• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Section A
 Section B














Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00014
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: February 19, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00014
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

00002-19-2010 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
        Page A 9
        Page A 10
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
Full Text




Apalachicola


Carrabelle







YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS
YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


Flower season
in full bloom

Page B1


Thursday, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 www. apalachtimes.com 50C



SSeahawks take school's 1st district title


GRACE O'NEAL I Contributed photo
Seahawks senior Jeremy James
cradles the District 4-2A basketball
trophy after the team defeated
Maclay 59-53 Saturday night.


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The Seahawks boys basket-
ball team wrote their names in
the record books Saturday night
with the first-ever district cham-
pionship in any sport for Frank-
lin County High School.
After taking apart host Jeffer-
son County 73-62 in the District
4 opener Friday night in Monti-
cello, the Seahawks came back
Saturday night to engineer a 59-
53 win over Tallahassee Maclay,
with whom they had shared a
regular season co-champion-
ship.
"I guess hard work pays off,"


Drake said. "This is what we
went through the whole sum-
mer, lifting weights and working
out. A first district title for the
new school."
By bringing home an undis-
puted district trophy, the 23-5
Seahawks took a critically im-
portant step towards bettering
their chances to nail a first-ever
state Class 2A state crown in
Lakeland. They secured home
court advantage not only for the
regional quarterfinals tonight in
Eastpoint, but should they ad-
vance, also for the regional semi-
finals Tuesday, Feb. 24.
That game would pit the
Seahawks, backed by no doubt


the largest crowd ever to pack
the new gymnasium, against
whoever has won the regional
quarterfinal in Gulf County be-
tween Maclay and Port St. Joe.
Franklin County fans should
be out in droves for Thursday
night's regional quarterfinals,
when the Seahawks host West
Gadsden.
Though Port St. Joe's 72-36
domination of West Gadsden last
Saturday night in the District 3 ti-
tle match suggests the Panthers
might lack the claw strength to
pull an upset, Coach Fred Drake
isn't taking any chances.
"In the playoffs, anything can
happen," he said. "I preach to my


guys that all you have to be is be
the better team on a given night.
I'm worried we may look past
them. Their friends had already
texted them the scores, and they
knew the game (even before the
Maclay game).
"West Gadsden hasn't played
us all year. They may not have
the fear of us," Drake said.
"Maybe all they know about us
is the football team. They may be
thinking 'They're not no Port St.
Joe. We can play with them.'"
John Battles, a 5-foot-10
junior guard, has been averag-
ing 20-plus points a game for

See SEAHAWKS A9


Dan Sangaree made

modern movie

theater memories,

Florida style

Every February marks an important
anniversary for Apalachicola's Dan San-
garee.
Fifty-eight years ago, on Feb. 8, he
oversaw the birth of one of the first mod-
ern movie theatres in Florida.
The DeSoto, located in Arcadia, was a
modern marvel in 1951 featuring air-con-
ditioning, a "Grand Drape" designed for
both eye appeal and acoustic control, and
stylish modern men's and ladies lounges.
The cinema was housed in a ranch-style
building, unusual for a theatre but typical
of 1950s architecture.
The DeSoto was touted as one of the
finest small theatres in Florida, accom-
modating for 709 patrons the most up-to-
the-minute and luxurious theatre seats.
Even the sign was of the most contem-
porary style. The pylon-mounted sign
fashioned out of translucent plastic, with
960 blinking light bulbs known as twinkle
lights, was of the last word in marketing.
The DeSoto was also unusual be-
cause few theatres were constructed in
Florida in the early 1950s because of con-
trols placed on steel consumption by the
federal government, which effectively
banned the construction of large build-
ings. Because the theater's foundation
had been dug before the ban came into
effect, it was grandfathered in.
The opening of the theater rated a
special edition of the Arcadia paper. San-
garee received congratulatory telegrams
from major stars including Bob Hope,
Bing Crosby, Ray Milland, Betty Hutton
and Burt Lancaster, whose film "Ven-
geance Valley" made its Southern pre-
mier at the DeSoto on opening night.

'I think it would be cheaper to
give you a job'
Sangaree began his career in cinema
as a teenager during the Depression.
"Back then, it cost about 25 cents to
get into a movie, and it was nine cents for
kids. A gang of us boys got together and
threw in a penny apiece. I was chosen to
buy a ticket and go into the theatre. Then
I would go to the door and let the other
boys in one at a time. I thought nobody
noticed," he said.
"One night, the manager of the theatre
asked me to come to his office. He said, 'I
think it would be cheaper for me to give
you a job that to continue as things are.
You know all the ins and outs of the the-
atre,' Sangaree said. "After that, I had
to make them pay. That was my first job
in a theatre."
Sangaree worked off and on in the
Star Theatre in Arcadia for the next 18
years, taking time off to attend Emory
University, then located at Oxford, Ga.,
and to serve in the South Pacific in World
War II. Eventually, he became manager
of The Star, which was owned by Univer-
sal Films, a subsidiary of Paramount.
See MOVIES A5


Steve Davis, left, shows off his saltwater products
license to two marine economists who met with him
and Dakie Ward, right, on Feb. 3 to get input on an
upcoming survey of inshore shrimpers in the Gulf of
Mexico.

Economists look to

document shrimping

industry woes


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
It doesn't take a handful
of marine industry econo-
mists working for the fed-
eral government to tell
you how dire the financial
situation is for the Gulf of
Mexico shrimp industry.
It's just that they need
the actual numbers to
prove it.
Two economists, Alex
Miller with the Gulf State
Marine Fishers Commis-
sion and Dr. Jack Isaacs
with the Louisiana Depart-
ment of Wildlife and Fish-
eries, were in town last
week to meet with repre-
sentatives of the shrimping
industry for help in kicking
off a soon-to-be mailed sur-
vey of inshore shrimpers.


The idea is to take a
comprehensive snapshot
of the economic situation
facing Gulf shrimpers. But
if the numbers are any-
thing like Steve Davis' have
been, they will be consider-
ably thinner than they used
to be.
Davis, who along with
Dakie Ward, owner of Ward
and Sons Seafood, met with
the marine economists
Feb. 9, told how he sold off
a 65-foot steel hull vessel a
few years back.
"I don't have a ship I
own for shrimping. I sold
it for $7,000 after I had
paid $60,000 off on it. I'm
through with it, and I give
him the offshore permit,
too. And the hardware on
See SHRIMPING A6


Stimulus might


yield new sidewalks


By Lois Swoboda
and David Adlerstein
Times Staff Writers
On the same day that
President Barack Obama
signed the $787 billion
stimulus plan in Denver,
county commissioners got
a first glimpse of just how
much money might find its
way to Franklin County.
County Planner Allen
Pierce told the commis-
sioners Tuesday morning
that on Feb. 13, he attend-
ed the Florida Department
of Transportation telecon-
ference about the federal
stimulus package and talk-


ed how FDOT intended to
administer the funds.
That afternoon, Pierce
drove FDOT personnel
around the county and vis-
ited all 20 proposed proj-
ects submitted for fund-
ing before the end of last
year. Pierce said because
of guidelines imposed by
the legislation, the number
of proposed projects had
been cut down from the
original $125 million com-
missioners had requested.
Pierce said the state
will get about $1.3 billion
for infrastructure projects,

See STIMULUS A5


Phone: (850) 653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews@starfl.com
Fax:(850)653-8036


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Letters to the Editor .................. A5 SocietyNews........................ B2 REED O
Sheriff's Report...................... B4 Tide Chart........................... A6 F L O IR I D A
ChurchNews. ................. B3 Classifieds ................... ..... B6-B7IVE
Church News ......................... B3 Classifieds ........................ B6-B7


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
School News & Society Friday at 11 a.m.
Real Estate Ads Thursday ai 11 a.m.
Legal Ads Friday a 11 a.m
Classified Display Ads Friday at 11 a.m.
Classified Line Ads- Monday ai 5 p.m.


*


0


NE






A2 IThe imesLocl xx, xx xx,200


r


I.,'.'


IPTV, the newest, most evolved television
delivery system, provides 100% digital
television. You can now enjoy:
190+ channels of great entertainment, including
local programming
N lore than 20 free HD channels (over 25 total,
with more to come)
Optional DVR that allows you to record shows,
pause live TV and more



IPTV + Internet + Phone as low as $74.95 a month for six months
with a one-year term. This package includes:

IPTV Expanded Tier (includes Basic Tier), HD Free Tier and set top box
for one TV
Standard high-speed Internet
Phone with 120 minutes of long distance and three calling features
Other packages available, including bundles with unlimited long distance








Call 800.400.5568 to sign up today! Fair 7
-------------------------------- communications
HIGH-SPEED INTERNET PHONE TELEVISION Different from word one"




* Bundle price reflects a $15/mo. bill credit for six months with a 12-month term commitment. For customer to access HD programming, service must reside on an HD television. Package price does not include other applicable
fees, taxes and charges. IPTV service will support up to two SD channels and one HD channel running simultaneously at your location. An active SD or HD DVR recording is counted as one of the three simultaneous channels.
Prices based on Standard High-Speed Internet service. FairPoint high-speed Internet and phone service required to receive IPTV. Early termination fee of $99 applies. If subscriber decides to upgrade that term will begin on the
date of the change in service. If the customer does not renew or upgrade the customerwill be automatically charged a month-to-month rate. Upon cancellation of service, customer will be responsible for the return of equipment
within 5 days or equipment charge equal to the retail value will be applied to your account. Materials, labor or additional equipment purchased from the company will be included on the customer's bill.Available to residential
customers in selected areas only.Additional terms and conditions apply. 2009 FairPoint Communications, Inc.AII rights reserved.


NE ~*I


A2 I The Times


Local


xxx, xxx xx, 2009






Thursday, February 19, 2009


Local


The Times I A3


Wall That Heals coming to Apalachicola


From April 30 to May 3,
Apalachicola will host the
Vietnam Veterans Memori-
al Find traveling Wall That
Heals memorial and muse-
um, an exhibit that features
a half-scale replica of the
memorial and a museum
that travels to communities
throughout America.
Jimmy Mosconis, the
former county commis-
sioner who spearheaded
the completion last year of
the Veterans Memorial Pla-
za in Apalachicola, said the
long weekend will mark the
third stop on a nationwide
tour of a brand new travel-
ing wall to be dedicated in
Washington next month.
The traveling wall ex-
hibit profiles the Vietnam
War, educates visitors, and
features an information
center with staff to provide
information and assist in
searching for names on the
wall. The exhibit will be set
up at Apalachicola's Vet-
eran's Memorial Plaza on
Market Street, next to the
Three Servicemen Statue
Memorial.
Since its dedication in
1996, the Wall That Heals
has visited more than 300
cities and towns through-
out the nation, spreading its
healing legacy to millions.
In addition to its U.S. tour
stops, the exhibition made
its first-ever international
journey in April 1999 to the
Four Provinces of Ireland
to honor the Irish-born ca-
sualties of the Vietnam War
and the Irish-Americans
who served. It also has
traveled to Canada.
Mosconis is working


closely with a local commit-
tee to shape details of the
wall's four-day stay over
the same weekend as the
annual Historic Home Tour.
He said tentative plans are
to make May 1 a day for
area children to visit and
learn about the Vietnam
experience.
"We look to speak at
some of the classes be-
tween now and then," he
said. "We're trying to teach
a piece of history."

A visit to Washington
to toast Tom Selleck
On Feb. 2, Mosconis
traveled to Washington as
a guest of Jan Scruggs,
founder and president of
the Memorial FRnd, at a
dinner held at the News-
eum. Attended by such dig-
nitaries as Nebraska Sen.
Chuck Hagel, former drug
czar Gen. Barry McCaffrey
and former Secretary of
State Colin Powell, the din-
ner celebrated actor Tom
Selleck joining the Vietnam
Veterans Memorial Fund
as national spokesman for
the new education center
being built on the National
Mall.
Selleck, whose recent
television credits include
his Emmy-nominated re-
curring role in the "Jesse
Stone" movie of the week
franchise, which airs on
CBS with a new installment
premiering March 1, is best
known for his work on the
television show "Magnum,
PI." in the 1980s.
The series was heralded
in the veterans' community


PHOTO COURTESY OF VVMF
Jimmy Mosconis, left, stands with Ann Sherman Wolcott,
past national president of the American Gold Star
Mothers, center, and actor Tom Selleck at a Feb. 2
dinner at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., that
celebrated Selleck becoming national spokesman for the
new education center being built at the Vietnam Wall.


as the first positive media
portrayal of Vietnam vet-
erans. "When Magnum,
PI. came out, it constituted
the first positive portrayal
of Vietnam veterans in
the media, which meant
a great deal to those of us
who served," said Scruggs.
"In 1988, Magnum's
trademark wardrobe be-
came part of the Smithson-
ian collection in Washing-
ton, D.C.," he said. "When
we were looking for some-
one to help us raise aware-
ness of this important proj-
ect, Tom's name came up
right away."
Selleck served in the
160th Infantry of the Cali-
fornia Army National Guard
during the Vietnam era. He
feels a close connection to
those who served, especial-
ly to a friend who is remem-


bered on the wall.
"Ron Montapert was my
friend. Like many people
our age, he went to Viet-
nam, but he didn't come
home," said Selleck. "His
name is on the memorial,
and I think of him every
time I go there. For him,
and for all the others whose
names are on the wall, for
all those people who are
missed every day by their
friends and loved ones, I
want to do all I can to get
the word out about what is
being planned for the edu-
cation center."
Selleck has been in com-
munication with the memo-
rial fund since last year but
needed to wrap up work
on his latest film, "Jesse
Stone: No Remorse," be-
fore beginning his work to
promote the center.


