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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00026
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola, Fla.
Publication Date: May 14, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00026
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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        Page A 7
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    Section B
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THURSDAY, MAY l4, 2009 www.apalachtimes.com 50(





County says no to runway buf fer buy


.-

i~~~~~~ f~,PiC Y

me


A palachicola

Carrabelle








YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


By Lojs Swoboda
Times Staf fWriter
The county commission has
rejected a proposal to buy 21 acres
of airport land as a buffer for a
runway.
At the May 5 meeting, county
commissioners voted 2-2, with


Noah Lockley and Bevin Putnal
favoring the purchase and Cheryl
Sanders and Pinki Jackel opposed
to.
Smokey Parrish recused
himself from the vote since he is an
employee of one of the individuals
who own the land. A split vote
meant the land purchase could not


be approved.
Federal grant money is
available to buy the land at the
Apalachicola Regional Airport,
although Ted Mosteller, chairman
of the airport advisory board, said
the county could lose the grant
money earmarked for acquisition
if the purchase is not completed.


Jackel led opposition to the
land purchase by questioning the
appraised value of the property.
Both she and Sanders expressed
concern about wasting taxpayers'
money.
Mosteller appeared before the
commission with an appraisal of
a 21-acre block of land designated


as a buffer or protection zone at
the end of one of the runways. The
land is owned by DSW Holdings,
an investment group comprised
of Sid Dumas, of Huntsville, AL,
and 'It-avis Stanley, Olan Ward
and Walter Mack Ward, all of

See BUF FER AS


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Differences over whether
students should get Veterans
Day off, or have a four-day
weekend two weeks after
returning to school after the
Christmas break, prompted
school board members May
7 to reject a proposed 2009-
10 calendar.
On Tuesday night, the
board approved the calen-
dar after accepting some of
the changes that they had
called for.
By a 3-1 vote, the board
first sent the calendar pro-
posal back for revisions to
the school district's calen-
dar committee, which had
drafted it and placed it be-
fore district staffers, who
gave it their approval.
Board members Da-
vid Hinton, Carl Whaley
and George Thompson all
backed the move to reject
the calendar, while board
member Teresa Ann Martin
differed. Board chairman
Jimmy Gander was absent,
as he recuperates from knee
replacement surgery.
Thompson began opposi-
tion to the calendar by citing
the fact students would be
in school on Veterans Day,
which is always celebrated
on NOV. 11 regardless of
which day of the week it
falls. He said be believed
students should be off on
that day, and that he would
be willing to switch the day
with the Wednesday before
Thanksgiving, Nov. 25.
School administrator
Deborah Huckeba spoke on
behalf of the calendar com-


mittee, and said members
decided it would be better
to have a district-wide Vet-
erans Day program rather
than take a Wednesday off.
"We all felt that was a bad
day to take off in the middle
of the week," she said. "We'll
try to have a program on
that day."
On 'lI~esday night, when
the board unanimously ap-
proved the revised calendar,
it specified there would be
a schoolwide celebration on
Veterans Day, and did not
make it a vacation day.
Huckeba said the first se-
mester would run from Aug.
24, 2009 until Jan. 15, 2010,
with exams on Dec. 16 to 18,
right before students leave
for Christmas break.
"Most high school teach-
ers like to give exams before
Christmas anyway," she
said, noting that if any stu-
dents fail their exams, they
would have a chance to re-
view and re-test in January
before the end of the semes-
ter. Those who pass would
continue in their regular
studies, although the second
semester wouldn't formally
begin until Wednesday, Jan.
20.
"It's a new idea and we
don't know whether it would
work," said Huckeba.
Hinton's opposition to the
calendar centered on the
four-day weekend in Janu-
ary, which he said involved
too many days off so soon
after students returned to
school after the first of the
year.
He noted that the school

See CALENDAR A6


This painting of shrimp boats by Alison Hill was part of last year's Plein Air Paintout.
Below, Adriana Jenkins, Tylor Millender and Jill Diestelhorst, from left, learned about
plein air painting at the Crooked River Light.


By Tim (roft and Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

It's that time of year again and
22 Plein Air painters have arrived
in Gulf and Franklin counties to
record the day-to-day life of the
Wilderness Coast.
With different sponsorship
schedule and array of events, plein
air began last week and wraps up
Sunday.
Many of the painters are familiar
faces from previous years. Charles
Dickinson, painter of Apalachicola
Memorial Oaks, best in show for
2008, is back in town again.
Lori Putnam, of Nashville.
arrived early this year and did an
exhibition painting at last week's
Apalachicola Bay Chamber of
Commerce meeting.
James Hempel, of Milwaukee,
WI, had already sold three paintings
by the end of the day Sunday.
New this year are Luke Buck,
who has been painting since 1959,
Harold Frontz, a contemporary
hpor ssonist nsd e ch d 1 Tleo e
of nature.
Also here for the first time are
Morgan Samuel Price, who began
herdprofesdsioanal care at Hallmoark
has paintings in the corporate
collections of Disney, The Atlanta
See WELCOME A6


Frank Bruckmann
Luke Buck
Gene Costanza
Katie Cundiff
Charles Dickinson
Cynthia Edmonds
Mary Eric son
Sally Evans
Martin Figlinski
Harold Frontz
Tracey Frugoli
Richard Gallego
James Hempel
Mitchell Lee Kolbe
Morgan Samuel Price
Lori Putnam
James Richards
Tom Sadler
Diane Scott
Robert Simone
Theodore Tihansky
Donald Demers


New Haven, CT
Niveah, IN
Eugene, OR
Sarasota
St. Au ustine
Winter Park
Mars vle, NC
Winter Park
Panama City
Lexington, NC
Morton, IL
Palm dale, CA
Milwaukee, WI
Palm Harbor
Altamonte Springs
Nashville, TN
Athens, GA
Orlando
Hingham, MA
St. Petersburg
Monhegan Island, ME
Elliot, ME


RELAY FOR LIFE THIS WEEKEND: In photo above, Sheriff Skip
Shiver calls for bail money May 5 during the pre-event
Jail and Bail. Jim Miller, president of the Apalachicola
Rotary Club, is at right wearing a duck suit to promote
the Rotary's upcoming rubber duck race. This year,
Jail and Bail was held in Carrabelle by staff from the
Franklin Correctional Institution and in Apalachicola by
Jim "Toolie" O'Toole, organizer of Susan Hoffritz' Relay
Team. Teams raised $2,300, and so far the Relay has
raised $16,200 going into this Friday's Relay, which
begins at 5 p.m. at the consolidated school.


Phone: (850) 653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews~,starfl.com
Fax:(850)653-8036


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:


Casrifedd Dira idr Frday aill1a.mn.
Classified Line Ad Monday ai5 p.mn.


TABLE OF C
Letter to the Editor .. ..... ....A4
Sheriff's Report. .......... ... B4
ChurchNews......................... B3


BUBr





LIFE TIMES | B1


Board rejects,


then OKs,


school calendar


ELCO


E,


SD SPlIn Ai tH F ri i

IrtiSt record scenes throughout the county


ARTISTS PARTICIPATING IN 2009 PAINTOUT


LOIS SWO


BODA|I The Times


--- -~


:ONTENTS
SocietyNews.. .....2 FREEDOM .. B
Tide Chart ................... ........ A8 F PARS NERCT
Classifieds ................... ..... B6-B7


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r rlr.1 au ,



DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
An oyster boat is moored along the Eastpoint waterfront.


ROTARY



~ INTERNATIONAL


Thursday, MAY 1 d, 2009


A2 | The Times


Local


Ihu)r~nSetrrrc


Apalachicola Bay oyster har-
vesters still would be allowed to
work during summer months
under a draft proposal accepted
Thursday by national shellfish-
harvesting regulators.
There had been concerns
that the U.S. Food and Drug Ad-
ministration was going to insist
on shutting down Gulf Coast
oyster harvesting for part of the
summer starting in 2010 as a
way to further reduce the infre-
quent illnesses and deaths that
occur from eating oysters that
contain a naturally occurring
Vibrio bacteria. The bacteria
are more common during sum-
mer months.
According to Kevin Begos,
executive director of the Frank-
lin County Oyster & Seafood
Task Force, regulators gave
preliminary approval to a state
"ianthat wowuM shift n ser har-
during summer months instead
of shutting it down.
Begos represented Florida
at the executive board meet-
ing of the Interstate Shellfish
Sanitation Conference held last
week in Manchester, N.H. The
ISSC Executive Board endorsed
Florida's draft plan, which could
take effect in May 2010.
Under the proposal from the
Florida Department of Agri-
culture, local oystermen would
not have to use onboard refrig-
eration from May to October.
Instead, they would be allowed
to harvest only from 6 to 11 a.m.
Dealers also would have to cool
down oysters more rapidly once
they are unloaded.
In terms of economic impact,
Begos said the FDA and Gulf
States regulators expect sum-
mer harvest levels to decline
by 20 percent or more, meaning
that both wholesale and retail
oyster prices might increase.
He said the ISSC has asked for
an independent cost-benefit
analysis of how the new regula-
tions will impact workers, indus-
try and consumers.
The public will have several
chances to comment on the new
proposal throughout the next
year, Begos said, noting the


)~II I I 1~1~ ~-I -' I I I I I I I I It-1' I I I I I I I I I I )I ~L1~ 1(~I


II
II1~'1 II


..


More than $400,
and lots of local spir-
its, were raised for
the American Cancer
Society's upcoming
Relay for Life this
weekend, May 15 and
16 at the consolidated
school, through a
"Cutest Pet Contest."
Sponsored by the
Gulf State Communi-
ty Banks' St. George
Island Branch, the
contest drew nine
participants, with vot-
ing from May 4 to 8,
at a $1 donation per
vote.
First place went to
Lou and Kim Davis'
Zoei, a 4-month-old
puppy, that loves to
run along the beach
Second place went
to Tara Davis' Kenzie,
a 3-year-old dog, that
loves to play with a
pine cone in a sock.
Third place was
Gordon and Gaynell
Waldo's Rex, a 4-year-
old rescue dog, whose
favorite thing to do is
play in the bay.


FDA will monitor how well the
new regulations work during
the first two-year period (2010-
11) and further restrictions on
summer harvesting are possible
in the future.
The entire Gulf Coast oyster
industry will be covered under
the new plans, but Texas and
Louisiana have chosen to move
toward onboard refrigeration as
the main way to comply with the
new rules.
"Texas and Louisiana oys-
ter fishermen face the most
demanding changes under the
new plan," he said. "Fishermen
there will have to refrigerate
oysters within two hours of har-
vest; in Florida, fishermen have
five hours."
Begos said the current plan
does not require Florida fisher-
men to have onboard refrigera-
tion of any kind; in most cases,
Texas and Louisiana boats will
have to refrigerate.
"However, Florida fishermen
and dealers may have the op-
portunity to voluntarily install
onboard cooling as a way to stay


on the water past 11 a.m." he
said.
Onboard refrigeration sys-
tems will have to be approved
by FDA/ISSC, and guidelines
are being developed. "Oyster-
men should know that no sys-
tems are approved at this time,"
Begos said. "Do not invest mon-
ey in a cooling system until you
know what the rules are."
"The U.S. Food and Drug
Administration is making a
broad push for stronger food
safety rules with support from
Republicans and Democrats in
Congress and from the Obama
administration," said Begos.
"While many of us in Franklin
County feel oysters have been
unfairly targeted for regula-
tion, in fact other foods, such as
spinach, peanuts, tomatoes and
hamburger are facing tougher
inspections, too."
Begos credited staff from the
Florida Department of Agricul-
ture for key work on the plan,
with additional help from task
force members Tommy Ward
and Billy Dalton.


Kenzie


The Rotary International Presidential Citation
(Designation of a Top Club Worldwide)

Apalachicola, Lynn Haven, Panama City, Panama City Beach, Panama City East Bay,
Panama City Northside, Port St. Joe


Oyster industry to avoid summer closure


Cancer society fundraiser

picks cut est pets


and


The Rotary International Interact Presidential Citation
(Designation of Top Interact Service Clubs Worldwide)

Arnold High School, Bay High School, Mosley High School, Rutherford High School


and


Rotary District 6940


Recognizes the 2008-2009 District Club of the Year


PANAM\IA CITY EAST BAY ROTARY CLUB





I


Thursday, MAY 1 d, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


Lillian Smith,

spoke on behalf
E~r";"~L .;L. of the Carrabelle

city commission
~ meeting to request
t uk ~ i~~l~;C,;,. the commission
ledo tecsoci t
downtown to
12 house offices and
4' a Carrabelle city
14 L m mseum.
LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


Carb 1 1d I tTR 6 Oend Ci hl

to historical society


Lillian Smith did not bring a plate of
her famous cookies to last Thursday's city
commission meeting.
Speaking on behalf of the Carrabelle
Historical Society, she requested the com-
mission lend the society the old city hall
downtown to house offices and a Carra-
belle city museum. A temporary exhibit of
Carrabelle memorabilia has been on dis-
play at city hall since the Riverfront Festi-
val on April 25 and 26.
"It is better to give than to receive," she
said. "We are the history of Carrabelle."
The commission voted unanimously to
lend the building. The historical society
will be responsible for electric bills, and
the city will provide water and sewer ser-
vice at no charge.
Historical Society President Tamara
Allen said she is preparing a written
agreement to seal the deal. She said the


society is looking for additional volunteers
to work at the museum, which probably
will be open 20 hours a week.
They also are seeking additional ar-
tifacts relating to Carrabelle's history to
display, she said. If you would like to help
or have something to donate or lend, you
can contact Allen at 697-8380.
The centerpiece of the society's col-
lection is a medical bag once carried by
legendary local midwife and nurse, Tilly
Miller. For many years, Miller was the only
medical practitioner in Carrabelle.
The city hall building is also histori-
cally significant. It was built as a Works
Progress Administration project in the
early 1930s by local mason Marvin Jus-
tiss, who fabricated the bricks used in
the building. He is credited with con-
structing a number of the structures
downtown.


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ALWAYS ONLINE


www.apalachtimes .com


FCTDC 2009 PUBLIC MEETING
SCHEDULE CHANGES
Please note: Due to temporary non-elevator access at the SGI Firehouse, the May and June Committee
meetings will be held at the Franklin County Courthouse in Room 303 on the Third Floor.
Rescheduled Committee Meetings:
May 18, 2009 1: 30 PM Administrative: Franklin County Courthouse, Third Floor Room 303
May 19, 2009 1:30 PM Marketing and Grants: Franklin County Courthouse, Third Floor Room 303
Regular CouncilMeeting:
June 2, 2009 3:00 p~m. Franklin County Courthouse Annex, FuHl Council
Rescheduled Committee Meeting:
-ue 16, 2009 1:30 PM Franklin County Courthouse, Third Floor Room 303
REGULAR SCHEDULE RESUMES:
July 7, 2009 3:00 PM Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Full Council
July 21, 2009 1:30 PM SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meetings
August 4, 2009 3:00 PM Carrabelle City Offices (old Carrabelle High School), FuHl Council
August 18, 2009 1:30 PM SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meetings
September 1, 2009 3:00 PM Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Full Council
September 15, 2009 1:30 PM SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meetings
October 6, 2009 3:00 PM Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Full Council
October 20, 2009 1:30 PM SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meetings
November 3, 2009 3:00 PM Carrabelle City Offices (old Carrabelle High School), FuHl Council
November 17, 2009 1:30 PM SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meetings
December 1, 2009 3:00 PM Franklin County Courthouse Annex, FuHl Council
December 15, 2009 1:30 PM SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meetings
Any further changes will be published in the TIMES.
This is a public meeting and two or more County Commissioners may attend.


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.


Letters to the EDITOR


Thanks for showing honor and respect


Thursday, May 14~, 2009


2 When we go the Way

Sof the Wind on the Sea

JIM CLEMENITS T10 Pilgil Of 0 Fisherman

We are bold, fearless men who venture out to sea
Our hands and faces are weathered for all to see

For our entire lives our desire has been to fish
For existing on the ocean, is our solitary wish
Although many a vessel has sunk out of sight
We continue to work in the dark of the night

Go donto 11r pot htarre lendb asackle
We slip out the channel and turn the boat to port
We rummage for ale under the old broken thwart
As we steer our vessels with a firm grip on the helm
We feel the excitement, knowing the ocean is our realm

We steam ahead, healing from port to starboard
Through rain and fog, we always move forward
If the seas get rough and we lash things to the post
Our concern for our families stands out foremost

When the wind is strong and the waves at their worst
We will pray to our God amidst the darkest cloudburst

As the seas become calm, and the storm has past
We thank the good Lord, who makes us steadfast

The perpetual romance of fishing exists in our minds
Because there is no other feeling like fish on our lines

Though he knows every fish is not at his beck and call
A fisherman will never let that be his downfall

Fishing is a continuous series of occasions of hope
We are thankful for any, but for the big one we grope
We know that a fish is elusive but attainable
Their use as food has always been sustainable
We always preserve the fish which we fought
We know our families can eat what we caught

If we are lucky and blessed, we will fill our hold
Pack them in ice and make sure they stay cold
We then plot our course to bring us back home
For a familiar coastline, our weary eyes comb
When we are safely in port and the day becomes night
We say good night to our families and wait for first light

Some say it's is a hard life, but we will never complain
For it is our only way of life which we will not disdain
For the sake of a turtle which we would not offend
Some say our way of life may soon come to an end
We cherish our freedom that no kept man can understand
We stood on firm ground, which now feels like quicksand

We will remain on the water that we so love and respect
And work at our trades we have tried hard to perfect

Many say that we are truly a dying breed
But showing our sorrow is not in our creed
Though the strongest of men may fall to his knees
A fisherman will always rise up to see the buoys
So even if the Gulf Council intends to cut our mainline
We will always preserve our dignity time after time

We cry out to this Council, for devastation not to bring
If silence were the answer we would have said not a thing

For all good fishermen are the captains of their deny
So we will work our hands until they become blistery
Our only request is that after they have cast us adrift
And when we go the way of the wind on the sea
The government will build just one museum as a gift
With paintings of fishermen for generations to see

Tisr pem was written by Jim Clements, a barefoot fisherman from


Thed.Y in the first stanza represents a vessel with its sails full of
The shape of the stanzas represents a vessel full of hope.


