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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00027
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola, Fla.
Publication Date: May 21, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00027
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
        Page A 9
        Page A 10
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
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County votes to step into island sewage debate


ABC School to relocate to elementary school campus


Story and photo by David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

In a move that would have been inconceivable a handful

of years ago during early years of friction, the county school
board in the last couple weeks took two giant steps towards

cementing a tighter working relationship with the Apalachicola

Bay Charter School.


Apa lachicola


Carrabelle









voUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


By Lojs Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

Opposition is growing to a
plan to build a central sewage
treatment system for St. George
Island's business district.
OnTue sdaymorning, the county
commission voted unanimously
to file a protest against the plant's
construction with the Public


service commission (PSC),
which enables them to have a
say in deliberations on the plant
pending before the PSC.
This action reverses a decision
from their May 5 meeting, with
Commissioners Pinki Jackel,
Cheryl Sanders and Bevin Putnal
all reversing their original vote
against becoming involved with
the PSC deliberations.


The commissioners instructed
County Attorney Michael Shuler
to file a protest with the PSC
regarding Eugene Brown's bid to
build a sewage treatment plant
on St. George Island.
At a public hearing April 21,
Brown, CEOofWaterManagement
Services Inc. of St. George Island
(WMS), first proposed to build
a plant at the northwest corner


of the island commercial area to
provide wastewater treatment for
structures from Third St. East to
Third St. West.
On May 5, after Shuler
requested funds to hire a
consulting utility attorney to
prepare a letter of protest for the
PSC, Jackel demanded a memo

See SEWAGE AS


OTTICE
AMISON


By Lojs Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

After changes to
the advisory board, the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle is
seeking volunteers to help
with existing programs
and institute new
activities.
In December,
former president ,
Sue Reed of
Carrabelle Beach
left her position
due to family
medical problems
and several of herHR
coworkers stepped BLAL
down with her,
leaving the center
shortstaffed. Only James
Lawlor, of Carrabelle,
remained as treasurer of
the board.
Herschel Blanchett, a
Tallahassee resident who
maintains a second home
in Lanark Village, agreed
to act as interim president,
and his wife Annelle is
now secretary. Mark
Collins, of Carrabelle, is
vice president. Dot Bless,
of Lanark Village, George


Jackson, of Carrabelle,
and Cathy Puckett, of
Carrabelle, have also
agreed to serve as interim
board members.
Blanchett said the
current board will serve
only until a general election
can be held in October,
He said the
center is actively
seeking new board
members and
volunteers to help
with operations
There. "If they have
some business
Inexperience, that's
:HELL wonderful. If they
:HETT can wash dishes,
that's wonderful
too," he said.
Both board members
and volunteers can come
from anywhere in the
county. The center was
built entirely with private
donations. Both it, and the
block on which it stands,
are the property of all
Franklin County seniors.
The center is
particularly in need of a
volunteer receptionist

See NEW FACES A6


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
After pleading no
contest to three felony
charges, Joseph Lee Mixon
was sentenced last week to
three years in state prison
in connection with
slamming a seafood
truck last November
into a downtown
Apalachicola bank, ( ,
setting it ablaze. -
Mixon said ,
nothing at the May I
11 hearing before [
Circuit Judge James JO!
Hankinson, which M
followed a plea
agreement worked
out by his attorney, Public
Defender Kevin Steiger,
and the State's Attorney's
Office, represented locally
by Robin Myers.
The 43-year-old
Apalachicola man was
charged with three third-
degree felonies grand
theft of a motor vehicle,
and two counts of criminal
mischief, one on the truck
he drove and the other
on the bank. Each charge
carried a penalty of up to
five years in prison.
Hankinson sentenced
Mixon to 36 months for the
grand theft charge, and 36
months for the charge of


criminal mischief on the
bank, with the sentences
to run concurrently. The
judge also sentenced him
to five years probation on
the criminal mischief on
the truck charge, to begin
after Mixon completes his
jail time. He also
was ordered to pay
$770 in court fees.
Steiger said
Mixon has been
ordered to repay 13
Mile Seafood for the
cost of the truck,
a 1997 Peterbilt
SEPH truck originally
XON valued by state
police at $95,000.
The attorney said
a hearing is scheduled to
work out details of that
repayment.
Mixon has been in the
county jail since Nov. 20,
five days after he slammed
the seafood truck in the
early morning hours into
the Apalachicola State
Bank, at Avenue E and
Market Street, in an
apparent suicide attempt.
Mixon, who was pulled
to safety by a newspaper
delivery driver, Steve Holt,
suffered the fracture of two
vertebrae, scalplacerations
and a knee injury in the
See MIXON A6


The landmark change took
place at the May 12 special
meeting, when by unanimous
vote the five school board
members approved a deal
that will enable the ABC
School to move into the
former Chapman Elementary
School beginning with the
2009-10 school year.
Equally important,
although less earthshaking on
the surface, was a logistical
change approved the week
prior, in which the district
agreed to recognize the ABC
School as a kindergarten
through eighth grade school,
rather than as separate
elementary and middle
schools.
The ABC School will retain


the two contracts that gave
rise to its gradual growth over
the past nine years, but will
now have one school number
with the Florida Department
of Education.
Principal Don Hungerford
said the change was
needed to make statistical
comparisons between it and
the district easier when, for
the first time since it began
in 2001, the ABC School
becomes a Title I school next
year.
Hungerford said the
ABC School now has nearly
60 percent of its students
on free and reduced lunch,
which means it will likely be
granted Title I status based
on its June 30 application


to the federal government.
The other Franklin County
schools, and now the
consolidated school, have
long been Title I schools,
which enable them to qualify
for a host of grants and other
enhanced financial support.
The school board's
decision to give the Chapman
building to the ABC School,
and sign a long-term lease
for the surrounding property,
still requires final approval of
the details by School Board
Attorney Barbara Sanders.
The board's vote of
approval for the major terms
of the deal will enable the
ABC School to begin the

See CHAPMAN A6


Phone: (850) 653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews~,starfl.com
Fax:(850)653-8036


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:


Casrifedd Dirpa idr a day aill1a.mn.
Classified Line Ad Monday ai5 p.mn.


TABLE OF C
Letter to the Editor .. ... .....A4-A5
Sheriff's Report. .......... ... B5
ChurchNews......................... B3


HE LPI NG

BODIES,

HEALING

HEARTS


LIFE TIMES | B1


NITA
MOLSBEE


New faces at helm


of senior center


Ir

jCS
Ce


Mixen sentenced for


RI1K fIre minseliel


:ONTENTS
SocietyNews.. .....2 FREEDOM .. B
Tide Chart ................... ........ A6 F PARS NERCT
Classifieds ................... ..... B6-B7


-























































































INVITATION TO BID

The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will be
accepting separate sealed bids for the following:

TWO (2) OPEN TOP ROLL OFF CONTAINERS
AND
THREE (3) RECYCLING CONTAINERS

Specification are on file in the office of the Franklin County Board of
County Commissioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola,
FL. 32320

Bids must be received in the office of the Franklin County Clerk of the
Court 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320 by 4:30
RM., EST, on June 1, 2009. Bids must be clearly labeled for each
separate bid. The sealed bids will be publicly open and read aloud
at 10:00 A.M. EST, on June 2, 2009, in the County Commission
Meeting Room located in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex.
For further information, contact Van W. Johnson, Sr., Solid Waste
Director, at (850) 670-8167.

An original and one copy of each bid shall be furnished in
a sealed envelope or container, plainly marked "LRoll Off /
Recycling Containers".
The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any
or all bids.


~FICKLING
& COMPANY

A Full Service Real Estate Company
"In- -r ~ I


BOARD OF COUNTY COM MISSIONERS
FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA

JOSEPH PARRISH, CHAIRMAN.


Thursday, May 21, 2009


A2 | The Times


Local


Story and photos by Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
Once again The Forgotten
Coast Plein Air Invitational
Paintout has come and
gone.
The week was a whirlwind
of activity, beginning with
the traditional dockside
gathering for the artists
at WaterStreet Hotel and
culminating with the Art in
the Afternoon celebration at
the old Cotton Warehouse in
Apalachicola.
In between, there were
exhibitions of plein air
paintings at SummerCamp,
the Cotton Warehouse and
Windmark Beach, plus live
demonstrations all across
both Gulf and Franklin
counties.
At the end of the event, the
artists had created over 280
paintings, 85 of which sold
for a total of around $60,000.
The sales volume was down
nearly 30 percent from last
year's total sales of $84,000
and the price of individual
paintings was slightly down
overall. It's a good time to
buy art.
Half of the proceeds from
the art sales goes to support
the Forgotten Coast Cultural
Coalition and will help stage
next year's Plein Air Paint
Out.
This year, organizers
worked even harder to
encourage the visiting
artists to record vistas
across the entire region and,
if the artists were a little
less visible in Port St. Joe
and Apalachicola, it may be
because they were exploring
wetlands at Alligator Point
or visiting train yards in
northern Gulf County.
A high point of the event
was aforum held at the Cotton
Warehouse on Friday where
Mallory O'Connor, author
and professor emeritus
of art history at Santa Fe
Community ollee ple tre

artist to human and natural
environments in Florida.
O'Connor, Paith Eidse,
author of "Voices of the
Apalachicola," and artist
Mitch Kolbe, of Palm Harbor,
discussed art and community
using painting he created
at last year's Plein Air, "The
Oyster Shuckers," as a
springboard. The painting
depicts the workers at Lynn's
Oyster House in Eastpoint.


1_111
, -5~


At top left, artist Mitch Kolbe talks about his painting "The Oyster Shuckers." The picture, created at Lynn's Oyster House during the
2008 Plein Air, became the centerpiece of a discussion about art, culture and the environment. At top right, organizers Jeanette Taylor,
of Apalachicola, and Leslie Fedota, of Port St. Joe, share a laugh at the Saturday Night Gala. At lower left, James Richards, winner
of the Artists' Choice Award for best in show, with his painting entitled "Oyster Villa." At middle right, a cluster of painters gathered
to record the image of the St. George Light. At lower right, guitar teacher Carol Harris, left, performs with student Lloyd Smith, a sixth
grader at Franklin County Middle School, at Sunday's Art in the Afternoon program.


Kolbe explained the
familial relationships of the
women pictured and what
it was like to paint them.
He said the experience
brought back memories of a
childhood visit to a seafood
house on the outer banks of
North Carolina.
"One of the women had
come from working all night


at WalMart in Panama City
to work five or six hours
shucking," he remembered.
"I said I wouldn't take a
break if they didn't. If they
took one, Ididn't see it."
Eidse talked about her
conversations with the
hardscrabble inhabitants
along the banks of the river,
from sharecroppers in the


north to fishermen in the
south.
She talked about the
water wars and how the
devastating loss of water
is bringing an end to the
indigenous peoples' way of
life.
"WYe are sitting in a
window of culture, history
and the environment,


and the art created here
captures that unique
moment," she said.
The Artists' Choice
Award f or best in show
went to newcomer James
Richards, of Athens, GA
for a painting of weathered
buildings along Mexico
Beach.
"Receiving this award


is a great honor," he said,
"This was my first time in
the area. I was blown away
by the amount of subject
matter everywhere you
turn. I do a few of these
Plein Air events every year
and they're always good to
the artists but down here,
the Southern hospitality
really shines."


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sale in the Apalachicola Bay area! St. Gll~F nn" BF 232


ATTENTION BIDDERS: Franklin County is an
employer and encourages participation with
enterprises and women's business enterprises.


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Plein Air Paintout opens window to way of life


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'I I n
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C~to~Ders





Thursday, May 21, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

Last weekend, 35
members of the Florida
Humanities Council
paid an educational visit
to Apalachicola and
environs.
Visitors from across the
state were treated to the
sights, sounds and tastes
of the Forgotten Coast
and had an opportunity to
hear lectures by several
prominent experts on
local history and culture,
including Apalachicola
beekeeper George
Watkins.
Anita Grove, director
of the Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce,
said the tour was a
tremendous success.
"The Humanities
Council began these
junkets about 10 years ago
but came to Apalachicola
for the first time last
October. That trip twas
sueh a success, tey
returned with a new group
this wekend," she asried

Friday and was treated to
Sle ture abyaConni nn g

author of "Remembering
Blue," a novel set in
the Panhandle. Fowler
spoke on local culture
and traditions and read
excerpts from several of
her books.
Bill Spohrer, president
of the Apalachicola Area
Historical Society, led a
tour of the city Saturday,
and then Dolores Roux
guided them through
Chestnut Cemetery
spinning tales of local
laughter and loss.
The group spent
Saturday taking a boat
ride up the river to visit
Watkins and his hives.
Later they visited 13
Mile Oyster Company


to taste and learn about
Apalachicola oysters. At
the end of the day, they
attended a talk by Florida
State University professor
Dr. Andrew Frank.
Frank has published
articles in the Georgia
Historical Quarterly,
Florida Historical
Quarterly, and several
book anthologies. He has
received research grants
and fellowships from the
American Philosophical
Society, American
Historical Association,
Newberry Library, and
Huntington Library.
His Saturday night
lecture, held at the Dixie
Theatre, dealt with the
fact the Forgotten Coast
really has heen "forgotten"
in many ways. Now that
the peninsula has been
settled, the Panhandle and
Apalachicola have been
forgotten in their historic
role in the state, he said,
reminding the group
that, in the early 1800's,
when people further north
thought of Florida, they
thought of Apalachicola.
Prior to the Civil War,
Apalachicola was the

GulfdCo nst coimopor t
after New Orleans, and
during the war was the
largest supplier of salt to
the Confederacy. Even
earlier, Fort Gadsden was
a tremendously important
outpost to the newly born
nation.
On Sunday morning,
the visitors gathered in
the dining room of the
Gibson Inn for breakfast
and a taste of tupelo
honey. Watkins gave the
final talk of the weekend,
explaining to the visitors
that his "shrimp killing
instincts" went back to
his Portuguese, Italian,
German and Scottish
roots.
"From when I was 20,


I had a big boat to get
offshore and get the big
shrimp," he said. "It was
a wide open door then.
All you needed was safety
equipment and a free
permit. Would you believe
I once went to court for not
having a free permit?"
From seafaring tales,
he segued into his wisdom
relating to beekeeping
and in particular the
tupelo honey for which
the Panhandle is famous.
Watkins is now the largest
producer of that delicacy
in the lower Apalachicola
River area, with six "local
dealerships" including the
IGA and the Piggly Wiggly
and more out-of-state
orders than he can fill.
The audience sat
spellbound as he
recounted how local
beekeepers feed their
hives on a progression of
flowers; maple, titi, high
bush gallberry and finally
tupelo.
"Once you become a
beekeeper you're going to
see all of these blossoms
all around you didn't
notice before," he said.
He remembered Joe

hi hI ,radew ad staughhe
was sad for the Indians
because, living in honey
heaven, they had no bees.
Those came with early
European settlers.
At the end of the talk
the visitors discussed
what they had learned,
what surprised them and
suggestions they might
have for local tourism.
Many of the visitors
were both surprised and
charmed by the beauty
of the area as well as the
friendly open nature of the
people.
Several commented
on the surprisingly
cosmopolitan attitude of
many locals. All professed
a desire to return again.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


George Watkins spoke at the Gibson Inn on Sunday morning.


CIassiielO Line Ad: Friday, May 22, 2000 NIOON OT
We will not accept any late ads for the May 28, 2007 Edition.


