time, active members of
Bethel AME Church, where
Richardson is an usher and
trustee.


Local


With summer at hand,
the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) reminds
Franklin County beachgo-
ers to be mindful of nest-
ing birds. The eggs and
chicks of nesting birds are
delicate and susceptible to
harm from disturbances
that cause adults to fly off
the nests.
"Just approaching a
bird is enough to flush it
away from its nest," said
Ricardo Zambrano, an
FWC biologist. "When
birds fly off their eggs,
it exposes the chicks to
predators."
Injuries to unprotected
eggs or chicks can hap-
pen quickly, either from
predators or even from the
intense heat of direct sun-
light. Sun worshipers can
help protect the birds by
moving parties, picnics or
fireworks away from nest-
ing areas.
This time of year, a vari-
ety of protected birds nest
on Florida's beaches, in-


cluding terns, black skim-
mers, snowy plovers and
Wilson's plovers.
The FWC and other
agencies posted signs ear-
lier this year around many
nesting areas on Florida's
beaches. These closed
areas protect nesting
birds from unnecessary
disturbances and prevent
humans from stepping on
their nests. All of these
species nest in the open
and lay well-camouflaged
eggs directly on the sand,
making them nearly invis-
ible to predators and to the
untrained human eye.
"We need the public's
help in protecting these
spectacular birds while
enjoying the beach,"
Zambrano said. "Beach-
nesting birds are part of
Florida's unique natural
heritage."
For more information
on nesting shorebirds,
go to www.MyFWC.com/
CONSERVATION/Conser
vationYou_Living_w_Wild
life shorebirds.htm.


COURTESY OF FWC


A snowy plover on the nest.


While the session provided its share of challenges, it also provided some opportunities. For instance, I was
proud to sponsor successfulI legislation that:

Protects our agricu tural comm un ty from the threat of plant pests and disease.
Provides ou r small and f iscally constrained cou nties with significant tax relief .
Revises confidentiality laws for clinical psychologists to better protect the public interest.

Additionally, I am pleased that the Legislature restored $21 million in library funding that is critical to our small
counties, as well with the further development of a $20 million ethanol research project and facility in our district
that is expected to create 250 jobs.

I introduced a num ber of key amendments that improved other bills du ring the legislative process. I also weighed
in on many important issues through questions and debate on the floor of the House of Representatives.

It is very important to me that my fellow legislators have the opportunity to know and understand our issues and
values in District 1 0 so they can better understand our rural attitudes. I made it clear that I supported few, if any,
new fees or taxes for my constituency.

I want to hear your concerns and share information and ideas. Please call or stop by our legislative offices in
Madison, Chiefland or Tallahassee.



Representative Bembry's Initiatives:

/ Protect the interests of small and rural counties, provide them tax relief and protect them frmmunfunded state mandates
/ Publish state spending and budget information on the intemet for all to see
/ Create jobs by maintaining $20 million in funding for ethanol research here in our district
/ Stop a premature rule making process that would force residents to buy new and more expensive septic tanks
/ Streamline the permitting process so we can compete with Georgia to provide jobs
/ Legislature restored $21 million in funding for our libraries throughout our district
/ To maintain proper funding for our local law enforcement, fire rescue and Department of Corrections employees
/ Protect state workers from pay cuts in the budget process
/ Allow our school systems the flexibility they need to make it through these tough economic times
/ Protect our farming and agricultural interests from unnecessary permitting and development intrusion
/ Provided our small counties with significant tax relief in the imp~lemnentation of Amendment #4
/ Continue to protect our small county govemmnent structure

For a detailed summary of the 2009 Legislative Session and to read the full state budget log on to:
www.myfloridahouseagov


A8 | The Times


FWC: Steer clear of nesting beach birds












Thursday, June 25, 2009 ww w. apala cht i mes. co0m Page l


B
Section


LEFT: In the show's opening number, performed
by the "Hot Flashes," the shoulder strap on
Pam Nobles' leotard snapped midway through,
prompting a hilarious moment. Nobles breaks
out laughing as her mom, June Gray, lends a
hand. MIDDLE: Focusing on her next move in "This
Old Flag" is Cecillia James. RIGHT: From left,
Whitney Vause, Annalyse Wharrie and Parrish
Johnson strut in a tribute to famed Broadway
choreographer Bob Fosse.


Recital celebrates


heart's emotion

The beauty of love dominated the Franklin
Studios presented its 27th annual recital.
Entitled "The Gift of Love," the production focused
on the many facets of love, whether it be love of God,
love between a man and a woman, love of parent to
child, love of friends, love of life and love of country.
"We live in a world that sometimes feels like it is
spiraling downward when you hear the news on TV
about the horrible things going on around us," wrote
Nobles in her welcome. "If people would just focus on
loving each other more, our world would be a much
better place."
Highlighting the evening recital was a senior solo
by Parrish Johnson, who has studied dance for 13
years. Johnson also received a scholarship from the
studios at the high school graduation.
Also receiving awards for their commitment and
dedication were Haley Mathes (11 years), Whitney
Vause (12), Linda Griffin and Sara Ward (14), Linda
Maloy (20), Rita Theis (22) and June Gray and
Debby Ruffner (23).
Registration for next year's dance season is
Aug. 18 and 25, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Apalachicola
studio.

Taking part in "A Mother and a Father's
Prayer" are, from left, Brooke Moore, Mallorie
Shiver, Chelsea Register, and Amber Henning.


Helping to perform "This Old Flag" is 2nd Lt. Derek
Brown, a 2005 Apalachicola High School graduate
who just a weekend earlier graduated from West Point.
Flanking him are Katie Maxwell, left, and Sara Waird.


P romnt J d n "W e to m Al s ut n e yar ERl b r e m n, L~ex c Ho lnd,dK ista Kelley,u K lahn


LIFE


TI~ES










Weddingfs


Heather Fashenner, Corey Maxwell to marry
The parents and grandparents of Heather Fasben-
ner are proud to announce her upcoming marriage to
Corey Maxwell.
Corey is the son of Ronnie Maxwell and Cindy Wef-
ing, and grandson of Margaret and the late Corky Rich-
ards, all of Apalachicola. Heather is the granddaughter
of Wayne and Carolyn Butler, of Apalachicola.
The wedding will take place at Lafayette Park on
Saturday, July 18, 2009 at 6 p.m. in Apalachicola. Re-
ception will follow afterwards at the Eastpoint Fire
House.
All family and friends are invited.


~PET OWF TEH E


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Calll Lois at (850) 653-5857


Thursday, June 25, 2009


B2 | The Times


Society


By Despina Williams
Florida Freedom Newspapers
Carrabelle artist Leon
Wiesener is a thoughtful
sort, so it's not surprising
that his new art gallery
would be a bit high con-
cept.
Located at 409 Talla-
hassee Street in Carra-
belle, Perpenders Gallery,
which Wiesener founded
with wife, Frances, does
not peddle "regional art."
It doesn't sell mermaid
portraits, dolphin oil paint-
ings or things made out of
seashells.
"No more seagulls, no
more pelicans," said Wi-
esener with a chuckle.
Wiesener has opted for
a fine art approach, includ-
ing works from his per-
sonal collection of draw-
ings and lithographs by
Picasso, Matisse, Chagall
and other masters in the
gallery's two exhibition
rooms.
Wiesener has installed
motion sensors on all win-
dows and doors to protect
the pieces, which range in
price from $100 to $1,500.
Though he and Frances
have enjoyed the artwork
for many years, they're
ready to let the pieces go,
particularly since their
children have no interest
in inheriting them.
"Our children told us to
get rid of it before we die,"
laughed Frances.
Wiesener hopes interior
decorators designing mil-
lion dollar homes will visit
the gallery to "match the
quality of artwork to the
home."
The high profile work
will share gallery space
with the best of the area's
artistic talent Tallahas-
see photographer Ed Bab-
cock, Crawfordville jewel-
er Mary Reynolds, Carra-


GALLERY
OPEN
Perpenders
Gallery, located at
409 Tallahassee
Street in Carrabelle,
will host a grand
opening ceremony
on Friday, July 3 at
10 a.m.

belle watercolorist Joseph
Kotzman and Wiesener
himself.
An award-winning pas-
tel artist, Wiesener will ex-
hibit some of his drawings,
along with playful mixed
media creations he calls
"travel boxes."
The large boxes, which
are six inches deep, com-
bine pastel drawings with
other images depicting
places he's traveled.
The works showcase
Wiesener's offbeat sense
of humor.
"Dog Island vs. Hand
Island" offers a compari-
son of pests found in both
locations, including yellow
flies, mosquitoes and "no-
see-ums."
Another work is entitled
"Where the Giant Squir-
rels Live." (The answer:
Iowa.)
The gallery will also
showcase Wiesener's
handcrafted "nasty boxes,"
take-offs of Appalachian
children's toys that bite.
Gallery visitors should
handle Nasty Duck and
Nasty Scotty, a silver-
toothed dog, with care.
Perpenders will exhibit
25 to 30 pieces at a time,
with artwork rotated every
two to three weeks.
The Wieseners have
been diligently sprucing up
the gallery, housed inside a
charming old home, for the
July 3 open house.


Perpenders Gallery, founded by enadFacs
Wiesener, is located at 409 Talaseetrtin
Carrabelle.


In addition to works by Picasso and other masters,
the gallery will feature the work of local talents like
Carrabelle watercolorist Joseph Kotzman.


"We've had a lot of three
T-shirt days," said Frances
of the sweltering summer
heat.
Wiesener studied un-
der German Expressionist
Karl Zerby at Florida State
University and was an as-
sociate professor of art at
the University of Tennes-
see for a decade.
In naming the gallery
"Perpenders," Wiesener
chose a word that means
people who ponder a so-
lution diligently, which
speaks to his passionate
commitment to his craft.


"Perpend means to pon-
der. As a verb it's an act,
an intellectual act, and as
a noun, it's someone who
participates in that act,"
said Wiesener, who hopes
the gallery's visitors will
become perpenders as
well.
"Whoever comes here
is going to be put in the
situation of trying to pon-
der the difference of what
other galleries are offering
and what we're offering.
"Whether it's their
taste, we don't know. But at
least it's an alternative."


Crystal Taylor, Doug Sloan marry
Crystal Taylor and Doug Sloan were united in mar-
riage on Wednesday, June 17, 2009 at 6 p.m. at Lafayette
Park in Apalachicola.
The Rev. Ricky Jones, of the First Pentecostal Holi-
ness Church, in Apalachicola performed the ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of Carla and Buddy Page,
of Apalachicola.
The groom is the son of Clara Brigham, of Arkansas.


Kittens, kitten and more kittenS
If you are looking for a cute, cuddly, sweet,
affectionate companion who doesn't care what you
look like in the morning, come visit us at the Humane
Society and adopt a kitten. We have all sizes and
colors and we will reduce our adoption fee. We also
have some wonderful adult cats.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more details or visit
the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State
Route 65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the website
at www~forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable
pets
Remember, when you adopt a friend for life, you
not only save the life of that pet, you make room for
us to save the life of one more abandoned dog or cat!


