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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00029
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola, Fla.
Publication Date: June 4, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00029
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Thursday, JUNE 4, 2009 www.apalachtimes.com 50(




(lass of 2009 prepares for graduation day


i


County fares well at tax certificate sale


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 6


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Thursday night, June 4, the
Seahawks boys basketball team
won't be playing in the high
school gymnasium, although the
crowd seated there surely will
recall the glory the dozen var-
sity players brought to the entire
community.
The cheering will be polite,
the applause appropriate, but it
won't just be for feats of athletic
skill.
It will be for academic tri-
umphs, for books read and les-
sons learned, for the growth,
enlightenment and friendship
that a learning environment
nurtures.
And the court will be filled


with 72 young Seahawk men and
women, each taking their first
step out of the nest where for the
past 12 years they've safely and
securely received their educa-
tions.
Highlighting the evening's
graduation ceremony, which be-
gins at 7:30 p.m., will be a speech
from a young man who has gone
where eagles dare, Army 2nd
Lt. DerekBrown. The 2005 Apala-
chicola High School grad last
month became the first county
resident since Harry Buzzett
in 1944 to graduate from the
U.S. Military Academy at West
Point.
The tears of joy will flow, and
the smiles will shine, as parents
and grandparents, aunts and un-
cles, sisters and brothers, join in
the pride, and relief, that comes


from their loved one completing
a high school education.
Leading the class will be
three students who will gradu-
ate with highest honors, for hav-
ing earned a 3.75 or better grade
point average. Co-valedictorians
are Zachary Ward and Cheree
Whiddon, longtime friends who
have each received full scholar-
ships to Florida A & M Univer-
sity, where both plan to study
pharmacy.
Salutatorian is Angela Ocha-
la, who plans to go on to Talla-
hassee Community Center to
study nursing.
Graduating with high honors,
for earning a 3.5 or better grade
point, will be Erika Davis, Jami

See GRADUATION A8


PHOTO BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN
left, Desiree Trest, center and RyAnna
the slide show at the baccalaureate service




County deadlock


again grounds

airport purchase


Seniors Jared Mock,
Lockley, right, watch
sunday afternoon.


01I.0 MANl OF= TH1E II\INFANTRY


PHOTO BY LOIS SWOBODA
Dr. Randy Randolph pleaded with the
county commission to purchase the buffer
land.

Tie StaffWrite


Sellers reduced the asking price for a
parcel of land being sought by the Apala-
chicola Regional Airport, but a deadlocked
county commission again failed Tuesday to
approve the use of federal grant money for
the purchase.
County commissioners rehashed the
proposed purchase, which they last dealt
with May 5, of 21 acres of buffer land at the
end of runway 13-31. Last month commis-
sioners turned down the airport advisory
bo~ar' r cm ndtion no he u by
nal in favor and Cheryl Sanders and Pinki
Jackel opposed.

rishF rc sehd hICsl mrm Sh moe, sic
is an employee of one of the individuals who
own the land. A split vote meant the land
purchase was not approved.
Parrish requested renewed discussion
of the acquisition at Tuesday's meeting. He
said his request was in response to numer-
ous phone calls and emails he had received
regarding the issue. He said people wanted
to know if the federal grant money to make
the purchase had been lost.
Airport board member Al Mirabella
told commissioners the seller had reduced
their asking price. Last month, Jackel said
she did not believe appraisals reflected the
land's current market value. She said be-
cause much of the property was wetland,
it was undevelopable and its value was
diminished.
More than $10,000 was spent by the FAA
on two appraisals of the land, and a later
review of the appraisals.
DSW Holdings, an investment group

See AIRPORT A6


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
1% o what does a successful 43-year-
Sold attorney with a nice home in
4~ Apalachicola and a fondness for
gourmet cooking do once he's finished
his active service with the Florida Army
National Guard?
He tramps through the mosquito-
infested backwoods of Mississippi to
prepare for his assignments as a lowly
infantryman in Iraq, of course.
For the last month Dan Burke, who
three months ago was handling child


abuse and neglect cases as supervis-
ing attorney for the 14th Judicial Circuit
Guardian ad Litem program in Panama
City, has been getting up at 4:30 a.m.
He sleeps in a large barracks at the
National Joint Forces 'It-aining Center
at Camp Shelby, about 50 miles north of
Gulfport.
The 42 others in his platoon, plus sev-
eral more, share the barracks. There's a
latrine down the hall.
"I got stuck with the top bunk, which
was a drag," he said, in a telephone call
a few weeks ago.
Burke is doing the same kind of


things, but more intensively, as he did
during refresher training in April at Fort
Benning, things like land navigation,
weapons training, and physical training.
For example, learning how to move
smoothly in the latest high-tech body
armor, the Improved Outer Tactical
Vest, which supersedes the old design
and "provides greater ballistic protec-
tion and improved user comfort," is part
of Burke's preparation for the perils of
Iraq.

See DEPLOYMENT A6


A faltering economy, and a stepped-
up outreach to Tallahassee and Pan-
ama City, helped ensure the county's
treasury did well at Friday's tax cer-
tificate sale.
Tax Collector James Harris said
the county only had to "strike" to itself
a little more than $38,000 in tax certifi-
cates, well below the $88,000 it had to
absorb last year.
"Other counties told me they didn't
fare as well as I did," said Harris, not-
ing that the county is still selling the
remaining certificates on a first-come,
first-served basis.
About 65 bidders gathered in the
grand jury room of the county court-
house, from 9 a.m. to about 6:30 p.m.,
to take part in the sale. This was more
than the 50 bidders last year.
Tax certificates are sold each year
for the amount of a property's unpaid
taxes, with bidders competing to ob-


* r
LI ( ~I


PHOTO BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Tax Collector James Harris, left, conducts Friday's auction of tax certificates,
while his assistant, Sarah Braswell, inputs the data at right.


tain the best interest rate they can
on the certificate's value. Beginning
at 18 percent, or the equivalent of 1.5
percent per month, the bidders drive
down the interest rate they are willing


to accept on the certificates, which has
a statutory minimum of 5 percent.
The successful bidder at this "re-

See CERTIFICATE Al


Phone: 850-653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews~,starfl.com
Fax: 850-653-8036


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:

Legal Ad Friday aill1a.mn
Classified Display Ad Friday ai11 a.mn.
Classified Line Ad Monday ai5 p.mn.


Franklin High Class of 2009. ........... Bl
Shrf' epot ................... ... .
ChurchNews......................... B3


SocietyNews .......... .. ..
sports ............... ..............
Classifieds ................... ..... B6


B2 FREEDOM
A9 FLORIDA
NEWSPAPERS*INTERACTIVE
-B7


Apa lachicola

Carrabelle


Apalachicola lawyer readies for trip to Iraq


TABLE OF CONTENTS


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Gulf Front "Parker Cottage"
1401 HWY 98 Mexico Beach, FL


Thursday, June d, 2009


A2 | The Times


Local


By Lojs Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
Carrabelle has not one
but two new museums and
both are seeking articles
for public display.
Tamara Allen, president
of the Carrabelle Historical
Society said the new Car-
rabelle History Museum,
located in the old City Hall
building downtown, is hop-
ing area natives will lend
them bits of local history
fill out their collection. The
museum is especially inter-
ested in obtaining family
photos, class pictures and
yearbooks.

agr ed to alow chhcisth i
cal society to use the build-
ing for the foreseeable fu-
ture and that a grand open-
ing is planned for Friday,
July 3.
"People may feel like
nobody else is interested in
old pictures of their family,
but that's not true. So many
of the families here are
related through marriage
their histories are inter-
twined," she said.
The centerpiece of the
current collection is the
medical bag once carried
by Miss Tillie Miller, leg-
endary Carrabelle midwife.
Old city records are avail-
able for research and make
an interesting read. Medi-
cal tools belonging to Dr.
Richard Sands are also on
display.
A set of antique wooden
display cabinets, from Ri-
ley's Bait Shop, beautifully
restored by Mary Giles,
house part of the collec-
tion.
The museum is divided
into several exhibits includ-
ing a "worklife room" show-
casing the maritime trades
and the timber industry.
The exhibit features hand-
made net mending needles
created by William Massey.
Tommy Jack Massey be-
came a living artifact dur-
ing the recent Carrabelle


Waterfront Festival, when
he created a net to the de-
light of visitors, many of
whom had never seen this
dying art practiced
Another display show-
cases cookbooks and tex-
tiles that were important
parts of a woman's world in
old Carrabelle. An old Sing-
er sewing machine is on
loan from Rita Millender.
In the reading room
there are many old photo-
graphs, posters and year-
books.
The museum is open
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fri-
days and Saturdays. Allen
said that volunteer docents
are neee dto greet vsitos

the exhibits.
If you wish to share a
local treasure or volunteer
call Allen at 524-1153.


Help furnish the
l 1tliouse keeper's

A second new museum,
dedicated to the history of
the Crooked River Light, is
housed in a replica of one of
the two houses provided for
the keepers of the light.
Arlene Oehler, president
of Carrabelle's lighthouse
association, said the mu-
seum is seeking a number
of items to outfit the house
as a turn of the century resi-
dence. The target years for
furnishings are l895 to l915.
On the wish list are kero-
sene and oil lamps, braid-
ed or crocheted rugs, old
books, frames and wooden
boxes, fountain pens, led-
gers, local letters, desk ac-
cessories, games and toys,
model ships, mantle clocks,
fireplace screens, rocking
chairs, navigational equip-
ment, a wooden bookshelf
and assorted furniture.
Oehler said the museum
is building a science exhibit
explaining how a Fresnel
lens operates. They are
seeking glass prisms to use


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA
These old city records are available for research at the
new Carrabelle City Museum.


By Lois Swoboda
On Saturday, the
Boys and Girls Club of
Franklin County cel-
ebrated National World
No to Tobacco Day with
food, music and games.
Over 100 youngsters
gathered at the Carra-
belle Municipal Center
to learn about the health
hazards of smoking.
"Tomorrow is Na-
tional World No Tobac-
co Day," said Cherry
Rankin, who directs the
Carrabelle site. "Since
people go to church on
Sunday, we decided to
celebrate today."
The party was spon-
sored jointly by the club
and the county health
department, with fund-
ing provided by the
health department and
administered through
the city of Carrabelle.
David Walker, who
coordinates the county's
anti-tobacco program,
said it had been al-
most 10 years since the
county has had an or-
ganized tobacco educa-
tion program. Last year,
the health department
received a grant from


Tobacco Free Florida, a
program of the Florida
Department of Health
that works to decrease
the number of tobacco
users in Florida through
efforts aimed at both
preventing nonusers
from starting to use to-
bacco and encouraging
current users to quit.
The program is fund-
ed by money derived
from court settlements
against major tobacco
companies.
He stressed that the
consolidated school
has the highest rate of
smokeless tobacco use
of any Florida school.
"We're trying to build
public awareness about
how tobacco companies
lure teens into smoking
with cool characters and
candy-flavored cigars,"
Walker said.
In addition, there are
ongoing tobacco ces-
sation classes to help
users kick the habit in
Eastpoint, Carrabelle
and Apalachicola.
Anyone seeking help
with tobacco addiction
can contact the health
department at 653-2111
ext. 123.


Arlene Oehler displays a
lamp that will be used in
an exhibit to demonstrate
the function of a Fresnel
lamp.
chester said a busload of 40
visitors from the Panama
City Senior Center arrived
unexpectedly last Thursday.
"None of them climbed
the tower, but they bought a
lot of souvenirs," she said.
To help furnish the light-
house keepers house, to
volunteer as a docent or for
more information, please
call Oehler at 697-9790.


in the display. Right now, a
film on the lenses plays on
a big screen TV during busi-
ness hours, but curator Joan
Matey is designing a more
comprehensive exhibit that
will eventually fill one room
of the building.
The museum is already
welcoming visitors every
Thursday, Friday and Sun-
day from 1 until 5 p.m. and
from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday.
Many visitors pay $5 to climb
138 steps to the top of the
tower and enjoy the wonder-
ful view. Climbers must be at
least 44 inches tall and chil-
dren who meet the height
requirement must be ac-
companied by an adult.
Volunteer Ruth Win-


-L~' -1 ;~~J~Y; I 9~~y
5.5 1- Acre Estate of Mexico Beach Founder
2500 HWY 98 Mexico Beach, FL


Restaurant/Commercial Buildmng


~Y~YY i~F~pB .-102 dl1st Street Mexico Beach, FL
3BR Home Short Walk to the Beach Vacant/Wooded
*3,552 2 SF Corner Location with Frontage on HWY 98 oe ig Fml sdnta
10d 20th Street Mexico Beach, FL Lot Size: 90 x 150 a (Hwy. 98 Frontage 90' 2) Ltn Sz :i7 IXam y Reienil
* 1,100 2 Sq. Ft. 3 BR / 1.5 Bath Home with Guest Cottage Being Sold without Equipment City Water & Sewer Available

* Fri z ed wit exception fpro a t m 0't h bah


21st Street Mexico Beach
* Zoned Single Family Residential
* Lot Size: 100 X 100 a
SVacan taoeua cd weaGulf Vaiews


County celebrates





Tobacco Day


New Carrabelle museums seek bits of history


*FINAL NOTICE Don't Miss Out on These Amazing Properties


Lot 300' From Beach ABSOLUTE Lot
3 1 i1 s t St Mexico Beach 200'~ Frorm Beach




























LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
On M/ay 20, State Representative M/ichelle Rehwinkel-Vasalinda, (D-Tallahas-
see, left, visited the county to tour local solar facilities, guided by Ben Bloodworth,
owner of Sol Verde Renewable Energy Solutions. She is seen above at the Garlick
Environmental Associates offices at the Apalachicola Regional Airport. In July
2008, Garlick installed 25-kilowatt photovoltaic solar panels on the hangar roof.
Vasalinda also visited solar-powered residences in Eastpoint and Apalachicola,
and three sites on St. George Island. She viewed the solar-powered lighting de-
signed by Sol Verde for the island's bike path. The lighting project, about 90 per-
cent complete, will light the multi-use paths from 11th Street east to the state park,
and is approved by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
Vasalinda, who sits on the House Energy Committee, met Bloodworth last fall
at a TIallahassee Economic Development Council meeting on renewable energies,
and was curious about real world applications.


IV


Thursday, June d, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


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LOOKING ON THE SUNNY SIDE


















































































































-/ Ialac-h ic ola
Curral~lbelle


THE TIE

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


Thursday, June 4, 2009


Not my pet!
My pet can't be part of
a water pollution problem.
I sleep with my pet! He
watches TV with me on
the sofa. He sleeps in my
lap.
Of course, it's not your
pet alone, and sure, you
keep your pet clean. The
pollution results when
we add all of our pets
together.
Research by the
American Pet Products
Manufacturers'
Association shows that 40
percent of U.S. households
have at least one dog.
The U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) has been
studying the problem of
water pollution from pets
for several years. EPA
reports that two to three
days' worth of pet waste
from just 100 dogs in a 20
square mile watershed
can contribute enough
bacteria to temporarily
close a bay to swimming
and shell fishing (US
EPA 1b993e)sPet wat also
pollution in our local
waterways.
So, why pick on dogs?
Well, here is what studies
are indicating:
Humans produce 13
million fecal coliforms
(intestinal bacteria) per
gram of feces, or about 1.9
billion fecal coliforms per
day
Dogs produce 23 million
fecal coliforms per gram
of feces, or about 7.7 billion
fecal coliforms per day
A cow produces 230,000
fecal coliforms per gram of
feces, or about 5.3 billion
fecal coliforms per day
A horse produces
12,600 fecal coliforms per
gram of feces, or about 293
million fecal coliforms per
day.
A wild rabbit produces
20 fecal coliforms per
gram of feces.
Mice produce 330,000
fecal coliforms per gram
of feces.
You can see these
statistics in a report
at this site http://
www.co.thurston.
wa.us/shellfish/pdf/
HENDERSON2003.pdf
So, as you can see,
there's a special problem
with dogs. Dogs are built
to eat almost anything
and they have a real
diversity and number of
intestinal bacteria to deal
with that wide variety of
fodombine that with the
sheer numbers of dogs we
haecrwmmed into our
miles. If that many people
were relieving themselves


Isg womenI a ~ ~ ~ ~ f I~FF -er~
This photo, from the 1964 Chapman Shark yearbook, shows Mrs. Meyer's fourth grade girls performing
the traditional maypole dance.