The education center
at the wall is a project de-
veloped by the Memorial
Elnd to help the millions of
annual visitors learn about
the memorial, as well as
the Vietnam War. Although
still in the planning stages,
exhibits will include a wall
of photographs of those
whose names are on the
wall, a selection of the
more than 100,000 items
that have been left at the
Vietnam Veterans Memori-
al, a timeline of key military
events in the war, rotating
exhibits and a resource
center where visitors can
find in-depth information.
A section will illustrate
the legacy of service dem-
onstrated by the American
people, showing images of
those who served in all the
nation's conflicts, from the
Revolutionary War to Iraq.
The center will be built un-
derground near the Viet-
nam Veterans and Lincoln
memorials at an estimated
cost of $75 million to $100
million. Nearly $18 million
has been raised so far, in-
cluding a $10 million lead
gift from Time Warner.
The capital campaign to
raise money for and aware-
ness about the center is be-
ing kicked off this year, and
Selleck, as well as other
celebrities, are filming pub-
lic service announcements
this month to raise aware-
ness for the project.
Also, Selleck will be in
Washington next month
for the unveiling of the new
trailer for the Wall That
Heals, the half-scale rep-
lica of the wall that travels


around the country, bring-
ing the messages of heal-
ing and education to people
who might not otherwise be
able to visit the memorial.
There are several replicas
of the wall in existence, but
the Wall That Heals is the
only one with a traveling
museum. The museum is
housed in the trailer that is
used to transport the rep-
lica between communities.
This year, the entire ex-
hibit has been revamped
by Ralph Appelbaum As-
sociates, the museum
design firm planning the
exhibits for the Memorial
Center. This makes the
new Wall That Heals mu-
seum a smaller version of
what is being planned for
the center. Selleck will be
on hand for the ceremony
March 26 to unveil the new
museum to the public and
to talk about the education
center.
Established in 1979, the
Vietnam Veterans Memo-
rial Fund is the nonprofit
organization authorized by
Congress to build the Viet-
nam Veterans Memorial
in Washington, D.C. Today,
the Memorial FRnd is an in-
ternational nongovernmen-
tal organization dedicated
to preserving the legacy of
the wall, promoting heal-
ing and educating about
the impact of the Vietnam
War. Its initiatives include
educational programs for
students and educators, a
traveling wall replica that
honors the nation's veter-
ans and a humanitarian
and mine-action program
in Vietnam.


DO YOU KNOW THESE GIRLS?

SBeverly Douds, busy working on an upcoming book on Apalachicola, has
received lots of good photos, although some helpful providers do not know who
is in the photo or when the photo was taken. Douds is reaching out to the people
in Franklin County for their help before her deadline in the middle of April.
"So far, we have more than 198 photos for the book. But there are a couple of
more that I am hoping for," she said. "I would love to get more photos from the
Hill, for example, Holy Family School, the Tolliver family, Rose McCoy, Dr. Fred
Humphries and Bell Smith. I also need photos of the Marshall family, the Wefing
Marine Store, A.A. Core, William Fry and the Star of the Sea School. I would
like the Apalachicola Municipal Library folks and Delores Roux to know how
much they have helped me, and I could have never compiled all this information
without their help, along with many others," she said. Douds will discuss her book
project as guest speaker at the Port St. Joe Library for its Friends Membership
Drive from 2 to 4 p.m. Feb. 28. If you can identify the girls in the photo at left or
have pictures to share, call Douds at 850-229-1094 or 850-229-1151 or e-mail
A csblighthouselady2008@gmail.com.


JIMMIE CROWDER EXCAVATING & LAND CLEARING, INC.
COMPLETE SITE DEVELOPMENT
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
ASPHALT GRADING & PAVING LOT CLEARING
DEMOLITION WORK UTILITY CONTRACTOR
FILL DIRT TOP SOIL GRAVEL MASON SAND DELIVERED
POND BUILDING
C & D DEBRIS ROLL OFF CONTAINERS
FULLY LICENSED & INSURED
SERVING YOU SINCE 1964


850-697'8403 850-528-6933 850'52&5122
OFFICE ODIE CELL JIMMIE CELL


I FICKLNG
& COMPANY

A Full Service Real Estate Company


$179,000 GULF FRONT LOT BAYFRONT MAGNOLIA BLUFF,
CARRABELLE! Enjoy the white sandy Eastpoint One acre estate on N
beach & the gorgeous views that Bayshore Dr Beautiful lot w/ azaleas,
overlook Dog Island and St George fruit trees, mature pines 100'
Island from this 1 acre lot Property has waterfront w/seawall, dock & lift "Old
96'x 119' on the Gulf and 100' x 316' on Florida" style home w/ 2 br/1 5bath
the North side of Hwy 98 Cty water & Numerous outbuildings & tennis court
sewer available for this property Neghboring lot also available for sale
MLS# 234368 ..............$179,000 MLS# 208150 ............$499,000


Travis Stanley
850.653.6477
Grayson Shepard Jackie Golden
850.653.6713 850.899.8433


Mike Howze
850.653.5112


Jamie Crum
850.899.8758


Kim Davis Ed Mitchem
850.653.6875 850.653.5772


First Tier Plantation 3BR/2.5BA is a
fantastic deal at this price! Excellent
views of the Gulf you can see
dolphins play from any of the decks.
Beautifully decorated interior is
a perfect beach house. Tropical
landscaped pool is sure to please!
MLS # 206497..................... $895,000


FORSALEORLEASEH i :-.::i-. i..... 4-. 4 'P. P.rgr., airy -.ull view PRICEDROPinEASTPOINT$69,000!
this largecolonial circa 1900. 10'celings, home on St. George Island! 3BR/2BA mobile home on nearly a half
heart pine floors and lead pane windows Newly updated interior makes this acre lot Many great features make this
Zoned forcommercial/residential use so house a popular rental! Heated a cozy home fireplace, ceramic tile,
call for possibilitiesl Corner location in
the heart of the business district,/2 block and landscaped pool. Enjoy your garden tub, fenced yard and storage
off Hwy 98 Also available for lease, morning coffee or happy hour shed Enjoy the shady screen porch
entire home or individual offices from one of the many decks! and nice yard
MLS# 209022..............$899,900 MLS# 207288..............$699,000 MLS# 209094....................... $69,000
Please call us for a complete selection of properties for
sale in the Apalachicola Bay area! 112. G Fe lin BFd.2328
www.ficklgofflorida.St. George Island FL 3850.927.2255
www.ficklingofflorida.com [13 850.927.2255


25% Off
Bring this ad in
and receive 25%
off Labor only for


NE *I


The Gaq Blevins

D Blue Bond 8-229-1460
r af Blues mUgagqblpvins@yahoo.com
n myspace.com/thedeepbIluesband
"There's always time for the Blues" myspacp.com/subtlptranquilizm


I


lio J40E ItENT -ALI I











A4 I The Times ODinion


Thursday, February 19,2009


Rep. Boyd backs How come there's no more 4-H here?


streamlined


stimulus package

On Feb. 13, Congressman Allen Boyd (D-North
Florida) voted for the final stimulus package in
the House of Representatives, after successfully
fighting to streamline the bill and lower the cost
from the original House version. The final stimulus
package includes $320 in spending initiatives
compared to $544 billion in the original House
stimulus bill.
"I voted against the original stimulus bill in the
House because I knew that we could do better
and develop a stimulus bill that was
Smarter and includes provisions that
will truly stimulate and strengthen
our economy," said Boyd. "While
the final stimulus bill isn't perfect,
it's a better bill, and it's only better
because many of us, including
myself, were firm in our calls to cut
TIM CROFT the extra, unstimulative spending
tar news editor and put the focus on provisions that
are temporary, targeted, and timely."
At the insistence of Boyd and the Blue Dog
Coalition, the final stimulus bill was streamlined
to include critical investments in transportation
infrastructure and water and sewer projects,
as well as smart tax relief for families and small
businesses. The stimulative provisions advocated
by Boyd include:
Transportation infrastructure investments to
improve roads, bridges, flood control, clean water
projects, and other infrastructure projects
Education infrastructure for school
modernization, renovation, and repair
Grants to states for job training and workforce
development
Critical investments in rural communities such
as broadband services and wastewater projects
Boyd and the Blue Dogs also were successful
in removing unstimulative and even unnecessary
provisions from the final stimulus bill, such as
funding to sod the National Mall, a tax break for
movie producers to buy motion picture films, and
funding for smoking cessation activities.
The final stimulus package is expected to create
or save approximately 8,300 jobs in the 2nd District
of Florida alone and over 200,000 jobs throughout
the state of Florida.
The bill also gets money into the hands of
Americans who are going to spend it quickly
through temporary tax provisions, such as the
expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit and the
increase of the refundable portion of the child credit.
Additionally, it increases unemployment benefits
and provides more funding for food stamps and a
one-time payment to recipients of Social Security
and veterans receiving disability compensation
and pension benefits. Finally, the stimulus bill
helps small businesses quickly recover costs of
new capital investments by extending the bonus
depreciation for businesses making investments in
plants and equipment in 2009.
"While I supported this stimulus package, I also
want to be very clear and upfront with the people
I represent this stimulus package is not a cure-
all for our serious economic problems. In order to
strengthen our economy in the short and long run,
we must get serious about fiscal responsibility and
get on a path toward fiscal sanity," Boyd said.
"If we don't do this and continue to deficit spend,
then the level of our national debt the likes of
which we have never seen before will be worse
than the current recession. I am eager to tackle
our long-term financial problems head on, and I am
hopeful that President Obama's Fiscal Summit in
the coming weeks will be the first step to laying out
a framework to fiscal responsibility."


Apalachicola T
Carrabelle


THE TiMES

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
APALACHICOLA, FL 32329
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$23 year $15 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$33 year $20 six months


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


The summer of my
16th year I traveled with a
group of kids from Franklin
County to the state
4-H Congress at
the University
of Florida in
Gainesville. It was
an honor we had
earned by coming in
first in competitions
at the district level.
I was determined DENI!
to win. Red, Wh
In 4-H, young
people can choose
from a variety of projects.
It is, and was, much more
than raising a prize cow
or pig. Even in my day
we could select from
30 or more categories
ranging anywhere from
photography and leadership
to public speaking, clothing,
and foods and nutrition.
There were two ways
to compete. One was
a cumulative folder of
accomplishments. In other
words, just how good a kid
looks on paper. The other
was a demonstration in a
specific category. I did both.
My chosen project
was yeast breads, and I
had to go up against all
the other kids who were
district winners with their
demonstrations in foods
and nutrition.
I am still amazed at the
amount of planning and
preparation. I carted all
the ingredients for three
different pizzas to UE I


SE
ite


got up in the wee hours
of competition day to mix
my dough in a Spartan
dormitory kitchen.
The idea was to
show the risen
dough ready to
Shape, and the
S finished product.
S Timing was
crucial. My
presentation
ROUX would be ruined
and Roux if my dough went
too long and
fell. After all my
work in the kitchen, we
then had to transport
everything I needed for the
demonstration to another
venue for the competition.
I am forever grateful to
Toni Taranto. She was the
county extension agent who
shepherded me through the
whole process.
I thought my
demonstration went well.
It was certainly better than
the Holmes County girl
who spattered red velvet
cake batter all over her 4-H
uniform. I was only worried
about the guy. I can't
remember what he did, but
even then I knew that a boy
in a girls' category would
have extra cachet.
At the banquet the last
night in Gainesville, the
winners were announced.
I didn't even place. I felt
robbed.
Then came time for
the proclamation of state
winners who would go to


the national convention
in Chicago based on their
cumulative records. I won.
Oh, it was sweet, and I
cried at the podium while
the house applauded. I had
garnered the big win, but I
wanted that trophy for my
demonstration as well. You
know who got it. The guy.
Now, when I think
back, I believe 4-H taught
me the most important
lessons of my professional
life. I learned how to
make presentations, how
to look good on paper,
how to document my
accomplishments, how
to respond to corporate
donors, and how to be
gracious as a winner and a
loser.
Through 4-H, I went
to the state fair, the state
congress, the national
center in Washington, D.C.
and the national convention
in Chicago. All this before I
was seventeen.
4-H in Florida is
celebrating its centennial
year, and Franklin County
does not have a single
club today. 4-H is an arm
of the extension service
provided by land-grant
universities, in our case, the
University of Florida. Jim
Estes and his predecessor,
Bill Zorn were extension
agents with an agriculture
background. Back in the
day, they also had a female
counterpart called a home
demonstration agent. I


remember Carolyn Tew,
Bernice Shuler, and, of
course, the last one we had,
Toni Taranto.
After Estes retired, the
county requested an agent
with a marine science
background instead of
agriculture. Three years
passed before Bill Mahan
was hired. The scope of
the position shifted. He
is regularly involved with
river and bay issues. His
office coordinates the
Tropicana Public Speaking
Contest in middle school
and yearly butterfly
projects in elementary
school. Unfortunately, no
4-H.
Okay, I'll admit that
even in the day, 4-H was
kind of geeky for teens.
There weren't too many of
us who stuck with it after
junior high. But, for us few,
the rewards were really
incredible.
4-H requires volunteers,
support from the county
extension office, and
corporate sponsors. Maybe
it is an anachronism, but
I'm not quite ready to
concede that point. 4-H is
still vital in other parts of
the state and country.
Why can't we do it here?