The FCAT Writing scores are in. I was
a bit disappointed. The state average
score was 3.8 and we came in at 3.5. The
top score is a 6. As always, there were
some big surprises.
Kids I thought would score at least a
5 or 6 came in at 3 or 4. I had a 4.5 from
a drop-out no longer in school. Writing is
not a graduation requirement, but I still
give it my all. Most days I believe I
know how to teach students to write
well.
We are still waiting for Reading
and Math. The students must pass
those two in order to graduate. If
they don't pass in 10th grade, they
still have a few more chances.
The retakes are untimed and do
not require written responses to R
any questions. The retake test is A
all multiple choice. Is this a level
playing field?
The pressure on students and
teachers cannot be overstated, especially
with the Department of Education
focusing on why Franklin County School
is consistently low-performing. Students
want to graduate; teachers know their
performance evaluation includes student
performance.
"Franklin County School is
consistently low-performing." Doesn't
that seem a bit of a non-sequitur? This
is the first real year that we have been
truly consolidated. Last year was a
hodgepodge. The high school was in
Carrabelle with a temporary banner over
the school sign proclaiming that we were
a consolidated school.
The middle school was in
Apalachicola. The elementary kids got to
stay in place.
If there is anything I know about kids,
it is that they crave consistency. We have
a set routine every day in my classroom:
SAT vocabulary word cartoons, idiom
of the day, journals or grammar mini-
lessons, then the short story or play.
All assignments are on the board,
reiterated vocally, and sometimes


repeated in handouts.
The big administrative picture has
not always been so consistent. Math and
science teachers come and go, as do
coaches. Who is in charge of discipline?
The last few years have been troubled
with turnovers.
We are stabilizing, and I am optimistic.
George Oehlert is a good principal, and
though I only have 15 years
in the system, I have had too
many principals. He is stern;
~Ci he is affable; he was in the
classroom recently; he is
smart; he commands respect
and is respectful of teachers.
.He is also married to a terrific
English teacher. Margy taught
ED WHITE freshmen this year. I just can't
wait to have those kids next
NHD ROUX yer
Denis Roux So, once again, it is time to
reinvent myself. I shudder at
the prospect of receiving the Reading
FCAT scores. I heard too many kids say,
"Ms. Roux, the passages were sooooo
boring." I try so hard to put high-interest
books into their hands, just so they will
read. If I create a reader for pleasure, I
create a high FCAT reading score.
This I believe. Reading may be
a skill, but if it is not a pleasure, the kids
won't do it. Intensive Reading classes
don't work. How would you like to have to
document the pages read, and then do a
summary? Yuck.
Get them a book you think they might
like. Accept they might put it down. Help
them find another book. Read it. Talk to
them about it. Make no judgments. Help
them understand that reading is freedom
and the open door to lifelong education.
I do have teacher's pets. They are the
ones who come and say, "Ms. Roux, help
me find a book."

Denise Roux is a regular columnist
for the Apalachicola and Carrabelle
Times. 'lb reach her, e-mail her at
rouxwhit~mchsi.com


Thank you Apalachicola for the
patriotism and support you gave while
hosting The Wall that Heals. As a Patriot
Guard Rider, it was an honor to be a part
of the escort and the opening and closing
ceremony of this great occasion.
It is difficult to find words that express
the feelings we shared while escorting
The Wall from I-10 to Apalachicola. EMS,
fire trucks, law enforcement officers,
schoolchildren and teachers waving flags
in all the towns we passed through. What
a great way to teach. A young mother
sitting in her van outside of town with
her left hand waving while her right hand
was over her heart. An elderly couple
standing on a porch with the old soldier at
full salute while his wife stood beside him
with a hand on her heart. We were told
the line was over seven miles long and
they never wavered.
The list goes on and on. Franklin
County sheriff deputies led us all the
way with help from Jackson, Calhoun,
and Gulf counties. When we arrived


in Apalachicola you welcomed us as
the "'It~ue Patriots" you are, with flags,
banners and open hearts. This was
repeated on Thursday and Sunday when
we returned for each ceremony. Thank
You.
The opening ceremony was beautiful,
powerful and soul-searching. It provided
all in attendance an opportunity to
become part of this healing wall. I
have escorted "The Wall" before and
if given the opportunity will escort
"The Wall" again. I can only hope that
all communities or cities "The Wall"
visits will show the honor and respect
Apalachicola has shown all who were
involved in bringing this monument to
your great city.
A special thanks to Jimmy Mosconis
and all of his volunteers for a job well
done.

Wayne McKenzie
Patriot Guard Mentor
Panama Gty


It is a pleasure to say that the
fourth grade class at Franklin County
Consolidated School has raised enough
money for their three-day trip to St.
Augustine.
On Wednesday, May 27, two chartered
buses will be taking 70 students and 35
chaperones to the oldest town in the
United States. Students will be having
hands-on experience of years ago when
they visit: Castillo de San Marcos (the
fort), old schoolhouse, Fountain of Youth'

fundraisers and donations. All students
will have the opportunity to go on this


educational trip; all rooms, food, and
tickets are paid for with the money we've
made.
At this time, we would like to say
Thank You to our parents, business
partners, and our colleagues at FCS who
have made this possible. Our students
will remember this when they get older
and have fond memories of their school
days at FCS, and so will we!

Sincerely,
Donna Barber, Paula Dykes,
Melanie Humble and Laura King
Franklin County School fourth grade teachers


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Ap la hicola Times

Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8 868


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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


A4 | The Times OD1 8 0


Re086fs Of6 60fkch68 When




they enjoy th6 f 6WOrdS


THE TI

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


Fourth-graders heading to St. Augustine


HO WS.


Visit


a qa lash

times.


(O MH.


`Litter H~appen~s


DoMow Parte Don' Liter

































USDA ELIGIBLE J~
100% FINANCING TO QUALIFIED BUYERS!!!


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY INDIAN CREEK
SHORELINE RESTORATION PROJECT

The Apalachicola Bay and River Keeper, Inc. d/b/a Apalachicola Riverkeeper, a Florida not-for-
profit corporation, requests proposals for landscape design and the construction of a breakwater
and dock in conjunction with a shoreline restoration project at Indian Creek Park.

Each proposal shall set forth the costs and contractors qualifications to complete one or more of
the following components of the overall project:

1. Replace two piles on the existing dock at Indian Creek Park and extend the existing
dock approximately fifty feet (50' ) over the restoration area;
2. Provide a landscape design, cost estimate for plants, oversight of planting, and finish
grading at the site; and/or
3. Transport rock from St. George Island to Indian Creek Park, construct a breakwater,
grade site, and implement and maintain erosion control.

Each proposal shall describe the method the contractor will use to complete the project. Quotes
for one, two or three components of the project are acceptable and should be listed separately
from other project components. Project work dependent on adequate funding. Apalachicola
Riverkeeper has the right to waive minor technicalities. Any or all bids may be rejected.

Each such proposal shall be submitted to Dan Tonsmeire at the Office of the Apalachicola
Riverkeeper, 232-B Water Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, no later than 4: 00 p.m. ET on
Friday, May 22, 2009. All proposals shall be sealed and marked on the outside of the envelope
with the statement "Request for Proposals for FRANKLIN COUNTY INDIAN CREEK PARK
SHORELINE RESTORATION PROJECT. Each proposal shall include five copies.

Bid documents shall be available from the Apalachicola Riverkeeper office. Non-refundable
bid documents shall cost $10.00 per set with a two set maximum. A mandatory pre-bid meeting
will be held May 18, 2009, at 10: 00 a.m. ET at Indian Creek Park in Eastpoint.

The proposals shall be opened at the Apalachicola Riverkeeper office on May 26, 2009, at
10: 00 a.m. (ET).

The Apalachicola Riverkeeper reserves the right to reject any or all proposals.


IV


Thursday, MAY 1 d, 2009


AS I The Times


Local


Apalachicola. DSW offered
the land to the county for
$10,000 per acre.
Mosteller said the project
was jointly funded by the
Federal Aviation Authority
(FAA), which provided 95
percent of the grant and
the Federal Department
of transportation (DOT),
which provided the other 5
percent. Because the county
is eligible for economic
development funding, it
was not required to provide
any matching funds for the
purchase, he said. The FAA
also pays for closing costs,
surveys and appraisals.
The asking price was
based on a pair of appraisals
performed by Bell Griffith
and Associate, Inc. of
Tallahassee. OnApril24,2008,
Bell Griffith set the range
of value after adjustment at
between $9,415 to $14,999 per
acre.


The cost of the first
appraisal was $4,500, and
this first appraisal was
reviewed by Ketcham and
Associates, at an additional
cost of $2,200.
"It was a valid appraisal
done by a reputable firm.
It complied with reporting
standards and the uniform
standards of professional
appraisal practice," said
Clay Ketcham, in a telephone
interview.
Ketcham is a certified
member of the Commercial
Investment Real Estate
Institute, a designation
of an advanced level of
understandingofcommercial
real estate held by 6 percent
of the nation's estimated
150,000 commercial real
estate practitioners.
Based on Ketcham's
review, Bell Griffith revised
their appraisal, but the
revisions to the appraisal


did not significantly change
the estimated land value.
The new range of values
after adjustment, given last
month, went from $9,038 to
$12,749 per acre. The cost
of the second appraisal was
$3,800.
Jackel, who attended
the commission meeting
via teleconference from
Nashville, TN, said she
believed the appraisals
did not reflect the current
market value of the land.
Jackel, who owns a title
company, said she was
familiar with the appraisal
process and reviews about
100 appraisals a year.
When Jackel objected
to the purchase, Parrish
asked Mosteller if the DOT
and FAA had approved the
purchase price. Mosteller
said they had.
In a later interview,
Mosteller said he did not


understand the decision.
"At this very moment
the money is in the bank,"
he said. "All we have to do
is write the check. I don't
know the deadline for the
grant but if we don't use it, I
believe it will be lost. I don't
believe the FAA will redo
all of the necessary paper
work."
He said he had discussed
the purchase with Property
Appraiser Doris Pendleton,


who said the price of the
land seemed in line with the
current market.
In a telephone interview,
Pendleton said she isfamiliar
with Ketcham Associates
and considers them to be a
legitimate firm.
"I don't know how much
of the acreage in question
is wetlands, but in today's
market, $10,000 per acre is
not a bad price," she said. "I
just don't understand. Abank


will accept an independent
appraisal."
Mosteller said this
purchase is only Phase I of
the development plan for
the airport. He said in Phase
II an additional 25 acres
of land will be purchased,
but pre-application of land
acquisition of Phase II for
up to $263,000 was been
tabled until the problems
with completing Phase I are
resolved.


CALL JACKIE GOLDEN
FOR MORE INFORMATION I
ON THESE GREAT DEALS!!!


O#850-927-2255
C#850-899-8433


A Full Service Real Estate Company


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a ded cated connection to your home from our h gh-speed Internet network Unfortunately. cable Internet seru ce shares a connection w th other cable modem customers in the ne ghborhood
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Ei g b lty for Ful House packages requ res seru ces to be invo ced on a single bil The bundled pr ce excludes other applicable taxes, fees and surcharges tUnl m ted Long D stance M nutes av
abeon one phone Ine only Long d stance m nutes are for residental vo ce seru ce only and apply to d rect-d a ed calls term nat ng in the Un ted States, its terr tories and Canada H gh-Speed
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Join us Friday,

May 15

for food, fun and get our special
one day "thank you" rate on a Superior CD.*



As a local community bank, our success depends on the support
and trust of the individuals and businesses right here in our own
COmmunities. To all of our neighbors, we want to say thanks by
inviting you and your family to our Community Appreciation Day
on May 15. Join us from 10 to 4 for food, fun and the opportunity
to hear us say in person: Thanks.




Apalachicola I 850-653-9828
Carrabelle / 850-697-5626
$UPE IOR ANK Mexico Beach I 850-648-5060
Local. Friendly. Superior. Panama City I 850-763-8500
Port St. Joe / 850-227-1416


Pii~


*Minimum deposit is $500. Entire balance must remain on deposit to receive interest and APR.
Early withdrawal penalty applies. Subject to approval. www.superiorbank.com I Member FDIC


BUFFER from paoe Al


Ir & C~


COMPANYY



































and landscapes. He is
a member of the Plein
Air Painters of America,


FREE Werllness Agminars!
Saturday mormings from 10:00 to 11:00 a~m.

THE GARoem SHopD
I ~147 Commerce Street, Apalachicola
I Sponsored by Franklin County Health Department and Gardens, Inc.
I Florida Department of Health
I Cut out and keep this ad on your fridge!


| pring Atrirts

May 16th Seaside Planting~s

IMay 23rd Succulent Gardeinglil~
SMay 30th "'Plant Your ~lrleals Cookninge Class

I with Jill Welch, Kitchen G~ocleltss andc
I New Leaf Market's Culinary Db an


For more information contact:
Amanda@gardensinc~net & .
I ~(850) 653-1777
INadine Kahn, PCHD,
I(850) 653-2111 Ext. 123


Thursday, MAY 1 d, 2009


Local


The Times | A6


year began with three con-
secutive months without
a holiday, referring to the
stretch between Tuesday,
Sept. 8, the day after La-
bor Day, until Tuesday, Nov.
24, the Tuesday before the
Thanksgiving holiday.
Hinton questioned stu-
dents being off Monday,
Jan. 18, Martin Luther King
Day; Tuesday, Jan. 19 for a
professional development
day, in which teachers are
in school for in-service
training but students are
off; and Monday, Feb. 15, for
Presidents Day.
"I think we ought to cut
out the other two, and be


more focused on educa-
tion," he said.
Huckeba reminded the
school board that the col-
lective bargaining agree-
ment called for up to 10
days per year set aside for
professional development.
Cathy Wood, representing
the teachers' union, cau-
tioned the school board
against modifying the cal-
endar, and urged them ei-
ther to accept it, or to reject
it and allow the calendar
committee to make the rec-
ommended changes.
"This was not created
in a flight of fancy," said
Wood.


In the revised calen-
dar approved Tuesday, no
changes were made to any
of the original vacation
days or professional devel-
opment days.
Hinton also reiterated
his longstanding opposi-
tion to having the end-of-
the-year vacation referred
to as "Winter Break," and
the one in the springtime
as "Spring Break." He said
he preferred having the for-
mer referred to as "Christ-
mas Holiday," and the one
at the end of the March as
"Easter Holiday."
In the calendar present-
ed for approval Tuesday,


the changes regarding the
name for the two week-long
breaks had not been made
but Hinton again insisted
they be changed.
"If people are worried
about us being politically
correct, we're going to
have to stop praying before
school board meetings," he
said, noting that he knew
of no court cases challeng-
ing the religious terminol-
ogy for winter and spring
breaks.
The Christmas and
Easter terminology was
restored to the calendar
after Thompson, who had
seconded Martin's motion,


quietly gave his assent,
without further comment.
Reacting to the board's
initial vote, school em-
ployee Dolores Hayward-
Croom spoke out, asking
whether the board intend-
ed to have students attend
on the Martin Luther King
Day holiday.
"If it is the Martin Luther
King holiday, you'll have a
mighty lot of students who
won't come anyway," she
said.
On Tuesday, Superin-
tendent Nina Marks re-
minded the board that on
Jan. 7. 2008, the board had
approved adding Martin


Luther King Day as a vaca-
tion day, in keeping with its
status as a federal holiday.
The newly approved cal-
endar will have students in
school for the state mini-
mum of 180 days, with four
nine-week divisions: Aug.
24 to Oct. 23 (44 days); Oct.
27 to Jan. 15 (46 days; Jan.
20 to March 26 (47 days);
and April 6 to June 4 (43
days) .
Florida Writes statewide
testing will be held Feb. 8
to 11, with the reading and
writing FCATs on March 9
to 12, with make-ups from
March 15 to 19.


WELCOME from page Al

Braves and Prince Doha of Demers, of Elliot Maine
Qatar. focuses his painting
Guest judge Donald on maritime subjects


the Guild of Boston
Artists and a Fellow of
the American Society of
women's Artists.
This year's paintout
is aiming for even more
diversity. Carrabelle
welcomed artists
Gene Costanza, Frank
Bruckman and Robert
Simone to the new
Lighthouse Keepers
House at the Crooked
River Lighthouse on
Monday. They spent the
afternoon painting the
newly restored lighthouse
and then were entertained
with a reception in the
evening. All of the visitors
got a chance to climb the
lighthouse.
Carrabelle artist Penny
Anderson was on hand
with five boys and girls
from the Boys and Girls
Club giving them a taste
of open air art. Adriana
Jenkins, Tylor Millender,
Jill Diestelhorst, Marcus
Lattimore and "DJ"
Dakota James Turner,
all of Carrabelle, had
their own plein air
exhibit during the
reception complete with
biographies.
On Tuesday in Maddox


Horse Lininlent
Erae P *
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tion in racehorse's legs, is now
back on the market in its original
doctor re inmendeda 1 rmug
store survey, the formula at one
time became so popular that it rose
to the top of pharmacy sales for
topical pain rehievers. But the com-
pany marketing the product at the
time changed the formula and sales
plummeted. One of the inventors
of the originalefonrmulathas reorugh
trade name ARTH ARREST and
says it can relieve pain for millions.
ARTH ARREST works by a
dual mechanism whereby one in-
gredient relieves pain immediately,
while a second ingredient seeks out
andn dtos the a n mesteon r
brain. Considered a medical
miracle by some, the ARTH AR-
REST formula is useful in the
treatment of painful disorders rang-
ing from mmor aches and pains to
more serious conditions such as ar-
thritis, bursitis, rheumatism, ten-
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ARTH ARREST is available in
a convenient roll-on applicator at
pharmacies without a prescription
or call 1-800-339-3301. Now at:
BUY RITE DRUGS #8
117 Avenue E. 653-8825


Park in Port St. Joe,
several students from the
county were among those
who worked with artists
during Plein Air student
art day.
Local students
participating alongside
Gulf County youth
included Joy Carrino,
Brandi Benton, Andre
McQueen, Brandon Hand
and Tevin Ray, all from
the Franklin County
consolidated school; and
Malachi Parker, Gracyn
Kirvin, Kristina Boyd and
Jessica Shields, from the
Apalachicola Bay Charter
School.
Coordinated by the
Forgotten Coast Cultural
Coalition, the "Great Plein
Air Paint Out" features
nationally-recognized
talent as well as some
homegrown ability in a
series of events that spans
from Mexico Beach to
Alligator Point in Franklin
County.
"The crime de la
crime of artists will
be painting along the
Forgotten Coast and
our local residents and
visitors will get the first
chance to purchase these
paintings that capture
and preserve what we all
love about this area," said
event founder Richard
Carrell.
Plein air comes from
the French term "en plein
air" which translates
to "in the open air."
Essentially, artists work
in a host of mediums
to capture a scene in
the moment, as the
surrounding environment
dictates.
Local and regional
artists competed for the
top prize in Saturday's
first-ever Quickdraw
event, held in Port St. Joe
and jded by Demurs.
The Quickdraw is a timed
tw 1-homr en ptlein airo
anyone over the age of
14 who has their own art
supplies and easels. Paul
Lanier, of Jacksonville,
took the prize for his
painting of a palm shaded
stairway.
Art historian Mallory
O'Connor, Faith Eidse,
author of "Voices of the
Apalachicola" and Mitch


Kolbe, one of the visiting
plein air artists, will
hold a panel discussion
on "Art as a Window on
Local Florida Heritage"
on Friday, May 15, from
2 to 4 p.m., at the Cotton
Warehouse at the corner
of Avenue E and Water
Street in Apalachicola.
F~mded by a grant from
the Florida Humanities
Council, the discussion
will explore historic and
contemporary connections
between the artist and the
milieu in which he paints,
how his work protects
the unique relationship
between environment
and working traditions
and how work refines our
perceptions of the world in
which we live.
The event is free and
open to the public.
Painting from the
paintout will be on display
at three venues during the
event.
From 11 a.m. until 5
p.m., daily though Sunday,
the Wetroom Exhibit
will be in the Cotton
Warehouse. Art will be on
display and available for
purchase.
From noon to 5 p.m.
daily through Saturday,
visitors can come by Town
Hall at WindMark Village
Center where art will be
on display and available
for purchase.
The St. Joe Collection,
a plein air exhibition, will
occur daily from noon to
5 p.m. through Saturday at
SummerCamp at the east
end of the county.
There will also be free
artist demonstrations and
receptions throughout the
10-day event.
The Great Plein Air
Paintout will conclude
with Art in the Afternoon
from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m.
on Sunday in Riverfront
Park in Apalachicola. This
wil le aa famih-oerieenetnd
and there will be painting
and music. The event will
be art lovers' last chance
to purchase a painting
from this year's event.
For more information
on the events surrounding
the Great Plein Air
Paintout call 800-378-8419
or visit www.pleinairfl.
com.