Art worth pon ering


Community

BRIEFS

National forest could
raise cost of pass
The Apalachicola Na-
tional Forest is taking public
comments on a proposal to
increase the fee for the an-
nual pass from $40 to $50
per year. The fee for the
pass has not been increased
in over 10 years. Of the mon-
ey raised through the fees,
95 percent goes toward op-
erating and improving sites
within the forest-like camp-
grounds.
Cathy Briggs, recreation
manager on the Apalachico-
la National Forest, said the
Forest Service recognizes
how important these sites
are to local communities
and those who use the sites.
This fee increase will help
them maintain the recre-
ation sites to the level and
quality that people have

c eop Ih would like to
comment on the proposed
increase can send com-
ments by July 10, 2009 to:
Apalachicola National For-
est, 57 Taff Drive, in Craw-
fordville or e-mail chriggsca
fs.fed.us

Groom, Hauser,
Martina appointed to
Workforce Board
On June 2, the county
commission voted unani-
mously to reappoint Betty
Croom, of Apalachicola, for
another three-year term on
the Gulf Coast Workforce
Bo dthe same time, they
moved Sheila Hauser from
a slot representing the pri-
vate sector to an economic
development slot after Lynn
Martina, of Eastpoint, was
appointed as private sec-
tor representative. Hauser
qualifies for the economic
development slot because of
her workwith the Carrabelle
Chamber of Commerce.










obituaries


Tommy and Tammy Stevens along with their daughters,
Jill and Brandy, would like to convey "Thanks" on behalf
of their entire family to friends, family and the entire
community of Apalachicola for all the help and kindness
shown to us after the loss of our son and brother, Hakan
Stevens. As well as a thank you to everyone involved with
the fundraising event that helped with the costs of Hakan's
memorial. The love, kindness and support during this very
difficult time has been tremendous and greatly appreciated.
Thank you.
The Stevens Family



Toll Free: (888) 831-6754
gu VE ED\B Helping Hands Makce The Difference


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcathefairpoint. net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www. stpatricksmas s. com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. ................ PM
SUNDAY ................. ................... 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
\SUNDAY ................. .................8:30. AM


The United Methodist Churches

SOf Frankhin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672
Pastor: Julie Stephens
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
PrWorshi Serviceal e0s0 am every 1Sunda .m
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola 77-Ar ATe:


Sunday School 9:45 am Js
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm II 11i~~ ek aib~
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm II 11 (
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm eS)
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm I 1
NreyProvided during regular church services


IV


Thursday, June 25, 2009


Local


The Times | B3


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

The Department of
Children and Families has
made good on its promise
to start up a local office
to help local residents in
determining eligibility
for public assistance
programs.
Diana Anthony, with
25 years experience with
DCF has begun work
setting up an office at the
Franklin County Health
Department, at 139 12th
Street in Apalachicola.
Robyn Gordon,
operational program
administrator for access
for Circuit 2, said a
working agreement that
can be renewed in six-
month intervals has been
drawn up with the health
department. As soon as
connectivity issues are
resolved, and Anthony
has completed a two-day
refresher course, she will
begin office hours, Monday
through Friday from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m.


"We are glad that she
is there and we do hope
residents of Franklin
County will take the
opportunity to apply for
assistance they potentially
are eligible for," Gordon
said. "We asked for a local
access line and we're
checking right now to see
what they consider local.
"We're working issues
out with the telephone,"
Gordon said. "People will
be able to call her direct
without going through
the health department
switchboard."
Anthony's primary
responsibility is to
determine the eligibility
for public assistance
programs for residents of
the county, she said.
She will be completing
interviews locally, either
by telephone, which is the
preferred method, or if a
customer needs to come in,
she'll see them face-to-face
at the health department,
Gordon said.
"They won't have to
connect to someone in


another county for their
interview or for case
processing," she said.
"That will be done by Miss
Anthony."
Customers would still
need to use the customer
call center if they have
changes to report, or if they
want to make inquiries
on their case. They can
reach the call center by
calling 1-866-762-2237 or
by accessing the Web
site www.myflorida.com/
accessflorida.
Gordon said the online
Myaccess account can
address questions such
as what benefits are
available, obtaining a
temporary Medicaid card,
when reviews are due or
when an appointment is
scheduled.
Community partners are
still being used to help with
the application process. Any
businesses or organization
interested in become a
community partner can call
community partner liaison
Erin Lamonica at (850) 488-
0675 ext. 236.


Gordon said DCF staff
has made headway in
reducing the backlog in
Circuit 2. "Applications
fluctuate from day-to-day
but overall, from February
to the present, we've
reduced backlog in the
circuit by 63 percent," she
said. "We're continuing to
work on that."
Applications for DCF
programs have seen a
spike of late, as individuals
are affected by the ongoing
recession.
Gordon said the county
had 1,136 active clients for
food stamps last month,
a rise of 15.7 percent over
the 982 active food stamp
clients in May 2008.
In terms of Medicaid,
there were 1,360 clients
in the county last month,
a rise of 11.5 percent over
the 1,220 people on the
program in May 2008.
A total of 1,798 county
residents took advantage of
DCF programs last month,
an increase of 12.4 percent
over the 1,600 clients in
May 2008.


Robert L. Rodgers, 67,
passed away on Monday,
June 15, 2009 at Select
Specialty Hospital in
Tallahassee.
Born in Jacksonville,
he moved from Arcadia to
Perry in 1998.
Son of the late Gerald
Rodgers and Idel Bridges,
Rodgers was a veteran
of the U.S. Army. He
played the piano for
the Senior Center. He
enjoyed writing gospel
songs, writing a book, and
playing music.
He is survived by his
wife of 44 years, Ida J.
Rogers, of Perry, son;


Robert Rodgers, of
Fontenot, TX., a daughter;
Polly Ann Grantham, of
Louisiana; two brothers;
Thomas Rodgers, of
Madison, and Danny
Talbert, of Apalachicola;
two sisters; Jean Watson,
of Apalachicola, and
Peggy Talbert, eight
grandchildren, one great
grand-child and a host of
nieces and nephews.
Funeral Services
were held at Joe El
Burns Funeral Home on
Wednesday afternoon,
June 17. Interment
followed at Pineview
Memorial Gardens.


Fonda Leigh Glass
Ashton, 43, went to be with
her Heavenly Pather on
Wednesday, June 17, 2009.
Fonda was born March
9, 1966 in Orlando, and later
moved to Eastpoint. She
was a loving person and
touched many lives.
Preceded in death by
her father, James Robert
Glass, she is survived by


son Justin Ashton;


grandchildren Cheyanne
Johnson, Madison Evans,
and Jasmine Evans;
mother Lisa Sloane;
grandparents Charles and
Charri Lynn Rosalis; along
with aunts, uncles, cousins
and friends.
There will be a memorial
service on Saturday, June
27 at 2 p.m. at Lighthouse
Holiness Church, 1921

Souhpot.any qstions,
call (205) 478-7164.


Area residents who are
willing and able to donate
blood are asked to come out
and give nextweekwhen the
Bay Medical Bloodmobile is
in the county.
A special request has
been made that folks
consider donating in the
name of Wallace Hill,
a longtime resident of
Franklin County who lives
in Apalachicola. Hill is
battling leukemia and is in


need of blood transfusions. education teacher. He has
The insurance company been an active member of
will only cover this to a the American Legion in
certain point and therefore Apalachicola.
he needs blood donated in The Bay Medical
his name to help cover the Blood Mobile will be in


or drawing a card from the
fishbowl for various "gifts"
from local businesses.
On Wednesday, July 1
from 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. the
bloodmobile will be at the
Carrabelle branch of the
Franklin County Library,
where all donors also will
receive a free beach towel.
For more info, call Aimee
Palmer, area blood drive
coordinator at Bay Medical,
at (850) 747-6570.


Apalachicola on Monday,
June 29 at the Natural
Medicine Shoppe from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. Donors will
receive a free "Blood Donor
Beach Bum" beach towel
and in addition, will have a
choice of a Subway cookie


cost.
Married to Dot Porter,
and brother to Helen
Quackenbush, Hill and
his wife are both retired
from the Franklin County
School District, where
he was a vocational


Did you have a fun
weekend at the Saltwater
Classic? The
weather sure was
nice.
You always
seem to run into
someone you know,
when you're out
and about. Talked
to a couple who
are now from Port LANIA
St. Joe. Come to Jim
find out, they were
from Centralia, IL,
which is a hop-skip-and-a-
jump from my hometown
of Granite City, IL.
When I was at the VA


clinic in Tally, visited
with several from
Franklin County.
I had driven
Jerry Hartnett
up for his
appointment.
Sunday was
the first day of
summer-and we
sure have been
NEEWS hot. Got the old
'elsh A/C full speed!
Don't forget to take
your vitamin B1 in
the morning to ward off
the yellow flies. And if you
do get bit, make a paste
of meat tenderizer with


water. Put some on
the bite to draw out the
sting and reduce the
swelling.
On July 4, services will
be held at our American
Legion Post 82, in the
village, at 1 p.m., followed
by a BBQ lunch. We
will have Thomas Lee's
world famous ribs, potato
salad, beans, and Tom
Larsen's corn on the
cob. A donation of $7 will
be collected at the door.
Come enjoy the afternoon
with us! At 4 p.m. they
will draw the winning
ticket for the Ford Taurus


wagon.
Members of the Lanark
Boat Club will hold a
picnic on the Fourth, but
don't have all the details
yet.
Keep Deputy Tony
Sapp in your prayers. He
was injured in a rollover
accident, while on duty.
Be kind to one another
and check in on the sick
and housebound and
remember God's last
name is not damn!
Until next time, God
Bless America, our troops,
the poor, homeless, and
hungry.


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


RK
IW


SHwy 08 O tSt3.

LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


Attention all you
gardeners out there! A .
common question I get
from folks around the
county is, "Do you have any
information about ...?" You
can fill in the blank as to
what topic people are looking
for information on. So this WO
week, I decided to take a AROUI
proactive approach to letting Bill i
all our gardeners out there know
we have some new and updated fact
sheets available for you.
The following is a list of lawn and
garden related fact sheets that were
recently updated or are new UF IFAS
publications.
Growing Gardenias in Florida
-Circular 1098, is a 7-page illustrated
fact sheet by Joan Bradshaw and
Sydney Park Brown, providing
guidelines for growing this evergreen
shrub known for the sweet scent of its
wax-like blossoms site selection,
planting, maintenance practices,
pests and other problems, cultivars,
and propagation. May 2009. http://
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/MG336
Giant Swallowtail, Orangedog,
Caterpillar/Butterfly Revised 5-page
illustrated fact sheet (EENY 008)
by H. J. McAuslane. It describes
this striking, wonderfully "exotic"-


looking butterfly that is very
abundant in Florida, and
whose larva is the well known
"orangedog" that is a minor
pest of sweet orange and
other members of the citrus
family its distribution,
description, life cycle, host
plants, biological control and
other control methods. May
2009. http://edisifas.ufl.edu/


including ecotypes, site selection,
site preparation, sowing seeds,
establishment and maintenance.
April 2009. http ://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
EP368
Sharpening Tools for Landscaping
and Gardening ENH-1120 is a 5-page
illustrated fact sheet by Geoffrey C.
Denny. The publication discusses
the required equipment and supplies
to sharpen common landscape and
garden tools, as well as the proper
sharpening techniques. May 2009.
http ://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/EP3 79
Black Spot of Rose PP268 is a
5-page illustrated fact sheet by Jozer
Mangandi and Natalia A. Peres
that describes a fungal disease that
that affects nearly all rose cultivars
worldwide causal agent and
geographic distribution, symptoms
and control. May 2009 http://edis~ifas.
ufl.edu/PP268
If you don't have Internet access
and would like a copy of any of these
fact sheets, then please let me know,
and I'll be happy to send you a hard
copy. Happy gardening!

Bill Iahan is director of the
Franklin UF-IE4S Extension
Program. Contact him at 653-9337,
697-2112, ext. 360, or via e-mail at
bmahaneuffledu.