T yest0fye0f?.
folks would make little bouquets
of flowers to leave anonymously
at friends' doorways. That loving
practice had faded away by my
childhood.
By the time I was a senior,
there was another month of May
tradition. Senior parties! Groups
of parents and kids would get
together to plan pool and beach
celebrations, cookouts, and more.
These were chaperoned events
and every weekend leading up to
graduation was booked. As a class,
we bonded even closer, knowing
our lives were set to change
dramatically, and soon.
During that time, graduation
gifts poured in. Many parents set
up a display in the dining room.
Most of the gifts were small
maybe a set of towels for college
or a laundry bag. You may rest
assured that a proper thank-you
note was written for each and
every one.
I don't bemoan the loss of grace
or the structure of days gone by.
Life was not perfect then by a long
shot. We live in a different world
now. I embrace the change. But, I
have to wonder if maybe our kids
are somehow missing out. I hope
they will be able to reminisce with
fondness about the Mays of their
childhood.
Denise Roux is a regular
columnist for the Apalachicola
and Carrabelle Times. 'lb reach
her email her at rouxwhit@
mchsi.com.


sW inef Of0 tne mayp01OS Ol
Ah, the merry, merry month of fresh flowers, walked to the Gorrie
Mlay. Okay, I know it is June and monument in the center of the
my work year is culminating with square. The queen was crowned,
graduation and the arrival of FCAT and then the entertainment
scores, but my thoughts are drawn began. The majorettes twirled, the
back to the Mays of my youth in dancers performed, and a student
the Sixties. choir sang.
It all began The highlight was a traditional
~i one day last week maypole dance performed to
when I walked the tune "In an English Country
;~ia -into the school Garden." Custody of the maypole
administration and training of the dancers fell
building to sign in to Gladys Meyer, fourth grade
~~Iand say my good teacher extraordinaire.
mornings to Sharon There was a practice maypole
RED HIT Rotwrg~ht and at school and the female students


ANID ROUX Patty Creamer at
Denise Roux the front desk. It is
a pleasure every
day to see their
smiles and receive their cheery
greetings. We generally have a
little catching up to do as well.
This particular morning they had
questions about May Day not
the Soviet Union revolutionary
parade, but rather the seasonal
celebration we used to have in
Apalachicola.
It was a grand and graceful
event held in the city square in
front of the Episcopal church. The
May Queen and court were elected
by students at Chapman High
School. I can't remember if the
escorts were elected or selected
by the ladies.
The school band played, seated
under the giant oaks, as the
teenaged girls, dressed in spring
formals and carrying nosegays of


in her class would perform until
she was satisfied we had it right. I
remember it well. The actual day
of our dance was very different
from our practices.
We all wore our Sunday
dresses. The maypole was
adorned with wide pastel ribbons.
We sedately walked in pairs to
the beat of the music and then
we very seriously performed our
orchestrated maneuvers until
the pole was covered with woven
ribbon. Then we reversed the
dance and unwrapped the pole. It
was very formal, and we felt very
important.
In later years I played the
clarinet or the oboe in the band
at the celebration. I believe that
1968 was the last year of May Day
festivities.
Mother told me that when she
was a child there was another
May Day tradition. It seems that


Unfortunately, as people become
increasingly desperate during
tough economic times, crime rates
rise. What's worse those being
targeted are often in
dire financial straits
themselves.
One of the most
financially devas-
tating ways people
are victimized is
identity theft, where
JASONI someone steals
ALDERMANI your personal in-
formation and uses
it to open accounts, take out loans,
make purchases or rent an apart-
ment, among other offenses.
It might take months to discov-
er you've been hit and by then you
could be out thousands of dollars
and have severely damaged credit
- not to mention having to spend
hundreds of hours sorting it all out.
Here are a few precautions you
can take to protect your personal
identity:
Think "low-tech." Surprisingly,
although high-tech crimes like com-
puter hacking get more publicity,
old-fashioned thievery accounts for
the vast majority of identity thefts.
*Watch out for pickpockets tar-
geting your wallet, purse, check-
book and credit or debit cards.
*Intercepted mail containing
checks or personal information to
and from banks, government agen-
cies, retailers, medical providers
or insurers. Some thieves even fill


out change -of-address cards to re-
direct your mail, so pay attention
when expected bills or correspon-
dence don't arrive.
*People rifling through your
trash.
*Always shred sensitive paper-
work and never leave purchase
receipts behind at the store.
*Strangers (and even personal
acquaintances) who have access to
your home or workplace always
lock up sensitive information,
*People who "shoulder surf"
while you enter passwords at ATMs
or retail card machines. Always
shield the keypad.
Sound the alert. Keep handy
phone numbers you can call to
quickly report lost debit or credit
cards or checks; also program them
into your cell phone in case you're
away from home. In addition, if you
are a victim of identity theft, con-
tact the three major credit bureaus
and ask them to place fraud alerts
on your files: Equifax (www.equifax.
com, 888-766-0008), Experian (www.
experian.com, 888-397-3742) and
11tansUnion (www.transunion.com,
800-680-7289).
To monitor your credit and spot
errors or fraudulent activity, order
one free credit report per year from
each of the three bureaus at www.
annualereditreport.com. Each bu-
reau tracks slightly different infor-
mation, so it's a good idea to stag-
ger ordering reports from each
throughout the year.


Say no to "phishing." Be suspi-
cious of realistic-looking emails
- supposedly from trusted sources
- that ask you to supply or confirm
account information, log-in IDs or
passwords. Legitimate business-
es and government agencies will
never ask you to verify sensitive in-
formation by email. When in doubt,
contact the organization yourself:
Never click on the link provided
within the email it could take you
to a copycat website capable of in-
fecting your computer.
The same advice applies to
phone callers purporting to rep-
resent companies with which you
do business: Before verifying or
supplying any private information,
call the main information num-
her yourself (it's usually toll-free)
and verify that the call was legiti-
mate. The Security and Exchange
Commission's Web site, www.sec.
gov/inve sto r/pub s/phi shing.htm,
discusses how to spot and avoid
phishers.
These are only a few of the pre-
cautions you should routinely take
to protect your personal informa-
tion. For more tips, visit Practical
Money Skills for Life, a free per-
sonal financial management site
sponsored by Visa Inc. www.practi-
calmoneyskills.com/security
JasonAlderman directs Visa's~fi-
nancial education programs. Sign
up for his free monthly e-N~ewslet-
ter at www.practicalmoneyskills.
com/newsletter.


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
APALACHICOLA, FL 32329
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


A4 | The Times O~n o


Time to do something


about your pet's poop


THINK ABOUT PERSONAL POLLUTION

outside, there would be no
question that a problem
exists.
Yes, there are animals
in nature but they aren't
concentrated the way we've
concentrated our pets.
Sure, there are wild
animals all around us and
they have always been
here. But look at the chart
again. Wild rabbits have
only 20 fecal bacteria per
gram of waste, and mice,
which most of us think of
as relatively unsanitary,
have only 330,000 per gram
compared to 23 million per
gram in dog waste. Even
horses come in with only
12,600 fecal coliforms per
gram. Dogs win this race.
We import nutrients
to feed our pets. Wild
animals eat what is
available in the natural
landscape. For our

shpp in an te ltr
deposited on the ground,
thereby increasing local
nutrient loads
Besides, just because
we can't affect one part of
the problem, we shouldn't
ignore the part we can
control.
It's just good will...
and good sense. Over
half the residents of our
community don't have
pets and shouldn't have to
deal with what ours leave
behind.
What to do with pet
waste?
*Flush it down the
toilet (without the bag).
*Bury it in the yard.
*Put it in the trash
receptacle.
This advice above
is from the U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency. Protecting our
water quality takes effort
from all of us together.
Visit www.TAPPwater~org
for more information.
TAPP (Thinke About
Personal Pollution)
is funded in part by a
Section 319 Nonpoint
Source Management
Program Implementation
grant from the U.S.
Environmental
Protection Agency
through an agreement
with the Nonpoint Source
Management Section of
the Florida Department
of Environmental

im lmnte dy the
City of Tallahassee
Sto~rmwater Management
Tallahassee's Go Green
initiative '


Hard times embolden identity thieves























































































































































I


Thursday, June d, 2009


Local


The Times | AS


By [oj<; Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

The St. George Island
Lighthouse is extending
its hours to accommodate
the growing number of
visitors to the light and the
nearby visitor center and
lighthouse museum.
An assistant lighthouse
keeper has been hired
to help staff the facility,
and volunteers are being
sought to man the light
and museum.

tor eTe hIl nwabnedoen
10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday
through Saturday, except
on Thursday, and noon
until 5 p.m. on Sunday.
"We are extending our
hours to meet the demand
of our visitors," said St.
George Lighthouse Asso-
ciation President Dennis
Barnell.
Lighthouse Keeper
Stanley Colvin said 6,461
people climbed the light-
house from its opening in
December through mid-
May. The total includes
3,959 adult climbers, 1,243
youth climbers and 1,259
free climbers (children
younger than 6 years old
and Lighthouse Associa-
tion or Florida Lighthouse
Association members).
She said the visitor cen-
ter has been averaging
$1,800 a month in sales in
addition to revenue from
tickets to climb the light.
Island resident Jim
Duncan has been hired to
help Colvin with her du-
ties at the reconstructed
St. George Lighthouse. He
will begin work immediate-
ly and will work 20 hours a
week.


Elaine Rosenthal, direc-
tor of the lighthouse muse-
um and visitor center, said
the association is seeking
new members and volun-
teers to work in a number
of capacities at the center
and during fundraisers.
The association currently
has about 260 active mem-
bers. If you would like to
volunteer, then you can
call the visitor center at
927-7744.

Private aid

to navigation
The association has
submitted an application
to the Coast Guard for the
Cape St. George Light to
be designated as a Private
Aid to Navigation. Inspec-
tors have visited the light-
house several times and
approved the application
with restrictions. The light
will be shielded in a 30 de-
gree are on either side of
the bridge to avoid affect-
ing the vision of motorists.
Barnell has been in-
formed by the Coast
Guard commander in New
Orleans that the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service has
filed an objection to the
light based on its potential
effect on nesting sea tur-
tles. He said that the per-
manent light for the light-
house has arrived from
Vega Industries limited
a New Zealand firm, but
the Coast Guard asked,
not ordered, that it not be
installed until after the
turtle nesting season ends
in October and the light-
house association plans to
comply. A temporary green
light is being used now.
"I don't think it should


PHOTO BY JIM KEMP
New Assistant Lighthouse Keeper Jim Dunkin joins Keeper Stanley Colvin at
the base of the 92-step spiral staircase which leads to the top of the Cape St.
George Light.


be lit during turtle nesting
season," said Bruce Drye,
the island's marine turtle
permit holder. "It kind of
keeps me from doing my
job. It isn't really wildlife
friendly. It is just a tourist
attraction."
Arlene Oehler, president
of the Carrabelle Light-
house Association, said she
had been contacted by the
island lighthouse associa-
tion about the matter.
"We did some research
about wildlife when we
were installing our bea-
con because Lesley Cox
was very concerned about
the matter," she said. "We
found a lot depends on the
size of the light."
Kemp said she is com-
piling information on this


topic so that the asso-
ciation can come to an in-
formed decision. She said
when her research is com-
plete, she plans to share
what she learns with the
Coast Guard and U.S. Fish
and Wildlife.
Rosenthal said the
county has asked that con-
struction of the lighthouse
keeper's house be delayed
until after the tourist sea-
son so as not to have a con-
struction site in the middle
of the park during a busy
time of the year.
Barnell said enough
funds have been raised to
begin the project but not to
complete it. Construction
is expected to begin in late
August.
On May 23, at the annual


meeting of the St. George
Lighthouse Association,
elections for officers and
the association board were
held at the meeting.
Barnell was retained
as president. Terry Kemp
was reelected secretary
and Jim "Skip" Kemp will
again serve as treasurer.
Joe Bacher, Vito Bell, Bud
Hayes, Phyllis Vitale-Lew-
is, Fred Stanley, Ed Tiley,
Rick Plessinger and Rich-
ard Saucer will all continue
to serve on the board of di-
rectors for the association.
Roy Ogles is the steward-
ship coordinator.
Operation of the Cape
St. George Light is funded
in part by the Franklin
County Tourist Develop-
ment Council.


Behavioral Health Center| Bixler EmergencyCenter | CancerCenter| DiabetesCenter| Heart&VascularCenter| NeuroScienceCenter
Orthopedic Center| Rehabilitation Center| Surgery Center| Women's &Children's Services | George E.Weems Memorial Hospital


Ap~alachicola St. George Light expands hours, hires assistant
men


sentence d

for seafood

VIolations

Two Apalachicola men
have been sentenced in
connection with the har-
vesting and sale of illegal
seafood.
Maxwell Wood, United
States attorney for the Mid-
dle District of Georgia, said
co-defendants James Na-

nas ndr ,efer B aenh 0-
50, of Apalachicola, were
sentenced May 7 in Albany,
Ga., by the Honorable W.
Louis Sands, United States
District judge for the Mid-
dle District of Georgia '
Both men, along with
Guy Stovall,a.35,aof D na

D. Brown, 66, of Medart
pleaded guilty to the felony
crime of conspiring to pur-
chase and sell in interstate
commerce fish with a mar-
ket value in excess of $350'
knowing that the fish had
been taken and sold in vio-
lation of Florida laws and
regulations. These four de-
fendants also pleaded guilty
to an additional felony vio-
lation of the Lacey Act.
Nations was sentenced
to a term of imprisonment
of 90 days followed by 90
days home confinement'
a period of supervised re-
lease of two years, and a
fine of $2,000. Cannon was
sentenced to a period of
probation of two years and
a fine of $1,000.
Stovall was sentenced
to a ter mof imoprisonme t

days home confinement, a
period of probation of five
years, and a $7,500 fine.
Brown was sentenced to a
period of probation of two
years and a fine of$5,000.
According to the defen-
dants' plea agreements,
James Stovall, 41, of Co-
quitt, Ga., and Guy Stovall
own and operate Road
Runner Seafood Inc., re-
tail and wholesale sea-
food business in Colquitt.
Brown and Robbie Jenkins,
55, of Perry, owned and op-
erated seafood businesses
in the state of Florida, and
Nations, Cannon and Eric
Donald Woods, 28, of Perry,
were engaged in commer-
cial fishing in the Gulf of
Mexico.
During the time period
of the conspiracy from
April 2004 through August
2006, Road Runner made
106 purchases of fish from
Nations, Cannon, Brown,
Woods, Jenkins and other
sellers. These purchases
included fish known to
have been taken and sold
in violation of Florida laws
and regulations.
Frequent violations in-
cluded harvesting and sell-
ing fish such as red snap-
per, grouper and speckled
trout during closed sea-
sons, and harvesting and
selling fish without the re-
quired state licenses. Upon
each purchase, Guy Stovall
would either fail to submit
required records to the
state of Florida or would
submit false records which
listed a different species of
fish from the actual species
which had been illegally
sold.
Road Runner also pur-
chased a relatively inex-
pensive imported catfish
fillet commonly known as
swai, sutchi or sutchi cat-
fish (the scientific name
being pangasius hypothal-
mus). However, James
Stovall would invoice the
fillets as a different species
of fish, primarily grouper.
He knew that the imported
fillets were not in fact grou-
per.
When law enforcement
agents executed a search
warrant at Road Runner's
business, they discovered
what they suspected to be
sutchi catfish for sale in the
retail section of the busi-
ness. The fish was adver-


tised for sale as "imported
grouper" and "imported
grouper pengoseous."

























































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IV


Thursday, June d, 2009


A6 | The Times


Local


verse auction" pays off the
unpaid taxes, obtains a
first lien on the property,
and must hold the certifi-
cate for at least two years,
and no more than seven,
before he or she can ob-
tain a tax deed and seek to
recoup their profit.
Harris said he offered
up 1,791 delinquent tax
certificates, at a total val-
ue, including penalties,
advertising and commis-
sion, of about $2.94 mil-
lion. This was 673 more
certificates than were of-
fe red last year, to no one's
surprise given the state of
the economy.
Last year about $2.6
million in tax certificate
value was auctioned off.
"More people are delin-
quent," said Harris.
The number of delin-
quent tax certificates have
been steadily rising over
the last four years. For
tax years 2001 through
2005, the county averaged
about 669 tax certificates
sold each year, but after
that, both the number of
certificates and their total
values jumped, to $1.4 mil-
lion in 2006, and in 2007 to
$2.55 million.
Harris could not con-


firm what the average in-
terest rate to be paid on
the certificates was, but
said it probably stayed in
the double-digit range.
"The rates stayed high;
they just would not bid
them down,' he said. "Very
few of them went low."
Bidders are attracted
to the certificates both for
their high interest rates,
as well as the fact they are
a high-priority lien, ahead
of a mortgage, and super-
seded only by federal or
county municipal liens.
"It's a lot better than
what they're earning at
the banks," Harris said.
The tax collector said
he has no plans to go to
an online bidding system,
mainly because his flock
of longtime bidders likes it
the way it is. "I won't say
never, but bidders say they
want a live sale," he said.
The county decided this
year also to advertise for
the sale in the Tallahas-
see and Panama City daily
newspapers, and Harris
said he believes that con-
tributed to the size of the
field.
"That got us a lot of new
bidders in," he said. "Our
county fared fairly well."