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So that wve mlay spend the lMemlorial Day*
H-oliday with our family & friends we will
be having early deadlines for all advertising
placed in. The Star & The Times I
Early Deadlines for: Thursday, May 28, 2000

Ad with Proof: Wednesday, May 20, 2009 -

1Ad without Droof: Thursday, May 21, 2000

ClaSSiiel~ Iine Ad: Fridlal, May 22, 2000 NOON CT
We will not accept any late ads for the May 28, 2007 Edition.


Please call with asy questions: (


T Sta 22 -2 8ThM The TI0e Gr 0 "I 8




"" STARTHE


CALEN DAR from pageAl
















Thursday, Mayl14, 2009 w ww. a pala ch t i me s. com Page 7


i


Recorded weights for Bash on the Beach


Steps to overcoming hee pam


APALACHIme
STAT E BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Commnunity Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint ISt. George Isln
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 1200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
There are always lots of
people showing skin on the
beach on beautiful St. George
Island.
But on April 18 skin
stretched over bulging mus-
cles when the Blue Parrot
hosted the second annual
USA Southern Bench Press
and Dead Lift Championship
also known as Bash on the
Beach.
A crowd of several hun-
dred onlookers were awed by
the strength and stamina of
over 30 power lifters. It was a
day of metal music and may-
hem with competitors from
Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana
and Texas as well as Florida.
Competing for the home
team were Tim Whitehead'
of Eastpoint; Megan Lamb,
of St. George Island; Carlos
Castillo, 'lkavis Stanley, Kathy
Castner and David Driver,
all of Apalachicola; Marcus
and Darius May, of Carra-
belle; and Doug Sloan, Alfr~ed
Cutchin and Andrew Gaza-
pian, all of Wewahitchka.
Whitehead, who holds a
bench-press record for the
Florida Police Olympics
with a 435-pound lift, bench-
pressed 500 pounds at the
tournament, breaking his
personal best by 70 pounds.
There were lifters on hand
from 4 to 74 years of age.
The big lift for the day was
an exhibition performance by
organizer George Herring,
owner of Bodies by George in
Lawrenceville, GAwho dead


lifted 700 pounds.
Whitehead, manager of
the Apalachicola Fitness
Center, trains local lifters for
the event. He said weightlift-
ing is a sport for people of
any size or age and encour-
aged anybody interested in
learning about power lifting
or competing next year tO
co' t me 6o sa tning
for next year.


PhotOS Bly LOlb )WUUUOUA
bench-presses 350 pounds as Tim Whitehead and guest official Sandra Herring


Darius May, of Carrabelle,
look on.


LEFT: Megan Lamb, of
Apalachicola, prepares
for her 1 10-pound lift.

RIGHT: Matt Christy,
of Georgia, dead lifts
635 pounds to win the
men's open category.
Notice the bend in the
bar.


The following
are the
best lifts,
measured
in pounds,
by each of
the Bash on
the Beach's
participants:


David Driver 225

Sub-Master Men
Ken Smith 525

Master Men
Tim Green 300
Travis Stanley 340
Pete Lindrom 315
Darius May 350


Tim Whitehead 500
Billy Graham 405
Chris Minix 525
Doug Sloan 500
Marcus May 325
Alfred Cutchin 455

Open Men
David Driver 225
Carlos Castillo 240


Brian Fisher 455
Ken Smith 242
Ken Milllrainy 242


Megan Lamb 205

Super Teen
Morgan Herring 325


Master Men
Doug Sloan 500
Tim Green 465

Open Men
Matt christy 635

Exhibition
George Herring did a
700-pound dead lift.


Bench PreSS
Master Women
Kathy Castner 105

Open Women
Megan Lamb110

Jr. Men
Carlos Castillo 240


Dead Lift Junior Men
Master Women Andrew Gazapian 530


Kathy Caster 150

Open Women


Submaster Men
Ken Smith 500


The American Podiat-
ric Medical Association
wants everyone to think
feet especially during
the spring!
April was "Foot Health
Awareness Month," and
it's vital to remember the
importance of good foot
and ankle care. This is a
time for all Americans to
stop and take a good look
at their feet.
This year's campaign
focuses on heel pain, and
a podiatrist's important
role in diagnosing and
treating this widespread
condition. Did you know
that nearly 40 percent of
Americans revealed foot
pain has inhibited them
from performing life's
daily activities? Foot pain
is never normal. If you
experience foot pain, see
an APMA pediatric physi-
cian,
Are your heels hurt-
ing? The statistics say
there is a good chance.
According to a recent sur-
vey from the American
Pediatric Medical Asso-
ciation (APMA), heel pain
is the foot ailment that
affects Americans most;
16 percent of the popula-
tion regularly experienc-
es it.
When you pound your
feet on hard surfaces
while playing sports, or
wear shoes that irritate
sensitive tissues, you can
develop heel pain. Many


people try to ignore the
early signs of heel pain
and keep performing the
activities that are caus-
ing the problem. But
when you continue to use
a sore heel, it can quickly
get worse and become a
chronic condition, leading
to more problems.
While it is a common
misconception that heel
spurs are to blame, the
most frequent cause of
heel pain is plantar fas-
ciitis. With this condi-
tion, too much running
or jumping can lead to in-
flammation of the tissue
band (fascia) connecting
the heel bone to the base
of the toes.
The pain is generally
centered under the heel
and may be mild at first,
but tends to flare up when
you take your first steps
after getting up in the
morning, or resting for
a period of time. Plantar
fasciitis is often success-
fully treated with custom
orthotics, injections, pre-
scription medications,
physical therapy and im-
mobilization,
However, the longer
you have untreated pain,
the more difficult it is to
find relief.
There are other causes
of heel pain, however.
Other possible causes
can include:
*Achilles Tendinitis.
This condition is often


caused by tight calf mus-
cles, bone spurs, age, in-
jury and primary tendon-
itis.
If left untreated,
this can also develop
into tendon rupturing and
a more chronic problem
called tendonosis, which
involves adhesions and
scar tissue formation.
*Fat Pad Thinning.
Age, obesity and walk-
ing on hard surfaces can
all cause fat pad thin-
ning, which occurs on the
fleshy ball of the heel of
the foot. Treatments for
the condition may include
soft insoles and soft-soled
shoes prescribed by a po-
diatrist.
"Heel pain is generally
the result of faulty bio-
mechanics that place too
much stress on the heel
bone and the soft tissues
that attach to it," said
Dr. Ronald D. Jensen,
APMA president. "If pain
and other symptoms of
inflammation--redne ss,
swelling, heat--persist,
you should limit normal
daily activities and con-
tact a pediatric physician
immediately."
To avoid heel pain, al-
ways wear shoes that fit
well and wear the proper
shoes for each activity,
not wearing shoes with
excessive or unevenly
worn heels or soles, and
stretch the heel well be-
fore exercising. Fortu-


nately, if detected early,
heel pain can be success-
fully treated with several
noninvasive treatment
options.
To learn more, visit
www.apma.org/heelpain
or call Dr. Tamara Marsh
at 653-FEET.


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A
Section


Heavy







Lifting



30 Power lifters show off

at Bash on the Beach


2009 Seahawks Football Schedule

Aug. 28: at Jefferson County 8 p.m.


Sept. 18: at Rocky Bayou 8 p.m.
Sept. 25: BYE WEEK
Oct. 2: John Paul II 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 9* at Port St. Joe 8 p.m.
Oct. 16: at Wewahitchka 8 p.m.
Oct. 23: Liberty County 8 p.m.
Oct. 30: Blountstown 8 p.m.
Nov. 6: at West Gadsden 8 p.m.
Nov. 13 : at Holmes County 8 p.m.
District games in bold.









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East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
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SOLU NAR
m = Minor M = Major add 1 hour for daylight savings
Date Day AM PM Rise/Set Moon
05/14 Thu m 8:55 m 9:25 5:08AM O
M 2:45 M 3:10 6:45PM
05/15 Fri m 9:45 m 10:15 5:07AM
M 3:35 M 4:00 6:46PM
05/16 Sat m 10:35 m 11:00 5:07AM
M 4:25 M 4:45 6:46PM
05/17 Sun m 11:20 m 11:45 5:06AM
M 5:10 M 5:30 6:47PM
05/18 Mon m m 12:05 5:06AM
M 5:50 M 6:10 6:48PM
05/19 Tue m 12:25 m 12:35 5:05AM g
M 6:25 M 6:45 6:48PM
05/20 Wed m 1:00 m 1:15 5:04AM
M 7:05 M 7:30 6:49PM


:~I~:


Thursday, MAY 1 d, 2009


Local


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Franklin County Principal
George Oehlert could never be in
the National Honor Society when
he was a boy growing up in St.
Louis.
His youthf ul escapades led to
his breaking too many rules, so
many in fact that he was expelled
from school. .
In time he would work his way
back to earn a high school educa-
tion and later a college diploma,
but the immediate impact of that
expulsion meant he was denied
the pride that comes with being
inducted into one of the nation's
oldest organizations for the high
school elite.
"I was a punk. There's no get-
ting around it," he said. "Without
the opportunity to go to college,
there's no telling where I'd be to-
day."
So, it was with a mix of jealousy
and joy that Oehlert, with a tear in
his eye, welcomed the many par-
ents who filled the high school's


cafetorium April 16 for the annual
induction ceremony.
"These are academic All-Stars
and we can be as proud of them
as we are of our athletes," said
Oehlert, after sharing his story of
his high school years. "These are
special students and we are proud
of each one of them."
Desiree Trest, the sergeant-at-
arms of the honor society, opened
the program by leading everyone
in the Pledge of Allegiance and the
invocation.
Angie Ochala, president of the
honor society, then offered a brief
history of the National Honor Soci-
ety, after lighting a candle.
The other officers then each
took their turn reciting one of the
key selection criteria of the honor
society, and lighting a candle.
Secretary Tricia Golden spoke on
scholarship, Vice President Alana
Hutchins on leadership, Treasurer
Derek Salyer on service and Ocha-
la on character. Historian Joy Car-
rino also spoke on citizenship.
Ochala led the introduction of
the new inductees and Hutchins


administered the pledge. New
inductees included five seniors,
Jami Giametta, Andre McQueen,
Paige Moses, Tevin Ray and Chel-
sea Soderholm; and junior Damien
Davis.
New inductees also included 17
sophomores, Dale Butler, Tiffany
Carroll, Drue Chisholm, Breanna
Cook, Jessica Galloway, Jimmy
Goggins, Morgan Golden, Lakota
Humble, Brandon Jones, Dalin
Modican, Ashley Moseley, Isabel
Pateritsas, D'Andre Robinson,
Hannah Schooley, Shelby Shiver,
Michael Turner and James Win-
field.
The inductees joined the 24
society members, who include se-
niors Miranda Banks, Brandi Ben-
ton, Erica Davis, Tomilee Dowden,
Charles Goggins, Sarah Hadsock,
Parrish Johnson, Cody K~link, Zach
Ward, Cheree Whiddon, Whitley
Wilson, Ochala, Golden, Hutchins,
Salyer and Trest; and juniors Katie
Brannon, Kyndall Hardy, Cecillia
James, Heather Kemper, Shelby
Nowling, Natalie Shiver, Russell
Simmons and Carrino.


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Ser iorsa ,ndPited lst month intedtrheMNcaticma Hono ro ciety inceudd d fro left, Chelsea Soderholm,


Date
Thu, May 14
Fri, May 15
Sat, May 16
Sun, May 17
Mon, May 18
Tue, May l9
Wed, May 20


High
830
820
830
820
830
820
820


Low
730
730
730
710


% Precip
30%
30%
30%
40%
60 %
60 %
0%


National Honor Society Treasurer
Derek Salyer lights a candle in
honor of service, a key criterion
for being selected a member of
the society.


Sophomore Michael Turner Sophomore Jessica Ga loway
is newly inducted into the is newly inducted into the
National Honor Society. National Honor Society.


05/14 Thu 02:09AM
01:54PM
05/15 Fri 02:50AM
03:09PM
05/16 Sat 03:34AM
04:33PM
05/17 Sun 0:0AMM

05/18 Mon 05:07AM
06:54PM
05/19 Tue 12:05AM
12:19PM
05/20 Wed 01:51AM
12:42PM


09:53AM
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08:48PM
1:3 AMM
11:56AM

05:56AM
07:46PM
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08:32PM


OU WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS!
TABLES WEDDING ARCHES
CHAIRS CANDELABRAS


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05/14 Thu 08:28AM
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05/16 Sat 01:21AM
02:20PM
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05/18 Mon 02:54AM
04:41PM
05/19 Tue 03:43AM
05:33PM
05/20 Wed 12:26AM
11:17AM


11:41AM

09:03AM
06:10PM
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106 Trade Circle


.:i l Port St Joe, FL~et ut
f4 S ~1Phone:
227-1411



7. C .-. C


A8 | The Times


NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY INDUCTS 23


LET US H


HIHCHAIRS

TNNNRWRE
















Thursday, Mayl14, 2009 www. apalachtimes. com Page l


''~".v ep ,w r s~,e- ha
.. ooderw'e Decay
severe Dcv

Dietician Merlinda Borgersen, a senior public health nutritionist
with the Leon County Health Department, sits behind a display
showing the progression of baby bottle tooth decay.
classes," Pugh said. "If they're in and dads love that," she said. "We
the home, we ask them to sched- try to pull them in. They're not
ule it when the dad will be there. excluded. It's their choice what
"We listen to baby's heartbeat, they want to do."


Luncheon raises awareness of sexual assault


B
Section


rows


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Expectant mothers from
across the county got plenty of
gifts from the county health de-
partment Thursday at the annual
baby shower.
First they got a wealth of
knowledge they could use to en-
sure their newborns would be
healthy and well-cared-for.
Then they got an abundance
of tools to help them keep their
babies well-fed, active and edu-
cated.
About 16 moms showed up for
the morning shower at Apalachic-
ola's City Hall in Battery Park,
part of an outreach conducted
by Healthy Start, coordinated by
Kayla Barber, R.N.
First came education, which
covered topics such as childbirth,
breast-feeding, car seat safety,
bathing, diapering, swaddling
and safe sleep.
David Walker, who directs
the anti-tobacco outreach at the
health department, spoke on the
dangers of smoking while preg-
nant, complete with images of
blackened lungs.
In a later interview, Alma
Pugh, who works for the Healthy
Families program, said cigarette
addiction is one of the most dif-
ficult challenges the health de-
partment faces in working with
pregnant moms.
"With cigarettes, it's very hard
to discourage them," she said.
"We give them a lot of informa-
tion on the effect of drugs. We
bombard them with information,
and we can refer them for help.
We do all of that."
Pugh said one factor in help-
ing moms avoid drugs during
pregnancy is that they are made
aware the Florida Department
of Children and Families has a
drug-testing program that could
subject the mom to sanctions by
the agency.
"Our biggest problem is re-


Right now, moms can go to
Gulf County and visit the ob-
stetrics clinic held there twice a
month, and which will soon have
ultrasound.
"Right now you have to go to
Panama City," Barber said.
Women in Carrabelle and La-
nark Village can go to Tallahas-
see, and transportation can be
provided.
After lunch, courtesy of the
Philaco Women's Club, served by
Debbie Colvert and Anne Sicu-
liano, Barber got the young wom-
en involved in a spirited game
of Baby Bingo, where they
learned info on pregnancy, and
Name That Baby Tune, where
they won prizes for knowing
songs like "This Old Man" and
Other favorites.
The highlight for many of the
Women came with the raffling of
door prizes, with everyone get-
ting at least two prizes. These
included portable playgrounds,
Snuglis, high chairs, a book
on "What to Expect the First
Year," a Happy Giraffe bouncer,
a Merry Monkey gym and breast
pumps.
Each woman received a $35
gift certificate to the IGA, which
specifically excluded alcohol or
cigarettes, and a carnation for
Mother's Day.
In addition to county health
department programs that in-
clude WIC, tobacco prevention,
and Head Start, community part-
ners for the event included Sea-
horse Florist, Franklin County
Literacy. March of Dimes, Com-
munity Action, Oyster Radio,
The Times, Rotary Club and
Philaco.
Healthy Start focuses on such
topics as mom care, childbirth
education, smoking cessation,
bereavement counseling, breast
feeding education and parent
and child development educa-
tion,
For more information, call the
health department at 653-2111.


