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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00020
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: April 2, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00020
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
Full Text




palachicola


Carrabelle








YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


FAITH AND FAMILY


Tuesday, APRIL 2, 2009 www. a palach time s.com 50C




Group to try new tactic for voting


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The Concerned Citizens of Frank-
lin County signaled Saturday at their
annual meeting they plan to try a new
approach to securing countywide vot-
ing, long one of their top priorities.
A budget watchdog group, which
is no stranger to confrontation with
the county's elected officials, the
Concerned Citizens (CCFC) said it
plans in the next couple months to
empower a separate, arms-length
group to address the voting issue.
The new entity will gather the re-
quired signatures of registered vot-
ers to place a binding referendum on


the ballot by November 2010.
The move would seek to bypass
the county commission, who the
CCFC contends has dragged its feet
on countywide voting ever since vot-
ers approved a non-binding referen-
dum in November 2006, by a better
than 2-to-1 margin.
"This is going to be our major
passion for this year, to get it done,"
said Allen Feifer, who was re-elected
by acclamation as the CCFC's chair-
man.
Also approved to sit on the board
for the upcoming year were Frank
Gibson, Ken Osborne, Delores Roux,
Sandy Howze and Gail Riegelmayer,
who is acting secretary. Her husband,


Paul, serves as the CCFC's treasurer
but does not sit on the board of direc-
tors.
The group also announced two
other major priorities for the upcom-
ing year: to continue ongoing partici-
pation in the decision-making pro-
cess for the county's upcoming 2009-
10 budget and to step up monitoring
of the property appraiser's office in
regard to its property valuations.
But pursuing countywide voting,
in which individuals are elected from
each of the five county commission
and school board districts but are
voted on countywide, remains at the

See VOTING A6


Moderator Gail Riegelmayer addresses the CCFC's
annual meeting while Paul Riegelmayer, left, Frank
Gibson, center, and Allen Feifer listen.


Renowned artist


psson V

a -


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Apalachicola is privileged to
host a workshop this week led
by Albert Handell of Santa Fe,
N.M., who is widely honored
as the greatest
living pastel
artist.
He was
the first artist
elected into
the Pastel Hall
of Fame and
Pastel Society of
America and is
one of only three
living artists
to receive that
honor.
Fifteen
students from LOIS SWO
across the Above, Gina
United States traveled frorr
have gathered Scotland, to
from March Handell wor
29 through riht, Albert
April 4 to learn ght Albert
from Handell. taught a clas
Gina Campbell drawing tree
traveled from Chestnut Stre
Scotland by
plane and from Panama City by
taxi for the workshop.
Alice Jean Gibbs and her
daughter, Lynn Spohrer, close
friends of Handell, invited him
here to instruct.
"Alice and Lynn started


working with me when they
came to a class in Taos, N.M.,"
said Handell. "We have formed
a great friendship. Now I come
here every year to teach. This
is my fourth or fifth year, and I
love it here. It feels like coming


BUODA I the limes
Campbell
Dundee,
attend the
shop. At
Handell
s on
s at the
eet Cemetery.


home."
Born in
Brooklyn, N;
in 1937,
began play
chalks at an
age, create
on the cityst
He began or
studies of
and anatomy
the age of 16.
In 1954, 14
enrolled at *th
Students LeagL
of New York Cit
to study drawin|
and anatomy.
From 1961 to 19l
Handell lived
and trave
Europe. Since
1961, he has had
more than 30 one-
man shows and
received over 70


prizes and awards.
He now spends much of i
time traveling within the Un
States and abroad teaching.
has co-authored five books a

See ARTIST A6


Apalachicola might buy Pierce home for library


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Apalachicola city offi-
cials have begun talks to
purchase a historic home
adjacent to the municipal li-
brary on Avenue D and use
it to expand the space avail-
able for its collection.
City commissioners
voted unanimously March
3 to have City Attorney Pat
Floyd begin discussions to
purchase the home of Alan
Pierce, at 87 Avenue D, be-
hind the library.
Library board member
Susan Clementson and
Lynn Wilson, chair of the
Patrons of the Apalachicola
Library, backed the plan be-
fore commissioners.


UAVIU AULtKillN |I The limes
The Pierce house is landscaped with an abundance
of greenery and flowers.


Clementson said the
library intends to use the
Pierce property for its main
collection and for a separate
children's room. Wilson said
there is sufficient parking


space for about 20 cars and
suggested the city might
close off an alley to accom-
modate the project.
"There are two lots,
and we see the possibil-


ity of adding to that," said
Clementson. "We serve all
sorts of purposes and we're
growing, and we need more
space,"
The 2,300 square foot
house is on the market for
$479,000, Pierce said. He is
represented by real estate
agent Shaun Donahoe, who
was at the city commission
meeting.
The wood frame house,
etched to look like stone, has
three bathrooms, two bed-
rooms and space to house
the library's collection.
Built in about 1907, the
house was turned around
and renovated in 1927 by
the same individual who
built the downtown post of-
fice, Pierce said.


He has offered the city
the property, which encom-
passes two lots, for $350,000,
and a financing plan over
five years. Conversion to a
library use would require a
special exception because
the land is zoned residen-
tial.
Clementson said the
library saw 973 patrons in
February, with the librari-
an, volunteer and workforce
staff logging 155 hours.
The city commission also
approved the submission of
an application for a Library
Service and Technology Act
(LSTA) grant, which library
board member Carrie Kien-
zle said is an operational
grant targeted for the city's
underserved population.


County


jobless rate


highest


since '97

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

More people out in the
workplace but fewer of
them holding down jobs
than previous months is
why the county's unem-
ployment rate in February
was nearly double what it
was one year ago.
According to prelimi-
nary labor market statis-
tics released Friday by the
Florida Agency for Work-
force Innovation, the coun-
ty's jobless rate rose to 7.6
percent in February, with
349 people, out of a county
labor force of 4,611, without
jobs.
This marks the highest
percentage of jobless in
the county since July 1997
when the unemployment
rate stood at 8.2 percent.
The February 2009 un-
employment rate was up
four-tenths of 1 percent
from January's rate of 7.2
percent, when 323 people
were jobless out of a small-
er workforce of 4,492.
One year ago, in Febru-
ary 2008, the labor force
stood at 4,516 people, but
only 176 were without jobs,
for an unemployment rate
of just 3.9 percent.
The county's unemploy-
ment rate placed it as 12th
best in the state in Febru-
ary, just behind Miami-
Dade. Liberty County had
the state's lowest unem-
ployment rate at 5.5 per-
cent, followed by Alachua,
Monroe, Leon and Jackson
counties, all between 6 and
7 percent.
Union, Wakulla, Brad-
ford, Okaloosa and Jeffer-
son counties also posted
better unemployment num-
bers than Franklin. There
were 27 Florida counties
with double-digit unem-
ployment rates in Febru-
ary
Franklin's 7.6 percent
jobless rate for February
is nearly two percentage
points better than the state
average of 9.4 percent,
which represents 874,000
jobless out of a labor force
of more than 9.25 million.
Florida's jobless rate was
six-tenths of a percentage
See JOBLESS A6


Phone: (850) 653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews@starfl.com
Fax: (850) 653-8036


Letter to the Editor ................... A4
Sheriff's Report....................... B4
Church News...................... B3, B5


Society News......................... B2
Tide Chart ........................... B8
Classifieds ........................ B6-B7


o FREEDOM
FPA L 0 -R I INTERACT
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
School News & Society Friday ai 11 a.m.
Real Estate Ads -Thursday ai 11 a.m.
Legal Ads- Friday ai 11 a.m
Classified Display Ads Friday ai 11 a.m.
Classified Line Ads- Monday ai 5 p.m.


*


0


TABLE OF CONTENTS


I


NE






A2 I The Times


Local


Thursday, April 2, 2009


Always online I| ww.apalachtimes.com


Possible flooding as river levels remain high
Local officials are preparing for pos- Pierce said the Army Corps of Engi-
sible flooding along the Apalachicola Riv- neers is releasing water to avoid inunda-
er, as persistent rains keep water levels tion, and plans to max out the flood level
high. in Blountstown at 24 feet. He said river
Alan Pierce, the county's director of ad- levels are expected to crest Friday at 23.9
ministrative services, said the emergency feet, with the Ochlocknee cresting on Fri-
management office has made sandbags day also at 24 feet.
available for public use at the state yard "It takes a couple days for the water to
on Bluff Road, at the Lanark Village vol- get here," he said. "River levels will stay
unteer fire department, and at Eastpoint. up through the weekend. Because of the
"We've done everything short of de- rain locally, there could be flooding be-
claring a local state of emergency," said yond that because of rainfall south of the
Pierce. "The sandbags are for public use dams."
if they feel their house may be threatened. Area rains had exceeded 3 inches by
People who need them are those threat- Wednesday morning, and were expected
ened by river rise, those on the river itself. to continue through the end of the week.
This is not a coastal flooding, or a storm Pierce said flood stage in Franklin
surge." County is about 14 feet, with the most his-
Residents of the Womack Creek area toric flood about 27.5 feet. He said it starts
of Tate's Hell State Forest were asked to flooding in low-lying areas of the county
evacuate beginning Wednesday morning, when levels are at 20 feet in Blountstown.


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"Redneck Peep Club" 2008 Best in Show
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Entry must be
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All characters must be
marshmallow Peeps
All scenes must depict some
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* Business entries must
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* Entries must be in good
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* You can work in pairs,
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Thursday, April 2, 2009


Local


Pre-registration continues


The school is holding its
first registration for stu-
dents in all grade levels
beginning Monday, March
30 and continuing through
Wednesday, April 8.
In the past, registration
has been held only for stu-
dents entering pre-kinder-
garten and kindergarten
classes.
Elementary guidance
counselor Wanda Teat said
"Pre-registering students
will enable our school to
have programs set and
ready to go at the begin-
ning of the next school year.
It allows parents to review
what their child signs up for
and to finalize any changes
made to their coursework."
Oehlert encouraged
parents to take advantage
of pre-registration to learn


about all that the school has
to offer. "We have free break-
fast and lunch and free after-
school programs," he said.
"We have highly qualified,
certified educators as well
as academic coaches who
work with children in math,
reading and science."
The school has spe-
cial needs classrooms, re-
search-based curriculum,
science labs for grades 5-
12 and computer labs for
grades K-8 as well as year-
round intensive reading
and math remediation, Oe-
hlert said.
Parents are encour-
aged to find out more about
clubs, sports and other or-
ganizations they'd like their
children to be part of during
the 2009-2010 school year,
Teat added.


Pre-K, elementary
and middle school
pre-registration
Kindergarten through
eighth grade pre-registra-
tion will begin Monday, April
6 and continue through
Thursday, April 8.
Pre-kindergarten and
ESE pre-kindergarten reg-
istration will also be held
April 6 through 8 at the
Franklin County Learning
Center. For more informa-
tion, see Dr. Kay Cadwal-
lader, director, or call 670-
8458.
Voluntary Pre-kinder-
garten registration will be
held at the Early Learning
Coalition. For more infor-
mation, call Donna Wood at
653-4304 or 1-866-269-3022.


FSU professor sinks sharks'


teeth into students


By Joan Matey
Special to the Times

The Franklin County
Public Library after-
school program, KIT, dis-
covered a different sort of
celebrity, living right here
in our own backyard.
On March 26, Dr. Dean
Grubbs of the Florida
State University Coastal
and Marine Laboratory
had a captivated audience
of KIT ("Keeping it To-
gether") students for his
presentation on sharks.
Scientists are always spe-
cial celebrities in my book
and one look at some of
Dean's film clips taken
during "routine" research
makes him more than
eligible for an episode of
America's most danger-
ous jobs.
Recently on the Na-
tional Geographic chan-
nel, Grubbs and a team
of other scientists are
shown hauling up a huge
six-gill shark and tagging
it for tracking purposes.
Charts can be made from
these studies, show-
ing the diving habits of
these huge creatures: the
depths and distances and
daily routines.
Students were able to
carefully handle an ar-


JOAN MATEY I Special to the Times
Dr. Dean Grubbs of the Florida State University
Coastal and Marine Laboratory captivates KIT
students with sharks' teeth at Carrabelle library.


ray of dried shark's jaws
in various sizes. Those
scary rows and rows and
rows of eternally replaced
teeth (as they wear out,
new ones grow) definitely
conveyed how theirs is a
life of serious eating.
We learned the simi-
larities between sharks
and stingrays and heard
stories of unfortunate in-
juries that Grubbs had
experienced; unavoidable
when spending years and
years researching crea-
tures in the wild.
Preserved (formerly
alive)specimens of small
sharks were brought in a
large bucket to show a va-


riety of local shark types,
including the alien-like
hammerheads and bon-
net heads, and the more
common black tips, to
mention a few. Their skin
felt rough but at the same
time, sort of velvety.
Grubbs travels the
world studying sharks
and has potentially dis-
covered a new, never-be-
fore-seen species of deep
water shark in Hawaiian
waters.
KIT students loved this
program and when asked
who might consider shark
research for a career,
there were several brave
responders!


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The Times I A3


A PENNY INVESTED IS A LESSON LEARNED






















SUBMITTE PHOTO I Special to the Times
The state PTA hosted a rally in Tallahassee March 18 that brought thousands
of parents and students to the Capitol urging lawmakers to spare education
from budget cutting. Carrying signs and chanting "No more cuts- Save
our generation," 3,000 people stood on the Capitol steps and presented
15,000 pounds (worth about $20,000) of pennies, including 12,500
pennies from Franklin County. Catherine Wood, president of the Franklin
Teachers Association, said the consolidated school, the Learning Center at
Brown and the ABC School all pitched in and collected pennies to represent
children and staff in the county.
The Franklin County group, who also included Deedee Dasher, president
of Franklin Support Staff, and bus drivers Liz Frye and Liz Roper, pictured
above with pennies, visited representatives and senators. "They were
very receptive and listened to our concerns," said Wood. "Each time we
were told that the State of Florida is in a very serious financial crisis. We
suggested that a penny sales tax increase for the next three years could
generate over $3 billion for education. The Florida Education Association is
working very diligently to have our politicians to make education in the state
a priority." The group later met up with Superintendent Nina Marks, who
was in meetings all morning with other superintendents.


Library students to honor special women Sunday


Students in the
Franklin County Public
Library's TIGERS and
KIT programs will be
honoring the special
women in their lives at
a celebration supper
this Sunday, April 5
beginning at 4 p.m. at the
Apalachicola Community
Center at Battery Park.
Honoring Women in
our Students Lives -
Women Who Inspire is the
culmination of Women's
History Month activities at
the program sites. Nadine
Kahn, guest speaker at the


event, will address stress
relief for women.
There will be a Youth
Rally on Monday, April
13tat the Apalachicola High
SchoolBaseballfieldfrom 1
to 6 p.m. The Anti-Tobacco
Program for Today's Hip
Hop Generation theme is
"STEP (Smoking Tobacco
Equals Pain) in the
name of life and snuff out
tobacco."
All students from 10
years old and up are
welcome to attend this
energetic rally. There
will be something for


everyone including: music,
workshops, contests,
food, giveaway items,
and prizes. Registration
begins at 12:30 p.m.
Studentsarealsoinvited
to take part in the anti-
tobacco poster contest and
a writing contest based on
this year's theme. Submit
entries of posters, essays,
or poems to the Library
branches in Eastpoint and
Carrabelle and to the new
Program Center in the old
Apalachicola High School
Field House no later than
April 9.


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Opinion


A4 I The Times


JI


Thursday, April 2, 2009


The way young



minds work



still fascinates

I am on the last day of spring break, and I have just
finished grading a massive pile of literary analysis
papers, poetry projects and senior research papers. I did
it right this time. I spread everything out on the dining
room table and graded for an hour or so a day. I had the
leisure to write long notations and ponder recurrent
writing weaknesses.
Will they ever stop writing "alot"? It is two words,
not one, my dears. Will they ever keep tenses and point
of view consistent? Will they ever learn how to use
a semi-colon? Will they ever believe I actually read
everything they write and stop cutting
and pasting from articles and essays
on the Internet? After 15 years in the
classroom, the evidence points to the
contrary.
After all this time, I am still
fascinated by the way their minds work.
New research indicates their brains
don't reach full reasoning maturity until
RED WHITE the mid-20s. I believe it. Their decisions
AND ROUX often reflect an amazing naivet6.
Denise Roux For example, the 10th-grade Reading
FCAT features two 80-minute sessions.
I agree that it is grueling and that many
of the passages are mind-numbing. However, this is the
test they must pass for graduation. Too many kids say,
"Oh, I just got so bored that I gave up and marked any
answer."
Excuse me, you couldn't concentrate for less than
three hours on a test so important to your future? Do
you have to be constantly entertained?
Of course, this doesn't apply to all students. Many are
self-motivated and will try their hardest out of a sense of
personal honor. Thank God. I have to teach whomever
walks into my classroom door. Their test performance
reflects directly on me and our school.
Now that FCAT is over and done with, many students
want to believe the school year also has cranked to a
halt. "Come on, Ms. Roux, let's just take it easy now, the
test is over."
I can't blame them. We put so much emphasis on
testing skills; it's hard for them to fathom there are other
valuable lessons to be learned. And, by the way, why
should they learn anything that is not going to be tested?
I should add here, not only tested, but also counted
for graduation. They only have to pass reading and math
in the 10th grade to earn a diploma. Writing also is tested
in 10th and then science in the llth. Those scores count
toward the school grade, and that's it.
If you want to see a bunch of sullen juniors, try
administering the science FCAT one year. No amount
of cajoling will put them in a good mood about taking a
grueling test that does not count for them unless you
consider the grade on their transcript.
I am not a lone voice in bemoaning this ridiculous
test. Columnist Ralph De La Cruz of the Sun Sentinel
wrote "Get rid of the FCAT" on March 6.
"Since its inception in 1998, it has stressed out our
kids, changed the educational priorities in the classroom,
wasted precious class time, forced good educators
to leave the profession early and forced unnecessary
changes in good schools.
"If the feds really want to stimulate us, change the
federal No Child Left Behind law that requires every
state to test third- through eighth-graders every year in
math and reading, so that we can finally rid ourselves of
the FCAT beast.
"In Florida alone, that would save $51,577,368."
Believe me, that $51 million is only a token figure.
Much more money is spent on FCAT preparation
materials, scoring and more. The only ones benefitting
are the testing corporation giants like McGraw Hill.
I want someone important in the education world
to look me in the eye and say that FCAT has improved
education in Florida. The test has its defenders, but they
aren't usually in the classroom.