"We're starting to wear
those around, crawl with it,
run with it, whatever you
gotta do," he said.
Burke has been attached
to Alpha Company, of the
2nd Battalion of the 198th
Armored Regiment of the
Mississippi National Guard.
He's beginning to settle in to
the routine.
"I'm starting to know the
people I'm going to deployed
with and I couldn't ask for
a nicer group of people to
be with," he said. "All have
been great to me and made
me feel like I've always been
here. These are good Mis-
sissippi salt-of-the-earth
people."
Many of them, also, aren't
much more than half his
age.
"I'm probably the oldest
for my rank," said Burke,
who is a Specialist E-4, one
of the four junior enlisted
ranks in the Armyjust above
Private First Class.
"Most people my age
are majors or lieutenant
colonels or sergeants," he
said.
So how did Burke get
where he is today? And what
does he have to look forward
to tomorrow?


FOUnti 0 WOV ao0Und
Army's age limit
Burke's pathway to the
military began in earnest in
March 2003, when Operation
Iraqi Freedom began.
Burke was a 37-year-old
attorney for the Guardian
ad Litem program in South
Florida. A native of Troy, NY,
he was well-educated, hav-
ing earned a bachelor's in
science in foreign service
from Georgetown Univer-
sity in 1988, and then a law
degree from Albany Law
School in New York three
years later.
"When the war started,
I thought 'I really need to
do something,"' he said.
"I believe in serving one's
country if one can do that. I
figured I was still relatively
young and able to do some-
thing. Kind of a delayed
reaction from 9/11.
"I've always been politi-
cally pretty conservative. I
thought President Bush's
approach made a positive
impact in the Middle East. It
was a reasonable start. I'm
impressed by that and I sus-
pect these autocrats tookno-
tice," he said. "Now whether
it diminished the war on ter-
ror, that's a dividend that will
take years to know."
As a student of foreign
affairs, Burke followed the
situation closely. "I have a
lot of faith in the younger
people, there's a huge young
population in Iraq, a huge
percentage of the popula-
tion is between 18 and 45. On
the flip side, the life expec-
tancy of a male is 68 years
old," he said. "I think there's
hope younger people will
moderate."
But back in the U.S.,
Burke himself was hitting
40 back in 2003, and so when
he made the decision to sign
up, the Army Reserve's re-
jection letter indicated they
weren't interested. "I think
the age cutoff was 36 or 35 at


that time," he said.
A woman who he worked
with at the Guardian ad Li-
tem program suggested
the Navy Reserve program,
which had a cutoff age of 39
at the time.
And so, beginning in
June 2003, he began his one
weekend a month commit-
ment with drills in Hialeah,
and then did three weeks on
the Great Lakes on a Navy
Reserve boat.
But still, he yearned for
the Army. "It wasn't fun but
it wasn't bad," said Burke. "I
felt like I wanted to do some-
thing more, to be a soldier, to
he more deployable."
As it turned out, Burke's
18 months with the Navy Re-
serve gave him a backdoor
entry into the Army Nation-
al Guard, which he decided
upon after getting a little
"encouragement" from his
fellow sailors.
"At the time I thought
because of my age, I wasn't
sure what I could do. I got in
there and I remember one
guy saying 'Burke's high
speed,' he remembered.
By this time, Burke had
taken a job with the Florida
Department of Corrections,
which brought him up to
Tallahassee, and was still
drilling with the Navy Re-
serve.
But this time, now over
40, when he applied for the
Army National Guard, he
was credited with prior ser-
vice in the Navy and so was
granted entry in late 2004.

'J ley (10n't reallly
let you go'
Burke was assigned to
Alpha company of the Tal-
lahassee-based 53rd Infan-
try Brigade, 3rd Battalion,
124th Infantry Regiment of
the Guard, and in late 2006,
switched over the Char-
lie 'Itoop, a cavalry scout
squadron.
He faced the monthly
drills, and two weeks of an-
nual training, with soldiers
who frequently Florida State
University students and
their peers, ranging in age
from 18 to their mid 20s.
Burke, at 5'11" and 185
pounds, had scored well on
the APFT, the Army Physi-
cal Fitness Test, a three
event physical performance
test used to assess endur-
ance, that measures perfor-
mance on sit-ups, push-ups
and a two-mile run.
"I'm actually in pretty
good shape, which has al-
ways helped everything," he
said.
But it wasn't all a breeze.
The new Guardsman had
been assigned to a special
program, essentially a re-
peat of the basic training he
had received when he joined
the Navy Reserves. This
meant a five-week Warrior
'Itansition Course, at Fort
Knox.
"That was hard," Burke
recalls. "Constant physical
exhaustion."
In August 2007, as he
neared the end of his three
year commitment, Burke
went to work as an attorney
with the 2nd district of the
state's Guardian ad Litem
program, overseeing cases


in Gulf Calhoun, Washing-
ton, Holmes, Jackson and
Bay counties.
He bought a house in
Apalachicola, and his three
years of drilling ended
Nov. 2007, but he decided to
extend it one more year. "I
felt like my three years went
by pretty quick," he said.
He had put in an appli-
cation to serve as a Judge
Advocate but later with-
drew consideration. "It
would have been with the
purpose of maybe staying
in 20 years," he said. "The
military's not in my blood.
They pressure you to stay in
but I didn't join for a career.
I love my country and I'm
really happy to serve. I'm
very much looking forward
to concluding my service
too."
Conclusionofthatservice
Burke thought was last No-
vember, when he wrapped
up his four years and ended
his monthly drilling. "It
felt good too. I slept in that
weekend," he said.
Burke was placed in In-
dividual Ready Reserve
(IRR) status, meaning he
didn't get paid or had to
drill, but was subject to be-
ing called up at any time.
"I got several emails to
join other units, with the
threat that if I didn't, I'd
get deployed soon. I heard
through the grapevine, so
I knew it was a credible
possibility," he said.
And sure enough, on
Feb. 4, Burke got the letter.
"I said 'Oh boy, won't this
be a disrupting event," he
recalled.


'Kind of easing
people back in
After tying up loose
ends with his job and home
(they've hired a temporary
replacement at work and
he has friends taking care of
the house), Burke prepared
in February and March for
his April 5 flight from Pan-
ama City to Columbus, Ga.
He was anxious, wondering
whether he would secure
medical clearance.
"It's entirely possible
they won't deploy me, but
I'm not expecting that," he
said, before he left.
As it turned out, his
physical condition was in
good shape for a tour of duty
in the Middle East. And the
anxiety has abated.
"That has luckily passed.
That whole anxiety is
over and that was really
stressful," he said.
"There were a bunch of
Other guys coming in at the
same time, and all got picked
up on the bus. We got on the
bus and nobody was saying
anything," he recalled, as
they approached Fort Ben-
ning. "The driver said 'Je-
sus, you guys all sound like
you're all going to back to
basic training. It's not going
to be that bad."
Burke expected Fort
Benning to be "just one of
those experiences. Sud-
denly the drills sergeants
arrive and all hell breaks
loose. And then you're' sit-
ting around afew dy sdoi g
paperwork."
But this time, the arrival


was more low-key. "It was
pretty subdued. I expected
it to be a lot worse than it
was. They were kind of gen-
tle with us," said Burke.
"A lot of guys were ac-
tive duty who had been out
two or three years," he said.
"Generally for the young
guys, many had been over
there once or twice. They're
just kind of easing people
back in. I feel worse for the
people who have been out
for years. Three and four
years seems to be the com-
mon number that I'm hear-
ing."
The 100 or so soldiers re-
ceived refresher training at
Fort Benning, and got to be
fairly close, Burke said.
"Most got out two or
three years ago, and said
just about everything they
went to was hot. Iraq was
very hot back then," said
Burke. "And all these guys
almost had a CIB (Combat
Infantry Badge).
"That strikes home," he
said. "He's telling you it was
like being there last week.
How one of the youngest
guys got killed in his unit his
last week there. Shot in the
face. When you hear those
stories from people your
training with, it really does
hit home."
But now that he's at
Camp Shelby, where there
are "thousands roaming
around here," the pace is
picking up and the digs
aren't as fancy.
"Fort Benning is like a
country club compared to
here," he said. "This is out
in the middle of nowhere in
the woods, with basic lodg-
ing and training."
Burke also has received
a cursory review of Iraqi
history and culture. He's
been attached to a more
mechanized infantry unit
than he was familiar with in
Tallahassee.
"Basically everything's
done through vehicles, even
though we're infantry," he
said. "We'll be doing secu-
rity and/or convoy."
As it appears now, in a
few weeks he'll be off to Ku-
wait for two or three weeks
and then on to Iraq.
Since his original order
was for 400 days, starting
from April 5, it looks like
he's committed at least until
mid-May 2010, but it could
be longer.
"The problem is with the
Army, it's like the Mafia.
They don't really let you go,"
he joked. "So this thing could
happen all over again.
"I'm nervous about be-
ing in the Army for a year,"
Burke said. "I've never de-
ployed. I'm going with a unit
I don't know. I trust they're
going to be cool. I guess
I'm just nervous about the
unknown."
"My biggest fear is I'd
make a mistake and do
something stupid and get
somebody hurt," he said.
"That's always my biggest
fear about the military.
"Every soldier complains
and is miserable at points
in time and just wants to
get out and go home," said
Burke. "But in the big pic-
ture it's exactly the reason I
signed up."


Su reyin g & Mapp in g '7f
1177 Cape San Blas Road | Port St. Joe, Flor a
Phone: 850-227-7252 | Cell: 850-527-7869
surv227@yahoo.com

Bou nd ary
ToDoa raDhy a


comprised of Sid Dumas, of Hunts-
ville, Ala., and Rtavis Stanley, Olan
Ward and Walter Mack Ward, all of
Apalachicola, reduced the price of
the offering from $10,000 to $9,000 an
acre. This meant it was less than the
$9,038 per acre low end of the lower of
two appraisals.
Mirabella said the Federal Avia-
tion Authority (FAA) asked the
county to purchase the land.
"The FAA recommended you buy
the land? The sellers did not offer it
to you?" Parrish asked.
Mirabella said this was correct,
and that the purchase was for the
safety of the airport and community.
Other airports have been impinged
on by development, and forced after
the fact to purchase buffer land with
structures on it, he said.
"If we don't purchase this land
now," he said, "we may be forced to
buy it later with the taxpayers' money.
Federal grant money is available now.
This is the first phase of a three-part
project to buy 70 acres of buffer land.


"If we don't make this purchase,
we will lose the money for phases two
and three. That is $631,000 the county
won't be getting," said Mirabella.
"I believe if we don't buy this land,
the FAA is going to tell us in the fu-
ture we have to buy it. Then it will
be with the money of the taxpayers,"
said Putnal.
"I think this is the best time to buy
it. Knowing the situation of the gov-
ernment, money that they have today
might be gone tomorrow," Lockley
said.
Parrish told the commission he
believed "this is the only approach
we can purchase without having to
eminent domain peoples' houses,
including mine."
He said wetland areas in the buf-
fer zone could be used for mitigation
on future airport projects because the
land would never be developed.
Dr. Randy Randolph, of Jackson-
ville and Apalachicola, son of former
airport manager Cleve Randolph,
begged commissioners to make the


purchase. He said he regularly flies
into the airport and that the buffer
zone is needed.
"If you look at a map, ours is the
biggest airport between Tallahassee
and Panama City. I'm here to plead
with the members of the board to
please pass this because it will protect
Apalachicola and the airport. In the
future, we will have to purchase this
land with county money," he said.
The discussion ended once again
in a split vote with Putnal and Lock-
ley favoring the purchase and Sand-
ers and Jackel opposed. Once again
Parrish recused himself.
The purchase would be jointly
funded by the FAA, which provides
95 percent of the grant, and the Fed-
eral Department of Transportation
(DOT), which provides the other
5 percent. Because the county is
eligible for economic development
funding, it was not required to pro-
vide any matching funds for the pur-
chase. The FAA also paid for closing
costs and surveys.


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Ca ll 1-877-U-CAN-NO W or visit Florida Quit Line.com


IV


Thursday, June d, 2009


Local


The Times | A7


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

Volunteer firefighters are
seeking an increase in Mu-
nicipal Services Benefit Unit
(MSBU) rates to offset in-
creases in the cost of equip-
ment and training, but the
county commission says a tax
increase is problematic.
On 'lIesday afternoon, fol-
lowing a May 6 meeting by the
Franklin County Firefighters
Association, commissioners
held a workshop to discuss
proposed changes to MSBU
rates. These are rates paid by
county property owners that
go towards keeping the fire
departments afloat.
The firefighters propose
to raise MSBUs across the
board, but the most contro-
versial suggestion is to assess
vacant parcels of land at rate
of $30 per year. In the past, no
fee has been assessed for un-
developed land.
Jay Abbott, president of
the firefighters' association
said 80 to 90 percent of fire
calls are to brush fires on
undeveloped parcels. He


said the fires are triggered
by lightning, fireworks and
campfires.
"WYhen you start talking
about raising people's taxes,
you're committing suicide,"
said Commissioner Bevin
Putnal. "There's people who
live way up in the woods who
don't want to pay anything
because if their house catch-
es on fire it will burn before
you even get there."
Abbott said, "Generally
with a structural fire, you
are preventing the fire from
spreading and starting a
huge forest fire or burn-
ing down someone else's
house."
Steve Fling, chief of the
Alligator Point Volunteer
Fire Department, said resi-
dents need to take into ac-
count other duties of the
fire departments when they
consider MSBU increases,
He cited first responder ser-
vices as an example.
'On Alligator Point, we of-
ten put a patient on the heli-
copter to the hospital before
the ambulance even arrives,"
he said.


Abbot said outfitting a
firefighter costs around
$7,000 and workman's comp
insurance runs $70 per per-
son annually. This is in ad-
dition to equipment main-
tenance and thousands of
dollars in liability insurance
and training, paid by indi-
vidual departments annu-
ally.
Eastpoint Fire Chief
George Pruett said the
county is a unique situation
because of its rural nature.
He said the Eastpoint Vol-
unteer Fire Department
covers 200 square miles.
"We don't just work our
districts, said Abbott. "We
mutual aid a lot. The Apala-
chicola State Bank fire is a
good example of that. With-
out help, the whole block
would have burned."
The commission said
they would set a date for a
public workshop at the next
commission meeting.
"You don't need to con-
vince us of what you do,
you need to convince the
public," said Commissioner
Cheryl Sanders.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
On Saturday, Tallahassee still life artist Pam
Talley had a sidewalk art show at The Pearl
on Water Street, at 230 Water Street. Talley,
holding art above, who has been teaching
art for 20 years, said, "Creating art is about
documenting my personal experiences in the
world and preserving a unique visual memory."


O Florida Department of Health


Fifefightefs propose hike in MSBU fees


PAINTER AT THE PEARL


Proposed changes
OUtlined
The current assessment
for a single-family dwelling or
a single unit of a multi family
rental property is $42. The pro-
posed increase of $15 would in-
crease the assessment to $57.
Mobile home parks would
be assessed at $16 per space,
with a maximum of $160 per
trailer park. This is an increase
of $4 per space.
The proposed increase for
travel trailer and RV rental
spaces is $3 per space, bring-
ing the rate to $8 per space.
The proposed MSBU for
hotels and inns is $10 per room,
an increase of $3 per unit.
The rate for commercial
buildings would increase $25
to $100.
Buildings housing multiple
business activities would pay
$500, an increase of$200.
Vacant parcels of land, for-
merly not assessed, would be
assessed at $30 per parcel.
Also proposed are in-
creased assessments for
buildings on pilings over 28
feet in height.





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Thursday, June d, 2009


Local


-


Call Bob Dallas
(850) 522-4078


PHOTO BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Pastor Roy Carroll addresses the Class of 2009 at the baccalaureate service Sunday afternoon.


Giametta, Sarah Hadsock,
Derek Salyer, Desiree 'It~est
and Elodie Ward.
Graduating with honors,
for earning a 3.0 or better
grade point, will be Miran-
da Banks, Jamie Daniels,
Tomilee Dowden, Charles
Goggins, Patricia Golden,
Nicholas Hewett, Alana
Hutchins, Parrish Johnson,
Dakota Klink, Andre' Mc-
Queen, Paige Moses, Tevin
Ray, Chelsea Soderholm,
Katrisha Washington and
Whitley Wilson.
Other graduates include
Gene Anderson, Steven
Babb, Kevin Beasley, Bran-
di Benton, Heather Benton,
Jarrod Bergstrom, Hannah
Boatwright, Karah Busby,
Isiah Buzbee, Quanteka
Croom, Cheyenne Cruson,
Khrystal Davis, Lloyd Da-
vis Jr., Bradley Douglas,
Bobby Garrett, Bri'Ana
Gordon, Arielle Griffin,
Andrew Gurganus, Bo
Hardman, Kristina Harts-
field, Brittany Hunnings,
Jeremy James, Alexander
Jetton Patrick Johnson,
Patrick Jones, Miles King,
Brandon Lashley, Jacob


Lee, T.J. Lemieux, Shelby
Lipscomb, Vincent Litton,
RyAnna Lockley, Dakota
Massey, Jared Mock, Ash-
ley Myers, Grace O'Neal,
Kristen Parmele, Glenn
Richards Jr., Christopher
Sanders, Antonio Sanders
Jr., Marty Shirley, Alex-
ander Simmons, Brittney
Smith, Asenath Thomas,
David Varnes, A.J. Wil-
liams, Jr., Richard Williams
and Deshaun Winfield.