Denise Roux is a
regular columnistfor
the Apalachicola and
Carrabelle Times. lb
reach her, email her at
rouxwhit@mchsi.com.


Letters to the EDITOR


Three cheers for
the bus drivers
To the Editor:
Each day more than
480,000 school buses take
more than 26 million
students to school in
the United States. In
Franklin County, we
have 16 drivers that
take over 800 students
to our school. Too often,
however, we take these
drivers for granted and
forget the important role
they play in our child's
education.
Not only do they
safely get our kids to
school each day, but they
also provide access to
education some might
otherwise not have.
Which is why Franklin
County District School, is
taking time this month to
celebrate the third annual
national Love the Bus
school safety program
to thank our drivers for
their contribution to our
community.
Throughout the month
of February the American
School Bus Council
celebrates in school
districts across the country
as a way to raise awareness
and appreciation for
hundreds of thousands
of school bus drivers who
safely transport children to
and from school each day.
The federal
government already
recognizes school bus
transportation as the
safest way for children
get to and from school,
and that is in large part
due to the dedicated
men and women who are
committed to ensuring
the safety of every child
on their bus. We honor
their commitment this
month and look forward
to celebrating at schools

Toll Free: (888) 831-6754
Franklin County: (850) 670-5555
Leon County: (850) 926-9602

G.INICAR



oE MEDIOCP
Helping Hands Make
The Difference


across our community.
I encourage parents
and teachers in Franklin
County to take a minute
this month to thank your
child's bus driver.

Sincerely,
Nina Marks,
Superintendent of Schools
Robert Coursey, As-
signed
Coordinator of Transporta-
tion

(Editor's note: The
regular Franklin County
School District bus
drivers are Pat Golden,
Dora Coulter, Dee
Dee Dasher, Lucretia
Taylor, Judy Pate,
Linda McQuagge, Leola
Martin, Maxine Taylor,
Patricia Hollenbeck,
Kansas Norris, Liz
Frye, Elizabeth Roper,
Joan Dasher, Bonnie
Jones, Angela White
and Jackie Tharpe.
Substitute drivers are
Debra Murray and June
Medley.
The Times joins in
saluting these early
rising, hard-working,
patient and caring
staffers, helping to keep
children safe to and
from school.)

In search of fresh
local shrimp
To the Editor:
In vain I have
searched for a website
relating to the local
seafood industry, so I am
expressing my concern
here.
I am a vacation home
owner on the Island,
where I have been
spending a good part of
winters for the last 15
years. While here, we
of course would like to
support the local seafood
industry. Being quite
fond of shrimps, we are
getting more and more
exasperated with the
unpredictable quality
of shrimps, regardless
where we buy them.
Invariably there are
a few that just taste
awful of ammonia, a
sign of serious spoilage.
It is hard to tell, which
pieces are affected until
you bite into them. This


means we are becoming
more and more loath
to buy and serve them
as a treat, especially to
guests. At what point
in the supply chain and
how this contamination
occurs, I cannot tell.
Whenever I complain
to a vendor, they look
at me like I am coming
from the moon. There
obviously is a serious
problem with quality
and handling control
here that would need
addressing. If the fishing
industry wants to stay
viable, they better clean
up their act, or we will
have to resort to buying
imported frozen shrimp
from Asia, which would
be another blow to the
local economy. In this
case, fishermen cannot
blame anybody else but
themselves.

Margrit Kapler
St. George Island

Shriners will be
boon to local area
To the Editor:
I read the fine article
in the Feb. 14 issue
of The Times: "The
Shriners are coming! The
Shriners are coming!"
That article pointed out
the positive impact that
the Shaddai Shriners of
Panama City will have
when they conduct their
ceremonial activities
in Carrabelle in April.
I am a Shriner myself
and much of the fun and
fellowships surrounding
membership in the
Mystic Shrine is the
pageantry that takes
place at ceremonial
sessions.
Just a few weeks ago,
I travelled from my home
in Texas to witness a
Shriners' Ceremonial in
Springfield, Missouri.
And, I wasn't the
only visitor. I sat next
to a fellow Shriner
who now resides in
Japan! Shriners like to
travel and visit other
Shriners. When I was
a little kid, I watched
Shriners in parades. I
was lucky my Dad was
a Shriner. I once told
him: "When I grow-up,
I want to be a Shriner."


I clearly remember him
responding: "Well, you
will have to join the
Masonic Lodge first."
The general public
often doesn't realize
that Every Man Who Is
a Shriner first joined
a Masonic Lodge and
is a 3rd degree Master
Mason. Up until the year
2000, a man also had to
be a Knight Templar
Mason in the York
Rite of Freemasonry
and/or a 32nd degree
Mason in the Scottish
Rite of Freemasonry
(or both Rites) to be
eligible to join and
retain membership as a
Shriner.
But now, a man only
has to join the Lodge
with the three basic
degrees. I consider
myself to be lucky to
have joined both rites
as well as the Mystic
Shrine. I have a fuller
Masonic education
and more historical
reference which
has broadened my
knowledge.
The visit by the
Shriners to Carrabelle
will be an economic
boost to the area. But, I
hope that the events will
continue to be publicized.
Who knows many
other boys will grow-up
to be fine young men
and desire to join the
Shriners, just like I did!
I encourage everyone
to take an interest
in it. "The Shrine" is
more than just a "fun"
organization. It is a
fun group which has a
worthwhile purpose. I
joined Masonry at age
18...and I'm age 45 now. It
remains one of the best
things I ever did. With
our national economy
being a
bit gloomy, everybody
should take a
moment and see why
the men in the red
fezzes with black tassels
are world-famous for
"Spreading the Sunshine
of The Shrine." It will put
a smile on everyone's
face.

Sincerely,
James A. Marples
Longview, TX


*


NE






Thursday, February 19, 2009


Local


The Times I AS


STIMULUS from page Al


FRANKLIN COUNTY'S WISH LIST
The county has scaled back its initial $129 million
request for federal stimulus money, narrowing the
projects to those that meet the law's criteria and have
a realistic chance at being fully funded.
The list now includes:

Road widening and paving shoulders
County 67 from MP 1.066 to Liberty County Line

Raising south approaches
County 67 Pine Long Bridge

Railroad crossing replacements
Bluff Road

Sidewalks
Bluff Road to Avenue M
Avenue M (12th Street to Market Street)
South Bayshore (U.S. 98 to Island Drive)
North Bayshore (U.S. 98 to Rose Drive)
Martin Luther King St (12th Street to Market
Street)
6th Street (Avenue M to U.S. 98)
River Road (U.S. 98 to Mill Road)
Old Ferry Dock (N Bayshore to Avenue A)
Avenue A to CC Land
CC Land to State 65
St. George Island
Oak Street in Lanark Village (Arizona to
Heffernan Drive)
24th Avenuenue (Bluff Road to U.S. 98)
Franklin Blvd (St. Fishing Pier to Gulf Beach
Drive)
U.S. 98 (Carrabelle River to Crooked River
Lighthouse)
Island Drive in Eastpoint (U.S. 98 to South
Bayshore)
U.S. 98 in Apalachicola (Clairmont Avenue to
Lombardi/Co Seafood Landing Park)


with those funds divided among
highways, airports, mass transit,
railways, high speed rail and ports.
This will leave only about $450 mil-
lion available statewide for high-
ways and road projects.
Pierce said because federal
rules restricted paving funds to
those roads already on the feder-
al aid list, only three roads in the
county would qualify: 30A to Gulf
County, Gulf Beach Drive to the
state park on St. George Island and
County 67.
Pierce said because both 30A
and Gulf Beach Drive either have
or are getting state funds to make
improvements, the only road eligi-
ble is County 67. Pierce said he re-
quested that road be widened to 24
feet, just as it is in Liberty County,
at an estimated cost of $8.9 million.
Pierce said a distribution of the
state highway funds to all 67 coun-
ties likely would not be enough to
cover the cost of this project be-
cause an equal distribution, which
is unlikely, would yield only a share
of about $7 million.
Because the County 67 widen-
ing probably would cost too much,
Pierce set about finding other proj-
ects that met the federal criteria
and probably were in the funding
range.
"The only thing on the list pro-
vided by DOT were sidewalks," he
said.
Pierce submitted 18 sidewalk
projects around the county, to-
taling 14 miles and two railroad
crossings.
Pierce said FDOT personnel
are looking for the segments that
could be ready for construction in
30 days.


"Some of the segments had
problems, some did not, but all
were submitted," he said. "FDOT
is meeting this week to determine
what every county will receive.
The estimated cost of all the side-
walk projects is approximately $3.7
million. It is my expectation that
Franklin County will receive far
less than $3.7 million, but FDOT
would not make any projections on
Friday."
Also at Tuesday's meeting,
former Tallahassee mayor Scott
Maddox appeared before commis-
sioners representing Government
Services LLC.
"We are a company of has-
beens in good standing," he said.
"We have a former Governor, Lt.
Governor and three Speakers of
the House."
Maddox, a former chairman of
the state Democratic party, said
Government Services was inviting
Franklin County to join Gulf and
Jackson counties in an a regional
alliance to pursue federal stimulus
money.
"We have two roadblocks," he
said. "The state will pick our pock-
ets and fund their own deficits and
projects, and then the urban areas
will pick our pockets."
He said if projects are present-
ed as a regional package, they will
make more sense and be more
likely to be funded. Government
Services is asking for a contribu-
tion of $20,000 by each participat-
ing entity in advance. The money
cannot be repaid with a grant.
He said he could not guarantee
that the county would obtain fund-
ing because that would be a contin-
gency guarantee and illegal under


state and federal law. He said he
felt funding could be obtained.
The $20,000 would provide rep-
resentation in Tallahassee and
Washington for one year, as well
as grantwriting and the creation of
a regional package, Maddox said.
He said there was money specifi-
cally for rural areas to pursue as
well as money for health care. He
said the region eventually might
encompass Franklin, Gulf, Jack-
son, Calhoun, Washington and Bay
counties.
"You mean to tell us these peo-
ple are fixing to give us a stimulus
and we have to pay somebody to
get it for us?" Commissioner Bevin
Putnal asked.
"Where can we find the num-
bers on money available to Florida
broken down?" Commissioner
Pinki Jackel asked.
Maddox said Government Ser-
vices is pursuing that information.
Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson
said she did not know of any money
readily available to fund the proj-
ect.
"I just want to be sure we're
very prudent as a board as to how
we spend our money, especially
money we don't have," Chairman
Smokey Parrish said.
The board voted 4-1, with Com-
missioner Noah Lockley dissent-
ing, to send Pierce and Jackel to an
organizational meeting on March
3. The commissioners, as well as
County Attorney Michael Shuler,
plan to study the agreement pro-
posed by Maddox.
"I just don't think it's fair for the
government to offer this money
and we have to hire somebody to
get it," Lockley said.


MOVIES from page Al


Paramount later sold out
to the American Broadcasting
Company (ABC), which bought
120 theatres from Miami to Tal-
lahassee.
In 1950, ABC decided to build
a new theatre for Sangaree, the
DeSoto, to replace the Star. It
was Sangaree's first grand open-
ing.
"When we opened the theatre,
everything was gala, like the
Academy Awards," he said.
The proceedings were marked
by a number of special events.
Sangaree's wife of one year,
Georgette, and Mrs. S.C. Smith
acted as hostesses welcoming
Jesse Clark, the general man-
ager of Florida State Theatres,
along with company president
Leon D. Netter and a number of
corporate officers and their wives
to the DeSoto. Many local celeb-
rities and elected officials also
attended. Radio news commen-
tator Major George Robinson of
WSUN was on hand to broadcast
the festivities live.

The contents of an old
safe
Sangaree handed over the
first night's receipts to Mr. Hyde,
chairman of the DeSoto County
March of Dimes, as a donation
on behalf of ABC. Evening tick-
ets were 48 cents for adults or
nine cents for a child. A matinee
cost 44 cents.
Construction workers discov-
ered an old safe when digging
the foundation of the theater. As
an added attraction, the safe was
opened on stage at the DeSoto's
premier.
"People from all over the
country tried to claim that safe,"
Sangaree said. "We never knew
where it came from. Nobody re-
membered a business on that
spot. It was a vacant lot. The safe
opened up, instead of out, and it
was buried. It must have been a
trap door under some building."
Mr. Kerr, a local air condition-
ing specialist, fired up a torch
to cut into the vault as the audi-
ence waited spellbound. Inside
the vault, they found only an old
strongbox and in the box about
three inches of mud.
"There was no mud in the safe
itself. I believe that was money
that had decayed over time. I will
always regret not having that
mud analyzed to see if it was pa-
per," Sangaree said.
Over the years, at the DeSoto
and other theatres he managed,
Sangaree set up a publicity
stunts to entice the public to the
latest films.
On one occasion, the mayor of
Arcadia presented a trick horse
with a key to the city at the DeSo-
to.
"The horse wore rubber shoes
so it could come right inside,"
Sangaree said. "It walked right


up on the stage. The horse was
housebroke. The trainer would
ask it questions, and the horse
would answer by tapping its foot.
"It could also solve arithmetic
problems. The trainer put a big
watch on its hoof, and he'd ask
'What time is it, Joe?' That horse
would stick out his leg and look
so hard at the watch. Then he'd
stomp out the answer," he said.
For the musical hit "Okla-
homa," Sangaree built a tall
wooden tower with a timed valve
that would shoot out a stream
of water periodically like an oil
gusher.
"One time, we were showing
a war picture. I got the National
Guard to set up their 90-millime-
ter anti-aircraft gun in front of
the theater. That drew a crowd,"
he said. "We also had fireworks
that shot 30 feet up into the air
and exploded. That shut down
the telephones lines in town with
people calling the sheriff to see if
I had shot off that gun. The sher-
iff called me and said'Don't shoot
that thing off again!'"
Sangaree continued to man-
age theatres for ABC for several
decades. In 1957, he was trans-
ferred from Arcadia to the Ritz
Theatre in Bartow and then to
the 4th Street Drive-In in St. Pe-
tersburg, which had a 625-car
lot.
"People used to bring their
families and come early to get
parked. We had all kinds of slides
shaped like elephants and other
stuff for the kids to play on," he
said.
Later, he was transferred back
to Bartow, and from there, he re-
tired and returned to Apalachic-
ola for a short stint in the oyster
business with a partner, legend-
ary boat builder Roy Smith.
Sangaree's work for ABC had
been outstanding. He won prizes
including a trip to Mexico dur-
ing his career. ABC wanted him
back, and in the mid-1960s, they
sent the state auditor, a close
friend of Sangaree, to ask him to
return to work. The auditor came
back three times, and finally,
Sangaree agreed. He continued
to manage theaters for ABC un-
til 1969, when he took a job with
Florida Enterprises, another cin-
ema management company.
"At the time, I was managing
the Howell Theatre. I used to say
Florida State Theatres sold the
Howell, and they sold me with
it," he said.
Florida Enterprises built him
a new theater, and he remained
with that company until his un-
wavering retirement.
Sangaree looks back on his
career in movies with many
fond memories. Eventually, he
came back to live in Apalachic-
ola, where he spent much of his
childhood, and he became a mas-
ter gardener, but that's another
story.