Denise Roux is a regular columnist for the
Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. Tb reach her, email
her at rouxwhit@mchsi.com


palachicola
Carrabelle


THE TIMES

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


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P.O. Box 820
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Phone 850-653-8868


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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


We can live without much, but not without hope


I received an email this
morning Re: Sad News. It
was from a family member up
North attempting to inform
family in the South of the
suicide death of a family friend.
Even though I had not been in
contact with him in quite some
time, I still could not help but
wonder why he would do such INT
a thing. Temolyn
He had to have lost hope. I
concluded he must have lost hope. He
gave up.
The other day I was watching the
Franklin County Commission meeting
when all throughout I kept saying to
myself this is hopeless. Some of the
decisions that are made, it seems like,
"We just don't get it."
Here again, I thought about the
phrase from Abraham Lincoln's
Gettysburg Address, "Government
of the people, by the people, for the
people..." Sometimes it does not
seem, (to me) that this is what is going
on.
After watching for over an hour, all
the people, the people being governed,
the people governing and the other
people "for the people?" I was just
about to give up when, all of a sudden,
near the end there was this ray of
hope. This hope came for me when
Commissioner Jackel commented
on being happy to be a part of the
commission when they agreed to
waive the building permit fee for
churches.
It is not so much that issue but
what she later said in reference to
what her mother had told her. She
said, "It is only what you do for God
that really counts." I agree with her
mom.
As governmental leaders, people
who govern, there is hope for us, the
people who are governed, if you would
get and keep that thought in mind.
Only what you do for God, for His
name's sake, will really count in the


"YING
TUNE
n Wintons


Without mentioning
the specific, but having in
mind some recent financial
decisions made by our county,
I was thinking, if these type
of decisions are made even
though not everyone agrees,
they are still made and nobody
stands up against it, I too
began to have thoughts of
hopelessness.


Loss of faith and trust in
the system, and the people who allow
such things to be, plagues me daily.
So being one of the people, instead of
giving up, I began to pray a prayer of
hope because we can live without a
whole lot of things, but we cannot live
without hope.
No matter how complex the
problems we might solve or how high
the mountains we must climb or how
impossible to meet the demands that
are made upon us everyday, we must
have hope that some day the world
will change. We must believe that the
black skies will become blue skies and
the Lord will make a way some how.
Nothing more demoralizes a
person or a people like the feeling that
there is no hope. In order for life to
seem worth living, a person must have
the prospect that there is a bright side
somewhere.
No matter how dim or hopeless our
situation might seem, all of us need
to maintain healthy hope levels in our
lives.
I have renewed my commitment
to praying for our governmental
officials and leaders, realizing that I
can place my hope in God. As we pray
this prayer by Dr. Charles Stanley, let's
remember to:
Pray that they would realize their
personal sinfulness and their need for
Jesus Christ.
Pray that they would recognize
their own inadequacy to fulfill their
tasks and that they would depend
upon God for knowledge, wisdom and
the courage to do what is right.


Pray that they would reject
all counsel that violates spiritual
principles, trusting God to prove them
right.
Pray that they would resist those
who would pressure them to violate
their conscience.
Pray that they would reverse the
trends of socialism and humanism in
this nation, both of which defy man
rather than God.
*Pray that they would be ready to
sacrifice their personal ambitions and
political careers for the sake of this
city, county, state and nation if yielding
them would be in the best interest of
their country.
Pray that they would rely upon
prayer and the Word of God as the
source of their daily strength, wisdom
and courage.
Pray they would restore
dignity, honor, trustworthiness and
righteousness to the office they hold.
Pray that they would remember
to be good examples in their conduct
to the fathers, mothers, sons and
daughters of this city, county, state and
nation.
Pray that they would be
reminded daily that they are
accountable to Almighty God for the
decisions they make.
We can turn to Psalm 43:5: "Why
are you downcast, 0 my soul? Why so
disturbed within me? Put your hope
in God, for I will yet praise him, my
Savior and my God."
Hold on to hope as an alternative
to giving up. Hope that where we are
is not where we always will be. Hope
that this nonsense will make sense
one day. We can live without a lot of
things, but we cannot live without
hope.

Temolynn Wintons is a
professional educator in
Apalachicola, active in directing
youth activities in her church and
community. Reach her at lynn@
temolynnwintons.com.


Letters to the EDITOR


Protect children's
education from
budget cuts
My purpose is not to
alienate one group of
citizens against the other.
I am asking "What do
we as a people consider
most important?" I am
attempting to ensure
that what we value most,
our children's education,
is protected from a cut
of over $1 million to the
school budget.
Recently, we (the
voters) approved a salary
increase to the educators
of the Franklin County
School District. Now we
learn that due to projected
budget cuts all this is in
jeopardy. Why? I am not
the finance director nor do
I wish to debate where the
money went for these pay
increases.
I can't recall during an
election when a politician
- local, state and federal
- did not use education as
their number one issue. It's
slogans such as "children
are our future" are often
used on us voters as an
assurance to increase
funding for education.
I graduated in 1973
in the first class from
Apalachicola High School.
We all know that over
the years our schools
have produced highly
effective people: pilots
who flew over Cuba;
officers who attended
military academies;
heroes who fought and
died for this great nation;
medical doctors, lawyers,
federal judges, teachers,
professors, carpenters,
plumbers as well as those
in commercial seafood.
Those of you who know
my family and me will
remember that my father
and mother did not send
us to school as a burden to
the faculty. I can honestly
say that we were raised
in a family with structure
and discipline. On the rare
occasion when we did get in
trouble at school, my father
did not blame the teacher
and ask whose fault it was.


It was just "turn
and assume the
Some may think
but I do think we
support our teac
giving them the ]
the doubt.
So my questi
is most importai
citizens of the cc
Truly children a
future and educz
should come firs
been puzzled ho
government con
to give pay raise
its workers whe:
employees have
stagnant for thri
consecutive yea
year will be no d
Talks of 5 percer
in progress.
How did we a
condone college
(teachers), with
future (children)
classroom, maki
money that thos
the-job training
for county gover
In these tough e
times it comes d
"What should go
provide?"
It's easy for r
"Children are ou
and we must inv
future, not cut. V
it takes to provi(
should be on the
cuts. If county g
doesn't seem to
then I am sure t
board can do the
I will close wi
following quotes
Founding Fathe.
Benjamin Frn
Bible and a new
every house, a g
in every district
studied and app
as they merit -
principal support
morality and civ
Benjamin Ru
removing the Bi
schools we woul
wasting so muc
and money in pu
criminals and so
pains to prevent
Take the Bible o
schools and their
be an explosion


around Don't expand library
position."
this cruel into historic district
should My wife and I have
'hers by owned our house at
benefit of 90 Avenue D since the
winter of 2001. We have
on is what enjoyed spending time in
nt to the Apalachicola over the past
county. years because of the quiet
re our ambience of the historic
ation district. We were initially
st. I have attracted to Apalachicola
w county because of the quality of
itinues the historic district and the
*s to city's strict adherence to the
n state integrity of the R-1 zoning
been that maintains this quality.
,ee We both are strong
rs and this supporters of the
different. library. I am an architect
nt cuts are specializing in historic
restoration and my wife is
is a society a librarian in the Monroe
graduates County school system. We
our recognize the importance
) in their of improving services to the
ing less residents of Apalachicola,
e with on- however, we both feel that
working the change of use and
rnment? zoning at 87 Avenue D
conomic is incompatible with the
conomioc surrounding single-family
lown to houses in our immediate
)vernment neighborhood and will
negatively impact our
ne enjoyment of our house.
ir future" Below is a list of our
rest in that concerns, as directed
Whatever to the Apalachicola
de funding Planning and Zoning
table, no Commissioners,:
overnment 1. Parking. The present
make cuts, owner of 87 Avenue D is
he school Allen Pierce. One of Allen's
e same. pastimes is gardening, and
ith the as a result he has created
3 from our a very beautiful garden
rs: that surrounds all sides
anklin "A of his house. If his house
spaper in becomes the library, where
:ood school will the required parking
- all be located and what part
reciated of his garden will be
are the destroyed? Where will
rt of virtue, the required paved ADA
il liberty." parking spaces be located?
sh "By Even if the required
ble from parking is located away
d be from the corner of Avenue
h time D and 7th Street, library
finishing patrons will tend to park
D little closest to the front entry
t crime, in the Avenue D right-
ut of our of-way at the front of the
re would house. This street parking
in crime." will significantly alter the
Dan Parish residential character of
Apalachicola the neighborhood. Also the


new parking lot, wherever
it is located, will be
required to have nighttime
lighting which will also
change the character of
the neighborhood forever.
2. ADA Accessibility.
If the existing house
is converted into the
library, major exterior
changes will need to be
implemented to adapt it
to ADA requirements.
A paved accessible
route from the street to
the entry, a ramp, and
signage will need to be
installed. Although we
hope these changes will
be designed sensitively,
they will forever change
the residential character
of the house and
neighborhood.
3. Air Conditioning
Units. The new library
use will require a more
controlled interior
environment to protect
the collection. This system
will be significantly
larger than the existing
air conditioning units for
the house. They will run
most of the year and most
of the time. No matter
where they are located
on site, they will be loud
and constant. This noise
will severely impact the
quiet ambience of the
neighborhood forever.
I believe there are other
and better alternatives
for the expansion of the
library and I would be
happy to volunteer my
professional services
to the library board and
the city to explore those
alternatives. I support
all improvements to
the library, but not
those that encroach on
the R-1 zoning and the
surrounding historic
district.
Please consider our
reasons for not wanting
this change that will
negatively impact our
house. Please maintain
the integrity of the R-1
zoning and the historic
district by voting to deny
this proposal.
Thank you for your
consideration,
Thomas and Phyllis D. Pope


*


NE






Thursday, April 2, 2009


Local


The Times I AS


FWC offers grants to secure Dumpsters from bears


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

The bear population is grow-
ing. An encounter with a treed
sow and cubs at a Carrabelle res-
taurant and predation by a young
male bear on caged birds in East-
point put bears in the news this
spring.
Happily, some local residents
have learned to cope with furry
neighbors and secure the garbage
containers and other sources of
food that act as bear magnets.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission's (FWC)
Bear Management Program is
initiating a new plan that will help
county residents to secure even
more garbage containers against
the powerful scavengers.
The program has secured a
grant to cost-share the price of
retrofitting dumpsters to make
them more bear resistant. The
program requires the waste han-
dler (i.e. WastePro or Emerald
Waste) and customer each pay
one-third of the cost, and BMP
will pick up the rest. Although cost
estimates vary by size and design
of canister, a retrofit could rea-
sonably be expected to cost about
$300 per Dumpster, so each party
would provide $100. Waste Pro
and Emerald Waste Services are
aware of the program and willing
to participate.
Wildlife biologist Adam War-
wick said Emerald Waste, which
serves part of the county, is inves-
tigating bear-proof containers but
does not yet offer this option.
Ralph Mills, a spokesman for
WastePro, a solid waste disposal
company serving part of the coun-
ty, said, "We can get bear proof
Dumpsters for any business that
desires one. For residential areas,
where you have enclaves like St.
Theresa, we can get the barrels,
but it would be more cost-efficient
to put a centralized dumpster in
place."
He said individual bear-proof
containers ($195) cost about three
times as much as regular trash
barrels. The cost of bear-proof
Dumpsters is only 30 percent
higher than standard models,
which is less prohibitive.

First come, first served
Because these funds are from
a grant, this is a one-time oppor-
tunity. Finding is available on a
first-come, first-served basis. The
grant deadline is June 1, and all
funds must be spent before that
time.
If you are interested in the pro-
gram, then call 697-3734 as soon as
possible. Funding is available only
to purchase and install bear-proof
containers, not to pay continuing
fees for trash pick-up. Retrofitting




Employees
say an
electric fence
around the
trash area
solved the
bear problem
for Two Al's
Restaurant
at 1 Gulf
Beach drive
in Carrabelle.


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA
Ken LaPaz of Hog Wild Barbeque, 1593 U.S. Highway 98 in Carrabelle, retrofitted this Dumpster
for about $200. He said he invites anyone interested in his design to come by for a look, but not at
lunchtime please.


can take some time and effort, so
it is vital to act quickly if you want
to participate.
Warwick and his associates are
looking for areas where retrofit-
ting will benefit the most people.
Residential Dumpsters for trailer
parks and apartment complexes
and Dumpsters serving commu-
nity resource centers, such as
schools and churches, are high on
the priority list to receive funds.
Dave Telesco, program coordi-
nator for the FWC, said the match-
ing funds program can be used to
help subsidize the acquisition of a
neighborhood Dumpster.
"If we can get the waste under
control, you're going to see a dra-
matic drop in bear problems," he
said.
"We recognize that waste from
restaurants can significantly con-
tribute to community conflicts,
and so we would be amenable
to cost-sharing with businesses
where there is a clear link be-
tween their waste and neighbor-
hood complaints," Warwick said.
"We are looking at 2 to 8 yard
Dumpster sizes, but keep in mind
retrofitting larger Dumpsters is
likely to be more costly than the
smaller dumpsters, so the funds
will help fewer locations."

Always a way to solve it
Some local merchants have al-
ready taken steps to secure their
refuse.
Two Al's, west of Carrabelle,


has constructed an electric fence
around their Dumpster, and em-
ployees say this has proved very
effective.
Wildlife technician Ron Copely
said the FWC lent the restaurant
a fence to try out before they pur-
chased one of their own.
"We've got equipment to lend
in a case like this. We even have
bear-proof trash cans for people to
try out," he said.
Telesco said installing an
electric fence is quick and eco-
nomical in most cases. Fences
generally cost less than $200 to
install.
Ken LaPaz, owner of Hog Wild,
also in Carrabelle, retrofitted his
own Dumpster. He drilled half-
inch holes in the Dumpster and
inserted I-bolts to hold a sheet
of plywood in place, securing the
lid.
"I came up with the idea
through a little time and trial and
error. It took me about two hours
to do the work and cost about
$200," he said. "The bears still
come back. There was one out
here the other day, but it couldn't
get in. Yes, it's a problem. I just
don't like the idea of hurting the
bears. There's always a way you
can solve it without hurting the
bears."
Gary Fritz of Alligator Point is
offering his own version of a hand-
crafted bear-proof container for
home trash cans. He said the bear
baffler is a wooden box construct-
ed out of 4 x 4s surrounded by 1 x


6s with a hinged latched door on
one side.
"I built one for myself about
six months ago, and it has
solved my problem," Fritz said.
"You can see where they have
scratched at it, but they didn't
get in. My pick-up guy from
Emerald Waste just unlatches
it, empties the can and closes
it back up. It worked so well for
me, I thought I'd try offering it to
other people."
Fritz is marketing his bear-
proof boxes for $475.

Check with service provider
"If you can make it bear-proof
yourself, then I'm for it, but we're
trying to take the track of going to
your waste management provider
before you make any changes to
be sure they will still service you
after you make changes," Telesco
said. "Sometimes, it may be better
just to allow them to do the retro-
fit."
LaPaz said one reason he made
his own change to his Dumpster
is because his female employees
might not be able to lift the heavy
metal lid of a bear-proof contain-
er.
Telesco said the best way to
deal with that problem is behavior
changes. He suggested the lid to
the container might be left open
for only part of the day or that
there might always be a designat-
ed person on site to deal with the
heavy metal lid.


Come out



for food,



friends
Got home from the
hospital last Friday. Had a
pretty good week at home
so far. I really appreciated
all the cards, calls and
visits. Thank you.
You have been to
the Legion Post 82 for
hamburger night, haven't
you? It
is really
catching
on, and
they have
decided
to do
away with
birthday
LANARK NEWS night and
Jim Welsh leave the
hamburger
night. Of
course, we will be glad to
see you on Wednesdays
and Sundays for pizza! Eat
in or take out; just call 697-
9998 to put in for one to go.
You also are welcome
to join us Saturday night
for dinner. All the servings
begin at 5 p.m. and end at 9
p.m., so come on down and
enjoy the evening with us.
These meals, along with
the breakfasts, lunches
and dinners at Chillas
Hall, are always open to
everyone.
Mark your calendar
for Saturday, April 11.
Members of the Lanark
Golf Club will cook and
serve the last pancake
breakfast for the season;
they will resume in
October. Thank you for
your continued support.
Keep the second Saturday
open; it might continue
through the summer
months!
Don't forget the big
yard sale at The Legion
for Tonya's Hope. The
sale opens at 9 a.m., and
at 12:15 p.m., a roast pig
lunch will be served,
including side dishes
for your donation of $8.
Of course, Thomas Lee
Brannan will roast the pig.
Please keep Tom
Shields in your prayers,
and strength and comfort
for MaryAnn and their
family. We also need to
keep William "Bill" Lane
and his family in our
prayers. And, of course,
all the departed. Pray for
their eternal peace.
I am not quite clear
about the school budget
cuts. I figure all that
money from the lottery
would pick up the slack.
You reckon it accidentally
could have been diverted
to another department?
Be kind to one another
and check in on the sick
and housebound, and
remember volunteers
make it happen! Become
one today.
Until next time, God
bless America, our troops,
the poor, homeless and
hungry.


FREE Wellness Seminars!
Saturday mornings from 10:00 to 11:00 a.m.

THvE GARDEN SHOP
147 Commerce Street, Apalachicola
Sponsored by Franklin County Health Department, Gardens, Inc.
and Florida Department of health


Early Registration for SUMMER and FALL
Don't Miss Your Chance Early Registration begins April 13
Beginning April 8, you can view the Summer and Fall Class Schedule online at www.gulfcoast.edu search
through hundreds of available classes.
The Counseling Center is available to assist students Monday Thursday, 8:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Students can
also register online at www.gulfcoast.edu 7 days a week!

Need a career change?
Train to become a Licensed Practical Nurse!
Become an LPN in just one-year! Only 30 students are admitted each year- Apply Online Today! The
application deadline is April 30 and class begins in June. For more information about this program, contact
Sharon Milner at 850.873.3524 ext 5521 or visit www.gulfcoast.edu.

Welcome Spring!
All GCCC campuses will be closed for Spring Break.
Gulf Coast Community College Panama City Campus, The Gulf/Franklin Center, The North Bay Center, and
The Tyndall Education Center will be closed for Spring Break on Friday, April 3. The College will re-open
on April 6, 2009.


*I






A6 I The Times


Local


Thursday, April 2, 2009


Susan Kiss, of Tallahassee, displays her
"backpack" of pastels.


ARTIST from page Al


is about to release his
third DVD.
"Pastels were
once considered a
secondary medium,
but it has undergone
a renaissance, thanks
to me and some of my
friends," he said. "Up
until about 30 years
ago, pastelists stayed
indoors. Working with
pastels on location is
brand new. It's become
a movement and I'm a
part of that."
His paintings are in
numerous private and
public collections and
museums.
For a period of 15
years, 1960 to 1975,


Handell's pastels were
included in every book
published on pastels in
the U.S.
His pastels enjoy
international reputation.
He is well known for
his painting workshops.
He is now represented
by the Ventana Fine Art
Gallery in Santa Fe; the
Howard Portnoy Gallery
in Carmel, Calif.; and the
Third Canyon Gallery in
Denver.
Students of Handell
are urged to acquire a
large palette of chalks.
"With 10 colors of
pastel, you can draw, but
you can't paint," he said.
"I like to paint."