Pl0880 Cail With any questions:


The Star 227-1278 The Times 653-8868


TH:SA
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Brick Construction, Terrazzo & Tile Floors Vinyl Flooring, Storage Area, Walk in cooler
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Two exterior storage rooms ~


Bees, boat trip, delight Humanities Council visitors


O O




So that wve m~ayT spend the Memorial Day
H-oliday with our family & friends we will
be having early deadlines for all advertising
r" placed in The Star & The Times


Earls Deadlines for:

Ad with Proof:

eAd without Droel:


Thursday, May 28, 2000

Wednesday, May 20, 2000

Thursday, Hay 21, 2000


OPEN HOUSES FOR ALL PROPERTIES: SUNDAY, MAY 31, 1-4 PM CST


ABSOLUTE Lot
Walk to the Beach
21st Street Mexico Beach





Thursday, May 21, 2009


county comp plan plainly
states that if you have ac-
cess to central sewer all the
lots that currently serve as
drain fields can be devel-
oped. So the county com-
mission will not be able to
stop it and if they try, it will
wind up costing the county
and the taxpayers a lot of
money in court. The only
thing the county commis-
sion could control would be
the height of such develop-
ments. But hey, it only takes
three votes and that could
change also!
Smoke: Some people
would have you believe
that higher density sim-
ply means condominiums
(like our neighbors to the
west, Destin and Panama
City Beach). Simply BS....
Guess what folks? Panama
City Beach and Destin both
have central sewer sys-
tems but they don't have
oystermen working their
bays anymore. Why is this?
Runoff pollution from new
development on St. George
Island will directly contrib-
ute to the destruction of
oyster beds. Don't take my
word for it; ask the experts,
the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Florida De-
partment of Environmental
Protection.
Fact: We should get
some good testing done and
find exactly where our prob-
lem is coming fr~om. That
sounds logical to me. Don't
you think it would serve us
better if we found out the
key information before we
put a system in? Kind of
feels like we are putting the
cart ahead of the horse!
Smoke: The world as
we know it is coming to an
end. John Boy Brown from
somewhere in North Geor-
gia is gonna come down
here and flush a toilet and
all the oysters, fish and
the whole estuary is going
to collapse, so we have to
act now. BS again.... Gene
Brown's St. George Island
sewer system would take a
year or more to permit and
build, and that is if the con-
struction doesn't hit a snag.
We could have the system
in place and may still wind
up with the same problems.
I guess then the only thing
left to do then would be to
tie the whole island to the
system and guess what?
Even higher density!
Fact: Mlr. Brown went
around the county commis-
sion's back with this whole
deal.
Smoke: Already being an
established utility, he has
the right. No sir, we are the
citizens of Franklin County,
not Leon County, and we
don't need someone cram-
ming something down our
throats. It should have been
presented accordingly to
the county commission and
the public should have had


adequate time for discus-
sion. Kind of sleazy way of
doing things (my opinion)!
Pact: A petition has been
floating around supporting
the St. George Island sew-
er idea. Got a copy on my
email! Being myself, I had
to call a few of the folks and
inquire, and found that the
people who created that pe-
tition kinda mislead people.
Guess what?
Smoke: Ready for this?
A particular person who
claims to be "for the work-
ing man" has been throw-
ing all the above Smoke!
(or BS). Not only that, with
help from some buddies she
seems to be working hand-
in-hand with developer
Gene Brown to scare peo-
ple and make them think
the St. George Island sewer
system will protect the Bay
Being misleading to
people is one thing that just
doesn't sit well with me.
If you have an opinion or
you wish to take a stand on
something, the more power
to you, but let's be honest
with all these good people
in the process. If you are for
the working man or woman,
he honest with him or her!
In closing, a decision of
this magnitude demands
discussion. So maybe as a
community together we can
shake the county commis-
sion out of this coma and
bring back common sense.
The clock is ticking! It is in
your hand, Franklin County
- pick that phone up and
let's make our local govern-
ment work for us. Remem-
her to be elected to such a
position should be an honor,
not a privilege. We owe the
county commission nothing
but they have to answer to
You, The People.
Ottice Amison
Lifelong resident


Central sewer on
island lona overdue
I have read the recent
articles on the issue of sew-
er on St. George Island with
great interest and at times
with great frustration. Ms.
Riegelmayer's letter was all
about the potential for over-
development on the island.
How can you get some sort
of high density on a lot that
is 25 feet wide?
She also wants us to be-
lieve that if a central sewer
system is built, the height
restriction will be in jeop-
ardy. This is simply not the
case; the county commis-
sion has upheld the height
restriction time and time
again. And any one build-
ing even one foot over has
had to change a roof line or
raise the floor to accommo-
date the law.
It just amazes me that
the very people that swear
to protect the bay can turn
a complete 360 in a matter
of moments. I think that it is
time to stand for the bay if
you claim to care about the
bay. Most people claim to
care about the bay but use
the bay to push a personal
agenda.
Mr. Begos seems to
think that if we dig a hole in
the sand and bury our head
in it, the problem will go
away on its own or he wants
us to believe that there is no
problem. This is simply not
acceptable. If you ignore
this Iroblem lon s ou h,


The truth of the matter age treatment plant passed
is that the bay in my opin- and underway. Secret meet-
ion has been showing signs ings with the FSWA are con-
of pollution for quite some stant and they are pushed to
time. This issue needs to be convince the public and the
resolved now. We cannot do commission that St. George
nothing and expect Mother Island commercial district
Nature to continually take is totally responsible for
care of us when we abuse the closure of the bay at all
her. times in all ways and some-
Hank Garrett thing musthbe done with the
Eastpoint "(major player."
What is the motivation
for all of this hard work and
Sewage sagal would deviousness by the "play-
malke ood ers?" Iwould venture to say
the only inhibitor of high
Hiaasen novel density and development of
Franklin County and the this beautiful spit of an is-
happenings on this sewage land is a sewage treatment
treatment issue would be a plant. This has happened
great storyline for Carl Hi- throughout the rest of Flor-
aasen, the famous Florida ida. Read a Hiaasen novel
writer and former Miami and you too will be con-
Herald columnist. vinced these happenings in
Smart good-looking rural Franklin County have
county commissioner ap- a sad ending. You cannot
pears from nowhere and have development and oys-
gets elected as county com- ters, you can have eco-tour-
missioner. A voting block of ism, oysters and planned
the "three" develops and development. Our visitors
tables everything of impor- come here because of what
tance to the community. it isn't, not what it could be.
The one issue that would Wake up commissioners
prevent major development and seafood workers to the
of the island, "a sewage truth and save "The Last
treatment plant," becomes Great Bay" before it is too
an issue and is pursued late.
frantically by another major Please know that we
player who wants to strike it need to slow down, do an
rich. The major player who independent study of the
wants to strike it rich in pollution source, look at the
the sewage business then results and choose a sys-
shows up at every meeting tem or systems that will not
and convinces the seafood cost the islanders an arm
workers that the island is and a leg to tap into and that
the cause of all of their prob- will be financed by public
lems and woes. The major money not private money
player contracts with land- that has to be paid back.
owners to buy certain par- Please, please, please stop
cels of land for his sewage this train.
treatment plant. The major Jeanni McMi lon
player also spends thou- St. George Island
sands of dollars for a plan-
ning firm to come up with Bte a hn
a less than perfect idea for Betrsethn
a sewage treatment plant Sorry witil
that we must buy in to. secg ln
The ranlinCounty Seaepnt
Seafood Workers Associa- Franklin County Seafood
tion begins a petition that Workers are being misled in
has Eastpointers and other the information they are re-
non-islanders convinced ceiving about the proposed
that "The Island" needs to Central Sewage System on
go sewage treatment and St. Georges Island. Some
only a private sewage treat- people are telling you sea-
ment owned by the major food workers that this sys-
player. A public one, or one tem will be good for the
funded by grants and that environment and will help
will reuse all the water and protect the bay. This is
that will be cheap to tap into just wrong according to the
is not the answer; only the research and the facts.
private one will do. On Monday evening,
The Department of there was an emergency
Health inspects five res- meeting to explain the ef-
taurants after the busiest fects of a central sewage
month, July, and a two-inch system on other parts of
rain and declares they are Florida.
all spewing sewage on into The seafood industry
our precious environment. has been battered in the
Administrative orders are past few years from every
received from attorneys, angle possible. First it was
money is spent to be in the shrimpers who had
compliance. Complaints are to cut holes in their net
filed by a certain restaurant and install and use TEDs
owner to other restaurant ('lI~rtle Excluder Devices)
owners and threats and which opened up the net
angry meetings begin and to let out turtles and any-
there is riotous behavior by thing smaller including
commissioners and com- their profit-making shrimp.
mercial property owners on Then the oyster shuckers
the island. were targeted to make their
The Public Service Com- cracking machines easier
mission is to receive letters to clean, which took several
of support or non-support of tries to get them certified to
the idea. The county com- pass inspection. That was
mission, the three mus- just the beginning of the
keteers," refuse to send the battle.
county attorney with a mu- Next came the worst
nicipal attorney to the PSC battle we ever had to en-
to find out the facts and rep- dure, which is now referred
resent the islanders. The to as the "Net Ban" and put
brother of one of the com- a hurt on the mullet fisher-
missioners is seen following men. Most of my friends
the "major player" around who worked as shrimpers,
and it is rumored he has an shuckers, and mullet fish-
interest in getting this sew- ermen have either done


as I have and found a de-
pendable source of income
elsewhere or are now har-
vesting oysters. Whatever
they chose to do to support
their families, I bet they are
still concerned about issues
that will negatively affect
the natural resources that
are surviving the battle
against them.
These natural resources
were once abundant in the
1960's and 1970's. I can re-
member when my daddy
and my uncle would com-
pete with each other to see
who could catch the most
wheelbarrows full of oys-
ters. That was before you
were required to put them
into burlap bags (croaker
sacks). They enjoyed work-
ing on the bay and so did I. I
miss working on the bay be-
cause I grew to love the in-
dustry and the people who
are still working the bay
will also tell you that it is not
easy, but it will supply your
needs as it has been doing
for people all my life.
The business district on
St. Georges Island should
not be put on a central
sewage system without re-
searching the effects it will
ultimately have on the natu-
ral resources that exist in
our bay. If we jump up and
try to solve a problem with
the first suggestion we get,
the natural resources may
just cease to exist. What will
happen to us then? What
will happen if this economy
keeps sinking and we lose
our public jobs? Will there
be oysters, shrimp, and
fish to feed our children or
grandchildren? Natural re-
sources are a blessing from
God and if we get too over-
powered by making a dollar
we just might be cutting our
own throats.
If you are a seafood
workers who has signed
a petition about the cen-
tral sewage system on St.
George Island you need
to find out the facts and
understand what the re-
search shows can happen
if this Mr. Brown has his
way with getting his name
on the central sewage sys-
tem. He would then have a
monopoly and no one else
could suggest other ways
to fix the problem. The
problem is that he does
not want to tell anyone how
much it would cost or how
much the taxpayers would
have to pay to maintain the
system.
With me the problem lies
in how the updated sewage
system on St. George Is-
land will affect the height
restrictions there in the
future. Will the people who
are supposedly fighting to
protect the bay stand up
and oppose the increase in
the height restrictions? Or
will they roll over expecting
their bellies to be rubbed?
My husband is a sea-
food worker and he was not
asked his opinion on this
issue nor did he even know
that there was a proposal
about this system. Frank-
lin County Seafood Work-
ers Association supposedly
approved of the sewage
system in a letter that was
prepared by Linda Raffield.
Mr. John Richards, the
president of the FCSWA,
said that he did not sign the
letter and no one else was


S LETTER A


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apaachic50a RL 329


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
APALACHICOLA, FL 32329
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$23 year $15 six months
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U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (D-
Florida) will be meeting with coun-
ty and city commissioners on Tues-
day, May 26.
The meeting will be from


2 to 3 p.m. at Carrabelle City
Hall, at the former Carrabelle
School.
The information gathering is
open to the entire public and will


give elected officials a chance to
meet and speak directly with the
senator.
For more information, call the
planning office at 653-9783 ext. 161.


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barelyaesserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains,


A4 | The Times O~n o


Letters to the EDITOR


Facts and smoke on
central sewer
Well a lot has been go-
ing on in Franklin County
the last couple of months,
the St. George Island cen-
tral sewer being possibly
the most important. So im-
portant that maybe there
should be some public
discussion on the topic. It
would be nice for the public
to have it's say but it seems
a few of our county commis-
sioners seem to think oth-
erwise.
Well I've had discussions
with some folks around the
county and the future of
the Bay seems to be at the
top of everyone's list of pri-
orities. Economically that
is probably a good idea but
wait a minute... our board
of county commissioner
(three of them in particular)
refused to send our county
attorney to represent the
county in Tallahassee at
the Public Service Com-
mission. My hats off to Mr.
Shuler he practically got
on his knees pleading with
the county commissioners,
but his pleas seem to have
fallen on three deaf ears. I
have sent emails to each of
the commissioners asking
for a special meeting to re-
consider their decision and
as of the time of this letter I
have not had response.
So that only leaves me
with my thoughts. I start
asking myself all sorts of
questions. What are the
motivations behind such
decisions? I have heard a
ton of rumors, but rumors
can be hurtful and not really
productive so let's air some
laundry
Let's talk about Facts
and Smoke: (Pacts being
facts and Smoke being 100
percent Bull):
Fact: We have a pollution
problem on the beaches of
St. George Island. I am no
way denying that fact what-
soever! Tourism also plays
a role in our local economy,
just as much as our local
fisheries, and the problem
should be addressed. But
we don't know where the
beach pollution is com-
ing fr~om. It could even be
from raccoons, dogs and
seagulls!
Smoke: Some people
would have you believe that
there is human feces (crap,
in layman's terms) floating
around the bay and the fish
are being contaminated,
possibly shutting down the
local oyster fishery. But
there hasn't been any ill-
nesses by the consumption
of oysters or fish from our
bay attributed to sewage
pollution. The problem is on
the Beach, not the Bay!
Fact: A central sewer
system on the island will
raise density, from Day One
of operation. Our current


pala 7c-h ic ola
Curral~lbelle


THE TIE

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


Sen. Bill Nelson to hear from laublic at meeting


COrrection
In the front page story "Welcome Plein Air Painters" in last week's Apalachicola Times, the name of the
girl pictured in the front page photo is Adrianna Butler, and not Adrianna Jenkins. The Times apologizes
for the error.






















































































































































I


I


Thursday, May 21, 2009





Hazy
I have been wallowing
in the past of hazy memo-
ries,
Bob, an old friend in
Tampa, turned me onto
an author
I hadn't
read Ace
Atkins.
He was a
crime re-
porter for
the Tampa
RED WHITE Tribune,
AND OUX received
Denise Roux aPuizr
nomina-
tion, and now writes nov-
els. I had mentioned to
Bob that I liked the gritty
south Louisiana novels by
James Lee Burke featur-
ing flawed detective Dave
Robicheaux.
Bob encouraged me
to give Ace a try. Seems
they knew each other
from the Trib, and their
desks were side-by-side.
Thanks, Bob.
I trusted his judg-
ment enough to order five
books from Amazon two


Local


The Times | AS


bootleg rum
that is good news. Most of
hanks to our mutual my historical knowledge
Id, we were able to comes from books like
lect. About "White these. I'll donate "White
dow" he wrote to me, Shadow" to the library so
Novel is the first you can either learn some
;in a Tampa trilogy -- Florida history or spend
lot sure when I'll start time reminiscing.
ing the second novel. I'm now reading "Wick-
me across the story ed City." You may have
it Charlie Wall while guessed that the setting
arching the death of is Phenix City, Alabama.
,man in Tampa from This was a wide-open
1956. The woman's town across the river
,and was Wall's per- from Columbus, Georgia.
l1 attorney and some Prostitution, gambling,
ght her death could murder and government
ied into Wall's mob corruption were the or-
Ig from a year and a der of the day. Once I fin-
before. ish, this one also goes to
wasn't until I left the library.
pa did I fully real- Somewhere in the
;he potential of writ- brain are memories of
about Tampa of that stories about the wicked
od. As many writers city's clean up. Perhaps
noted, sometimes they will come back as I
~nce offers a better read the book.
pective ... there is so Denise "Machine Gun"


paperbacks and three
hardbacks. The anticipa-
tion of new books and a
new author to read is bet-
ter than Christmas morn-
ing for me.
I started reading in
chronological order by
publication date. The first
two featured the same
protagonist a former
pro football player turned
blues history professor.
They were gritty and
dark. I really like James
Lee Burke, but Ace's
books are better.
When I started read-
ing "White Shadow," I
initially had no idea I was
in the realm of historical
fiction. It's set in Tampa
in the 1950s and before
too long the name Santo
Trafficante got my atten-
tion. He was a real guy
and infamous in the his-
tory of organized crime.
Bells started clanging in
my brain. I got on the 'Net
and sure enough, a real-
life guy named Charlie
Wall was the White Shad-


ow. His brutal murder
is unsolved to this day.
Charlie was a good ole
Southern boy who rose to
underworld power large-
ly due to his control of
the illegal numbers game
known as bolita.
That started the mem-
ories. As a kid in the Six-
ties, I recall that bolita
had a presence here in
Apalachicola. Many peo-
ple bought numbers and
according to local legend,
the payoff was 70-to-1. I
remember talk of an un-
dercover female cop who
slept her way around
enough to build a case
that resulted in local ar-
rests. I suspect there are
many stories out there
from longtime residents
just a bit older than I am
and with better memo-
ries.
I also began to recollect
stories my Nana shared
with me about Tampa in
the Twenties and Thir-
ties. There were tales of
bootleg rum from Cuba


h; that's~ unique ~and
edible about Florida
at period and I know
,e returning to write
e about it." Well,


ida.
T1
frien
conn
Shac
"The
book
I'm n
writi
I ca:
abou
rese
a wo
late
husb
sona
thou
be t
killing
half
It
Tam
ize t
ing
peric
have
dista
pers
muc
incr
of th
I'll b
more