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Moms-to-be attending the Healthy Start baby shower last week are, from left, Avie Porter
(Apalachicola), Becky Padowitz (Carrabelle), Ciera Carlson (Carrabelle), Samantha Creamer
(Eastpoint), Jacqueline Hefner (Eastpoint), Ann Richards (Apalachicola). Angela Hill Polous
(Eastpoint), April Banks Russell (Eastpoint), Kayla Moore (Eastpoint), Ashley Creamer
(Apalachicola), Samantha Gilbert (Eastpoint) and Bobbie Jean Taylor (Apalachicola).


peat teen pregnancies," Barber
said, with teens ranging in age
from 13 to 19.
The program also uses educa-
tion to help moms avoid pre-term
babies, which are under 3 7 weeks,
with full term at 40 weeks.
Barber said that with four out
of five expectant moms at the
health department willing to con-
sent to involvement with Healthy
Families, the county is at the
state standard.
"They have an idea about
pregnancy, but they have a lot to
learn, that's for sure," she said.
Teens who are married, with a
father fully involved in their preg-
nancy, are not the typical situa-
tion, she said. "We have a lot of
engaged people," Barber said.
Those young men who take re-
sponsibility for the life they have
created are offered opportunities
to learn alongside their partners.
"We invite them to childbirth


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
On April 30, Linda Gibson, di-
rector of Franklin County's Ref-
uge House of North Florida host-
ed a luncheon to raise awareness
about sexual assault.
About 30 men and women
from many different parts of the
community were present.
Describing sexual assault as
"a societal illness that if left un-
treated, it grows, it harms, and
sometimes it even kills (and) is
protected by a veil of silence,"
Gibson said one in six women
and one in 33 men are assaulted
at some point in their lives.
There is a sexual assault every
two minutes in the U.S., but 60
percent go unreported, she said.
The good news, though, is that
reports have increased by 33 per-
cent since 1993, so the veil of si-
lence is beginning to lift.

Childhood abuse
Fifteen percent of assault vic-
tims are under the age of 12, and
95 percent of these children know
their attacker.
Local author Dawn Radford
gave a moving account of her
own battle with memories of
childhood abuse. She said her
creativity, and gradual ability to
reach out with her story, eventu-
ally saved her.
"Healing begins when finger-
tips touch," she said.
Wanda Teat, guidance coun-
selor at the Franklin County
Elementary School, discussed
the prevalence of sexual abuse
among local children. Alma Pugh,
Healthy Families program coordi-
nator, spoke on the role of family


of self; lack of self-worth; guilt;
anxiety attacks and poor judg-
ment concerning relationships .
Teat said what amazed her
most is that ongoing abuse can
actually impede a child's learn-
ing process
Sphe said abused youngsters
live in a world of fear. They fear
not only abuse, but the loss of a
parent they still love
"The most important thing is
to let them know there is help ,,
Teat said. "Let the child know
that it's not their fault and that
their parents can still love them
but make bad choices,,
Pugh said her program is a
prevention agency that monitors
children from the womb to adult-
hood. She spoke in defense of
men who might not understand
the harm of their actions
"Fathers sometimes get the
short end of the stick," she said.
"They only do what they have
been taught. Sometimes they
don't know any better.

Getting througil
Apostle Shirley White, over-
seer of the Love and Worship
Church, outlined her role as a
Christian counselor, describing
how abuse both oppresses and
suppresses the spirit.
Another woman agreed.
"I only got my healing through
the word of God," she said. "I was
raped, and I never told anybody
but a small group of women at
the church where I went to. I ney-
er heard it again, except when we
spoke among ourselves."

Victim services
Deborah Lloyd, regional di-


rector for Refuge House; Clarice
Powell, victim advocate with the
sheriff's office; and Amy Sapp,
who works in the Weems Memo-
rial Hospital emergency room,
concluded the program with pre-
sentations regarding advocacy
on behalf of assault victims and
the need for improving services
available locally.
Powell, who is on call around
the clock, said she has seen an
increase in the number of sexual
assaults on children, not only by
adults, but child-on-child attacks.
"The hospital does the best we
can, but we need a program more
like the one in Tallahassee," Sapp
said. "We need a separate unit for
women to go to where they feel
more private.
Lloyd described Tallahassee's
Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner
program (SANE), which employs
certified forensic nurses who can
streamline the process of exam-
ining victims of assault.
Victims of an attack should not
shower, change clothes, eat or
drink before they are examined,
she said. When they enter an
emergency room, they generally
have to wait, and the examina-
tion itself can be prolonged if the
examiner is inexperienced in the
proper procedures. Waiting com-
pounds the feelings of an already
distraught victim, and the exami-
nation is somewhat intrusive.
"You don't want to traipse
these women through the ER.
Don't want to call in the report
over a radio that's mounted on


a wall in the hallway," Sapp said.
"We need to be able to take them
right into triage and call in a fo-
rensic nurse immediately."
She emphasized that every
victim should be examined, even
if they do not wish to press charg-
es immediately. Refuge House
advises them of their rights and
encourages every woman to be
examined and allow specimens
to be taken and stored.
"Sometimes, they'll start to
think about it a week later and
get angry, even though at first
they may not want to report the
attacker," Sapp said.
She also said that rape victims
are frequently stalked by the at-
tacker afterward and might need
protection.
Forensic interviews with mo-
lested children are of the utmost
importance, as they may save
the child from having to testify in
court later on.
Another important aspect of
follow-up in assault cases is an
examination for pregnancy and
sexually transmitted disease.
"The good news is that we're
starting to get more counselors
here now, which is so important,"
said Sapp.
Refuge House provides direct
services to battered women, their
children and sexual assault sur-
vivors and works to eliminate the
conditions in society that allow
such violence to continue. While
in shelter, residents participate
in counseling, support groups
and case management.


LOIS 5WOBODA
Linda M. Gibson, director
of Refuge House, hosted a
meeting to raise awareness
about sexual violence.

counseling in preventing abuse.
Teat said she is frequently
aware of abuse and is often con-
tacted by children seeking help.
Bullying is a warning sign, she
said.
"A child who is being hurt at
home, usually they're going to
come to school and hurt others,"
Teat said.
Other signs of past or cur-
rent childhood abuse can include
obsessive behavior in hygiene,
spending, work or religion; ex-
cessive need for stability; exces-
sive drive for perfection; eating
disorders; unconscious hostility
toward men; lack of trust; poor
sense of social boundaries; pro-
miscuity; depression; recurring
nightmares; fear of the dark; ide-
alization of the father; over-nur-
turing of others; under-nurturing


LIFE


TI~ES


OO~;VM


BAB


Healthy Start th


hower for expectant moms


NEED HELP?
If -,:::I.I rs.:.::: ::- 5 :::n..kr.:::. .. e s ep.:.r asfeb se c l
65 2:-]: 1 : 2: ::r S :.5 n: Il

















































































"%'-


rPET OFETEHKE


retriever and hound mix, arrived at the
Adoption Center a month ago. He is a
sweet, playful puppy waiting patiently
for a loving home.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more
details or visit the Franklin County
Humane Society at 244 State Route
65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the
website at www.forgottenpets .org to see
more of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend
for life, you not only save the life of that
pet, you make room for us to save the life
of one more abandoned dog or cat!


Thursday, MAY 1 d, 2009


B2 | The Times


Local


On Saturday, May 16
from 1 to 3 p.m., Down-
town Books, at 67 Com-
merce Street in Apala-
chicola, will host local
author Willoughby Mar-
shall, whose "Apalachic-
ola: Economic Develop-
ment through Historic WILLO
Preservation" has been MARS
republished as a 35th an-
niversary edition.
Maps and charts add to the
text which was the architect-
author's studied vision in 1974
of what the built environment of
Apalachicola could become.
In this edition's foreword,
Marshall wrote that he hopes
the reissuance "will assist in the
continuing education of involved
local citizens and public officials
so that the existing public-private
stewardship of Apalachicola will
continue to evolve in a positive
way."


Following graduation
from Chapman High
School and service in the
U.S. Army during World
War II, Marshall attended
the University of Notre
Dame, graduating with a
bachelor's of fine arts and
UGHBY two years later a bache-
HALL lor's of architecture.
As a young architect
he and the late Pierce Barrett
formed the firm of Barrett and
Marshall in Tallahassee. Mar-
shall was active in the Chamber
of Commerce, leading the Eco-
nomic Development Committee
to consider the building of the
Civic Center by inviting inter-
nationally-known architects to
come and talk with city leaders.
Among their projects, the firm
designed Sacred Heart Church
in Lanark Village, and the resi-
dence of Carl Zerbe, a Bauhaus
painter who was a member of


Florida State University's art de-
partment through the 1960's.
The Barrett firm became Bar-
rett, Daffin and Bishop when Mar-
shall journeyed to Cambridge,
MA to work with Walter Gropius
at The Architects Collaborative
before starting his own firm, Ar-
chitect Willoughby Marshall Inc.
in 1963.
In addition to the award-win-
ning study on Apalachicola,
Marshall in 1977 received an
AIA National Honor Award for
the renovation and restoration
of the New Mellery Trappist Ab-
bey in Dubuque, Iowa. His work
in Maine, including St. Peter's
Church on Mt. Desert Island and
the Newman Center in Orono,
was cited in the 1976 "Maine
Forms of American Architec-
ture," a Bates College exhibi-
tion and publication. His work
includes numerous public and
private projects.


Since returning home in 1988
to reside in the 1834 family home,
residence for the Marks and Mar-
shall families since 1900, he has
been an advocate for the town's
preservation of the built and nat-
ural environment.
In 1992, using funding from
the Florida Recreation Develop-
ment and Assistance Program
as well as a legislative grant and
funding from the Alfred I. Dupont
Foundation, Marshall designed
Apalachicola's Lafayette Park, in-
cluding the elegant gazebo which
often functions as a wedding site.
The restoration was based on the
park's design in the original 1835
city plan.
In 2007 he completed the
adaptive reuse of the Fry Conter
house at 96 Fifth Street which
now functions as the Apalachico-
la Museum of Art. This work was
made possible by funding from
the Florida Secretary of State,


Division of Historic Resources,
and the State Historic Advisory
Council as well as funding from
the Dupont Foundation and the
Trust for Public Land.
In 2008, the museum received
an award from the Florida Trust
for Historic Preservation in the
field of adaptive use, in recogni-
tion of preserving a significant
piece of the state's rich heritage.
Art and architecture continu-
ally give back, so the gifts con-
tinue to demand exercise of the
mind and spirit. Marshall contin-
ues to practice, and he and his
wife, Marie, enjoy frequent visits
from and to their family, especial-
ly their four children: Dr. William
Marshall, of Boston; Mary and
John Marshall, attorneys in Bos-
ton and New Orleans, respective-
ly; James Marshall, a teacher in
the International School in Bang-
kok, Thailand as well as their four
grandchildren.


I

i


In honor of National
Women's Health Week, the
Franklin County Health
Department recognizes
Elaine Kozlowsky,
a retired teacher
who co-founded
Franklin Needs
Inc. Breast Can-
cer Advocates.
Two years ago,
a group of women h
in the Panhandle ELI
Players theatrical KOZL(
group were dis-
cussing breast cancer at a
post-theater party. Many
of the women had recently
seen the movie "Calendar
Girls" and thought that
creating their own calen-
dar would be a great way to
build a breast cancer fund
for local residents.
Kozlowsky took the dis-
cussion to heart and orga-
nized a group of women to
pose in the 2009 Franklin
Needs Inc. calendar. She
and fellow members of
Franklin Needs sold the
calendars at every pos-
sible local event and have
now raised $44,000 to fund
a Franklin County Breast
Cancer Early Detection
Program.


Franklin Needs Inc. is
working with local health
partners to provide access
to mammograms for coun-
ty women between
the ages of 35 and
49 that meet cer-
tain requirements.
The annual Na-
tional Women's
Health Week, which
- began on Mother's
AINIE Day, May 10, em-
OWSKY powers women to
make their health a
top priority. With the theme
"It's Your Time," the na-
tionwide initiative encour-
ages women to take time
for themselves for a longer,
healthier and happier life.
For more information
about National Women's
Health Week or National
Women's Check-Up Day,
visit the U.S. Department
of Health and Human Ser-
vices, Office on Women's
Health Web site at www.
womenshealth.gov
DOH promotes, protects
and improves the health of
all people in Florida. For
more information about the
Franklin CHD, visit www.
doh. state .fl.us/chdFranklin/
index.html.


Ryan and Nicole
Sandoval are proud to
announce the birth of
their son, Jeffrey "Ryan"
Sandoval, Jr. on Friday,
Feb. 20, 2009 at Gulf Coast
Medical Center.
He weighed 8 lbs. 15
ozs. and was 20%/ inches.
Maternal grandparents
are Helen and Randy
Cook, of Apalachicola.


Paternal grandparents are
Gwen and Doug Creamer,
of Eastpoint.
Maternal great-
grandparents are Sue
and Hampton Smith, and
Eloise and Curtis Cook,
of Apalachicola. Paternal
great-grandparents are
Irene and Mike Pridgeon, of
Sumatra, and the late Mary
Creamer, of Eastpoint.


Raevyn Trai-Joie White
Jefferson graduated cum
laude with her master's in
business administration
from Florida A&M
University School of
Business and Industry on
Sunday, May 3.
Raevyn was dual
enrolled as an early
admission freshman at
FAMU and senior at Port
St. Joe High School in
2004-2005. Graduating
from high school with
high honors, she received
Florida's Bright Thtures
Scholarship along with
numerous other schools
and community related
scholarships and financial
awards.
A member of the
National Honor Society
in high school, Raevyn,
21, went on to be inducted
into the White and Gold
Honor Society at FAMU
and awarded Presidential
Scholarships as well as
a School of Business
Scholarship and graduate
assistantship for her high
academic excellence,
which consistently placed


her on the dean's list.
Raevyn plans now
include relocating to
Atlanta, where she will
work for Accenture, a
global management
consulting, technology
services and outsourcing
company. She also intends
to stay in the will of God
by eventually starting her
own ministry/business,
a studio of dance
and development for
underprivileged girls.
Raevyn wishes to thank
God and everyone (too
numerous to name) He
allowed to support her in
any and every way during
her college experience.
Special thanks to her mom,
Temolynn Wintons, (and
Big and Lil' Bobby); her
Granny, Shirley White;
Pastors Sheila "Auntie
La La" and Leonard
"Uncle Tony" Martin;
her granddaddy, Dennis
Jefferson, of Tallahassee;
Uncle John and Aunt
Betty Croom and Willie
and Ella Speed for all
their prayers, support and
encouragement.


Kevin and Alanna
Lolley are proud to
announce the birth of their
son, Colton Lee.
He was born Thursday,
March 26, 2009 and
weighed 9 lbs. 6 ozs. and


was 22 %/ inches long.
He was welcomed by
his grandparents, George
and Annette Martina, Sybil
Lolley and Jerry and Gail
Lolley, and many aunts,
uncles, and cousins.


Help Suzy find a home
This is Suzy, a 2-year-old beagle
currently in the care of Franklin County
ElderCare Services. Her owners have
both gone into a retirement home and
cannot take Suzy with them. Bert Ivey
of ElderCare says Suzy is very loving,
spayed and is current on her shots. All
se n ds is a goo home. If yu can


MISSING: Izzy the dog went missing on Mother's Day around
2:30 p.m. from 59 24th Avenue in Apalachicola. If you've
found her, please call Glenda at 323-0307. There is a reward.


Downtown Books to host architect, author


IHometown Health


Hero' recognized

Kozlowsky spearheaded fundraising project
to help women detect breast cancer early


Graduation


Births


Jeffrey Sand oval Jr. born


Raevyn Jefferson earns FAMU MBA


C01ton Lolley born


Pets


HAVE YOU SEEN IZZY?



























































































































The United Methodist Churches

Sof Franklin County Welcome Youl

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday

75 5" St. Apalach cuol 65393 fmaalach@gtcom~net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
'Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Ca abell n697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
PrWorship ervicealt0s00 a.m ivt 1 .m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www~ursgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
NreyProvided during regular church services


S St. Patrick Catholic Church 1
Ave. "C" & 6th St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
(850) 653-9453 mail: stpatcath@gtcom.net

PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
MASS SCHEDULE

SATURDAY ................ ........... ........ 5 PM
SUNDAY ......... . . . .. . .. . . .. 10 AM
SUNDAY SPANISH MASS. .. .. . . . . . .. .. . . .. 5 PM
TUESDAY FRIDAY . . . ... ... .. .. .. . . .. 8:30 AM


IV


Thursday, MAY 1 d, 2009


The Times | B3


Big Bend Hospice would like to take this opportunity to thank Karla Ambos
for the many blankets she made for our "Burden Bears" project. These "Burden
Bears" are given to our patients so that they may let go of their burdens and hold
on to these precious bears. Karla serves as a Franklin County Advisory Council
member for Big Bend Hospice and is very involved in supporting the patients and
families in Franklin County.
Again, Karla, we would just like to say "thank you" for the hard work and
dedication that you give to your community.

Pam Rakcer Allbritton
Big Bend Hospice
Wakculla/Franklin Team
Community Resources/Volunteer Coordinator


Obituaries


Wayne Walter Ward
was born July 30, 1941 in
Apalachicola to Walter and
Carmi Ward. He passed
away Thursday, May 7,
2009, at the age of 67, in
Apalachicola.
Wayne was a lifelong
resident of Apalachicola.
He was a shrimper, an
avid hunter, and loved
being with his family.