Dr. Robert E. King Dental



Due to the death of Dr. Robert E. King, our
dental office will be closed permanently.
Please make arrangements to pick up your
patient dental records. The office, located
at 325 Long Avenue in Port St. Joe, will be
open Monday through Wednesday from 9-11
a.m. and 2-4 p.m. ET until the end of April.
After this time, your records will be made
available at the Gulf County Health
Department dental clinic, located at 2475
Garrison Ave. in Port St. Joe. For more
information, call our office at 850-227-1812.


Art Walk to celebrate palettes and palates JOBLESS from paqe A1


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer


From noon to 6 p.m. April 4,
Apalachicola hosts its third an-
nual Art Walk, featuring local
cuisine and art and wines from
around the world.
Potters, painters, photogra-
phers and more will display their
work at downtown businesses.
More than 40 artists plan to ex-
hibit this year. Among those art-
ists expected on Saturday and
their locations are:
Petunia's: Stained glass
artist John Devault of Mexico
Beach
Blue: Plein Air Paint Out
veteran Sara Beth Fair, exhibit-
ing her paintings alongside the
darkly humorous ceramics of
Apalachicola's Leslie Wallace
Coon.
Owl Caf6: Apalachicolan
Emily Mikkelson
Caf6 Floridita: Beth Apple-
ton will sketch
The Grady Market: Jew-
eler Liz Smith, stained glass
artist Lori Bluni, potter Mark
Fletcher, oriental water colorist
Ann Kozeliski and glassworker
Darcy Abbott.
Garden's Inc.: Folk artist
Anne Hempel
Downtown Books: Painter
Sue Atkins, of Carrabelle, will
demonstrate technique of apply-
ing oils to linen
Riverlily: Wooden flute mak-
er Kenyon Wilson
The Frame Shop: Water-
colorist Penny L. Anderson, of
Carrabelle, pastel artist Mary


Brown, photographers Ron
Dickey and Charlie Sawyer, and
painter Neil Smith Willow, of
St. George Island, will display
work.
Chamber of Commerce of-
fices: Potter Jonathan Rudloff
Avenue E: Folk artist Rid-
ley Stallings, Christina McDer-
mott who works in watercolors
and creates photo collages, and
painter Davey Bonar
The Honey Hole: Collage
artist Claudia Howat
An exhibit of children's art at
the Cotton Warehouse on Wa-
ter Street will be from noon to 4
p.m.
These artists and more will be
scattered downtown and through
the bowery district, including
local artists Kristin Anderson,
Lane Autrey, Richard Bickel, Al-
ice Jean Gibbs, Katherine Neill,
Lynn Wilson, Gerry Garlick and
Amy Friedman.
While browsing the artistic
offering, visitors can also enjoy
a taste of local cuisine. Six doz-
en downtown eateries will pour
wine and serve samples of sig-
nature dishes throughout the af-
ternoon. The Apalachicola Sea-
food Grill, Owl Caf6, Tamara's
Caf6 Floridita, Up the Creek,
and That Place in Apalach will
participate. Sometimes
Go to any of the six locations
Saturday and purchase a special
wine glass to use in the tasting.
Each of the participating restau-
rants will offer a special entree
following the Art Walk and David
Carrier will be the guest chef at
Caf6 Floridita that evening.


point higher than the January rate of 8.8
percent and is up 4.2 percentage points
from one year ago.
The state's current unemployment rate,
highest since April 1976 when the rate was
also 9.4 percent, is 1.3 percentage points
higher than the national unemployment
rate of 8.1 percent.
Florida has lost almost 400,000 nonag-
ricultural jobs over the past year, continu-
ing the trend of over-the-year declines that
began in August 2007 primarily due to de-
clines in construction jobs.
Gov. Charlie Crist has signed on to an
infusion of $165 million in federal economic
stimulus funds to directly benefit both job
seekers and businesses.
"These funds will provide critically-
needed training and job placement servic-
es including summer employment oppor-
tunities for young people and assistance
for Floridians at One-Stop Career Centers
around the state," said Cynthia Lorenzo,
interim director of the Florida Agency for
Workforce Innovation.
Additionally, the agency has available
nearly $1.4 billion in federal stimulus
funds for Florida's unemployment com-
pensation program, including benefits for
unemployment compensation recipients.
The agency began mailing and electroni-
cally depositing an additional $25 weekly
in federal stimulus funds for qualified
unemployment compensation recipients
last week.
Floridians are encouraged to utilize the
Employ Florida Marketplace, an online
tool that provides comprehensive work-
force services at no cost. Employers can
post job openings and job seekers can post
resumes at www.employflorida.com.
For more information on other Agency
for Workforce Innovation programs, go to
www.FloridaJobs.org.


VOTING from Dace Al


top of the list.

New political
committee would seek
1,000 signatures
Feifer said the CCFC is
interviewing individuals to
serve on a political commit-
tee to be formed by June 1.
The committee would se-
cure signatures of about
1,000 voters on a petition
to hold a binding referen-
dum. This would allow for
a cushion beyond the 774
signatures, or 10 percent
of registered voters, which
the law requires.
The CCFC would help
fund the new political com-
mittee and turn over all its
research to it, but the two
would remain separate,
Feifer said.
Once the petitions were
certified by Supervisor of
Elections Ida Elliott, she
would assign a date for the
election.
Feifer said the earli-
est election in which the
entire county participates
would be November 2010;
both Apalachicola and
Carrabelle have municipal
elections this fall. He said
organizers might ask for a
mail-in ballot, but it is too
soon to say.
With Gail Riegelmayer
serving as moderator for
the meeting, Feifer out-
lined the CCFC's research
into the countywide voting
issue, stressing the group
has opted for a binding ref-
erendum as an alternative
to legal action.
He said 37 of Florida's
67 counties have county-
wide, also known as at-
large, voting, while 23 have
single-member voting, six
have a hybrid of the two
and one has a unique sys-
tem.
Feifer said following
the non-binding referen-
dum, the county commis-
sioners paid lip service to
voters' wishes, but let the
matter drop. In addition,
he said, they declined to
instruct County Attorney
Michael Shuler to seek
a legal opinion from the
Florida attorney general's
office as to how county-
wide voting might bear on
a federal judge's ruling in
the mid-1980s that created
single-member districts as
a remedy for past discrimi-
nation.
Apalachicola's African-
American community has
been outspoken in its op-
position to at-large voting,
arguing it would return
the county to an era when
blacks could not be elected
to positions in county gov-


ernment.
Gail Riegelmayer, how-
ever, took a different view
Saturday, arguing much
has changed over the past
two decades, as evidenced
by the election of African-
Americans to Apalachicola
mayor all the way up to the
president.
She said racial demo-
graphics have shifted in
the county commission
district that encompasses
the Hill, which Noah Lock-
ley now holds, to the point
where it is now a white ma-
jority district that, if it pur-
sued strictly racial politics,
could elect a white county
commissioner.
"It's not a race thing
anymore," she said.
Riegelmayeralso sought
to clarify what she called a
major confusion surround-
ing the issue. She stressed
that under countywide vot-
ing, each of the five com-
missioners would still have
to live in the district in
which he or she is running,
so there would continue to
be geographic representa-
tion. The only difference
would be that the voters in
the entire county would be
entitled to vote for each of
these commissioners.

Problems alleged
with property
appraiser's office
With slides outlining
the CCFC's position pro-
jected in front, about two
dozen people listened to
an argument framed by a
stark statistical narrative
that began by asserting
that "people are hurting
in Franklin County and
beyond" and that is "not a
Democrat or Republican
issue, not a rich or poor is-
sue."
The data asserted that
the county trails the state
in economic development,
with an average income
of $27,179, well below the
state's average family in-
come of $39,776.
Nearly 14 percent of the
county's workforce works
for local government,
which is one of the highest,
if not the highest rates of
government employment
in the state, it said.
"Our seafood industry
is a shadow of what it once
was with no hope of return-
ing to the glory days," read
the slide. "Construction
jobs are scarcer still; retail
stores and restaurants are
closing on a regular ba-
sis."
The presentation said
high property taxes scare
off new business and stifle


job creation and that "in-
equities in how properties
are assessed creates mis-
trust and hurts economic
development."
Feifer said the CCFC
has researched dozens
of assessment inequities
that violate state law. "We
have a war chest of proper-
ties improperly assessed,"
he said, noting that the
CCFC has researched va-
cant properties claimed
as homestead exemptions,
in violation of state law, as
well as land reverted to
agricultural or timbering
uses that lowers tax rev-
enues.
"The CCFC believes
the value of under-as-
sessed property is a very
large number, and as a
consequence, the county
doesn't realize the revenue
it ought to receive," Feifer
said. "We've got dead peo-
ple who own homesteads.
We have seven motels that
were 100 percent home-
steaded."
He said the CCFC is
seeking "to have the whole
county reappraised to get
a new baseline, and we're
starting from there."

School system
criticized, economic
development sought
The CCFC presentation
included a harsh portrayal
of the county's schools, de-
scribing "a dismal school
reputation as demonstrat-
ed by low graduation rates
and bottom of the rung test
scores that rob our chil-
dren of a decent future."
The slides zeroed in on
the county's high dropout
rate and low percentage of
college-bound graduates
and high percentage of
school suspensions when
compared to the state av-
erage.
"Yet our teacher/pupil
ratio may be the lowest in
the state, at one teacher for
every 8 12 students," they
said, noting a declining
enrollment for the consoli-
dated school, which they
said is now at about 825.
"Our $55 million school is
the most expensive in the
state on a cost per student
basis."
The CCFC also was
critical of a lack of orga-
nized economic develop-
ment. "Why is working for
the county, city or hospital
the best job anyone can
hope to find in Franklin
county?" they said. "Near-
ly 700 people work for local
government, and their av-
erage wage is over $5,000
more than you can find in


the private sector and with
much better benefits."
Because of a lack of
political will, "an attitude
to keep the status quo,"
county government main-
tains "an unequal play-
ing field that favors some
over others in hiring, land
use changes, zoning and
a pattern of inside dealing
resulting in undervalued
property assessments,"
the CCFC said.
The CCFC also took is-
sue with what it termed
"the highest incarceration
rate in the state (with) 9.3
percent of our citizens are
locked up or are on proba-
tion."
Some in the audience
expressed concern with
becoming publicly involved
in the CCFC because law
enforcement might look
the other way if they were
subject to retaliation. Feif-
er said that beginning with
former Sheriff Mike Mock
and continuing with Sher-
iff Skip Shiver, there's been
"a major difference in tone
and temper" that has reas-
sured his group.
"A few years ago, when
we were formed, it was
scary," he said. "Now it's
much more subtle."
In his report, treasurer
Paul Rieglemayer said
membership rolls are
kept confidential since the
group is a 501 (c) 4, but that
means dues and contribu-
tions are not tax deduct-
ible.
He said about one-third
of the 500-member group
is local, with the other
two-thirds property own-
ers who have a permanent
residence elsewhere. "The
trend is more and more lo-
cal," said Feifer.
The group outlined a
strategy for next year, in-
cluding urging creation of a
plan to create private sec-
tor job, asking the schools
to set "higher but attain-
able goals for our students
and make those goals pub-
lic knowledge," and calling
for "lower property taxes
on everyone to create tax
fairness and save families'
homes and livelihoods."
Feifer said the CCFC
may have an easier time
this year in its scrutiny of
the county budget. "The
economic situation as a
whole is on our side this
year," he said, noting that
Clerk of Courts Marcia
Johnson has asked county
departments not to spend
"any money they don't
have to" for the remainder
of the fiscal year.
For more information
on the CCFC and its plans,
call 653-5571.


*I







S CARRABELLE APALACH COLA




PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, April 2, 2009 www. a p a a c h t i m e s. c o m Page 7



Seahawks down Jefferson Co., Aucilla Christian

Jefferson Co. 101 720 0-11I
Franklin Co. 2 1 8 1 22 x- 16

Franklin County got on the winning side Tuesday,
March 24 vs. Jefferson County. The Seahawks pitchers,
Bo Hardman and Jason Thompson, scattered seven hits
while striking out 12 to led the Seahawks to a 16 11 vic-
tory at Seahawk Field.
Leading hitters for the Hawks were Gary Larsen 1-
for-2, Steven Babb 2-for-4 with two home runs, Thompson
2-for-5, Cole Lee 1-for-4 with a double, and Hardman, who
helped his own cause by going 2-for-3.


Aucilla Crst.
Franklin Co.


000 000 3-3
200 300 x-5


Franklin County stayed on the winning track Monday
vs. Aucilla Christian. Steven Babb was on the mound and
almost pitched himself a no-hitter. Backed up by some
stellar defensive plays, he kept the Aucilla hitters baffled
at the plate until the top of the seventh inning. Babb gave
up three hits in the top of the seventh inning, one of which
was a solo homerun, but the Seahawks held on to win 5-
3.
Leaders at the plate for the Seahawks were Gary
Larsen 2-for-4, Jared Mock 2-for-3, Babb 2-for-3, one a
home run, his fourth of the year, Gene Anderson 1-for-
3, and Caden Barber 1-for-4. This brings the Seahawks
record to 4-9.
The Seahawks played host to the Blountstown Tigers
on Tuesday afternoon. The Friday, April 3 game vs. John
Paul II has been rescheduled due to John Paul's Spring
Break.


Senior Steven
Christian.


Photo by DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Babb nearly had a no-hitter Monday, as he hurled the Seahawks to a 5-3 win over Aucilla


Lady Seahawks rout Maclay, stay atop district


Photo by DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Lady Seahawks freshman center fielder Chena Segree, shown above pitching last month
against Jefferson County, had a great game defensively against Maclay on March 19.


Cape St. George Light Day to


be celebrated Saturday


The Franklin County Board of -
County Commissioners has de-
clared April 4, 2009 to be Cape St.
George Light Day in an official
proclamation passed unanimously
at their March 17 meeting. r
The proclamation also com-
memorates the dedication of the
Cape St. George Light and St. NEILE.
George Lighthouse Park, which
will take place on that day.
The commissioners noted in the proc-
lamation that "the people of Franklin
County rallied to rebuild the historic light-
house (which) now stands in St. George
Lighthouse Park as a beacon of hope for
residents and visitors alike, and will once
again be a guide to mariners."
The lighthouse will be dedicated in
a ceremony beginning at 10 a.m. in St.
George Lighthouse Park at the center of
St. George Island. Keynote speaker at the
ceremony will be lighthouse historian and
author Neil E. Hurley, whose involvement
with Florida's lighthouses dates back to
his days in the U.S. Coast Guard. His most
recent book, "Florida's Lighthouses in the
Civil War," was published in 2007.
Hurley was instrumental in research-
ing original construction details of the
Cape St. George Light, which helped en-
able the historic structure to be rebuilt
accurately. He served as an informal
consultant to the St. George Lighthouse
Association during the early days of the
salvage and reconstruction effort.
Also on the program will be Fred
Gaske, director of the Division of His-
torical Resources for the Florida Depart-
ment of State. The division administered
the $398,000 in grant money which helped


H


fund the project.
Representing the Florida De-
partment of Environmental Pro-
tection, owners of the lighthouse,
will be Lee Edmiston, director of
Coastal and Aquatic Managed Ar-
eas. A St. George Island resident,
Edmiston was involved with the
URLEY Cape St. George Light during his
tenure with the Apalachicola Na-
tional Estuarine Research Reserve.
Also in attendance will be many de-
scendants of former Keepers and As-
sistant Keepers of the Light, as well as
representatives of the U.S. Coast Guard,
which assumed control of the lighthouse
in 1949, when the U.S. Lighthouse Service
was absorbed into the USCG.
Following the dedication program, a
fundraiser for the future construction of
the Lighthouse Keeper's House Museum
will feature a chicken barbecue lunch, hot
dogs prepared by local Boy Scout Troop 22
of St. George Island, music by "Sax Man"
Karl Dappen and Tallahassee band Eclec-
tic Acoustic, and a silent auction of more
than 70 works of arts and other unique
items.
Auction items can be previewed on
April 1, 2, and 3, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at
Sea Oats Gallery on East Pine Avenue,
St. George Island. A wine reception on
Friday, April 3, from 5 to 7 p.m. will close
the preview, and the silent auction will re-
sume after the ceremony on Saturday.
The lighthouse will be open for free
climbing Saturday afternoon.
For more information, please contact
Terry Kemp at 927-2000, or the St. George
Island Visitor Center & Lighthouse Mu-
seum at 927-7744.


By Christy Thompson
Special to the Times

The Lady Seahawks cruised past district rival Maclay March 19 to be-
come an impressive 4-0 in the district.
The girls turned up the heat and shut down Maclay 10-0 within five in-
nings of play. Centerfielder Chena Segree let nothing get by her, making a
total of four catches in the air to wrap this one up tight for the Seahawks.
Defensively the girls did not let up and committed only one error during
the game. This determination carried over at bat for the Seahawks with
a team effort of nine hits.
Freshman Morgan "Noodle" Newell led the team with two singles on
the day, three RBIs and one stolen base. Nearly every member of the
Seahawks' roster recorded a hit on the day to easily put this district rival
back on the bus.
It definitely makes a difference on the field when each and every girl is
having a successful game. The Lady Seahawks are hard to handle when
everyone is on their game. This season is right on track, with no plans of
ever looking back.
The girls are working hard and being number one in the district is
no easy feat, but it is being done. The team is determined to continue
to be undefeated in the district and win the district. It will happen and
those that are a part of it will forever remember this season as a Lady
Seahawk.
The Lady Seahawks are soaring high and nothing will pull this bird
down! The focus still remains the same and that is to make history in
Franklin County by claiming the district championship.
Christy Thompson is the coach of the Lady Seahawks softball team.