-

PHOTOS FROM THE COLLECTION OF DAN SANGAREE
Jesse Clark, the general manager of Florida State Theatres, poses with the staff of the concession
stand at the opening of the DeSoto. Below, air conditioning specialist Kerr is sen with the mystery
safe opened at the debut of the DeSoto Theatre.


2


NE ~*I






A6 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 19, 2009


SHRIMPING from paqe Al


it," he said.
"I have three boats that
ain't left the dock, two off-
shore and one inshore. I
paid $100,000 for the steel
hull and $80,000 for the en-
gine, and I couldn't sell it
for $50,000.
"That's the way it's been
around here for the last
two years," he said. "When
it gets up to $4 a gallon for
fuel and you're catching a


$2.50 shrimp, the numbers
just don't add up."
Miller and Isaacs are
keenly aware of the num-
bers not adding up, having
studied the results of a re-
cently released study of off-
shore shrimping in the Gulf
based on a survey of those
who hold federal permits.
That report concluded
that "the financial and eco-
nomic situation is bleak for


LET US HELP YOU WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS!
CRIBS TABLES WEDDING ARCHES
HIGH CHAIRS CHAIRS CANDELABRAS
TENTS LINENS PUNCH BOWLS
DINNERWARE BEACH WHEELCHAIR CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN


26 H
E stpitF


Date
Thu, Feb 19
Fri, Feb 20
Sat, Feb 21
Sun, Feb 22
Mon, Feb 23
Tue, Feb 24
Wed, Feb 25


% Precip
50%
30%
0%
0%
30%
0%
0%


TIDE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
Cat Point MinusO:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03

APALACHICOLA
02/19 Thu 06:58AM -0.3 L 03:18PM 1.1 H
05:38PM 1.0 L 10:17PM 1.2 H
02/20 Fri 07:51AM -0.3 L 03:26PM 1.1 H
07:05PM 0.9 L 11:41PM 1.2 H
02/21 Sat 08:34AM -0.3 L 03:43PM 1.1 H
08:00PM 0.8 L
02/22 Sun 12:52AM 1.3 H 09:10AM -0.3 L
03:59PM 1.1 H 08:44PM 0.7 L
02/23 Mon 01:51AM 1.3 H 09:40AM -0.2 L
04:11PM 1.1 H 09:21PM 0.6 L
02/24 Tue 02:42AM 1.3 H 10:04AM -0.1 L
04:21PM 1.2 H 09:56PM 0.5 L
02/25 Wed 03:30AM 1.3 H 10:24AM 0.0 L
04:30PM 1.2 H 10:28PM 0.3 L

CARRABELLE
02/19 Thu 04:45AM -0.5 L 01:53PM 1.8 H
03:25PM 1.6 L 08:52PM 1.9 H
02/20 Fri 05:38AM -0.5 L 02:01PM 1.8 H
04:52PM 1.4 L 10:16PM 1.9 H
02/21 Sat 06:21AM -0.5 L 02:18PM 1.8 H
05:47PM 1.3 L 11:27PM 2.1 H
02/22 Sun 06:57AM -0.5 L 02:34PM 1.8 H
06:31PM 1.1 L
02/23 Mon 12:26AM 2.1 H 07:27AM -0.3 L
02:46PM 1.8 H 07:08PM 1.0 L
02/24 Tue 01:17AM 2.1 H 07:51AM -0.2 L
02:56PM 1.9 H 07:43PM 0.8 L
02/25 Wed 02:05AM 2.1 H 08:11AM 0.0 L
03:05PM 1.9 H 08:15PM 0.5 L


the average vessels in most
of the categories that were
evaluated. With few excep-
tions, cash flow for the aver-
age vessel is positive while
the net revenue from op-
erations and the 'profit' are
negative. With negative net
revenue from operations,
the economic return for av-
erage shrimp vessels is less
than zero.
"Only with the help of
government payments does
the average owner just
about break even," read the
report's conclusion. "In the
short-term, this will discour-
age any new investments in
the industry. The financial
situation in 2006, especially
if it endures over multiple
years, also is economically
unsustainable for the aver-
age established business."
Isaacs said just having
a snapshot of the inshore
shrimping situation might
yield benefits.
"It always helps for de-
cision makers to know the
economic situation of fish-
ermen. Sometimes, they're
not aware of what they're
facing," Isaacs said. "We
need a good, clean, unbi-
ased source of information.
Good information tends to
produce better decisions."
Miller said it is crucial
for the industry to provide
economic to augment the
environmental data that is
so often used.
"When they're mak-
ing decisions, they making
biological decisions. There
hasn't been economic data
there to make these deci-
sions, and this is the first
time there's that data for
the Gulf."
Isaacs said work has
been done piecemeal, but it
quickly becomes outdated
without constant updating.
"They see a study (on-
line), and they don't realize
the cost of fuel and the price
of shrimp has changed a lot
(since it was written)," he
said. "This is a snapshot in
time."

Gift cards for first
600 shrimpers
Miller, whose office is in
Ocean Springs, Miss., said
surveys will be sent to a


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Shrimpers at the Mill Pond in Apalachicola have expressed concern that
sailboats moored in the channel are impeding their access to the docks.


couple thousand inshore
Gulf shrimpers by April
1. In addition, the first 600
shrimpers who return their
completed three-page sur-
vey will receive a $25 gift
card.
Along with County Ex-
tension Agent Bill Ma-
han, Ward and Davis went
through each of the ques-
tions with the two econo-
mists at the Feb. 9 meeting,
helping to tailor the survey
to the specific needs of the
local shrimpers.
"There's a lot of dis-
repair in that Mill Pond,"
Davis said. "You can see
the ones that are working,
the ones who aren't work-
ing and the ones that won't
never work."
Davis shared a number
of typical complaints, criti-
cizing the effect of the net
ban and fish shooters, and
asking that the federal gov-
ernment help get the tri-net
back into service.
"Florida's really going in
to the recreational fishery,"
Miller said.
"They're taking it away
from us and giving it to
them," Davis replied.
When the economists
got to the survey questions
related to licensing, Davis
stressed that even shrimp-
ers who only have a toe left
in the water will keep their
licenses.
"Everybody keeps the li-
cense. They may say if you


don't have one, you can't
get another one," he said.
"Grouper and snapper (fish-
ermen) can sell their per-
mits. I sold mine for $3,500,
and back then, you could
have got $5,000 for it."
Ward deplored restric-
tions that are making it
cumbersome and economi-
cally unfeasible for shrimp-
ers to continue to work their
trade.
"You talk about limited
entry," he said. "Now come
on, folks, This used to be
America."
He told Miller and Isaacs
his is the only ice house left
in town, but as usage dwin-
dles, he is keeping it going
on the proverbial "spit and
glue."
"If you're not making
anything, you're not put-
ting anything more in it," he
said.
Ice is critical to the in-
dustry's survival, the econo-
mists said, noting that after
Hurricane Katrina, many
shrimpers found their boats
and nets were intact, but
there was no ice to be found
to make a trip profitable.
Ward recalled sending
drums of ice and fuel to
Pascagoula, Miss., after the
storms.
"We had more more
damage out of Dennis than
the hurricanes of 1998," he
said.
Both men said the sea-
son for "brownies" has been


all but gone over the past
five years.
"We would start seeing
brownies about May 8 for
a six-week season," Davis
said. "We call them'hoboes'
because they're going to
catch the next train out."
But despite the problems
of the industry, compounded
by a lack of freshwater com-
ing down the Apalachicola
River from Georgia, both
men were not without hope.
"It's not dead," Davis
said. "Now we're in a bad
strait, and it's hoping to get
better."
Ward recalled when he
got out of high school, the
industry was in a down
time.
"We had to getfuel vouch-
ers," he said. "I've seen the
hard times, and I've seen
the real good times. It's bad,
but it could get better."
Mahan stressed that "we
have to go for the best avail-
able economic data, even
though it's bad."
Both men, though,
weren't entirely convinced
and warned that some
shrimpers might be too dis-
couraged to complete the
survey.
"They don't listen to us,
partner," Ward said.
"We know how to bitch,"
Davis said. "We just don't
know how to win."
For more information on
the survey, call Alex Miller
at 228-875-5912.


A Call To All Vendors,
Coming March 5th, 2009


taste home w


COOKING SCH OL


y^|5puh^ ^V^^d^VIrj^


Get on the Menu
(~t )n necL %III iii i i ni d he part 1 i-, hi pc1 % popul~ir Iiiuc c'ci
Fori dcl~iiki~ nd mrcinlonimC oncall Nl~it I-Holbrook 0-50) 2-58-4163%


Temperature
High I
700
67
57
62
550
58
60


11"FE"Em


I


850-670-8686
888:1670-8686


NE I


WEEKLYI~ I


'We, i bditvwv!!


d






Thursday, February 19, 2009


Local


The Times | A7


Weekend celebrates African-American heritage


Apalachicola's African-
American community will
celebrate its rich history this
weekend with its sixth annual
celebration.
The African American
History Festival will kick off
at noon Feb. 20 at Franklin
Square, adjacent to the Rec-
reation Center Park on Sixth
Street.
The grand marshall,
County Commissioner Noah
Lockley, will cut the ribbon at
4 p.m., followed by an evening
full of local talent gracing the
stage.
In addition to plenty of good
food, great music and infor-
mative displays, the event will
feature the raffle of an original
work by Florida Highwayman
artist Robert L. Lewis.
The theme this year will be
"African-American history -
Bringing change to America."
The parade will begin at
11 a.m. Feb. 21, starting on
Martin Luther King Boule-
vard in front of the former
Apalachicola High School
and moving down the boule-


vard to Sixth Street and over
to the park.
The festivities continue
Feb. 21, complete with an eth-
nic fashion show. The winning
essay from the contest will be
read aloud. A performance
by Yazid, a drummer from
Tallahassee, will grace the
stage in the afternoon, with
the evening featuring the P
& W. Trio from Albany, Ga., as
headliner.
A gospel hour has been
added each night of the event,
with a Feb. 22 service at noon
at the park. The festival runs
through Feb. 22 at 4 p.m.
The festival this year will
be supported by a Tourist
Development Council grant
and is once again organized
by H'COLA, which stands for
Hillside Coalition of Laborers
for Apalachicola, a nonprofit
organization community ser-
vice organization begun in
1999.
For more information, call
H'COLA President Elinor
Mount-Simmons at 323-0544
or go to www.hcola.org.


Paul Montgomery performs on guitar last year with the P. & W. Trio from Albany,
featured act this Saturday night.


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Ga., who will be the


H'COLA
royalty,
appearing
in the 2008
parade,
included
fourth-grader
Alexis Jones,
on the
roof, and
her sister,
first-grader
Mercedes
Jones.


Francis re-elected to fourth term


Chief Judge Charles
A. Francis was re-elected
Tuesday as chief judge for
a fourth term by his fellow
judges in the 2nd Judicial
Circuit, composed of Leon,
Gadsden, Wakulla, Frank-
lin, Jefferson and Liberty
counties. His fourth term
will start July 1 and run
through June 30, 2011.
Francis was appointed
to the bench in 1999 by
Gov Jeb Bush and was re-
elected without opposition
in 2002 and 2008.
He serves as vice chair
of the Trial Court Bud-
get Commission and is a


member of the Executive
Committee of the Flori-
da Conference of Circuit
Court Judges. He also
has served as chair of the
Florida Courts Technology
Commission and chair of
the Article V Technology
Board established by the
legislature.
Francis engaged in the
private practice of law in
Tallahassee for 27 years
before his appointment to
the bench. He was AV rat-
ed and was a Florida bar
board certified real estate
attorney and a certified
circuit court civil mediator.


He was a member of the
board of governors of the
Florida bar and past presi-
dent of the Tallahassee Bar
Association.
Francis was born and
raised in St. Petersburg
and moved to Tallahassee
to attend Florida State Uni-
versity, where he obtained
a bachelor's degree in gov-
ernment in 1969 and a Juris
Doctor with honors from
FSU College of Law in 1972.
He is married to Brenda
Roberts Francis, a com-
mercial real estate broker.
They have four children
and seven grandchildren.