ACE ADKINIS
and a drive-by shooting
she witnessed on Colum-
bus Avenue. My father
was born there. I finished
my college in Tampa and
worked there for more
than seven years. I feel a
real connection.
Ace's book is fiction,
but there was enough
truth to send me on hours
of fascinating Internet re-
search on the growth of
organized crime in Flor-


Roux is a regular colum-
nist for the Apalachicola
and Carrabelle Times. 'lb
reach her, email her at
rouxwhitemchsi.com


Q. When reading local
news reports on court
activities, I see where
cases were either
nolle pressed or a no
information was filed.
What do these terms
refer to?
A. When someone
has been arrested
for a crime, the State
Attorney's office must
determine whether
or not to proceed
with the case, and decide


what the formal charges will
be. When the State
Attorney announces
a "no information,"
that means they have
Decided not to file
formal charges and the
case is closed. A "no
information" may be
filed for various reasons,
Q.ERK OF THE but typically, it's done
CIRCUIT COURT to prevent cases of
Marcia Johnson little merit proceeding
forward. In other words,
the State Attorney decided not


to file an "Information" which
is a paper document setting out
the crimes the defendant will be
charged with,
When formal charges
have been filed, and a case
reaches a point where the
State Attorney doesn't wish
to proceed further, a Nolle
Prosequi is announced, and
the case is closed. It is a Latin
legal term meaning "not to
pursue." A Nolle Prosequi,
also known as Nolle Pross is
filed when the State Attorney


is of the opinion that an
adjudication of the charges is
not in the interest of the public
and/or that the available and
admissible evidence is not
sufficient to satisfy beyond a
reasonable doubt.
Both filings have the effect
of saving taxpayer dollars.
Please remember; however,
that anytime a defendant is
fingerprinted when being
booked on criminal charges, a
record of the arrest is generated
to the Florida Department


of Law Enforcement. Even
though a case may be dropped
or dismissed, a criminal history
check will still reflect a record of
the arrest with that disposition.
If you have any questions or
comments about this column,
please forward them to:
Marcia Johnson, Clerkc of the
Court, 33 Markcet Street, Ste.
203, Apalachicola, FL 32320,
or by email to: mmjohnson@
fr~ankclinclerkc.com. Visit the
Clerkc's website at: www.
fr~ankclinclerkc.com.


present to say whether they ap-
proved of this letter. I looked over
the list of signatures and there
were only a few seafood workers
on the lists. Most of the seafood
workers who signed the petition
did not know what they were
signing. One oysterman told me
that he signed a petition for all


buildings to be made to have ade-
quate sewage disposal.
The majority of the signatures
that were received were from
the workers from Harry A's Bar.
They were saying that their jobs
depended on this central sewage
system being installed and I know
for a fact that Harry A's has been


in business for years without the
central sewage system.
As a citizen of Franklin County
and a saltwater products license
holder, I am asking that every
seafood worker or anyone who
thinks that this system is right
for Franklin County do some re-
search before making up your


mind about whether you are op-
posed or in approval of the sys-
tem. Once you figure out where
you stand then you should give
your county commissioner a call
telling them how you feel. This
is a big project with some very
confusing issues that surround it.
Always remember it is better to


be safe than sorry and the other
old saying "If it ain't broke don't
fix it."
I will let it be known that I am
opposed to this system and the
way it has been applied for. I do not
think that a project with this mag-
nitude should be so top secret.
April [)alton


QSend in a clear, sharp, recent photo of your child or
grandchild enjoying the summer. You may enter as
many children as you wish, but only one child per
entry. Photos will NOT be returned! Please do not
submit your only copy. *
Choose which category to enter the child:
First Category: Newborn 2 yrs. old
Second Category: 3 yrs. old 5 yrs.old

C You can submit your entry three ways:
1.Complete and mail entry form along with a $10 entry .
fee to: Cutest Summer Baby Contest /NIE, P.O. Box
1940, Panama City, Florida 32402.
2. Enter online at www. newsherald.com, look for the
"Cutest Summer Kids" icon and instructions.
3. Drop off form, photo, and entry fee at
The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, Panama City.
Deadline for all entries is May 21, 2009 by 12 p.m. (CST)

Two rounds of public voting will run from May
25 through June 18. You may vote online at
newsherald.com, mail-in your votes, or drop them
off at The News Herald office. Each vote is just $1.00
and you can vote as many times as you'd like. Don't
forget to tell your family and friends to vote! All proceeds
from the contest will benefit Newspapers In Education.

The first place winners along with the rest of the top
six vote getters from each category will be featured on
a "Cutest Summer Kids" keepsake insert in The New~s
Herald on Sunday, June 28th and online Saturday
June Also, First, Second, and Third Place for each 1
category will receive fabulous prizes. -
For more information call 850-747-5008
NEW HRAD


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OW b- We


WEWSHER~L~,,


memories of bolita and


Your Public TRUST


LE TTE RS from page A4


.


communlcations
Different from word one"


HE._STAR


k~l-i-,I










PUBLIC NOTICE
The annual report of the J. Ben Watkins Founda-
tion, Inc. is available at the address noted below for inspection
during normal business hours by any citizen who so requests
within 180 days after publication of this notice of its avail-
ability. Additionally, copies of said annual report are available
upon payment of reasonable copy charges.
J. Ben Watkins Private Foundation, Inc.
564 Rhoden Cove Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32312
The principal manager is J. Ben Watkins III: telephone
(850) 488-4782


CHAPMAN from page Al


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T/DE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
ro find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
:rom those given for APALAC IOLA: Lw
'at Point MinusO:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
ro find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
rom those given for CARRABELLE: Lw
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03

APALACH ICOLA


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CARRAB ELL E


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SO LU NAR
m = Minor M = Major add 1 hour for daylight savings
Date Day AM PM Rise/Set Moon
05/21 Thu m 1:45 m 1:55 5:04AM O
M 7:45 M 8:1 5 6:50PM
05/22 Fri m 2:30 m 2:45 5:03AM
M 8:35 M 9:00 6:50PM
05/23 Sat m 3:15 m 3:35 5:03AM
M 9:25 M 9:55 6:51 PM *
05/24 Sun m 4:10 m 4:30 5:03AM
M 10:20 M 10:50 6:51 PM
05/25 Mon m 5:05 m 5:40 5:02AM

05/26 Tue NI 11 0 M -6:55 622 A
M 12:10 M 12:40 6:52PM
05/27 Wed m 7:25 m 8:05 5:01AM
M 1:15 M 1:50 6:53PM


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IV


Thursday, May 21, 2009


A6 | The Times


Local


5 a.m. crash. It was later
determined Mixon was not
authorized to be driving the
seafood truck at the time of
the accident.
The crash caused the
bank to erupt in flames,
and it later had to be razed
to make way for a new
bank to be constructed on


the site, at a cost of several
million dollars.
Mixon's sentence
could keep him in state
custody through Nov.
2012, although prisoners
who exhibit good behavior
can be paroled after
completing 85 percent of
their sentence.


The sentence marks
the third time Mixon has
spent time behind bars in
a state penitentiary.
On Oct. 28, 1985, right
after his 20th birthday, he
was sentenced in Franklin
County for three felonies -
burglary of an unoccupied
structure, armed burglary


and arson. He was released
Dec. 6, 1991 after doing a
little more than six years.
On Dec. 15, 1995,
Mixon returned to prison
following a conviction
for marijuana sale in
Escambia County. He was
released Nov. 7, 1997 to
state probation.


who Blanchett said would
be someone with a key to
come and open the door
every day.
When asked about
the resignation of former
board members he said
he believed the center had
always been well run but
added, "There is tendency
for anyone to burn out
because there are so few
volunteers."
The center is currently
serving breakfast on


Tuesday and lunch on
Thursday. This month, the
center began airing films
during the lunch. They
also host bingo on Monday
evenings and an over-50
dance on the first Saturday
of each month at 7 p.m.
The board said they
hope to encourage more
recreational activities
and are trying to promote
Wednesday as a games day.
They also hope to increase
lunch service to three days


a week.
Thereisarecommended,
but voluntary, donation for
meals, $2 for breakfast and
$3 for lunch.
"We'd rather them come
and visit than sit at home
alone because they don't
have the money. There
are alot of lonely seniors
in the county," Blanchett
said.
The board also hopes to
erect an adult day care on
the site of the senior center,


He said there is a house
available but volunteers
would be needed to move it
to the site.
Blanchett said that inth
future, he hopes the center
will go in a slightly different
direction, moving its focus
away from health care and
toward recreational and
educational activities. He
also said he feels the center
must partner more with
other facilities for seniors
in the area.


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move right after the
end of the school year
on June 3. Hungerford
assured Superintendent
Nina Marks that any
renovation work started at
Chapman would allow for
the district's removal of
materials it has stored at
the site.
"I was happy to see
the unanimous vote," said
Hungerford. "I have had
personal conversations
with all the board
members, and our whole
goal is to try to do it right. I
was very appreciative that
everybody kept an open
mind and we just worked
our way through.
"We want our children
in a permanent building,"
he said. "Bricks and
mortar don't alone make
a good educational facility
but it provides a much
higher level of safety than
portables do. For the last
couple years that's been
one of the goals of the ABC
board and administration,
to be in a safer facility."
He said his working
relationship with Marks
when she was dean of
the middle school, and
friendship with Principal
George Oehlert and wife,
Margy, who once taught
at the ABC School, has
controbnuste to better

charter school and the
district.
"There is definitely
a personal connection
with both of them," said
Hungerford. "I believe very
strongly that we're moving
in a better direction in
Franklin County. There are
people who have worked
diligently to mend fences.,,

T0fms of the deal
Terms of the deal
include the ABC School
obtaining the main
Chapman building,
including the Willie Speed
school board room, as
well as the adjacent


gymnasium and band
room, for $1. Together with
the district administrative
offices, the school board
meeting room will now
be on the campus of the
former Brown Elementary
School in Eastpoint.
Chapman's surrounding
playgrounds have been
leased to the ABC School
for $1per year for 50
years. The school board
has retained the right
to abrogate the lease in
the event of a change in
circumstances for the
district.
In addition, if the ABC
School plans to leave the
Chapman campus, the
building would revert back
to the district and could
not be sold to enable the
charter school to secure
additional funds.
Hungerford said the
ABC School plans to use
the Chapman auditorium
located in the historic
building next door that
previously housed the
district's administrative
offices. The Chapman
Auditorium, one of the
oldest buildings in North
Florida, was built between
1929 and 1934 in the
Egyptian Revival-Art Deco
period architecture.
Sanders said terms of

al te cou to osne
government offices
is being drawn up.
Hungerford said the
county has assured the
ABC School it will be able
to use the auditorium,
including serving as
schedulers for its use by
other entities.
"We haven't created a
policy on the gym yet," he
said.

Plans for
both campuses
The 11 acres where the
ABC campus now sits, on
land donated in 2002 to
the school by The St. Joe
Company, will be used


as an auxiliary campus,
at least for the next two
years. After that the ABC
School will have free title,
having fulfilled St. Joe's
initial stipulation the
campus must be used for
educational purposes for
at least10 years.
"We'll have some
outdoor education and
we'll probably use it
for some clubs," said
Hungerford.
He said the school owns
13 of its 18 portables, and
may sell some of them
off, but that it appears
the school has the same
financial benefit from
holding on to the leased
models.
The ABC School will
receive about $200,000 in
capital outlay funds from
the district this year, which
represents 5 percent of
the district's capital outlay
budget. Next year, if again
approved by the school
board, that amount is
expected to drop to around
$175,000
Hungerford said that
based on what it cost
to renovate the former
Carrabelle School, "we're
guessing it will be in the
ballpark of $170,000 to
$200,000" to prepare the
school for the fall.

and erdcat ng dg nrm
the ducting, tear out
drywall and tear out parts
of the carpeting," he said.
Changes to the current air
conditioning system, fresh
paint and replacement of
lightbulbs are all on the
school's to-do list as well.
Hungerford said the
following year the school
plans to replace most of
Chapman's carpeting,
make changes to the
ceiling tile and add more
insulation.
"And then we know we
need to start banking some
money," he said. "The air
conditioning will have to
look at major changes.
And we might be able to


revive the solar (energy)
systems. I love the idea of
solar because I can't think
of a better facility to make
green."
There will be an after-
school program on the
new campus next year,
although it is not yet
certain which one it will
be. "Right now if Project
Impact is renewed, they
will be with us. If it is not
renewed, then we will talk
with the Boys and Girls
Clubs," Hungerford said.

Enrollment
continues to climb
Enrollment at the ABC
School is expected next
year to continue the steady
growth it has shown since
its inception, with about
312 already registered for
next year, the same as are
currently enrolled.
"I'm expecting a few
more children before
school starts, some new
ones and some who
aren't coming back," said
Hungerford. "This will go
on all summer long."
He said some of the
lower grades have waiting
lists, and there are
openings in the higher
grades, but that overall,
if enrollment was spread
eevenls th~reohlall rade
close to 350.
"We're projecting
between 320 and 330 (for
next year)," he said.
So far, only one ABC
teacher has said she isn't
coming back next year.
"We will hire at least one
person and may hire up
to three teachers," said
Hungerford.
He also estimated
that of the school's 28
"graduating" eighth
graders, at least 24 plan
to attend Franklin County
High School next year,
with the others either
relocating to neighboring
districts or attending
virtual school.


58 0.249.7666
Thursday Monday 10:00 5:30, Sunday 1:00 4:00


Temperature
High
790
820
830
830
850
850
840


Date
Thu, May 21
Fri, May 22
Sat, May 23
Sun, May 24
Mon, May 25
Tue, May 26
Wed, May 27


~ ~ ~~1 ~ ~~ ~


Low % Precip
710 50 %
730 40 %
740 40 %
730 40%
740 60 %
740 60 %
750 60 %


05/21 Thu 03:24AM
01:05PM
05/22 Fri 04:44AM
01:32PM
05/23 Sat 05:52AM
02:04PM
05/24 Sun 06:53AM
02:43PM
05/25 Mon 07:50AM

05/26 Tue AMM 2A
11:16AM
05/27 Wed 01:14AM
12:10PM


1.2
1.6
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1.7
1.5
1.8
1.6
1.9
1.6

- .
1.4
-0.5
1.4


07:36AM 1.0
09:15PM -0.1
08:25AM 1.2
09:59PM -0.3
09:11AM 1.4
10:44PM -0.5
09:52AM 1.5
11:32PM -0.6
10:32AM 1.5


08:41AM
04:20PM
09:25AM
05:17PM


05/21 Thu A15AMM

05/22 Fri 03:19AM
12:07PM
05/23 Sat 04:27AM

05/24 Sun AMM 8A
01:18PM
05/25 Mon 06:25AM
02:04PM
05/26 Tue 07:16AM
02:55PM
05/27 Wed 08:00AM
03:52PM


052AMM 1.:
06:12AM 1.9
07:46PM -0.5
06:58AM 2.2

073AMM 2
09:19PM -1.0
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10:09PM -1.0
09:03AM 2.2
11:01PM -0.8
09:57AM 2.2
11:54PM -0.6


MIXON from paoe Al


NEW FACES from page Al


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Fifth grader Amelia Newman was third overall
among elementary schoolers for her biochemistry
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The Franklin County Board of
County Commissioners are pleased
to announce the receipt of State
Funding of $350,000 for New Home
Construction. Applications and
program guidelines can be picked
up at the Franklin County SHIP
Program located at 78-11th Street
in Apalachicola. Applications must
be returned to the SHIP Program by
Friday, June 5, 2009.

All applicants will have to meet
typical Affordable Housing
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Thursday, May 21, 2009


Local


The Times | A7


Fourth grader Jackson Copley was overall winner
among elementary grades for his plant science
project on "Growing with Gravity."