LIBRARY HAPPENINGS


The Franklin County Public Li-
brary in Eastpoint's spring book
sale of hardbacks and paperbacks
continues at $1 a bag. Selections
include fiction and nonfiction, best-
sellers and classics. Included with
the sale are the Franklin County
Public Library T-shirts and totes for
$8 each.
The Eastpoint and Carrabelle
Branch of the library will be closed
Friday, April 10 in observance of
Good Friday.
The library advisory board will
begin meeting on the third Thurs-
day of each month starting, Thurs-
day, April 16. April's meeting will be
held at the Carrabelle Branch, at
5:30 p.m. the public is invited. The
May meeting will be Thursday, May
21, 5:30 p.m. at the Eastpoint library
Hungry for free computer in-
struction? The Wilderness Coast
Public Library is offering free com-
puter classes in the three-county
area for the next several months.
Contact the Carrabelle Library at
697-2366 to register for computer


classes.
Classes this month will begin
Friday, April, 17 starting at 9:30 a.m.
with Excel Level 1, and at 1:30 p.m.
for Windows XPA. Finding for this
program is provided by a Library
Services and Technology Act grant
administered by the State Library
of Florida.
The Carrabelle Branch will hold
its monthly book social on Thursday,
April 9, at 5:30 p.m. This month's
guest will be Cindy Neel, author of
"The Potter's Wife." The public is
invited to this special book event
and the opportunity to greet and
meet Neal.
Construction continues on the
new Franklin County Public Library
building Eastpoint, on North Bay-
shore and Ferry Dock Road. Crews
have poured the concrete founda-
tion and will soon be ready to erect
the building.
For more information about the
Eastpoint library or Carrabelle
branch of the library, call 670- 8151,
670-4423 or 697-2366 in Carrabelle.


ABLA(CHIC91k
STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561
U


NE





A8 I The Times


Local


Thursday, April 2, 2009


Carrabelle to host Tartan Day celebration


Everyone is invited to
celebrate America's Scot-
tish heritage on Tartan Day
this Sunday after-
noon in Carrabelle.
"Fiddles and
Thistles" will be
held at 3 p.m. April
5 at the Franklin
County Senior Cen- !
ter in Carrabelle,
at the corner of Av-
enue F and First SAVAN
Street East. BARF
Entertainment
for this seventh annual Tar-
tan Day celebration will fea-
ture a program of tradition-
al Scottish music hosted by
the Lanark Scottish Fiddle
Orchestra, and featuring


City, schools

partner

for Project

Impact
The City of Apalachicola
and Franklin County School
Board have partnered to pro-
vide after-school and sum-
mer camp programs through
Project Impact.
The programs are of-
fered at three sites includ-
ing Franklin County School
in Eastpoint, Apalachicola
Bay Charter School and the
new City of Apalachicola rec-
reational site at the former
Apalachicola High School.
The Project Impact office is
co-located with the Franklin
County Library Tigers Pro-
gram at the field house of
AHS.
The building has been
refurbished to include a
classroom and computer lab
for Project Im-
orIda..0 pact, with the
' gymnasium
\ \ reopened for
+*c,,,t^ students from
3 to 6 p.m. and
available for public use from
6 to 9:30 p.m. weekdays. It
is managed by volunteers
on the weekends. The gym
will be available for special
programs upon request by
contacting the City of Apala-
chicola at 653-9319.
Project Impact initiated
the city's after-school pro-
gram in February and is con-
tinuing to accept students
from elementary through
high school. Free after-school
services include homework
help, targeted tutoring, edu-
cational enhancement, rec-
reational activities, and arts
education.
A full-time program will
be offered in the summer
with the first session running
from June 15 to July 2, and
second session running July
13 to 30. Enrollment for the
city's Summer Camp pro-
gram will begin after spring
break and is accessible on-
line at www.projectimpactf-
cs.org oryou may contact the
program office at 323-0231 or
the coordinator of each site.
Summer programs will
be offered at all three sites,
with the ABC site focusing
on recreation and academic
enrichment, the high school
site focusing on credit re-
covery and enrichment, and
the City of Apalachicola site
focusing on academics and
an enriched arts and culture
program.
Project Impact is funded
by the 21st Century Commu-
nity Learning Centers grant
program to support creation
of community learning cen-
ters that provide academic
enrichment opportunities
for children, particularly
students who attend high-
poverty and low performing
schools. The program helps
students meet state and lo-
cal student standards in core
academic subjects, such as
reading and math; offers
students a broad array of en-
richment activities that can
complement their regular
academic programs; and of-
fers literacy and other educa-
tional services to the families


of participating children.
For information, contact
Faye Johnson at 323-0231.


members of the group.
Highlighting the perfor-
mances will be 11-year-old
Scottish highland
dancer Savannah
Barrier from Pan-
ama City and the
world famous "The
McIlroys," Scot-
land's musical am-
bassadors, with bag-
pipes and song. This
INAH will be a homecom-
tIER ing for them since
they helped start the
Lanark Scottish Fiddle Or-
chestra eight years ago.
Also, there will be a pre-
sentation by Profs. Arnold
and Rebecca Burkart, about
the history of Scottish music


from 1780 to 1820, as it re-
lates to Scotland's musical
contribution to the Ameri-
can and Canadian tradition.
April 6 officially was
declared National Tartan
Day in America by Con-
gressional action in 1998, to
celebrate the many contri-
butions of Scots to the na-
tion. This date was chosen
to celebrate the signing of
the Treaty of Arbroath on
April 6, 1320, in Scotland,
which was the model for
America's Declaration of
Independence.
If you are one of the
11 million Americans who
claim Scottish, or Scot-
Irish roots, or if you just


love good music and want
to be Scottish for the day,
come and enjoy the pro-
gram. The Big Bend area is
a natural place to celebrate
Scotland's contributions
to America's history. Wear
your tartan, plaids or argyle
socks! Join the fun.
Voluntary donations of
$5 at the door support the
continuation of Scottish
music and highland danc-
ing in our area. Refresh-
ments will be served.
For details, contact
Cal Allen, music director,
697-8380 or calallen@att.net.


THE MCILROYS


'9


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LIFE


TIMES


Thursday, April 2, 2009 w w w. apalach times. com Page 1


Wedding ceremony caps Segree family reunion


Story and photos by David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

The annual Segree family
reunion last month added some
more new members even before
it was over.
Held March 14 at the Eastpoint
Fire Department, the reunion
once again a delicious array of
homemade foods and family
fellowship, all topped off with
musical accompaniment.
But this year it culminated
in a marriage ceremony, as
Frank Archideane Segree III
and Yolanda Lynn Davidson
were wed by County Judge Van
Russell.
Segree, son of Inez and
Frank Segree, Jr., of Eastpoint,
has followed in his father's
footsteps, working as a captain
for the Army Corps of Engineers.
He is master of the Dredge
Hurley, flagship of the Corps'
dredging fleet in the Mississippi
River, while his new wife directs
a home health care agency in
Vicksburg, MS.
The Segrees, a large extended
Eastpoint family whose roots in
Franklin County date back to the
19th century, spent the morning
swapping stories about their
education at "The University of Cat
Point," and recalling their youth back
in an era when a turnstile bridge that
connectedEastpointandApalachicola
was a new development.
The eldest, R.D. Segree, was there,
as well as several of the older cronies
that are part of Eastpoint's rich history, Roy David
Daniels, Steve Daniels, J.T Boatwright and Collie
Watkins.
As the family members gathered, on stage was a
quintet of string musicians who played a repertoire
that blended classic bluegrass songs with old-time
Gospel numbers, calling themselves "three old men
and a boy."
'And I'm the boy,"joked Willard Vinson, who sang
and played guitar. "But it's OK, I'm legal to be here."


Left, performing at the Segree
reunion are, from left, George
Creamer, Edward Smith, Miles
Creamer, Willard Vinson and
Ronnie Segree. Below, Enjoying
some bubble blowing with
his granddaughter, 4-year-old
Emaleigh Segree, is Frank Segree
Jr. Bottom left, Angela Fletcher,
of Panama City, cuddles her 2-
year-old son, Wyatt, at the Segree


Vinson was accompanied by Ronnie Segree
on the mandolin, Edward Smith, from Carrabelle, on
the acoustic guitar, George Creamer on the electric
guitar and his son, Miles Creamer, on the electric
guitar.
Ronnie Segree and other younger men in the
Segree clan Larry, Freddie, Donnie and Brad had
all helped bring in the fish and fry it up, as well as
serve up and shuck two bushels of oysters.
Faith filled the firehouse like the sweet
aroma from a barbecue smoker, as Vinson sang


such songs as "Friends at the Old Country
Church."
Brother Randy Montgomery once again sang and
offered an extended blessing, reminding everyone
to remember those passed away this past year, the
new additions who were born "and all our old men
and women.
"We're headed that way," said Montgomery.


Ilse Newell concert blends faith with fun


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Seventeen members
from the extended families
of the three Bowles sisters,
daughters of the late Rev
Samuel and Eugenia
Bowles, blended the
sacred and the irreverent
Sunday afternoon at the
Apalachicola Area Historical
Society's Ilse Newell Find
for the Performing Arts
series.
The concert featured
vocals, instrumentals
and surprises as the
families of area residents
Eugenia Bowles Watkins,
Ruth Bowles Eckstine
and Matilda "T" Bowles
McLain came together
for a memorable, musical
afternoon.
Eugenia Watkins'
husband, retired music
professor Bedford Watkins,
on piano, and their son,
the Rev Thomas Wyatt
Watkins, an American
Baptist minister from
Indianapolis, opened the
concert. They performed
"Stone Table Dance," and
then the selection "Spring"
from Antonio Vivaldi's "The
Seasons." They closed with
the bluegrass fiddle classic
"Orange Blossom Special."
Tenor Greg McMillan,
son-in-law of retired
Presbyterian minister Rev.
Joe and Ruth Eckstine, then
performed "A Simple Song
from Mass," by Leonard
Bernstein.
T McLain's husband,
retired Army colonel Dave
McLain, then appeared as
a wall as he led a troupe
of actors in a hilarious
rendition of the scenes out


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Top left, performing a scene from "A Midsummer
Night's Dream" on Sunday afternoon are, from left,
Donovan Diez, David Diez, Mimi Diez and Dave
McLain. Top right, Rebecca Watkins sings the song
"Scarborough Fair" as she is accompanied on vocals
by her father, the Rev. Tom Watkins, at left, and her
mother, Donna Watkins, on guitar. At left, Performing
the song "Sisters" on Sunday afternoon are, from left,
Randi Hamner, the three Bowles sisters, Matilda "T"
Bowles McLain, Eugenia Bowles Watkins, and Ruth
Bowles Eckstine, and Virginia McMillan.


of William Shakespeare's
"A Midsummer Night's
Dream" that feature
The Rude Mechanicals
doing a performance
of'Pyramus and
Thisby"
Appearing as Bottom
(playing Pyramus) was the
McLains' grandson, Joe
Diez, and as Flute (playing
Thisby) was the McLains'
son-in-law, Donovan Diez.
The McLains' daughter,
Mary, was Philostrate (as
Stage Manager) while
granddaughter, Mimi
Diez, was Quince (playing
Moonshine), and grandson
David Diez was Snug


(playing
Lion).
Dave McLain then sang
"Get Me to the Church on
Time," a song out of the
musical "My Fair Lady."
Watkins and his son,
McLain and McMillan then
combined as the "One-
Night-Stand Barbershop
Quartet" as they sang "My
Wild Irish Rose."
The Eckstines'
daughters, Randi Hamner
and Virginia McMillan, sang
a duet "Sisters" by Irving
Berlin, and then were
joined by their mother, and
two aunts, Eugenia Watkins
and T McLain, for a spirited


number in brightly-colored
boas. A black-and-white
photo of the three sisters,
at the seashore when they
were in their late teens,
greeted concertgoers upon
their arrival.
Joe and David Diez
each performed on the
piano, and were followed
by the three Watkins'
grandchildren, Seth,
Sarah and Rebecca, who
performed the song "Oye,"
in Spanish, accompanied
by their dad on tambourine,
and their grandfather on
the maracas.
Rebecca Watkins
then sang the traditional


song "Scarborough Fair,"
as arranged by Simon
and Garfunkel, with
vocal accompaniment
from her dad, and guitar
accompaniment from
her mom, Donna
Watkins.
The barbershop quartet
returned to sing "This
Little Light of Mine" with
"Do Lord," arranged by Val
Hicks.
Mimi Diez then recited
the poem "The Orange,"
by Wendy Cope, followed
by her and her father doing
the classic comedy routine
"Who's On First?" made
famous by Abbott and
Costello.
The afternoon closed
with all three families


taking the stage to sing the
hymn "For All the Saints,"
in memory of the Rev
Samuel P and Eugenia H.
Bowles.
The reception that
followed in Benedict Hall
featured works of area
potter Geri Anderson, with
all monies raised going to a
charity to bring wheelchairs
to those people throughout
the world who are unable to
afford them/
The Ilse Newell Rind
will close its 2009-10 series
on Sunday, April 26 with a
concert in Lafayette Park
featuring a steel band under
the direction of Kayleen
Kerg. Bring a lawn chair,
and kick back and
relax.


*


B
Section


NE






B2 I The Times


Local


Thursday, April 2, 2009


Don and Cheryl Varnes
are excited to announce
the birth of their precious
daughter, Callie Lynn
Varnes.
Callie was born 5 1/2
weeks early on Wednesday,
March 11, 2009 in
Tallahassee. She weighed 5
lbs. 4 ozs. and was 18" long.
After spending nine days
in the neonatal intensive
care unit, she was able to
come home, where she was
welcomed by her brothers,
Ashley and David, and one
very proud Nana.
Maternal grandparents
are Marie Wimberly and


Marion
Eckstein, 90, a
resident of Pelican
Rapids, Minn.,
died Tuesday,
March 24,2009,
at Pelican Valley
Nursing Home.
Marion Juanita
Nelson was born EC
Oct. 27, 1918, in EK
Killam, Alberta,
Canada, the
daughter of Frederick and
Laura (Smith) Nelson. She
graduated from Washburn
High School in Minneapolis,
Minn., in 1937.
On Sept. 10, 1942, she
joined the U.S. Navy serving
during World War II. She
married Harold Anderson
in 1943, and they lived in
Mahnomen, Minn. Marion
and Harold eventually were
divorced.
In 1958, she married
Warren Eckstein and they
resided in Florida. In 2003,
Marion moved to Pelican
Rapids, Minn.
She was an avid doll
collector and restorer.
She enjoyed playing cards
and spending time on her
computer corresponding


the late JY Wimberly, and
the late David Barfield,
all of Sumatra. Paternal
grandparents are the late
Cecil and Delores Varnes, of
Apalachicola.


with friends, new
and old.
She is survived
by four sons,
Bruce (Nick)
Anderson,
Ammon, Idaho,
Wayne (Patti)
Anderson, Detroit
Lakes, Minn., Jeff
TEIN (Karen) Anderson,
Webster City,
Iowa, and Warren
(Genie) Eckstein, Murray,
Ky; 10 grandchildren;
11 great-grandchildren;
one brother, Jim Nelson,
Webster City, Iowa; and one
sister, Barbara Thompson,
Menomonie, Wis.
Marion was preceded
in death by her parents;
husband, Warren;
sister, Beatrice; and two
daughters, Kathryne and
Karen Anderson.
No funeral services are
planned as per Marion's
wishes.
Larson Funeral Home,
Pelican Rapids, Minn.,
handled arrangements.
Her online guest book
is available at www.
larsonfuneral
pelicanrapids.com


PET OF THE

PET WEEK


Mario and Pepper, pictured above, are
two of the seven gray tabby kittens currently
at the Adoption Center. Because they have
all been here since October, we are reducing
their adoption fee. These sweet, affectionate
kittens have been spayed and neutered, are
up-to-date on their shots and are waiting for
a loving home.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more details or
visit the Franklin County Humane Society
at 244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You may
log onto the website at www.forgottenpets.
org to see more of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend for
life, you not only save the life of that pet,
you make room for us to save the life of one
more abandoned dog or cat!
We also need donations of bleach, laundry
soap, cat litter, dog toys and treats. Anything
you can give would be greatly appreciated.


Congratulations


Terry Kemp: A woman

you need to know


Lois Swoboda
The Times
Congratulations to Terry
Kemp of St. George Island,
for having been chosen one
of "25 Women You Need to
Know" for 2009.
The "25 Women You
Need to Know" celebration
is a program of the
Tallahassee Democrat
newspaper. A reception for
the winners this month will
be sponsored by the law
firm Holland & Knight. The
program, now in its third
year, attracted more than
150 nominations.
In the March 1
announcement, Kemp's
profession is listed as
community volunteer. She
has been a tireless worker
for the restoration of the


Cape St. George Light and
is active in the Franklin
County Humane Society
and the conservation
committee of the Philaco
Women's Club.
According to the
announcement, the
nominees reflected a wide
range of backgrounds,
ages and experiences.
Some of the women had
worked many years in
their professions or areas
of business. There were
successful company
owners and others with
great achievements in
managing nonprofits
and civic organizations.
All demonstrated a
commitment to their
neighbors and to supporting
community causes.


We would like to
announce the upcoming
wedding of Jackielee
Hollon to Zack Thompson.
Jackielee is the
daughter of Denise
and Skip Barwick, and
Bruce Hollon. Zack is
the son of Kristy and


Randall Mauney, and Jay
Thompson Sr.
The wedding will be
held on Saturday, April 4,
2009 at 5 p.m. at 999 Mill
Rd, Carrabelle, on the
banks of New River.
All family and friends
are invited.


Natural Sponge & Soaps
- Nationally Acclaimed Business
(We help Apalach to be a place where
people come to visit.)
16 Ave E
Apalachicola FL. 32320
850-653-3550
Awww.apalachspongecompany corn


Happening


Nutrition kits

help feed fitness


As March was National
Nutrition Month, Nadine
Kahn, the county's chronic
disease educator, was on
hand at the Apalachicola
Fitness Center on the
morning of March 18 giving
away nutrition kits stocked
with vegetable and herb
seeds.
"I'm doing a health expo
at the fitness center every
month in addition to my
other projects," she said.
National Nutrition
Month is a nutrition
education and information
campaign sponsored
annually by the American
Dietetic Association. The


campaign is designed
to focus attention on the
importance of making
informed food choices and
developing sound eating
and physical activity habits.


Happy BIRTHDAY


Happy birthday, Tim


Timmy Shuler
celebrated his ninth
birthday on Sunday, March
15, 2009.
He celebrated with
friends and family on a
giant water slide and had


Greene named

Apalachicola librarian


Caty Greene, of
Apalachicola, has been
selected as the new
librarian at the Apalachicola
Municipal Library.
She worked with her
mother at the History
of Science Library at
Harvard University and
held a library job during
college. Greene has lived in
Franklin County for going


on six years.
The library also is
seeking to fill a 20-hour a
week Workforce position.
Applicants must be over 55
years of age and have no
other work income, but may
be receiving up to $1,300 a
month in Social Security
benefits. Applicants are not
required to have a college
degree.


a Tim Tebow #15 football
jersey birthday cake.
Happy Birthday
Timmy!
We love you,
Daddy, Mommy, Bubba
and Sissy


Valerie Creamer turns 9


Valerie Joyce Creamer
celebrated her ninth
birthday on Monday,
March 30, 2009.
She is the daughter
of Diane Creamer, of
Carrabelle, and Joey


Creamer, of Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents
are Dinah Taunton and
the late James Taunton.
Paternal grandparents
are Junior and Shirley
Creamer, of Apalachicola.