GFC has the Continuing Education courses you need!
Register Today!
Sign up for Continuing Education courses at The Gulf/Franklin Center today stop by or register online at
www.gulfcoast.edu/ContinuingEd.
Ieath ,ar


CPR & Basic Life Support for Health Care Professionals
HeartsaverAED
First Aid, AED, & CPR for Day Care Employees


Meets February 21
Meets February 27
Meets February 28


Introduction to MS Excel 2007 Meets February 21,1:00 5:00 p.m.
Intermediate MS Excel 2007 Meets March 7,1:00 5:00 p.m.

Need a career change?
Train to become a Licensed Practical Nurse!
Become an LPN in just one-year! Only 30 students are admitted each year Apply Online Today! The
application deadline is April 30 and class begins in June. For more information about this program, contact
Sharon Milner at 850.873.3524 ext 5521 or visit www.gulfcoast.edu.

DOS^A^ u Coast
Co m niyC llg w wglfos-eu 1 5.2797


Eu

I


5 month trial offer:


$2495
Sta d per month
Standard High-Speed Internet


Switch to FairPoint high-speed
Internet and enjoy five months
of extra-low pricing and...

* Fast downloads
* FREE activation and use of modem
* FREE Videomail and 100MB of email storage


f


* FREE self-installation and 24/7 tech support
* FREE security package with anti-virus and firewall ($50 value)
* Support for email files up to 25MB (great for photos and music)
* The option to add phone and television and save on all three!


Call 877.342.7092 to get this great deal!



----------------------------- communications


HIGH-SPEED INTERNET 0 PHONE 0 TELEVISION


Different from word one"


*I


--






A8 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 19, 2009


t of a true pioneer






Monroe Thompson, who turned 99 in


November, still loves the thrill of the hunt


By Greg Daniels yield, so it could be consumed
Special to the Times throughout the year. Raccoons,
opossums and crows posed
As the sun stamped her final a much greater threat to the
seal of approval on yet another crops in those days than did the
glorious January day in the pin- deer. If deer were seen stand-
ey woods, Monroe Thompson ing in the garden one minute,
steadied the cross-hairs on the they would probably be seen ly-
scope mounted atop of his 30-30 ing there the next.
Winchester bolt-action rifle. Thompson expressed that
His aim was directed at a 4- there seems to be more deer
point buck that appeared from now than there were 50, 60 or 70
the woodline approximately 30 years ago. Several factors could
yards from his elevated obser- contribute to the increase, such
vation post nestled between as better conservation prac-
the Ochlocknee and Sopchoppy tices and enforcement, folks
River basins. As he smoothly not being as dependent on wild
and steadily squeezed the trig- game for a food source, and the
ger with total disregard to the lack of free-ranging cattle and
recoil and report of the high- hogs roaming the pine scrub
powered rifle, the whitetail buck flats and hardwood hammocks
fell instantly in his tracks from and swamps eating up all of the
a single well-placed shot. natural deer feed. In those days,
Many might think that this it wasn't uncommon to consume
scenario is raccoonsand
well within opossums,
the norm and they
and status were pretty
quo during tasty when
hunting sea- prepared
son in North properly.
Florida and The pri-
is more than mary means
likely simul- of transpor-
taneously station was ei-
occurring their on foot,
in several horseback,
locations or horse and
throughout buggy. One
the Panhan- horse was so
dle. boney on her
On the backbone
contrary, that you
there's one couldn't ride
significant her bare-
factor that n back; she
separates also couldn't
this event stand any-
from all oth- thing under
ers; Thomp- her tail, such
son cel- A 10-point buck Monroe Thompson as reins or
ebrated his bagged on Jan. 11, 1983, while tack while
99th birth- dog hunting. pulling a
day on Nov. wagon, and
16, 2008. would kick
News of this event first aired violently until she was clear of
at work in casual conversa- everything she was pulling. One
tion. Many others like myself time, he moved a house with a
decided this was definitely a yoke of oxen (two ox bound to-
story worth being sharedby all. gether with a large wooden
When Thompson's son, Mitch- yoke) from across the branch
ell, mentioned our intentions to using railroad irons and huge
his dad, he was quick to point wooden rollers.
out another local hunter who On many occasions, when
had recently bagged a couple of he would visit neighboring Sop-
bucks in the woods nearby. choppy through the woods, he'd
Little did Thompson know, swim the river and just float
his reluctance to be noticed is the animals across; sometimes
a direct reflection of his humble they wouldn't swim and would
character and does nothing be pulled across the river as
more than fuel a writer's pen they floated naturally. For a
and make him more worthy livelihood, Thompson worked in
of recognition. Feb. 7, I was the turpentine woods chipping
blessed with the sincere plea- boxes and scraping trees, in the
sure, honor and privilege of logging woods, with the state
speaking with Thompson and road department and in the
his boys, Herbert and Mitchell, construction business building
at their homestead in Curtis houses all around this area, in-
Mill. cluding Alligator Point and Car-
During this genuine oppor- rabelle.
tunity, I learned that Thompson Upon retirement at the age
was born in 1909 on the Frank- of 65, Thompson started av-
lin County side of the Ochlock- idly deer hunting, mostly with
nee River in a vast expanse of hound dogs. The best and sec-
land referred to as Womack ond buck he ever killed was a
Creek Swamp. fine 10-point, and this magnifi-
While growing up in the cent specimen is hanging on the
roaring '20s and the Great De- wall of his bedroom. He bagged
pression in the 1930s, these this trophy whitetail buck with
catastrophic and monumental a shotgun while running dogs
occurrences of American his- on Jan. 11, 1983, one buckshot
tory seemed to have little or no piercing the heart.
effect on this part of the world. After dog hunting for many,
Most people planted their many years and harvesting his
own crops and preserved the share of deer, he took up still


At top, Monroe Thompson blows a buck grunt tube that he uses to scare or
away. Above, Thompson climbs the stairs of his "condominium."


hunting a few years back on
some of his family property that
borders the Morrison Ham-
mock Unit of the Apalachicola
National Forest. With the help
of a nephew and his sons, he
built an elevated shooting
house that he refers to as his
"condominium." This elevat-
ed observation post is 12 feet
above the ground, insulated,
carpeted, heated and stocked
full of necessities. There's an
ample supply of drinking water,
snacks, newspapers, bug spray,
scent neutralizer, a urinal bot-
tle, pine disinfectant, flashlight,
a large comfortable office chair
and a two-way radio that he re-
fers to as his C.B.
As we were leaving his resi-
dence en route to the "condo,"
Thompson reached down and
picked up a small, hard-shell
pecan and handed it to me.
As he handed me the pecan,
Thompson said, "I'm not sure
if there's anything in it, but you
can have it anyway." I slipped it
into my pocket, and we were on
our way.
Although I'm not in the least
bit superstitious, I put the lit-
tle pecan in my hunting fanny
pack when I returned home,
kind of like our Southern ver-
sion of the buckeyess" native to
the northern states. The origin
and source, of course, meaning
much more to me than the little
nut itself.
When we arrived at the
"condo," Thompson climbed
the two flights of stairs; upon
reaching the top platform, he
said, "If y'all are man enough,
come on up!" This is just one of
many witty and optimistic re-


marks expressed by Thompson
throughout the afternoon. Not
only has Thompson witnessed
a century of time come to pass,
but also he has certainly been
a genuine "Sport Model" in the
process.
As I said my goodbyes to
Thompson, he was settling in
and awaiting the prime, gold-
en hunting hour. While I was
descending the stairs of his
"condominium," the sun was
also gradually sinking into her
resting place behind the pines,
gums and water oaks to the
west across the tannic acid
stained waters of the mighty
Ochlocknee. My emotions were


PHOTOS BY GREG DANIELS
"shoo" the turkeys


overwhelmed with a strange
and refreshing sense of enlight-
enment. I have been engaged
in conversation for a couple
short hours with a remarkable
individual who generously took
me for an awesome and unique
stroll through a century of his-
tory.
I've heard and used the term
"North Florida pioneer stock"
loosely and nonchalantly on
several occasions to describe
local natives, including myself;
however, Thompson meets
and exceeds any criterion es-
tablished for the covetous and
prestigious title "pioneer."


Thompson's "condominium" up close.


*I


IV







SCARRABELLE APALACH COLA





PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, February 19, 2009 w ww.apalachtimes.com Page A9



Lady Seahawks trounce Liberty, fall to St. Joe, Wewa


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The Lady Seahawks opened
this year's season with a pre-
season tournament in Blount-
stown on Feb. 7.
The girls played two games,
againstBlountstown andSneads,
with the purpose of this debut to
get things in order and work out
weaknesses before the first reg-
ular season game.
"I do not think any of us
thought the day would result in
two losses for the Seahawks,"
said coach Christy Thompson.
"We were so nervous that mis-
takes were made continuously
throughout the day. The girls
and I agreed to just put this day
behind us and move forward as
soon as we left the field."
The first game of the 2008-09
season was scheduled for Port
St. Joe on Feb. 10.
"This is a team that looks
great playing together and has
worked together for four years,"
Thompson said. "This is what we
aspire to look like within the next
two years at Franklin County
High School."
The Seahawks went into this
game with a much better atti-
tude and performed well against
the team that quite possibly
could win the state champion-
ship this year.
"We had five fielding errors,
and that is a pretty good stat
coming from a team comprised
of essentially junior varsity-aged


girls versus a loaded senior Port
St. Joe team," Thompson said.
"St. Joe pitcher Kayla Minger
is sensational and held the Se-
ahawks to only two hits on the
night."
Eighth grader Chena Segree
and freshman Megan Newell
each had a hit, as the Lady Se-
ahawks fell 10-0.
By the time the team reached
Liberty County on Feb. 12, they
were ready for a win.
"It was our turn to be on the
winning side," Thompson said.
"This was a very tight game all
the way until the top of seventh
inning when the Seahawks ral-
lied for an impressive 11 straight
runs to win 13-3 in their back-
yard!"
The game had been tied at
1-1, 2-2, and 3-3 before the Se-
ahawks decided to take control
during their last at-bat. Sopho-
more pitcher Shelby Shiver re-
corded six strikeouts on the day,
also hitting a double and stealing
one base during a seventh-in-
ning rally.
Segree led the team with two
doubles, a single and two stolen
bases, which broke the 3-3 tie.
Morgan "Noodle" Newell had
one double, Kendyl Hardy one
double, Khrystal Davis one dou-
ble and two stolen bases. Leigh
Redmond had one double and
a stolen base and Ciara Moore
three stolen bases.
"The girls played extremely
well on defense making the Bull-
dogs earn each of their three


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Above, Junior first baseman
Kendyl Hardy (No. 9) makes
the long stretch to field the
ball during action against
Wewahitchka on Feb. 13.
At right, freshman second
baseman Megan Newell
(No. 7) crosses first base
in play last week against
Wewahitchka.


runs. I actually had more confi-
dence in our fielding abilities be-
fore this seventh-inning thriller
at bat. The hitting will come, and
in the meantime, we must play
tough on defense," Thompson
said.
The third and final game of
the week came at home Feb. 12
against Wewa.
"This is a team that should
have been beaten by the Lady
Seahawks, but way too many
errors claimed the victory,"
Thompson said. "The Gators de-
cided to bunt on us, and we just
kept making errors on the throw
to first base. I think we had four


throwing errors while defending
the bunt."
The Seahawks had the game
at 4-2 at the beginning of the
third inning but were plagued by
the bunting strategy of the Ga-
tors.
"I honestly believe that we
were just exhausted physically
from the Liberty County game
and obviously mentally absent,"
Thompson said. "The night be-
fore, the girls nor I got home
before nearly midnight. We were
all tired the next day at school.
It's tough to play back-to-back
games, especially when you get


home so late. It's still no excuse
for the senseless errors, but this
is a young team.
"I feel that things will go our
way the next time we face Wewa.
They know we gave them a game
with a big red ribbon attached. It
just got out of control after the
score was 8-4. The girls quit, and
that is something we cannot do
at anytime. It will all get better,
and these mistakes will become
less and less a factor.
"We were beaten miserably
last Friday, 15-4. Refocus, re-
focus. We want districts this
year!"


SEAHAWKS from page Al


the Panthers and is their
premier scoring threat.
"That will be Jeremy
James defensive assign-
ment again," Drake said.
James has picked the
right time to play the best
games of his senior season,
producing back-to-back
double-digit scoring in the
district tourney.
"He had a good tourna-
ment, and he played well
defensively," Drake said.
"He hit two big threes in
the Maclay game."
The Seahawks and
Marauders were in their
typical, nip-and-tuck de-
fensive duel all Saturday
night, with Franklin Coun-
ty clinging to a thin 25-23
lead at the half.
The Seahawks didn't let
up the third quarter, inch-
ing ahead 34-30 going into
the last quarter.
About halfway through
the quarter, the Seahawks
had pushed it to a nine-
point lead, 42-33, which
they kept until just under
two minutes, when James
hit two free throws for a
short-lived 10-point lead.
But with senior forward
Zan Simmons fouling out
with about three minutes
left and junior guard Aus-
tin O'Neal fouling out with
1:30 left, it was up to senior
A.J. Williams and under-
classmen Zach Jones and
Marcus Allen to step up
and preserve the victory.
"It was still a tight
game. Williams came in
and played big. They all
gave us some valuable
minutes," Drake said.
Freshman Carlos Mor-
ris led the team with 17
points, followed by senior
Deshaun Winfield with 16
and James with 12.
"Battling with Maclay
made the seventh time
we played Maclay in two
years," Drake said. "At the
time, we were tied 3-3 going
back two years. It was just
like the NBA playoff and we
were in the seventh game.
We had to win the big one."
There wouldn't have
been a "big one" at all
had the Seahawks not dis-
patched host Jefferson
County 73-62 to secure a
berth in the championship
game. After opening up
a 38-24 halftime lead, the
Seahawks widened it to 16
points with just under six


GRACE O'NEAL I Contributed photo


Seahawks
seniors
Zan
Simmons,
left, and
Deshaun
Winfield
stand
with the
District
4-2A
basketball
trophy
Saturday
night.