Stresses snaking the
right choicOS
Following an awards
assembly Friday morning
at school, the sanctuary
at the Eastpoint Church
of God was filled to near
standing room only Sunday
afternoon for the annual
baccalaureate service.
Brittany Marie Smith,
the class president, led the
Pledge of Allegiance, fol-
lowed by a welcome from
senior Tevin Ray.
Bishop Robert Davis,
from the Love & Worship
Center Church Worldwide,
provided an openingpraye ,
encouraging the graduates
to continue their search
for learning. In his closing
benediction, Pastor Don
Carroll, of the Carrabelle
Christian Center, shared a
similar message.
"Wisdom is knowledge
of the future," said Car-
roll. "On top of wisdom and
knowledge, you need un-
derstanding.
Following a Scriptural
reading of Psalm 23 by Ry-
Anna Lockley, and a solo
by Brittany Hunnings, Su-
perintendent Nina Marks
offered the keynote words


of encouragement. (See
sidebar on Page A10).
At the outset, the wom-
en who helped organize
the service distributed to
each member of the class,
a tiny plastic bag filled with
a star, a string, a whistle
and a fork, items that
Marks elaborated on in
her remarks. Sponsors of
the baccalaureate included
Nellie Sanders, Lora Had-
sock, Barbara Lockley and
Tammie Ray-Hutchinson.
A slide show, featuring
pictures from the child-
hoods of each graduate,
set to music, then was pro-
jected on a giant screen
in front. The presentation
was prepared by seniors
Angela Ochala and Chelsea
Soderholm.
The Free Fire dance
ministry from the Car-
rabelle Christian center
then performed a stirring
routine on the altar. Bare-
foot, and dressed in red-
t-shirts and camouflage
pants, the dancers moved
the audience with their
spirited steps, complete
with handstands, leaps and
high-stepping enthusiasm.
Pastor Roy Carroll, who
also teaches at the Frank-
lin County School, then of-
fered a moving inspiration,
opening by joking that "if I
hadn't been in this suit," he
would have joined in with
the dancers.
He told the soon-to-be
graduates that he would
offer "perspective from an
educator, a man with gray
hair and a friend" in his
remar s.
"'OK, thanks, but what
now? Where do we go from
here?" Carroll said, echo-
ing the questions ringing in
the students' heads.


He told the seniors how
they were now "in a phe-
nomenal, once-in-a-lifetime
place" and urged them
to consider "three little
things" as they embarked
on the future.

Who do you know
and trust?
First, he said, there's an
"internalization of values"
challenge.
"Who are you going to
be, and why are you going
to become that person?"
he asked. "There comes
a point where you are the
one to make the call."
Carroll hearkened back
to when he was just an el-
ementary school student
in the county, years ear-
lier, and how when he was
playing Red Rover, the op-
posing line broke and he
found himself hurled into
the mud.
"I learned then you
have to be careful who you
trust," he said. "There are
going to be some of you for-
tunate enough to decide for
yourself."
While Carroll's search
for God was born as a
youth, he didn't get the
answers so quickly or so
clearly, he told the seniors.
"I remember walking and
looking at the stars and
asked "God, if you're there,
talk to me"'" he said. "And
He never did."
The pastor encouraged
the students to focus on
the fact that they will be-
come subject to persua-
sion as they mature, and
to hold fast to God as a
source for understanding.

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Thursday, June 4, 2009 w ww. a pala ch ti m es com Page 9


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Honored at the May 23 sports banquet were the girls middle school .
basketball team, under the leadership of Coach Paul Bankston, his wife,
Carla, and his sons Nahshon and C.J. Bankston. Bankston presented each
player with an 8 x 10 photo for moms. Taking part in the 2008-09 season
were Dixie Bach, Myesha Campbell, Ashley Carroll, Andrea Cupid, Julie D.,
Katarena Davidson, Carla Dean, Keaton Hersey, Dysheriah Key, Anna Lee,
Samantha Marxsen, Stephanie Marxsen, Meagan McClain, Haleigh Ming
and Shelby Myers. Receiving the three leadership awards were, from left,
McClain, Myers and Carroll.


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Above, honored by the Booster Club
at the May 22 high school spor:Fts
banquet was Tim Whiteheadrgt
for being a "Super Booster." In her
-~IIIIC ~ ~presentation, Monica Moron, left, said
he was voted the boosters consensus
pick for the award "for going the extra
mile, and giving of himself tirelessly."
Above, Seahawks basketball coach Fred Drake, left, enjoys a laugh as he
received a special presentation of a cash award from the Boosters at the high
school sports banquet May 22. Drake led the Seahawks to the Class 2A Final
Four and was recently named runner-up to Big Bend Coach of the Year in a
vote by his peers. At right is Franklin County Principal George Oehlert.

s aodft lea~haawks gireshbasoketdba he
volleyball team, under the direction of
David Walker, included Megan Andrews,
Joy Carrino, Quanteka Croom, Jamie
Daniels, Khrystal Davis, Brooke Harper,
Emily HatField, Alana Hutchins, Cecillia
James, Carli Klink, Ciara Moore, Megan
Newell, Oneika Lockley, Morgan Newell,
Angela Ochala, Grace O'Neal, Christian
Pateritsas, Brandi Pridgen, Chelsea
Soderholm, Harley Tucker, Tiffany Varnes
and Karah Busby. Hutchins received the
award for best sportsmanship. Daniels for
most improved, O'Neal for best defensive player, Davis for best offensive player,
and Croom, left, for Most Valuable Player.
Also honored was the 2009 softball team, under the direction of coach Christy
Thompson. Playing this year were Meagan Andrews, Tiffany Carroll, Khrystal
Davis, Kendyl Hardy, Kara Harrelson, Brooke Harper, Gracyn Kirvin, Ally
Millender, Ciara Moore, Megan Newell, Morgan Newell, Leigh Redmond,
Chena Segree, Shelby Shiver, and Harley Tucker. Morgan Newell won best
defensive player, Chena Segree won best offensive player, Megan Newell won
best all-around player, senior sportsmanship went to Davis, and Shiver, at right,
won Most Valuable Player.





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Pictured left, honored at the May 23 Franklin County Middle School sports
banquet, held in the school's cafetorium, were the members of Coach Mike
Todd's middle school boys basketball team. Taking part in the 2008-09
season were David Butler, Jamie Golden, Leonard Green, Zach Howze,
Skyler Hutchinson, Tyler Rowell, Roy Williams and Teran Wilson. Named top
defensive player was Hutchinson, at right, and named most enthusiastic player
was Rowell, at left. Names top offensive players was Williams.
Pictured right, also honored were the 2008-09 Seahawks, who included Marcus
Allen, Brandon Hand, Jeremy James, Patrick Jones, Zach Jones, Dalin Modican,
Carlos Morris, Austin O'Neal, Arron Prince, Alexander Simmons, AJ Williams,
Deshaun Winfield and James Winfield. Honored as best offensive player for
the second consecutive year was Morris, right, who was also an AII-Big Bend
first team selection, as picked by Panhandle coaches. James was best defensive
player, while Winfield, left, who was second team AII Big Bend, also won the
team's MVP honors for the second straight year.


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Thursday, June d, 2009


Baccalaureate


~6~-1~Qt~



QzC~/


By Nina Marks

Editor's Note: The fol-
lowing remarks were de-
livered by Superintendent
Nina Markcs at Sunday's
baccalaureate service.
At the outset, the ushers
passed out plastic bags
to each senior and inside
were a star a whistle, a
string and a forkc.

In the spring of 1972, my
high school guidance coun-
selor called in my parents.
I, being the oldest of
four, made my highly edu-
cated British father quite
proud. I was the first of his
children who would travel
away from home to pur-
sue a career in education.
Needless to say, when the
guidance counselor told
him, "Nina will not be a
successful college student,
she should've prepared for
something else," he was
not a happy man and I had
a lot to prove to myself
and to the parents I didn't
want to disappoint!
Let me share with you
today a simple story of
expectations, choices, and
wishes.
Remember when you
were younger and some-
one read the story of Pin-
occhio? For this moment,
place yourselves into the
life of that character. As


come a real boy, but he had
to meet expectations first,
sort of like your require-
ments to become a real
graduate.
Now, look in your tool
bag and pull out the string.
In the story Pinocchio


"Who do you know? Who
can you trust?" Carroll
said. "There's going to be
a point where you must be
persuaded."
He then quoted Paul's
words, in 2 Timothy, when
the disciple wrote "Yet I
am not ashamed, because
I know whom I have be-
lieved, and am convinced
that he is able to guard
what I have entrusted to
him for that day."
Carroll told of his expe-
riences going to college in
Tallahassee, when his faith
was tested when friends
wanted to party. "I remem-
her how tough it was," he
said, recalling the pressure
to drink. "I said 'Bring me a
Pepsi.' They want me to be
sociable? I said 'Bring me a
Pepsi.'
"I do not fault them.
I do not judge them my-
self," he said. "I couldn't do
it. It takes strength to be
self-directed.
He then cited a pas-
sage from Romans, which
reads "And we know that
in all things God works for
the good of those who love
him, who have been called
according to his purpose.
Carroll stressed that
"You have to know and you
have to do. What kind of
path are you going to go?"
He then cited a pas-
sage from Job, which reads
"There is a path which no
fowl knoweth, and which
the vulture's eye hath not
seen: The lion's whelps
have not trodden it, nor the
fierce lion passed by it."


PHOTO BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Superintendent Nina Marks addresses the


baccalaureate service.

sings he's "got no strings
to tie him down." He truly
believes he can go through
life on his own, much like
many of you here today.
I believed I could do any-
thing when I was 18, too.
That's youth,
As the story continues,
he is told he must prove his
bravery, his truthfulness,
and his unselfishness to
become real or in your cas-
es, to graduate. He is told
that if he needs any help
to just give a little whistle
-but, he still believes he
can do it on his own. You
will find your whistle in you
tool bag
Pinocchio still doesn't
get it! He continually
comes to a fork in the road


science or learning from
his mistakes. Peer pres-
sure was everywhere yet,
he still believes he can do
it on his own. A fork has
been provided for you in
your tool bag. The next
time you pick up a fork,


PHOTO BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Seniors Ashley Myers, left, and Paige Moses smile
from their pew at the baccalaureate service Sunday
afternoon.


think, as Oprah says for
a split second before you
make a decision...and let
your conscience be your
guide.
The darkness of the
cobblestone streets and
the undesirable characters
creating temptation make
Pinocchio realize he needs
to make better choices in
his life. He wishes upon
a star; a glow in the dark
star is provided in your
tool bag..
Finally, the little pup-
pet's wish comes true
and he becomes a real
boy. That's what we call
maturity.
When I left for college, I
believed I could do it all on
my own, with no strings to
Slimtle d tler becus
wanted to be independent.
Luckily, as it turns out,
when a fork in the road ap-
peared, I followed the path
right for me.
Just like the character
Pinocchio, I have learned
many lessons while travel-
ing the road to becoming
a real adult, but the most
important lesson I learned
was that I could not do it
completely on my own.
Graduates, look at your
star again. Think about
who you can depend on,
when you wish upon your
star.
And parents, fam-
ily members, guests today,
please remember "Your
child has many hidden
treasures that, once uncov-
ered, polished like a star,
and held up to the light of
encouragement, will lead
them to success."

Tn tem emmyr ol T98,
26 years later, I walked
across a stage in Talla-
hassee, along with Linda
Massey, Brenda Wilson,
Cathy Wood, and many oth-
ers to receive a master s
degree. Encouragement
and support was all around
me and my very proud Dad
was there to cheer me on
and to congratulate me
on my 4.0 G.PA. The first
thing he said to me was "I
wonder where that high
school guidance counselor
is today? I didn't know and
it didn't matter anymore.
Once again, locate your
star:
Place your star of en-
couragement somewhere
for it to glow in the dark
(your car visor, your bed
headboard, anywhere) to
rmn dbou nhat thedpeo le
your support. So, just give
a little whistle when you
need them.
Thank you for allow-
ing me to be a part of your
lives.

supa eMarkcs is h
Franklin County Schools.


But, Carroll continued,
God "will lead you into joy
and righteousness, and in
the steps that will bless
your life.
As he prepared to wrap
up, he reminded the se-
niors that "it's not what I do
for God, it's what God does
for me. The most important
thing is who you know."
Principal George Oe-
hlert then offered brief
remarks, reminding the
audience that baccalaure-
ate services date back to
1432, long before there was


a United States.
He noted the Supreme
Court had laid down rules
that applied the Constitu-
tional requirement of a sep-
aration of church and state
to public school settings.
"As long as they're stu-
dent-driven, they couldn't
take that away," he said.
"But even if they did, I know
Franklin County would do
it anyway.
Refreshments followed
the service, compliments of
the Philaco Women's Club
of Apalachicola.


I~ I


Dr. Laban Bontrag er is pleased to announce the
associateship of his da ug hter Dr. Monica Bontrag er
at his practice in Bristol. Monica is currently
accepting new patients. Together they offer years
Of experience along with new and fresh ideas.
MOnica is a recent graduate from the University Of
Florida College Of Dentistry.


.... .... ..... '

,.1. 1 ,.1 .~ ~I.,.I.. I you all we could. It's time for us
..1. .... ~... .. II....e is so much pain in that, but there
I, alou a ...,underf ul ~cnlse of pride and accomplishment
as we look at our beautiful daughter. We love you
Kaitlyn, and we pray that our love will sustain you
forever. It's time now... spread your wings and fly.


BrjStOI Dental Clinic
Dr. Laban Bontra er
Dr. Monica Bontrager
12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd.
Bristol, FL 32321
(850) 643-5417


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Thursday, June 4, 2009 w w w. a pala ch t i mes co0m Page 1


B
Section


county High School


KARAH
LYNIETTE BUSBY


ISIAH TYRONE
BUZBEE


HEATHER JARROD
CORINNE LAMONT
BENITONI BERGSTROM


HANNEAH
LILLIAN
BOATWRIGHT


QUANITEKA WHITNIEY JAMIE LEIGH ERIKA LADALE KHRYSTAL
SHENAY CHEYENNE DANIIELS DAVIS FAITH DAVIS
CROOM CRUSON


LLOYD EDWARD BRADLEY SCOTT
DAVIS JR. DOUGLAS


TOMILEE BOBBY WAYNE
MELISSA GARRETT
DOWDENI


JAMI LEIGH
GIAMETTA


ARIELLE
DESTANI
GRIFFIN


SARAH JESSICA
HADSOCK


BO KINCAID
HARDMAN


KRISTINA NICHOLAS
PAULINIE ALEX HEWETT
HARTSFIELD


BRITTANY
NIICOLE
HUNNINEGS


ALANA
GABRIELLE
HUTCHINIS


CHARLES PATRICIA BRI'ANA
ANDREW DARLENE SHANITAVIA
GOGGINS GOLDEN GORDON






JEREMY JAVONI PARRISH CATES PATRICK
JAMES JOHNSON RASHAD JONES


MILES DAKOTA JAMES
HAMILTONI KLINIK
KINIG


BRANIDONI ERIK
LASHLEY


JACOB AUSTINI THOMAS FRED SHELBY ANN RYANNA ELISE
LEE LEMIEUX JR. LIPSCOMB LOCKLEY


JAMES DAKOTA ANIDRE' LAVON
MASSEY MCQUEEN


JARED MICHAEL
MOCK


JOELLENI PAIGE ASHLEY MARIE
MOSES MYERS


ANIGELA RAE GRACE MARIE KRISTENI TEVINI GLENNE ALLENI
OCHALA O'NIEAL NIICOLE JERRARD RAY RICHARDSJ1R.
PARMELE






DEREK LEE ANITONIIO MARTY DEANI ALEXANDER BRITTNIEY
SALYER ANITHONIY SHIRLEY DANIIEL MKCHELE SMITH
SANIDERS JR. SIMMONIS


DESIREE
NKIOLE TREST


ELODIE
WARD


CHELSEA
CHEYENE
SODERHOLM


ASENATH
SHALMANISER
A. THOMAS


RALPH DAVID
VARNIES III


ZACHARY
BRYCE WARD








JAEVAHAUN
WINIFIELD


KATRISHA
NIYSHAUN
WILLIAMS
WASHINIGTONI


PAULA CHEREE
WHIDDON


RKCHARD LOUIS
WILLIAMS


WHITLEY
MARKITA
WILSONI


NOT PK(TURED
Kenneth Andrew Gurganus
Alexa nder Jacob Jetton
Patrick Roy Johnson
Vincent Lee Litton
Christopher Wayne Sanders
Alexander Jerome Williams, Jr.