Jhamere turns 3
Jhamere Rhodes turned
3 on Wednesday, April 1,
2009.
He is the son of
Quinnaland and Felicia
Rhodes, brother to Dy'Quan
Lake, Maliek, Brannon,
Quinnaland Jr., Tobias and
Shannon Rhodes.
He is grandson of
Irestine Bouie, Iris
Hamilton and Darlene
(Walter) Pugh, and godson
of Leon and Felicia O'Neal.
I'm 3, Uncle Shawn.
Happy Birthday
Jhamere! We love you!

Shower


Carranza shower
Victor and Tamra Carranza are having a Boy!
A baby shower will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday,
April 5 at the Eastpoint Firehouse.
All friends and family are invited to attend.




LET US HELP YOU WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS!
CRIBS TABLES WEDDING ARCHES
HIGH CHAIRS CHAIRS CANDELABRAS
TENTS LINENS PUNCH BOWLS
DINNERWARE BEACH WHEELCHAIR CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN


2 H
E S.pit F 22


NE ~*I


Birth


Callie Varnes born


Obituary

MARION ECKSTEIN


Wedding


Jackielee Hollon, Zack

Thompson to wed


====MEMO,


85-7088


'e twv!!






Thursday, April 2, 2009


Church


The Times I B3


Violet Evangeline
Andrews passed away
Friday, March 6, 2009,
surrounded by her family
after a battle with cancer.
Vi was born Sept. 27,
1933, to James (Canoe
Jim) and Martha T. Putney
in Newport, N.H.
She is survived by
her loving husband of 57
years, John L. Andrews
of St. George Island; and
her four children, Lewis
Andrews of St. George
Island, Marty Wiggins and
husband, Ed, of Claremont,
N.H., Joanne Andrews
Stevens of New London,
N.H., and Betty Ann
Andrews of Joplin, Mo.;
eight grandchildren; and
two great-grandchildren.
She also is survived by
her three sisters, Betty
Beland, Martha Murgatruy
and Linda Putney; one
brother, James Putney,
all of New Hampshire;
two aunts, Margerie "Sis"
Thomas and Madeline
"Red" Shepard, also of

LILLIE MA
Lillie Mae
Croom of
Apalachicola was
called home to
be with Jesus at
the age of 89 on
Saturday, March
28, 2009.
She was
residing in the CR4
Panama City
Nursing Center in
Panama City. She was born
Aug. 17, 1919, in Moultrie,
Ga.
Croom is survived
by nine children, Cydell
Wilson, Granville Croom
Jr. (and wife, Delores) and
Marvin B. Croom, all of
Apalachicola, Bertha Mae
Rhodes (and husband,
Ruffin Rhodes) of Austin,
Texas, Betty J.C. Wright
(and husband, Robert Lee
Wright Jr.) of Oklahoma
City, Okla., Evelyn Goss of
Houston, Texas, Lawrence
E. Croom of Panama City,
Deborah A. Croom (and
husband, Allen Thompson
Sr.) of Fort Lauderdale and


Brother William
Anthony "Bill" Lane,
was born May 11, 1955, at
Tyndall Air Force Base to
William J. and Marie Lane.
Hie passed away Friday,
March 20, 2009.
Bill graduated from
Apalachicola High School
in 1973, then enlisted into
the United States Marine
Corps. He served his
country for 12 years and,
following an honorable
discharge, returned to his
hometown of Apalachicola,
where he began to work for
the St. Joe Paper Company
for 10 years.
It was during that
time he met his wife,
Patricia Weaver, and
they were united as one
on July 26, 1999. After,
the closing of the paper
mill, he began his career
with the Department of
Corrections. He worked
at Gulf Correctional
Institution in White City,
at Franklin Correctional
Institution in Carrabelle
and finally at the Bay City
Work Camp as a sergeant
until the time of his
passing.
Bill's greatest pleasure
and happiest moments
came from spending
time with his family and
friends at the ponderosa in
Lanesville.
He leaves to cherish his
memories his wife, Patricia
Lane; parents, William and


lI

I


New Hampshire; and
many cousins, nieces and
nephews.
Vi moved to St. George
Island in 1991, and quickly
became very active in
the annual Chili Cook-off,
where she ran the sweet
booth for 13 years. She
affectionately was known
by some as "The Bag
Lady" for her artistically,
beautiful purses that
she made each year for
the Quilting Club, to be
donated and sold to benefit
the St. George Island Fire
Department.
Vi also loved to
cook and will be well
remembered for her
breads and Biscotte. In
compliance with Vi's
wishes, a private memorial
service will be held at a
later date.
Memorial contributions
may be made in her name
to the St. George Island
Fire Department. She will
be greatly missed by all
who knew and loved her.

E CROOM
Lowery Croom of
Miami.
She was
preceded in death
by her husband,
Granville Croom
Sr.; and son,
Wallace "Tootsie"
Croom.
1OM She is also
survived by
31 grandchildren,
61 great-grandchildren,
nine great-great-
grandchildren, a
goddaughter, Claudette
Hamilton, a special "son,"
Tyrone Evans, and a host
of relatives in the
Port St. Joe and Carrabelle
area.
Viewing and wake
services will be held
Friday, April 3, from 5 to
7 p.m. at Kelley FRneral
Home, 149 Ave. H,
Apalachicola.
Services will be held
Saturday, April 4, at 11 a.m.
at the Love Center, with
interment at Snow Hill
Cemetery.


Marie Lane; daughters,
Keneidra Williams (James)
and Sheneidra Cummings;
brothers, Patrick J. Lane
(Doris) and Jonathan R.
Lane (Philinda); sister,
Monica Moron (Michael);
grandchildren, Zyon and
Zymarion Williams; and
mother-in-law, Bernice
Weaver.
He also leaves behind
aunts, Marion Long
(James), Mattie Ruth
Lane, and Eula Rochelle;
brother-in-laws, James
Bennett (Debra), Wendall
Weaver (Katherine), and
Anthony Weaver (Valerie);
sisters-in-law, Bonnie Russ
and Linda Russ; nieces and
nephews, Tameka Lane,
Patrick Jamal Lane, Erika
Lane, Jonathan Lane,
JR, Jasmine Lane, Marti
Moron, Monet Moron,
Tory Lane, and Courtney
Bell; special friends,
Sherman Siples, Harold
Byrd, Darion Dawson, and
Wayne O'Neal, Jr.; and
a host of cousins, other
family and friends.
Funeral services were
held March 27, at New Life
Deliverance Tabernacle
by the Sea with burial in
Magnolia Cemetery.
Arrangements were
entrusted to Kelley
Funeral Home, 149 Ave. H,
Apalachicola. Condolences
may be sent and viewed at
www.KelleyFineralHomes.
com.


Maureen Joyce Walker
Bearden passed away
Sunday, March 22, 2009, at
age 26.
Born Dec. 1, 1982,
Maureen was a lifelong
resident of the area. She
loved life and enjoyed
spending time in the
outdoors, fishing and
boating.
Maureen was a devoted
wife and mother. She loved
her family and enjoyed
spending "family time"
together. She will be
missed by all.
Maureen was preceded
in death by her father,
Randy Robert Walker of
Panama City.
She is survived by her
best friend and loving
husband, James A.


Shelly Mauldin
Galloway died in
Tallahassee on March 24,
2009, after a long battle
with cancer.
She is survived by her
husband, Jeffrey Stuart
Galloway; daughters,
Katherine Elizabeth
Galloway and Jessica
Leigh Galloway; son, Ryan
Christopher Galloway;
parents, Guy N. and
Sharon A. Mauldin, all of
Eastpoint; sister, Tracy M.
Johnson (Mrs. Timothy)
of Alpharetta, Ga.; brother,
Matthew W Mauldin
(Rebecca) of Cumming,
Ga.; four nephews; a niece
and a number of devoted
cousins.
She was born in
Alpharetta, Ga., on May 6,
1964. She graduated from
Milton High School in
Alpharetta and from North
Georgia College and State
University in Dahlonega,
Ga. She taught pre-school
in Georgia for a number of
years.
She moved to Franklin
County with her family
in 2001. Over the past
several years, she was
a devoted member of
the Apalachicola United
Methodist Church.
She was an outspoken


Bearden of Panama City;
two daughters, Elizabeth
and Brooke of Panama
City; mother, Tammy
Leigh and husband,
Ritchie Dean Golden, of
Eastpoint; two sisters, Toni
Leigh Hutchison and April
Renee' Walker, both of
Eastpoint; and one brother,
Fredrick Hieber.
She also leaves
behind to cherish
her memory her
grandparents, Jimmy
and Maureen Barns
of Callaway; and
grandmother, Pat
Hutchinson of Eastpoint.
A celebration of life was
held Thursday, March 26,
at Brock's Home Town
Funeral Home chapel in
Callaway.


advocate for the fight
against breast cancer.
She was actively involved
in the American Cancer
Society's Annual Relay for
Life, and was awarded that
organization's Courage
Award in 2008. Her positive
attitude, her strength
and determination in the
face of adversity and her
passion for life were an
inspiration to everyone
whose life she touched.
Visitation with the
family was Thursday
afternoon, March 26, at
the Apalachicola United
Methodist Church,
followed by a memorial
service at the church.
Visitation in her
hometown of Alpharetta,
Ga., was Saturday evening,
March 28, at the Northside
Chapel, 12050 Crabapple
Road, Roswell, Ga. A
memorial service followed
Sunday afternoon, March
29, at the Alpharetta
United Methodist Church,
69 Main St., Alpharetta, Ga.
In lieu of flowers,
the family requests
that memorial gifts
be made to the Shelly
Galloway Memorial Rind,
Apalachicola United
Methodist Church, 75 Fifth
St., Apalachicola, FL 32320.


GRACE M. PROSSER


Grace M. Prosser, 93,
of New Martinsville, WVa.,
formerly of Lanark Village
and Tully, N.Y, passed
away Friday, March 27,
2009, in her home, after
a courageous battle with
cancer.
She was a loving
mother, grandmother and
great-grandmother and
will be sadly missed.
She was born Oct. 23,
1915, in Syracuse, N.Y. She
was a retired secretary
with Dr. Callahan, DDS;
a member of the Red
Hat Society; and an
Episcopalian by faith.
She was preceded in
death by her parents,
Bessie and Jack Kries; her
husband, Floyd Prosser; a
daughter, Judith Prosser;
and a brother, Francis
Kenyon.


Survivors include
a son, Gary (Barbara)
Prosser of Wilbur, WVa.;
and two grandsons,
Mark (Greta) Prosser
and their children, Jacob
and Alexis Wade, and
Emily and Noah Prosser,
all of St. Clairsville, Ohio,
and Joel Prosser and
his fiance, Jennifer
Peck, and her children,
Jessica, Donald, and
Stephanie Peck, all of New
Martinsville, WVa.
A memorial service
was held March 30 at the
Alma Ripley Chapel United
Methodist Church with
Rev. Donald M. Thomas
officiating. Interment will
be held in Tully, N.Y, at a
later date.
Grisell RFineral Home,
New Martinsville, WVa.,
handled arrangements.


JIMMY TRAWICK FAMILY
The family of Jimmy Trawick wishes to thank our
many friends and family for everything that was done for
our family during our loss. The prayers, visits, food, and
flowers were greatly appreciated and meant so much to
all of us. A very special thanks to Brother and Sister Barks
for the wonderful service. May God Bless every one of you.
Martha, Jamie, Nita, Rod, Preston, Dakota, Devin,
and Claudia

AMERICAN FLAGS
Franklin County School would like to make known
their great appreciation to the AMVETS Post 107 in
Carrabelle for purchasing American flags to be displayed
in the classrooms at the new Franklin County School site.


r St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave. "C" & 6th St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@gtcom.net

PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
MASS SCHEDULE

SATURDAY ............. ........... ................ 5PM
SUN D AY .................................... . . ...... 10 AM
SUNDAY SPANISH MASS .................... .............. 5 PM
TUESDAY FRIDAY ................................... 8:30 AM


*I


Ministry BRIEFS


VIOLET ANDREWS


Trinity
EST. 1836
Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


WELCOMES YOU

Church

of the

Ascension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM


Obituaries


MAUREEN BEARDEN


Hospice sponsors plant swap
On Friday, April 3, the Big Bend Hospice Frank-
lin County Advisory Council will sponsor a memorial
plant swap at The Farmers' Market in Apalachicola
from 3 to 5 p.m.
Please bring a beautiful flower or plant in honor
or in memory of a loved one and swap it with others
who are remembering their loved ones at this time
of year.
Special "Hands for Hospice" windsocks will add a
touch of whimsy to any garden and have been hand-
made by Karla Ambos and Bev Hewitt. The "Hands
for Hospice" windsocks make a great gift for any gar-
den lover and are available for a suggested donation
of $10. All proceeds go directly to providing care to
patients and families in Franklin County.
Please come and join Council members: Bev
Hewitt, Donnie Gay, Pam Mahr, Joe and Jeanette
Taylor, Sandra Smith, Karla Ambos, Judy Cook, Ella
Speed, Betty Croom, and Paula Harmon at the farm-
ers' market in front of the Medicine Shop in Apala-
chicola and swap beautiful flowers or plants in honor
or in memory of a loved one.
Please contact Pam Raker Allbritton at 508-8749
for additional information.

Dinner to benefit mission
The First United Methodist Church of Apalachico-
la will host a spaghetti dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday
to benefit the Guatemala Mission Team.
Tickets are $7 for adults, and $5 for children and
will be sold at the door.
Takeout is available.

Churches to pray for schools
Clergy from throughout Franklin County have
united behind a plan to keep churches open on Maun-
dy Thursday, April 9, to host a prayer vigil on behalf
of the schools.
The clergy plan to keep their churches open all
night on Maundy Thursday to anyone to come and
pray for the county's schools, students, staff, faculty
and school board.

Hospice invites clergy to dine
Big Bend Hospice Chaplains invite area clergy and
other leaders in the congregation to attend a special
luncheon at noon April 16 at Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee.
Come enjoy a complimentary meal and fellowship
with community clergy.
At this quarterly meeting Rabbi Jack Romberg
and the Rev. Jack Stroman, will speak on "Finding
Meaning in Suffering." The meeting is open to all
clergy in Leon, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Wakulla,
Franklin, Liberty and Gadsden counties.
RSVP to the Rev. Candace McKibben as soon as
possible at 878-5310, ext. 250 or candace@bigbend-
hospice.org.



THE THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH EPISCOPAL
WELCOMES YOU CHURCH


SHELLY GALLOWAY


WILLIAM 'BILL' LANE


Cards of Thanks


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


IThe United Methodist Churches

of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5' St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Friday of each month
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672
Pastor: Julie Stephens
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis


O






B4 I The Times


Law Enforcement


Thursday, April 2, 2009


Harvester arrested after pulling a gun


An oyster harvester who had
pulled a gun in a dispute over leased
oyster bottom was arrested last
month by officers from the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission's Division of Law En-
forcement.
Officers Travis Huckeba and
John Allen were dispatched to the
west side of Apalachicola Bay to
investigate the alleged trespass
and harvest of oysters from leased
oyster bottom. It was discovered
that a firearm had been pulled


Easter egg hunt

planned April 11

The Franklin County
Sheriff's Office will host its
annual Easter egg hunt at
noon April 11 on the field
adjacent to the sheriff's of-
fice at 270 State Road 65 in
Eastpoint.
All kids are invited to
come out and participate
in a wonderful day of egg
hunting with lots of prizes
to be given away.
The sheriff's office will
be grilling hot dogs for the
occasion free of charge.
Come out and enjoy the
fun!
For more information,
call 670-8500.


on the legal harvesters who had
confronted the alleged trespasser
/harvester.
The firearm-wielding harvester
was arrested and charged with ag-
gravated assault with a deadly weap-
on. Another harvester involved was
arrested on an open warrant filed
earlier in the year by Officer Chasen
Yarborough for possession of a fire-
arm by a convicted felon.
On the evening of March 18, Of-
ficer Steven Cook was dispatched
to a vessel harvesting oysters in


the prohibited waters of the Apala-
chicola River channel. Cook made
contact with two harvesters actively
engaged in harvesting oysters from
the prohibited waters.
Six misdemeanor citations were
issued for violations pertaining to
harvesting oysters from prohibited
waters, harvesting oysters at night
and possession of oyster tongs on
the water at night. Six warnings also
were issued for insufficient vessel
safety equipment and license viola-
tions.


Benefit blood drive
From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
April 7, the Bay Medical
Center Bloodmobile will
be at the Franklin Coun-
ty Consolidated School
in Eastpoint for a blood
drive to benefit longtime
Weems Memorial Hos-
pital employee Gracie
Vaughn of Apalachicola.
Vaughn suffers from
chronic inflammatory de-
myelinating polyneuropa-
thy, and one treatment
for the disease is intrave-
nous high-dose immuno-
globulin infusions, which
require large amounts of
blood to produce.
If you wish to donate


blood, first report to the
front office of the school
for a campus pass. For
more information, call Ai-
mee Palmer at 747-6570.

Jordan Bayou plan
At the March 4 city
commission meeting,
Tamara Allen, program
manager of the Carrabelle
Waterfront Partnership,
asked the commission
for approval to develop a
plan for improvements to
publicly held land at McK-
issack Beach and Jordan
Bayou, also known as Old
Carrabelle Beach.
Allen said the partner-
ship would like to see the


land preserved as a na-
ture park. Proposals for
improvements include re-
strooms, an interpretive ki-
osk, a boardwalk to protect
wetlands and barricades to
prevent access to the area
by off-road vehicles.
Commissioners said
they were supportive but
urged Allen to be sure any
proposal would fall within
the guidelines of the Flor-
ida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection.
Leslie Cox, who is
working with Allen on the
project, said all proposed
improvements were based
on past projects that had
received DEP approval.
By Lois Swoboda


The following report is
provided by the Franklin
County Sheriff's Office. Ar-
rests are made by officers
from the following county
and state law enforcement
agencies: Apalachicola
(APD), Carrabelle (CPD),
Florida Highway Patrol
(FHP), Franklin County
Sheriff's Office (FCSO),
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC), Florida Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion (FDEP) and Florida
Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services
(FLDOACS).
All defendants are con-
sidered innocent until prov-
en guilty in a court of law.