FEB. 13 DISTRICT SEMIS VS. JEFFERSON
COUNTY
Franklin Co. 18 20 15 20-73
Jeff. Co 10 14 21 17-62
SEAHAWKS: Deshaun Winfield 10/16 2s, 3/7
FTs, 23 pts.; Zan Simmons 4/10 2s, 8 pts.; Carlos
Morris 3/11 2s, 0/4 3s, 4/4 FTs, 10 pts.; Jeremy
James 4/8 2s, 2/4 FTs, 10 pts.; Austin O'Neal 6/11
2s, 7/9 FTs, 19 pts.; Zach Jones 1/1 2s, 2 pts.;
Marcus Allen 0/1 2s, 1/2 FTs, 1 pt.
Totals: 28/58 2s, 0/4 3s, 17/26 FTs
Rebounds: Simmons 10, Morris 9, Winfield 8,
James 6, O'Neal 3, Jones 2
Assists: O'Neal, Winfield, James 2, Morris, Allen
Blocks: Winfield 2, Simmons
Steals: James 9, Morris 3, O'Neal 2, Simmons,
Williams

FEB. 14 DISTRICT FINALS VS. MACLAY
Franklin Co. 18 7 9 25 59
Maclay 14 9 7 23 -53
SEAHAWKS: Winfield 8/13 2s, 16 pts.;
Simmons 3/3 2s, 6 pts.; Morris 4/10 2s, 2/8 3s,
3/4 FTs, 17 pts.; James 0/3 2s, 2/5 3s, 6/8 FTs, 12
pts.; O'Neal 2/5 2s, 4 pts.; A.J. Williams 1/2 2s,
2/4 FTs, 4 pts.
Totals: 18/35 2s, 4/13 3s, 11/16 FTs
Rebounds: O'Neal, Simmons 5, James 4,
Williams, Morris, Winfield 2
Assists: James 6, Morris, Simmons 4, Winfield 3,
O'Neal 2
Blocks: Morris, Simmons 2


minutes in the third quar-
ter, 42-26.
But after Jefferson
County went on a 19-11 run,
the Seahawks had a much
smaller 53-45 margin go-
ing into the final quarter.
The Seahawks hammered
home the victory by wid-
ening the lead to 17 points,
69-52, as the minutes ticked
away, eventually settling for
a comfortable 73-62 win.
Winfield scored 23 points
to lead Franklin County
with junior guard Austin
O'Neal scoring 19 and Mor-
ris and James 10 each.
Junior guard Arron
Prince had a family emer-


agency in Atlanta and missed
both district tourney games.
Drake said he did not know
whether Prince would re-
turn for the regional tour-
nament.
Also advancing among
the 19 schools in Region 1,
Class 2A, were Baker (23-
3) in District 1, who topped
Freeport (15-12) 59-47; and
Cottondale (17-10) in Dis-
trict 2, who won 47-33 over
Southport Bozeman (11-13).
Bozeman plays at Baker
tonight, and Freeport plays
at Cottondale.
Today's regional quar-
terfinal in Eastpoint is at 7
p.m. Admission is $6.


CONVENTION
S SERVICES CO.


-El


American Red Cross


EXPO


SEMINARS, DEMONSTRATIONS,
& GUEST SPEAKERS.

NEW THIS YEAR! ENTERTAINMENT FOR
THE WHOLE FAMILY:

A GOSPEL CONCERT FEATURING GOLDEN ROSE &
OTHER LOCAL GOSPEL GROUPS.
(SATURDAY ONLY 12 5 P.M.)

SA SPECIAL AREA JUST FOR KIDS THAT INCLUDES: ARTS
AND CRAFTS, A PETTING ZOO, FACE PAINTING, AND
MORE...


Marc 6OA -N rounds t l:n Mtreet A anerman Ave.

Marc 7 -I OA11to 7p1 M-0lr-ta i|- ,e -'r00 O r-' -|-'


March 8 Noonrto 4pm C1[): 116;r I Under 1 FE


PANAMA CITY
NEWS HERALD
S w . m


News d z
on your side -


NEWSHERALD.co


KNOLOGY'


I ShSowSpososI


SuNTRuST


~GEsO


*


APALACHI(H IK
STATE BANK* 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


I I


NE


..... .... 1


M .^ -.


J- A imr i C% L--- 0 A..






Al 0 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 19, 2009


Seahawks


split


opening


games

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Under a new coach, the Se-
ahawks baseball team split its two
opening pre-season games, topping
Blountstown 11-1 on Feb. 12 behind
Steve Babb's one-hitter and then
falling 7-4 to Liberty County on Feb.
13.
"The first game was a confi-
dence builder. It was a young un-
derskilled baseball team we were
playing against," said coach Rod
Murphy. "Steven Babb pitched ex-
cellent, with 10 strikeouts, and they
were pretty helpless to do any any-
thing.
"The second game was more of
a test where we were at," Murphy
said. "Apart from a couple of criti-
cal errors, we were in the game the
whole way. We could have won the
game.
"Bobby (Garrett) delivered up a
cookie that the guy pounded for a
three-run homer, and we made two
critical base-running errors. They
were not intimidated by a team
that previously had wiped them up.
They were confident and expecting
to win. I'm grateful you have these
games to work things out."
A Michigan native who grew
up outside Detroit, Murphy was
a starting linebacker for Central
Michigan University, a one-time na-
tional championship in the smaller
college ranks.
He earned a bachelor's degree
in education when he attended
Central Michigan 30 years ago, and
after a brief stint in the New Balti-
more, Mich., public schools, Mur-
phy moved to a private academy in
inner-city Detroit, where he worked
with troubled and at-risk youth.
For the next three decades, he
was active in Brown Evangelistic
Ministries in Detroit, doing ev-
erything from teaching outreach


ABC middle school


opens season


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Chase Richards, standing, presided over this picnic table full of
hungry Seahawks at last week's pre-season barbecue at the St.
George island home of coach Rod Murphy.


FEB. 12 AT LIBERTY COUNTY
Franklin Cty 0 0 3 0 2 6 -11
Blountstown 1 00 0 0 0 1
Senior Steven Babb struck out 10 en
route to a one-hitter Thursday night, Feb.
12 in the Liberty County Bulldog Classic
Baseball Tournament. Leaders at the -
plate were Gary Larsen 2-for-5, Jared
Mock with a double, Caden Barber 2-
for-3, Babb 1-for-i with a double, and
Chase Richards and Cole Lee added
singles.

FEB. 13 AT LIBERTY COUNTY
Franklin Cty. 2 0 0 0 00 2-4 Seahawks baseball coach
Liberty Cty. 0 0 0 0 3 4 0- 7 Rod Murphy tries his
Franklin County played the host hand at oyster shucking
team Feb. 13 in the Liberty County after getting a lesson
Bulldog Classic and fell a little short, from senior pitcher Steven
Leaders at the plate were Jared Babb
Mock 2-for-2, Chase Richards 3-for-4, abb
Jason Thompson and Brice Carlson 1-
for-3. Pitchers Bobby Garrett, Mock and Thompson combined to strike
out eight.


ministries to training teens in car-
pentry to serving as Sunday school
superintendent.
Two years ago, he went back to
school at Wayne State University to
earn a master's, and a few months
ago, he accepted the teaching post
at Franklin County High School
and the job of coaching the baseball
team.
Last week, Murphy hosted a
barbecue for the entire team at his
St. George Island home, very well-
attended, with plenty of burgers to
munch and oysters to shuck.


Murphy even had former pitch-
ing ace Ron Bloodworth out to talk
to the boys on one occasion.
"There really was a different at-
titude. There really was the emer-
gence of a winning attitude," Mur-
phy said. "These guys were expect-
ing to win. They were beginning to
show class, the dignity of feeling
important, of feeling confident and
cohesive as a team.
"Together with the degree of tal-
ent we have, the sense of pride with
which they carry themselves can
go a long, long way," he said.


\The Apalachicola Bay
Charter School middle
school baseball team opened
its 2009 campaign with a Feb.
3 win at home 10-2 against
Hosford and then a tough 7-
6 loss Feb. 6 on the road to
Blountstown.
Coaches are Stacy Kirvin,
Michael Newell and Bryce
Ward, with the lineup includ-
ing eighth graders Daniel
Carrino, Billy Harris, Zach
Howze, Josh Reeder, LaDar-
ius Rhodes, Seth Rogers and
Seth Ward; seventh graders
Graham Kirvin and James
Newell; and sixth grad-
ers Josh Braswell, Michael
Daniels, Travion Turrell and
Jared Zingarelli.
The ABC School some-
times fields two squads, an
A and a B squad, and each
plays a five-inning game,
with the A game results go-
ing toward the won-loss re-
cord.
Home games are played
at the D.W Wilson Sports
Complex in Apalachicola.
The team is part of sev-
en-team middle school "dis-


trict," which also includes
Blountstown, Franklin
County, Port St. Joe, Wewa-
hitchka, Hosford and Tolar.
Because of a challenge
in rounding up coaches,
Franklin County decided to
move many of the middle
schoolers into the varsity
ranks and forego a separate
middle school squad this
year. Florida High School
Athletic Association rules
prevent any of these Frank-
lin County middle schoolers
from playing on the ABC
School squad.
The ABC Middle School
baseball team's remaining
2009 season is as follows,
with all times Eastern Stan-
dard:
Friday, Feb. 20 at home
vs. Port St. Joe at 5 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 27 away vs.
Wewahitchka at 4:30 p.m.
Monday, March 2 away
vs. WR. Tolar at 3 p.m.
Friday, March 13 at
home vs. Wewahitchka at
4:30 p.m.
Friday, March 20 away
vs. Port St. Joe at 5 p.m.


TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLGAME
The following are the remaining games this month.

2009 Seahawks high school baseball
Friday, Feb 20 at home vs. East Gadsden. First
pitch at 4 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 26 at home vs. Liberty County. First
pitch at 4 p.m.

2009 Lady Seahawks high school softball
Thursday, Feb 19 at home vs. R.F Munroe. First
pitch at 4 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 25 away vs. Bay High. First pitch
at 6 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 26 to 28. Cougar Classic at Godby.
Opponents to be announced.

2009 Lady Seahawks Middle School softball
Friday, Feb 20 away vs. Blountstown. First pitch at
4 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 23 away vs. Port St. Joe. First pitch
at 5 p.m.


OPEm HOUSE


NE *I













LIFE


TIMES


B
Section


Thursday, February 19, 2009 w ww.apalachtimes.com Page 1


Flower season in


Above, Apalachicola Bay Charter School fourth grader Corie Cates examines the camellias on
display at The Garden Shop in Apalachicola Jan. 31. At left, a bee buzzes around one of the
white camellias, whose blossoms signify loveliness.


All hail 'Queen of the Southern Garden


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Frank Venable, a lover
of camellias, shared his
knowledge and know-how of
this exquisite "queen of the
Southern garden" at a special
event held Jan. 31 at The
Garden Shop in Apalachicola.
With several stunning
varieties from Richbourg
Nurseries in Monticello on
display, the sunny day drew
a nice audience for Venable's
talk, which outlined the history
of the flower dating back to its
origins in eastern and southern
Asia.
There are 100 to 250
described species, with the
famous member though
often not recognized as a
camellia being the tea
plant (C. sinensis). Among
the ornamental species,
the Japanese Camellia (C.
japonica) is perhaps the most
widely known, though most
camellias grown for their
flowers are hybrids.
Venable said the flower first
appeared in America in the
1700s and gradually grew into
an expensive hobby in the 19th
century.


"Like a gentlemen's club,"
he said, noting that it was port
cities such as Apalachicola that
would be the first to encounter
a new species from abroad.
Because they are
a midwinter bloom,
they are especially
popular in the South,
Venable said, although
enthusiasts have seen
them grow as far north
as Massachusetts and
Delaware.
"People were
amazed they could
grow, unprotected,
so far north," he said, FR
adding that there is an
ongoing effort to develop cold-
resistant varieties.
"People have to play with it
by hybridizing," he said. "I don't
do that. I'm just getting mine to
enjoy this time of year."
Venable has about 50 in
the ground, having started
a few years ago after he was
thoroughly impressed by a
Tallahassee Camellia Society
show.
"This is a wonderful
experience," he said. "It's an
addiction-type thing."
Venable urged the audience
to take a day trip to visit the


w








VE


national headquarters of the
American Camellia Society,
south of Macon, Ga. The
society was left about 150 acres
several decades ago, and they
now are bursting with
camellia magnificence.
Though camellias
S are considered
moderately salt-
tolerant, Venable
did not recommend
planting them in
extreme coastal
settings, such as on
St. George Island,
unless there is a
well protected area
enhanced with rich
organic material.
The island's Jim Cobb has
had some success in growing
them, and he and his wife were
on hand to absorb Venable's
talk.
Venable said he prefers
cottonseed meal on his
plants, although the price has
skyrocketed lately, and that for
the most part, he doesn't obsess
on fertilizers.
"It's too confusing to me.
I stick 'em and plant 'em,"
he said, noting that many a
camellia has been killed by
overfertilizing.