Fifth grader Jessica Schmidt was second overall
among elementary grades for her engineering
project on "Electroplating."


Sixth grader Morgan Martin was best overall among
middle schoolers for her cellular biology project on
"Cloudy Bacteria."


Eighth grader Cheyenne Martin was second overall Seventh grader Cynthia Duncan was third overall
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The wonders of science were the
order of the day earlier this month
when the Franklin County elemen-
tary and middle schools hosted their
annual science fair.
Judges were Kim Wren and Jess
Wren, and Nicole Selly, as the dis-
trict's best and brightest showed off
their knowledge of science.
The following are the results:

Elementary School
Overall Winners: 1) Jackson Co-
pley 2) Jessica Schmidt and 3) Ame-
lia Newman
Environmental Sciences: 1) Jay-
lynn Lyston 2) Colby Estes and 3)
John Michael Neel
Plant Sciences: 1) Jackson Cop-
ley and 2) Savannah Alday
Physics: 1) Cash Creamer and
Tony Gallegos 2) Bubby Kilgore
(Best Magnet Display) and 3) Chel-
sea Register and 3) Jared Hunnings
and Taylor Millender
Chemistry: 1) Brandon Walker


2) Savannah Maples and 3) Destiny
Maples and 3) Michael Hatfield
Behavioral & Social Sciences: 1)
Lael Parker
Biochemistry: 1) Amelia New-
man 2) Miranda McLeod and 3) Dy-
corian Brown
Animal Science: 1) Alexis Segree
and 2) Trent Shiver
Cellular & Molecular Biology: 1)
Lauren Carrins
Medicine & Health: 1) Kayla Pil-
ger (team) 2) Ellie Weldom and 3)
Brandon Hutchins
Engineering: 1) Jared King 2)
Jessica Schmidt (team) and 3) Ken-
dal Meyer
Middle School
Overall Winners: 1) Morgan Mar-
tin 2) Cheyenne Martin and 3) Cyn-
thia Duncan
Plant Sciences: 1) Ryan Babb 2)
Roxanna Barahona and 3) Shamei-
ka Lake
Environmental Sciences: 1) Ally


Millender 2) Kaylee Edwards and 3)
Jonny Riley
Biochemistry: 1) Morgan Mock
2) Katie Wood and 3) Brett Sasnett
Engineering: 1) Cheyenne Martin
2) Dixie Black and 3) Dasia Davis
Astronomy: 1) AJ Copley
Behavioral & Social Sciences:
1) Devon Young 2) Madison Newell
and 3) Taylor Gay
Physics: 1) Cynthia Duncan 2)
Caden Crum and 3) Cole Lee
Chemistry: 1) Casey Sapp 2) Aa-
liyah West and 3) Robin Segree
Animal Sciences: 1) Trianna
Lockley 2) Logan McLeod and 3)
Johnathan Walis
Microbiology: 1) Stephanie Marx-
son and 2) Myesha Campbell
Medicine & Health: 1) Jessie
Cameron and Gage Brannon 2)
Thomas Riley and Lenny Ward
Cellular & Molecular Biology: 1)
Morgan Martin 2) Aaron Riley and
3) Cody Lyston.
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Head Start SEWAGE from page Al


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Thank you to the many people
who made our Festival a success:
Franklin County Sheriff's Dept.
Frank nT CountyCLandfill~ila~se

Michael Allen, Oyster Radio
Norm Brennan (Lawn Service)

Te Fank n Chronicle
T.J. Sellers, At Your Service Concierge
Sheila Hauser, Forgotten Coast TV
Amy Kilgore
Sharon Thon an

Carolyn Sparks
Joan Matey and the Fishy Fashion Models
David Butler
Carrabelle Junction
Gaye Lass
Lucille Walden
Cheree Woods
Skip Fnink
Lesley Cox
Must See Magazine
Kelly-Riley Funeral Home
Boys & Girls Club of Carrabelle
Randy Timm
Mark Wilbanks
Ann Wilson
Cheryl Ann Griffin
Robin Hilton
Rama Ben Baruch
Carl Sherrod
Sharon Rider


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Fishy Fashion Show Sponsors
Jill Archer, Realtor
Carrabelle Marine
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Kids' Zone Sponsors
BEC & Co.
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Thursday, May 21, 2009


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer


Healnh and I h blit tionames
ter, at 239 Crooked River Road,
outside Carrabelle, opened its
doors after months of anticipa-
tion.
The grand opening for the
facility was held on Jan. 8 but
delays in the state inspection
and licensing process post-
poned the actual opening until
this month.
The center will be managed
by Saber Healthcare Group
LLC of Ohio. Bill Weisberg,
spokesman for Saber, said the
facility had two residents as of


May 14. He said that St. James
is staffed and ready to accept
up to 25.
The rehabilitation center
has 27 full-time employees and
will eventually have over 80
full-time employees and 20 to
30 part-time, making it the larg-
est private sector employer in
the county.
At full capacity, the center
will house up to 90 residents.
The 39,000-square-foot building
has two wings that share a din-
ing facility serviced by a state-
of-the-art kitchen.
St. James has four private
rooms and 43 semiprivate with
two beds each. Every room has
a window and a bathroom. In


and private pay patients and
that he expects to house about
70 percent Medicaid funded
residents.
At the grand opening in
January, Linda McCord, assis-
tant director of nursing, said
the center would offer in-house
training for certified nursing
assistants. Weisberg said this
is still part of his business plan
but that the education program
will not begin for at least a
year.
He said Saber is now seek-
ing state certified employees to
work at the St. James Center.
Lisa Mitchem will be the
administrator overseeing the
operation. Originally from


Georgia, she holds a degree in
behavioral and social sciences
from Brewton Parker College
of Mt. Vernon, Ga.
She said she has worked
in Florida nursing homes for
the last eight years and is a li-
censed nursing home adminis-
trator.
Some familiar local faces
are on staff at St. James. Physi-
cal therapist Tom Broccato will
oversee therapy in a new state-
of-the-art exercise center and
dance instructor Pam Nobles
will be teaching on site as well.
Dr. Stephen Miniat of Apala-
chicola has been named medi-
cal director for the rehabilita-
tion center.


from him explaining why
the commission needed
input into the PSC's
decision. At that time, it
was generally believed that
May 15 was the deadline
for a protest to the PSC.
Because Brown's proposal
was not legally published
until April 20, the actual
deadline was May 20.
Jackel said Tuesday
that after reading Shuler's
memo, she had reached
the conclusion that the
commission needed to
have a voice in the PSC's
decision making.

Emer ency meeting
questions petition
At an emergency
meeting in the courthouse
annex Monday night,
called by Kevin Begos,
director of the Franklin
County Seafood and
Oyster Task Force, John
Richards, president of the
Franklin County Seafood
Workers Association
(FCSWA) denied
authorship of a letter in
support of the centralized
sewage treatment plant.
He also stated publicly
that he did not support
the plan. The letter and
an attached petition
had been circulated by


Linda Raffield, FCSWA
secretary, and Maxie
Carroll, both of Eastpoint,
over the last two weeks.
The letter said that the
sewage treatment plant
was needed to save the
bay.
"Some would say that
this proposal is moving
too quickly, but the bay is
at risk each day and each
day that passes we are one
stepecloser to possible bay
closure due to impure or
polluted waters," it read.
The petition collected
over 300 signatures, many
from seafood workers,
but also including island
residents. Several
prominent island business
owners had signed the
petition, including Terry
Brewer, Tracy and Turner
Brock, Gene Butler,
Steve Rash, James Frost,
Carlton Goodson, Kim
Davis, Billy Blackburn,
Jeff Galloway, Olivier
Monod, Helen Spohrer,
Deborah Stamatinos,
Larry Stone, Gary Ulrich,
and Lee and Mary Noel.
Begos denied that
sewage problems on the
island pose a threat to
the bay. He said vibrio
contamination is gulfwide
and unrelated. He said
the last time sewage


contamination was found
in a local oyster was eight
years ago.
Begos asked Richards,
whose name did not
appear on the petition,
if he endorsed the
accompanying letter,
"My signature is not on
it," Richards replied.
""Itlooks like somebody
put your name on it," said
Begos. "Would it be fair to
say that the FCSWA does
not support this?"
"I think it wouldbe good
to say that," responded
Richards.
Ottice Amison, owner
of Amison Seafood, said
he feared a central sewer
system would lead to
increased population
density on the island and
ultimately damage the
bay.
"The problem we're
having, especially with
the sewer program Brown
is proposing, is that
we're getting ahead of
ourselves," he said. "Let's
slow down and figure out
what the problem is and,
by all means, let's fix it, but
let's not lose everything
else in the process."
Begos played a
tape of Steve Riley, an
attorney for the Office
of Public Counsel, who
is investigating Brown's
proposal as part of his
mandated role as a
consumer watchdog.


Riley could not be present
because he was ill.
Riley said Brown had
sought many variances to
build the plant, and that
his is seeking to postpone
questions about how he
will finance the project
and what the cost will be
to consumers until after
the plan is approved by
the PSC.
"Granting of the
certificate would
eliminate the possibility
of other solutions being
considered. It would
give him a monopoly on
wastewater service from
Third Street to Third
Street," said Riley.

COUnty commission
feVOFSes decision
At the beginning of
this Tuesday's meeting,
Jackel called for a change
in the agenda and the
sewage plant came up
for discussion at 9:15 a.m.
instead of the previously
scheduled slot at the end
of the meeting. Jackel
said she requested the
change because the
project was "important
and on everyone's mind."
Nita Molsbee, manager
of the WMS office,
protested the change in
the agenda saying Brown,
president of the utility
company was on his way.
She said he had sent each


commissioner a letter
on the previous day and
wanted to be present
when the matter was
discussed.
Commission Chairman
Smokey Parrish said the
commission did not intend
to open up the proposal
for public discussion on
Tuesday.
"Mr. Brown will have
ample opportunity to
speak at the PSC hearing,"
said Shuler.
He told commissioners
they must file a protest
now as a placeholder to
keep open the option to
object later if they choose
to do so.
Shuler then reminded
the board he needed
authority to hire a
consulting utility expert.
Sanders said a Request
for Proposal (RFP) would
be needed to assure the
best price, but Shuler
said there was no time
for an RFP in advance of
the PSC's initial hearing
on June 15, 60 days after
Brown filed his proposal.
At that hearing, the PSC
will consider protests, like
the one the county plans to
file, and decide whether to
schedule a public hearing
when all parties can have
detailed input.
Begos said the second
public hearing will
probably be held some
time in 2010.


Goldottvel Spons tons

Liberty Communications
Pepsi of Tallahassee
St. James Bay Golf Course


A8 | The Times


St. James rehab center welcomes first patients


THE CENTER WILL
BE ABLE TO ACCEPT
MEDICARE, MEDICAID
AND PRIVATE PAY
PATIENTS


addition there is a large bath-
ing room fitted with whirlpool
baths and a lifting chair on
each wing.
Weisberg said that while
paperwork is still being pro-
cessed, the center will be able
to accept Medicare, Medicaid


applications

now beinO*

accepted
Applications are being
accepted for fall enroll-
ment in the Head Start
Child Development Pro-
gram.
There is no cost for par-
ticipation in the program
which serves 3- year olds
who will be turn 3 by Sept.
1, 2009 and 4-year-olds
who will not turn 5 by Sept.
1, 2009, including children
with special needs.
Participants must be
residents of Franklin, Jef
ferson or Leon counties
and families must meet
the federal income guide-
lines established by the U.
S. Department of Health
and Human Services.
For more information
call 850-201-2050 or stop
by the main office located
at 309 Office Plaza Drive,
Tallahassee, or the Head
Start Centers in Jefferson
County at 950 Mamie Scott
Drive, Monticello, the
Franklin County Center
at 203 North Fifth Street,
Carrabelle, or the East-
point Center at 85 School
Road, Eastpoint.















Thursday, May 21, 2009 w w w. ap al ac ht i me s com Page 9


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DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Seahawk sophomore James Winfield runs for daylight in Friday's Red and
Black scrimmage, which drew a host of onlookers. "We got a chance to look
at some people for the first time in full speed scrimmage," said Coach Josh
Wright. "Our staff was very encouraged by several of the young people.
We felt defensively we ran the football well, but there were some missed
assignments in places offensively. The excitement and enthusiasm was great."
The rooster of 38 Seahawks take the field Thursday, May 21 at 8 p.m.
against Rocky Bayou Christian School, out of Niceville, with the game at
Destin Middle School. "We're not going to hang the weight of the world on
this jamboree," said Wright. "Our bottom line is we like being around each
other, and they like being on the practice field with each other. Our job as
coaches is to love them and their job is to love each other."


the Apalachicola 'Twisters,
coached by Greg Sasnett,
Ottice Amison and Brian
Kent, with shining play
also coming from the
Apalachicola Sharks, Eastpoint Bucks
and Carrabelle Crusaders.
The AAA boys divisions, for 9 and
10 year olds, was where the players'
skills and talents begin to shine. The
Eastpoint Sluggers, coached by Lan-
ny Rester and Chris Golden, emerged
victorious, in a league that included
tough competition from the Apala-
chicola Lightnings, the Eastpoint
Bulls, and the Carrabelle Masons.
The two teams in the Majors, for
boys ages 11 and 12, fought it out all
year long, with the Eastpoint Rays,
coached by Fred Babbs and Michael
Gilbert, eventually taking the top slot
over the Carrabelle Warriors.
Among the girls' squads, the Dar-
lings division, forages 7and 8, featured
two teams, with the Apalachicola Fire-
flies, coached by Brock and Kim John-
son, and Ward Kirvin, edging out the
Eastpoint Sweethearts for the title.
The Angels, for girls age 9 and 10,
featured tough head-to-head compe-
tition between the three teams, the
Apalachicola Angle Lightning, the
Eastpoint Lady Hunters and the Car-
rabelle K-otic Hotshots. As of press
time, a playoff game between the East-
point and Carrabelle squads awaited
to determine the division champ.
Because the Ponytails division, for
ages 11 and 12, fielded just one team,
a countywide Undertakers squad, the
squad played the three Port St. Joe
teams each week. "They've been
very competitive with Post St. Joe,"
said Newell. "They've won some and
they've lost some."
The Belles, for ages 13 to 15, had
among the fiercest female competi-
tion on county fields. The Carrabelle
Strykers, which included four 11 and
12-year-olds, proved to be competi-
tive with the Apalachicola Lady Bugz
and the Eastpoint Little Rebels, who
battled each other all year long.
A championship game Friday
evening gave the crown to the Little
Rebels.


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Franklin County wrapped up play
this week in the Dixie Youth League,
completing another fine season on
diamonds from Carrabelle to Apala-
chicola.
Rhonda Newell, who oversees the
league with her husband, Michael,
said there was once again strong par-
ticipation from the youth, from kin-
dergartners to high schoolers, from
parents who served as coaches and in
other volunteer positions, from fami-
lies who came out to watch the games,
and from sponsors, whose financial
backing made the whole league pos-
sible.
"We had great turnout with our
sponsors," said Newell. "The major-
ity of our 27 teams had dual sponsors,
which is wonderful, with the economy
we have here."
Because of some early April rain,
the annual Day of Baseball had to
be postponed, but even held April 18,
it turned out to be a huge success at
D.W. Wilson Park, under the watchful
eyes of organizers Nikki Millender,
Van Johnson and Fonda Davis from
the county parks and recreation de-
partment.
In all the league fielded 11 Apala-
chicola teams, nine from Eastpoint
and seven from Carrabelle.
The youngest age bracket, the co-
ed T-Ball teams of boys and girls un-
der age 7, fielded seven squads, three
in Apalachicola and two each in East-
point and Carrabelle. Apalachicola
saw play from the Pirates, Eil Ras-
cals and Sharks, while Eastpoint was
home to the Golden Eagles and the
Soldiers, and Carrabelle to the Mighty
Mites and the Sand Gnats.
The AA boys division, for ages 7 and
8, once again featured fierce competi-
tion, with four teams, two from Apala-
chicola and one each from Eastpoint
and Carrabelle. Emerging on top was


Victoria Coleman, with the Apalachicola Lady Bugz in the Belles division
for girls age 13 to 15, swings and misses.


Bailey Segree, with Barber's
Sluggers, of Eastpoint, a AAA squad
for boys 9 and 10, practices his
swing with the BatAction machine.


Coach Larry Warren helps get the
Eastpoint Lady Hunters of the Angels
division, for girls ages 9 and 10,
fired up.