Mary Cashul died
Wednesday May 6, 2009 at
the age of 87.
Born Dec. 7, 1921
to the now late Casper
and Sarah Fatta, she
was a native of Buffalo,
NYbefore moving to
Apalachicola some 25
years ago. She was a
homemaker, a veteran of
the United States Marine



Raymond Lee
Jernigan,83, passed
away on Sunday, May
3, 2009 at Panama City
Nursing Center.
He was born Oct. 18,
1925 in Sabine, TX and
lived here most of his
life. He was a dedicated
Christian and a loving
husband, father and
grandfather.
He is survived
by three sons; R.L.
(Audrey) Jernigan and



Anne D. Hall was born
on Jan. 25, 1919, to the now
late Harold and Margaret
Ives in Clarks Green, PA.
She passed away on May
11, 2009, at her home on St.
George Island at the age
of 90.
Anne was a retail store
owner before her retiring.
She attended the Morton
School of Business and



Robert Edward Connell,
was born March 8, 1926,
to the now late James and
Christian Connell in Ridge-
field, New Jersey.
He passed away May 10
in Tallahassee, at the age
of 83.
Bob, ashe wasmost
affectionately known, was
a resident of Apalachicola
for more than 50 years. He
worked as an investigator
for Department of Business
and Professional Regula-
tions before his retirement;
he was a World War II Army
Pilot; member of the Na-


Wayne Walter Ward
He is survived by
his wife, Donna Ward;
daughter, Carol W. Clayton
(Danny); mother, Carmi
Ward; brother, James
Lloyd Ward (Elizabeth);
sister-in-law, Martha Pearl
Ward; grandchildren,
Denise Clayton and
Jennifer Clayton; great
granddaughter, DeAnna
Clayton; and numerous



Corps and m~emhbe of St.
Patrick Catholic Church.
Survivors include
her daughter, Beverly
C. Kelley; grandson,
Kristopher G. Kelley; and
great-granddaughter,
Krista Kelley, all of
Apalachicola; a brother,
James J. Fatta; and a
sister, Eleanor Campbell
Engler.

Raymond Lee Jernigan
David Jernigan, both
of Lakeland, and Bill
(Sharon) Jernigan, of
Auburn, GA. He has
two stepdaughters;
Sue (Donnie) Gay, of
Apalachicola, and Ellen
Foley, of Panama City;
three stepsons, Frankie
(Mary Ann) Foley and
Danny (Gwen) Foley,
both from Rock Hill, SC,
and Ronnie Foley, of
Fountain.
He is also survived

Annie D. Hall
later IBM School.
She is survived by her
children, John Christopher
Hall, Deborah Anne Brown,
and Karen Louise Hall;
brother, Harold Dowd; sis-
ters, Jane Warr, Esther Sta-
ples, and Mary Josephine
Christiano; grandchildren,
Christian Nicole Brown
Hourany, Rachel Ellen Hall;
and Joseph Warren Brown;

Robert "Bob" Connell
tional Guards; American
Legion; F&AM Lodge 76;
and Scottish Rite.
Bob was very honored to
have given his World War II
memorabilia to the Camp
Gordon Johnston Museum
in Carrabelle.
Survivors include his
children, Robert Edward
Connell, Jr. (Pat), Karen
Biddy (Jim), Christian
Griggs, and Robin Connell;
brother, James Connell;
five grandchildren; and one
great-grandchild; numerous
nieces, nephews, and a host
of family and fr~iends.


nieces and nephews.
EAneral services were
held Monday, May 11 at
Kelley Ekneral Home
Chapel with burial in
Magnolia Cemetery.
Viewing was Sunday,
May 10.
Condolences may
sent and viewed at www.
KelleyEk`neralHomes.
com.



A funeral mass will be
held Monday, May 18 at 11
a.m. at St. Patrick Catholic
church in Apalachicola
with burial in Magnolia
Cemetery. Viewing will be
held from 9 to 10:30 a.m.,
followed by Rosary prior
to Mass.
Condolences may be
viewed and sent via www.
KelleyEkneralHomes.com.



by his brother, Aubrey
(Louise) Jernigan, of
Indian Pass Beach, and
sister, Leola (Charlie)
Pittman, of Lynn Haven.
He was preceded
in death by his wife,
Gladys Jernigan,
and stepdaughter,
Betty Fox. He has 20
grandchildren and 20
gre at- grandchildren n.
He was put to rest at
Magnolia Cemetery in
Apalachicola on May 6.



great-grandchildren; Hunt-
er Titus Hourany, Hayden
Christian Hourany, Ty~ War-
ren Brown, and Sarah Ruth
Brown; and numerous
nieces, nephews, friends,
and loved ones.
Memorialization by
cremation. Condolences
may be sent and viewed via
www.KelleyEkneralHomes.
com.



He was preceded in
death by his wife; Lou
Marks Connell; parents,
Chrissie and James Connell;
and sister, Jean Christie.
General services will be
held Thursday, May 14 at
10 a.m. at'It~inity Episcopal
Church with interment in
Magnolia Cemetery, with
Masonic rites and military
honors.. Visitation will be
held Wednesday, May 13,
from 5 to 7 p.m. at Kelley
General Home Chapel.
Condolences may be sent
and viewed via www.K~elley-
E~neralHomes.com.


Franklin County Advisory Council members, from left, front row, are Beverly
Hewitt and Judy Cook; and second row, Jeanette Taylor and Sandra Smith. Back
row, from left, are Joe Taylor, Karla Ambos and Pam Mahr. Not pictured are
Paula Harmon, Ella S eed, Dixie Partin ton, Betty Croom, Melanie "Toonie"
Waddell and Donnie Gay. Photo courtesy Big Bend Hospice.




Volunteers heart of

*


A Big Bend Hospice
family calls to have someone
come sit with their mother
so they can go out for their
anniversary.
A grieving husband
receives a phone call from a
volunteer who is checking in
to see how he is holding up.
A group of volunteers
meet to discuss how to
make sure no one in need of
hospice services in Franklin
County is unaware of Big
Bend Hospice.
All of these caring people
live and work right here
in the county and share
their time with friends and
neighbors as Big Bend
Hospicevolunteers.Founded
by volunteers 25 years
ago to provide a different
more compassionate way
to finish life's journey, Big
Bend Hospice today serves
over 42 patients each year
in Franklin County, and 375
families everyday within an
eight-county service area.
Volunteering does
not necessarily mean
working directly with
patients. Although patients
and their families are
offered a volunteer to help
with errands, provide
transportation and offer
companionship; there are
many other opportunities to
vo uter.
Advisory Council
members, for example,
meet monthly and act
as ambassadors in their
community, advising Big
Bend Hospice on issues in
their county and helping
to increase awareness of
hospice services. These
committed men and women
are stay-at-home moms,
business people, and retirees
but each has in common the
desire to help others.
"I've been fortunate to


have enjoyed a fulfilling
career and to be able to
retire at a relatively young
age. I wanted to change my
focus and start by giving
back to the community,
and Hospice seemed to be
a natural fit," said Karla
Ambos, a volunteer with the
Franklin County Advisory
Council.
During National
Volunteer Appreciation
Week, Big Bend Hospice
salutes the caring men and
women who volunteer in
Franklin County.
"These special people
are enriching lives and
making a difference to


hospice families" said Pam
Raker Allbritton, community
resources coordinator for
Big Bend Hospice. "They
not only sit at bedsides,
they sit in 90 degree heat at
fairs and festivals, they put
together goodie bags, they
bake and speak on ourbehalf
at clubs and churches. They
are the heart and soul of our
organization."
If you are interested
in becoming a Hospice
volunteer, please call Pam
at (850) 508-8749 for the
next orientation session.
Volunteer to Change the
World, it starts with a phone
call!

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


EST. 1836

Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


You didn't push your dancing
shoes too far back in the closet,
did you? This Saturday night, May
16, there will be a dance at the
Carrabelle Municipal Complex. The
dance is to benefit the Carrabelle
Food Pantry. Everyone's favorite
band, The Journey, will play for your
listening and dancing pleasure.
Things get underway at 6:30 p.m. and
continue until 8:30 p.m.; admission is
by donation. Bring some finger food
to share, your dancing shoes, and
your main squeeze. EAn starts when
you walk in the room.
We had a nice crowd, May 5, at the


Lanark NEWS

Bingo for the Bus.
Our next one will be
on Wednesday, June
3. Hope you will be
able to join us. Doors
at Chillas Hall will be
open at 5 p.m., bingo
starts at 6:30 p.m. See
LANIARK NEWS ya here!
Jim Welsh Remember
when I asked you
to keep the second Saturday open
for breakfast? Well, mark June 13
on your calendar. Plans are in the
works! More later.
If you wish to have your house


blessed, Father Joseph has started
blessing the houses in your area.
This is open to all houses, Catholic
and non-Catholic. If you wish to
have this blessing, call 697-3669, and
leave your name, phone number, and
address.
Be kind to one another and check
in on the sick and housebound, and
remember what Rita Mae Brown
said: Friends are like the stars, you
don't always see them, but you knoW
they are there!
Until next time, God Bless
America, our troops, the poor,
homeless and hungry.


Church


Card of THANKS


WELCOMES YOU

Church




101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 A1M





1 * ***-**-- - 4
Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321


FUndfaiser for pantry planned

The Camp Gordon Johnston Association presents an
evening of dance with live music by Journey from 6:30 to
8:30 p.m. May 16 at the Carrabelle City Complex Cafete-
ria, 1001 Gray Ave.
The music will provide sounds that include country
swing, Cajun, polka, waltz and Latin. Admission will be by
donation. The event is a benefit for the Carrabelle Food
Pantry.
All donations will be used to restock the pantry for
needy residents. Please bring finger food to share.


IV


Thursday, MAY 1 d, 2009


Law Enforcement


The following report is provided
by the Franklin County Sheriff 's
Office. Arrests are made by officers
from the following city, county and
state law enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle
(CPD), Florida Highway Patrol
(FHP), Franklin County Sheriff 's
Office (FCSO), Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FC), Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection (FDEP)
Florida Division of Insurance
Fraud (DIF) and Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Consumer
Services (FLDOACS).
All defendants are considered
innocent until proven guilty in a


court of law.

May 5
Chandler L. Washington, 20'
Apalachicola, sale of a controlled
substance within 1,000 feet of a
church and counts violation of pro-
bation (FCSO)
Willie L. Smith, 44, Apalachic-
ola, sale of a controlled substance
within 1,000 feet of a church and
violation of probation (FCSO)
Stephen M/. Foy, 39, Tallahas-
see, violation of probation (FCSO)


Ta~znya VGriggs, 44, Apalachic-


ola, sale of a controlled substance
within 1,000 feet of a church (FCSO)

Mgy $
John L. Lamberson III, 36, La-
nark Village, aggravated battery
with great bodily harm (FCSO)
Antonio D. Clemons, 20, Apala-
chicola, battery by inmate (FCSO)
Terrance I. Walker, 41, Apala-
chicola, Bay County warrant for
failure to report (FCSO)
Jay E Garner, 33, Lamont, vio-
lation of probation (FCSO)


Cole Younger, 27, Benton, Ill.,


DUI (FHP)
Thomas R. Howard, 19, East-
point, retail theft (APD)
Zoe Lorca, 39, Apalachicola,
DUI (APD)
Derrick E. Kennedy, 37, Car-
rabelle, driving while license sus-
pended or revoked (FDEP)

May I0
Edward J. Prince Sr., 44,
Carrabelle, two counts battery
(FCSO)
Eric A. Tatum, 29, Eastpoint,
violation of probation (FCSO)
James H. Brinson Jr., 33,
Apalachicola, DUI (FHP)


Forehand and Mike Fish, with the Flori-
da Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-


The individual was arrested earlier this
year for taking deer with a gun and light.


U.S. Congressman Al-
len Boyd (D-North Florida)
said Tuesday that Franklin
County schools will receive
$388,291 in federal funding
under the American Recov-
ery and Reinvestment Act,
recently signed into law
with Boyd's support.
This federal funding is
part of an investment of
nearly $1.8 billion released
this week to Florida by the
U.S. Department of Educa-
tion. Franklin County will
use this funding to support
teaching jobs and preserve
needed programs at area
schools.
"The federal funding
is great news for Franklin
County," said Boyd. "Pro-
viding quality education is
something that is very im-
portant to me and the peo-
ple of North Florida, and
there is no doubt that these
stimulus dollars will help
many students, teachers,
and families in the Franklin
County area."
To date, Florida has re-
ceived nearly $600 million
in stimulus dollars to fund
programs such as Title I
and the Individuals with
Disabilities Education Act
(IDEA). The state is eligi-
ble to apply for an addition-
al $891 million this fall.
The county also has
been active in seeking


stimulus funds.
At the May 5 commis-
sion meeting, the board au-
thorized Chairman Smokey
Parrish to sign a Certificate
of Participation that would
allow Sheriff Skip Shiver to
apply for a $436,000 stimu-
lus-funded Bryne Justice
Assistance Grant.
Alan Pierce, director of
administrative services,
told the commission that
the county's two dune res-
toration projects had made
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's
list of possible projects for
stimulus funding. The two
small projects are rebuild-
ing and replanting the
dunes at Carrabelle Beach
and at St. George Island
County Park.
On April 23, Pierce at-
tended a meeting in Gulf
County sponsored by Rick
Marcum, director of Op-
portunity Florida. Mar-
cum told the group Oppor-
tunity Florida is poised to
assist the region with job
creation, and distributed a
one-page form for city and
county governments in
Gulf and Franklin counties
to use to propose ideas for
Opportunity Florida to use
in seeking stimulus funds.
I have already provided
the forms to the City of
Apalachicola and Carra-
belle.


Sea turtle nesting sea-
son has begun on Florida's
beaches, which means
beach residents and visi-
tors need to follow a few
precautions to ensure a
successful season.
The instincts of the sea
turtle tell her to proceed
toward the brighter hori-
zon over the ocean. Bright
lights on the landward side
of the beach can confuse
the nesting sea turtle and
the hatchlings that emerge
from the nest. Lights on the


beach can lead them away
from the ocean. Lights
that are needed for human
safety should be shielded
so they are not visible from
the beach or turned off
when not needed.
"Just one light can kill
thousands of turtles over
several years," said Dr.
Robbin Trindell, a biologist
with the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission. "Many lights burn
all night without contribut-
ing to human safety."


Ph. 850-927-3628
Mobile 850-425-8620
Licensed & Insured

ROBERTS APPLIANCE
REPAIR
-ALL MAJOR BRANDS -






18 Shado Ln
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: (850) 653-8122
Cell: (850) 653-7654
DON WILLSON'S
SEPTIC TANK
SERVICE
Serving all of Franklin
County Residential/
Commerical
Septic Tanks &
Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or night
653-9406


B4 | The Times


Tf00pers to conduct

Vhicll( 0InSpections

Members in Troop H,
Quincy district, of the Flor-
ida Highway Patrol plan to
conduct driver's license/ve-
hicle inspection checkpoints
next month during daylight
hours at the following loca-
tions in Franklin County:
*May 14 through May
19: County Road 370, CR
157, CR 59
*May 20 through May
.6 CR 37,CR 3A Stat
Road 300 (St. George Is-
land Causeway).
*May 27 through May
31: SR 30, SR 30A, SR 65
All personnel participat-
ing in the checkpoints will
be responsible for following
the procedures outlined in
Chapter 17.12 of the Flor-
ida Highway Patrol Policy
Manual regarding driver
license and vehicle inspec-
tion checkpoints, said Lt.
Mark Brown.


Sheriff's REPORT


1 ^ ,
HRDS 1810H On firearm possession f 0 0 In 0 Unt S( 00 S

A Gadsden County man arrested ear- mission's Division of Law Enforcement,
lier this year on a hunting violation has last week served a warrant on the man
been determined to be a convicted felon. for possession of a firearm by a convict- g U g g g y y y g
tL Harry Parker and Officers Hank ed felon


AmI11st $4~00,000 to be invested


ad inl


JACKSON'SI.,, -


Lights out for sea

turtle nesting season

Precautions can prevent turtle deaths


Builders By The Sea, Inc.

Gary Bartlett


Don Lively General ContractorsLL
LICENSED AND INSURED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Plumbing New Construction Roofing IIto get your
Pressure Washing Additions *Vinyl Siding ad in
Painting and More No Job Too Small

P.O. Box 439RGO55
Carrabelle, FL 32322 gyC g
697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 Sce (ce


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a palach
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www vislrsuLFcouNTY com C Employees Club of City of Wewahitchka, FL
"Pa...a rumn ovdedby th1 Gulf Connie Parrish Or Gwen Exley
County Tounst Development Council." 1- 850-639-2605







SECURE YOUR BOAT ASHORE

Join the areas only Hurricane Club

Full Service Marina and Boatyard





~T MARINEc


292 Graham Drive, Carrabelle, 32322
850-697-3337 Office 850-697-4282 Fax

infooddockssiddeecarrabbeelllee.ccom


Lat: N 290 50' 56" Long: W 840 40'02"


TR CRREADING s10 a


Gulf Side

Where You Always Save and

You're Always Appreciated!


(850)653-9695


Thursday, MAY 1 d, 2009


Local


The Times | B5


from 3 to 6 p.m. every week in
Building 1100, Room 1105. Call
670-2800.

TUepday, May 19
Franklin County Com-
mission meets at 9 a.m. at the
courthouse annex in Apala-
chicola. For info, call 653-8861
ext. 100.
Apalachicola Community
Redevelopment Authority
meets at 5 p.m. at Apalachicola
Bay Chamber of Commerce.
For info, call 653-9419.
Apalachicola Community
Garden meets at 6 p.m. at
Apalachicola Bay Chamber of
Commerce. For info, call 653-
9419.
Breakfast at the Franklin
County Senior Center in Carra-
belle. Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal
at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call 697-
3760.
Bi oe 7 p.m. St. Geo ge Is-
land Fire Dept. $1 / card. Pro-
ceeds go to St. George Island
Civic Club. Call 927-4654.

Wednesday, May 20
Sea Oats Garden Club
meets at 11:30 a.m. at the Car-
rabelle Branch of the Franklin
County Library, 311 St. James
Ave. For more info, call Arlene
Oehler, president, at 697-9790.
Apalachicola Traffic Safety
Team meets at noon at City
Hall in Battery Park. For info,
call 653-8715.
GED classes are offered
at the Franklin County School
from 3 to 6 p.m. every week in
Building 1100, Room 1105. Call
670-2800.

TilUfStay, May 21
Apalachicola Community
Pride meets at 6 p.m. at the
Franklin Square Rec Center.
For info, call 653-8715.
Wandering Star Quilting
Club. Chillas Hall Lanark Vil-
lage. 1 to 3 p.m. Call Christine
Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon and
Information Specials at the
Franklin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Noon. $3 dona-
tion. Call 697-3760.