"They like filtered sunlight,"
Venable said. "Some people, I
have read, don't fertilize them
at all."
According to a printout from
Amanda Kollar's shop, the
camellia can produce flowers
up to six inches wide. It is a
slow grower, but eventually,
some japonicas will reach up to
20 feet tall.
Camellias like acid soil with
plenty of moisture, the printout
says. Because early morning
sun might cause petals to
become limp and brown, an
ideal location would be west of a
structure or barrier wall. Prune
in spring after flowering. Keep
other plants a safe distance
away and apply mulch to
protect the camellia's shallow
roots.
Camellias prefer partial
shade and appreciate being
blocked from out late afternoon
sun. They are hardy in zones
6-9 (we are located in zone
8b) but for extra protection,
apply heavy pine straw mulch
and cover flower buds if frost
threatens.
"We are blessed to have this
warmth down here," Venable
said, noting that it is often eight
to 10 degrees warmer here than


in Tallahassee or Thomasville,
Ga., the latter having to cancel
a recent camellia show because
of the cold.
Kollar's handout noted that
camellias can be propagated by
taking semi-ripe cuttings from
late summer to winter (use
rooting hormone). They also
can be air-layered in spring.
This very popular and
regal shrub is used in borders
and as hedges. Use it for
specimen plants on the lawn
and for colorful accents near
outdoor living areas. Camellias
are especially attractive and
easy to grow when planted
under a canopy of live oaks
and pine trees that provide
broken shade. It is tolerant of
urban conditions if maintained
and performs beautifully in
containers.
The genus (Camellia) was
named for George Kamel,
a Jesuit missionary who
traveled in Asia and studied
the flora of the Philippines. Red
camellias symbolize intrinsic
worth, and white blossoms
mean loveliness. Displayed at
Korean weddings as far back as
1200 BC, camellias represent
longevity and faithfulness.


No berries,

blooms in

January,

turns out to

be Lyonia

Last month, my
Philaco friend Ruth
Eckstine told me her
husband, Rev. Joe, was
going to bring me a plant
to identify. He turned
up a week later with
something that looked a
lot like a branch from a
blueberry bush.
Problem was, this
bush was blooming
in January, and it
never makes berries.
With some help from
Extension Agent Bill
Mahan, I was
able to identify
it as lyonia, also
known as hurrah
bush, stagger
weed, fetterbush,
shiny leaf, male
blueberry and he-
huckleberry. LOIS
Lyonia is a Who
member of the
heath family, and
five species commonly
occur in the Southeast.


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
Rev. Joe Eckstine and his branch of lyonia.


C




SW(
t's B
You


in was probably either
Lyonia mariana or
Lyonia lucida.
The name
/(0 stagger weed
Comes from the
idea that lyonia
might have some
narcotic-like
S effects on animals
when eaten.
OBODA Some heaths
hugging are poisonous,
? although there
is no research
available on the toxicity
of lyonia. Fortunately,


The one Joe brought grazing animals are


reported to find it
unpalatable, which
means it's a good
choice where deer are a
problem.
Flowers come out
on wood of the previous
season, before new
growth begins in early
spring. Lyonia flowers
are usually pink, but
some varieties are white
and some nearly red.
Although they might be
small, the flowers are
in showy clusters, very


See LYONIA B5


i a


H'COLA's

6th Annual African-American History Festival

February 20 22, 2009
Franklin Sauare 6th Street ADalachicola


A.J. Smith
Consultant


A L4CHICtL,
STATE BANK- 1B97

Croom's Transportation, Inc.

of Apalachicola





Goosby's
Enterprises


"African-American History: Bringing Change to America"

.E.. NA .- RC4.4 ve
,Ot ^^ lO \ COUNTY FLORIDA l


For additional information, forms, and a full list of eve
850.653.7515, 850.323.0544 or www.hcola.or2


NE


J.


J.






B2 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 19, 2009


Herman Lee, Consuila Harris to marry
Herman Lee and Consuila Harris will join their lives
to become one on Saturday, March 7, 2009.
The wedding will take place at 3 p.m. at St. Paul AME
Church in Apalachicola.
Mr. Lee is the son of the late Mr. Clyde and Ida Mae
Lee. Miss Harris is the daughter of the late Mrs. Eddie
Mae Harris.
All family and friends are invited. Reception to follow
at the Apalachicola Community Center at Battery Park.
The couple is registered at JC Penney.



PETOF THE


P E WEEK







C1.















Pepper, a 5-month-old tabby kitten,
arrived at the Adoption Center with his
three siblings four months ago. They are
all beautiful, affectionate, playful kittens
waiting patiently for a loving home.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more
details or visit the Franklin County
Humane Society at 244 State Route
65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the
website at www.forgottenpets.org to see
more of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend
for life, you not only save the life of that
pet, you make room for us to save the life
of one more abandoned dog
or cat!

Don't forget the Bow Wow Ball
at the Armory in Apalachicola on
Saturday, Feb. 14. Cocktails are from
6:30 to 7:30 p.m.; dinner is at 7:30
p.m. Tickets will be available at the
door. Happy Valentine's Day



4 .




.4 :.41 :4 C4. :.41 I: 4 4 1 4 4 4 4
.4 -4 -4. -.4 -'3 4.4 :'%4 ;4 ;- 4 -. I"Y

GULF STATE The
Community Coolest Bank
f Bank in the
i www.gscb.com Hottest Spots

Apalachicola Carrabelle Crawfordvllle
(850) 653 2126 (850) 697 3395 (850) 926 8338
SEastpoint St. George Island
(850)670-8786 (850)927-2511

DON'T PAY TOO MUCH!
$50 Quarterly
Saves YOU $100 a year!
for residential accounts

Aloha Bugs Pest Managcment
Franklin County's ONLY LOCAL Pest control company
Call Lois at (850) 653-5857


February 18 March 1
tX THEATRE
APALACHICOLA, FLA. *Florida's Delicious History
March 5
u, ,) H e-M *Denotes Free to the Public
"t'H Itd ^ a >lProgram
850-653-3200 ~ www.DixieTheatre.com


Dona Polous, Casey Harrell to wed
Dewitt and Connie Polous of Eastpoint are pleased
to announce the upcoming marriage of their daughter,
Dona Brooke Polous, to Casey Brandon Harrell.
Harrell is the son of Jason Harrell of Crawfordville
and Deneen Harrell of Apalachicola.
The couple will be wed at 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 28,
at the Eastpoint Church of God. Reception to follow in
the fellowship hall.
The bride's grandparents are G.W and Ruby
Dykes of Apalachicola and James and Mag Polous of
Eastpoint. Miss Polous' great-grandmother is Johnny
M. Dykes of Apalachicola.
The groom's grandparents are Barbara and James
Crum of Eastpoint. Mr. Harrell's great-grandmother
is Preshia Crum of Eastpoint.
Miss Polous is employed at Resort Vacation
Properties on St. George Island. Mr. Harrell is a
sergeant at the Franklin Correctional Institution in
Carrabelle.
No local invitations will be sent. All friends and
family are invited to attend.


Realtors' open house tour

attracts healthy turnout


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
The real estate market
in the Panhandle is alive, if
a trifle subdued.
On Feb. 7-8, the
Realtor's Association of
Franklin and Southern
Gulf Counties held its
second annual open house
tour of available properties
from Alligator Point to
Mexico Beach.
This year, 45 realtors
showed 78 homes and
commercial properties.
Realtors registered 235
visitors during the event,
135 on Saturday and 100 on
Sunday.
"We showed 10 houses.
We didn't have as many
houses as last year, but we
had more visitors. It was
a good little show," said
Hollis Vail of Jeff Galloway
Realty.
"We were pleased with
the turnout," said Gloria
Salinard, the association's
executive director. "So far,
there have been no offers


Get six months of extra-low prices on bundled services. Choose Basic Phone +
Internet for $49.95/mo.1 (includes 120 minutes of long distance and three calling fea-
tures plus Standard high-speed Internet) or Unlimited Phonet + Internet (unlimited
long distance', nine calling features, Standard high-speed Internet) for just $64.95/mo.2
A bundle is your best value not just for the promotional period, but afterward and
you'll have fewer bills to pay.



Call 877.342.7091 or visit www.FairPoint.com a k---
to learn more. We're here to help. Po fnt
--communications


HIGH-SPEED INTERNET U PHONE U TELEVISION


Different from word one"


1$90 savings and $49.95 price reflects $15/mo. savings for 6 months on FullHouse Basic bundle (Basic Phone + Internet) and requires a 12-month commit-
ment (introductory price without term commitment is $54.95/month).2$120 savings and $64.95 price reflects $20/mo. savings for 6 months on FullHouse
Unlimited bundle (Unlimited long distance phone+ Internet) and requires a 12-month commitment (introductory price without term commitment is $69.95/
month).Additional bundles and discounts available in some areas.
FullHouse bundles are available to residential customers for a limited time and subject to change without notification. Eligibility for FullHouse packages
requires servicesto be invoiced on a single bill.'Unlimited Long Distance: Minutes available on one phone line only. Excludes 900, international, directory
assistance, operator services, and dial-up Internet calls. Long distance minutes are for residential voice service only and applyto direct-dialed calls terminat-
ing in the United States, its territories and Canada. Contact Customer Service or visit www.FairPoint.com for international long distance rates. FairPoint may
suspend, restrict or cancel your service if your usage is inconsistent with residential voice usage. High-Speed Internet Service: Prices based on Standard
High-Speed Internet service. Early Termination: Early termination fee of $99 applies. If subscriber decides to upgrade to a higher-value bundle, that term
will begin from the date of the change in service. If the customer does not renew the term of service or upgrade to a higher-value bundle the customer
will be automatically charged a month-to-month rate. Not all services available in all areas. Additional terms and conditions apply. 2009 FairPoint Com-
munications, Inc.All rights reserved. 674SEFH


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
Kara Landiss of
Prudential Shimmering
Sands Realty said she
was pleased with the turn
out at the open house.
or contracts resulting from
the show, but it's a little
soon to expect that. A lot
of members said there
were some very interested
potential buyers that they
will keep in touch with."
Salinard said the first
organized open house
last year resulted in three
sales.
"A lot of work has gone
into cleaning up these
houses and getting them
ready to show. That in
itself is a good thing," said
Kim Davis of Fickling
Realty, who showed the
former headquarters of
Garlick Environmental
Services at 48 Ave. D in
Apalachicola.
"This was better than
a lot of open houses I've
been to," said Thomas
Luster of Coastal
Connections LLC. "It's
something we're planning
to do every year. I think it
will get better each year,
especially if the economy
gets better."


Lanark

NEWS

Despite the rain, the
pancake breakfast for the
Lanark Golf Club was a
huge success. Good food
and fellowship can't wait
till next month. The second
Saturday is on March 14.
Hope you can join us. Just
come on over to Chillas
Hall around 8 a.m. Thanks
to all who braved the
weather to support the golf
club, and
thanks to
Chef Joe
and his
helpers.
Music,
music,
music!
We had a
good crowd JIM WELSH
at the Lanark News
Valentine's
Dance at
Chillas. The band kept
the dance floor occupied.
If you wanted to speak to
the Queen of Lanark, you
needed to work you way
through the couples on the
dance floor, 'cause that's
where she was, having a
good time.
Next Tuesday, Feb. 24,
there will be a lasagna
dinner for the association.
Serving begins at 4:30 p.m.
at the hall. Hope to see you
there!
The 17th annual
community breakfast will
be Thursday, March 28,
at the hall. Just walk in,
sit right down and one of
the waiters will take your
order, bring you orange
juice, coffee, pancakes,
French toast, scrambled
eggs and sausage. Yum,
yum! Then later, after you
have enjoyed your full
breakfast, sashay over to
the bake sale table and
pick out something to top
off your lunch or dinner.
Serving begins at 8 a.m.
and continues until 11 a.m.
The new doors have
been installed at Chillas
Hall. ABSOLUTELY no
posters, Scotch tape or
anything on these doors!
Don't forget to check
in on the sick and
housebound.
Until next time, God
Bless America, our troops,
the poor, homeless and
hungry.


NE *I


9 wr-=L-


117 Highway 98
Apalachicola
Phone: 850-653-8825
9AM 6PM Monday Friday
9AM 1PM Saturday


Your Full Service Pharmacy


After Hours Refill Line Now Available


We Accept Capital Health Plan, All Medicare Part D
And Many Other Insurance Plans


Most Prescriptions Filled in 15 Minutes or Less
Corner of 9th Street and Highway 98
With Drive Thru Service


I






Thursday, February 19, 2009


Gideons

donate Bibles

to hospital,

nursing home

Weems Memorial Hospital
CEO Chuck Colvert and St. James
Health & Rehabilitation Center
Administrator Lisa Mitchem
recently received enough Gideon
Bibles for each of their patient
rooms.
This first-time benevolent gift
to both facilities from The Gideons
International was arranged by
Weems chaplain the Rev Dr. John
Sink.
The Gideons International,
founded in 1899, serves as a
Christian missionary outreach and
is one of the old Christian business
and professional men's association
in the world. Their members come
from many denominations and from
countries other than the Untied
States.
The Gideons, who take their
name from a major judge and
heroic leader in Old Testament
history, first began their "Bible
Project" in 1908. Currently, they
are organized in more than 180
countries around the globe and
print bibles in more than 80
languages.
These Gideon Bibles are based
on the 1611 Authorized Version
and are distributed free of charge
to hospitality institutions, medical


Chosen Generation to
present musical service
The Chosen Generation Youth
Ministry will present "Blacks
in HIS-tory" and "Marks of
Distinction" on Sunday, Feb. 22, at
the Love Center in Apalachicola.
The service will be a musical
dramatic presentation and
recognition of community
members whose efforts have
assisted with the advancement of
the African-American community.
Everyone is welcome to attend.