LIFE


TI~ES









Graduates


Kayla Shuler

graduates from PSJ

Kayla Danielle Shuler
graduated on Monday,
June 1, 2009, from Port St.
Joe High School.
She plans to attend
Tallahassee Community
College in August. She is
the daughter of J. Gordon
and Rebecca Shuler, of
Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents
are Hollis and Kathermne
Fleeman of Clarksville.
Paternal grandmother Paternal grandfather is
is Elaine Gordon Alfred O. Shuler, Sr., of
Santiagoe, of Tallahassee. Panama City.


Caithin Shuler

graduates from PSJ


Happy Birthday


Shaylee M~artina turns 2


Sheyanne RUSsell born


GL\.CI & Toll Free:
(888) 831-6754
Franklin County:
(850) 670-5555

*Onb,~s 92696 Leon County:

Helping Hands Make The Difference





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PET OF THE NE
-WE KI I


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
AMERICAN-MADE MEMORIES: It was like a step
back in time when the Model A and T Club
of Northwest Florida visited Apalachicola last
weekend. Eight cars from Fort Walton Beach,
five of them antiques, made the journey to the
Antique Car Museum in Tallahassee and spent
the night in Apalachicola on the way home, a
round trip of 250 miles. The ancient engines
of these pampered beauties purred on Sunday
morning as the revved up for the last leg of
the journey. A club member said the antiques
average around 15 miles per gallon.







1_-,,, I II "' ir 111 llllr 1 .lyI .I' II'


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DON'T PAY TOO MUCH!
$50 Quarterly
Saves YOU $100 a year!

Aloha Buls Post Maremnal0RC
Franklin County's ONLY LOCAL Pest control company
Call Lois at (850) 653-5857


Thursday, June d, 2009


B2 | The Times


Society


Shaylee Martina
celebrated her second
birthday on Friday, May
29.
She is the daughter
of Glenn and Danielle
Martina, of Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents
are Billy and Serita
Gay, and paternal
grandparents are Alvin
and Kathy Martina, all of
Apalachicola.


Christopher Lee Russell
Jr.is proud toannounce the
birth of his baby sister.
Sheyanne Leshay
Russell was born on
Thursday, May 28, at
10:27 a.m. on her daddy's
birthday. She was born
at Gulf Coast Medical
Center in Panama City
and measured a sweet 19
inches long. She weighed in
at 6 lbs. and 3.2 oZs.
Her proud parents are
Christopher Lee Russell, Sr.
and April Lynn Russell, of
Eastpoint.
Maternal grandparents
are Joe and Becky Banks,
and paternal grandparents


Caitlin Elizabeth Shuler
graduated on Monday, June
1, 2009, from Port St. Joe
High School '
She plans to attend Gulf
CoastCommunityCollege in
August. She is the daughter
of Thomas M. and Nancy
Shuler, of Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents
are James E and
Margaret Anne Stokes, of
Apalachicola.
Paternal grandmother
is Elaine Gordon
Santiagoe, of Tallahassee.


r"rr


are Carlos and Christine
Russell, all from Eastpoint.
Maternal great-
grandfather is Bill Banks, of
Eastpoint. Proudgodparents
are April and Frankie
Dalton, ofEastpoint.


Paternal grandfather
Alfred O. Shuler, Sr.,
Panama City.


Segree


Ryan Segree and May
O'Kelley will be joined
together in holy matrimony
on Saturday afternoon,
June 6 at 4 p.m. at the
Eastpoint Church of God.
Ryan is the son of
Ronnie and Vickie Segree,
of Eastpoint. He is the
father of daughters Tristin
and Kimberly Segree.
May is the daughter
of Marva O'Kelley, of
Birmingham, AL, and the
late Charles O'Kelley, of
Wilmington, DE. She is
the mother of Trevor and
Maegen Wynn.


Steven Christopher
Overcash graduated on
Saturday, May 9 from the
Walker School of Business
at Appalachian State
University in Boone, N.C.,
with a bachelor of science
in business administration,
with a major in banking and
finance.
For four years he was
involved in a Special
Olympics fundraiser, the
Polar Plunge. He was a
member of the First Baptist
Church Youth Group in
Blowing Rock, NC. He
played intramural football,
basketball and softball for
all four years.
Steven is an avid
snowboarder and karaoke
singer. He never missed an
Appalachian State home


The wedding celebration
will unite their two families
into one. All family and
friends are invited to
attend.


football game in three years
and travelled to many away
games.
Steven is the son of Sandi
Hengle, of Apalachicola,
and the nephew of Lynda
Adair, of Apalachicola. He is
pictured at his graduation
with his mother, Sandi
Hengle.


~~Bo~ ~3


Cipa


Bubba
Bubba, a 3-month old Shar Pei mix, arrived at
the Adoption Center a month ago. He is a sweet
and absolutely adorable little boy in need of a
loving home.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more details or
visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244
State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the
website at www forgottenpets.org to see more of
or oempb r, shen you adopt a friend for life,
you not only save the life of that pet, you make
room for us to save the life of one more abandoned
dog or cat!


rogeoNp


r.*/f. J


Canoe the Bayous of the Bays

$1 5 for %/ Day

866-7417
98Stbayecotours.com


FOrida State



Ifir 8n 00 XperI


to pek Jn 1 1


An internationally Big Bend, part of "The
known Florida State Nation's Food Bank
University scientist and Network," the marine
fire-ant expert will speak lab is collecting non-
on "Fire Ant Biology and perishable food items
Ecology" at a free i at its monthly
public lecture onl -L lectures. Attendees
Thursday, June r~~Iare asked to bring
11, at The Florida I rIaan item or two
State University IIt 3 and help solve
Coastal and Marine LLi the community's
Laboratory, in St.l ~Ehunger crisis.
Teresa. ~YIThe marine
WalterTschinkel, ~EI 1I laboratoryislocated
the Robert O. Lawton DR. WALTER at3618U.S.98,atthe
Distinguished TSCHINKEL intersection of U.S.
Professor of Biology 319 and 98, halfway
at FSU, will deliver the between Carrabelle and
lecture, the next event Panacea.
in the monthly Coastal For additional
and Marine Conservation information on this
Lecture Series hosted by lecture, or future lectures
the laboratory. in the monthly series,
The talk will be from contact the lab at 697-4095
7 to 9 p.m.; refreshments or via e-mail at sthoman@
will be served. fsu.edu or visit the Web
In association with site at www.marinelab.fsu.
Second Harvest of the edu/outreach.html.


Wedding


_
/ ,.


May O'Kelly, Ryan


to wed


Mualen Lyree Henry born

Mark and Kandice Henry,
of Eastpoint, are proud to
announce the birth of their
daughter, Malen Lyree
Henry.Cs~
She was born Thursday,
May 14, 2009. She weighed r
7 lbs. and 6 ozs. and was 19
inches long.
She was welcomed home
by her grandparents, Timmy
Register, Terry Creamer, and
Mark and Katrina Henry.


Overcash graduates

frOm Appalachian State










Obituaries


Lanark News





HlaDD HoUY1r~e SrSOH.


In Loymgf Memory


Churc }} J


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave. "C" & 6th St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@gtcom.net

PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
MASS SCHEDULE

SATURDAY ................ ........... ........ 5 Ph
SUNDAY ................. ............... .... 10 AM
SUNDAY SPANISH IASS ................ ............. 5 Ph
TUESDAY -FRIDAY ............... .............. 8:30 AM




The United Methodist Churches

Sof Frankhin County Welcome Yot1

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
SundaySchool 10:00a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ase. B Canabell n6s97-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) -670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 ivivi.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


FOR SERVICE AND DEDICATION: Willie Speed stands at
the door of the new school board room, named in his
,honor, at the Learning Center in Eastpoint. The school
~district administration office has moved to the former
Brown Elementary School, and the media center
has been renovated to accommodate the board

y Elementary, was named for Speed a few years back.
~ In dedicating the new school board room Tuesday
\ evening, Chairman Jimmy Gander cited the many
j ~ -~ Iyears of service of Speed, who served as a teacher,
B.,~B ~ ~ Iadministrator and school board member in Franklin
~~ii~iil~i)~iEl~~"R~i~County. Speed thanked the board for the new school
board room, and said he was honored the board
chose to bring his name to the Eastpoint section of the
county.
DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
NreyProvided during regular church services


~oi inis ftI nt * 1

r,,,l, \I'rr i'~,' ,,,,, z ,


Thursday, June d, 2009


Local


The Times | B3


Dorothy Mae Faircloth
was born Jan. 9, 1926,
in Apalachicola, to the
now late Mattie and Neil
Vause. She passed away
on Sunday, May 31, 2009.
She was a lifelong
resident of Apalachicola.
She worked as a
restaurant manager,
cashier, waitress, and
most importantly as a
mother and grandmother.
Dorothy was very
devoted to the Pentecostal
Holiness Church in
Apalachicola. She was also
a former Eastern Star.
She is survived by
her children, Warren


Dorothy Mae Faircloth

Faircloth (Annada),
Sandra Scarabin (Steve),
and Carla Watkins
(George); sister, Florida
Barfield; grandchildren,
Jessica Paterson, Erica
Attarian, Kendra Ty~son,
Amber Watkins, and
Kara Watkins; great-
grandchildren, Dylan
Dunaway, Jake Paterson,
and Colin Attarian;
numerous nieces and
nephews; and a countless
number of friends.
Serving as active
pallbearers are Johnny
Turner, Richard Ham,
Charles Wilson, Earl
Creamer, Scott Able, and


David Paul, Jr. Honorary
pallbearers include Red
Davis, David Paul, Junior
Cooper, Sammy Crum,
Roger Mathis, Ricky
Hathcock, Clay Moore,
Allen Ham, Ricky Jones,
and Tom Conner.
Rineral services were
held Wednesday, June 3, at
2 p.m. at the Pentecostal
Church with burial in
Magnolia Cemetery, Sister
Susan Roach presiding.
Viewing was Tuesday
evening, June 2 at the
Pentecostal Church.
Condolences may be
viewed and sent via www.
KelleyEineralHomes.com.


The Memorial Day
service and lunch was
well attended.
Talked to Kyle
Lamberson and he asked
me to let you know that
mother, Betty, is now here
at St. James Health and
Rehab. When you're out
that way, why not stop by
and visit her? She would
be glad to see you.
Our sympathies go
out to Laurel Newman
and the family. Laurel's
father, J.W. Hannan,
passed away last week.


Laurel, a
longtime
Reporter
for the
Carrabelle
Times,
wrote
lovingly
LANARK NEWS about her
Jim Welsh father's
service
during
World War II in the
Pacific Theatre, and
described in detail a 2005
trip they took to the USS
Arizona Memorial at


Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.
Also, keep the
Saunders family and
Bob in your prayers. Bob
passed away last Sunday.
Don't forget the Big
Bend Saltwater Classic
over Father's Day
weekend, and don't forget
dear ole Dad.
Be kind to one another,
check in on the sick and
housebound. Got Jesus?
Until next time,
God bless America,
our troops, the poor,
homeless and hungry.


Tammy and Tommy Stevens
~L~ wish to invite the friends of
their son, Haken, to a memorial
service in his honor. The service
will be held on Sunday, June 7 at
2 p.m. in Lafayette Park.
Haken Stevens, 30, of
Apalachicola, died early
Saturday morning, May 23, 2009.
HAKEN Please bring your stories and
STEVENS memories of Haken to share.


Following the service, Sandra
Smith invites participants to
a reception at her home on
the corner of Eighth Street
and Avenue B. Musicians are
asked to please bring your
instruments.
An account has been opened
at Gulf State Community Bank
for the Stevens family to help
defray Haken's final expenses.


On June 5, you went to a new
home.
You welcomed Perry into the
family, and knew Mary would be
here, and that knowledge allowed
you that day to quietly slip away.
We were saddened that Sunday
that you went away, but knew
you were tired, that the road had
gotten rough and the hills had
gotten too hard to climb.
We wish you could have stayed


another day, and it really took
time for us to accept your passing
couldn't be delayed. The Lord
chose the perfect time.
Daddy, Becky was once your
baby, and in later years, you
became her baby. For that reason,
after 15 years it's still hard to say
goodbye to yesterday.
We love and miss you,
Becky and Perry Floyd, and
Mary Brown


Sister Dorothy Nell
"JoNell" Foster Brown was
born to the late Roosevelt
and Jessie Foster, Feb.
2, 1946, in Tylertown,
Mississippi. She entered
into rest May 20, 2009,
at 1:30 p.m. at Memorial
Hospital in Mississippi.
She met and married
Elijah Brown, Jr. and into
this union were born eight
children.
She leaves to cherish
her memory, three
daughters, Janice Brown,
of Wildwood, Tawana
Dienice Brown Robinson
(Walter), of Apalachicola,
and Rosemary Brown,
of St. Mary, Georgia;
five sons, James Brown
(Yolanda), of Port Sulphur,
Louisiana, Fred Brown,


Arthur Brown and Elijah
Brown, all of Panama
City, and Charles Brown,
of Mayo; 21 very special
grandchildren, and five
great-grandchildren (one
preceded her in death).
Also left to cherish
her memory are five
sisters, Betty Quinn and
Marie Quinn, of Houston,
Alnora Allen and Julien
Wright, of Chicago, and
Mattie White of Ocean
Springs, Mississippi;
two brothers, James
Foster, of Ty~lertown, and
Lonnie Quinn, of Houston;
brothers-in-law, Freddie
Brown (M/ary) and Herburt
Miller (Carolyn) Miller,
ofApalachicola; sister-
in-law, Sis. Rose Tolliver
of Apalachicola; very


special friends, Rosalee
Redman, of Gainesville,
and Rozalyn Baker, of
Panama City; special niece
and nephews, Brenda
Grindle and Anthony
Brown and Courtney Bell;
and numerous nieces,
nephews, cousins, and
friends.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Elijah Brown, Jr.
Rineral services were
held Saturday, May 30
at Mt. Zion Missionary
Baptist Church with burial
in Magnolia Cemetery.
Arrangements entrusted
to Kelley Rineral Home,
Apalachicola.
Condolences may be
viewed and sent via www.
KelleyEineralHomes.com.


WILLIAM
MATHIS


The children and
youth are hosting the
sale to further raise
money for summer
programming. Prices
are $4 for six-inch, and
$7 for 12-inch and you
can order online at
www.fumacapalach. org.
Orders will be available

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


after the 11 a.m. worship
service.
If you have any
questions or would like to
place a telephone order,
please give Scott Kinkead
or Missy Miller a call
at 653-9530. Thursday
afternoon is the deadline
for telephone orders.


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


The 2009 graduating
class of Franklin County
High School would like
to thank the pastor and
all of the members of the
Eastpoint Church of God
for allowing us to have
our baccalaureate service


in your sanctuary. For
welcoming us and for the
wonderful hospitality, we
pray that the Lord will
continue to bless each of
you richly.
We also would like
to thank each person


that participated on
the program, from
the beginning to the
end. Because of each
of you, we have many
cherished memories.
We want to thank The
Philaco Women's Club


of Apalachicola for all of
the delicious food. Your
concern, labor, and support
of the Franklin County
graduating seniors have
not gone unnoticed.
The 2009 FCHS senior
class


On behalf of the Board
of the Franklin County
Humane Society, I would
like to thank all of the
volunteers who helped
with our Cinco de Mayo
Rindraiser. We raised
over $9,000.
I would particularly
like to thank Joe and
Charlotte Bacher who
hosted the event at
Sometimes It's Hotter;
Terry Brewer from Harry


A's for providing the food;
Sweetwater Brewing
Company of Atlanta
for providing great
beer, Coke and Cone
Distributors.
Our Planning
Committee consisted
of Charlotte Bacher ,
Judy Schultz, Susan
McLendon, Karen
Bush, Kara Landis and
Debbie Flowers. Without
the hard work and


contributions of these
folks, we would never
have been able to make
the event a success.
I would also like to
thank all of the business
owners on St. George
Island, in Eastpoint
and Apalachicola for
providing such great
raffle items. And our
appreciation goes out
to all of the talented
artists who gave us the


fabulous artwork for our
silent auction. We know
that times are tough but
our old and new friends
really came through
for us. It is all about
the animals and all of
the work and effort will
help us save more of our
helpless friends. Thank
you.
Susan Kearney
President, Franklin
County Humane Society


EST. 1836

Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 Abi lo:30 An
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 Phi
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 Phi
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 Phi
TIRTRSDAY 3:30 5:30 Phi


Haken Stevens


William James Mathis

Jan. 9, 1900 June 5, 1994


Dorothy Nell Foster Brown


Metiotlist youtil
miniStry hosts sub sale

The youth ministry of
the cooperative parish
of the First United
Methodist Church of
Apalachicola, and St.
George Island United
Methodist Church, will
host a sub sale this
Sunday.