Spittle Bug Mass. PHOTO BY UF IFAS
Twolined Spittle Bug.


Well, if you haven't noticed, temperatures
have gone up during the first few weeks of May.
This is typical for this time of the year. Also
typical of our weather this month is that May
is often one of our drier months,
;Iso it's time to get serious about
wateringn.
Many new plants are lost be-
cause of insufficient watering.
~FLRemember that new plants only
Have roots in an area the size of
-b- the football that was in the pot.
WORLD So be sure to direct water to that
AROUNIDYOU area.
Bill Mahan If the football gets too dry,
the plant can wilt and even die.
Water the lawn and other large areas in early
morning when less water is lost to evaporation
and more is absorbed by plants.
The following gardening tips are just some
of the information contained in May/June issue
of UF IFAS' Gardening in the Panhandle News-
letter. The newsletter is written by our District
Horticulture and Florida Yard & Neighborhood
Agents who work in the Florida Panhandle.
The following garden tips are provided by Alex
Bolques, Gadsden County Horticulture Agent.

IF OWOFS
Allow the foliage on spring bulbs to grow. Do
not cut it off until it turns yellow and falls over.
Remove spent blooms on roses and other
flowering perennials (deadheading). Cutting
flowers is good for the plants and will give you
more flowers in the long run.
Control black spot on roses by applying fun-
gicides on a regular basis.
Set out caladium bulbs in prepared beds.
Plant them about 18 inches apart and 2 inches
deep.
Rejuvenate houseplants. Take them outdoors


and inspect for spider mites and mealybugs.
Shift pot-bound specimens to a size larger pot.
Fertilize annual and perennial flowerbeds.
Choose a product that contains nitrogen and
potassium, but little or no phosphorus.
Bulbs or tubers to plant now include agapan-
thus, blackberry lily, clivia, gloriosa lily, crinum,
flag iris and Louisiana iris.
Annuals to plant include celosia, coleus,
crossandra, gaillardia, geranium, hollyhock, im-
patiens, kalanchoe, marigold, nicotiana, orna-
mental pepper, penta, phlox, portulaca, salvia,
torenia, verbena, vinca and zinnia.
Spice up your landscape with ornamental
peppers. They produce colorful fruits from late
spring through fall. The fruits come in a range
of colors including red, purple, yellow, and or-
ange. Many varieties also have interesting and
attractive foliage, including variegated forms.

Trees an sh ub
Do any necessary pruning of junipers in May.
Mature palms should receive an application of
granular fertilizer. Use a special palm fertilizer
that has an 8-2-12 +4Mg (magnesium) with mi-
cronutrients formulation. Apply one pound of
fertilizer per 100 square feet of canopy area or
landscape area.
Finish pruning spring flowering shrubs such
as azaleas, spiraeas, camellias and forsythia by
early June.
In my next column I'll cover tips for your fruit
& nut trees, vegetables and lawns.
If you would like a copy of gardening in the
Panhandle Newsletter, please let me know and
I'll send you one. Happy gardening!

Bill Mahan is a FL Sea Grant Agent and di-
rector of the Franklin UF-IFAS Extension Pro-
gram. Contact him at 653-9337, 697-2112 x 360,
or via e-mail at mahaneaufl.edu.


such as fruits and veg-
etables, wind, and even
the sun. You will find new
and creative ways to run
household appliances and
even cook a tasty treat.
Recycle and reuse as you
create unique sculptures,
pictures, and wearable art
pieces.
Track 'Two: Building
Green Yes, there are
"green" careers and you'll
learn all about them as you
explore how construction
can co-exist with nature.
Conducting energy audits,
building your own energy
efficient model home,
and even creating one-
of-a-kind furniture from
reclaimed wood are just a
sample of the fun.
The college runs Mon-
day through Friday, July 20


to 24, and Monday through
Friday, July 27 to31. Cost is
$109 per week, with meals
not included.
You can register on-line
at http://www.gulfcoast.
edu/kidscollege or call
(850) 872-3823. Space is
limited, so register today!

Marine lab to host
lecture on bay
Sca lops
A lecture on the "Status
of Bay Scallops in Florida
West Coast Waters," will
be held from 7 to 9 p.m. on
Thursday, May 14, in the
auditorium of The Florida
State University Coastal
and Marine Laboratory.
Refreshments will be
served following the lec-


ture, the next event in
the monthly Coastal and
Marine Conservation 2009
Lecture Series hosted by
the laboratory.
The May 14 talk will be
presented by Steve Gei-
ger, Ph?.D., an associate
research scientist at the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Research Institute.
In association with
Second Harvest of the
Big Bend, part of "The
Nation's Food Bank Net-
work," the marine lab is
collecting non-perishable
food items at each of its
monthly lectures. Attend-
ees are asked to bring an
item or two and help solve
the community's hunger
crisis.
The marine lab is lo-
cated at 3618 Hwy. 98 in St.


Teresa at the intersection
of highways 319 and 98,
halfway between Carra-
belle and Panacea.
For additional informa-
tion on the lecture May 14


or future lectures, contact
the lab at 697-4095 or via
e-mail at sthomancafsu.
edu. Or visit the Web site
at www.marinelab.fsu.edu/
outreach.html


r


Always on| ine

www.apalachtimes.om ~








Gardening tips for May and June


Community CALENDAR


Thursday, May 14
The Apalachicola Bay Area
Chamber of Commerce will
host its Business After Hours
from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at The Green
Door, 32 Avenue D and Market
Street. For more info, call 653-
9419.
Wine and Cheese Social for
Plein Air artists. 5 to 7 p.m. at
Sea Oat Gallery, St George Is-
land. Street. For more info, call
800-378-8419.
H'COLA's quarterly gov-
ernment update from city and
county government officials. 6
to 8 p.m. at the 6th Street Rec-
reation Center.
Wandering Star Quilting
Club. Chillas Hall Lanark Vil-
lage. 1 to 3 p.m. Call Christine
Hinton 697-2551.
Luncheon and Informa-
tion Specials at the Franklin
County Senior Center in Car-
rabelle. Noon. $3 donation. Call
697-3760

Friday, May I5
Art as a Window Florida
Humanities Scholars lead a
discussion on how history and
culture affect art. Cotton Ware-
house, Apalachicola. For more
info, call 800-378-8419.

Saturtlay May I()
A Working Waterfront in
Riverfront Park in Apalachic-
ola. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more
info, call 800-378-8419.
Grand Patrons Party cel-
ebration and art sales, debut of
Plein Air artists' choice paint-
ings. Apalachicola. $40 ticket.
Cotton Warehouse, Apalachic-
ola. For more info, call 800-378-
8419.

Sunday, May 17
Arts in the Afternoon final
show and sale, family entertain-
ment, children's art activities.
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Riverfront
Park in Apalachicola. For more
info, call 800-378-8419.

00da Cy, 07
GED classes are offered
at the Franklin County School


Local BRIEFS


GCCC's Kid's College
00eS Gre6HI
Kids entering sixth, sev-
enth and eighth grade who
would like to get an early
college experience are
welcome to attend GCCC's
second annual Kid's Col-
lege this summer.
This year's theme
is "Kid's College Goes
Green." Kids' College will
be held over the course
of two weeks and consists
of two tracks offered both
weeks. Each track can ac-
commodate 25 students
per week, so early regis-
tration is advised.
Track One: Living
Green Learn to reduce
your impact on Mother
Earth as you explore al-
ternative energy sources


VI~t~il~
II





;II)


| 1100 |

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act (ADA), disabled per-
sons who, because of their
disabilities, need special
accommodation to particl-
pate In this proceeding
should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320 or Tele-
phone Volce/TDD (850)
653-8861 prior to such
proceeding.

Dated this 14th day of
April, 2009.

Marcla Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49th Street,
Sulte 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954)453-0365
Facsimile: (954)771-6052
Toll Free:1-800-441-2438
May7, 14,2009
2083T

NHE FFOSFSALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN That pursuant to a
Writ of Execution Issued In
tlheCCooun y For aaf Fratnh
23rd day of March, 2009
In the cause where Firs

ade ttep nla Tsurrel Int
defendant, belng Case No
02-9-CC In said court. 1,
Srki uhvr y, ShrFf d
have levied upon all th
right, title and Interest of
thuer adfndad Stt Illa Y
Ing described property
to-wit:


Wn W17SS 151402033

Plus any and all contents
on or Inside the above de-
hcibdvehacl 11 uin
the property of the defend-
ant, Stephnla Y Turrell.

and on the 1st day of
June, 2009 at the Franklin



astolt po 32 Fak

ble, I will offer for sale all of
the said defendant's
Stephnla Y Turrell right, ti-
tle and Interest In aforesaid
property at public outcry
andwmillsell the same, sub-
ject to all prior lens, en-
cumbrances and judg-
ments Ifbany tdadtheorh g


ceds ob~e ap Id eas fa
as may be to the payment
of costs and the satisac-
tlon of the above de-
scribed execution. Note: In
accordance with the Amer-
Ican with Disabllties Act
persons with disabilities
needing a special accom-
modation to participate In
this proceeding, should
contact Debble Mock no
later than seven days prior
to the proceeding at
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office at (850)-670-8519.

Skip Shiver

Sheriff of Franklin County
Florida
By: Debble L Mock
Deputy Sheriff
April 30, May 7, 14, 21,
2009
2110T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION


AU RA TARENOEFSCAGL-
lONE'
Deceased.


zzoo |
Apalachicola, Florida, at
11:00 a.m., EST on the
21st day of May, 2009, the
following described prop-
erty situated In Franklin
County, Florida and set
forth In the Order or Final
Judgment, to-wit;

Parcel 1:

A certain lot, tract or parcel
of land described by
metes and bounds as fol-
lows: begin at a point on
the South side of State
Highway Number Ten,
One Hundred (100) feet
West of the Intersection of
the Western, boundary line
of a parcel of land de-
scribed In a deed from
J.M. Griffin and wife to
Gadsden Newell dated the
25th day of November A.D.
1944, recorded at pages
375-376 of Deed book
UJ.J." In the deed records
of Franklin County, Florida,
with the said South side of
State Highway Number
Ten, run thence South
along the West boundary
of a One Hundred (100)
foot parcel of land sold to
C,W. Randolph to St.
George Sound, thence
West along the Sound ap-
proximately Elghty (80)
feet where a line parallel
with and Elghty (80) feet
from the said West bound-
ary of the Randolph tract
will Intersect the St,
George Sound, thence
North to said State High-
way number Ten, thence
East along the South
boundary of said State
Highway Number Ten
Eighty (80) feet to the point
of beginning. Said land
comprising a strip Elghty
(80) feet wide lying be-
tween said State Highway
and St. George Sound and
lying and being In Section
Eleven (11) of T9S, R8W In
the County of Franklin and
State of Florida

Parcel 2:

Commence at a point on

tRhed othwhsc els 650 ee
Easterly of a parcel of land
sold to Roy Grifiln and Is
the East boundary of a
parcel of land sold to J.D.

De Recor cles, n Pa
326; thence run South 200
;feet to the South right of

whec eru SE steel ao~n
said South right of way line
for 50 feet to the Point of
Beginning. Thence con-
tinue Easterly along the
South right of wary line
100 feet more or less to a

eon hnern oth 5

fetmore or less to apnt e
South of Sthe PontofBe-
gunnin; thence run North

3fetmore or less to the in

Sou hrn ranh o ew~aolinoe

Beginning.

Being apart of original Lot
',I Fr ctoal S1l t S
Florida.

The description of Parcels
1 and 2 are further de-
scribed as follows:

Commence at the lntersec-

rgt-of- ay tbhoeundr South
Old Stat Rtoad No 10 and

boundary of Bayview
Drive, In S11, T9S, R8W
Franklin County, Florida

od"50t0hen eestr aong si
South right-of-way bound-
ary 438.39 feet, thence run
South 01008'21" West
159.78 feet; thence run
North 89046'24" West

Sot 01"0 16t tet51r 0
feet, thence run South

t~hec rnWNr 00 42 0
East 10.00 feet, thence run
South 89057'06 West
103.35 feet, thence run

S t.h0 fe to39'4con se e
monu~me ,01tohe~nc ,,
199.59 feet to the South-
elyU riht-ofhway boundary


| zzo |
32320 & 78 12 ST,
APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320

TO:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
DARRELL STANTON
WARD
Whose residence Is: 162
POLY RD,
APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320 & 280 PRADO ST,
APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320 & 78 12 ST,
APALACHICOLA, FL,
32320

If alive, and If dead, all par-
ties claiming Interest by,
through, under or against
JAMES R. PAYTON; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
JAMES PAYTON; DAR-
RELL STANTON WARD;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
DARRELL STANTON
WARD and all parties hav-
Ing or claiming to have any
right, title or Interest In the
property described herein.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure
of Mortgage on the follow-
Ing described property:

Commence at an old terra
cotta monument marking
the Southeast corner of
Section 21, Township 8
South, Range 8 West
Franklin County, Florida
and thence run South
182.91 feet to the North-
easterly right-of-way
boundary of Bluff Road'
thence run North 63 de-
grees 10 minutes 00 sec-
onds West along said
right-of-way boundary
612.99 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING. From
said POINT OF BEGINN-
ING continue North 63 de-
grees 10 minutes 00 sec-
ands West along said
right-of-way boundary
143.57 feet, thence run
North 1029.20 feet to the
Southerly edge of the Apa-
lachicola River, thence run
South 72 degrees 23 mn-
utes 14 seconds East
along said river's edge

rth7 8f0 egrteeesn2 mnn
utes 25 seconds East
along said river's edge
62.11 feet, thence run
South 1067.04 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING.

LESS AND EXCEPT the
following described parcel:

Commence at an old terra
cotta monument marking
the Southeast corner of
Section 21, Township 8
South, Range 8 West'
Franklin County, Florida
and thence run South



thec ru Nout6 de

onds West along said
right-of-way boundary
612.99 feet to a re-rod for
the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. From said POINT OF
BE INNINGgreccmtiue

utes 00 seconds West

bunndar id43.5h weto a
rero~d, thence) runr Noo
thence run South 63 de-
grees 10 minutes 00 sec-
ands East 143.57 feet to a
re-rod, thence run South
340.02 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING.


Non rcusw ha Pnr ts
Egress, and AccessOEas -

Records Vol. 640, Page
496, Public Records of
Franklin County, Florida.

a/k/a 162 POLY RD APA-
LACHICOLA, FL232320

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten def nses,UIf any, to It

torney for Plaintiff, whose
adrdessS Ite203100Stir in
Lauderdale, Florida 33312
within 30 days after the
first publication of this no-

wt th dC rk ef hicin Co
elltae trlffore service on
diately thereafter; other-
else aa fault wIl boe ehne


| zzo
Coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320 or Tele-
phone Volce/TDD (904)
653-8861 prior to such
proceeding.

Dated this 28th day of
April, 2009.

Marcla Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49th Street,
Sulte 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone:(954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
May 7, 14, 2009
2134T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK, FA'
Plaintif,

vs.

KRNR BET KNO-
SPOUSE OF KAREN BETH
MILLENDER; JOHN DOE;
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANT(S)1N POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT



CASE NO.:
2008 CA 000357


FRNEOCTUORFE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
JGI N 3pursuant to a Final
dated the 11th day of De-
cember, 2008 and entered
00 Cae No.th2008 rc
Court of the 2ND Judicial
Circuit In and for Franklin
AouSty N onda, Mwh erl
BANK, FA Is the Plaintiff
and KAREN BETH MIL-
LENDER; UNKNOWN

MLOLEND ; JON DOTE
JANE DTO ASNUN KNOWN

SION OF THE SUBJECT

ats wl el t thdeehg
est and best bidder for
cash at the ON FRONT
STEPS OFCOURTHOUSE
at the Franklin County
Courthouse In Apalachl-
cola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m.

fnth 18h d o une



LOT 32, BLOCK 9, LAN-
ARK VILLAGE UNIT 1, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 14A,
OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA

AY IF SONTCLAIMIN
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA), disabled per-
sons who, because of their
disabilities, need special
accommodation to particl-
pate In this proceeding
should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl-
cola, FL 3220 or Tele-
phone Volce /TDD (850)
653-8861 prior to such
proceeding.