March 24
Jonathan L. Berry, 23,
Dothan, Ala., violation of
probation (FCSO)
Jessica M. Vanderford,
39, Panama City, felony DUI
and driving while license
suspended or revoked
(FCSO)

March 25
Mark R Sanders, 30,
Eastpoint, violation of pro-
bation (FCSO)
Jermaine T. Fedd, 34,
Apalachicola, four counts
sale of a controlled sub-
stance within 1,000 feet of a
church and two counts sale
of a controlled substance
within 1,000 feet of public


housing (FCSO)
Dondrell Ducker, 29,
Apalachicola, failure to ap-
pear (FCSO)

March 27
Alvin Cummings, 46,
Apalachicola, two counts
sale of a controlled sub-
stance within 1,000 feet of a
church (FCSO)
Jonathan G. Pace, 31,
Apalachicola, violation of
probation and failure to ap-
pear (FCSO)

March 28
John T. Rhear, 44, St.
George Island, DUI (FCSO)
William R. Johnson, 28,
Carrabelle, violation of do-
mestic violence injunction
(FCSO)
Elex D. Pugh, 31, Pana-
ma City, violation of proba-
tion (APD)

March 29
Vernon Thompson, 51,
Carrabelle, violation of pro-
bation (FCSO)
Mateo Estebon, 27,
Apalachicola, no valid driv-
er's license (APD)

March 30
Ronnie Hopps, 53,
Apalachicola, trespass on
property (FCSO)
George M. Gilbert, 35,
Apalachicola, disorderly in-
toxication (FCSO)


Officials reexamine seafood park bids


SAt their March 17 meet-
ing, county commissioners
I opened bids for a contract
to construct a deck, dock
boardwalk and picnic pa-
vilions at the new Seafood
Workers Park on the Lom-
bardi property at the west
end of Apalachicola.
* I The high bid was
$130,000, from Larry Joe
Colson of Apalachicola.
Low bid was $80,000, from


Eastern Coastal Construc-
tion of Chipley.
County Planner Alan
Pierce said all four bids
received were above the
$70,000 in grant money
dedicated to this portion of
the park project.
Commissioners asked
County Engineer Dan Roth-
well to reexamine the proj-
ect and find a way to reduce
the cost of construction.


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NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING FOR A LARGE SCALE
AMENDMENT TO THE CITY OF
CARRABELLE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
Public Hearing of the
City of Carrabelle
Planning and Zoning Board
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Carrabelle Planning
and Zoning Board will hold a Public Hearing on Thursday, April 16,
2009, starting on or after 4:30 P.M., at the Carrabelle Municipal Com-
plex, 1005 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, to consider the following
item, First Reading of:
The purpose of the Public Hearing is to receive comments and make
decisions regarding the above matter. The plan amendment includes
changes to the Coastal Management Element of the Comprehensive
Plan and to Future Land Use Maps 1-14 and 1-16. A copy of the Maps
as amended is attached to this notice, below.
ORDINANCE NO: 439
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, SPECIFICALLY CITY-INITI-
ATED TEXT AMENDMENTS TO 7.G.2 POLICY 1.1.1 AND THE
DEFINITION OF "COASTAL HIGH HAZARD AREAS" FOUND
IN SECTION 10 OF THE COASTAL MANAGEMENT ELEMENT;
AND THE AMENDMENT OF FUTURE LAND USE MAP SERIES,
MAP I-14AND 1-16, OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TO CON-
FORM TO STATE STATUTE; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
A copy of the Ordinance is available for inspection at City Hall. Mem-
bers of the public are encouraged to attend the hearing and be heard
on this matter.
At this hearing, the Planning and Zoning Board will accept public tes-
timony and will consider the adoption of Comprehensive Plan Amend-
ment 09-02.
All interested parties are invited to attend the public hearing and com-
ment upon the Plan Amendments or submit their comments in writing
to the Planning and Zoning Board. Further information concerning
the proposed amendments can be obtained from the City Clerk at City
Hall, at 1005 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, Florida, or by calling (850)697-
2727, between the hours of 8:30 A.M and 4:30 PM., Monday through
Friday, excluding holidays.
Please be advised that if a person decides to appeal any decision made
by the Planning and Zoning Board with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this hearing, such person will need a record of the proceedings,
and for this purpose such person may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is based. The City of Carrabelle
does not provide or prepare such record pursuant to E S. 286.0105.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons with
disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the City Clerk at City Hall, at 1005 Gray
Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, or by calling (850)697-2727, no later than
three (3) days prior to the proceedings.
Any person requiring a special accommodation at this hearing because
of a disability or physical impairment should contact the City Clerk at
(850) 697-2727 as soon as possible.
Keisha Smith
City Clerk
April 16, 2009
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Thursday, April 2, 2009


In loving

MEMORY


J.C. BUSBY
Sept. 4, 1942
to April 2, 2008

Missing You
It's already been a year
now,
The time has just
passed me by;
I still can't believe I lost
you,
I often ask why.
I still ache for your
touch,
I miss your smile each
day.
Your music has gone
silent here on earth,
The angels get to hear
you play.
Your voice still lingers
in my heart,
I can still hear you
speak;
It helps me when I'm
down,
And when I'm feeling
weak.
Friends and family offer
comfort,
I guess they
understand.
How hard it's been
since you left,
You were such a special
man.
It seems life must go on,
I know this is true,
But it isn't the same
now,
Daddy, I still miss you,
It's been a year,
But it still feels like
yesterday.
We still miss you.


Church


Youth enlist


in Lord's



army

Excitement radiated through the air as
all roads led to Love Center's Chosen Gen-
eration annual Spring Break "Armed Forces
Youth Rally" on March 20.
Nearly 300 youth, youth leaders, family and
friends attended from across the region and
from churches in and around the community.
The theme centered on being young sol-
diers in the army of the Lord and answering
His call to enlist in His service. Group after
group participated in and presented an array
of ministry arts expressions including songs,
dance, drama, stepping and even rapping.
The roll call included youth from Tallahas-
see, Crawfordville, Carrabelle, East Point,
Apalachicola, St. George Island, Port St. Joe,
Panama City, Marianna, Blountstown and all
in between reporting for duty.
Pastors L.D. and Sheila Martin gave an
opening prayer and welcome to all who at-
tended.
The included a Hula Hupe praise, Bible
drill, dancing and singing.
Chosen Children, age 3 to 10 gave a special
dance presentation "I am not forgotten" which
was coordinated by Min. Lafayette Brown.
Next up Carrabelle Christian Center's
Free Fire got things heated up dancing to "It
could've been me." This dance provoked the
"Dance like David Danced" dance contest,
coordinated by Joel Williams. Youth repre-
senting various ministries were able to show
off their dance skills as the crowd cheers on
the extreme moves by the participants. The
dance-off ended in a tie and each youth re-
ceive a prize valued at $5.
Coming back to the stage, "I believe" and
"Sing, sing, sing," were sung by the Rally's
house band for the evening, "The Reel". They
had the lights and youth jumping.
Following them was the "Donia Rappers"
from Macedonia Baptist Church, Panama City.
Coming to the stage, chanting "we ready" and
free style rapping their various testimonies of
how Christ changed their lives.
"I'm a soldier, in the army of the Lord,"
Love Center's Chosen teens sang as they got
in formation for a step and speak-out written
by the youth and directed by Dakaya Quan
and coordinated by Min. Cydell Lockley.
Port St. Joe's House of Praise youth and
Pastor Cardrella Garland were in the house


The Times I B5


These young men from the Eastpoint Church of God youth group were among 300
young people who took part in the Love Center's Chosen Generation "Armed Forces
Youth Rally" March 20.


and represented with a recitation of youth
who found themselves in hell because they
did not heed the invitation to salvation. The
conclusion and title of the poem was "Hell is
for Wimps."
Love Center's Junior High Group of about
20 youth presented a dance using flags and
wearing war paint, "Waging War" choreo-
graphed by LaShonda Williams and under the
coordination of Minister Teresa Martin.
Meanwhile Eastpoint Church of God pre-
pared to minister in a drama titled "Too Late to
Apologize," which told about three youth who,
after being introduced to the truth of Jesus
Christ and the church, decide to go out party-
ing, when they are killed in a car accident and
find themselves in hell. This thought-provok-
ing drama was a reality check for the youth
and a visual aid to get them thinking about
their lives.
Following the skit, altar ministry was in
order. "The Reel" ministered and the Free
Fire worshipped with "Lord, You're Holy" as


dozens flowed to the altar for repentance and
rededication.
Afterward, attendees were invited to more
fun and fellowship, eating and enjoying deli-
cious hamburgers, chicken, hotdogs, chips,
cookies, popcorn and drinks organized out-
side by Carolyn Williams, Love Center's Chil-
dren ministry coordinator, and supported
by donations from community, parents and
grandparents.
"Each group has its own distinct and
unique flavor," said Pam Shiver, wife of East-
point Church of God's youth pastor.
"Yeah, matter of fact each Rally has had
its own flavor and personality," Scott Shiver
chimed in.
"We are grateful to God and to each one
who came and participated in whatever way
you did. Together we made it a success. God
did exceedingly, abundantly above that which
we could even ask or think," said Temolynn
Wintons, the Love Center's youth pastor and
the event's coordinator.


Tonya's Hope fundraiser against cancer Saturday
American Legion Post 82, 2316 Oak food and entertainment will be under our
Street, Lanark Village, will host its third pavilion, weather permitting.
annual Tonya's Hope cancer fundraiser, on At 3:30 p.m. the fun will continue inside
Saturday, April 4, to benefit residents of La- the lounge with a live auction featuring
nark who have been stricken with Chuck Spicer as the auctioneer.
cancer. He will have the most valuable and
Activities start at 9 a.m. with a unique items to auction off. After
Treasure Sale; coffee and donuts the auction Evelyn and Company
will be served. At noon we will have will be performing our famous Ka-
a memorial service and a Celebra- raoke for the rest of the evening.
tion of Life ceremony for those liv- Tonya's Hope was started to
ing with or cured of cancer. help Tonya Bridges when she was
The pig, cooked by Thomas Lee Tonya Bridges so very ill. We continue with this
Brannan, will be served at 12:15 very worthwhile project in her
p.m. Side dishes will include cole slaw, memory and we thank her family for allow-
baked beans, potato salad, macaroni salad ing us to honor her in this way.
or Tommy Larson's famous corn on the Any help and donations would be greatly
cob. You will have a choice of three sides appreciated. Donations will be accepted at
for a donation of $8. the Legion Post any day after 4 p.m. Con-
Also at 12:15 p.m., we will have our fa- tact the Post at 697-9998 or Kathy Ingersoll
vorite entertainers playing and singing for at 697-9533.
you enjoyment. Turk Leonard will singyour Contracts for Lanark residents who are
request and our own Carrabelle songbird in need of Tonya's Hope funds are available
Evelyn McAnally will be singing also. All at the American Legion Post 82 in Lanark.

2009 ROAD PAVING PROJECT PROJECT #7.080

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified
person, company or corporation interested in constructing:
2009 ROAD PAVING PROJECT
Project is located in Franklin County, Florida and consists of approximately 12 miles of roadway
resurfacing, shoulder work, and striping at locations throughout the county.
Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St, Joe,
Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes,
on public entity crimes.
All bidders shall be FDOT qualified per Section 2-1 of the FDOT Standard Specifications for
Road and Bridge Construction, latest edition.
Completion date for this project will be 210 days from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented
to the successful bidder.
Liquidation damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at
$250.00 per day.
Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for the "2009 Road Paving Project."
Bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. (EDT), on April 20th, 2009, at the Franklin County Clerk's
Office, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203 Apalachicola, Florida 32320-
2317, and will be opened and read aloud on April21st, 2009 at the County Commission meeting
at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, FL.
Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $100.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should
be made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC.
The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to
accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the
best interest of Franklin County. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the
opening.
All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration
and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida.
If you have any questions, please call Clay Kennedy at (850) 227-7200.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS-00010


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6B @ The limes @ Thursday, April 2, 2009 Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


1100
1587T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS, INC.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

PILAR FLORES, et al,
Defendants.

CASE NO.:
19-2008-CA-000380

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
PILAR FLORES
Last Known Address: 45
Alan Dr., Apalachicola, FL
32320
Also Attempted Service At:
14324 S Skene Ave.,
Compton, CA 90220 and
400 Kings Point Dr., #430,
North Miami Beach, FL
33160

Current Residence
Unknown

UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF


1100
PILAR FLORES

Last Known Address: 45
Alan Dr., Apalachicola, FL
32320
Also Attempted Service At:
14324 S Skene Ave.,
Compton, CA 90220 and
400 Kings Point Dr., #430,
North Miami Beach, FL
33160

Current Residence
Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure
of Mortgage on the follow-
ing described property:

LOT 1, BLOCK 11, OF
GULF COLONY UNIT NO.
1, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF ON FILE
IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it,
on Marshall C. Watson,
PA., Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 1800
NW 49TH STREET, SUITE
120, FT LAUDERDALE FL
33309 within thirty (30)
days after the first publica-
tion of this Notice THE AP-
ALACHICOLA TIMES and
file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the com-
plaint.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA), disabled per-
sons who, because of their
disabilities, need special


1100
accommodation to partici-
pate in this proceeding
should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Suite 203, Apalachi-
cola, FL 32320 or Tele-
phone Voice/TDD (904)
653-8861 prior to such
proceeding.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
4th day of March, 2009.

Marcia Johnson
As Clerk of the Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
08-10906
March 26, April 2, 2009

1628T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR LEON COUNTY,
FLORIDA

LEON COUNTY FLORIDA,
a Charter County and Po-
litical Subdivision of the
State of Florida,
Plaintiff,

v.

GWENDOLEN LETTS, and
all other persons in pos-
session of subject real
property, whose names
are uncertain,
Defendants.

CASE NO.: 08-CA-2321

NOTICE
FOR PUBLICATION

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action to fore-
close on a code enforce-
ment lien on the following
property in Leon County,
Florida:

Begin at the Southeast


corner of the Northeast
Quarter of the Southwest
Quarter of Section 33,
Township 1 North, Range
2 West, run thence North
89 degrees 56 minutes
West for a distance of
1342.15 feet to a point,
thence run North 00 de-
grees 02 minutes East for
a distance of 1040.51 feet
to a point thence run East
for a distance of 120 feet
to a point on the Western
side of Frances Maples
Drive, thence run North 00
degrees 02 minutes East
along the Western side of
Frances Maples Drive for a
distance of 70.22 feet,
thence run East 660 feet to
a point on the Eastern side
of Mark Charles Drive,
thence run South 00 de-
grees 02 minutes West
along the Eastern side of
Mark Charles Drive for a
distance of 90 feet, thence
run East for a distance of
120 feet to a point which is
the point of beginning,
thence continue East for a
distance of 225 feet to a
point, thence run South 13
degrees 13 minutes 30
seconds West for a dis-
tance of 136.55 feet to a
point on Beth Circle,
thence run Northwesterly
along a curve having a ra-
dius of 50 feet for an are
distance of 62.55 feet to a
point, thence run North 46
degrees 59 minutes 15
seconds West for a dis-
tance of 185.3 feet to the
point of beginning, being
LOT 20, BLOCK D, WHIS-
PERING PINES SUBDIVI-
SION, according to a map
made by Apalachee Engi-
neer and Land Surveyors,
Inc. dated April 8, 1971.

ALSO:


A 1971 Liberty
Mobile-Home Model
Southernaire; Serial No. G
5196, together with all fur-
niture and fixtures therein;
said Mobile Home being
affixed to Lot 20, Block D,
Whispering Pines Subdivi-
sion.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to the
Complaint for Foreclosure
of Lien, twenty (20) days
after the last date of publi-
cation on counsel for the
Plaintiff, Leon County, Flor-
ida, whose name and ad-
dress is: Laura M.
Youmans, Esq., Leon
County Assistant County
Attorney, 301 South Mon-
roe Street, Room 202, Tal-
lahassee, Florida 32301,
and file the original with
the Clerk of the Court, oth-
erwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief prayed for in the
Complaint for Foreclosure
of Lien.

This notice shall be pub-
lished once week for four
(4) consecutive weeks in
the Apalachicola Times.

WITNESS my hand and
seal of said Court at Leon
County, Florida, on this
19th day of March, 2009

BOB INZER,
CLERK OF THE COURT
FOR LEON COUNTY
FLORIDA
By: Yolanda Smith
Deputy Clerk

Laura M. Youmans, Esq.
Florida Bar. 14091
Assistant County Attorney
Leon County Courthouse
301 South Monroe Street,


| 1100
Room 202
Tallahassee, Florida 32301
(850) 606-2500
April 2, 9, 16, 23, 2009
1642T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR FRANKLIN
COUNTY

Liquidation Properties Inc.
Plaintiff,

-vs.

Elizabeth Mullins and Rod-
ney Mullins a/k/a Rodney
D. Mullins, Wife and Hus-
band;
Defendant(s).

Case #: 2008-CA-0179
Division #:
UNC:

AMENDED NOTICE OF
SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der rescheduling foreclo-
sure sale dated March 9,
2009 entered in Civil Case
No. 2008-CA-0179 of the
Circuit Court of the 2nd Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein Liquidation Prop-
erties Inc., Plaintiff and
Elizabeth Mullins and Rod-
ney Mullins a/k/a Rodney
D. Mullins, Wife and Hus-
band are defendant(s), I
will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash, AT
THE WEST FRONT DOOR
OF THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN
APALACHICOLA, FLOR-
IDA, AT 11:00 A.M., April 9,
2009 the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Final Judg-


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| 1100
ment, to-wit:

BEGIN AT THE TERRA
COTTA MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF LOT
20 OF SOUTHLAND, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 4 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING
RUN NORTH 31 DE-
GREES 07 MINUTES 05
SECONDS WEST 330.20
FEET TO AN IRON ROD
AND CAP (MARKED
#7160), THENCE RUN
NORTH 58 DEGREES 55
MINUTES 30 SECONDS
EAST 187.47 FEET TO AN
IRON ROD AND CAP
(MARKED #7160),
THENCE RUN SOUTH 34
DEGREES 20 MINUTES 01
SECONDS EAST 330.63
FEET TO AN IRON ROD
AND CAP (MARKED
#7160), THENCE RUN
SOUTH 58 DEGREES 53
MINUTES 51 WEST 206.01
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.