Cards of Thanks


2009 F {HS senior class


WELCOMES YOU

Church

Of the.

As cension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AIM


Franklin County Humane Society










































































~ ~ ~~1 ~ ~~ ~


T/DE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
m in othe ies ofr Ch foIng areas, subtract the indicated times
HigH Low
'at Point MinusO:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
To i thee tes ofrth fownLL aeas, subtract the indicated times
HigH Low
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03

~~A LA"* L


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

LEASE OF COMMI1/ERCIAL-USE AIRCRAFT PAINT

FACILITY APALACHICOLA REGIONAL AIRPORT


The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners (Owner) is requesting proposals
from firms interested in entering into a long-term lease of a new commercial-use aircraft
paint facility at Apalachicola Regional Airport. The Owner is currently developing plans
for the facility and anticipates that the facility will be available for occupancy no later
than June 2010.


For additional information please contact Alan Pierce at (850) 653-9783, Ext. 161 or
email at Amy Ham-Kelly at amyh~fairpoint.net for a proposal packet and a copy of
concept plans and specifications for the building.


Sealed proposals shall be submitted to the following address no later that 4:00 P.M. local
time (EST) on Monday, July 6, 2009:


Franklin County Clerk of Court
Attn: Michael Moron'- Board Secretary
33 Market Street, Suite 203
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Alan Pierce- 850-653-9783, Ext. 161


Only ro osals received by this time will be considered. Pro osals shall clearly indicate
firm name and shall be clearly labeled "PROPOSAL-LEASE COMMERCIAL-USE
AIRCRAFT PAINT FACILITY."


CARRAB ELL E


SO LU NAR
m = Minor M = Major add 1 hour for daylight savings
Date Day AM PM Rise/Set Moon
06/04 Thu m 1:55 m 2:10 4:59AM
M 7:55 M 8:20 6:57PM
06/05 Fri m 2:35 m 2:50 4:59AM O
M 8:40 M 9:05 6:58PM
06/06 Sat m 3:20 m 3:35 4:59AM O
M 9:25 M 9:50 6:58PM
06/07 Sun M 4:5 M 0:2 0 :": O

06/08 Mon m 4:55 m 5:20 4:59AM
M 11:10 M 11:40 6:59PM
06/09 Tue m 5:50 m 6:20 4:59AM
M M 12:05 7:00PM
06/10 Wed m 6:40 m 7:10 4:59AM O
M 12:30 M 12:55 7:00PM


Thursday, June d, 2009


Local


Two local banks are ex-
pecting a flood of applica-
tions for anew government-
backed, interest-free loan
for struggling businesses,
Both Apalachicola State
Bank and Gulf State Com-
munity Bank plan to offer
the America's Recovery
Capital loans beginning
June 15.
Small businesses suf-
fering financial hardship
as a result of the slow
economy might be eligible
to receive temporary relief
to keep their doors open
and get their cash flow
back on track through the
loan program, said Karen
G. Mills, administrator of
the Small Business Ad-
ministration
SBA will guarantee the
ARC loans, which are de-
ferred-payment loans of up
to $35,000 available to es-
tablished, viable, for-profit
small businesses that need
short-term help to make
their principal and interest
payments on existing quali-
fying debt.
ARC loans are interest-
fr~ee to the borrower, 100
percent guaranteed by the
SBA and have no SBA fees

as hs' WA C las ca
provide the critical capital
and support many small
businesses need to make
it through these tough eco-
nomic times," said Mills.
"Together with other provi-
sions of the Recovery Act,
ARC loans will free up capi-
tal and put more money in
the hands of small business
owners when they need it
the most. This will help vi-
able small businesses con-
tinue to grow and thrive and
create new jobs in commu-
nities across the country."
As part of the Recovery
Act, the ARC program was
created as a no-interest,
deferred payment loan to


help small businesses that
have a history of good per-
formance.
A business must show
they had a profit in one of
the past three years, have
tax returns, balance sheets
and profit-and-loss state-
ments and personal finan-
cial statement for all own-
ers more than 20 percent
owners. They also need an
income and expense projec-
tion for two years to show
they can repay the loan and
must cash flow.
They also need a short
paragraph outlining the use
of proceeds and how it will
help them maintain their
business as a viable busi-
ness. If you are interested
in this program, get your
information ready now, as
experts expect the avail-
able funds to run out by
September.
ARC loans will be dis-
bursed within a period of
up to six months and will
provide funds to be used
for payments of principal
and interest for existing,
qualifying small business
debt including mortgages,
term and revolving lines of
credit, capital leases, credit
card b ligtin oudsno e
ers and utilities.
Repayment will not be-
gin until l2 months after the
final disbursement. Bor-
rowers don't have to pay in-
terest on ARC loans. After
the 12-moth deferral period,
borrowers will pay back the
loan principal over a period
of five years.
ARC loans will be made
by commercial lenders, not
SBA directly.
For more information on
ARC loans, visit the Apala-
chicola State Bank or Gulf
State Community Bank, or
go to http://www.sba.gov/re-
covery/arcloanprogram/in-
dex.html.


The restaurant at
SummerCamp, located at the
I 1,1,. .,unction of U.S. 98 and U.S.
319, has opened under new

b management. Restaurateur
Riccardo's in Tallahassee for
more than a decade, said she
has leased the property. The

C4 is open Thursdays through
.Z Saturday from 1 1 a.m. until
8 p.m. and Sunday just for
~J lunch. The fare is moderately
-Y~g~e~priced sandwiches, salads
- -and baskets with a daily
I~E~RS TAM HT special. Food is prepared in
an open kitchen overlooking
,. .,, the dining room and the
II; mpass s n eh.Th
view of the Gulf from the
gP~~dl III' ~~.poi snhr h
dining room is spectacular.
The cafe's name translates as
the "good life." Lipford said
I she believes anyone on the
Forgotten Coast can enjoy the
good life if they appreciate
what nature has provided for
us here. By Lois Swoboda




Be CTreatVe at your library


Franklin County youth and visitors
are invited to participate in this sum-
mer's reading program at the Franklin
County Public Library, in Eastpoint or
Carrabelle.
Every Friday morning, beginning
June 19 and running through July 31,
from 10 a.m. to noon, the library will be
transformed into a creative arts cen-
ter. Art, music, hip hop dance, drama,
science fun, snacks, and stories will all
be a part of "Being Creative @ Your Li-
brary."
There is no charge for participants,
and registration forms are available at


the front desk of each library, or sign up
on the first day. Special guest artist Sue
Bull will be teaching pottery making,
and Ellen Ashdown, local dancer and
writer, will lead participants through a
medley of dances including "The Chick-
en Dance," "The Macarena," and a
parody of Jai Ho dance from the movie
"Slumdog Millionaire."
Other guest artists will lead puppet-
ry, music making, and crafts. Come be
creative at the Franklin County Public
Library this summer.
For more information, call 670-8151
in Eastpoint or 697-2366 in Carrabelle.


Thursday, June 4
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-
3760.
Carrabelle City Com-
mission will meet at 6:30
p.m. at the municipal com-
plex, 1005 Gray Avenue,
Carrabelle. For more info,
call 697-3 18. C u t i h

School graduation exer-
cises at 7:30 p.m. in the
gymnasium. For more info,
call 670-2800.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Apalachicola Revolv-
ing Loan committee meet-
ing at 5 p.m. at City Hall in
Battery Park. For more
info, call 653-8715.

F ft MS da Ju 5
The new Carrabelle
History M/useum, at 106 B


Street, SE (Old City Hall)
will be open from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Learn more about
local history. For more info,
call Tamara Allen at the
Carrabelle Historical Soci-
ety 697-2141.

Saturday June6
The new Carrabelle
History Museum, at 106 B
Street, SE (Old City Hall)
Spm ue will bel mil10b
all Fridays and Saturdays
in June as well. For more
info contact Tamara Allen
at 697- 2141.

Monday June 8
Apalachicola Planning
and Zoning meeting at 6
p.m. at City Hall in Battery
Park. For more info, call
653-8715.
Franklin Cultural Arts
Council will meet at 6 p.m.
at the Carrabelle City Hall
Complex, 1001 Gray Ave.
Come join us in forming
the Franklin Cultural Arts


Council to enhance the
cultural environment and
economy of Franklin Coun-
ty through development
and promotion of the arts
and cultural tourism.
Bingo at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Early bird at
6 p.m., regular bingo at 7
p.m. Cards begin at $4. Call
697-3760
GED classes are offered
h ltef Franln6 pCounty
ery week in Building 1100,
Room 1105. Call 670-2800.

Tuesday, June 9
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30
a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2 sug-
gested donation. Call 697-
3760.
The Carrabelle His-
torical Society will meet
at 6 p.m. at the Carrabelle
Branch of the Franklin
Public Library. For more
information, contact Ta-
mara Allen at the Carra-


belle Historical Society at
697-2141.
Apalachicola Com-
munity Garden meeting
at 6 p.m. at the Apalachic-
ola Bay Chamber of Com-
merce. Call 653-8715.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Dept. $1/icard.
Proceeds go to St. George
Island Civic Club. Call 927-
4654.

Wednesday, June 10
GED classes are offered
at the Franklin County
School from 3 to 6 p.m. ev-
ery week in Building 1100,
Room 1105. Call 670-2800.

Th rday Jun 11
SWandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-
3760.


Temperature
High Low
820 740
830 730
860 750
860 760

86" 77


Date
Thu,June 4
Fri, June 5
Sat, June 6
Sun, June 7
Mon, June 8

Wed, June 10


% Precip
30 %
30 %
10%
0%

60%


06/04 Thu 04:45AM
12:48PM
06/05 Fri 05:47AM
01:18PM
06/06 Sat 06:30AM
01:53PM
06/07 Sun 07:03AM

06/08 Mon PMM 0A

06/09 Tue 1:0 AMM
11:16AM
06/10 Wed 12:41AM
12:00PM


07:36AM 1.2
09:37PM -0.2
08:24AM 1.3
10:20PM -0.3
09:11AM 1.3
11:00PM -0.3
09:54AM 1.4
* M37M -.(


07:53AM
04:00PM
08:15AM
04:46PM


06/04 Thu 03:20AM

06/05 Fri 14* ZMM
11:53AM
06/06 Sat 05:05AM
12:28PM
06/07 Sun 05:38AM
01:07PM
06/08 Mon 06:05AM
01:50PM
06/09 Tue 06:28AM
02:35PM
06/10 Wed 06:50AM
03:21PM


05:23AM 1.9
6*:2 M .3
08:07PM -0.5
06:58AM 2.1
08:47PM -0.5
07:41AM 2.2
09:24PM -0.5
08:22AM 2.2
09:57PM -0.5
09:03AM 2.1
10:28PM -0.3
09:47AM 2.1
10:56PM -0.2


B4 | The Times


Banks to offer interest-free loans


SUMMERCAMP (AFE OPENS UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT


Senlof cen Of 0

host dance Saturday

The Carrabelle Senior
Center will be hosting a dance
this Saturday evening, June
6, starting at 7:30 p.m.
Everyone is welcome to
come on by and slow dance
to the big band sounds of DJ
Ron Vice
The Carrabelle Senior
Center is at 201 N.W. Avenue
F: on the corner of N.W Av-
enue F and First Street.
Admission is free and do-
nations are always welcome.


COunty CALENDAR




































































*uldr yyTeSeI
Gary Ba t et


Building Supplies
& Auto Repair
Carrabelle 697-3333
We Deliver Anywhere

AgC Hardware and Vsime~n
Cbda Paint Center Amercan Express

Tatlen. ,n Sliesse
CALL to get your ad in


850-653-8869~


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Plumbing New Construction Roofing
PreSSure Washing Additions Vinyl Siding
Painting and More No Job Too Small

P.O. Box 439 RO625
Carrabelle, FL 32322
697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 ~










DENTURE
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-ALL MAJOR BRANDS -


June CHECKPOINTS

Members in the Florida Highway patrol's Troop H,
Quincy district, have been authorized to conduct driver
license/vehicle inspection checkpoints during daylight
hours at the following locations in Franklin County.
This marks change from last month because all roads
listed below will be eligible for checkpoints throughout
the entire month of June.
*State Route 30, SR 30A, SR 65, SR 384, SR 67, SR
377, SR 385 and SR 300 (St. George Island Causeway) and
County Road 370, CR 157, CR 59, CR 374 and CR 30A.
All personnel participating in the checkpoints will
be responsible for following the procedures outlined in
Chapter 17.12 of the FHP Policy Manual regarding driver
license and vehicle inspection checkpoints, according to
Lt. Mark Brown.


3LOniCa WORLtrger, 99p



12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321

TE LEPH ON E (850) 643-5417


IV


Thursday, June d, 2009


Law Enforcement


The Times | B5


The following report is
provided by the Franklin
County Sheriff's Office.
Arrests are made by of-
ficers from the following
city, county and state law
enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD), Car-
rabelle (CPD), Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP),
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office (FCSO), Florida
Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission
(FWC), Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection (FDEP), Flor-
ida Division of Insurance
Fraud (DIF) and Florida
Departmentof mAgri ul
vices (FLDOACS).
All defendants are con-
sidered innocent until prov-
en guilty in a court of law.

May 26
Kaila L. Odom, 25, Bris-
tol, violation of probation
(FCSO)
Howard J. Reeder,
59, Apalachicola, battery
and criminal mischief
(APD)


MOV 27
Jessica M/. Music, 26,
Eastpoint, violation of pro-
bation from Dixie County,
and violation of proba-
tion from Alachua County
(FCSO)

May 28
Jamie L. Lamberson,
39, Eastpoint, violation of
probation (FCSO)

May 29
Reginald T. Steele, 41,
St. George Island, domestic
battery (FCSO)

41, Demra rea h, Gisonn,
ly intoxication and resist-
ing arrest without violence
(APD)
Leanne C. Coulter, 40,
Kalamazoo, Mich., violation
of probation (FCSO)
Donna K. Varner, 28,
Eastpomnt, DUI (FCSO)

May 30
Carlos E. Aponte, 41,
Eastpoint, domestic bat-
tery (FCSO)


The students of the Apalachicola Bay Charter School delighted a T
standing-room only audience May 14 at the Chapman Auditorium
with a unique take on the famous musical "The Wizard of Oz." Under -
the direction of Temolynn Wintons, the entire elementary grades and Sixth-graders performing are,
middle school band students performed as the beloved characters from left, Alexis Phil potts as
from the story by L. Frank Baum. Above, Mrs. Karen Ward's the Tin Man, Hannah Wintker
kindergarten and first-grade students, from left, are Edy Rash as as Dorothy, Katie Seger as the
Scarecrow, Alex Joanos as Tin Man, Rebecca Willis as Dorothy and Cowardly Lion and Travion Turrell
Elan Blitch as the Cowardly Lion. as the Scarecrow.


A 25-year-old
Carrabelle man was
jailed on 11 counts
relating to metham-
phetamine manufac-
ture and sale after
being arrested May
26 following a brief
confrontation with
MC
police. M
Michael Angelo ROBI
Robulock, 25, who
resides at 524 River Road,
was held on $115,000 bond
in the county jail following
the incident.
On May 26, members of
the Franklin County Sher-
iff's Office Narcotics Unit
executed a search warrant
at Robulock's River Road
residence. They were as-
sisted by law enforcement
personnel from the Carra-
belle Police Department,
Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Ser-
vices, and deputies from the
sheriff 's office and K-9 unit.
Prior to the execution of
the warrant, which was for
the sale of a controlled sub-
stance, methamphetamine,
Robulock was observed
operating a 2000 Chevrolet
automobile a short distance
from the residence.
Upon an attempt to stop
Robulock by sheriff's depu-
ties and Carrabelle police
officers, a chase ensued
where Robulock attempted
to run over one of the depu-
ties trying to stop the ve-
hicle. The deputy fired his
service weapon into the


engine to disable the
vehicle.
Robulock was
able to return to his
residence, fled in-
side and barricaded
himself, refusing to
come out. Inside of
the house, a female
IAEL identified as Dani-
LOCK elle McCullough,
who also resides at
that location, was present.
Deputies surrounded
the house, and after a brief
confrontation and nego-
tiation, Robulock surren-
dered. During the execu-
tion of the search warrant,
members of the Narcotics
Unit located and seized ma-
terials, paraphernalia, and
controlled substances such
as methamphetamine, and
controlled prescriptions.
Police said evidence of an
active methamphetamine
laboratory was also found.
Robulock was charged
with manufacturing of
methamphetamine, three
counts of possession of a
controlled substance, one
count of sale of a controlled
substance, possession of
listed chemicals, one count
of manufacturing of drug
paraphernalia, trafficking
in over 28 grams of meth-
amphetamine, fleeing or
attempting to elude law en-
forcement, aggravated as-
sault with a deadly weapon
on a law enforcement of-
ficer, and resisting without
violence.