)RLD
ND YOU
Mahan


IN134
The Red Admiral Butterfly -
EENY-446 is a 4-page illustrated fact
sheet by Donald W. Hall and Jerry E
Butler. It describes this distinctive,
medium sized, brightly colored
black and orange butterfly that is
common throughout much of the
United States, including our area, its
distribution, description, life cycle and
biology, and hosts. April 2009. http://
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/IN8 10
Establishment of Leavenworth's
Tickseed (Coreopsis leavenworthii)
on Roadside Right-of-Ways ENH-
1104, is a 7-page illustrated fact
sheet by Jeffrey G. Norcini, Anne
L. Frances and Carrie Reinhardt
Adams, provides recommendations
for establishing this upright
wildflower with showy yellow petals
and brownish center that occurs
almost exclusively in Florida,


DCF sets up office in health department


Robert L. Rodgers


Fonda Leigh Glass Ashton


Bloodmobile in county next week


Card of Thanks


Legion Post 82 to host Fourth of July lunch


I rimty
EST. 1836


WELCOMES YOU

Ch urch



Asocetnhson
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AIM


UF provides lawn, garden publications





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Manhattan Style Boutique Located Within


IV


Thursday, June 25, 2009


Local


According to the most recent
figures, Gulf Coast Community
College is posting an 8.2 percent
overall FTE increase in enroll-
ment for the Summer A 2009
term as compared to the Sum-
mer A 2008 term.
The highest percentage of
GCCC's student population
groups also showed a positive
increase of 7.6 percent FTE
and 6.4 percent in head count.
FTE, which stands for "Full
Time Equivalent" is an enroll-
ment calculation representing
one student enrollment of 13.3
credit hours. All figures are
considered preliminary until fi-
nal numbers are calculated af-
ter the end of the semester.


count and 32.0 percent in FTE.
Summer Bpreliminary num-
bers are also showing an overall
increase of 32 percent as com-
pared to Summer B 2008. The
highest percentage of GCCC's
student population groups also
showed a positive increase of
46.6 percent FTE and 43.1 per-
cent in head count which can be
broken down into:
General education and uni-
versity transfer (degree-seek-
ing) students increased 40.3
percent in head count while
FTE increased 44.0 percent
*Postsecondary vocational
(career-based, terminal pro-
grams) classes rose by 66.7
percent in head count and 60.0


percent in FTE.
*College Prep numbers in-
creased 65.0 percent in head
count and 66.7 percent in FTE.
"Summer is no longer a
'slow time' for dynamic institu-
tions like ours," said Dr. Jim
Kerley, president. "There is
considerable activity across
the entire college, includ-
ing credit classes, continu-
ing education, and even sum-
mer camps like Kids College.
The large gains in our short
Summer B semester are due
to offering more classes
than ever before, and as the
numbers show, students are
responding to these flexible
schedules. "


The increase can be broken
down into:
*General education and uni-
versity transfer (degree-seek-
ing) students increased 6.3 per-
cent in head count while FTE
increased 5.7 percent.


*Postsecondary vocational
(career-based, terminal pro-
grams) classes rose by 1.8 per-
cent in head count and 5.9 per-
cent in FTE.
*College Prep numbers in-
creased 19.0 percent in head


Congratulations to the
following Apalachicola
Bay Charter School
students for making the
honor roll of the entire
2008-2009 school year:

Kindergarten
Perfect Attendance:
Bradley Lee.

First grade
All A's: Alyssa
Robinson, Eden Rash,
Connor Messer, Rebecca
111is Sru nM sa e
Martina, Savannah
Parker, Camille Williams.
A/B: Jake Norred
Allison Register, Kassidy
Raffield, Krista Kelley,
Elan Blitch, Chloe Davis,
Jayden Justice, Kalahn
Kent, Brock Shiver, Faith
Cooper, Hunter Davis,
Summer Granger.

Second grade
All A's: Christian
Amison, Bryce Kent,
Wesley Benoit, Kevin
Flores, Jaiden Hill,
Alexus Johnson, Damien
Freeman, Angel Henning,


Phoenix Swords, Eva
Varnes, Morgan Vaughn.
A/B: Lexi Holland,
Charlie Carter, Karolynn
Myers, lan Lashley,
Christopher Newell,
Sophia Kirvin, Antiuana
Croon Matthew Cox,

Perfect Attendance:
Bryce Kent

Third grade
All A's: Rebekah Lee,
Natalie Terhune, Ethan
Moses, Faith Sapp,
Lucas Sasnett, Savannah
Montgomery, Corie
Cates, Brooke Martina,
Kate McLemore, Camilla
Shiver, Connor Rash'
Jaylunn Obee, Landen
Abel, Michaela Cassidy'
Katelyn Denney, Sara
Pouncey, Allie Zingarelli'
Joseph Martinez.
A/B: Amanda Butler,

ebr ,ee Crdn s, be

Simon Hodgson, Sam
Salman, Preston Burkett,
Brian Barfield, Gabriel
Guidry, Jacob Pendleton,
Alyssia Shirah, Goerianna
Meyers, Cameron Wynn.


Perfect Attendance:
Simon Hodgson, Lucas
Sasnett, Jacob Pendleton,
Allie Zingarelli, Alyssia
Shirah.

FOUrth grade
All A's: Jayla Alley, Allie
Kirvin, Marena Benoit,
Mallorie Shiver, Eve Bond,
Emily Crosby, Emily
Zindrarelli, MaxwellslDavis,
AnrwNguyen, Ati
Ramirez.
A/B: Holly Chambers,
Hunter Butler, Marshall
aSwet trone Phil otts'
Wilson, Kacey Howard
Jaylon Gainer, Katy '
Spann, Logan Crosby.
Perfect Attendance:
Greyson Creamer,
Marshall Sweet.

Fif th grade
All A's: Adriane Elliott,

Si er Jsu arotis.

Amber Henning, Maliek
Rhodes, Daniel Roberts,
Maya Blitch, Celest
Creamer, Gabby Bond,
Glory Miller, Spencer
Strickland.


Sixth grade
All A's: Brooke Frye,

CasB:'I ii t Henderson,
Kelsey Shuler, Amanda
Anthony, Gracyn Butler,
Sasha Carr, Era Cooper,
Logan Allen, Corey
Bratton, Katie Seger,
Alyssa Varnes, Jared
Zingarelli.
aP rf~etoAttendance:


Seventh Grade
All A's: Kristen
Burkett, Graham Kirvin.
A/B: Holly IR~rr,
Christian Jones,
James Newell, Brandy
Parker, Gracyn Kirvin,
James Bailey, Antonio
Croom, Jessica Shields,
Samantha Shiver,
Mercury Wynn.

Eighth Grade
MAll A's: 11 ha Patriotis,
Vause.
A/B: Hannah Pruett'
Coyer Causseaux, Seth
Ward, Griffin Kahn,
Christina Collins and
Emily Cash.


thThe ftolln ingw ek
honor roll for the
Franklin County School.
Congratulations to all our
middle and high school
students.

6th Grade
A/B: Lacey Amerson,
Tressie Buffkin, Julie
Diestelhorst, Curtis
Gordie, Zoie Lance, Justin
Holland, Macey Hunt,
Morgan Martin, Samantha
Marxsen, Summer Medley,
Morgan Mock, Tyler
Rowell, Payton Smith,
Michael Strops, Aaliyah
West, Calli Westbrook.

7th Grade
A/B: Ryan Babb,
Kristen Bryan, Jesse
Cameron, Ashley Carroll

Deboah Dmhpse aLaun

Nichols, Wesley Norred
Brook Pittman, Lea
Venable, Bria Walker

8th Grade
A/B: Morgan Kelley,
Carla Lewis, Stephanie
Marxsen, Shelby Myers,
Miranda Pilger, Kyndl
Schoelles, Chena Segree,
Katie Wood,


All A's: Jessica Dempsey,
Deanna Quick, Brianna
Riddle, Tiffani Schmidt,
Kristine Thompson,
Adreenah Wynn


SaI B~Thteresa Carr,
Johnson, Tanner K~link,
Lyndsey Mahaffee,
Emerald Norris, Christina
Pateritsas, Harely Tucker,
Tiffany Varnes,

10th Grade
All A's: Ashley Moseley,
Isabel Pateritsas, Shelby
Shiver, James Winfield
A/B: Robbie Butler,
Tiffany Carroll, Breanna
Cook, Cody Daniels,
Jessica Galloway, Jimmy
Goggins, Lakota Humble,
Chantelle Lucas, Hannah
Schooley

11th Grade
All A's: Dustin Putnal,
Ty~Sdron Wynn
A/B: Kateleen Brannan,
Adrienne Chambers,

Deie CaCrk, M~a a a

Kemper, Garry Larsen,
Derick Rhodes, Russell
Simmons

12th Grade
All A's: Khrystal
Davis, Tomilee Dowden,
Sarah Hadsock, Parrish
Johnson, Asenath
Thomas, Zachary Ward,
Cheree Whiddon
A/B: Gene Anderson,
Miranda Banks, Erica
Davis, Jeremy James,
Patrick Jones, Dakota
K~link, Shelby Lipscomb,
Ryanna Loockley, Angela
Ochala, Tevin Ray, Derek
Salyer, Elodie Ward


A'S
Z ZA


J rM AM
WOOD FIRED Pl


Rose Buskens: Susie Eppley: Jenni Calvarese:
Ow"el"o"et-lg"" dhan oogstMlc d ManicurelPedcuse and



741 you Panspaiillin /\eeds
Mon Fri 8:00 5:00 CST Sat 8:00 Noon CST
Flexible/Walk-Ins Welcome


B4 | The Times


GCCC enrollment increases for Summer 2009


COMMODOR~


ABC Honor Roll


Franklin County

Honor Roll


SEC L 1 L- U |


Doesn't Have To Be Expensive











NOTICE OF TRANMITTAL OF

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT S

NOTICE OF L AND USE CHANGE

The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing,
pursuant to Section 163.3184, Hlorida Statutes, to consider transmitting proposed
changes to the Franklin County Comprehensive Plan and the Future Land Use Map
Series to the Hlorida Department of Community Affairs for review. The proposed
changes include:

Delete Policy 2.2(n) of the Future Land Use Element: F4tel~sain Vllge laes.Th


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Amend the Future Land Use Map for the following two parcels:

Parcel 1: Change 1000 acres on Ochlockonee Bay in Sections 13, 14, 15, 16, 21,
22 and 23, Township 6 South, Range 2 West, as shown in the attached map, from
Marina Village Center to Agricultural.

Parcel 2: Change 200 acres east of Carrabelle mn Sections 16, 21 and 28, Township
7 South, Range 4 West, as shown in the attached map, from Carrabelle East Village
to Agricultural.

A public hearing on the proposed changes will be held on Tuesday, July 7, 2009, at
10:30 a.m. at the County Commission Meeting Room in the Courthouse Annex at 34
Forbes Street in Apalachicola. More information can be obtained and the proposed
changes may be inspected at the Franklin County Plamling Department, 34 Forbes
Street, Suite 1, Apalachicola, Florida (telephone 850-653-9783).