TOGETHER WITH A 30.00
FOOT INGRESS AND
EGRESS EASEMENT BE-
ING MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:

COMMENCE AT AT
TERRA COTTA MONU-
MENT MARKING THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER
LOT 20 OF SOUTHLAND,
A SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 4 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA AND RUN
NORTH 58 DEGREES 53
MINUTES 51 SECONDS
EAST 206.01 FEET TO AN
IRON ROD AND CAP
(MARKED #7160) MARK-
ING THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING
RUN NORTH 34 DE-
GREES 20 MINUTES 01
SECONDS WEST 30.05
FEET, THENCE RUN
NORTH 58 DEGREES 53
MINUTES 51 SECONDS
EAST 125.45 FEET
THENCE RUN NORTH 58
DEGREES 51 MINUTES 22
SECONDS EAST 325.88
FEET TO A POINT LYING
ON THE SOUTHWEST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF 12TH
STREET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 31 DEGREES 29
MINUTES 49 SECONDS
EAST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 30.00 FEET TO AN
IRON PIPE, THENCE
LEAVENG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN SOUTH 58 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES 22
SECONDS WEST 326.06
FEET TO AN IRON ROD
AND CAP (MARKED
#4111), THENCE RUN
SOUTH 58 DEGREES 53
MINUTES 51 SECONDS
WEST 124.00 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

DATED at Apalachicola,
Florida, this 11th day of
March, 2009

Marcia M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk


ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN,
LLP
10004 N. Dale Mabry High-
way, Suite 112
Tampa, FL 33618
(813) 880-8888
March 26, April 2, 2009

1643T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR FRANKLIN
COUNTY

JPMorgan Chase Bank,
National Association
Plaintiff,

-vs.-

Karen Beth Millender; Un-
known Parties in Posses-
sion #1; Unknown Parties
in Possession #2; If living,
and all Unknown Parties
claiming by, through, un-
der and against the above
named Defendant(s) who
are not known to be dead
or alive, whether said Un-
known Parties may claim
an interest as Spouse,
Heirs, Devisees, Grantees,
or Other Claimants
Defendant(s).

Case #: 2008-CA-0220
Division #:

AMENDED NOTICE OF
SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der rescheduling foreclo-
sure sale dated March 9,
2009 entered in Civil Case
No. 2008-CA-0220 of the
Circuit Court of the 2nd Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein JPMorgan Chase
Bank, National Associa-
tion, Plaintiff and Karen
Beth Millender are
defendant(s), I will sell to
the highest and best bid-
der for cash, AT THE
WEST FRONT DOOR OF
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, LOCATED
ON HWY 98, IN APALACH-
ICOLA, FLORIDA AT 11:00
A.M., April 9, 2009, the fol-
lowing described property
as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 6 AND THE NORTH
14 FEET OF LOT 7,
BLOCK D (112), RANGE
10, PICKETT'S ADDITION
TO THE TOWN OF
CARRABELLE, FLORIDA,
AS PER PLAT OR MAP
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20,
OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

DATED at Apalachicola,
Florida, this 11th day of
March, 2009.

Marcia M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN,
LLP
10004 N. Dale Mabry High-
way, Suite 112
Tampa, FL 33618
(813) 880-8888
March 26, April 2, 2009


1100
1644T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR FRANKLIN
COUNTY

LaSalle Bank NA as Trus-
tee for Washington Mutual
mortgage pass-Through
Certificates WMALT Series
2007-HY2 Trust
Plaintiff,

vs

Larry E. Evans; Mortgage
Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc., as nominee
for Terrace Mortgage
Company;
Defendant(s)

CASE NO
2008-CA-000275
DIVISION #:
UNC:

AMENDED NOTICE OF
SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der rescheduling foreclo-
sure sale dated March 10,
2009 entered in Civil Case
No. 2008-CA-000275 of the
Circuit Court of the 2nd Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein LaSalle Bank NA
as Trustee for Washington
Mutual Mortgage
Pass-Through Certificates
WMALT Series 2007-HY2
Trust, Plaintiff and Larry E.
Evans are defendant(s), I
will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash, AT
THE WEST FRONT DOOR
OF THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN
APALACHICOLA, FLOR-
IDA, AT 11:00 a.m., April 9,
2009, the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:

LOT 3, BLOCK B, SEA
DUNE VILLAGE, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 21,
OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

DATED at Apalachicola,
Florida this 11th day of
March, 2009.
Marcia M. Johnson Clerk
of Court
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT Franklin County,
Florida By: Michele Max-
well Deputy Clerk

ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN,
LLP
10004 N. Dale Mabry High-
way, Suite 112
Tampa, FL 33618
(813)880-8888
March 26, April 2, 2009

1645T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

RBC CENTURA BANK,
Plaintiff

vs

HENRIETTE BURNS A/K/A
HENRIETTA DEROZARIO
BURNS, et. al.,
Defendants

CASE NO 07-000475CA

RE-NOTICE OF FORE-


610-20


K K K


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


6B The Times Thursday, April 2, 2009






Franklin County's source of news for more than a century The Times Thursday, April 2, 2009 7B


| 1100 1100 1100 1100 3220 4100 4100 6110 /
CLOSURE SALE lachicola, Florida, at 11:00 torney, whose address is Food Services/Hospitality 2 br, 1 ba $499 Moves You
a.m. on April 29, 2009. RPO. Box 157, Apalachi- Twenty-eight Thousand Bldg Const/Skilled Trade In!! New Everything, near o
NOTICE IS HEREBY cola, FL 32329, on or be- Dollars) and if not bid at TAFB, 719 S Berthe,
GIVEN pursuant to an Or- Any person claiming an in- fore the 1st day of May, that price or higher, the IRONWORKERS Cooks Panama City850-236-4453
der or Final Judgment en- terest in the surplus from 2009, and file the original auction shall be cancelled. A NEW OrthoRest matress Experienced, Cooks Shift ______ 802-
tered in Case No. the sale, if any, other than with the clerk of this court set in sealed plastic. Full MUST have structural iron- is days & nights Call Lanark Village, 1 br' RFALESTATAE SALE
07-000475CA of the Circuit the property owner as of either before service on DATED: March 19, 2009. warranty. Sacrifice $225. work exp. MUST have own 850-653-6375 | apt. W/D, C/H/A, yard I
Court of the 2ND Judicial the date of the lis pend- plaintiff's attorney or imme- Can deliver. 222-7783 tools!!! Drug free work --- 1-- -- A $550 mo, 1st & last. Ask
Circuit in and for FRANK- ens, must file a claim diately thereafter; other- Marcia M. Johnson, place! Call Chuck (904) Restaurant/Food Serv for Jim 850-697-2788 s -
LIN County, Florida within 60 days after the wise a default will be en- Clerk of Court 626-9354 Or Chris (904) i 7100
wherein RBC CENTURA sale. tered against you for the By: Michelle Maxwell 773-3903 I SERVERS I Small Effic, very private,
BANK, Plaintiff and HENRI- relief demanded in the Deputy Clerk Web id 34031113 COOKS Sec. dep req. Must have Port St. Joe, St. George
ETTE BURNS A/K/A HEN- CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT complaint of the petition. March 26, April 2, 2009 BEDROOM1NEW ref + c-653-63redit score. a S amesBay
RIETTA DEROZARIO COURT BEDROOM SET: NEW *HOSTS 1 850-653-6375 Previously Bank Owned
BURNS, A/K/A HENR By: MicheleMaxwell Dated this25th day of QUEEN 7 pc set. Dovetail Customer Support Property. Priced way be-
ETTA DEROZARIO Deputy Clerk March, 2009. $2400 value, must sell Cashier I BLUE PARROT starting at $35,000. Please
BURNS, et.al., are defend- ve M. Watkins, I MARCIA M JOHNSON $999. 425-8374. Delivery Clerk needed at the mini HIRING Apartments call Counts Real Estate
ants, I willsell to the high FBN 0794996 As Clerk of the Court Available convenience store (blue). Please apply in person Accepting Applications Group at 850-249-3615.
MARKET STREET, FRONT 41 Commerce Street By: Michele Maxwell Must be able to work between 9a-5pm 7 days for 1, 2 & 3 Bdrms. HC
STEPS OF THE COURT- Apalachicola, FL 32320 As Deputy Clerk nights and/or weekends. a week@ & Non-HC accessible Want to buy Home or MH,
HOUSE, STE 203, (850) 653-1949 April 2, 9, 16, 23, 2009 Call 927-2163 for more info Blue Parrott units. Rental assistance Owner financing, $50,000
APALCHICOLA,FL 32320ST 23 ( 0April 2,99,,2009 St. George Island available. Call 850- or less, Fixer upper ok.
APALCHICOLA, FL 32320, April 2, 9, 2009 653-9277. TDD/TTY 711 Carrabelle or East Point
Florida, at the hour of 1702T Canopy Bed Food Serv/HEqual Housing Area Call Don at
11:00 a.m., on the 9th day 1680T STATE OF FLORIDA, DE_ 3100 Antiques Bed Food Serv/Hospitality
110 ApplanceCIRCUIT COURTBrand New in box $129 2 Soberpportunity 1- 678294 1637 OR
ofApril, 2009, the following IN THE CIRCUIT COURT PARTMENT OF ENVI 3120-Arts&Crafts 850545712 2 Sober Cooks 1-770-567-3624
described property: OF THE SECOND JUDI- RONMENTAL PROTEC- 3130 -:Auctions Good hours. Good pay. 4130 -
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND TION 3140- Baby Items Apply at The Grill in Bankcard Sales: Exp.
LOT 9 OF FAIRWAY PARK FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY 3150 Building Supplies Apchcol ahe n Grill in c da onlm kls: x20
SUBDIVISION AS PER FLORIDA. NOTICE OF 3160 Business Apalachicola anyday only, weekly signup bo- 6120
MAPORLATHREFA NEquipmentnus, management poten- Beach
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF APPLICATION 3170 Collectibles tial, ongoing paid residual. Beach
RECORDED IN PLAT JOHNSON PARK ASSOCI- 3180- Computers Complete 5 pc Solid Wood Franklin County Tourist Be part of a Nationwide Rentals-Sales Why Rent
BOOK 8, PAGE 15, PUB- ATES, LLC, The Department an- 3190 Electronics Bedroom Set w Dovetail Development Council Team that pays! BY OWNER When You Can
LIC RECORDS OF FRANK- Plaintiff, nounces receipt of an ap- 3200 Firewood Drawers. Brand New! $599 a8005973140 x 107. Visit BeachRealty.net n OU an
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA. plication from Curtis Mon- 3210 Free Pass it On Can Deliver 425-8374 Administrative Visit BeachRealtynet Own A Brand
VS. roe, File No. 3220 Furniture
Any person claiming an in- 19-0294405-001 -DF, to re- 320- Garage/ard Sales unsService Package POSTAL &GOVT JOB St. George New Home?
terest in the surplus from DORIS V. WETH- cover pre-cut submerged 3250 Good Things to Eat INFO FOR SALE? THE AVENUES at
the sale, if any, other than ERINGTON, the unremar- timber beginning at Mile 3260 Health & Filness The Franklin County TDC $160 wk elec, Satellite KEOUGH's LANDING.
the property owner as of ried widow of C.J. WETH- Marker 35.4, River Styx, 3270 Jewelry/Clothing is accepting proposals $160 wk, elec, Satellite, Green certified and HOP
the date of the lis pendens ERINGTON, a/k/a CHAR- and ending at mile Marker 3280 Machinery/ TWIN from qualified firms to pro- caution tra ixnd pool approved. Affordable Liv-
must file a claim within 60 LIE JOHNSON WETH- 15.4, Bloody Bluff, of the Equipment mattress set $125. All NEW vide a package of adminis- tl. in g on the Forgotten Coast
days after the sale. ERINGTON, WENDELL Apalachicola River. The 00Medical Equipment w/warranty 545-7112 trative services to support Beautiful view. 2 br $250 3 bdrm, 2 bath homes
BURTON, the only heir of timber recoveries will be 3310 Musicallans 'ments the operations of the Tour- You NEVER have to pay Call 850-6535114 ranging from 1250-2000
DATED this 10th day of MIRIAM BURTON GIB- conducted in Gulf, Liberty 3320- Plants & Shrubs/ B ist Development Council to for information about sqft in Carrabelle's Newest
March, 2009. SON, the surviving unre- and Franklin Counties. Supplies i nclude, but not be limited federal or postal jobs. If Subdivision only 1/4 mile
married widow of T.Y GIB- 3330 Restaurant/Hotel to the following: you see a job from the Carrabelle River
Clerk Circuit Court SON, JR., a/k/a THOMAS This application is being 3340 Sporting Goods 3230 guarantee", contact the
By: Michele Maxwell YOUNG GIBSON, JR., processed and is available 3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell) Serving as administrative FTC. St. George Pricing from the $100,000s
Deputy Clerk C.G. CHAPMAN, a/k/a for public inspection dur- staff for the FCTDC- The Federal Trade Pickyour Lot.
C.G. CHAPMAN, SR., ing normal business hours, .- scheduling and attend Commission laChooseYour Model.
Greenspoon Marder, PA., a/k/a CHESTER GRIGGS 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., meetings, drafting agen- is America's consumer 2 br, 1 ba, bar, satellite, Only 8 lots left!
TRADE CENTRE SOUTH, CHAPMAN, SR., C.G. Monday through Friday, I 3180 I HUGE EASTER das, taking minutes, handl- protection agency. util incl. $250/wk, Call BEC & Company, Inc.
SUITE 700, CHAPMAN, JR., FRANK R. except legal holidays, at YARD AKE ing all correspondence 850-653-5114 (850) 656-2608
100 WEST CYPRESS REYNOLDS, ETHEL JAN- the Northwest District of- Name Brand Laptops, Ab- YARD & BAKE Maintaining an accessi- www.ftc.gov/jobscams
CREEK ROAD, ICE LANE MATTHEWS, fice at 160 Governmental solutely Free! Get the SALE ble public office/facility, 1-877-FTC-HELP
FORT LAUDERDALE, FL MICHAEL PATRICK REYN- Center, Pensacola, Florida Laptop You Deserve. Newly New & Used, Start @ 25 maintain files and website. *
33309 OLDS, the heirs of F.C. 32502-5974. Super Thin Super Fast. CENT. MAKE OFFER. Response to requests for A public service 6130 7150
REYNOLDS, a/k/a FRANK April 2, 2009 Includes Free Shipping! Sat 4-11-09 @ 9 am UN- information about TDC message from the FTC
IMPORTANT C. REYNOLDS, BROOKS Log In Now! TIL. Across from programs and The News Herald arrabelFor SaleBy
In accordance with the GRIGGS, and ROLAND E. 1625T www.SuperFreeLaptop.co LYNN'S OYSTERS at Assist FCTDC in the ClassifiedAdvertising By
Americans with Disabilities SMITH, if alive, and if dead IN THE CIRCUIT COURT m 402 HWY 98 in preparation of procedural Department 3 br, 2 ba Unfurnished, Owner
Act, persons needing a or not known to be dead OF THE SECOND JUDI- EASTPOINT documents, request for W/D, D/W, CH& A, Deck, 1 acre lot high and dry,
special accommodation to or alive, their several and CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND proposals or bids, and Poolside. Covered boat cleared with trees. Re-
participate in this proceed- respective unknown FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY contracts parking. Long term duced Price $38K. Call
ing should, no later than spouses, heirs, devisees, FLORIDA ca Collect information on PRICE REDUCED. For ap Captain JR for more de-
seven (7) days prior con- grantees, creditors, and all PROBATE DIVISION tax revenues collected poinment, 850-877-7696. tais at 850-6708858
tact the Clerk of the parties natural, corporate, 3220 | Process invoices and ex- home or cell 653-5030
Court's disability coordina- or otherwise claiming inter- In Re: Estate of j a, pedite payments with
tor at 301 S MONROE ests by, through, under or ARRIE L. PARKER, at Port St Joe Marina Franklin County Finance
STREET ROOM 225, TAL- against them, a majority of Deceased. Saturday, April 11. Office Lanark Villa I
LAHASSEE, FL 32301, the surviving BOARD OF 8a.n.to2p.m.ET Financial-Draft and mon- BUSINESS & FINANCIAL R
850-577-4401. if hearing or DIRECTORS OF C & G IN- File Number 03-000009-PR 5 Piece 100% MicroFiber in the parking lot ofthe marina. itor budgets, create, pres- ba Renovated/fur | 7160
voice impaired, contact VESTMENT CORPORA- Living Rm Set including This is a sale for boating and ent and interpret monthly 5100 Busnes nshed end unit, new ki 61 x210'Mobile home lot
(TDD) (800) 955-8771 via TION, a dissolved Florida NOTICEOFSALE coffee able. $649, ALL fishingenthusiast. Spaceare financial statements and Oppo rtuniies and bath, mni 4 m n hfr sa le hm l
pefrmbdtNOTICEaOFiSALE s 5110 -MoneytoLend ep orosale$25,000,Ca
Florida Relay System. corporation, NEW in boxes. Delivery $10.00 for a 10'x 10 Spot. perform budget analysis lease $495/mo + dep., no me 850 5024
March 26, April 2, 2009 Defendants. NOTICE IS GIVEN hat he Available. 222-7783 tables.There Manage grant program smoking, pet considered.Home-850-370-615-0124 or
undersigned Clerk of the will be an area for Boat Sales, including noticing grant (850 653-3838 Ce 850370618
1662T CASE NO: 08-000519-CA Circuit Court of Franklin which will cost $20.00. Last program funds, conduct-| 5100
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT County, Florida, pursuant yeartwo boatssol0dduring the ing training session f-A!
NOTICEOFACTIONa pplicants, oversee appli ALL Cash Business En-
OF THE SECOND JUDI- NOTICEOFACTION to the Order of Sale en- sale. Contact Ray Whitneyat cations and contracts, ergy Drinks, Coke, Peps61
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND tered in this cause will on 850-647-6328 or PortStJoe monitor grantees and ob Snickers, and Frito-Lay
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY To: R April 9, 2009 at 1100 a 6 piece PUB TABLE & Marina. 850-227-9393 tainfollow upreports vending oute. No Seling
FLORIDA DORIS V. WETH at the front steps of the chairs, solid wood. New in Maintenance and update Involved! Recession
ERINGTON, the unremar- Franklin County Court- cra e. List $1200, Take ofwebsites Proof! Minimum invest- house
GULF STATE COMMU- ried widow of C.J. WETH- house at Apalachicola, $425 (can deliver) Other administrative du ment $3600. Cal 1 br hous
NITY BANK, ERINGTON, a/k/a CHAR- Florida offer for sale to the 222-9879 3250 others as riniequested by the 1800-7700160 Call /h/aw/d incl. OMTIVE NE
Plaintiff, LIE JOHNSON WETH- highest and best bidder for 222-9879 32 es as requested by the 1-800-770-0160 C/h/a, w/d incl. A CeA i
ERINGTON, WENDELL R cash, the following de- SweatmoreFCTDC. Strawberry No pets. 850-653-9788 1 Antique Col
vs. BURTON, the only heir of scribed property in Frank- Sweatmore Stawberr 8 850-615-0058 81100- Cars
MIRIAM BURTON GIB- in County FloridaRanch Opening Wed April In addition respondents 8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
DURL E. CHAMBERS JR SON, the surviving unre- County, Florida: 1st @ 8am! U pick $1.79 will include in their pro- / 1, 2, & 3, br 8130 -oTrucks
and REBECCA D. CHAM married widow of TY GIB Lot 3 Block 88 ST. lb. We use no insecticides posal administrative sup- Apalachicola, FL. 8140 Vans
BERS, husband and wife SON, JR., a/k/a THOMAS GEORGE ISLAND GULF $155 Brand Name. Queen 7224819 port and infrastructure to Call 850-643-7740. 81 Motorcycles
and CITIFINANCIAL EQ YOUNG GIBSON, JR., BEACHES, UNIT NUMBER mattress set, unused in include 3 br 1.5 ba, M 8170- AutoPartles
UITY SERVICES, INC. a C.G. CHAPMAN, a/k/a 5, a subdivision as per sealed plastic with & 3 br, 1.5 ba ,Mexico & Accessories
foreign corporation C.G. CHAPMAN, SR., map or plat thereof re- warranty. 222-7783. an ADA handicapped ac- * * Beach, Canal Front, boat 8210- Boats
Defendant(s).a/k/a CHESTER GRIGGS corded in Plat Book 3, Delivery Available cessible office sutable for REA ESTATE FOR fp, no pets, 8220- Personal Wterrft
(s). CHAPMAN, SR., C.G. Pages 16 and 17 of the identification as the TDC -[ F$1,000 mo $500 dep. 8230-- Sailboats
CASE NO: 08-000549-CA CHAPMAN, JR., FRANK R. Public Records of Franklin offices, such office equip- 6100 Business/ 850-648-5045 8240 Boat & Marine
REYNOLDS, ETHEL JAN- County, Florida (the ment as is necessary to Commercial Supplies
ICREYNOLDS, EMATTHEWSL JAN- ounty, Florida (the mentquip aoffice includingto 6110- Apartments 3 br, 2 ba, house on River 8310 Aircrafl/Aviation
NOTICEOFSALE ICE LANE MATTHEWS, roperty). equip an 81office including 6120- Beach Rentals Rd, FP fncd in backyard. 8320 ATV/Off Road Vehicles
MICHAEL PATRICK REYN- W but not limited to the fol- 6130 -Condo/Tfownhouse REDUCEDI $750 mo Call 8330 Campers & Trailers
NOTICE is hereby given OLDS, the heirs of F.C. Together with all the ap- 100% Leather Living Rm .......... lo........... administrator's desk 6150 use Rentmmale Wanted Maria 8507660357 8340 Moorhomes
that, pursuant to the Order REYNOLDS, a/k/a FRANK purtenances thereunto be- Set. Lifetime Warrany on 4100- Help Wantedad suite e 10-Rooms formRentd ---___--__
of Final Summary Judg- N BROOKS longing. Provided that, the Hardwood Frame. new 4130- Employment clerical desk suite 6170- Mobile Home/Lot
ment of Foreclosure in this GRIGGS, and ROLAND E. opening bid for the Prop- still in crate. List $1999. Let Information filing cabinets 6180 Out-of-Town Rentals 8110
cause, in the Circuit Court SMITH, if alive, and if dead erty shall be $128,000 go for $629.545-7112. Can flng computer 6190- VacTimeshare Rentals achicola 2 br, 2 ba,
of Franklin County, Florida, or not known to be dead (One Hundred Deliverals Apalachicola 2 br, 2 bam a
I will sell the property situ or alive, their several and ll- fax and copying ma- CH/A. New neighborhood.
ated in Franklin County, RECTORS OF C & G IN- uiles dw $700 mo, 1st, last, + $500