Additions
Alew Homes
Remodeling
R.R. 0067644


Ph. 850-927-3628
Mobile 850-425-8620
Licensed & Insured


On May 28, mem-
hers of the Franklin
County Sheriff's Of-

Icoeng witho csest t -
tors from Florida De-
partment of Correc-
tions, and K-9 Unit
from the Franklin
County Sheriff's Of-
fice intercepted a
vehicle.


area of the Moorings
Motel, in Carrabelle,
and was in the pro-
ces sfthceheckn in
SOffice's K-9 alerted
on the vehicle driven
by the suspect.
Coady was placed
COADY under arrest for
three counts of pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance. The substances re-
covered had been concealed
in the trunk area of the ve-
hicle and included powder
cocaine, crack cocaine and
heroin.
She was booked at the
county jail and a $15,000 bail
was set.


LESLIE (


The car, a blue 2009 Chev-
rolet Cobalt, was driven by a
white female identified as
Leslie A. Coady, 49, from the
St. Petersburg area, and it
was believed to be trans-
porting illegal controlled
substances.
Coady had driven to the


18 Shadow Lane
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: (850) 653-8122
Cell: (850) 653-7654
DON WILLSON'S

SEST VITCAEN
Serving alleo FraInki
commerical
Septic Tanks &
Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or night
653-9406


~aBan WOnrfager,


=13/ =1


OFF TO SEE THE WIZARD


Sheriff's REPORT


Officers confront Robulock,

make meth arrest


:H
U


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Steam Cleaning & Remediation
24 Hour Water Extraction
IICRC Certified Technicians
Mold Remediation, Tile & Grout Cleaning'
Carpet & Upholstery
& A Licensed & Insured


Vehicle nabbed transporting


drugs into county





;IIIII~IIII


1100
57 minutes 00 sec-
West 56.02 feet to a
marking the Intersec-
rf said right of way
the approximate
high waterline of the
belle River for the
T OF BEGINNING,
e from said POINT
iGINNING run, along
approximate mean
waterline as follows:
70 degrees 01 mln-
14 seconds East 9.11
hence South 41 de-
15 minutes 17 sec-
East 12.13 feet;
e South 31 degrees
minutes 04 seconds
42.82 feet; thence
19 degrees 31 mln-
44 seconds West
feet; thence South
grees 43 minutes 07
ds West 77.55 feet;
e South 18 degrees
minutes 40 seconds
54.08 feet; thence
18 degrees 49 mln-
33 seconds West
feet; thence South
grees 03 minutes 43
ds East 23.06 feet;
e South 66 degrees
minutes 22 seconds
35.99 feet; thence
71 degrees 21 mln-
17 seconds East
feet; thence North 88
es 41 minutes 52
ds East 93.43 Feet;
e South 82 degrees
minutes 57 seconds
61.70 feet; thence
70 degrees 51 mln-
28 seconds East
feet; thence South
grees 20 minutes 37
ds East 29.02 feet;
e North 82 degrees
minutes 51 seconds
51.85 feet; thence
40 degrees 27 mn-
04 seconds East
feet; thence South
grees 48 minutes 52
ds East 35.89 feet;
e South 31 degrees
minutes 57 seconds
48.01 feet; thence
32 degrees 18 mln-
59 seconds West
feet; thence South
grees 41 minutes 31
ds East 42.49 f eet;
e North 83 degrees
minutes 45 seconds
26.24 feet; thence
64 degrees 17 mln-
00 seconds West
feet; thence South
grees 45 minutes 45
ds West 52.03 feet;
e South 89 degrees
minutes 40 seconds
44.97 feet; thence
85 degrees 17 mln-
18 seconds West
feet; thence South
grees 21 minutes 43
ds West 53.34 feet;
e North 75 degrees
minutes 45 seconds
81.07 feet; thence
73 degrees 36 mln-
16 seconds West
feet; thence North 85
es 24 minutes 05
ds West 33.71 feet;
e North 84 degrees
minutes 29 seconds
25.63 feet; thence
27 degrees 47 mln-
04 seconds West
fret ten Suth

dsNEst 15_80 feet;
minutes 56 seconds

2025 degree e4 mne
03 seconds East
feet: thence North 88
es 06 minutes 29
eds Wehst 2551c feet;

20.73 feet; thence
67 degrees 47 mln-

I ditl ig oan h
State Road Number
ence leaving said ap-
uae en n dihr t
y North 21 degrees


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


1100 -Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1130-Adoptions
15-eson a
1160 -Lost
1170 Found




2376T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR FRANKLIN
COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

AMERICAN HOME MORT-
GAGE SERVICING, INC.,
Plaintff,

vs.

ELGIN E. SIZEMORE
A/K/A ELGIN SIZEMORE:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
ELGIN E. SIZEMORE
A/K/A ELGIN SIZEMORE:
ANITA A. SIZEMORE: UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
ANITA A. SIZEMORE: IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPEC-
TIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUS-
TEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s)

CASE NO. 07-CA-424

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice Is hereby given
that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered In the
above-styled cause, In the
Circuit Court of Franklin
County, Florida, I will sell
the property situate In
Franklin County, Florida,
described as:

A PARCEL OF LAND IN
SECTION 1. TOWNSHIP 9
SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST
WITHIN THE CORPORATE
LIMITS OF THE CITY OF
APALACHICOLA, COUNTY
OF FRANKLIN AND STATE
OF FLORIDA, DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS:

COMMENCE AT THE
POINT WHERE THE
SOUTH LINE OF SECTION
1, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH,
RANGE 8 WEST, INTER-
SECTS THE WESTERLY
SIDE OF BLOCK 115 OF
THE CITY OF APALACHI-
COOA TAFN THCEER N
ALONG THE WESTERLY
SDE EFSAIDS ULOK 15
SIDE OF AVENUE F (OR
CHERRY STREET) OF
THOELACITYTHOFNACPEARCU -
WESTERLY A DISTANCE
OF 95 FEET TO A POINT
ONA6THSOTNR NTMA K

RTURNEETWASDTSTANCE6 O
15 FEET TO A POINT
WHICH IS THE POINT OF


A CNEYDEOD; RO
SAID POINT OF BEGINN-
ING RUN WEST ON 6TH
SRE TA TDISETNACNECERUOF

SOUTH A DISTANCE OF


1100 1
utes 37 seconds West grees
51.41 feet; thence leaving hands
said headwall run South point
75 degrees 21 minutes 37 tlon o
seconds West 41.95 feet; with
thence North 89 degrees mean
55 minutes 23 seconds Carral
West 73.67 feet to a point POIN1
lying on sad headwall and thenc~
said approximate mean OF BE
high waterline; thence run said
along said headwall and high \
said waterline as follows: South
North 89 decrees 55 mln- utes 0
utes 23 seconds West feet; t
116.22 feet; thence North grees
83 degrees 30 minutes 30 onds
seconds West 160.02 feet; thenc~
thence North 77 degrees 21 m
11 minutes 10 seconds West
West 292.04 feet; thence South
continue along said ap- utes
proximate mean high wa- 63.89
terline asfollows: North 78 20 del
degrees 36 minutes 16 second
seconds West 32.41 feet; thenc~
thence North 76 degrees 13 m
09 minutes 03 seconds West
West 21.92 feet; thence South
North 75 degrees 54 mln- utes
utes 53 seconds West 67.17
38.32 feet to a point mark- 65 del
Ing the intersection of said second
waterline with the South- thenc~
easterly right of way of Av- 00 m
enue "A, said point being East
the point of curve to the North
right having a radius of utes
646.20 feet; thence North- 80.82
easterly along said curve degre
and said right of way for second
281.32 feet, thru a central thenc~
angle of 24 degrees 56 44 m
minutes 37 seconds, East
chord of said arc being; South
North 49 degrees 03 mln- utes
utes 16 seconds Past 42.57
279.11 feet to a re-bar; 82 del
thence continue along said second
right of way as follows: thenc~
North 57 degrees 38 mln- 24 m
utes 23 seconds East East
110.73 feet to a re-bar; South
thence North 72 degrees utes
51 minutes 50 seconds 22.75
East 190.50 feet to a rod 08 del
and cap; thence South 89 second
degrees 07 minutes 27 thenc~
seconds East 223.44 feet 51 m
to arod and cap: thence West
South 89 degrees 13 mln- South
utes 40 seconds Easc utes
150.15 feet to a rod and 25.56
cap; thence leaving said 03 del
right of way run South 00 second
degrees 46 minutes 20 thenc~
seconds West 134.11 feet 10 m
to a rod and cap; thence West
South 89 degrees 47 mln- South
utes 06 seconds East utes
145.27 feet to the POINT 28.44
OF BEGINNING. Above 89 del
lands subject to a 20 foot second
wide drainage easement thenc~
lying over and across the 06 m
Northeasterly portions West
thereof. North
utes
PARCEL "B 67.69
Commence at the Intersec- 88 del
tron of the centerline of second
11th Street West In Plck- thenc~
etts Addition to the City of 32 m
Carrabelle, a subdivision West
as per map or plat thereof North
recorded Plat Book 2, utes
Page 20, of the public rec- 43.95
ords of Franklin County, degre
Florida with the centerline second
of U.S. Highway Number thenc~
98 (State Road Number 55 m
30), said point being the West
point of curve to the left South
having a radius of 716.20 utes
hsea; tenc S thastsearldy .1d9

ceunte lne90)f US bHighway ts on
Number 30) for 552.29 31 m
4e~etd thru a central anaue 5f h
seconds, chord of said are utes
being South 44 degrees03 14.09
minutes 37 seconds West degre
538.27 f dt rthence cone Fecor


utes 00 seconds West West
100.59 feet; thence leaving Nollh
sad c rnterlie r4nS eoueh ut

to a point lying on the said ~
Easterly right of way of 30; th~

Id;t ece rnw aons tperrne
right of way South 21 de- of wa


|1100
of time to file a petition for
an administrative hearing.
The Department may, for
good cause shown, grant
the request for an exten-
slan of time. Requests for
extension of time must be
filed with the Office of Gen-
eral Counsel of the Depart-
ment at 3900 Common-
wealth Boulevard, Mall
Station 35, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-3000, before
the applicable deadline. A
timely request for exten-
slan of time shall toll the
running of the time period
for filing a petition until the
request Is acted upon. If a
request Is filed late, the
Department may still grant
It upon a motion by the re-
questing party showing
that the failure to file a re-
quest for an extension of
time before the deadline
was the result of excusable
neglect.

If a timely and sufficient
petition for an administra-
tive hearing Is filed, other
persons whose substantial
Interests will be affected by
the outcome of the admin-
1strative process have the
right to petition to Inter-
vene In the proceeding. In-
tervention will be permitted
only at the discretion of the
presiding officer upon the
filing of a motion In compll-
ance with Rule 28-106.205,
F.A.C.

Petitions must be filed
within 14 days of publica-
tlon of this notice. Under
Section 120.60(3), F.S.,
however, any person who
has asked the Department
for notice of agency action
may file apetitionwithin14
days of receipt of such no-
tice, regardless of the date
of publication. The petl-
tloner shall mail a copy of
the petition to the appll-
cant at the address Indl-
cated above at the time of
filing. The failure of any
person to file a petition for
an administrative hearing
within the appropriate time
period shall constitute a
waiver of that person's
right to request an admin-
Istrative determination
(hearing) under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S.

A petition that disputes the
material facts on which the
Department's action Is
based must contain the
following Information: (a)
The name and address of
each agency affected and
each agency's file or Iden-
tification number, If known;
(b) The name, address,
and telephone number of
the petitioner; the name,
address, and telephone
number of the petitioner's
representative, If any,
which shall be the address
for service purposes dur-
Ing the course of the pro-
ceeding; and an explana-
tlon of how the petitioner's
substantial Interests are or
will be affected by the
agency determination: (c)

Aow theempeeitlner renveld
noie o he aency ell

disputed Issues of material
fatt fnthere are none the
(e) A concise statement of
the ultimate facts alleged,
Including the specific facts
tat te pettitioeoersaoh


agency's proposed action:
(f) A statement of the spe-

Ilcrle rstatutub ta

tlon of the agency's pro-
posed action; and (g) A
stat mentyo tet ttreleef

stating precisely the action


| 1100 1
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of Julla C. Chitten-
den, deceased, whose
date of death was March
20, 2009 and whose social
security number Is
265-52-7007, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Frank-
Iln County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address
of which Is 34 Forbes
Street, Suite 2, Apalachl-
cola, Florida, 32320. The
names and addresses of
the personal representa-
tive and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are
set forth below.

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's
estate must flle their claims
with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERl-
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DEDEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publica-
tlon of this notice Is May
28, 2009.

Personal Representative
Ann M. Chittenden
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative:
Ann M. Chittenden
Florida Bar No. 311456
18035 Rakestraw Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32310
Telephone: (850) 544-2192
May 28, June 4,2009
2401T

NITREATCOTORS


spandaortaDo tontr ctof

Blds will be received by
the District Three Head-
quarters until 10:00 A.M.
CST June 22, 2009, for In-

OIBDnOT-08/09 001WVWTB
work within this con-
tract consists of demolition
saio rmoa services
tures, other Improvements,
and debris from FDOT

caonndrsold aran S jcete
to the right of way of State
and Federal Highways for
16cou tis:r llyCa hun


soJ f rson L cn, L
erty, Okaloosa, Santa
Rosa, Wakulla, Walton

end m'Nash dgon C m

tract Is available on our
website at

/ id v ewd a ~dvrt s
ment_key_num=79484


174.4 FEET TO THE
SOUTH LINE OF SAID
SECTION 1. TOWNSHIP 9
SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST
THENCE RUN EAST
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE
OF SAID SECTION 1, A
DISTANCE OF 95 FEET
THENCE RUN NORTH A
DISTANCE OF 174.4 FEET
TO6THSTREETANDTHE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
BEING A PARCEL OF
LAND FRONTING 95 FEET
ON SAID 6TH STREET
AND RUNNING BACK THE
SAME WIDTH, A
DISTANCE OF 174.4 FEET
TO THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID SECTION 1. TOWN-
SHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8
WEST.

ALSO, THE EAST 25 FEET
OF BLOCK 264 OF THE
MAP OF GREATER APA-
LACHICOLA, A SUBDIVI-
SION IN THE CITY OF
APLACHICOLA, FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
DEED BOOK M, PAGE
436, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A
230 Avenue F
Apalachicola, FL 32320

at public sale, to the high-
est and best bidder, for
cash, Front steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, 33 Market Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320 at
11:00 AM, on June 18,
2009.

DATED THIS 1st DAY OF
May, 2009

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Witness, my hand and seal
of this court on the 1st day
of May, 2009.

CLERK OF CIRCUIT
COURT
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the
American with Disabilities
Act of 1990, persons need-
Ing a special accommoda-
tlon to participate In this
proceeding should contact
the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceedings. If
hearing Impaired, please
call (800) 955-8771 (TDD)
or (800) 955-8770 (volce),
via Florida Relay Service.

Law Offices of Daniel C.
Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
Attorneys for Plaintiff
May 28, June 4, 2009
2377T
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE

OFdFLOURIA IN ANDCFU
FRANKLIN COUNTY


N iona Ass caton,Bak
Plaintiff

-vs.-

warn B il lllenndPr sU
slan #1; Unknown Parties
In Possession #2; If Ilving,

andalUnaknotwne brtles

named Defendant(s) who
are not known to be dead
o a ie, wh tsher sald Im
an Interest as Spouse,


No bid will be considered
unless It Is submitted on
the official proposal form
provided by the State of
Florida Department of
Transportation. Such pro-
posal forms may be ob-
tained from the State of
Florida Department of
Transportation, Right of
Way Office. (Contact Infor-
mation below.)

The Department reserves
the right to reject any and
all bids or accept minor Ir-
regularities In the best In-
terest of the State of Flor-
Ida.

Minority Business Enter-
prlses are encouraged to
participate In the solic-
Itation process.

Please direct all questions
to:
Vicky Willilams
Florida Department of
Transportation
District Three Right of Way
1074 Highway 90
Chipley, Florida 32428
Phone: (850)415-9442
Fax: (850)415-9147
vicky.willilams@dot .state.fl.