S .



Timmy Shuler, with the Sluggers of
Eastpoint tries to avoid the tag put on
him by Tyler Pendleton, covering first
base for the Eastpoint Bulls, in AAA
squad for boys 9 and 10.


Members of the Apalachicola L'il
Rascals T-ball squad field the ball
under the watchful eyes of coach
Ricky Abercrombie.


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN|IThe Times
At top left, Pitcher Jack Harris, with Barber's Sluggers, of Eastpoint, a
AA squad for boys 9 and 10, fires a curve ball off the mound. At top
right, Charlie Winchester with the Progress Energy Mighty Mites.


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A
Section


14~ r .IJ


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EB L
I II II


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COUnty kids shine on the
1ONd. n





Thursday, May 21, 2009


Local


Talent abounds at 'Seahawk Idol' show
Performing before a raucous crowd of students in
~the cafetorium, the middle and high school's annual
talent show, called "Seahawk Idol," brought down the
house April 22.
There was an air of contemporary Christian music
to the show, with several acts featuring the latest in that
genre, culminating in a spirited performance by Capt.
Cool and Raddix Band, featuring Masan Crosby, Kruiz
Dickerson, Levi Odom and Maranda Moses, which
placed second overall.
A versatile musician, Moses played violin, and
Chase Richards guitar, as the duo took top honors at
the show,
Third place honors went to Andre Lucas for his
dancing performance.
Other acts in the show included Melissa Meyer, Alis-
sia Dempsey, Shelbi Pittman, and Carly Hunt, sing-
ing "Someone's Watching Over Me;" Daisha Carr and
Shelby Myer dancing; Caulin Sheridan on guitar and
Levi Spruill on drums; Sarah Clewell singing "These
Boots Are Made for Walking;" Joseph Eller singing; Ja-
cob Lee on banjo and Richards on guitar; and Cameron
, White, Holden Foley and Thomas Benetiz, doing a com-
edy routine.
Also taking part was Isaiah Taylor singing "Come to
His House;" Chris Nabors and Ruben Hewett, on guitar
and drums; Desiree Cummings, Tiffany Key, Derrick
Rhodes and Zach Jones dancing; The Reel, with Josh
Dooley, Brandon Jones, Bobby Wintons and Moses, do-
PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN ing instrumentals and singing; Alison Odom, dancing;
Nikki Loy, Kelly Pilger, Kayla Pilger and Abby Harris,
Maranda Moses, on violin, left, and Chase Richards on guitar, were the judge's dancing to "Get It Shawt;" and The Dreamettes, featur-
favorite at the high school talent show. AT LEFT: Sarah Clewell scampers as she ing Morgan Martin, DyShereah Key and Shameika Lake.
sings "These Boots Are Made for Walking." By David Adlerstein










Colton Sheridan plays guitar in a
performance with Levi Spruill on drums.
- v --Spruill was the top performer earlier in
;nJ1* ,~IQ the day in the elementary school talent
show. AT LEFT: Jacob Lee shows his
Performing their dance number, from left, are Tiffany Key, Zach Jones, Derrick versatility on the banjo in the hit song
Rhodes and Desiree Cummings. from "Deliverance."





BE




S 0ME 0 E









LO0KIING








Tobacco Free
Florida
BE FREE

You'll| teach him to ride a bike, tie his shoes a nd throw a ball. But if you use tobacco, you're teaching him that as well. Child ren of tobacco users a re twice as l ikely to use it themselves.
Quit today, for his sake as well as your own. Contact the Quitline today for free counseling, information and tips to help you succeed BE RESPONSIBLE. BE RESPECTED. BE FREE.


Ca ll l-877-U-CAN-NO W or visit Florida Quit tine.com


O Florida Department of Health


Al 0 1 The Times













Thursday, May 21, 2009 www.apalachtimes.com Page l


B
Section


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN|ITheTimes Brittany Hunningsrahst evna h


Members of Chantelle Lucas' relay team
console each other at the luminaria in memory
of Andrea Lucas, who died of liver cancer in
November at the age of 47.


Nathan March, grandson of Lanark Village's
Cindy Kemper, frolics on the grass during the
opening ceremony of the relay.


takes part in the dance ministry program put on
by Reveille, from the Eastpoint Church of God.
Behind her is Jason Register, in white, who
portrayed the salvation of grace in a dance that
featured everyone else in black, threatening
robes.


David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
A strong field of participants, balmy weather and desire to
fight the scourge of cancer made last weekend's Relay for Life
an inspiring success.
More than a dozen teams took part in onsite fundraisers,
including the Buccaneers, Cancer Nappers, Covenant Word,
sheriff's office, Franklin Correctional Institution, county health
department, Jim "Toolie" O'Toole, Knights of Columbus, the
realtors' association's Pajama Mamas and Papas, the Philaco
Women's Club Phillies, county high school Student Government
Association, Franklin County Seafood Workers Association, the
Florida Seafood festival and Weems Memorial Hospital Angels.
It was really nice," said event chair Susan Hoffritz, who
worked doggedly to ensure that the relay, held for the first time
on the field at the new consolidated school, would be a success.
Hoffritz said the relay drew twice as many teams, and twice
as many sponsors, as last year, and that even with the down
economy, was able to raise about $26,000 for the American Can-
cer Society. This is nearly one-third more than the $19,600 that
raised a year ago.
"It was a good journey for me in a lot of different ways," said
Hoffritz, who assumed the chairmanship after experiencing the
heartache of losing her father to cancer.
She recalled that one woman, witnessing the Jail and Bail
last week at the Gulfside IGA, approached her and thrust some
bills in her hand, explaining that it was the last of her cash un-
til the next week. Hoffritz tried to decline the donation, but the
woman insisted, stressing that the fight against cancer was that
important.
"It showed the kindness and openheartedness of people,"
said Hoffritz. "That gives a person hope in people in such cyni-
cal times."
The Jail and Bail program made about $3,000 for the cancer
fight.
Following a survivors dinner Friday evening, hosted by the
culinary arts program at the high school, the relay got under-
way on the football with welcomes from county commissioners
Pinki Jackel and Smokey Parrish.
"Dream work is teamwork," said Jackel. "No matter your
circumstances, you are winner.
After remarks from Bryan Young, regional sales manger for
Emerald Waste Systems, Parrish told the crowd that "cancer
doesn't discriminate. It affects all of us here."
In addition to Emerald, event sponsors included Progress
Energy, Dan Garlick Environmental, Ace Hardware, Eastpoint
Apartments, Heritage Southern Villas of Apalachicola, East-
point chiropractor Dr. Zoe Segree, Executive Office Phrniture,
Marks Insurance Agency, Fairpoint Communications, and
Weems Memorial Hospital.
Heralding the start of the relay were the drum corps from
the Apalachicola Bay Charter School, followed by music all
night long and into the morning from the Deep Blues Band,
Dave Carrington, Lee Tennyson and the George Pruett's "Out
of'llme" Band.
The event continued until Saturday morning, although the
crowd thinned out in the early morning hours.
A wrap-up party will be held Saturday, May 30 at Apalachic-
ola's Lafayette Park at 10:30 a.m. for "everybody who partici-
pated in the relay in any fashion, whether they donated or were
a team member, and anyone interested in becoming involved in
next year's relay," said Hoffritz.
On Thursday, June 11 there will be a committee meeting ral-
ly at the realtors association office in Apalachicola at 5:30 p.m.
Just as with the Lafayette Park party, all are welcome.


A POEM FOR MISS PAULA
The following poem was
written by Lauren Luberto, in
remembrance of her mother,
Eastpoint's Paula Luberto, who
passed away a year ago from
cancer. She read it aloud on
Friday night, just prior to the
lummnaria ceremony.
I know you're in a place
Where we all want to be,
But I miss you very much
and I want you here with me.
I'm glad you are not suffering
And your pain has gone away,
Because you fought quite a battle
each and every day.
You never once complained
And you never once asked why?
I don't know how you did it,
I never saw you cry.
You are the strongest person
That I'll ever know,
Nothing got you down
that's why you're my hero.
Your faith never wavered
And you were hopeful to the end,
But the cancer was too big
and your body couldn't mend.
So the Lord called you home
And we sent you on your way,
Now when I want to talk to you,
all I do is pray.
You're always in my heart
] hd dust were you said you' be'
Not a day goes by I don't feel you
right here next to me.
I know the day will come
When I see you once again,
Sometimes I can hardly wait
to be with my best friend.
You taught me so much
And showed me how to live,
Your love was bigger than life,
you had so much to give.
Everyday I think of you
And it's hard to believe you're
gone,
You are my hero, you are my angel
I love you always, you are my
MOMI


Anthony Taranto lifts his canes to show off
his walking skills as he takes part in the relay
with wife, Toni. He is back walking regularly
after a near-paralyzing accident.


Students in the high school's culinary arts
prog ram prepared and served up the
survivors dinner prior to the relay. Folding
table linens are, from left, senior Chelsea
Soderholm, senior Karah Busby, junior
Adrienne Chambers, and in background,
senior Charles Go mis.


Survivors lead the walkers during the
Opening lap of the relay for Life.


LIFE


TI~ES


H-E LPI G


B DIE ,





HE RT


HE LI G


Successful Relay for Life boosts fight against cancer














































































(0RRECTIONAL STAFF SERVES
IT UP FOR SENIORS


















LOIS SWOBODA|IThe Times
Volunteers from the Franklin Correctional
Institution served lunch May 14 to around 100
?."='-"0: atteFk in CountyeSenio aCebtelle
cooked up ham and chicken for the crowd.
Warden Duffie Harrison was on hand to join
in the feast. Rev. Mark Collins, chaplain for
the senior center, led grace and thanked the
warden and his crew on behalf of the diners.
Candy Gilbert, of Eastpoint, who works in
medical records at the prison, said funds for
the meal came from the Employee Benefit Trust
Fund. Pictured above is Carrabelle resident
Alice Webb passing along the lunch line. She
and her husband, Frederick, retired here from
England in November. Her daughter owns a
part-time residence in Carrabelle.


Na iroun Sponge B Suns
' ~(We help Apalach to be a place where
people come to visit.)

16AeApalachicola FL. 32320
850-653-3550
WWW. apalachspongecompany. com


PADDLING AGAINST POLLUTION











PHOTO BY GIL AUTREY | Special to the Times
On May 6 the Apalachicola Maritime Museum
greeted ecopaddler Margo Pellegrino with
a reception welcoming her to the county.
Pellegrino departed from the Harbor Branch
Oceanographic Institute in Ft. Pierce on April 15,
and is paddling around the Florida peninsula.
She will finish her journey over 1,000 miles
away in New Orleans, her third paddle to
raise awareness about pollution in the oceans.
Pellegrino's personal campaign is in partnership
with the Natural Resources Defense Council
and the Gulf Restoration Network. Her first and
longest paddle in 2007 covered more than
2,000 miles, from Miami to Maine.



Memorial services Saturday


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ALL *
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Pride in America Ir Pride in your pool
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Crni IC unt' sONC O L) Pes 0 troll cop ny


Thursday, May 21, 2009


B2 | The Times


Society


Ashton Carey born
Sean Carey and Kayla Moore,
of Eastpoint, are proud to an-
nounce the birth of their daughter,
Ashton Nicole Carey, on Thursday,
May 14, 2009 at Gulf Coast Medical
Center.
She weighed 8 lbs. 1.4 ozs and
was 20 1/4 inches.
Maternal grandparents are
Kimberly and Travis Bentley, of
Eastpoint, and Michael and Ai-
mee Moore, of Georgia. Paternal
grandparents are Charles and
Kristina Pierce, of Lakeland, and
formerly of Eastpoint.
Maternal great grandparents
are Jimmy and Junie Butler, and
Charles and Mazzie Moore, of
Eastpoint. Paternal great-grand-
mother is Shirley Monk, of Sum-
merville, sc.


:F71


Ik~R~3~E


Chason Martina born
Jayme and Jody Mar-
tina are proud to announce
the birth of their son, Cha-
son Lee.
He was born Wednes-
day, April 15, 2009, weigh-
ing 8 lbs. 6 ozs. and was 20
'2 inches.
He was welcomed home
with love by his grandpar-
ents, David and Janelle
Paul, and Kevin and Patty
Martina.
Maternal great-grand-
parents are Quention
Creamer, and David and
Edwina Paul, of Apala-
chicola. Paternal great-
grandparents are John
and Betty Gay, and Bill and
Burnell Martina, also of
Apalachicola.


What a good lunch
we had at the Senior
Center last Thursday.
Members of the prison
staff furnished and
prepared the food. We
had a large crowd
to enjoy it and
visit. It was good
to see everybody,
especially Audrey
Messer. You really
should join us.
Serving begins at
noon right after
Pastor Mark leads LANIAR
us in the Pledge Jim
and Prayer.
Breakfast at
the Center is only on
Tuesday now. You can
enjoy a full breakfast for
a donation, from 8 until
10 a.m.
Got that grill ready to
fire up this weekend? This
will be the opening of the
summer cookout season.
Memorial Day services
at the Legion Post 82 will
be Saturday at 11 a.m.
Flags will be placed on
the graves earlier.


There is a picnic/park
area on the north side
of the bus garage, with
tables, benches, and grill
spaces. This park is for
people to enjoy, not for
parking your car
.. the shade. Got
it?
-Popular opinion
has always been
that those at the
homeless shelters
are all winos, too
lazy to get a job.
NEEWS Not true, in most
~elsh cases there are
people there that
have lost their
jobs and their homes.
Support the shelters, the
food banks, and the soup
kitchens, when you can.
Be kind to one another
and check in on the sick
and housebound. If you
are parents, and don't
know it, most churches
have a nursery!
Until next time,
God Bless America,
our troops, the poor,
homeless, and hungry.


K
Wn


Dezmonae Sanders
turns 2!
Dezmonae LaShay
Sanders will turn 2 years
old on Friday, May 22, 2009.
She is the daughter of
Heather Hutchins and De-
lonta Sanders, and is the
sister to Nicolas Hutchins
and Jeromiah Russ.
She is also granddaugh-
ter to Patsy Hutchins, Bon-
nie and Harrison Jones,
James Hutchins, and the
late Lionel Sanders.
She will celebrate her
birthday on Saturday, May
23, at 3 p.m. in Apalachico-
la's Battery Park. All friends
and family welcomed.


Ac count Ee utive
Office: (850) 653-8869 Cell: (850) 370-6090
Email: ireed@starfl.com


Baxter, a 2 1/2 month old orange tabby
kitten, arrived at the Adoption Center three
weeks ago with his twin brother Binky.
They are both adorable, affectionate, playful
boys ready for a loving home.
vsCal a t6081 for oe de~tailseor

at 244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You may
log onto the website at www~for otte pets.
org to see more of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend for
life, you not only save the life of that pet,
you make room for us to save the life of one
more abandoned dog or cat!


850-227-1278
Por= HtJoFL 3 457
Fax: 850-227-7212
$690- 5-8 68
Apal chcao,5 8L323629


OU WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS!
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CHAIRS CANDELABRAS
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?Jt~lei ~e~tLe~z~!


Births & BIRTHDAYS


--THE TAR

.2~i TI


LET US H

HIHCHAIRS
TENTS









Obituaries


SUBMITTED PHOTO | The Times
A new 5,000-square-foot branch library for the Franklin County Public Library is rising in Eastpoint,
spearheaded by Friends of the Franklin County Public Library and funded primarily by donations from
individuals and businesses. An initial grant from the Northwest Florida Water Management District
secured a 13-acre site on Old Ferrydock Road for the facility, which will include administrative offices,
provide expanded space for collections and programs, and feature educational nature walks over the
protected wetlands. More than $200,000 has been raised for the Eastpoint construction, but at current
estimates, another $150,000 is needed. For more information about how you can help, call 670-8151.