FRONT STEPS OF
COURTHOUSE at the
Franklin County Court-
* a r~ house In Apalachicola,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
ANNOUNEMENF5 the 4th day of June, 2009,
1100 -Legal Advertising the following described
1110 Clasisicri Notices property as set forth In
1120 Public Notices/ said Final Judgment, to
Announcements wit:
1130 -Adoptions
spon ssTRACT 7
1160 -Lost
1170 Found Commence at the point of
SIntersection of the East
a boundary of Section 1,
| 1100 |Township 7 South, Range
2 West, with the Northern
1842T boundary of Gulf Shore
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Boulevard (State Road No.
OF CHILTON COUNTY, 370), said point being
ALABAMA marked by a concrete
monument and being the
LAKE MITCHELL. CON- Northeastern corner of
STRUCTION, INC., lands platted as Peninsular
PLAINTIFF, Point, Unit No. 4, said plat
being of record In the Of-
V flce of the Clerk of the Cir-
cult Court of Franklin
COASTAL CONNEC- County Florida; from said
TIONS, LLC, and, JAMES point run thence North 84
R. PAYTON, Individually, degrees 51 minutes West
and STANTON WARD, In- 40.16 feet along the North-
dividually. ern boundary of Gulf
DEFENDANT. Shore Boulevard to a point
marked by a concrete
Case No.: CV-2008-209 monument and being the
Southeast corner of a lot
NOTICE OF COMPLAINT deeded by Peninsular
Point, Inc. a Florida corpo-
Stanton Ward, James R. ration, as grantor to R. E.
Payton, and Coastal Con- Kestner of Leon County,
nections, LLC, whose Florida as grantee, In De-
whereabouts are unknown cember, 1949, said
must answer Lake Mitchell Kestner property being a
Construction, Inc. Com- strip of land approximately
plaint and other relief by 100 feet in wdth extending
the 29th day of June, from the Northern bound-
2009, or, thereafter, a ary of said Gulf Shore
judgment by default may Boulevard (State Road
be rendered against 370) North to the waters of
hlimher In Case No. Alligator Bay, also known
CV-2008-209 In the Circuit as Alligator Harbor, and
Court of Chilton County, being bounded on the
Alabama. West by certain lands of
the State Board of Educa-
DONE this the 7th day of tron of Florida, a public
April, 2009. corporation of the State of
Florida (F.S.U. Marine Lab-
Glenn McGrlff oratory), from the said
CIRCUIT COURT CLERK Southeast corner of the
CHILTON COUNTY, ALA- said R. E. Kestner Property
BAMA deeded to R. E. Kestner
ALISA L.UPCHRCHabout December, 1949, as
(UPC009) aiordehsallort thencEdause
ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN- boundary of the said R. E.
TIFF Kestner property, and par-
POST OFFICE BOX 2663 allel to the East boundary
CLANTON, ALABAMA lne of Section 1, Township

257655-1300 disSac Rf 82 52 Weet a
April 23, 30, 2009 point, thence run South 78
May 7, 14, 2009 degrees 40 minutes East a

2N THE CIRCUIT COURT ttnacne Souh 19 egr e
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL 26 minutes East 534.5 feet'
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR thence South 74 degrees
FRANKLIN COUNTY, 39 minutes 30 seconds
FLORIDA East 711 feet to a point
CIVIL DIVISION marked by concrete monu-
ment, thence South 79 de-
AS NO.:RO8-00006KCNA Nhee OmlutEn s




proposed 50 foot
VS. right-of-way containing an
existing rock paved street
STEVEN E. FLING A/K/A or road a distance of 464.5
STEVEN EDWARD FLING; feet to the Point of Begin-
D E B OR AH nngfaomtheNPolno B
DEBACK-WRIGHT; STE- gnl, u ot e
PHEN L. WRIGHT; UN- grees 03 minutes East
EOVWN ESPOUSE OF 372+ fe tg othea So

STEVN ENDWA EFLDNG; tkhnoweasNAlligato HrdH
AS UNKNOWN 03 minutes East along the
TENANT(S) IN POSSES- said southern shore lne 75
SION OF THE SUBJECT feet, thence South 00
PROPERTY, degrees 04 minutes East
Defendants. 416 feet to the Northern
boundary of said
RE-NOTICE OF right-of-way of the pro-
FORECLOSURE SALE psed ode st ence No t

NOTICE IS HEREBY WestN .4feet alor th
GIVEN pursuant to a Final sai Nrhn oda f
Judgment of Foreclosure the proposed road, thence
dated the 25th day of Au- North 55 degrees 54 mln-
gust, 2008, and entered In utes West 46.6 feet to the
CseCNr. u t066oCAh 10 Io~to BeS tninn, 6n
2ND Judicial Circuit In and Township 7 South, Rang
for Franklin County, Flor- 1 West, Franklin County
Ida, wherein WELLS Florida, as per plat re-
FARGO BANK, NA AS corded on page 570of Of-
TRUSTEE Is the Plaintlyf ficlal Records Book 95 of
andAS ENEN EE D NG tFe nPubli Rcuto rlds
.LN; DEOA with permanent right of In-
DBCK-W RGHT; SUTE- stress, egressoands r ges

KNOWN SPOUSE OF posed right of way and
STEVEN E. FLING A/K/A said rock paved road in-
STEVEN EDWARD FLING; cludinga connecting
JHNNDOE; JNANE DE causewayotnonSR I0 sai

ES)INSPUOBSSEESTSIOPNROOF tc eBaynE3 chaan~da r
ERTY are defendants. I will side of the Island type pen-
sell to the highest and best Iknsoa anras commonly
bidder for cash at the ON k"w sAlgtrPit


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| zoo
the Point of Beginning.
From said Point of Beginn-
Ing thence run South
89030'51" West along said
right-of-way boundary
58.22 feet to a rod and
cap, thence run South
00032'42" East 57.60 feet to
the approximate mean
high water lne of St.
George Sound, thence run
along said approximate
mean high water lne as
follows: South 62056'04"
East 39.27 feet, thence
South 84006'24" East 62.68
feet, thence South
83c01'57" East 83.75 feet to
a rod and cap, thence
leaving said approximate
mean, high water lne run
North 00032'42" West 93.59
feet to the Southerly
right-of-way boundary of
said U.S. Highway No. 98,
thence run South 89030'51"
West along said
right-of-way boundary
122.15 feet to the Point of
Beginning containing 0.33
of an acre, +/-.

Above described lands be-
Ing the same as property
described In O.R book
784, Page 566 and O.R.
book 170, Page 564 of the
official records office of
Franklin County, Florida.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabllties
need special accommo-
dations to participate In
this proceeding should
contact the ADA Coordina-
tor at 33 Market St, Apa-
lachicota, Florida 32320 or
Telephone (850)653-8861
prior to such proceedings.

Witness my hand and the
official seal of this Honora-
ble Court, on this 27th day
of April, 2009.

kC CIAOHNSONt
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Costin & Costin
Charles A. Costin
413 Willilams Ave.
PO. Box 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32457
850-227-1159
May 7, 14, 2009


2FDFC


LIN COUNTY

JPMORGAN CHASE
BANK, NATIONAL ASSO-
CIATION, AS PURCHASER
OF THE LOANS AND
OTHER ASSETS OF
WASHINGTON MUTUAL

KNWN AS FWOARSMH
TaNntMUTUAL BANK, FA,
itif

vs.

JAMES R. PAYTON, et.al.
Defendants.

CASE NO. 09000094CA

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
JAMES R. PAYTON
Whose residence Is: 162
POGY RD, APALACHI-
COLA, FL, 32320 & 78 12
ST, APALACHICOLA, FL'
32320

TO:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JAMES R. PAYTON
Whose residence Is: 162
POGY RD'
APALACHICOLA, FL
32320 & 78 12 ST
AP3A2LACHICOLA, FL'

TO:
DARELL STANTON

Whose residence Is: R6D2

APALACHICOLA, FL
32320 & 280 PRADO ST
APALACHICOLA, FL,


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of Audra Maurine
Scaghlone, deceased,
whose date of death was
October 23, 2008, Is pend-
Ing In the Circuit Court for
Franklin County, Florida,
Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which Is 33 Mar-
ket Street, Sulte 203, Apa-
lachicola, Florida 32320.
The names and addresses
of the personal represent-
ative and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's
estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERl-
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of the first publl-
cation of this Notice Is May
7, 2009

Personal Representative:
S epha~nleAM. Robblsnoa,
#153
Hanover, MD 21076
tatinysfor Personal
Stuart E. Goldberg
Fla. Bar No. 0365971
Amy Mason Collins
Fla. Bar No. 0044582
of the law firm of
Goldberg & Olive





2114T
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT STATE OF FLOR-
IDA, IN AND FOR FRANK-
LIN COUNTY

BAYSIDE SAVINGS BANK
Plaintiff



CHARLES P WILSON, AN-
NIE MAE WILSON, PAULA
WEBB, and PAUL WILSON
and THE UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA, SMALL
BUSINESS ADMINISTRA-
TION
Defendants.

Case No. 08-000037-CA.

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice Is hereby given that
pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated
April 27, 2009, and entered
In Civil Case No.
08-000037-CA of the Cir-
cult Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit In and for
Franklin County, Florida
wherein BAYSIDE SAV-
INGS BANK Is the Plaintiff
and CHARLES P WIL-

WOLNSON, APNANA WM B
and PAUL WILSON and
THE UNITED STATES OF
AMERICAADMS LTLRAB O

are het I sen blds II wl

for cash at the front door
of the Franklin County
Courthouse, 33 Market St.


WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
20th day of April, 2009.

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
As Clerk of the Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

A copy of this Notice of
Action, Complaint and Lls
Pendens were sent to the
defendants and address
named above.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tion to participate In this
proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days
prior, contact the Clerk of
the Court's disability coor-
dinator at 8506972112'
PO. BOX 340, APALACHI-
COLA FL, 32320. If hearing
Impaired, contact (TDD)
8009558771 via Florida
Relay System.

This Is an attempt to col-
lect a debt. Any Informa-
tion obtained will be used
for that purpose.
May 14, 21, 2009

INTE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

AURORA LOAN SER-
VCES LLC,


VS.

DAVID POTEETE; KATHY
POTEETE; UNKNOWN
TENANT (S); UNKNOWN
FONNANOT(S); IN SPUOSSEEST
PROPERTY
Defendants.

CASE NO -
19-2008-CA-000555


_ORNEOCTUORFE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final

datgm the2 h da fo F
ruary, 20NO9, an ete ed I

000555, of the Circuit
Coutcofnthed oD Frudca
County, Florida, wherein
AURORA LOAN SER-
VICES, LLC Is the Plaintiff
and DAVID POTEETE;
KATHY POTEETE; UN-
KNOWN TENANT (S);


AS UNOW BJS N

ERTY are defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the ON
FRONT STEPS OF
COURTHOUSE at the
Franklin County Court-
house In Apalachicola,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on

t2h0e09, hhe dja owng ur
scrlhbeld poperty lasu st
ment, to wit

LOTS 7AND 8, BLOCK 0 "
OF LANARK BEACH, UNIT
NO. I, A SUBDIVISION OF
PARTS OF SECTION 11
AND PARTS OF FRAC-
TIONAL SECTIONS 12, 13,
AND 14, TOWNSHIP 7
SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF APPEARING IN
PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 13,
OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WTEH L60 DAYS AFTER

In accordance with the
Amer cns wt hD sadbil les

sonaswho, because o hi
accommodation to particl-
pate In this proceeding
should contact the ADA


Dated this 28th
April, 2009.


day of


Marcla Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
B: M chel kMaxwell

Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49th Street,
Sulte 120


SB The Times Thursday, May 14, 2009





| 1 0| 1 0 1 10 0 1 1 0| 3 2 1 0|6 1 | 7 1 5 0

MORTGAGE ELEC- which is 33 Market Street, OWNERS' ASSOCIATION, Loan Trust 2007-2, 2 Entertainment Centers Efcec 1 acre north of east point,
TRNCREGISTRATION Sulte 203, Apalachicola, INC; SUNTRUST BANK; Plaintiff, Oak book case, Drop leaf E Caabele $0 o odrigPgeel
SYSTEMS, INCORPO- Florida 32320. The estate UNKNOWN TENANT #1; table & chairs, Odd table, 850-510-2888 803060
RATED AS NOMINEE FOR Is testate and the date of UNKNOWN TENANT #2 vs Misc. 850-227-3823
AMERICAN BROKERS the decedent's Will Is Sep- are the Defendants. I will Resort VacationLag
CONDUIT; CHARLES tember 20, 2006. The sell to the highest and Douglas A. Klrtley, Properties of SGI,
HEATH GALLOWAY; JEN- names and addresses of best bidder for cash at, Defendant(s) |no tui
NIFER A. GALLOWAY; the Personal Representa- 11:00 AM on June 18, Agraoprtny Nr dwtn, Big piae 1.82 Acre for sale In Su-
NTLEK. ANDERS; tives and the Personal 2009, the following de- Case #: 2007-00428-CA awalts you at the largest fenced backyard. Pet okmarFlrd.Hyfot
JOHN DOE; JANE DOE Representatives' attorney scribed property as set Division#: 2 Pc Full/twin mattress vaainrna o-Kitchen has frig, micro and age boarders National For-
AS UNKNOWN are set forth below. forth In said Final Judg- UNC: sets In sealed plastic NEW payon St Geor e Is- hot plate, $500/mo plus est asse au
TENANT(S) IN POSSES- ment, to wit: $129 Ea Set. Can Delvie adW ffe r etutilltles. $44,000 Asking $28,000
SION OF THE SUBJECT Any Interested person on AMENDED NOTICE OF 545-7112 bend eofits packgreto 802874 Can be divided. 653-8792
PROPERTYwhom copy of the Notice LOT 34, SUNSET BEACH, SALE full-time employees.or6377
Defendants. of Administration is served PHASE 2, ASUBDIVISION *Front Desk Clerk SotenVla
CASE NO.:wht qualeags thevl dt A ER RMAPCOORRDEPLAT NOTINCEpuslSan tbEREBY *House eepking Desk Aatet
07-0000130-CA the Personal PLAT BOOK 6 AT PAGE der rescheduling foreclo- 5 Piece Solid Wood Pub Apyipesntdy Accepting Applications4ciylt nAachoa
Representatives, venue, or 17 OF THE PUBLIC REC- sure sale dated April 27, Set $225 NEW IN BOX. at for 1, 2 & 3 Bdrms. HC Blc26,Lt1-5
RE-NOTICE OF jurisdicton of the court Is ORDS OF FRANKLIN 2009, entered In Civil Case22-89DevryAal 13WstGfBac & Non-HC accessible $90,0006 Lor s can vid
FORECLOSURE SALE required to file any objec- COUNTY, FLORIDA No. 2007-00428-CA of the alDrvStGegeIan, units. Rental assistance Nc iaenihoho
tlons with the Court In the Circuit Court of the 2nd Ju- FI 32328 aviabe Call 850- P5-72o
NOTICE IS HEREBY manner provided In the Any person claiming an in- dlclal Circuit In and for 653-9277. TDD/TTY 711. on2rSt65-72r
GIVEN pursuant to a Final Florida Probate Rules terest In the surplus from FRANKLIN County, Flor- EqualHousing 653-7777
Judgment of Foreclosure within the time required by the sale, If any, other than Ida, wherein HSBC Bank,13 OpportunitY North Historic District 5th
dated the 12th day of De- law or those objections are the property owner as of N.A., as Indenture Trustee Street building lot.
cember, 2008, and entered forever barred. the date of the Ils pendens for the registered $170 Queen Pillow-Top 410 $65,000. 60 X100. Corner
In Case No. 07-000130-CA must file a claim within 60 Noteholders of Renals- Mattress Set. NEW In 'lot. Brokers protected. Call
of the Circuit Court of the Any person entitled to ex- days after the sale. sance Home Equity Loan 2 79 D I ve warranty. PO TALFO GOY JOB | 6120 404-218-0077
2ND Judicial Circuit In and empt property Is required Trust 2007-2, Plaintiff and 22-89Dlvry BeachNF FRSAE
for Franklin County, Flor- to file a petition for deter- Marcla M. Johnson Douglas A. Klrtley. are Sarfc
Ida, wherein DEUTSCHE mlnation of exempt prop- As Clerk of the Court defendantss, I will sell to *ato Rentals-Sales 1.16 acre lot, Lanark
BANK NATIONAL TRUST erty WITHIN THE TIME By Michele Maxwell the highest and best bid- au onBY OWNER Beach, W/ access to Gulf,
COMPANY F/K/A BANK- PROVIDED BY LAW OR As Deputy Clerk der for cash, AT THE Visit BeachRealty.net $2,750. Bill Miller Realty
ERS TRUST Is the Plaintiff THE RIGHT TO EXEMPT WEST FRONT DOOR OF A NEW 100% LEATHER YuNVRhvtopy 697-3751
and CHARLES K. AN- PROPERTY IS DEEMED Dated this 28th day of THE FRANKLIN COUNTY sofa, loveseat & chair set. for Information about WATDGetrpa
DERS; MORTGAGE ELEC- WAlVED. A surviving April, 2009. COURTHOUSE LOCATED Espresso, Solid oakferaorpsljb.IfacclaAa:%-1ce
TRONIC REGISTRATION spouse seeking an elective ON HWY 98, IN APALACH- foundation. No vinyl. Never you see job | 10wooded, vacant parcel
SYSTEMS, INCORPO- share must file an election In accordance with the ICOLA, FLORIDA, AT used. Still In crates. $1100 "guarantee", contact the Carrabelle suitable for single family
RATED AS NOMINEE FOR to take elective share Americans wth Disabilities 11:00 A.M., June 18, 2009, for set. 425-8374, can de- FTC. Home, Flood Zone X, ac-
AMERICAN BROKERS WITHIN THE TIME PRO- Act, persons needing a the following described lver The Federal Trade cess road and electric
CONDUIT; CHARLES VIDED BYLAW. reasonable accommoda- property as set forth In I~Commission 3 BR, 2 BA Unfurnished, available. 727-515-8537
HEATH GALLOWAY; JEN- tron to participate In this said Final Judgment, Is America's consumer W/D, D/W, CH& A, Deck,
NIFER A. GALLOWAY; Personal Representative: proceeding should, no to-wit:prtconaey. Plsd.Cvedbt& ,
NATALIE K. ANDERS; Ambler A. Mitchell later than seven (7) days car parking. Long term. -
JOHN DOE; JANE DOE 4188 RedOak Drive prior, contact the Clerk of LOT 46, ALLIGATOR HAR- Beautiful Solid Wood 8 www.ftc.gov/jobscams Available Now. For ap- | 7160
AS UNKNOWN Tallahassee, Florida 32311 the Court s disability coor- BOR UNIT3, ACCORDINGpcQenCoy Bed- 1-877-FTC-HELP pointment, Call Espit 0 CLn
TENANT(S) IN POSSES- Attorneyforthe Personal dinator at 850-697-2112, TO THE PLAT THEREOF room Set. GorgeousI 5-7779 Rd, 3 br, 2 ba, DW at-