Persons wislung to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or in writing
to the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, 33 Market Street, Suite
203, Apalachicola, Hlorida 32320. Transactions of this public hearing will not be
recorded. Persons who may wish to appeal any action resulting from this hearing
should make the necessary arrangements to assure that a verbatim record is made,
including testimony and evidence, if any, upon which the appeal is to be based.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact Marcia Johnson, Clerk, Franklin County, Apala-
chicola, Hlorida 32320 or (850)653-8861, extension 100, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771


Thursday, June 25, 2009


Local


The Franklin County
Tourist Development
Council (TDC) opens its
2009-10 grant cycle for Off
Season and Sustaining
Grants beginning July 3.
The deadline for
returning applications is
Aug. 3, with notification of
grant awards to be mailed
on or before Oct. 1.
The TDC funds two
separate grant programs
annually. The Off Season
Grant program is
intended to help promote
tourism-based events and
activities which reflect
the county's natural,
historical and/or cultural
attributes.
The Sustaining Grants
Program is intended to
help supplement operating
expenses for tourism-
related facilities or
museums which promote
the county's history,
culture and nature.
Last year the TDC
funded $75,000 for Off-
Season Grant awards,
$5,000 for $500 special
request awards and
$100,000 for sustaining
grants. For fiscal year
2009-10, the TDC has
allocated $180,000 for the
2009-2010 grant programs
and another $20,000 for
publicity of events.
The 2009-10 TDC Off
Season Grant allocation
is $80,000. This grant
provides funding for
festivals, sponsorships
and assistance grants,
and is subdivided
into three categories:
festival, sponsorship and
assistance.
Festival grants are
provided to support
organizations in producing
and promoting large,
multi-day events that
result in high tourist
demand and economic
return. Each festival grant
award is $7,500. A total of
three festival grants may
he awarded for the 2009-
10 cycle. Sustaining Grant


recipients are not eligible
for this award. Anticipated
attendance should be in
excess of 5,000 people.
Sponsorship Grants
are provided to support
organizations in producing
and promoting mid-size,
multi-day events that re sult
in high tourist demand
and economic return.
Anticipated attendance for
these events should be a
minimum of 2,000 people.
Each sponsorship grant
award is $5,000. A total of
six Sponsorship Grants
may be awarded for the
2009-10 cycle.
Assistance Grants
are provided to assist
organizations in producing
and promoting full-day,
recurring events which
generate strong tourist
demand and economic
benefits. The anticipated
attendance for these
events should be a
minimum of 400 people.
Each assistance grant
award is $2,000. A total of
11 Assistance Grants may
be awarded in the 2009-10
cycle.
A third, non-specific
"Special Request Grant"
category is available year-
round to accommodate
funding for unforeseen
tourism related events/
activities countywide.
A total of $5,500 will be
allocated for the 2009-
2010 season and may be
awarded as 11 separate
$500 awards
The TDC's Sustaining
Grant Program allocation


for 2009-10 is $100,000.
This grant is intended
to support ongoing
operations for existing
tourist destinations.
Allocations will be
divided among qualified
applicants. Sustaining
Grant award recipients
are limited to one
application for either a
$5,000 Sponsorship Grant
or a $2,000 Assistance
Grant.
The total allocation in
all categories is subject to
the availability of funds.
The FC TDC may revise
category allocations
without notice prior to
making awards. Grant
awards are for the sole
purpose of promoting
events in Franklin County
that will attract visitors.
Grant applications for
events that are primarily
fundraising events for
organizations are not
eligible.
Any Florida non-profit
organization is eligible
to submit an application
for review by the TDC
Grants Committee.
To learn more or
to request a grant
application, please call
Fran Edwards at the TDC
Administrative Office,
653-8678.
On or after July 3,
2009, you may download
an application from the
TDC website at www.
anaturalescape.com or
pick one up from the TDC
Office at 17%/ Avenue E,
in Apalachicola.


v I`Y "Y~~~~b


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The Times | B5


TDC announces




~~12009 10 gat cyl


Tourist Development Co0unil



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NOTICE OF GENERAL ELECTION

CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA

DATE: SEPTEMBER 8, 2009


CITY COMMISSIONER (TERM 4 YRS)

CANDIDATES MAY QUALIFY BEGINNING 12:00 NOON, JULY
20, 2009 UNTIL NOON JULY 24, 2009 (MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
DURING REGULAR WORKING HOURS). QUALIFYING FEES IS
$45.00 PLUS 1% OF ANNUAL SALARY.

ONLY PERSONS REGISTERED TO VOTE IN PRECINCT NO.5
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY AND WHO RESIDE WITHIN THE
CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE WILL BE
RECOGNIZED AS QUALIFIED ELECTORS AND ALLOWED TO
VOTE OR QUALIFY FOR CANDIDACY FOR MAYOR OR CITY
COMMISSIONER.

CITY OF
CARRABELLE, FLORIDA

WILBURN MESSER
MAYOR




INVITATION TO BID

The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will be accepting
separate sealed bids for the following:

TWO (2) OPEN TOP ROLL OFF CONTAINERS
AND
THREE (3) RECYCLING CONTAINERS

Specification are on file in the office of the Franklin County Board of County
Commissioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL. 32320

Bids must be received in the office of the Franklin County Clerk of the Court
33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320 by 4:30 P.M., EST, on
July 6, 2009. Bids must be clearly labeled for each separate bid. The sealed
bids will be publicly open and read aloud at 9:45 A.M. EST, on July 7, 2009,
in the County Commission Meeting Room located in the Franklin County
Courthouse Annex. For further information, contact Van W. Johnson, Sr.,
Solid Waste Director, at (850) 670-8167.

An original and one copy of each bid shall be furnished in sealed envelope
or container, plainly marked "Roll Off I Recycling Containers".

The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all
bids.

ATTENTION BIDDERS: Franklin County is an equal opportunity employer
and encourages participation with certified minority enterprises and women's
business enterprises.


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA


JOSEPH PARRISH, CHAIRMAN.


IV


Thursday, June 25, 2009


Local


On June 15, the volunteers who staff the
St. George Island Visitor Center climbed
onto a Croom's 'lk~ansportation van and were
taken across the bridge to Eastpoint for a day
ofactivities.
First stop was Barber's Seafood, where
Stephanie Barber began the tour on the
loading dock. She explained the process of
unloading, grading, marking shipments, and
loading oysters. Then the group moved into
the shucking room where they observed
shuckers in stalls opening oysters. Stephanie
graciously answered hundreds of questions
and was rewarded with a T-shirt for herself,
another shirt for her husband, and free light-
house climbing tickets for the workers.
The next stop was Indian Creek County
Park where the group split into two and took
turns enjoying a tour of the oyster bars, nr-
rated by John Richards and Linda Raffield, of
the Franklin County Seafood Workers Asso-
ciation, and listening to David McLain of the
Apalachicola Riverkeeper speak on issues
affecting the river, most notably the "Water
Wars."
Next activity was lunch at El Jalisco. Ev-
eryone enjoyed their Mexican meal and no
one left hungry.
The last stop was the construction site of
the new Franklin County library in Eastpoint.
Contractor Wayne Thomas showed the group
around the site and through the building. The
roof is expected to be completed this week.
The secretary of the Friends of the Frank-
lin County Public Library, Ellen Ashdown,
passed out plans showing the many rooms
and features the building will contain once
completed.
Library Director Glenda Ondracek added
her enthusiasm for the project, which still
lacks the funds for completion. She said a pic-
nic on the site is planned to show the commu-
nity the progress that has been made.
The St. George Island Visitor Center is
manned almost entirely by volunteers who
assist and answer questions about the island,
and sell tickets and provide information about


The following report is pro-
vided by the Frankclin County
Sheriff's O~f~fice. Arrests are made
by officers from the following city,
county, and state law enforce-
ment agencies: Apalachicola
(APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin
County Sheriff's Office (FCSO),
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission (FWC), Flori-
da Department of Environmental
Protection (FDEP), Florida Divi-
sion of Insurance Fraud (DIF)
and Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Services
(FLDOACS).
All defendants are considered
innocent until proven guilty in a
court of law.

June 18
Katherine M. Terrell, 48, Apala-
chicola, trespass after warning
(APD)

Jun U I9
Herbert L. McKinney, 52, Tal-
lahassee, violation of probation
(FCSO)
James E. Pillotti, 23, Apalachic-
ola, violation of probation (FCSO)

June 20
Keith Fl Dykes, 29, Tifton, Ga.,
disorderly intoxication (FCSO)

JUnO 23J
Kenneth M. Parker, 19, Carra-
belle, fleeing or eluding law officer
and DUI with property damage
(FCSO)


Photo by TOM KELLY


The roof of the new Eastpoint library is now complete.


The volunteers watch shuckers at work at Barber's Seafood in Eastpoint.


the lighthouse. Each quarter the volunteers
participate in an activity that allows them
to learn more about the county so they can
share their new knowledge with the island's
visitors.
Other activities have included a poker run


of the island's merchants, a trip to Apalachic-
ola, ambassador training, and a trip to Carra-
belle. Volunteers are always needed and may
sign up by contacting the visitor center at 927-
7744 or speaking with the Elaine Rosenthal,
executive director, at 323-1008.


Sheriff urges theft prevention measures
thDue to re ent ncres sin theftss plain view and in eaasyeach ns an
requesting assistance in the reduction keep yard tools secured.
or elimination of the opportunity for Keep homes and vacation
these types of crime. rentals locked at all times.
All visitors and county residents are
asked to secure all property by: Please contact the Sheriff's Office
*Locking vehicles when parked at 670-8500 should you see any suspi-
or left unattended. cious activity or if you have questions
*Do not leave valuables in regarding this bulletin.


POLLING PLACE:


CARRABELLE MUNICIPAL COMPLEX
103 AVENUE F
POLLS OPEN AT 7:00 AM AND CLOSE 7:00 PM

CITY COMMISSIONER (TERM 4 YRS)


VOTE FOR:


B6 | The Times


ISland Visitor Center volunteers tour Eastpoint


Sheriff's

REPORT







































































Builders By The Sea, Inc.

Gary Bartlett
Additions
New Homes Ph. 850-927-3628
Remodeling Mobile 850-425-8620
R.R. 0067644 Licensed & Insured


to g e


T/DE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
Tfnd oh tiee sfr Ch foIng areas, subtract the indicated times
HigH Low
~at Point MinusO:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
fo find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
rom those given for CARRABELE : 9: 5M n s0 03 w


APALACHICOLA


~ ~ ~~1 ~ ~~ ~


JACKSON'S ~ d
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Building Supphies
& Auto Repair
Carrabelle 697-3333
We Dehiver Any where


Painta e ese

JOE'S LAWN CARE fO gef YOUr
ad in

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Repair
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Family
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ROBERTS APPLIANCE
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Cell: (850) 653-7654
DON WILLSON'S
SEPTIC TANK
SERVICE
11vig l of Fa klI
Cout amesicleatial n
commerical

Greas Tapasn Puped


Have Grimler Will Travel
Stump and Root Grinding.
Reduced to chips.
No job too small or large.
Call Ilrec eaede

FREE ES IMTE8


Don Lively General Contractors
LICENSED AND INSURED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE


CARRAB ELL E


Plumbing New Construction Roofing
Pressure Washing Additions Vinyl Siding
Painting and More No Job Too Small

P.O. Box 439RO655
Carrabelle, FL 32322
697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 ~








Dentistry

DENTURE

LAB ON PREM IS ES
Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines


SO LU NAR
m = Minor M = Major add 1 hour for daylight savings
Date Day AM PM Rise/Set Moon
06/25 Thu m 7:10 m 7:50 5:01 AM O
M 1:00 M 1:35 7:04PM
06/26 Fri m 8:10 m 8:50 5:01AM
06/2 SatM M 2:570 PM
06/28 Sun M 905 0 M: 0 0 0 M

M 3:50 M 4:15 7:04PM O
06/29 Mon m 10:50 m 11:20 5:02AM
M 4:40 M 5:05 7:04PM
06/30 Tue m 11:30 m 11:20 5:03AM
M 5:20 M 5:05 7:05PM
07/01 Wed m l2 0 ml12:5 5 03M ()


I I


~aBan WOnrfager, 9 9 ~

3LOnica WOnrfager, 9 I




12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321

TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417


IV


Thursday, June 25, 2009


Local


The Times | BY


Thursday, June 25
Franklin County
School Board will hold
a special meeting at
6 p.m. at the Willie Speed
Board Room in Eastpoint.
For more info call 670-
2810.
Apalachicola Revolv-
ing Loan Committee will

Halet Fr5 m~or iaot, al
653-8715
Carrabelle Public Li-
brary, 311 St. James Ave.
offers Adut W roam 9: t

p.m. For more info, call
697-2366
East/ oint Public Li-
brary, 29 Island Drive, of-
fers Story Hour at 10 a.m.
and individual computer
instruction from 10 a.m.
to noon. For more info
call 670-8151.
Community Lun-
cheon and Information
Specials at the Franklin
County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Noon.
$3 donation. Call 697-
3760.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Friday, June 26
Exercise class at
Chillas Hall in Lanark Vil-
lage. 9 to 10 a.m. Open to
all and free.
Summer reading at
Eastpoint and Carra-
belle libraries, from 10
a.m. to noon.
The new Carrabelle
History 1Museum, at 106
B Street, SE (Old City
Hall) will be open from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. For more
info, call Tamara Allen at
the Carrabelle Historical
Society 697-2141.