The United Methodist Churches

SOf Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ae. B Calabell n6s97-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr cornerr of David S -) 670-8825

St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
NreyProvided during regular church services


S St. Patrick Catholic Church 1
Ave. "C" & 6th St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@gtcom.net

PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
MASS SCHEDULE

SATURDAY ................ ........... ........ 5 PM
SUNDAY .. .. .. . . . . ..... . . .. .. . .. 10 AM
SUNDAY SPANISH MASS. . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . .. 5 PM
TUESDAY FRIDAY . . . ... ... .. .. .. . . .. 8:30 AM


M


IV


Thursday, May 21, 2009


The Times | B3


Riley (R. J.) Nowling, 70,
of Eastpoint, passed away
'lI~esday, May 12, 2009, at
his home. He was born Nov
14, 1938, in Century, AL.
He is survived by
his wife, Virginia; four
daughters and two sons;
Penny Rotella, Tony Ray
Nowling, Belinda Nowling,
Shelia Nowling, Terry
Warren, Larry Warren,
Sherrie Warren and Tammy
Warren, all of Eastpoint,
one brother, Jack Nowling
of Bristol; 11 grandchildren,
nine great-grandchildren,
and two on the way.
He was preceded in


death by one son, Butch
Nowling; four brothers,
Wayne Nowling, Roy
Nowling and Clifford
Nowling, all of Eastpoint,
Leon Nowling of
Mississippi, and his sister,
Betty Carmichael, of
Eastpoint.
Services were held
May 14 at Deliverance
Tabernacle Church in
Eastpoint with the Rev
Larry Hatfield officiating.
Interment will follow in
Eastpoint Cemetery.
All services are under
the direction of the
Comforter Flineral Home.


Joseph H. White sell
passed away at his
home in Apalachicola on
Monday, May 11.
He was born Aug. 11,
1936 in Clearwater and
raised in Largo. After
earning a bachelor's of
science in horticulture
from Auburn University,
he married Jeanne
Marie Stenson in 1959
while serving in the U.S.
Navy. They had three
children, Pete, Daniel and
Elizabeth.
Joe completed a
doctorate in biology at the
University of Florida in
1971 and went on to teach
biology and botany at the
University of Arkansas at
Little Rock for 26 years.
While in Little Rock he
was an avid sailor at
Grand Maumelle Sailing
Club. He was a lifelong
woodworker and also
enjoyed running and
dancing.
After Jeanne and Joe


ended their 35 years of
marriage, Joe retired to
Apalachicola, where he
became a beloved member
of the community and
continued woodworking,
dancing, sailing and
running. His pursuit of
knowledge and culture
through reading remained
important through his
final days.
Joe shared the last
12 years of his life with his
dear companion, Betty
Collier. He is survived by
his three children and
daughter-in-law Mary
Whitesell (wife of Pete).
There was a memorial
service in Apalachicola on
Saturday morning, May
16 at the Fort Coombs
Armory in Apalachicola.
In lieu of flowers
you may donate to the
Nature Conservancy,
account 3205710, at Nature
Conservancy, 4245 North
Fairfax Drive Suite 100,
Arlington, VA 22203-1606


A memorial service
for Anne Doud Hall will
be held in Clarks Green,
Pennsylvania at the United
Methodist Church on
Glenburn Road on Friday,
May 29 at 1:30 p.m.
Anne, born Jan. 25,
1919, was one of five
children of the late Harold
Doud and Margaret Ives
Doud in Clarks Green. She
passed away on May 11,
2009, at her home on St.
George Island at the age
of 90.
Anne will be missed by
the many people whose
lives she touched. She
exemplified grace, charity,
hard work, diligence, an
eagerness to learn and
had a strong positive
attitude. She was a loving
wife, mother, grandmother,
great-grandmother and
friend to many.
She attended the
Wharton School of
Business and Keystone
College. From 1959
through the early 80's,
she and her husband,
the late Edward H. Hall,
owned and operated the
Ben Franklin store in
Columbus, Ohio where she
lived for almost 40 years.
Sports were a big part of
her life and she was an


avid Buckeye fan.
Anne retired at 80
years young, going on
to volunteer for many
organizations in Ohio and
later in Florida. She was
an amazing person and an
inspiration to many.
She is survived by her
brother Harold Doud
(Winifred), and her sisters:
Jane Warr, Esther Staples,
and Mary Josephine
Christiano. She is also
survived by son, John
Hall (Shawn), daughter,
Deborah Brown and
her companion Wilhiam
Reichert, and daughter,
Karen Hall.
Anne is also survived
by four grandchildren:
Christiaan Hourany
(Mark), Joseph Brown
(Stacey), Rachael Hall, and
Eli Bass, and as well as
Miles Brown and Nicolas
Reichert who were like
grandchildren to Anne.
Four great-grandchildren:
Hunter Hourany, Hayden
Hourany, TyS Brown, Sarah
Brown and numerous
nieces, nephews, and
friends will also miss Anne.
Anne was active in the
church and God was a very
important part of her life.
She was an avid reader
and gardener.


MUCHAS GRA(IAS,
SISTER MARY ALICE






"





/ Petel'SOn1
i















DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Staffers at the county health department in
Apalachicola treated Sister Mary Alice Friday
to a luncheon in her honor, thanking her for
the many volunteer hours she contributes. The
nun, who arrived in Apalachicola in September
after service in Oklahoma, Wyoming and
Washington, handles English-Spanish translation
for the many Central American immigrants who
receive health care services at the department.
A ormer hgh sc 00l science and mat teac er,
Sister Mary Alice also teaches an English as a
Second Language course, in conjunction with
the Gulf-Franklin Center, at St. Patrick's Catholic
Church. In photo above, the nun holds up a field
guide to birds, by Roger Tory Peterson, presented
her by the staff to assist her in her regular nature
walks. They also presented her photographer
John Spohrer's book, along with an anti-tobacco
t-shirt



50 n'sr eter hots Bill stH


Terrell Jimmy Cain was
born Aug. 7, 1922, to the
now late Mary Jane and
Sam Cain, in St. Andrews.
He passed away May 14,
2009, in Panama City, at
the age of 86.
He was a longtime
resident of Apalachicola.
He worked as a
commercial fisherman,
was a United States
World War II Navy veteran,
a member of First
Baptist Church of
Apalachicola, and a
past member of the
Southeastern Fisheries
Association.
He is survived by his


wife, Margaret Theresa
Cain; daughters,
Linda Faye Maloy (and
her husband, Paul) and
Catherine Scott (and
her husband William);
brother, James Cain;
grandchildren,
Catherine Ann Coulter,
Jason Scott, Renee Weisz,
and Jessica Scott; and six
great-grandchildren.
Flineral services were
held Saturday, May 16 at
Fellowship Baptist Church
with interment in Magnolia
Cemetery.
Condolences may be
viewed and sent via www.
KelleyE~lineralHomes.com


alIways online I www.apalachtimes. com


The Franklin County
Senior Center in
Carrabelle hosts a Bible
study every Thursday at
10 a.m.


The entire community
is invited to attend.
For more information,
call Pastor Mark Collins
at 697-2812.


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


NOWlilh FalmilV
We wish to thank everyone
who donated and helped, and to
evr oneN ihbough che paesefor

You were greatly appreciated and
God bless everyone.
The Nowling Family

Vietnam Memorial
I want to thank all the ones who
worked many hours to place this


Cards of THANKS

memorial of our men and women
who served in the Armed Forces for
f edo .
rNowmwe have had a chance to
se whn ittoih1nk J mmy Mosconis
for his hard work to bring the Wall
with 58,000 names. We all lost
someone, maybe a friend. I saw the
name of my neighbor. It was sad.
I know Jimmy Mosconis worked
so many hours on this memorial
Sincerely,
Richard Polous


EstesFamly
The Estes family would like to
thank everyone during our time of
sos ow after the passing of Gloria
Thanks for the prayers, food,
flowers, cards, and everyone who
came by the house.
Also a special thanks to Sister
Long. Please keep us in your
prayers.
God Bless all
The Estes Family


Church


Riley Nowling


Joseph H. Whitesell


Anne Doud Hall


Terrell Cain


LIBRARY CONSTRUCTION SPROUTS IN EASTPOINT


Trinity
EST. 1836


WELCOMES YOU

Church

of the .

As cension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AlI :



















































































































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Off Hwy 231 On Veal Road
(When fruit is available Please call)
Bay County's only U-Pick Strawberriej


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IF YOU HAVE A MORTGAGE OR
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Thursday, May 21, 2009


Local


Well, if you haven't
noticed, temperatures
have gone up during the
first few weeks of May.
This is typical for this time
of the year. Also typical of
our weather this month is
that May is often one of our
drier months, so it's time to
get serious about watering.
Many new plants are
losthbecause of insufficient
watering. Remember that
new plants only have roots
in an area the size of the
football that was in the pot.
So be sure to direct water
to that area. If the football
gets too dry, the plant can
wilt and even die. Water the
lawn and other large areas
in early morning when


less water
is lost to
evaporation
and more is
absorbed by
plants.
The
following
gardening
tips are just
some of


tips are provided by Alex
Bolques, Gadsden County
horticulture agent

Ve etableS
Sweet potatoes are
started from plants or
"draws." Be sure to
purchase only certified
weevil free sweet potato
plants.
Increase watering
frequency and amount
as tomatoes load up with
fruit.
Side-dress vegetable
gardens with fertilizer
containing nitrogen and
potassium. A fertilizer
such as a 15-0-15 can be
used. Use approximately 2-


3 cupfuls (1 to 1 %/ pounds)
per 100 feet of row.
Vegetables that can be
planted outdoors include
eggplant, lima beans, okra,
southern peas, and sweet
potatoes.

FrUits and uts
Harvest peaches,
nectarines and plums as
soon as they mature, before
the squirrels and birds get
to them.
Fertilize citrus with a
special "citrus fertilizer".
Be sure it contains about 1.6
percent magnesium, about
0.5 percent manganese and
small amounts of copper
and boron.


a.m.) to help prevent disease
problems.
Calibrate the lawn
sprinkler system so that
approximately one-half to
three-quarters of an inch
of water is applied to your
lawn.
If you would like a
copy of gardening in the
Panhandle Newsletter,
please let me know and
I'll send you one. Happy
gardening!
Bill Mahan is a Florida
Sea Grant agent and
director of the Frankclin
UF-IFAS Extension
Program. Contact him at
653-9337, 697-2112 x 360; or
via e-mail at bmahan@
afl.edu.


Summer can bring
lawn pests. Spittlebugs
damage centipede lawns
when populations become
excessive.
These smallblackinsects
with two orange strips
across the back can cause
yellow or reddish streaks
down the grass blades which
eventually turn brown.
Chinch bug damage in
St. Augustine lawns appears
as straw-colored areas in
full sun. These tiny insects
are black with white wing
patches on their backs.
It is best to water your
lawn in the early morning
(usually between 2 and 8


the information contained
in May/June issue of UF
IFAS' Gardening in the
Panhandle Newsletter.
The newsletter is written
by our district horticulture
and Florida yard and
neighborhood agents who
work in the Panhandle.
The following garden


The Franklin County
WIC Program (Women,
Infants, and Children
Nutrition Supplement
Program) joins the
American Dietetic
Association in urging
Franklin County citizens
to watch their weight, eat
nutritious meals and teach
their children good eating
and exercise habits.
National Nutrition
Month last month signals
a good time to take stock of
one's habits, routines and
goals in light of developing
or continuing habits
that will help you have a
lifetime of good health.
Maintaining a healthy
weight can contribute to
your overall health and
well-being. Experts at
the American Dietetic
Association say it's never


too late to take steps to
a healthy lifestyle. "It's
easier than you think,"
said Holly Kirsch, licensed
nutritionist and registered
dietician for the Leon
CountyHealthDepartment
and head of the regional
WIC program.
Think of a star with six
points pointing the way to
better living:
1. Get started by
incorporating a few
specific small changes,
like eating a piece of fruit
for your afternoon snack,
instead of a piece of candy.
This is a manageable
change, easy, inexpensive
and important.
2. Failing to plan is
planning to fail, as the
adage goes. We know
that convenience is key to
changing a habit, so plan


your meals for a week at
a time, so you won't be
forced to grab a bite of
empty and high calorie
"fast foods."
3. Make every bite
count. Choose foods
packed with vitamins,
minerals, fiber and other
nutrients.
4. Increase your
physical activity. You'll feel
better, sleep better and
think better. The Dietary
Guidelines for Americans
recommend that adults be
physically active for about
an hour a day.
5. Play it safe with
smart food handling.
Always clean your hands
and surfaces where food
touches. Keep raw and
cooked foods separate
from each other. Cook
foods to the proper


temperature and chill
leftovers promptly to avoid
illness.
6. Nutritional needs
change as we do. For
example, older adults
need more vitamin D and
calcium to help maintain
bone health. Check with
a registered dietitian
to figure out what your
specific nutritional needs
are.
For more information,
call the WIC Office at
the Leon County Health
Department, at 850-606-
8300, and ask to speak to
a nutritionist. You may
also visit the American
Dietetic Association Web
site at www.eatright.org.
If you have questions,
call the Franklin County
Health Department at 653-
2111 or 697-4121.


The Apalachicola
National Estuarine
Research Reserve
will present
the latestin
its Research
Seminar Series
on Wednesday,
May 27 at 7
p.m. at the
ANERR
Visitor's Center, 261
7th Street, in
Apalachicola.
Auburn University's
Dr. Chris Anderson,
assistant professor at
the School of Forestry
and Wildlife Sciences,


and associate director
of the Center for
Forest Sustainability,
will speak on
"Land use
and river flow:
Implications
for coastal
-ecosystems
along
Apalachicola
Bay."
Refreshments
to follow. For more
information contact
Megan Lamb at
670-4783 ext. 113 or
Megan.Lambedep.
state.fl.us.


The Cape San Blas
Lighthouse will be open
for the Memorial Day
weekend.
The "Sleeping Beauty"
gift shop will be open alone
with the Keepers cottage
next door. The tower with
be open for climbing from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Adults,
$5, children under 10 are
free!
The Sleeping Beauty


gift shop will be hosting
their first art exhibit this
weekend in the keeper's
cottage next door. Mrs.
Glynis Holcombe will be
showing offherbeautiful art
work. Herbusiness, "Piece
O'Cape" is the name of her
work and is displayed in
many states. She will be at
the lighthouse on Friday,
May 22 to Sunday, May 24
and maybe Monday (not


decided yet). Check out
her website http://www.
pieceocape.com.
Glynis is a self taught
artist who first picked up
a paintbrush in 2001 and
only puts it down to pursue
her first passion which is
fishing the waters of St.
Joseph Bay and Cape San
Blas. Come on out to the
Cape and check us out.
Climb the tower, Do a


little shopping in the gift
shop and check out the
free puppies Beverly and
Frank are giving away.
Hours this weekend only
are Friday and Saturday
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday
1 to 6 p.m. Regular hours
Wednesday and Thursday
are: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Call Beverly at the gift
shop for any other details
(850) 229-1151.


contact Tamara Allen at
the Carrabelle Historical
Society 697- 2141.

Saturday, May 23
The new Carrabelle
History Museum, at the
old City Hall, will be open
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For
more info, contact Tamara
Allen at 697- 2141.
Awakening '09 Dance
Conference and Youth
tianlat CCarrabeoln
Memorial Day Weekend.
Dance Workshop begins at
8 a.m. for all ages. At 7 p.m.
One Way Youth will host
a high energy, spirit filled
Youth Rally. Details at www.
freefiredancechemistry.
com or call or call Tammi
Hardy at (850) 556-4692 or
Jimmie Ty~re at (850)508-
9923.


Monday, May 25
MEMORIAL DAY -No
school, government offices
closed.
GED classes are offered
at the Franklin County
School from 3 to 6 p.m.
every week in Building
1100, Room 1105. Call 670-
2800.

]"UeSday May 26

CoAma hicolGarden at
6 p.m. at the Apalachicola
Bay Chamber of
Commerce. Call 653-9419.
Breakfast at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle.
Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal
at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call
697-3760.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Dept. $1 / card.


Proceeds go to St. George
Island Civic Club. Call 927-
4654.


Wednesday, May 27
GED classes are offered
at the Franklin County
School from 3 to 6 p.m.
every week in Building
1100, Room 1105. Call 670-
2800.


TUrSday, Maly 28
Wandering Star
Quilting Club. Chillas Hall
Lanark Village. 1 to 3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County
Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Noon. $3
donation. Call 697-3760.


Thursday. May 21
Apalachicola
Community Pride meets
at 6 p.m. at the Franklin
Square Recreation Center.
For info, call 653-8715.
Wandering Star Quilting
Club. Chillas Hall Lanark
Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Luncheon and
Information Specials at
the Franklin County Senior
Center 3indoC rrab le

697-3760.

Friday May 22
The new Carrabelle
History Museum, at 106
B Street, SE (old City
Hall) will be open from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Learn more
about our local history.
For more information


~8~9~


Lunch.