May 28, June 4, 2009

4TATE OF FLORIDA DE
APARTMENT OF ENVI-
RONMENTAL PROTEC-
TION NOTICE OF
AGENCY ACTION

The Department of Envl-
ronmental Protection gives
notice of Its Issuance of a
permit, file number
19-0293158-001-DF, to
Paul Aughtry c/o Garlick
E vironmenta As oc.
PO o 8,Ap 1ch-
cola, FL 32329t construct
a 111' long by 3' wide
breakwater along the
shoreline of the subject
property The breakwater
will be placed no more
than 10 feet waterward of
Mean High Water Line
(MHWL) and will consist of
approximately 38.6 cubic
yards of lmestone or gran-
Ite boulders no greater
than 3' In diameter. A layer
of filter facbric will be
placed under the boulders
and Spartina alterfloria will
be planted landward of the
breakwater on 1 foot cen-
ters. The purpose of the
project Is to stabilize the
shoreline and prevent fu-
ture erosion. The project Is
located along the shore of
Lot 7 of Kinja Bay Subdivl-
slan on St. George Island
Franklin County, Florida;

Suh, Ra~n e ownsthipat -
tude: 29" 40' 34" North
anedstLo gude -84 49 5t5r
body Is St. George Sound
an Outstanding Florida
Water and Class 11 Ap-
proved Water of the State.

alperns wshoase subescan-
by the Department's action
may petition for an admin-
Istatrlv )udprroceedl g

120.569 and 120.57, Flor
Ida Statutes (F.S.). The pe-
Irlo amusts cntoai th I
and must be filed
(received by the Clerk) In

tC unse If fthe Dep ntme


Tallahassee, Flor da
32399-3000.

UlnderaRule n -1 016(
Code (F.A.C.), a person
whose substantial Interests
aeepaaffecttedacbon y
also request an extension


A petition that does not
dispute the material facts
on which the Department's
action Is based shall state
that no such facts are In
dispute and otherwise
shall contain the same In-
formation as set forth
above, as required by Rule
28-106.301, FA.C.

Under Sections
120.569(2)(c) and (d),
F.S., a petition for adminis-
trative hearing must be
dismissed by the agency If
the petition does not sub-
stantially comply with the
above requirements or Is
untimely filed.

The application Is avall-
a b Ie
for public Inspection dur-
Ing normal business
h au r s
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday,
except legal holidays, at
the Tallahassee Branch Of-
flce of the Department of
Environmental Protection,
630-3 Capital Circle North-
east, Tallahassee, Florlda
32301.
June 4, 2009
2429T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

MOORINGS SECOND
LIEN LENDER, LLC a Flor-
Ida Limited Liability Com-
pany
Plaintff,



THE MOORINGS AT
CARRABLLLE, INC., a
Florida corporation,
Defendant.

CASE NO.: 09-000037-CA
DIVISION: CIRCUIT CIVIL

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice Is hereby given
that, pursuant to Plaintiff s
Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure entered In the
above-captioned action, I
will sell the property situ-
ated In Leon County, Flor-
Ida, described as follows,
to-wit:

PARCEL "A
Commence at a point
where the extension of the
West side ofl1 th Street
Intersects the South side
o Avenue :A' thence run
North 89 degrees 13 mn-
utes 40 seconds West
along said Southerly
boundary lne of Avenue
for a distance of 580.00
feet to a concrete monu-
ment; thence leaving said
right of way run South 00
degrees 35 minutes 24

ts h dPsON tOF3 BINe
ING: thence from said
POINhTOfdBeEG NION6Gmun
utes 12 seconds West
41.58 feet to a "X In a
heatdwall said po ntm ly
high waterline of the
Carrabelle River; thence
aund angh sai awaterl n

lwn tSo Oh c9 derese e4
92.06 feet to a V" In said
headwall; thence South 08
degre s I0 mnte 2


thence South 60 degrees
38 minutes 09 seconds
West 103.99 fee to a eX" I

North 80 degrees 18 mn-


NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der of Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated April 28,
2009, entered In Civil Case
No. 2008-CA-0220 of the
Circuit Court of the 2nd Ju-
dlclal Circuit In and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein JPMorgan Chase
Bank, National Assocla-
tran, Plaintiff and Karen
Beth Millender are
defendantss, I will sell to
the highest and best bid-
der for cash, AT THE
WEST FRONT DOOR OF
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, LOCATED
ON HWY 98, IN APALACH-
ICOLA, FLORIDA, AT
11:00 A.M. on June 18,
2009 the following de-
scribed property as set
forth In said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:

LOT 6 AND THE NORTH
14 FEET OF LOT 7,
BLOCK D (112), RANGE
10, PICKETT'S ADDITION
TO THE TOWN OF
CARRABELLE, FLORIDA,
AS PER PLAT OR MAP
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20,
OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON
WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMO-
DATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS
PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO COST
TO YOU, TO THE PROVI-
SION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CON-
TACT Franklin County
Courthouse, 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320 WITHIN 2
WORKING DAYS OF
YOUR RECElPT OF THIS
NOTICE OF SALE: IF YOU
ARE HEARING IMPAIRED
CALL: 1-800-955-8771; IF
YOU ARE VOICE IM-
PAIRED CALL:
1-800-955-8770

DATED at Apalachicola,
Florida, this 1st day of
May, 2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
DEPUTY CLERK

ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-

TIH PIRO & FISHMAN,
LLP
1000 4SNot 12Dale Mabry
Tampa, Florida 33618
08-096390
May 28, June 4, 2009

2N39T E CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION


JULIA C. CHITTENDEN
Deceased.

File No. 09-000010-CP


SB The Times Thursday, June 4, 2009





| 10 || 101 100 00 | 3130 | 20400 | 6100 || 6140 75
57 minutes 00 seconds May, 2009. ceeds to be applied as far ONIE Other Business Offices In nice 1 br house 1 acre North of East Point,
East 510.65 feet to the as may be to the payment bguldn noHw98bordering Tate s Hell,
POINT OF BEGINNING. Franklin County of costs and the satisac- PHARMACY Amsmn ak in Crbellen $30 ton $400 c/h/a, w/d incl. 850-370-6806
Clerk of the Circult Court tron of the above de- Buy Soma, Ultram, mo Call 850-510-2888 No pets. 850-653-9788 i lt Aachoa
PARCEL "C By: Michele Maxwell scribed execution. Note: In ABSOLUTE REAL Floricet, $71.99/90Q~ty Attendant 850-615-0058 4ciylt nAachoa
Conmmene a the Inersec- Duenpeuty Cer200 accordance wt te mer AEUSCT TOEN $17 E0t uR nSCR le- lyhorgo eoat Cara n hbd d
ettsAdditon tothe Cty o 2464T needing a specal acom- 440 24TH St., Apalach #41B31 1-888-518-2482 work involed.Apply i For Rent Space available mBo.(850) 697-4080 or on 23rdSt 653-8792 or
Carrabele, a subdivsion LEGAL NOTICE modaton to paticipate in Sa. June 13th @ 11AM Trldrugstore.0rg person at PuttN-Fuss Fun for small business or of- (850) 591-5899 653-7777
as per map or plat thereof this proceeding should 3/1, Large Corner Lot, Pool Park, 236 Hwy 98, flce. Utilities Included. 1 2, & 3, br North Historic District
recorded Plat Book 2, Notic slv puat to contact Debble Mock no SELLS TO HIGHEST Eastpoint. Downtown Historic Apa- 5th Street building lot.
Page 20, of the public rec- Florcea IsefS o uaFacil- later than seven days prior BIDDER REGARDLESS OF lachicola. 29 Ave. E. Cpa chlcoa 7F4 $65,000 OBO. 60 X 100.
ords of Franklin County, Ity Act, Florida Statutes, to the proceeding at PRICEl QUINTON SMITH (upstairs) For Info call C1806374 Corner lot. Brokers pro-
Florida with the centerline Chapter 83, Part TV that Franklin County Sheriff s 850-445-3212 . Carol 850-653-3871 Aplcioa2b,2btected. Call 404-218-0077
of U.S. Highway Number Seminole Safe N Secure Office at (850)-670-8519. www.Affiliated 43 HA e egbrod
98 (State Road Number wlhodaseonJe20auctionsacom ,$700 mo, 1st, last, + dep.
30),~ ~~~~~l sadpon big h 20 at 00 sameo atn 12 S0 hvr U13 B26 0B ,Bdgad .:Nnsoesoln
point of curve to the left US 98, Eastpoint, Florida Sheriff of Franklin County, I aultlTeans! Weededai Um, pets. Call850-670-8266
having a radius of 716.20 32328 of the contents of Florida Bankruptcy Auction Sat., EMLYET Overseas $119-$220K< yr. Very clean 3 br, 1 ba, 2 Reduced far below ap-
feet; thence Southwesterly mllwrhues otl-By: Debble L. Mock June 6th, 10am 50505 E. Bodyguards $250- screened porches, yard, praisal. Owner finance, If
along ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ 0 sai curve adsd nn-ahss)ntn-DptShrfCony1tt.RlA-owamnte $750/day, 18+ driveway, W/D hookup, necessary, 2 Lots 1.3 ac-
centerline of U.S. Highway gp poe June 4, 11, 18, 25, 2009 zoaCso adal, Ifrain 1-615-885-8960 ext 707. Lanark Village. Call for res. & 1.11 acres. Sold
Number 98 (State Road Jeffre Cano choppers, drag Jeep, golf www.InternationalExecutly more Info. Avail 06/01. Ph Eaton,3r separately or together. On
Number 30) for 552.29 Gene level Hyes carts, ATV's, pontoon es.net 926-2032 WsprnPneSu-vBluff Rd, between Magno-
feet, thru a central angle of Apalachee Bay Enterprises boats, guns, more. db| gar, $850 mo, Ila Circle. $49,000, &
44 degrees 10 minutes 59 Thomas Dixon Info./ilrections: Call Smart 4100 |Post Office Now Hiringl 678-640-4810 $47,000 Call 850-774-0674
seconds, chord of said arc amo he Auctions 928-210-1794 or Avg. Pay $21/hour or $54K | 6110 or 850-234-3209
ben~ot44eres3Charles Harris 92-1-59annually Including FederalS f
minutes 37 seconds West Linn Butler Benefits and OT. Pald
538.7 fet thn si ence con- Beonne Jone sal ae Food Serv/Hospitality Training, Vacations. PT/FT 1.6acre lot, Lanark
tinu alog sid cnterine1-866-945-0316 Lanark 5 br, 3.5 ba, Large Beach, view and access to
South 21 degrees 57 mmn- Bfrthsaedeof1 br, Apalachicola in- home w/ great Gulf view Gulf, $27,500. Bill Miller
utes 00 seconds West Jn 0 09 h wesETT Front Desk & POTL&GO' O ludes water, electric ca- Large lot $1,000 monthly Realty 850-697-3751
108 etl thence evn20 may redeem thelrphreoper 10 St JAUC3 ON0A BohpUteak~eeps e INFO FOR SALE? Ol.Fen 5d- yr, decks. 545-8813
68dgree 0mnts4 standing balance and cost 3110 -un Appliances experienced. Apply In r1b prmn.1*'| 7160
seconds West 100.00 feet bly ma llig it to Post Office 3120 Arts & Craft 440 24th St, ApalachAB- personat B1est Western, caution bloc from each Woo
ete pint linof on thoe BdT31205 Er tolty nF rr- t10 iness SLTNEGAUCMTIOSNT EVB- a4 bHey e, Apalachl- foors.e$850/rno+ er Townhomes for rent,
said U.S. Highway Number proatheweoue3150 Building Supplies SOLDI Antiques, Scuba 9 am ad 2 pm. You NEVER have to pay beach and restaurants! JeosaPnes Homested Pon-h
98 (State Road umber location 3160 p siesnt Gear, Fishing Gear & Please bring resume. for Information about Please call 404-402-5573 den reos Pt .d~erost month Eastpoint, 706 CC Land
30), said point being the June 4, 11, 2009 3170 Collectibles TclJwly tms eea rpsa os fo 5-5-49 ew 2oId3R,3b,2bD t
point of curve to the left 3180 Computers Vehicles, Tools, Glass- ou se a o a ae n tached carport w/ utility
having a radius of 7739.44 2465T 3190 Electronics ware, Housewares, Furnl- ,guarantee contact the 1B/BAusal u bruntsavilbl. al room, back porch, 3 room
feet; thence Southwesterly LEA OIE 3200 Firewood ture & Much Morel Quln- FTC, nished apartment with bal- 85-2-72workshop with covered
along ~ EGA sai crv ad a 3210 Free Pass it On ton Smith 850-445-3212 The Federal Trade cony, downtown Apalachl- ieal n etastlo
right of way for 88.83 feet' Noie sgie pruatt aurd ales www.Affiliated Installation/Maint/Repair Cmiso cola. claw tub, satellite, 1 acre high and dry Partial
thua etrlanl o 0Florida Self-Storage Facil- 3240 -Guns Auctionsacom sAeia osmrTV, WIFI Lease $800 | 10Bay View. $149,900. Motl-
degee 3 mnues27Ity Act, Florida Statutes, 3250 -GoodThingsto Eat 13%BP AU3103, AB2286 Maintenance poetnanc. month + electric. Call vated seller, bring offers.
seconds, chord of said are Catr8,PtIVha3260 Health & Fitness Position85-38015-7966
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Ith 1,452 s ft.





John uS ih
(850) 830-9096
Jamith.cel(4cox.net;

al Estate, Inc.
O E., Suite 104
FL 32578


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Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


The Times Thursday, June 4, 2009 7B


., CD L's FT. PT




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Itll i R~~O Llt Bk Johl uSkinnuar

850-229-7 I 2 condoman~cox.net
220 9th Streer. Prrt Sr Jre. FL.



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C PUBLIC MEE TIN


1


Thursday, June d, 2009


B8 | The Times


Local


The bald eagle, the
nation's symbol for 225
years, was on the brink
of extinction more than
four decades ago but was
removed from the federal
Endangered Species List
on June 28, 2007.
The number of nesting
pairs of bald eagles in the
lower 48 states increased
from fewer than 500 in
the early 1960's to more
than 10,000 in 2007. The
dramatic rehoundoccurred
after the government
banned the pesticide
DDT and conservationists
engaged in an aggressive
restoration program.
While the bald eagle is
no longer endangered, it
is still strongly protected.
The following press
release from the US Fish
and Wildlife Service tells
about the consequence to
construction companies
implicated in the
d struction of an eagle
Graham Brothers
Construction, Inc., and
Specialized Services,
Inc. were performing
contracting services for
a residential real estate
development company on
the "Lake Jessup Woods"
property near Sanford, in
Sem nole Cou elpmnt

company owned the
property. A subcontractor
observed a bald eagles'
nest on the property. As
work progressed, other
members of the crew,


including the defendant
corporations' employees,
observed the nest, as well
as at least two bald eagles.
One employee talked to a
supervisor about the nest
and was told to stay clear
of it.
On or about Jan. 5, 2005,
the defendant corporations
informed the development
company that employees
at the site had observed


the nest. Although the
defendant corporations
initially refused to use
their employees to
remove the tree and the
bald eagles' nest, the
defendant company later
reached an agreement
allowing the development
company's employees to
use the defendants' heavy
equipment to destroy the
tree containing the nest.


U.S. Magistrate
Judge Gregory J. Kelly
sentenced the two Georgia
construction firms to pay a
fine of $75,000 and to serve
one year of probation for
violating the Bald and


Golden Eagle Protection
Act.
This case was
investigated by agents of
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service andthe FloridaFish
and Wildlife Conservation


Commission. It was
prosecuted by attorneys
of the Environmental
and Natural Resources
Section of the Department
of Justice and the Middle
District of Florida.


YTfUIfe]8


JOHN SP0HRER


A bald eagle.


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The Frankin


County


Board of County


Commissioners is in the process of writing a land use
plan for the Fort Coombs Armory in Apalachicola. As
part of the planning process Franklin County welcomes
comments from the public on what they would like to
see in the plan. There will be a meeting on Wednesday,
June 17, at 5:00 p~m. at the Armory, 66 4th Street,
Apalachicola, to hear public comments. Persons unable
to attend this meeting may submit their comments in
writing to the Franklin County Planning Department,
34 Forbes Street, Suite 1, Apalachicola, Florida 32329.
More information can be obtained by contacting the
Franklin County Planning Department at 653-9783.


'MLS# 236034


$299,000 St. George Island\


CANAL FRONT

Spacious home on canal
with spectacular views
of the Apalachicola
Bay. 3 BR, 3 BA, Dock
and concrete launch


PY'P ramp! Huge living room
& dining room with 2 sided gas fireplace. Large
Master BR with separate tub and shower. Florida
room, screened porch overlooking the bay and
canal. Fenced yard. 4th BR built into piling area.
3rd BA at ground level. Unfurnished.
SHORT SALE!


John Shelby, Broker
800-344-7570
850-927-4777
www.sgirealty.com


GereIsland


Bald eagles, removed from endangered list, still a protected species


Our local real estate experts have identified what they feel are the

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