Saturday, June 27
The new Carrabelle
History M/useum, at 106 B
Street, SE (Old City Hall)
will be open from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. For more info con-
tact Tamara Allen at 697-
2141.
Monday, June 29
Aalach Icl Pla -
ning and Zo ing will hon-
a special meeting at 6 p.m.
at City Hall. For more info,
call 653-8715.
as le case klsV la C il -
to 10 a.m. Open to all and
free
Carrabelle Public Li-
brary yoga at 4:30 p.m. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Bingo at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Early bird at
6 p.m., regular bingo at 7
p.m. Cards begin at $4. Call
697-3760.
TUeSday June 30
Carrabelle Public Li-
brary story time at 2 p.m.
For more info, call 697-
2366.
Apalachicola Commu-
nity Gardens will meet at
6 p.m. at the Apalachicola
Bay Chamber of Com-
mene. 5or more info, call
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30
a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2 sug-
gested donation. Call 697-
3760.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Dept. 25 cents
per card. Families wel-
come. Proceeds go to St.
George Island Civic Club.
Call 927-4654.
Wednesday July 1
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village. 9


to 10 a.m. Open to all and
free.
Carrabelle Public Li-
brary offers Kids Wii from
9 to 11 a.m. For more info,
call 697-2366.

Carrabelle Public Li-
brary, 311 St. James Ave.
offers Adults Wii from 9 to
11 a.m. Yoga at 4:30 p.m. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Eastpoint Public Li-
brary offers Story Hour
at 10 a.m., and individual
computer instruction from
10 a.m. to noon. For more
info, call 670-8151.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call
697-3760.


Franklin County is in the process of
enhancing its ability to respond to the
next disaster and is in need of the com-
munity's help.
Pam Register, director of the coun-
ty's emergency management depart-
ment, said the county is updating its Di-
saster Preparedness Strategy as part
of this process.
"As a resident of the county it is
important that you provide your com-
ments regarding the strategy as well
as offer recommendations on how in-
dividuals, families, neighborhoods and


businesses as well as city and county
governments can become as prepared
as possible for future disasters," said
Register,
Please log onto the strategy's web
site listed below and provide thoughts
and ideas as to how Franklin County
can become better prepared for the
next disaster.
The Disaster Preparedness Strate-
gy Web site is www.drc-group. com/ims/
florida/franklin. Thanks for your help in
preparing Franklin County for the next
disaster.


It's that time of year again!
The Franklin County Sheriff's Of-
fice's S.A.EE. Program (Student And
Family Events) would like to invite all
students and families to come and en-
joy "Movies in the Park."
Enjoy a FREE family movie on our
12-foot movie screen. We will also be
serving FREE popcorn.
The following is the schedule, with
all events beginning at 8:30 p.m.:


*Thursday, June 25 at Vrooman
Park in Eastpoint
*Thursday, July 2 at Battery
Park in Apalachicola
*Thursday, July 9 at Light-
house Park on St. George Island
*Thursday, July 30 at Kendrick
Field in Carrabelle
*Tuesday, Aug. 4 National
Night Out at Vrooman Park in East-
point


Temperature
Hgh Lw

910 790
920 790
930 800


TuJune 25
Fri, June 26
Sat, June 27
Sun,June 28

.on e29


% Precip
30 %
30 %
10%
0%


06/25 Thu 01:05AM
12:18PM
06/26 Fri 01:46AM
01:24PM
06/27 Sat 02:24AM
02:38PM
06/28 Sun 02:58AM

06/29 Mon MM 7A
05:18PM
06/30 Tue 03:51AM
06:32PM
07/01 Wed 10:40AM


-0.4
1.3
-0.2
1.1
0.0
0.9
0.3

0.4
0.9
0.2
1.7


08:34AM
05:30PM
08:53AM
06:35PM
09:10AM
07:47PM
09:29AM

11:09PM
10:12AM


-


07:37PM 0.0 L


06/25 Thu 07:09AM
04:05PM
06/26 Fri 07:28AM
05:10PM
06/27 Sat 12:11AM
12:25PM
06/28 Sun 12:45AM
01:44PM
06/29 Mon 01:14AM
03:05PM
06/30 Tue 01:38AM

07/01 Wed MM 5A


10:05AM 2.1 L
11:33PM -0.3 L
11:11AM 1.8 L

07:45AM 2.2 H
06:22PM 2.2 H
08:04AM 2.4 H
07:49PM 1.9 H
08:24AM 2.6 H
09:44PM 1.8 H
08:47AM 2.6 H

05:24PM 0.0 L


county'ss disaster preparedness seeks comments


Community CALENDAR


'MOvies in the Park' to debut June 25





;II(I(~II)


| 1100
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of Jeffrey W.
Daugherty deceased,
whose date of death was
July 2nd, 2008, and whose
social security number Is
285-52-4455, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Frank-
Iln County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address
of which Is 33 Market
Street, Apalachicola, FL
32320. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's
estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERl-
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.

The date of first publica-
tlon of this notice Is June
25, 2009.

Personal Representative:
Susan Valentine
1160 Austin Court
Sugar Hills, GA 30515
Attorneys for Personal
Representative
BARBARA SANDERS
ATTORNEY AT LAW
80 MARKET STREET
APALACHICOLA, FL 32320
Telephone: (850) 653-8976
Florida Bar No. 442178
June 25, July 2, 2009



2N77T7HTE CIRCUIT COURT
FALTHCERSCEUCTON JAUN

FOR FDRAANKLIN COUNTY,
CIVIL ACTION

SUNTRUST MORTGAGE,
INC.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

ELIZABETH G. CHILD
A/K/A ELIZABETH CHILD,
et al,
Defendant(s).

CASE NO.:
19-2009-CA-000230
DIVISION:

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: KAREN TOMLINSON
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS.
Oa, OvneC Apalachl-

CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN

ANRY AENSD ACLL UMNKNGOWN

NUSGTH,TUHNEDEHR, AE
NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,

NHOEWHNERPARSTIDS MUA
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS


|1100
2804
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC
PLAINTIFF

VS

BILLY F. OWENS; DONNA
OWNES; ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED IN-
DIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION Ill; JOHN
DOE AND JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)

CASE NO:
2008-000027-CA

RE-NOTICE OF FORE-
CLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Granting the Motion to
Reset Foreclosure Sale
dated June 8, 2009 en-
tered In Civil Case No.
2008-000027-CA of the Cir-
cult Court of the 2ND Judl-
clal Circuit In and for
FRANKLIN County, Apa-
lachicola, Florida, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS of the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse, 33
Market Street, Apalachl-
cola, Florida at 11 a.m. on
the 22nd day of July, 2009
the following described
property as set forthIn
said Summary Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:

LOTS 7AND 8, BLOCK 86,
KEOUGH'S SECOND AD-
DITION, CITY OF
CARRABELLE, FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA. TO
GETHER WITH A
SIONM HE5576MOVILE

Any prsonecla nusgan In

the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pend-
ens, must file a claim
w thin 60 days after the
s le.

Dated this 9th day of June,
2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
By: Michelle Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons with disabllties need-
Ing a special accommo-
dation should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TloON, at te FANKLlaNt

1-800-955-8771(TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florlda
Relay Service.

LAW OFFICE OF DAVID J.
STERN, PA.
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND
ROAD, SUITE 400,
PLANTATION, FL


88 The Times Thursday, June 25, 2009


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


S1100
TANCE OF 172.92 FEET
CHORD BEING NORTH 60
DEGREES 26 MINUTES 12
SECONDS EAST 172.59
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED 4261), NORTH
54 DEGREES 19 MINUTES
42 SECONDS EAST 98.22
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED 4261), MARK-
ING A POINT OF CURVE;
POINT THENCE, HAVING
A RADIUS OF 774.33
FEET, THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 07 DE-
GREES 19 MINUTES 27
SECONDS FOR AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 98.98
FEET, CHORD BEING
NORTH 57 DEGREES 59
MINUTES 40 SECONDS
EAST 98.92 FEET TO A
RE-ROD (MARKED 4261)
MARKING A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVE,
HAVING A RADIUS OF
775.69 FEET, THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 18
DEGREES 37 MINUTES 14
SECONDS FOR AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 252.09
FEET, CHORD BEING
NORTH 70 DEGREES 58
MINUTES 05 SECONDS
EAST 250.98 FEET TO A
RE-ROD (MARKED 4261)
MARKING THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING
AND LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN N24005'46"W
365.95 FEET TO A
RE-ROD (MARKED 4261),
THENCE RUN NORTH 66
DEGREES 02 MINUTES 09
SECONDS EAST 121.00
FEETTO A RE-ROD
(MARKED 4261), THENCE
RUN SOUTH 24 DE-
GREES 05 MINUTES 46
SECONDS EAST 394.70
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED 4261) LYING
ON TILE NORTHWEST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF SCHOOL.
HOUSE ROAD, SAID
POINT ALSO LYING ON A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE NORTHWESTERLY
THENCE RUN SOUTH-
WESTERLY ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY AND CURVE HAVING
A RADIUS OF 537.64
FEET, THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 02 DE-
GREES 33 MINUTES 01
SECONDS FOR AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 23.93
FEET, CHORD BEING
SOUTH 78 DEGREES 21
MINUTES 31 SECONDS
WEST 23.93 FEET TO A
RE-ROD (MARKED 4261)
THENCE RUN SOUTH 79
DEGREES 38 MINUTES 13
SECONDS WEST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 100.51 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.