rau in RCny6 Fr V TMENT CORPORA- The Franklin County TDC ilternet access fortUitesrlu $ dep. no smokers. ^ S fS -
Florida described as spouses, heirs, devisees facilities for meeting dep. Non smokers only, no Jeep Cherokee 998
grantees, creditors, and alliA Franklin County Tourist tesubi t610Ca ee
EXHIBITus of 313.61 feet th parties natural, corporateMonday April 62009 1 br, 1 ba & 2 br, apart-bath $1150 mo, + utilities,$375 Down, $3,800 0% n-






a central angle of 87 de- r s a ne- Serving as admit native a propriateunfurn electric/water 1 yr lease, security de- signage toterest. Daylight Auto Fi-
C ommence at the North- ets by, through, under ore identify the TDC offices nancing 2816 HWY 98 W,
s ormne arc th or against, them, a majority of e Administrativen office expenses to in-- 9am to 9om 850-215-1769
west Cornier of Fractional the surviving BOARD OF AssisProperty taking clude: For Rent Spae available Bayview, 3 br, 2 ba, CH/A,-803-0776







Section 29, Townshipn8fthNg ng Bay R 2 Bedroom Home Located At Aesn ant a dcor- drmcal o
South, Range 6 West, DIRECTORS OF C & G IN W k u l utilities for sma business dw, $690 mo, 1st, last, +
Franklin County, Florida VESTMENT CORPORA- The Franklin County TDC internetaccess fice. Utilities included $600 dep. no smokers.







rain ut r0 Sat., April 18th, 10:00 AM Downtown Historic Ape- Call 850-670-8266n a
and run thence South 00 TION, a dissolved Florida is accepting proposals D ns Ap a 8 6 8
degrees 46 minutes 55 corporation,om quaed ind 7813 Hwy 39,ividu Respondents should pro lachicola 29 Ave E Pontiac Bonneville 2002
seconds West 594.0 feet 1 PROyERTIE 2D to provide contract ser- vide, in their proposal, a (upstairs Fo no a Carrabelle 3 br, 1 ba, $950 Down, $5,800 0% in-
along the West boundary YOU ARE NOTIFIED that 0 PfOPEfIf DAYS vices as an Administrative per hour pricing formula Carol 850-653-3871 completely remodeled, terest. Daylight Auto Fi-
of Fractional Section 29 to an action to Quiet Title the 1-Assistant. Applicants that would include provi- large private yard $700 dancing 2816 HWY 98 W
a point on the Noh side following property in Friday, April 18th,2:00 PM should be able to demon sion of the above services monthly210 NE 1stto 9 pm.850-215-1769
of Twin Lakes Road, said Franklin County, Florida: r Pa n o, ri state training and experi an dcit40 -006 u pB S
point leaving onsaid Easterly sai State Roa 370 a Lake Sem violence in serving as an ad should be submitted to the6110 Villas Townhomes for Carrabelle
right-of-way of Otter Slide isnce at an old con- Process invoices and ex- t/Proram Mmt Aartm nt Jones Homestead-Pon- 8210
concave Southwesterly, e monument marking CommercialProperty ministrative assist and th offices at Bay Mediaati65
RoadthenceNorth 69 crene outh72 5 W aterfr nt Home ability to perform t l diat 4 br 2 ba w/FP all appl
nds East along th- Eas t 372.44 feet to a con- 1 11 19 & 5 Magnolia Lane lowing tasks: Ave. E., Apalachicola, FlorIDA foincl 2 &3 Bdrms HC 12 month lease. 2 br andtub,
dius of 313.61 feet through South boundary of Frac- ida 32320 by 5:00 PM.
a central angle of 87 de tional Section33, Townce *Servingancial-Draft administrative Monday April 6 Inc. 1 br, 1 b & 2 br, apart bath $1150 mo, + utilities $375 Down, $3,8000%in
grees 50 minutes 56 sec- ship 6 South; Range 1 Building L t Panacea, staff for the FCTDCmccurief re stn a ying2 HtYAuo F
onds for an arc length of West, Franklin County, Lot FL scheduling, attending and All work performed under inc. Tile floors, part cy- posit, cr check & e eq dancing 2816 HWY 98 W
480.84 feet (chord bears Florida, wiouth72 heEasterly 104 Lak de Dr. itreording meets, this proposal will be the press panelling, private Nosmokes Call850-227-9732 Aluminum Boat



















d ft e asr04 tgtne.noobgkdonbrr 3 Lots Plus 2 Homes dnn57dr8c3an6So s
South 45 degrees 36 mn- boundary of the 100 foot Residential Property Drafting agendas, taking property of Franklin deck 1 block from beach 5738030776Lhurs Open
435.11 feet) to a point on No. 370, said poinalsod Maintenance and update and/ort Endispositiont may incl. $700/mo, Remodel 404 40Twin 8.2 Detroit Die5573
Northe Easterly right-of-way of No. 370, thence North 17 rl Br re of web sMaintaining an accesstes deem appropriate and 850-653-64591 ba, new app and sels Fly Bridge Out











of ORidge Road thence ner of Lot 1 of Pminutes 28 Other administrative du- A copy fc office/facility, shall the Scope of w/d, $550/mo 850-697- toRiggers, Diesel Genera-
South 69 degrees 56 m in- seconds East along said 1-800-342-2666 ti aies as requested by the Servioduces fand/or this position 2220 or 850-509-3535 6140 tor new full cabinHome


utes 00 seconds West right-of-way boundary 80.0 FCTDC. and/or answers to ques- Galey, Trim Tabs, Bait
along said Northerly feet, thence South 72 de- For More Details Visit tions may be obtained A T DA Station, Platform with
right-of-way 137.99 feet to grees 22 minutes 32 sec- M D Applicants should be avail- by contacting Florida G R E A T D E A L ladder, Bottom and
the POINT OF BEGINN- onds East 376.40 feet to a WWW.jdurhamauctions.com able thirty (30) to (40) Foresight, Attn: Bill Zinc's good. Runs
ING. concrete monument, hours per week and be Lowrie, PO. Box 896, Duplex for sale or rent Good Will Tradel Ask-
thence continue South 72 E F F IhuII wlling o perform duties Panacea, Florida 32346; ing $39,000 OBO At
Being Lot 11, Unit 2, Tar- degrees 22 minutes 32 10% BUYERS PREMIUM on contract with the TDC, by p hone (850) Central AC/Heat Panama City Marina slip
pon Shores Subdivision, seconds East 30.0 feet, Franklin County or such 962-4138 (daytime 603. Call 850-871-9300
according to the plat more or less, to the shore oganization as is desig- only); or by E-MAIL Sale prie $125,000 or 850-258-0996
thereof on file in the Frank- line of the Gulf of Mexico, lJl nated by the TDC. Appli- billlowrie@embarqmail.
lin County Planning and thence Southwesterly cants should submit a re- com. Many incentives
Zoning Office, Commerce along said shore line 80.0 a ui n iSc sume and salary proposal. Resumes shall be ac-
Street, Apalachicola, Flor- feet, more or less, to the Proposals cepted by postal mail or or
ida. Point of Beginning. will be received until e-mail no later than COMPLETE PACKAGES
has been __________ a__April 6,2009at 5:00 P.M. 12:00 noon EST on Rental $600 mo FROM$4,995
at Public Sale, to the high- has been filed against you. in the offices Monday, April 13, 2009. All Welded, AlAluminum Boats
est bidder, for cash, at the You are required to serve a F of Bay Media Florida Foresight is an 3br/ 1 2 ba BOAT SHOW FRI. & SAT.
steps of the Franklin copy of your written de- at 65 Ave. E., Affirmative Action/ BonifayForida
County Courthouse, Apa- fenses, if any, to it on Bar- Apalachicola, Florida Equal Opportunity Em- 850-899-0304 Or 850-653-1240 www.xtremeindustries.com
bara Sanders, plaintiffs at- 32320. ployerlFlrd


it





































ti
r






B8 I The Times


Local


Thursday, April 2, 2009


Bibliophiles sip champagne and sport chapeaux


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

Spring was in the air
Monday when a bevy of
dazzling damsels turned
out in their pre Easter
bonnets.
It was standing room
only as over 50 ladies
lunched and shopped in
support of the Franklin
County Library branch
now under construction in
Eastpoint.
Ellen Ashdown,
secretary of Friends
of the Franklin County
Florida Public Library
coordinated the "Chapeaux
and Champagne" event
held at Sea Oats Gallery
on St. George Island. She
was assisted by Elaine
Kozlowsky, of Eastpoint,
Uta Hardy, of Carrabelle,


Date
Thu, Apr 02
Fri, Apr 03
Sat, Apr 04
Sun, Apr 05
Mon, Apr 06
Tue, Apr 07
Wed, Apr 08


04/03 Fri 04:05AM
03:23
04/04 Sat 05:12AM
05:02PM
04/05 Sun 06:07AM
06:06PM
04/06 Mon 12:23AM
01:47PM
04/07 Tue 01:44AM
01:59PM
04/08 Wed 02:51AM
02:10PM


-0.2
1.9
-0.2
1.6
0.0
1.1
2.2
2.1
2.2
2.1
2.2
2.2


and Jean Collins, of St.
George Island.
The menu featured a


Temperature
High Low
750 640
740 540
750 640
750 600
710 500
720 540
740 590
TIDE TABLES


% Precip
80%
30%
20%
60%
30%
0%
0%


MONTHLY AVERAGES
Fo find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
rom those given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
.at Point Minus0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
Fo find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
rom those given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
3aid Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03
APALACHICOLA


04/02 Thu 04:55AM
04/03 Fri 06:18AM
05:36PM
04/04 Sat 07:25AM
07:15PM
04/05 Sun 12:05AM
02:59PM
04/06 Mon 01:48AM
03:12PM
04/07 Tue 03:09AM
03:24PM
04/08 Wed 04:16AM
03:35PM


-0.2 L


-0.1
1.2
-0.1
1.0
1.4
1.3
1.4
1.3
1.4
1.3
1.4
1.4


08:30PM 1.6 H


02:36PM
10:08PM
02:45PM
08:20AM
08:19PM
09:05AM
09:11PM
09:43AM
09:57PM
10:14AM
10:38PM


1.3 H
1.4 H
1.3 H
0.0 L
0.7 L
0.2 L
0.5 L
0.4 L
0.2 L
0.6 L
0.0 L


2.6 H


01:11PM
08:43PM
01:20PM
10:40PM
01:34PM
06:52AM
06:58PM
07:30AM
07:44PM
08:01AM
08:25PM


SOLUNAR
m = Minor M = Major add 1 hour for dailaight savings
Date Day AM PM Rise/Set Moon
04/02 Thu m 11:00 m 11:35 6:49AM
M4:30 M5:20 7:19PM
04/03 Fri m 11:55 6:47AM
M5:45 M6:15 7:20PM
04/04 Sat m 12:30 m 12:50 6:46AM
M 6:40 M 7:05 7:20PM
04/05 Sun m 1:20 m 1:35 6:45AM
M7:25 M7:50 7:21PM ".2
04/06 Mon m 2:05 m 2:20 6:44AM 0
M8:10 M8:35 7:21PM
04/07 Tue m 2:50 m 3:05 6:43AM
M 8:55 M 9:20 7:22PM
04/08 Wed m 3:35 m 3:45 6:42AM /
M9:35 M 10:00 7:23PM


Art Walk
This Saturday, April 4th, 12-6!
Come and enjoy music and refreshments in
a lovely setting while viewing our featured
folk artist, Anne Hempel. Rain or shine, you
will not want to miss it!



['* il I I


grilled shrimp salad and
crepes with strawberry ice
cream but the high point of
the afternoon was art.
This year's featured
artists were Kathi Gordon,
JenniferFlemmingandJoe
Waitsman, of Pensacola;
Joyce Estes and Cass
Allen, of Eastpoint, and
Denise Choppin, Claudia
Howat, Ann Kozeliski and
D. Majken Peterzen, of
Tallahassee.
The objets d'art on
display ranged from
Kozeliski's sumi-e
paintings to Peterzen's


textile images of women
andgoddessesto Choppin's
painted images taken from
vintage postcards.
Wearable art was the
theme of the event and
Gordon brought an array
of jewelry that she and
Waitsman, her son, had
created. Also available
were handmade jackets
and bags by Flemming and
painted silk saris created
by Estes.
Mary Swinson, of
Panama City, a fashion
icon on the Panhandle,
sent a display of the latest


in spring hats.
Denise Butler also lent
her collection of vintage
chapeaux to add to the
afternoon's d6cor.
There was a raffle
with items donated by
businesses and individuals
from both Franklin and
Leon counties.
Ashdown said the event
raised over $2,000 for the
library. She offered thanks
to artists and donors of
raffle items.
"It was obviously a
success. Every seat was
filled and people arrived


om left, one of the
cilitators of the library
benefit, Uta Hardy, of
arrabelle, served up
awberry crepes in one of
e tie-dyed hats sported by
:lunteers. Debbie Ruffner,
Eastpoint, displays her
ogram with its butterfly
cker proclaiming her a
nner of one of the door
izes awarded at Chapeaux
nd Champagne. A guest at
onday's luncheon, Peggy
kel, of Perry, displays
;r own creation, a hat
nd purse adorned with
productions of her own
paintings.
otos by LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
wearing fantastic and
different hats. It was really
a delight to see. Everyone
was very thrilled with the
raffle items," she said.
"The artists take a portion
of their sales, but all the
rest goes to the building
fund for the new library.
Every penny of the raffle
goes to the new building."
Ashdown sent special
thanks to Scott Kincaid,
music director of the St.
George Island United
Methodist Church, who
entertained guests with
classical keyboard music.


Our local real estate experts have identified

what they feel are the best values around and

are offering them to you in Real Estate Picks!

(In this section), Discover the best real estate

values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe,

Apalachicola, Cape San Bias, St. George Island,

Carrabelle and surrounding areas.


rMLS#208092


$199,000 St. George Island"


2ND TIER

CORNER

LOT

100 foot wide easement
to beach less than 200
feet from this lot secures a permanent Gulf View
from a new 2 story beach house built at an angle.
This quality building site is located on the south
side of East Gulf Beach Drive at 9th Street. Access
to the State Preserve leading to Apalachicola Bay is
about 600 feet away.


Georg John Shelby, Broker .all iodday!
rSt. Ge osleI 800-344-7570 0
t.eor n 850-927-4777 850-227-1278
........ www.sgirealty.com
.___________ ) ,. __________


NE ~*I


ARTIST COOPERATIVE OPENS IN CARRABELLE


There's something new in downtown Carrabelle. Janice McFarland of Crawfordville is looking for
local artists to join a cooperative and display their wares in the Bebo Gallery, originally the Carrabelle
General Store, located at 103 US 98 in Carrabelle. The co-op kicked off during Camp Gordon
Johnston Days and will now be open Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Art by Suzette Quaas, Barbara Taillefer, of Crawfordville (whose artwork is shown above), folk artist
Bebo, Joan Matey, of Lanark Village, and Shirley Cox, of Carrabelle, were on display at the grand
opening. In addition, there were representatives of the Pampered Chef and Acai Mona Vie dietary
supplements on hand.
McFarland said she is seeking other participants, especially local artists. If you are interested, call
933-8297.


CARRABELLE
04/02 Thu 02:42AM -0.3 L 07:05PM


WEEKLYd;^


ALWMANAC_




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