PRPRYae St e I- SerD.n 60836 COar ,32 I haDn OEORK4 DCPEADGE R6 O 7txs. Sc le $149 m s defothFC 1 br, 1 a, Re vt / fur- taorh dhcakrpwortchwc uthtym
est and best bidder for Sherry D. Walker, PA. 800-955-8771, via Florida OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, ble Classified Advertising nishd endh uinit newktch sidewalk and extra stall, on
cash at the ON FRONT 2782 WestCapps Highway Relay System. FLORIDA. Department land bathmi~e.n.4mont 1 acre high and dry.
STEPS OF COURTHOUSE Monticello, Florida 32344 les 45m e. o$165K. Motivated seller,
at the Franklin County (850) 386-5656 Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING ~ smoking, pet considered. bigofr.808969
Courthouse In Apalachl- Fax: (850) 386-5136 Attorneys for Plaintiff AN INTEREST IN THE (850) 653-3838 bigofr.808969
cola, Florida at 11:00 a.m. May 14, 21, 2009 2901 Stirling Road, SURPLUS FROM THE
on the 18th day of June' 2198T Sulte 300 SALE, IF ANY, OTHER Bedroom 6 piece set, all ,
2009, the following de- RQETFort Lauderdale, Florida THAN THE PROPERTY new. Sacrifice $5
scrhbe podpeFtalasude FORPROPOSAL phoe(0)7-1 OWTHESIFNDA posibl\2. Dlvr sLanairkb village, Carlttoen

ment ton at the North- Ir~ilf o sr5 2T 4 153-39 HE NAL6E EDYS L A Otaacheodmpbocdses, and Eas TT FR T Y nso doe t d d so : -

ran r thhS~ou Proposal (R P) tite nT IONFTTHHE CRECCI NC DATEDa plcoa separate prin r0,st nd. 3 a1o-Boo nm r il 850-927-2838RC TI
east quarter of Section 31 O-ieTanig.Tepr CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND Florida, this 28th day of Sauder computer cart, 6110 -Apartments Town h ous e/ Bar rl er 810-Antque & CD lectiblCs
60 nsip ~a hCan pose of the RFP Is to seek FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, Mca2 9.Johnson $40. Cal 670-8776 R house Pnr~t Jo I.S6 moBm 8120 Spors UiiyVhc
prpsl from, qualifiedunt FLORIDA 6140 House Rentals 10-Tuk
t ~ ~ ~ohsl cro qunlSe u2er f s SFRGO AK A eou yFrid noma ttd urn erm dS br 3 ba Ex- 84-ans
fee o ian Ironc rod nd capt 'I Depty ler 6180 Outofownat Rental opeePpine 10 t at

Dock0 e Roa sad point, alsor tlonan rojectI Manage- TFF:n Airport Road.d 8am-? = om fr credit cheiick euird 83 -Silot
flying on Eas curve 0 cocv etPoetBdetn EHVNWNLe aSAIO&FSMN oueod untrlt Moil Ho o $1,100in mo. Plae Call24 BS- Btoayl&Maies
m m~ ePONTO sBE- nRFPr for8 furlthr Ifo- wy Sut hl2Dle Ma bryl Buies ficsi nc 8320 AuTVffo adrhile

su tr rodn, EcantatWrkoc 9 -A-0026 aasp1aFI3318m10
dlus tof19.0fe, n9-CtyF321 TO: Youn po ckd $1.7 lb|ve Wentf do 0T~ehr Nota piets. adwr 85065-97 88 1-
through an he notreal angle ofr 1-0031-38 ex.385 BT ANWNL 1-t 5061-05
07 dgreeswa o 28d miuesr 128093329FxLST KNOWNble ADDRESS For' Leas 120 2 & 3 brerc
secondsc forgeen anrouc arcF dis-or 134THSREE C8mrca Bicmntr193$5
tbeae 4 d on Mlnal busmess Maage HPR AP3AACHIOLA FLshod Buildinge ot a10 c 77FLO.s Inght 84-ot2Uaina
24 inutes 52 sevecondsv Workorc Invsten ActLE ee e 20Apox10 qf. 86Hy9 W mt

rigt-f-w bund o auiPry aids and service 10 LPel PHRMC 85-63-78 orff 85-250 br 1ba 2hussnie


marknd a (mare d #7160) NOT KNOW TO BEP Tr-rusor.r (uptars Fore Info call mo. Call 653-8074


PIth28et nF hEINN 00to cat Th a AOWNA NRTTE STMAY it 1210 3300es Cace en 5c r3L ra FodTauOf s01T Dea75

hd s 00 S P F ta n SKT ON MAN RESS: Tara Flr ar~ ss61 ai httkin t sn 91A1 t9a In8L ew$g 0-H -179ampes to 9pmr
the PONThwsel OF on BGNIG BacFL358 Anys pokfrerDVSO: 80 Call 65-13 93,14-15.Strig r 1 baaprten.
co tai I nes .0 artea s ,el sonm d ssy c4 rt,00 ENTA D E S ar pa 727eo l c r e c doodG o M tr 9 9 $ 9
pate in this meting ise amall gou s3@aolecom Inl elec/, water Near 6 0d wn4 PG 290 o
Tihe-f a a bove decb d par sedt a dvs t eCon YOU ARE NO A TIFID ta wOlrdlcneltsc m b ah an et uatl!tl alg tA t ia c
e alln sai cuv lbth I Om urAc rpe rrly t la oa tocsig0- 640-0-57 ng21 H 69.9a

atu h ef19.2 et Peram Orty IhA bc40 Co pn Flond:FANKU Bb osor ,Apb c



N7dges2 iue TFHAN OE -1336 Ra SIXYEGT (68), N THDE A Srt 10-HepWne V IILes 80802516
OF ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 3 THE LISEE PENDNESia Comte metn of Th CONT OF FRANKLI 3140ur -93 Bayem norain5-5380
MNorithwe snsst FodaTrans AND SATE COFA FLORD 3 )10 -uldn Buidin Supplies. Dylgh ut Fnnc
WUTSHTgNot EDAA FLAee pnortatinCordtorply Athor WIHTH PURE 16 usns |
Ityfrc immediteyflongNNEALITH Eqiment -c
THE SALE tereularly scheduled CIRETYO APLCIOADES Ilectbl les 4100 p.21-1
pIn accgordnc wthe Ithebadmetigo hus LRIA N ACCORD- 319 -w Elctonc Edctoann Apala hicl RELMAIF
daMaly 2, 00 lrocrated INNG O AMPO LT30 iewo r1b t.fo 40/Fr rno19,$9
scine wih ah soua eprl auoOa alos auntyat sries OFMSAOD C NOWs INRM C i le g |g g moCaa850p-638-7746or 2b ham oseh omel gtA301a
Library.wa Anydar peso requir Gul Coast Commnit Chp a os ot 72 o mril 286H y9 .9 mt
ateshuld contac the e tons to participate winth isal- and you are reuiredW to 300 Heat &Ftes (Gan undd -oa Uto rovid in 0 chamin cotage $725 brd 7140 -, Fam &Rn

MaktStetSut20 thCordrAtotyaten deene withins 30s 2320 Machnr / Workforce107 Training PRCe nter service ines. C/H Cal770-wtrfon
Aalon acicoa F 32 0or meeiny conacin Am-9 tlRonfan, on Flrid ADe 320-Mdcl qimn ulfFrnki PECetr InPTortPoeryFr RalgtA t ianger200 $9
Teeh -81oleTDDbee rrmnat(5) al LGawN Group PL.,N coaP~l..l ammetsSt Joeprovide fllow-up 71 a ew outof-own Do6wn 9 $5,900 Total
(850)o-a proudry 215-0 8 orb em lat Panff at rey whs 320T -le Plats& hrbs srvce &nl d sevie to, jo Real Eostae, Dna ylgtA t Fnn g
suc prceeing Am er.errman hdr nc. aMddrs s91 CorporDate Supples applcant and851 8 employers Apa trtm nt 720-Tmehr 81 w 8 ,9 mt
com.0 Lake Drve Sult 300n 3330 -UI Resauan/Hte Ind Gul &t Frankli Coun- AcIpm 850-215-1769



120ID INAN FORin FRANK wis adeful will be en clencyg in cepted.AIE Ca ll850-653-37 Prpry Pr ce wayO bhe-Dr
Forth Laudegrdae, F2 lodaLN CONYtrdagm ed o KNW FARIr Sale ""-senrE eavh 27EDTTTY1. o markth value Pries Bedauty, economy, and
9hn: 94)43-35 UTRUnSpoT BAi N K S C C omlitorptto. aio p ceW orce 9poouuE E ngD st- tiC g tnts350ie00. Plraet l st,.1e
Facsmle (94) 771-6052 CESOR BY MERGERT T Thi ntie sal b pub-M pN ferred.T $2k/r Apl by0 Groupt 850-249-3615. Dorywith0 c oabi. Theeff-
Toll3 Free: 1-0-4123 SUN BAN/SUT FLOR Ilshe once00 eac week0 fo /80. plcto A- Lnr ilpcethl cussa -
Mayd 14, 21,e 2009 0) IDA, NoATeIONA ASOCIA-s two cosecuv weIS eks rnki o in0LnakVll dltna Info knot with8 Sam pratcal
20Thec u TION, Plitif the TheS GApaahcoa 80-5-61 to:/etSuf 2 r ba, Furnishedw/ 713, new 33nd Ilhp Mitsubishnig Delft
OFuty THEt SECOND JUDI- vs.E GCCCANT reitrd I lteAt a s 11-7 ayng thogh torg have bee built5-25-
CILCICITI ADNAI K. SADDIKI et. alc WITKONESmhand andS EA/EO/M/F/Veterl emp&p. lsoyer.tg Iul miw elrg 2Nc $ n 00 r201 nWah
FLORDA this7.0fe t ti Prwy 28th dayto ofKOW Aprl, r For0 sale byal ower Lanark home, build with, plans 5
PROBtATEi DIVSIO 2009. ..n reUNCOOng r*ea *- Vilag Tow House 25 brh from Glen'L with 6'2h head
morCAS NO08042C nlmunyole anr Villageon 1o brtll 1NNW bacls add35-62 on'srs on5 frn &ep Ge roo in9 man ain Pc
IN ~ ~ pt RE: ESTAT OFein Macl M.al Johnsonao~ Inl apt. i W/D, r C//A ard dw back low maint, $8,0 ue aalbeu onr-
AMBER KATHLEE NOTICEbe OFr Clerk of theis Cour Corl $550odlleselte~o mo, 1st & last. sk B ap only. ques gt. $9,70.0 Clall
HlANNO eNg FOECOSR SALE By:uholt Micel Maxwel Web Id #cio 34366 foes Ji 85as 6al 40-42-t 88 1-5-9782 850-6536930 86 w 8 .9a
Derce as eied. NOIC ISfl HEREBY Asio Deut Clerkig r85-53

FIE NO:d 090004C GIVENll o prsa to eaolinae Florida, Dfalt Ldaw Grouply ic b
County, Floridate Ambrpermnhril c 27, 2009H andpol bt, u
NFDIITAIN nee nCseN.O o Paeyu etl sdfriurrg aps 2Br au leigr apartment. CMPEE AKAE


(Testate) VtVZCourt of th e Se lcn udl- 33622-5018 IIOn consignment at Very large, (lean, bright. ",9FO
TO: Nc ItCunanFl ay 209062 Decorator'S Washer, dryer, s ove, refrigerator *,9

AlmbeRA,,,,,,,, h lve,,, whl U)RR N T IRUTO H W A REHOUJSE included. $700 per month + Al Welded AatsAluminum
Tallahassee, Florida 32311 MERGER TO SUN 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT SOCurity deposit. Person(s)
Th dmnstalo f hBANK/SOUTH FLORIDA, OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR Now Open at BOAT SHOW
Eteat o Am bar Katlee NATIPC0\ALASSO IATDONM, FRANKLIN COUNTY 212 Williams Ave need to be quiet, clean andFR.&ST
Hannon, deesd isMNSTRIES, NASIR K. HSBC Bank USA, N.A. as Downtown Port St. Joe responsible. Bonifaynotida
pendin I a tfe FCa D F NASRWNI s e sho5-2734 (850)653-1240 or (850)670-1211 www.xtremeindustries.com

County FI Iida, Pubate SADDIKl; SUNSET BEACH Renalssance Home Equity WWW.decorators-wareliousenetnet Apalachicola


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954)453-0365
Facsimile: (954)771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
May 7, 14, 2009

3NT E CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY

CVOLR NATION

CHASE HOME FINANCE
ELCR SCCTEOSSOCRH B
MANHATTAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION
Plaintiff '

VS.

TRACK M. MCCM [N A W

MCCLAIN, et al'
Defendant(s).

CASE NO.
19-2009-CA-000078
DIVISION:

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
TRACY M. MCCLAIN A/K/A
TRACY MATTHEW
MCCLAIN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
312 Earl King Street
Apalachicola, FL
323200000

CURRENT ADDRESS.
UNKNOWN

ANGELA MARIE MCCLAIN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS

32 E~ar Kmng St~reet

CURRENT ADDRESS.
UNKNOWN

ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN

DFMENDDANT(S)NWH A

OHAEDTHKENROO AIDALUVB
ANOWN ANTRTTE1 SM
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS

LASKTNKONWONWN ADDRESS:

CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following

uroent EIondaFRANKL N

NORTHWEST CORNER

IFTYB CAKPA2 CHlFCOTLHA
A SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT ON FILE IN
COMMON USE AT THE
BCLEKEOFNTHE CR UllT
COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID
POINT ALSO LYING ON
THE INTERSECTION OF
THE SOUTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-


ARY OF 21ST AVENUE

AN TH EDNECGEREESRU3
MINUTES 55 SECONDS
EASOTUALOHNG RSLAID

GHY1 W0FAEETBTOOUTNH
MOIT SOAFDBEGll INO

BEGNN SUNR SNSOU H

ALONG SAID
RGHT-0 -WAY BOUENEDT

THENCE LEAVING SAl
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-



THENC RUN NORTH 89 D
AGREES 31 MINUTES 55
SECONDS WEST 243.59
FEET, THENCE RUN

NORTH 100.00 FEET TO


THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses within 30
ty lafuer the fl torp I ca
fault Law Group, PL.,
Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address Is 9119 Corporate
Lake Drive, Sulte 300'
Tampa, Florida 33634, and
file the original with this
Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded In the
Complaint or petition.

Ishe dnc ea we o
two consecutive weeks In
tTe eThe Apalachicola

WITNESS myhand and
the seal of t1s Court on
this 23rd day of April,
2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

Florida Default Law Group,
PL
PO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
FO9013902
May 14, 21, 2009

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
VLORID IIN


DEUTSCHE BANK NA-
TIONAL TRUST COM-
PANY F/K/A BANKERS


vs

CHARLES K. ANDERS;


The Times Thursday, May 14, 2009 7B









































































































$100 000


Please contact:
BryCo Ward
8 53 8 925 7


(ARRABELLE UNVEILS MAGNIFICENT MURAL

George Weymouth,
:. *I ~ a volunteer for
Florida's Fish and
-?ILL ,~~AIP Wildlife Conservation
Commission, has
: completed a mural
, begun nearly 18
;- months ago. The
'. .'painting, which
--' depicts flora and
""" fauna of Tate's Hell,
now hangs in the
cafeteria of the
I'Wc~P-1 Carrabelle city offices
.in the old Carrabelle
,: School. Visitors may
ma. View Weymouth's
masterwork from
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Monday through
LOIS SWOBODA


I


,L 1st tier lot is walking
,di stance to Plantati on
~:~ii~j~air strip. This on
acre building site
is next to beach boardwalk at end of cul-
de-sac in Nicks Hole. Panoramic views of
Gulf & open green space toward bay. This
high &dry lot is inthe gated community
the St George Plantation.
UNDER CONTRACT

A -John She by,7 Boer
'St. Georg~eIsland 850-927-4777
Realty www.sgirealty.com


,YOUR
BEST PICK
HERE'


Our local real estate experts have identified

what they feel are the best values around and

are Offering them to you in Real Estate Picks!

(In this section), Discover the best real estate

ValueS in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe,

Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George

Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas.

("Old Florida Slyle Home"} ";~
| New custom built in a great neighborhood |


5125,000 WITIH L) P TO
$16,000 IN REBATES
100 17th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320
Income producing duplex on the corner of
17th and Ave F in Apalachicola.
Rent one side, live in the 2 or 3 BR, 1 V/2 Ba
side. Open floor plan, Lg porches front and
back. Eligible for 1st time home buyers
$8,000 federal tax credit, PLUS matching
$8,000 rebate at closing from sellers with
full price offer.
(850) 653-1240 or (850) 899-0304 1


Thursday, MAY 1 d, 2009


B8 | The Times


Local


Send in a clear, sharp, recent photo of your child or
grandchild enjoying the summer. You may enter as
many children as you wish, but only one child per
entry. Photos will NOT be returned! Please do not
submit your only copy.
Choose which category to enter the child:
First Category: Newborn 2 yrs. old
Second Category: 3 yrs. old 5 yrs.old
You can submit your entry three ways:
1.Complete and mail entry form along with a $10 entry
fee to: Cutest Summer Baby Contest INIE, P O. Box

2. Enter or in~e0,aP news eF Tdcom ok for the
"Cutest Summer Kids" icon and instructions.
3. Drop off form, photo, and entry fee at
The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, Panama City.
Deadline for all entries is May 21, 2009 by 12 p.m. (CST)
Two rounds of public voting will run from May
25 through June 18. You may vote online at
newsherald.com, mail-in your votes, or drop them
off at The News Herald office. Each vote is just $1.00
and you can vote as many times as you'd like. Don't
forget to tell your family and friends to vote! All proceeds
from the contest will benefit Newspapers In Education.
The first place winners along with the rest of the top
Gsix vote getters from each category will be featured on
a "Cutest Summer Kids" keepsake insert in The News
Herald on Sunday, June 28th and online Saturday,
June Also, First, Second, and Third Place for each
category will receive fabulous prizes.
For more information call 850-747-5008 *
NE DTHESTAR h- i"
ERMD.. Immun r == 9td, 4


Photos courtesy of W.K. SANDERS


/LS# 233897


$395,000 St. George Island\


ATTENTION
PILOTS


'I


* Home on 60 x 100 lot in historic
Apalachicola
* 1410 square feet heated and cooled
* 3 bedroom, 2 bath
* 26 guage galvanized metal roof
* Low maintenance Hardy siding
* Upgraded trim package
* 9 ft ceilings
* Solid oak hardwood flooring
* Tile in bathrooms and utility room
* Custom alder cabinets
* Solid surface granite countertops
* Stainless Steel appliances
* City water and sewer tap included
* Sodded yard
Mailing address:
First Choice Builders
215 Avenue H
Apalachicola, FL 32320


learning the construction trade, one task at a time
Franklin County School shop classes have been busy with several projects.
The classes are building an 8' by 12' shed, with two windows and a 5'
double door. The shed will be sold to generate funds for materials and
supplies for next year's classes. In photo at upper right, from left are Chris
Chumney, Robert Osborn, T.J. Lemieux and Kevin Beasley.
In photo at lower right, the classes have also built picnic tables for use by
the seniors at breakfast and lunch. "The students are now applying many of
the principles they learned during class all year long," said teacher W.K.
Sanders.
"The goal of the program is to give students a background in construction
skills useful for the professional or the handyman," he said.


-_- J ILI eweeY --


le


I


Call Today!
O 2 7- 1 27O




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