TOGETHER WITH A MO-
BILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON AS A PERMA-
NENT FIXTURE AND AP-
PURTENANCE THERETO;
PLUS VIN'S
GADL675A78103-BH31
A N D
GAFL675B78103-BH31

A/K/A 489 TIP TUCKER
ROAD, EASTPOINT, FL
32328

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lls Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
June 1, 2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Florida Default Law Group,

LO Box 25018 Foa

33622-5018
F08082215
June 18, 25, 2009


2677T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR


1 ue I 1
33324-3920
(954) 233-8000
07-24786(GMAP)
June 25, July 1, 2009
2484T
NOTICE OF
SHERIFF'S SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN That pursuant to a
Writ of Execution Issued In
the Circuit Court of Leon
County Florida, on the
19th day of May, 2009, In
the cause where Capital
City Bank was plaintiff and
Bert Pope, L.C. f/k/a Pope
Brothers Real Estate, LLC;
Lalrd Point Propertles'
LLC, f/k/a Chapel Terrace
Partners, LLC; and Bert S.
Pope, Individually were
Defendants, being Case
No.92-0220-CA In said
cut Si kSnhir nas 7
Florida, have levied upon
all the right, title and Inter-
est of the defendants Bert
Pope, L.C. f/k/a Pope
Brothers Real Estate, LLC;
Lalrd Point Propertles,
LLC, f/k/a Chapel Terrace
Partners, LLC; and Bert S.
Pope, Individually In and to
the following described
real property, to-wit:

Property located at 3150
U.S. Highway 98, St.
James Island Park, Lanark
Village, FL 32323 more ac-
curately described as fol-
lows;

Lots 84 and 85, Block "C ,
In ST. JAMES ISLAND
PARK, Unit No. 3, a Subdl-
vision In Fractional Sec-
tions 4 and 5, Township 7
South, Range 3 West. ac-
cording to the Plat thereof'
recorded In Plat Book 2
Page 6, of the Public Rec-
odsdaof Franklin County,


Ond90n the th day of rul ,
Door of the Franklin
County Sheriffs Office, In
the city of Eastpoint'
Franklin County, Florida, at
the hour of 11:00 a.m., or
as soon thereafter as pos-
sible, I will offer for sale all
of the said defendants Bert
Pope, L.C. f/k/a Pope
Brothers Real Estate, LLC;
Lalrd Point Propertles,
LLC, f/k/a Chapel Terrace
Partners, LLC; and Bert S.
Pope, Individually right, ti-
tle and Interest In aforesaid
real property at public out-
cry and will sell the same'
subject to all prior lens,
encumbrances and judg-
ments, Ifany, to the high-
est and best bidder or bid-
ders for CASH, the pro-
ceeds to be applied as far
as may be tothe payment
of costs and th satisfac

sr dadexecuin Noe In
Ican w hw DtsabdhltlII At

Speeding a special accom-
modation to partic pate In
this proceedin Iphould
conta t Debble Mock no
later than seven days prior
to the proceeding at
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office at (850)-670-8519.

Skip Shiver,
Sheriff of Franklin Count ,

B Dbble L. Mock
Deputy Sheriff
June 4, 11, 18, 25, 2009
2668T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

COUNTRYWIDE LOANS
SERVICING, L.P,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JERRY S. JONES A/K/A
JERRY SIMMONS JONES,
et al,
Defendant(s).

CASE NO.:
19-2009-CA-000204
DIVISION:


CLYDE OLIVER; ET AL.,,
Defendants.

CASE NO.
192008CA000001XXXXXX

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAP-
TER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der or Summary Final
Judgment of foreclosure
dated May 11, 2009, and
entered In Case No.
192008CA000001XXXXXX
of the Circuit Court In and
for Franklin County, Flor-
Ida, wherein Aurora Loan
Services, LLC Is Plaintiff
and CLYDE OLIVER; KEN-
NETH FRIENDLY; MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REG-
ISTRATION SYSTEMS,
INC. AS NOMINEE FOR
PRIMARY CAPITAL ADVI-
SORS, LC, MIN NO.
1002293-3000020639-5;
ONE CHARLESTON
PLACE HOMEOWNERS'
ASSOCIATION, INC.; UN-
KNOWN TENANT NO. 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO.
2; and ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING IN-
TERESTS BY THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO
THIS ACTION, OR HAV-
ING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE
OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DE-
SCRIBED, are Defendants,
I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at at
the Front Door of the
Franklin County Court-
house, 33 Market Street,
Apalachicola, FL 32320 at
Franklin County, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 2nd day
of July, 2009, the following
described property as set
forth In said Order or Final
Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 43, BLOCK 10
(WEST), ST. GEORGE IS-
LAND GULF BEACHES,
UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 7,
OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act of 1990, persons need-
Ing special accommoda-
tlon to participate In this
proceeding should contact
the Clerk of the Court not
later than five business
days prior to the proceed-
Ing at the Franklin County
8C50u hu~s81 Telephone
1-800-955-8770 via Florida
Relay Service.

DATED at Apalachicola'
Florida, on May 12, 2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ,
PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
PO BOX 11438
Fort Lauderdale, FL
33339-1 438
Telephone: (954) 564-0071
June 18, 25,2009


2746T
IFNORTHFER IRUNIT CC RT

PROORTAE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF
J~effrey Wd Daugherty
Decease .

File No. 08-000067-CP
Division Probate


CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN

ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GiRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
property In FRANKLIN
County, Florida:

COMMENCE AT A POINT
WHERE THE LINE DIVID-
ING LOTS 65 AND 66 OF
SOUTHLAND, A SUBDIVI-
SION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
1, PAGE 4, OF THE OFFl-
CIAL RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA MEETS THE
RIGHT OF WAY
PEACHTREE ROAD;
THENCE RUN ALONG
SAID BOUNDARY LINE AS
FOLLOWS: SOUTH 62 DE-
GREES 52 MINUTES 41
SECONDS WEST 660.0
FEET TO A ROD AND CAP
FOR THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING: THENCE FROM
A POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTINUE SOUTH 62 DE-
GREES 52 MINUTES 41
SECONDS WEST 165.00
FEET TO A ROD AND
CAP; THENCE LEAVING
SAID BOUNDARY LINE
RUN NORTH 27 DE-
GREES 07 MINUTES 51
SECONDS WEST 263.84
FEET TO AROD AND CAP
LYING ON THE SOUTH-
ERLY BOUNDARY LINE
OF HATHCOCK ROAD;
THENCE RUN ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY
NORTH 62 DEGREES 52
MINUTES 01 SECONDS
EAST 165.00 FEET TO A
ROD AND CAP; THENCE
LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF
WAY RUN SOUTH 27 DE-
GREES07 MINUTES 51
SECONDS EAST 263.87
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses within 30
days af er the fls pdub| c-
fault Law Group, PL.,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address Is 9119 Corporate
Lake Drive, Sulte 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and
file the original with this
Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded In the
Complaint or petition.

This notice shall be pub-
Ilshed once a week for two
consecutive weeks In the
The Apalachicola Times.

WITNESS my hand the
seal of this 1st day of
June, 2009.

larcla M Johnson
By: Michele Maxwell

Florida Default Law Group,

POBox 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
FO9030643
June 18, 25, 2009


BARBARA RIDDLE WARD
A/K/A BARARA A. RIDDLE
JAMES W. WARD JR.
FRANKLIN COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS; JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) IN
POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY
Defendants.

CASE NO.-
19-2008-CA-000405

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated the 26th day of May,
2009, and entered In Case
No. 19-2008-CA-000405, of
the Circuit Court of the 2nd
Judicial Circult, In and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein AURORA LOAN
SERVICES, LLC Is the
Plaintiff and BARBARA
RIDDLE WARD A/K/A
BARARA A. RIDDLE
JAMES W. WARD, JR ;
FRANKLIN COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS; JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) IN
POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY are
Defendants. I will sell to
the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the ON
FRONT STEPS OF
COURTHOUSE at the
Franklin County Court-
house In Apalachicola,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 6th day of August,
2009, the following de-
scribed property as set
forth In said Final Judg-
ment, to wit

LOT 4, BLOCK 19, ST
GEORGE ISLAND GULF
BEACHES, UNIT NUMBER
1 WEST, A SUBDIVISION
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 7
OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act (ADA), disabled per-
sons who, because of their
disabilities, need special
accommodation to particl-
ulde n this proee ig
Coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320 or Tele-
phone Volce/TDD
(850)653-8861, prior to
such proceeding.

Marcla Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49th Street
Sulte 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954)453-0365
Facsimile: (954)771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
June 18, 25, 2009

2722T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION

AURORA LOAN SER-
VICES, LLC,
Plaintff,


CASE NO.
19-2008-CA-000488
DIVISION

NORTICSEALOEF FORECLO-

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated May 26'
2009 and entered In Case
No. 19-2008-CA-000488 of
the Circuit Court of the
SECOND Judicial Circuit
In and for FRANKLIN
CouLty SF orda, wherein
WELL FARO BAK, NA'
Is the Plaintif and ROB-
ERT BELDIN JR; JOANNA
M. BELDIN; are the De-
fendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash at FRONT DOOR OF
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 33 MAR-
KET STREET, APALACHI-
COLA, FLORIDA at
11:00AM, on the 15th day
of July, 2009, the following
described property as set
forth In said Final Judg-
ment:


LCOORD7EDOSU IVUSINOR
LYING IN SECTION 30 '
NWGNESHIPWE8T SFO TNHK
LIN COUNTY, FLORIDA,
BEING MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:

COMMENCE AT A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT LY-
ING THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF SECTION 25'
TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH'
RANGE 7 WEST, FRANK-
LIN COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 23 MINUTES 12
SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE EASTERLY BOUND-
ARY OF SAID SECTION 25
A DISTANCE OF 99.44
FEET TO A RE-RUN'
THENCE RUN NORTH 89
DEGREES 59 MINUTES 38
SECONDS EAST 2640.20
FEET TO A l INCH SOLID
BAR, THENCE RUN
SOUUTHES001DEGRERNDS 0

COCR9E9E MONTUMONA
MUANRKESDOU6T791), TENDCEE
GREES 59 MINUTES 41
SECONDS EAST 821.13
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED 5826), THENCE
RUN NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 46 MINUTES
SECONDS EAST 725.48
FETNCTEORAUNNIRON PIP
DEGREES 57 MINUTES 55
SECONDS EAST 725.95
MEKETDTO58A RHE-RN D
RUN SOUTH 00 DE-
GREES 05 MINUTES 41
SECONDS WEST 52.95

(ME KETDO 42A61)RELY N
ON THE NORTHWEST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF SCHOOL
ONUSENRRTA ATSHENRC
ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY THE FOLLOWING 5
COURSES NORTH 66 DE-
GRER N3S2 MANSUTES7 4

(ME KETDO426A) MRAERKRNG
A POINT OF CURVE TO
THE LEFT, HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 810.13 FEET,
THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE NOFE1S2 DEGREES
ONDS FOR AN ARC DIS-


TAMMIE L. PAULIN a/k/a
TAMMIE PAULIN, ROBERT
PAULIN AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.

CASE NO.:
19-2008-CA-000303
DIVISION:

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice Is hereby given pur-
suant to Final Judgment of
Foreclosure for Plaintif en-
tered In this cause on May
26, 2009, In the Circuit
Court of Franklin County,
Florida, I will sell the prop-
erty situated In Franklin
County, Florida described
as:

COMMENCE AT A
RE-ROD LOCATED IN AV-
ENUE "F"AT THE SOUTH-
WEST END WHERE THE
90.00 FOOT
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF SAID
AVENUE "F" JOINS THE
SOUTHER LY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF ELLIS VAN FLEET
STREET (6TH STREET)
AND BEING LOCATED IN
GREATER APALACHI-
COLA, FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND
RUN NORTH 89054'53",
WEST ALONG THE
SOUTHER LY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF SAID ELLIS VAN
FLEET STREET A DIS-
TANCE OF 434.76 FEET
TO A RE-ROD (MARKED
#7160) MARKING THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING AND LEAV-
ING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH
00025'13" WEST 174.24
FEET TO A RE-ROD
( MARK ED # 7 1 6 0)
THENCE RUN SOUTH
89054'31" WEST 99.67
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED #4261),
THENCE RUN NORTH
00025'14" EAST 174.39
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARK #4261) LYING ON
THE SOUTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF ELLIS VAN FLEET
STREET, THENCE RUN
EAST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 99.67 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

and commonly known as:
8 ELLIS VAN FLEET, APA-
LACHICOLA, FL 32320; In-
cluding the building, ap-
purtenances, and fixtures
located therein, at public
sale to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, at
the front door steps of the
Courthouse, at 33 Market
St., In Apalachicola, Flor-
Ida, on July 15, 2009 at
11:00 a.m.