11:30 am-2:30 pm


Dinner
Tues. sun. 5:00pm


10:00 pm


B4 | The Times


May and June prime months for serious gardening


WORLD
AROUNIDYOU
Bill Mahan


WKC program joins nutritious nibbers


Auburn prof to



spdRH on laTX T
and rier 111


Cape San Blas Lighthouse to host local art


Coun-ty CALENDAR




































































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Pea Ridge Road Bristol,
TE LEPHONE (850) 6


I


IV


Thursday, May 21, 2009


Local


The Times | B5


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
A 62-year-old Eastpoint
man was arrested at his
North Bay shore Drive home
Thursday morning
on a St. Lucie County
charge of sexual
battery against a
10-year-old female
member of his
extended family.
Anthony Joseph

ino ustod wihoeun TO1
incident May 14 by ERI
members of the U.S
Marshals Florida
Regional Ehgitive TaskForce.
He remains in the countyjail,
where he awaits extradition
to St. Lucie County.
The felony charge of
capital sexual battery on
a child under 12 carries a
mandatory life sentence.
According to the warrant
affidavit issued May 11 by
Circuit Judge Dan Vaughn,
of the 19th Judicial Circuit
Court, the charge stems
from incidents alleged to
have taken place between
Dec. 28, 2008 and Feb. 28,
2009 at the residence of a
family member in St. Lucie
County.
The girl's mother told an
investigator with the Florida
Department of Children and
Families, and a sheriff's
deputy, that her daughter
woke up while sleeping
on the couch, during a
Dec. 28 overnight stay at a
grandparent's home, to find
Erario's hand underneath
her pants on her private
parts.
The warrant affidavit,
drafted by detective Ronald
Went, said the girl initially
"did not believe this had
happened to her" and told
no one about the incident.
On Feb. 15, the girl said
Erario hugged her from the
back while the family was
at the beach, putting his
arms around her front and


holding her against him.
"The second time he did
this, she took and forced his
arms away from her," reads
the affidavit.
Later that day, she
once again slept
on the couch at the
residence, and woke
Sup around 11:30 p.m.
to find Erario "had his
hand on the outside
of her pants and was
covering her crotch
NYarea. (He) stoldall?
ARIO off the couch and he
was catching her "
according to the affidavit.
The girl called her
mnodtherato pick tupbher ud
not explain why. The girl
told investigators Erario
had been drinking on both
occasions.
Because the following
Monday was President's
Day, the girl went to work
with her mother, and it
was then she related the
incidents. Since then, the
girl's mother "has noticed a
change in (the daughter's)
normal pattern. She deleted
(Erario's) phone number
from her cell phone. She
refused to sleep with the
light out in her bedroom.
She woke up one night
screaming someone was
on top of her. Other little
things," reads the affidavit.
The deputy who first
interviewed the girl told
Went that "while I was
talking to (her), I noticed she
is a bright and smart child.
She can express herselfvery
well, and does not hesitate
to talk about these incidents.
We did not go into a lot of
detail, as I believe she will
respond better to a female
investigator."
The girl was later
interviewed by a female
representative from St.
Lucie County's Child
Protection Team.


I '
LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


CTuiSer quilts to comfort crime victims

On Thursday, May 14, the Wandering Star Quilting Club presented the Franklin County Sheriff's
Department with 23 "cruiser quilts" in embroidered carry bags. Each bag also contained a small
stuffed animal. The quilts will be carried by deputies to give to crime victims, especially children, as a
gesture of comfort and solace. The presentation has become an annual event for the local quilters. In
photo above, Sheriff Skip Shiver, center, and Deputy Ryan Sandoval accept the quilts from the quilters.
Sandoval and Shiver were invited to stay for coffee and cake with the group. The club also presented
Sandoval with a baby quilt for his infant son, Ryan Jr.


~b Im V P


Members in Troop H, Quincy district, of the Florida
Highway Patrol plan to conduct driver license/vehicle
inspection checkpoints next month during daylight
hours at the following locations in Franklin County:
*Thursday, May 21 through Tuesday, May 26: County
Road 374 and CR 30A State Road 300 (St. George Island
Causeway) .
*Wednesday, May 27 through Sunday, May 31: SR 30,
SR 30A, SR 65
All personnel participating in the checkpoints will
be responsible for following the procedures outlined
in Chapter 17.12 of the Florida Highway Patrol Policy
Manual regarding driver license and vehicle inspection
checkpoints, said Lt. Mark Brown.

Sheriff's REPORT


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isThperfoflowingbyrepohrt
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office. Arrests are made
by officers from the
following city, county, and

gae cielaw I eah co a
(APD), Carrabelle
(CPD), Florida Highway
Patrol (FHP), Franklin
County Sheriff's Office
(FCSO), Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC),
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
(FDEP), Florida Division
adnsulor Dreapuadrt t
of Agriculture and
Consumer Services
(FLDOACS).
All defendants are
considered innocent until
proven guilty in a court of
law.

My 1
Alonzo V James, 42,
Perry, violation of probation
(FCSO)
Shelton W. Trail, 31,
Clermont, DUI (FCSO)
Ethan T. Rapack, 18, St.
George Island, burglary,
grand theft and criminal
mischief (FCSO)

May 13
Matthew J. Fox, 28,
Tarpon Springs, driving
while license suspended or
revoked and DUI (FCSO)
Kevin E Hammond, 20,
Eastpoint, battery (FCSO)


May 14
Zachary T. Craig, 29,
Apalachicola, providing
alcohol to person under
age 21 (FCSO)
Vill h Eatns, 2, t ar
(FCSO)
Amanda J. Goodson, 37,
Eastpoint, DUI, resisting
arrest without violence'
criminal mischief, and
fleeing or attempting to
elude officer (FCSO)

May I5
Anthony B. Kilpatrick,
37, Havana, violation of
probation (FCSO)

M0} ](
Oliver C. Green, 43
Springhill, Pinelas County
warrant for failure to
appear (FCSO)

May 1
Robert A. Hill, Jr., 18,
Apalachicola,DUIanddriving
while license suspended or
revoked (FHP)
Cynthia G. Heafey, 45,
Lanark Village, DUI and
refusal to submit to breath
test (CPD)

May 18
Carolyn G. Hazouri, 42,
St. George Island, violation
of probation (FCSO)
David M. McCranie,
45, Eastpoint, disorderly
intoxication and indecent
exposure (FCSO)


Federal marshals


arrest Eastpoint man


FHP CHECKPOINTS


KSO N' S

suppliess
Repair
697-3333
Anywhere
ware and Vlae eran
Center lernxes





;IIII)~)I)


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| 1100 |
thence run North 63 de-
grees 10 minutes 00 sec-
onds West along said
right-of-way boundary
612.99 feet to a re-rod for
the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. From said POINT OF
BEGINNING continue
North 63 degrees 10 mln-
utes 00 seconds West
along said right-of-way
boundary 143.57 feet to a
re-rod, thence run North
340.02 feet to a re-rod,
thence run South 63 de-
grees 10 minutes 00 sec-
onds East 143.57 feet to a
re-rod, thence run South
340.02 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING.

Together with a Private
Nonexclusive Ingress,
Egress, and Access Ease-
ment, recorded In Official
Records Vol. 640, Page
496, Public Records of
Franklin County, Florida.

a/k/a 162 POLY RD APA-
LACHICOLA, FL 32320

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, If any, to It,
on Nwabufo Umunna, At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose
address Is 2901 Stirling
Road, Sulte 300, Fort
Lauderdale, Florida 33312
within 30 days after the
first publication of this no-
tice, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Plaintlis attorney or Imme-
dlately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded In the
complaint.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
20th day of April, 2009.

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
As Clerk of the Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

A copy of this Notice of
Action, Complaint and Lls
Pendens were sent to the
defendants and address
named above.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tion to participate In this
proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days
prior, contact the Clerk of
the Court's disabllty coor-
dinator at 8506972112,
PO. BOX 340, APALACHI-
COLA FL, 32320. If hearing
Impaired, contact (TDD)
8009558771 via Florida
Relay System.

This Is an attempt to col-
lect a debt. Any Informa-
tion obtained will be used
for that purpose.
May 14, 21, 2009
2174T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION


TON L KTUBSBTN EON


Plaintif


2235T
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE
2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, INAND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY

HSBC Bank USA, N.A., as
Indenture Trustee for the
registered Noteholders of
Renaissance Home Equity
Loan Trust 2007-2,
Plaintif,

vs

Douglas A. Klrtley,
Defendant(s)

Case #: 2007-00428-CA
Division #:
UNC:

AMENDED NOTICE OF
SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der rescheduling foreclo-
sure sale dated April 27,
2009, entered In Civil Case
No. 2007-00428-CA of the
Circuit Court of the 2nd Ju-
dlclal Circuit In and for
FRANKLIN County, Flor-
Ida, wherein HSBC Bank,
N.A., as Indenture Trustee
for the registered
Noteholders of Renals-
sance Home Equity Loan
Trust 2007-2, Plaintiff and
Douglas A. Klrtley. are
defendantss, I will sell to
the highest and best bid-
der for cash, AT THE
WEST FRONT DOOR OF
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED
ON HWY 98, IN APALACH-
ICOLA, FLORIDA, AT
11:00 A.M., June 18, 2009,
the following described
property as set forth In
said Final Judgment,
to-wit:

LOT 46, ALLIGATOR HAR-
BOR UNIT 3, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4, AT PAGE 16, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

DATED at Apalachicola.
Florida, this 28th day of
April, 2009.
Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
Franklin County, Florida
By Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN,
LLP
10004 North Dale Mabr
Hwy, Sulte 112
Tampa, Florida 33618
07-83125T
May 14, 21, 2009


231 TE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-

ARL F RNKULI CNO ANT

CVOL DIVlSION

WIL.UAM D. LIMPERT, II,


VS.

JOHN FITZGERALD WHIT-
AKER a/k/a JOHN WHITA-
KER and SUSAN A. WHIT-


TO:
JAMES R. PAYTON
Whose residence Is: 162
POGY RD, APALACHI-
COLA, FL, 32320 & 78 12
ST, APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320

TO:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JAMES R. PAYTON
Whose residence Is: 162
POGY RD,
APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320 & 78 12 ST,
APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320

TO:
DARRELL STANTON
WARD
Whose residence Is: 162
POGY RD,
APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320 & 280 PRADO ST
APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320 & 78 12 ST
APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320

TO:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
DARRELL STANTON
WARD
Whose residence Is: 162
POLY RD,
APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320 & 280 PRADO ST
APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320 & 78 12 ST
APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320

If alive, and If dead, all par-
ties claiming Interest by,
through, under or against
JAMES R. PAYTON: UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
JAMES PAYTON: DAR-
RELL STANTON WARD:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
DARRELL STANTON
WARD and all parties hav-
Ing or claiming to have any
right, title or Interest In the
property described herein.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure
of Mortgage on the follow-
Ing described property:

Commence at an old terra
cotta monument marking
the Southeast corner of
Section 21, Township 8
South, Range 8 West,
Franklin County, Florida
and thence run South
182.91 feet to the North-
easterly right-of-way
boundary of Bluff Road,
thence run North 63 de-
grees 10 minutes 00 sec-
onds West along said
right-of-way boundary
612.99 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING. From
said POINT OF BEGINN-
ING continue North 63 de-
grees 10 minutes 00 sec-
onds West along said
right-of-way boundary
143.57 feet, thence run
North 1029.20 feet to the
Southerly edge of the Apa-
lachicola River, thence run
South 72 degrees 23 mln-
utes l4 seconds East
along said river's edge
70.17 feet, thence run
North 80 degrees 20 mln-
utes 25 seconds East

Tln Fai Er er' edge


NOTICE OF SALE

Case No. 09-000023-


CASE NO.:
07-0000130-CA


WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintff,

VS.

BETH VAN WINKLE, et al,
Defendant(s).

CASE NO.:
19-2009-CA-000126
DIVISION:

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
BETH VAN WINKLE
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
134 8TH STREET
APALACHICOLA, FL
32320

CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN


ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
property In FRANKLIN
County, Florida:

THE NORTH
ONE-FOURTH (NORTH
1/4) OF LOT THREE (3)
AND ALL OF LOT FOUR
(4) OF BLOCK
SIXTY-EIGHT (68), IN THE
CITY OF APALACHICOLA,
COUNTY OF FRANKLIN
AND STATE OF FLORIDA
WITH THE APPURTE-
NANCES, ALL IN THE
CITY OF APALACHICOLA,
FLORIDA, AND ACCORD-
ING TO A MAP OR PLAT
OF SAID CITY NOW IN
COMMON USE.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses within 30
days after the first publica-
tlon, If any, on Florida De-
fault Law Group, PL.,
Plaintlifs attorney, whose
address Is 9119 Corporate
Lake Drive, Sulte 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and
file the original with this
Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded In the
Complaint or petition.

This notice shall be pub-
Ilshed once each week for
two consecutive aek I



WITNESS my hand and
te s Ithof ths Cour o
2009.


lrk of t Cu II
As Deputy Clerk

Florida Default Law Group

P. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida


RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated the 12th day of De-
cember, 2008, and entered
In Case No. 07-000130-CA
of the Circuit Court of the
2ND Judicial Circuit In and
for Franklin County, Flor-
Ida, wherein DEUTSCHE
BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY F/K/A BANK-
ERS TRUST Is the Plaintif
and CHARLES K. AN-
DERS: MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INCORPO-
RATED AS NOMINEE FOR
AMERICAN BROKERS
CONDUIT: CHARLES
HEATH GALLOWAY: JEN-
NIFER A. GALLOWAY:
NATALIE K. ANDERS:
JOHN DOE: JANE DOE
AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY are defend-
ants. I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash at the ON FRONT
STEPS OFCOURTHOUSE
at the Franklin County
Courthouse In Apalachl-
cola, Florida at 11:00 a.m.
on the 18th day of June
2009, the following de-
scribed property as set
forth In said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:

Commence at the North-
west corner of the South-
west quarter of the North-
east quarter of Section 31
Township 8 South, Range
6 West, Franklin County
Florida; thence run South
164.00 feet to a point
thence run East 151.50
feet to an Iron rod and cap
lying on the Northeasterly
right-of-way of Old Ferry
Dock Road said point also
lying on a curve concave
to the Southwesterly and
marking the POINT OF BE-
GINNING. From said
POINT OF BEGINNING
run Northwesterly along
said Northeasterly
right-of-way boundary and
along said curve with a ra-
dlus of 1192.20 feet
through a central angle of
07 degrees 28 minutes 12
seconds for an arc dis-
tance of 155.44 feet, chord
bearing North 30 degrees
24 minutes 52 seconds
West 155.33 feet to an Iron
pipe lying on the Inter-
section, with the Southerly
right-of-way boundary of
Avenue "A, thence run
North 61 degrees 17 mn-
utes 30 seconds East
along said Southerly
right-of-way boundary
121.00 feet to an Iron rod
and cap (marked #7160)
thence leaving said
right-of-way boundary run
South 28 degrees 52 mn-
utes 34 seconds East

1h42.3a feue t on6rd


onedes Westnlinl7.50 feesec-
the POINT OF BEGIN Ir

more or less.

The above descriednsar


clal Records Book 815
Rg er2s49 of there Ofi a
County, Florida.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING


In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act (ADA), disabled per-
son who, because of their
disabllties, need special
accommodation to particl-
pate should contact the
ADA Coordinator as 33
Market Street, Suite 201
Apalachicola, FL 32320 or
Telephone Volce/TDD
(850) 653-8861 prior to
such proceeding.

Dated this 28th day of
April, 2009.

Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 Nw 49th Street, Suite
120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
May 14, 21, 2009
2190T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF
AMBER KATHLEEN
HANNON
Decease d.

FILE NO: 09-000004-CP

NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
(Testate)

TO:
Amber A. Mitchell
4188 Red Oak Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32311

The administration of the
Estate of Amber Kathleen
Hannon, deceased, Is
pending In the Circuit
Court In and for Franklin
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which Is 33 Market Street
Sulte 203, Apalachicola
Florida 32320. The estate
Is testate and the date of
the decedent's Will Is Se -
tember 20, 2006. Thpe
names and addresses of
the Personal Re resenta-
tives and the pPersonal
Representatives' attorney
are set forth below.