Any persons claiming an
Interest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

Dtd20th91s 27th day of

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Edward B. Pritchard
(813) 229-0900 x1309
Kass, Shuler, Solomon,
Spector, Foyle & Singer'
PA.





2 Bdr, 2 Ba upper apartment.
Very large, clean, bright.
Washer, dryer, stove, refrigerator
included. $700 per month +
SOCurity deposit. Person(s)
need to be quiet, clean and
FOSponsible.
(850)653-1240 or (850)670-1211
Apalachicola


I _


z t(d1m/z tDat~( ]1,]/ s (~.

$269,900



3 Bd re/5 Bath 1,452 eq. ft.
$349 900

Call lth6 COnldOil6YI
'YOUr GUlf-frOnt GUrUS"

JOhfl Skinner John Smith
(850) 865-0154 (850) 850-909e
condombillck ea1 jsmitnh.celcomnet



4566 H wy 20 E., Suite 104
Niceville, FL 32578


|7160


Eastpoint, 706 CC Land
Rd, 3 br, 2 ba, DW at-
tachedbacarpport hw/3 ut lty
workshop with covered
sidewalk ahnd extra tal don

Bay View. $149,900. Motl-
vated seller, bring offers.
850-879-6496






Mobile Home 14x66, 2 br,
2 ba, Spa, porch, utility
room, all electric, fur-
nished. Lot 121 ft x 75 ft,

fo s75,00 l 6m5 821


ApalaChiCOla Bay Charter School
is SCCepting resumes for

the f011owing positionS

f0! the 2009-2010 SChol00 year
211?81081 (100811011teacher RSS1818111: 0811(11(181
sho1081611 CRV60 fifst aid certification and a
background in exercise and athletics,
- Maintenance/custodial: candidate should have a
backgound in air conditioning and be capable of
light plumbing.


Pel...ase .. ..ums o oan Hgerfrdg
98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 or
e-mail to ABCSchoolifairpoint.net
FAX (850) 653-1857
INCLUDE SALARY REQUIREMENTS



RECE PT IONIST

Experienced person
needed for busy Medical
Office in Eastpoint, FL


Must be organized, have

good people skills and
ability to multi-task.

Computer experience
is a MUST. Bilin ual

preferred, but not required.


Send resume to

hrdep~artment~inf mc.org
or Fax (850)670-8582
EOE/DFWP/M-F


Sp ri ng Cleaning ?
Place your gently used furniture, rugs & lamps
on consignment at

Decorator's

a WAR E HOUSE

Now Open at
212 Williams Ave
Downtown Port St. Joe
850-227-3344
WWW.decorators-wareliouse.net


PART TIME
GENERAL MAINTENANCE
TECH POSITION FOR 32 UNIT
APARTMENT COMPLEX IN
CARRABELLE. MUST HAVE OWN
TOOLS AND PASS BACKGROUND
AND DRUG TEST. GENERAL
KNOWLEDGE OF HVAC,
PLUMBING, & ELECTRICAL
REQUIRED.
APPLY AT 807 GRAY AVE. #33
MONDAY-THURSDAY
9:00AM TO 2:00PM
PHONE 850-697-2017

FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD
85 School Road, Suite 1
Eas pint, FL 328


ANNOUNCEMENT OF
POSITION AND POSSIBLE
POSITIONS

Positions: Instructional:
Middle School Math (1)
instructional:
K-12 Teachers

Location: Franklin County Consolidated


salary: FCSB Salary Schedule

Contract: 2009-10 School Yea

Deadline: July 6, 2009, noon

Job description and application may be
obtained from Franklin County School
Board Fmnance Office. Applications must
include (1) a high school diploma, (2)
college transcripts if applicable, and (3)
three letters of recommendation .Successful
applicants must agree to a criminal history
check (includes FDLE processing fee) and
a drug screening at the Franklin County
Public Health Unit.

Pie se retunappli ions tothe nation



Erankin Cmert school Board isan


.II


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


The Times Thursday, June 25, 2009 9B


3300
Silk flowers for Sale, Plan-
ninga summereor fallbwe -
tiful silk flowers most pur
chased for wedding w/
original stems. Some wed-
t ng a dne ns fnorn-
White. Original cost over
a100,G r cideal,Amu t
part Call 850-653-5855 to
Inquire


4100
Adminstrative/Clerical

Work from home
Government office jobs,
FT/PT, data entry, cus-
toe seso ce, ado n cle -

fits: Call for Information
package nowl Call
1-888-293-7370.

Bldg Const/Skilled Trade
CRANE OPERATOR
MUST have NCCO certifl-
cation. NO PER DIEMI
Drug free work place Call
Chris (904) 773-3903
Web Id #34041511

Food Serv/Hospitality

Front Desk &
Housekeeper
Both positions must be
experienced. Apply In
p rson t BstAW serh
cola between
9 am and 2 pm.
Please bring resume.

I nstal lation/Maint/Repair

Maintenance
PerSOn


Apartments
Immediate opening for
maintenance person. 40
hrs per week with bene-
plmbinE, nR pntin ,
14l~.:in,.: -,I and carpentry
.~ii:i: D~rag dfre
.~l~ transportation
n :~~~i:I Some travel
n :~~~i:I Equal Op or-
850-653-9277




Pre-K Teacher
Dlr tr/ tea e dn e for


ur ea. Fl utnm ea pousion

Ify? Please call (850)
323-0385 to set up an
Interview.



|4130
POSTAL &GOYT JOB
INFO FOR SALE?


Caution

You NEVER hav to p
for Informatlonave p
'.dueral ore ostaa jobs. f
"gT r nte r nt tetthe


Is ARmeia' cos~umer


w 8~ftc Fo iob cams


mn hul s drC

ClassDfiedrA eertising


Sales Pros Tired of work.
Ing bell to bell? Highest
pandu nnmmssi ns. Ean
control of your time. Call
1-800-675-8445


| 6100
Fo Lease
Commercial
Buildng
Approx 1100 sq ft.
Available now Corner
of H~wy098 & 172t Street
850 615 0058
FOR LEASE
Commercial Property lo-
cated at 245 US Hwy 98
W, Apalachicola, Florida
(former Express Lane);
2200 Sq Ft Commercial
Building -Triple Net Lease
(Lessee pays taxes, Insur-
ance, & maintenance);
Lease Price $2,000 per
month plus sales tax: Con-
tact Dan Kennedy with Ex.
press Lane -Phone (850)

832-s8R ra

flce. Utllties Included.
Downtown Historic Apa-
lachicola. 29 Ave. E.
(upstairs) For Info call
Carol 850-653-3871
Very clean 3 br, 1 ba, 2
screened porches, yard,
driveway, W/D hookup,
Lanark Village. Call for
more Info. Avail 06/01. Ph
926-2032



257 Prad6 11rO 1 ba, apt
W/S/G Incl. $575 month, +
$300 deposit, Call
850-653-6735
Chapman House Cottage,
ch mr study foent In
month + deposit All utill-
ties and CH&A Included
850-653-1475

figritage Villas

Accepting Applications

uits aom renal ais
tance may be available.
Hud Vouchers ac-
cepted. Call 850-653-
9277. TDT/TTY 711.
Eq~u~a Hou ing




Lanark Village
1 br, 1 ba, Renovated/ fur-
nished end unit, new
kitchen & bath, minimum 4
month lease $495/mo +
dep., no smoking, pet con-
sidered. (850) 653-3838
Lanark Village, 1 br






Aclep ing3A plicatio~ns
& Non-HC accessible

b5-27 TDDT a 1
Equal Housing
Opportunity

Studio Apt.
Furnished
Upstairs studio
Qulet location, water &
electric Incl'd. Walk to
downtown. $700 mo. plus
deposit 850-653-9116 or
850-774-7178 for appt.





Rentas-cShales
BY OWNER
Vlsit BeachRealty.net

St. George

$160 wk lc Satellite,
Grag Icudedk pool
Beautiful view. Call
850-653-5114


| 110 | 1100
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVI- hearing will be to present
SEES, GRANTEES, OR evidence and testimony
OTHER CLAIMANTS and forward a recom-
mended order to the De-
LSKTNKNWONWN ADDRESS: plartmeht I nonjeptilion I
shall become final agency


action.

If a petition Is filed, other
affected persons may petl-
hen orp lave to Interype
tlon for Intervention must
be filed at least twenty (20)
days before the final hear-
Ing and must Include all of
the Information and con-
tents described In Uniform
Rule 28-106.205, FA.C. A
petition for leave to Inter-
vene shall be filed at the
Division of Administrative
Herns De art et of
120Aaahee SPm a ka

32399-3060. Failure to pe-
tition to Intervene within
the allowed time frame
constitutes a waiver of any
right such a person has to
request a hearing under
Sections 120.569 and
120.57, FS., or to particl-
pate In the administrative
hearing.
After an administrative
hearing petition Is timely
filed, mediation I vial

3n afcted prson what I
made a party to the pro-
ceeding by filing that re-
quest with the administra-
uh lsodn of Idmltrbay
tive Hearings. The choice
of mediation shall not af-
fect a party's right to an
administrative hearing.

MkeeMcDanoelChi nie
Planning
Department of Community
rs55Shumard Oak Boule-

Tallahasee, Florida
32399-2100
June 25, 2009


Lanairkb village, Crltt n
walk-in closet, landlord
pays some utllties.
$525/mo + $300/dep.
850-927-2838

To wnhou se /Barr ler
Dunes (ape .San Blas,
Por S. Je Fl 6mo mln-
Imum term, 3 br, 3 ba, Ex-
cellent condition, custom
furnishings and decor
Complete PC, printer
wre ss hrdkwarre setr p


$,01 5-856 Please Call



| 6140
1, 2, & br
Apalachicola, FL.
Call 850-643-7740.

257 Prado, 3 br, 2 ba,
W/S/G Incl., $850 month,
850- 0067deposit, Call




Eastpoint New 3 bed-

copm N2 sokn om pets
850-670-8266

Eastpoint, 3br, 2ba,
Whispering Pines Sub-DIV,
db| gar, $850 mo,
678-640-4810


CRRENNTADDRESS: UN-

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
org aio t fomec ng
property In FRANKLIN
County, Florida:
LOTS SIX AND SEVEN OF
BLOCK FIFTY-ONE IN THE
CITY OF APALACHICOLA,
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.

has been filed against you
ad yo r eurd to

te seene s cii 3
tlon If any, on Florida De-
fault Law Group, PL.,
Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address Is 9119 Corporate
Lake Drive, Sulte 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and
file the original with this
Court either before service
on Plaintiff s attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded In the
Complaint or petition.

Ishe dnc l wek for tu
consecutive weeks In the
The Apalachicola Times.
WITNEfS hmy hand tho
June, 2009.
Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group,
PL.,

aPO6 01 Florida
FO90049792
June 25, July 2, 2009
2784T
STATE OF FLORIDA
MTNA TMEF7ROF COM-

NOTICE OF INTENT TO
FIND FRANKLIN
COUNTY COMPREHEN-
SIVE PLAN AMENDMENT
IN COMPLIANCE

DOCKET NO.
09-1 ER-NOl-1901-(A)-(1)
The Department gives no-
tice of Its Intent to find the
Amendment to the Com-
prehensive Plan for Frank


n091 9 nMy5 2ba007
IN 0 MPIA CE pu s
163.3187 and 163.3189
FS.

The adopted Franklin


Recommendations an

Cremaaiab Io pubi Icn-
spection Monday through
Friday, except for legal
holidays, during normal
business hours, at the
Franklin County Planning
and Building Department,
34 Forbes Street, Apalach-
Icola, Florida 32320.


on 04ncte aeaSdn a


defined In Subection

06.14n bS.e eads th gh
opubliction fof thi notice,
and mupst nlde allnc ofte
Information tand cotens

descibed In SUnifor Rule
281063.2018, FA.. The pe-
tl"lo "'st be fiew htehln
of Ctyommnity1 Afairs, 2555
Suard Oakt Boulevard, o h
32 e r elonand dant n

to10.1 timely fie etto shll
cltonmst tue a wlver ofh any


Tatovaseerpoedne sln
120.599-1 and 12.7 FS. If

eotitioni f ile d, pttio he ur
ponse of te admainisrative


7150

4 city lots In Apalachicola
Block 266, Lots 12-15
$90,000 or can divide.
Nice2 pvat~e n ig~h hood
653-7777

20 acre track, high & dr
w/ scattered trees, Agricul-
thou cuty ca ted a
4028 NW Malverty Ln. Al-
tha FI, $75,000 653-2154
or 670-8070

North Historic District
5th Street building lot.
$65,000 OBO. 60 X 100.
Corner lot. Brokers pro-
tected. Call 404-218-0077

Reduced ear bflo ca

necessary, 2 Lots 1.3 ac-
res. & 1.11 acres. Sold
separately or together. On
Bluff Rd, between Magno-
Ila Circle. $49,000, &
$47,000 Call 850-774-0674
or 850-234-3209


810-Sports Utility Vehicles
8140 -Vans
also- commercial
asso- Motourcyce.
8170 -Aut Parts

8220-Persna watercraf
8230 Sailboats
8240 o-t ...amri..
Supplies
8310 Aircraft/Aviation
82 Tm R dd vehicles





|8110


Toyota Camry '95 $675
Doo nD0 glht rst F,9n0c
Ing 215-1769 9 am-9pm


|3130

JrAUCTIONA
SaturdaY June 20th 4pm
Viewing 3PM Hwy 2301
Beside Bayou George
Post Office. Antiques, col-
lect ibe, otnsc t3o0 t le

Ing motor, glassware,
mont 10ci S~e AB
964AUl384850-722-9483




3220


; ~
2 PC Full or twin mattress

1e 2n seed plasticD NEW





5 Piece Solid Wood Pub
Set $225. New In box
222-9879. Delivery Avall-
able



,
$169 Queen Pillow-Top
Mattress Set. NEW In
2li 79.teh vrvarranty.





A New Leather Sofa,
Loveseat & Chair Set. Es-
presso, Solid oak founda-
in{00New Stil In cates
can deliver.




Beautiful Solid Wood 8
pc. Queen Canopy Bed-
room Set. Dovetail Draw-
erN1w 9 2b2-es. Sa rl






Bedroom 6 piece set, all
new. Sacrifice $550.
545-7112. Delivery Is
possible.






t 7s t cn Kda ivrr





New Curio
Dsplay$1 4 74et Still





Solid Wood
Sleigh Bed $249. New In
box 545-7112







FOR
SALE
Microwave $20. Flve-foot

Foldout sewng tbe $00
slon ladder $120, plus
more. Weekend of June
27-28 only. 276 Frank
McKamey Way near
Carrabelle. For directions
cal. 597-2203.". o ml
om


Lanark 5 br, 3.5 ba, Large
home w/ great Gulf view.
Larg lot $1,000 monthly

ILanark Village On the cor
ner of Carlking & Oak St.
2br, 1ba, spacious kitchen
utility room, $700 mo.
9isls 3& sec. Call

Lvel lebeac Iycottagte
access. 2 br, 2 ba, A/C,
florida room, tiled floors,
blinds, curtains, new
kitchen, carport, laundry
room with washer and
dryer, screened fish clean-
Ing shed, large beautifully
landscaped yard. Lanark
on 98. $850 mo, Includes
water/septic. $500 secu-
rity. Available 06/01. Call
67-n1 omdeasy or nirght.ret

Joeenn eH ostead- -Pon
12 month lease. 2 br and 3
br units available. Call
850-227-9732



6170
I3 layshorenDr Apalachi
whirlpool bath, quiet
neighborhood. Unfur-
nished. $575 mo, 1st & last
$400 dep 653-4293 after 4


8 14 O


Dodge Conversion Van,
1992 78K miles, New tires
&tu~ne3-ulp21$2,700, Call





COMPLETE PACKAGES
FROM
"499
All Welded, AllAluminum
808ts
BOAT SHOW



www.xtremeindustries.com


Del Del Del

Panama Cty Beach, FL



GUlf-frOnt COndOS

Ocean Reef & Tropic Winde

COnldOYYIYIUmfs


21o- Pers
2110 Pets: Free to
Good Home
2120 Pet Supplies
2130 Farm Animals/
2140 Piv~estock








Kittens
Assorted colors, 2 month
ood, male and fem le, free
Cat Coalition
Help save our local cats
and kittens. Call 653-1430
Karen, Leave message


Need To

Sell Your

Fura etuirr?


fab furun teudr behdero m
& dining furniture.
Contact uS
today!


850-227-3344




For Sale




850-653-5610


~ F~rmM~nrO



COastal Properties

& Premier Subdivision Lots

Cape San Blas, Carrabelle, Alligator
Point, Panacea, Crawfordville &
Tallahassee, FL and Thomasville, GA

Visit RowellAuctions.com for Complete Property
Information and Bid Closing Time for Each
Specific Property

Call for Details 800-323-8388



10% Buyers lmium AU479 AB296 GAL AUC002594


RER0 EgrAE FRSAE1
7110 Bh~oea om/
712o Cm ercial
7130 -CondolFownhouse
7140 Farms & Ranches
a6 dH ciil Hoe~ ts
7180 Investment
71oo Out-of-Town
Real Estate
7200 -Timeshans


I ~egin lHS HSday -:- June 16
SEnds Tuesday -:- June 30


..-------------------- -
I July 4th Holiday
Deadline

SDue to early press runs
Sfor the July 4th holdiay
Sthe deadline to publish a
Sclassifindein-column

I in the Thursday, July 2, edition
I of The Times is

1 c|ose Of day,
I (5:00 Eastern; 4:00 Central Time)
IFriday, June 26th


SCall (850) 747-5020
Sto place your ad.

SThe business office at The Apalachicola/Carrabelle
SThe rnlceswl re opnseorbnday Julat38.~a.m.


|6130 117100
2 br, 2 ba, 1200sf Twnhm, Why Rent
Carrabelle, lar e deck We o a
$650 mo. $650 dep. Avall-WhnYuCn
able 08/01/09 Call for an Own A Brand
appt. 850-562-4996. NeW Home?
THE AVNUEhl S at


Ke Gc Ile LANDHNOGP
approved. Affordable Lv-
Ing on the Forgotten Coast
3anb r, 2 bat 50o~m
sqft In Carrabelle s Newest
Subdivision only %/ mile
from the Carrabelle River

Pricing from the $100,000s
Plckyour Lot.
Choose Your Model.
Only 8 lots left!
BEC & Company, Inc.
(850) 656-2608



1.82 Acre for sale In Su-
matra Florida. Hwy front-
age boarders National For-
est assessed value
$44,000 Asking $28,000
Can be divided. 653-8792
or 653-7777





..Unique property
w zoned C-4 Mixed
-Use anlows a
business downstairs and residential unit
above (Great Gulf View!). Excellent
location on main paved road (East Gulf
Beach Dr.) to State Park for maximum
exposure for commercial use. Easy
beach access on East Third Street.


,YOUR

BEST PICK

b HERE!


___


Thursday, June 25, 2009


B10 1 The Times


Local


1998 3 br/2 ba, 28X(68 Cavalier MH
on 100x142 lot Living room, separate family
room w/stone fireplace. Kitchen and dining
room have wood floors
$85,000 for more
Information
Call (850) 653-2083 or
(850) 323-0107
aSk for Sam.


Always online | www.apalachtimes.com


At the June 16 Franklin
County Commission meet-
ing, Extension Agent Bill
Mahan introduced Becky
Blanchard, a University of
Florida doctoral candidate
in cultural anthropology
who will be doing research
in the county over the next
year.
Her project examines
life in rural coastal com-
munities experiencing
environmental, economic
and regulatory change. It
focuses on the relationship
between the oyster indus-
try and sustaining the en-
vironment in the context of
the "Water Wars," coastal
development, and Food and
Drug Administration and
Interstate Shellfish Sanita-
tion Commission regula-
tions. Blanchard wants to
determine how changes to
the seafood industry and
the environment impact
people's livelihoods, identi-
ties and sense of commu-
nity.


Photo by LOIS SWOBODA

Raised in Oregon,
Blanchard graduated in
2002 from Stanford Uni-
versity with a bachelor's in
anthropology and minor in
geology. Her grandfather
was a commercial crabber
on Tillamook Bay.


Becky Blanchard.


She is a fellow in adap-
tive management of water,
wetlands and watersheds
in the National Science
Foundation's Integrative
Graduate Education and
Research Traineeship pro-
gram.


The TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL NEUROSCIENCE CENTER
Is an accredited Stroke Center and designated Brain & Spinal Cord Injury Acute Care Center.


(11~LS#107389


$115,000 St. George Island\


III


COMMERCIAL
/ RESIDENTIAL
LOT ON THE
ISLAND


John Shelby, Broker
soo-344-7570
809 7-47


' St. G ogIs1 nd 1
ReRan


~~I i


Florida Gulf Coast lot
Pinewood Shores #3
Carrabelle Beach
Franklin County

$349,000.00
1.07 acre beach front lot,
80-feet white sandy beach,
wooded, private. Deep lot
off Hwy 98. Convenient to
nearby Apalachicola on the
Forgotten Coast. By owner.
Only 6-hours from Atlanta,
1 hour from Tallahassee,
minutes from St. George
Island. Your own paradise.


ui i rn o6 0


c. -~i
- ~i
If
t: E~:ti


University of Florida researcher

to study community change


'Ham It Up' at

summer library


reading program
Calling all young actors to attend
this week's summer reading program
at the Franklin County Public Library
branches in Carrabelle and Eastpoint.
This week's theme is drama and
participants will have the opportunity
to do pantomime, drama, and role
playing activities. If you want to be a
star or just act like one, the library
summer program will give you a few
tips and pointers.
Along with all the drama fun will be
stories, games, and snacks. This week's
read aloud stories at the Eastpoint
library are "Let's Pretend," "Rap A Tap
Tap," and "There was an Old Lady Who
Swallowed a Shell."
The Carrabelle Branch summer
reading will be "Hamming it up" as
well, with lots of great literature,
drama activities and games, and
snacks.
For more information about the
summer reading program or any
public library program, call 670-8151 in
Eastpoint or 697-2366 in Carrabelle.


Our local real estate experts have identified

what they feel are the best values around

and are offering them to you in Real Estate

Picks. (In this section), Discover the best

real OState ValueS In IMexico Beach, Port St.

Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George

Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas.


CRl TOday!

850-227- 1278




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