Any Interested person on
who ma copy of the Notice
of AdminisrationIs served
who challenges the validity
of the WIll, qualifications of
the Personal
Ieprestentat ves, vecnuue, or
reurd to file a ojc
reqirwi th the C urtoInbjteh
manner provided In the
Florida pProbate Rules
within the time required by
law or those objections are
forever barred.

Any person entitled to ex-

e mt pro ert s r q t e


PROVIDED BY LAW OR
TE RITHT TSO DEXEMMPT

W spo seek ng asuerl ng v

t Ta r m u s t fi a n e l h i o



Per onaA Rprcehs tative:

4188 Red Oak Drive
Tallahassee. Florida 32311


Notice Is hereby given that
pursuant to a final judg-
ment entered In the above
entitled cause In the Circuit
Court of Franklin County,
Florida, I will sell the prop-
erty situated In Franklin
County, Florida, described
as:

1. That certain parcel of
land more particularly de-
scribed as follows (the
"Land ):

LOT 18:

Commence at a St. Joe
concrete monument mark-
Ing the Southwest Corner
of Section 17, Township 7
South, Range 4 West,
Franklin County, Florida;
thence run North 00 de-
grees 51 minutes 39 sec-
onds East 3158.95 feet;
thence North 88 degrees
42 minutes 06 seconds
East 495.83 feet; thence
North 01 degrees 17 mln-
utes 54 seconds West
15.00 feet to a point lying
on the Northerly right of
way of West Road; thence
run along said right of way
as follows: North 88 de-
grees 42 minutes 06 sec-
onds East 1263.11 feet to
concrete monument;
thence continue North 88
degrees 42 minutes 06
seconds East 208.05 feet
to a rod and cap for the
POINT OF BEGINNING:
thence from said POINT
OF BEGINNING run, North
88 degrees 42 minutes 06
seconds East 208.06 feet
to a round concrete monu-
ment; thence leaving said
right of way run North 01
degrees 12 minutes 37
seconds West 209.40 feet
to a round concrete monu-
ment; thence South 88 de-
grees 38 minutes 59 sec-
onds West 208.13 feet to a
round concrete monu-
ment; thence South 01 de-
grees 13 minutes 54 sec-
onds East 209.14 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.;

2. All structures or build-
Ings now or hereafter lo-
cated upon the Land or
any part thereof, Including
all equipment, apparatus,
machinery and fixtures of
every kind and nature
whatsoever forming part of
sald structures or buildings
(the Ilmprovements );

3. All fixtures, fittings, ap-
pliances, apparatus,
equipment, machinery and
articles of personal prop-
erty and replacements
thereof, now or at any time
hereafter affixed to, at-
tached to, placed upon, or
used In any way In con-
nection with the complete
and comfortable use, en-
joyment, occupancy or op-
eration of the Improve-

rats o the Land


at public sale, to the high-
est bickier for cash, on te

Cu ty SCourtho~upse c

no a F loI t 3 43 9 d




B M chel Maxwell

May 21, 28 2009


2233T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
IDA IN AND FOR FRANK-
LIN COUNTY

SUNTRUST BANK, SUC-
CESOR BY MERGER TO
SUN BANK/SOUTH FLOR-
IDA, NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION, Plaintif ,

vs

NASIR K. SADDIKI et. al
Defendants

CASE NO. 08000425CA

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated April 27, 2009 and
entered In Case No
08000425CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judl-
clal Circuit In and for
FRANKLIN County, Flor-
Ida, wherein SUNTRUST
BANK SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO SUN
BANK/SOUTH FLORIDA
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
IsaPlaintif and WISDOM
MINISTRIES, NASIR K
SIDDIKI; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF NASIR K
SADDIKl; SUNSET BEACH
OWNERS' ASSOCIATION
INC; SUNTRUST BANK.
UNKNOWN TENANT #1.
UNKNOWN TENANT #2
are the Defendants. I will
sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at
11:00 AM on June 18
2009, the following de
scribed property as set
forth In said Final Judg-
ment, to wit.

LOT 34, SUNSET BEACH,
PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 6 AT PAGE
17 OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

Marcla M. Johnson
As Clerk of the Court
By Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

Dated this 28th day of
April, 2009

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tlon to participate In tis
proceeding should, no

ltr han scven6 c7 dy

PO. BOX 340, APALACHI-
COLA FL, 32320. fth arnD

8095S5-8t7e7 via Florida

BnE ra & Ka~tz PA.


Sulte 300
Frtl2Lauderdale, Florida
Telephone: (305) 770-4100

Maax 342165230- 9


11oo -Legal Advertising
112 -r PulcNtistces
Announcements
1130- Adoptions
rp-apon as
1160 -Lost
1170- Found


1100
2083T
NOTICE OF
SHERIFF'S SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN That pursuant to a
Writ of Execution Issued In
the County Court of Frank-
Iln County Florida, on the
23rd day of March, 2009,
In the cause where First
Select, Inc. was plaintly
said Stephnla Y Turrell was
defendant, being Case No.
02-9-CC In said court. 1,
Skip Shiver, as Sherl#f of
Franklin County, Florida,
have levied upon all the
right, title and Interest of
the defendant Stephnla Y
Turrell In and to the follow-
Ing described property,
to-wit:

2005 Volvo S80
Vin# YV1TS592151402033

Plus any and all contents
on or Inside the above de-
scribed vehicle Including
keys when applicable, as
the property of the defend-
ant, Stephnla Y Turrell.

and on the 1st day of
June, 2009 at the Franklin
County Sheriff's Office. lo-
cated at 270 State Rd. 65
Eastpoint, FL 32328 Frank-
Iln County, Florida, at the
hour of 11:00 a.m., or as
soon thereafter as possi-
ble, I will offer for sale all of
the said defendant's
Stephnla Y Turrell right, ti-
tle and Interest In aforesaid
property at public outcry
and will sell the same, sub-
ject to all prior lens, en-
cumbrances and judg-
ments, If any, to the high-
est and best bidder or bid-
ders for CASH, the pro-
ceeds to be applied as far
as may be to the payment
of costs and the satisfac-
tlon of the above de-
scribed execution. Note: In
accordance with the Amer-
Ican with Disabllties Act,
persons with disabllties
needing a special accom-
modation to participate In
this proceeding, should
contact Debble Mock no
later than seven days prior
to the proceeding at
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office at (850)-670-8519.

Skip Shiver

Sheriff of Franklin County,
Florida
By: Debble L Mock
Deputy Sherly
April 30, May 7, 14, 21,
2009
2132T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-

IDAMINORANAD FOR FCRAANSKE

BANK, NATIONAL ASSO-
CIFATITOHNEAS PUAR HAA R

WTA HRNGTAOSNSEMSUTU L

KNTUAAS WAS A G


vs.

JAMES R. PAYTON, et.al.
Defendants.


Loll wingdescibe Ppar vs


CHARLES K. ANDERS:

TONAC RGISC AI


AMERICAN BROKERS

EOANTDHU LLO AYARLEE
NIFER A. GALLOWAY
NATALIE K. ANDERS:


Commence at an old terra
cotta mo um t marking

South, Range 8 West
Frnadnklthe (ounty F oid

ly291feet torithe oNo h-
boundary of B uff Road?


SB The Times Thursday, May 21, 2009





| 3220 | 320 4100 | 6110 |1 6130 11 7100 | 8110
Lpnprk Villpqq Lanark Village Port St. Joe, St. George Ford Escort 1999, $495
Other 1et' 'br, 1baRenovated/ fur Island and St. James Bay down, $3,900 total 0%
Rental'snished end unit, new kitch Previously Bank Owned interest Daylight Auto
" 6 Piece Solid Wood Bed- NEW SOLID WOOD Permit I so 2 br, 1 ba, Furnished w/ and bath, minl. 4 month Property. Priced way be- Financing 2816 Hwy 98 W
MERCHANDISE rooraw Ser d49N Dovetail Dnette Se w/4 cars Cler RELETT ORI /utlllde mocdd. d le ra $95/moco derendo warktn ral3 P ies 2516 a/p
3100- Antiques deliver. 425-8374 222-7783. Can deliver. Must have building & con- sloo Businessi corner lot 850-697-2220 or (850) 653-3838 call Counts Real Estate
3110 Appliances suconkwldeAvl- commercial 850-509-3535 Group at 850-249-3615. Toyota corolla 1992, $495
3120l ~ -a Artste &ek Crft 6blt ooeaecm 110 -Apartments down, $3,200 total, 0% In-
34- ab Itnems Ottaacheodm bcdseskand p tr. Koo ratelnc aS 810Cnolw use Southern Villaste DIghHuo8
3150 Bu~ildnSupplies separate printer stand. 3 Work, Excel & Internet. 6140 House Rentals Aamet no7 zao 215-1769 9am/9 m
Equimen $15 Quen lustopSauder computer cart, Ing and zoning will be 160 Rooms for Hent Accepting Applications 1 br house For sale by owner, Lanark
3170 Collectibles mattress set. NEW In plas- $4.Cl 7-76 hlfl or ilb o 6170 Mobile Home/Lot for 1, 2 & 3 Bdrms. He c/h/a, w/d incl, Vllage Town House, 2 br,
3180 -Computers tic w/warranty Can Deliver 120 Mal60876 hlf ondy-ridy Will be 8o6180 Out-of-Town Rentals & Non-HC accessible 1 ba, add on s on front&
3190 Electronics 850-545-7112 12 ModyFrdy 6IIb 190 Timeshare Rentals units. Rental assistance No pets. 850-653-9788 back, low maint, $81,900
320 ireoodaccepting applicationS 6200 Vacation Rentals 850-615-0058 |y 8120oly
3210 Free Pass it On May 26. Applications avall- available. Call 850- B pt ol
ad~aes1N LOTESE~p330 Ie t Crraele Cty653-9E2 ITHDD TY711. le lyhors I eoCera 1ele 1-850-697-8923 Chevy Bla ert 199$595
Thi G n gs t hat r dw arr tound tic Wanted, Franklin Co. 61 0Opportunity mo. (850) 697-4080 or trs algtAt l
320 eath Ftns flce $699. Delivery avall. tas9A1,~ygBusiness Offices In nic Efiiny (5)5159 1 0ncln9 n16/9Hwy 98W
3280 EMa hine y/ 85-2-343 1 954S n Rsr aain In Carabel F$30 to $400 Carabelle $500 mo. 1 ,&3 r 1ar ohosaPit
dca equipment spy$0-ah rpriso G, m al 850-510-2888 505028 Apala hc ola7 F. 850-370-6806
3310 Musicelalnsments rnl 7-3562 For Lease Lanark Village, 1 br I 1.82 Acre for sale In Su-
3320 Plants & Shrubs/ emall gobucs13@aol.com A great opportunity I apt. W/D, C/H/A, yard 2 br, 1 ba, 2 houses, nice matra Florida. Hwy front- 8 3
Supplies ALL NEW Queen Orthope- wwwfloridalicenseplates.com awaits you at the largest Commercial $50m,1t&ls.Akneighborhood, Ave A, age boarders Nlational For- Dodge PickUp XCab $995
3330 Restaurant/Hotel dic Plowtop Mattress Set vacation rental com- Building for5 Jmo 850-697-2788sk Eastpoint, $500 mo, $500 est assessed value down $6,900 total. 0% In-
34 pricg B o& ell aSea ed PlasticD v4e9r, pany on St Georg r pro 10 q t L - - - .1 dep. Call 670-8820 $44,000 Asking $28,000 terest Daylight Auto FI-
F30 shedet CH/A. Newl neighbrhood $9000 orivr ca iie.dw,$590tta.0 n
SolidWood edroo Set M~lpYI~ltr at fr smal busness r of- Upstars sudio on smkers nly, o on 3rd S. 6538792 r naning. 816 Hy 98
NE 00 mcr ibr, 85-22-73.Ca dlier 5 -65F3 378 for cal deposi 85-63-11 or brahll 2 a ett ad $500 0X0.Cre
stain5 5~I '- resitant $500 delly 85-74-17 fdor appt. plord, walk to bay, m atur lot.Brker proteced Call or age 01,$
eryavailable.222-9879I prsn tda F' en Sac avial sunse nonA smoer indivdalor 404-218-0077rcn iie |on 814900 oa.0
|70 4100 | rnt p y dentm t Sacrifaeniceoho ers.DyigtAt I

PUB Set. solido woodo Fron Des &o beach and restarns ll Vlo stit Becsatntu i LanarmkVlae 5brs 3.5y lahiol Area:n %1 -w 1 acr
liverw~veal drw r. tl 22 -97 Both epositins must b e C a t i G or Ilnd D nor n 850-65 -6459 Gulf view.i Larged lotk $110 sultablefori Dstingl fa il D iv
Comorabe ECINR xpriece. ppy n BR1B upscae fr motl4581HmeFlood Zon X,7 ac 5- 179 93 FrdConero
brand ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 2 NE,10 Mco ero tBetWsernse aparmen withh bal- t 630in cess roa ands eletri Van $,500,Churc
ll..i. $2l 0 alue 249 Hw0Emlymn 98, Apalachl You NEVER hav tot n payr cony, dontw Apalachl aal b ule.2751-83 $750.Cloao v
Pi.c Liin colaSe between for9 FInomtnabu cola. clawown tub, satllte Carb lle usLn avn17 ie
stain~~ ~ ~ ~ amitat and pm federal or postal717fo jobs. Ifrd TVk WIF Lease $800r lot -rkr pc. 265-3d430Cel38-24
Please briongrsm. 'u se a job moths + o ectic. Call 3 B, B Unurise Lovel b eah cottage. |6,0 760 X10 o Ne w a 3K p
NEWurate ,00 contac the,8622-73Cnelvr ao 850-653-8801 dpslD C5-531 e 2bt senb Espit 0 CLn

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II I I


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Thursday, May 21, 2009


B8 | The Times


Local


IGIS SWOBODA | The Time
This 1942 single-engine biplane landed safely just east of the junction of US 98 and U.S.
3190onMay 14.



Historic biplane makes



emergency landing


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

Passing motorists and
residents in the St. Teresa
area on the eastern end
of the county watched in
astonishment May 14 as a
biplane pilotedbyaLakeland
man made an emergency
landing on US 98.
Nobody was injured and
the plane was disassembled
and trailered to Lakeland
the next day.
The sheriff's office said
the original 1942 single-
engine plane, piloted by
Shawn D. Slade, 28, landed
safely over a two-mile
stretch ofroad.
Sheriff Skip Shiver
said the office received a
report around 4:30 p.m.
of an airplane attempting
an emergency landing on
U.S. 98, east of the junction
where US 319 splits off.
Slade had just re-
fueled at the Apalachicola
Regional Airport en route
to Lakeland to deliver the
plane to the owner. After
re-fueling, the pilot began
to experience mechanical
problems while in flight,
and initially hoped to land
at the Wakulla Airport and
have the plane assessed for
problems.
On realizing the engine
was losing power, he made
an emergency landing


'It weas a verl nice landing a~nd he
wa~cs very rlady th~at 98 wa~cs clear a~nd
he w~as able to gfet dowen.. The road is
zDeTz/ nccTTOwe there.

Earl McClure
chief Operating officer for the
H-exoport GreenSteel factory in Carrobelle


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on the highway, read the
report.
Earl McClure, chief
operating officer for the
HexaportGreenSteelfactory
in Carrabelle, witnessed the
landing and told this story of
the unusual encounter.
McClurewasheadedback
to the plantfrom Tallahassee
on US 98 when, a few miles
before the SummerCamp
development, he saw the
biplane.
"I saw this airplane
sort of coming in like it had
been flying to the east and
then it did a half-circle turn
and went back to the west.
He just kept getting lower
and lower and I thought
that either he's buzzing his
girlfriend's house or he's
going to land," he said.
"I didn't see him come
down," McClure said. "Then
I came across him in the
road about a quarter-mile
east of SummerCamp. He
had landed heading west.
There were already several


cars stopped. He moved
the plane off the road so we
could get by.
"It was a very nice
landing and he was very
lucky that 98 was clear and
he was able to get down. The
road is very narrow there,"
he said.
According to a press
release from the sheriff's
office, the office received
a report of an airplane
attempting an emergency
landing on US 98, east of
the junction of US 98 and SR
319.
An Apalachicola airport
employee who remembered
the plane said it was in
beautiful condition and was
being transported from
Arizona. He said a plane of
this type refuels about every
two hours.
Shiver responded to the
scene and contacted the
Federal Aviation Authority.
Sheriff's deputies found no
injuries or road blockage
due to the landing.


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