Weems to host Gracie
Vaughn benefit
Weems Memorial Hospital
will host a benefit luncheon for
longtime employee Gracie Vaughn
on Friday, Feb. 20, at the hospital.
The hospital plans to set up an


Local


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
Weems Chaplain, Dr. John Sink, left, Weems Director of Nursing
Candi Fox, center, and Weems CEO Chuck Colvert display one of
the new Gideon Bibles.


and nursing facilities, schools and
colleges, and prisons as well as to
members of the U.S. Armed Forces
and to U.S. Veterans Administration
and military base hospitals.
"We are truly grateful to the
Gideons for their generous gift of
the Holy Scriptures," Colvert said.
"We appreciate the concern and
dedication of our new Hospital
Chaplains Association in arranging
for this gift to coincide with our
recent efforts to enhance the
quality of Weems' service to our
patients here and at Weems'
newly opened medical center in
Carrabelle.
"No matter how much you
renovate the patient's room, it's not



Church BRIEFS

outdoor tent, decorated with festive
balloons, to help offset the cost of
Vaughn's treatment for chronic
inflammatory demyelinating
polyneuropathy (CIDP).
The benefit will feature boiled
shrimp, fried fish and barbecued
chicken, which includes side orders
of cole slaw, baked beans, hush
puppies and dessert. Plates are
available for $10.
For more information, call
Jennifer Brandon at 653-8853, ext.
101.

Trinity to host Shrove
Tuesday pancake supper
Trinity Episcopal Church will
have a Shrove Tuesday pancake
supper from 5-7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb.
24, in Benedict Hall (next door to
church).
All tickets are $4 and can be


complete without an internationally
recognized Gideon Bible. The
more we know about the holistic
approach to health care, the more
we can appreciate the spiritual
needs of our patients," he said. "We
are extremely pleased to offer these
Gideon Bibles to our patients."
Mitchem also was most
appreciative of the Gideons' gift
of their famous Bibles and the
chaplains' initiative. "How timely
and appropriate as we open the
doors of this new, much needed
90-bed medical support facility to
serve the people of Franklin County
and improve their quality of life
under difficult circumstances," she
said.


purchased at the door or by calling
653-9550. Everyone is encouraged
to come enjoy good food and good
fellowship. We do takeouts.

Love Center Ministries
expands to Eastpoint
The Love Center Ministries has
expanded to Eastpoint, under the
direction of Evangelists James and
Alma Pugh as pastors.
The new Breakthrough ministry
began Feb. 3 and now hosts regular
Bible study on Tuesday evenings
at 6:30 p.m. at a storefront on 29
Island Drive at the Point Mall.
Services are held the second and
third Sundays of the month at
5 p.m. Apostle Shirley C. White
serves as general overseer of the
ministries.
For more information, call 653-
2303.


Relay for Life seeks volunteers


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

Susan Hoffritz, the Relay for
Life chairman, wants to make this
year's event the biggest and best
ever.
Because 2009 marks the 25th
anniversary of Relay for Life, the
theme for the marathon walk, to be
at 6 p.m. May 15 until noon May 16,
is "A Silver Slumber Party."
"We are looking for volunteers
to form teams and walk. If you
can't walk, you can ride a golf cart,
bicycle or even skate," Hoffritz said.
"We want cancer survivors to come
forward so we can honor them."
Hoffritz is pushing for this year's
relay to remain true to itself.
"We really want people to stay
overnight. We walk through the
night because cancer never sleeps,
and cancer patients can't take a day
off no matter what the weather,"
she said. "When they are tired, they
must fight on. We walk for those
who can't."
Relay for Life is looking for
entertainers and people who want
to cook and sell food at the event,
either dinner or breakfast.
As usual, this year's relay will
feature food and live entertainment.
The Sheriff's Department will be on
hand to show movies. There will be
three dedication ceremonies, one
for survivors, one for caregivers
and, of course, Luminaria for those
we remember.


Susan Hoffritz is seeking
volunteers for this year's Relay
for Life.
"I am doing this because
my father was diagnosed with
pancreatic cancer on Dec. 16, 2007,
and 40 days later, he was dead. This
is for him," Hoffritz said.
She met with Alisha Townsend,
community development director
for the American Cancer Society
of the Big Bend, to discuss
volunteering.
"We realized that both of our
fathers had died on the same day
of pancreatic cancer. I wound up
volunteering to be chairman,"
Hoffritz said.


She said doctors and hospitals
might not inform cancer patients of
the help available to them through
the American Cancer Society. She
hopes to change this in Franklin
County.
"There's a whole host of services
nobody knows about," she said.
"Franklin County has one of the
highest occurrence rates of cancer
in Florida. It's a shame so many
people struggle here financially and
don't know there's help available.
"Last year, during Seafood
Festival, there was a woman near
the entrance selling smoked mullet
to raise gas money for her mother
to go to Tampa for treatment. We
were able to get her both money for
gas and free accommodations at
the Hope Lodge," she said.
Hoffritz said her biggest
disappointment so far has been the
lack of interest and participation by
the local schools. She said she sees
very little support for the Relay
for Life by either teachers or the
administration.
"My biggest mission is to get
students in our schools involved.
Kids get cancer, and their parents
do, too. One girl, Chantelle Lucas,
is trying to form a team, Candy
Mountain. She recently lost her
mother to cancer, and the team is
dedicated to her," she said.
Hoffritz said anyone interested
in volunteering or anyone seeking
help can contact her at 323-0560 or
lakefall@aol.com.


The Times I B3


Obituaries

Rena Heusel


Rena Lena
Heusel, 68, born
March 2, 1940, in
Ellenburg, N.Y,
passed away Dec.
31, 2008, of natural
causes.
She and her
late husband of
20 years, Lee HEI
Heusel, were
residents of
Apalachicola for 48 years.
She was the daughter
of the late Nelson and
Irene Mesic of Ellenburg.
She leaves behind three
sisters, Shirley Creamer
of Apalachicola, Terry
Marchand of Las Vegas
and Doris Burns of North
Carolina; two brothers,
Sammy Mesic of Dunellon
and Davis Mesic of New
York; four loving and
very devoted daughters,
Cindy Smith and Tommy
Glass, Terri and Eddie
Woodall, Judy and Douglas
Hicks, and Mary and
Norman Freeman, all of
Apalachicola, who all loved
her dearly; and a wonderful
man, Alvin Gloner of


Apalachicola,
father of their
four loving
daughters.
She also
left behind 11
grandchildren
and 18 great-
grandchildren, all
USEL of Apalachicola.
Also surviving
her is a wonderful
best friend with whom she
spent a lot of time, Emily
Bentley of Panama City,
who loved her so much and
was like part of the family.
They had a friendship of
over 49 years together.
Miss Rena had a heart
of gold and will never be
forgotten. She has blessed
many and was a wonderful
mother, wife, granny and
best friend. We love and
miss you very much.
Services were held
Monday, Jan. 5,2009, at
Kelley Funeral Home
with burial in Magnolia
Cemetery. Pastor Susan
Roach of the First
Pentecostal Holiness
Church officiated.


Minnie Kinsey


Minnie Frances Kinsey,
86, died Tuesday, Feb.
10, 2009, at Eden Springs
Nursing Home in Medart.
She was born July 26,
1922.
She is survived by her


two daughters, Sandra
Pendleton and Janice
Truxell; five grandchildren;
two great-grandchildren;
and local cousins
Laeverdee Sangaree and
Voncile McLeod.


In Memory

Robert Robertson
Feb. 14, 1972, to July 7, 2002


The blessing of his smile,
love of life, laugh, friendship,
willingness to always lend a
hand ... and to have known
him here on earth. Robert,
we miss you more each day
... each holiday ... know that
you are dearly loved, and we
look forward to being with you
forever in heaven.
Lord, thank you for his life,
Mom and all the family

THE I THE


EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


Trinity
EST. 1836
Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


WELCOMES YOU

Church

of the

Ascension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM


* I


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave. "C" & 6th St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@gtcom.net

PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
MASS SCHEDULE

SATURDAY ................ .......................... 5 PM
SUNDAY ................ ... .......................... 10 AM
SUNDAY SPANISH MASS. ............................... 5 PM
TUESDAY FRIDAY ................................... 8:30 AM


The United Methodist Churches

of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5' St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Friday of each month
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672
Pastor: Julie Stephens
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


lu






B4 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 19, 2009


FWC targets oystermen

working the bay


On Jan. 27, Officers Don
Walker and Steven Cook
conducted an oyster detail in
Apalachicola Bay, boarding
11 vessels and inspecting 26
harvesters. The inspections
revealed violations for no
saltwater products license
and no Apalachicola Bay
oyster harvest permit. Four
misdemeanor citations were
issued for the violations.
Following that, Officers
Woody Cook, John Allen,
Carmon Brownell, Don
Walker, Travis Huckeba,
Charlie Mallow, Ryan Knut-
son and Lt. Charlie Wood
conducted a detail in the
Two-Mile area of Apala-
chicola Bay. The detail was
directed to specifically ad-
dress tagging requirement
violations for commercially
harvested oysters, hull iden-
tification numbers on ves-
sels and vessel safety equip-
ment inspections.
During the detail, 39 ves-
sels were boarded with 73
harvesters being inspected.
Seventeen misdemeanor
citations were issued for
violations pertaining to un-
tagged bags of oysters, hull
identification numbers and
license violations. One in-
fraction citation was issued
for expired vessel registra-
tion. Sixty-three written
warnings were issued for
vessel safety equipment
and various resource viola-
tions.
Officers Chasen Yarbor-
ough, Woody Cook and Ste-
ven Cook conducted inspec-


tions of commercial oyster
harvesters in the areas of
Cat Point and East Hole on
Apalachicola Bay. The offi-
cers boarded 23 vessels and
inspected 48 harvesters.
Two misdemeanor citations
were issued for no saltwa-
ter products license and
no Apalachicola Bay oyster
harvest permit. Three in-
fraction citations were is-
sued for expired vessel reg-
istration and insufficiencies
in vessel safety equipment.
Twenty-five written warn-
ings were issued for various
vessel safety equipment in-
sufficiencies.
Officers Woody Cook and
Steven Cook also conducted
a decoy deer detail in the
area of McIntyre. Numer-
ous complaints had been
made by the leaseholders
of the private property re-
garding non-lease members
harvesting deer from the
property.
The officers stopped a ve-
hicle after the driver/father
allowed his juvenile son to
shoot the decoy placed on
the property. The father ad-
mitted knowing the property
was a private hunting lease.
The father was charged
with felony trespass by a
projectile for allowing the ju-
venile he was supervising to
shoot the decoy deer on the
private property. The father
was arrested and transport-
ed to the Franklin County
Jail. The officers seized two
shotguns and one rifle dur-
ing the offense.


Tr A i


Feb. 9 DUI (FCSO) church and possession
Feb. ot calnnllabl1 FCSO-,
Kaila Odom, 25,
Eastpoint, DUI (FCSO) Feb. 11
William J. Logan, 71, Wayne N. Braswell Feb. 13
Eastpoint, violation of Jr., 30, Eastpoint,, sale Michelle D. Massey,
probation (FCSO) of a controlled substance 32, Carrabelle, theft
Brittany M. Gay, 24, within a 1,000 feet of (APD)
Port St. Joe, violation of public housing (FCSO) James E. McCord,
probation (APD) Reginald J. James, Jr., 31, Foley, AL,
45, Apalachicola, driving violation of probation
Feb. 10 while license suspended (FCSO)
or revoked (APD) Michael J. Harris, 45,
Steven A. Taylor, 31, James D. Creamer, Theodore, AL, failure to
Tallahassee, two counts 27, Apalachicola, failure appear (FCSO)
of sale of a controlled to appear (FCSO)
substance within a 1,000 Feb. 14
feet of public housing, 1
two counts of sale of a Feb. 12 Timothy W. Finley,
controlled substance Clifford L. 40, Apalachicola, DUI
and possession of a Armstrong, 64, Alligator (FCSO)
controlled substance Point, violation of
(FCSO) probation (FCSO) Feb. 15
Jeffrey D. Bonner, Benita K. Judson,
24, Eastpoint, lewd or 46, Apalachicola, Brett P Gormley,
lascivious molestation three counts of sale 30, Apalachicola, DUI,
(FCSO) or possession of a possession of cannabis,
Louie W Barber, Jr., controlled substance and refusal to submit to
44, Bayou La Batre, AL, within 1,000 feet of a DUI test (FHP)


FWC makes no change to flounder rules
State officials made no changes to flounder gig-
ging rules at a meeting Feb. 5 in Destin, said Kev-
in Begos, of the Franklin County Oyster & Seafood
Task Force.
The Task Force testified at the meeting of the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion and reminded officials that state records
show the flounder fishery is stable and healthy.
None of the Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission members spoke in favor of banning
flounder gigging at the meeting.
"We hope this bad idea has been put to rest,"
said Begos, who noted that recreational fishing
groups at the meeting did not support a ban on
flounder gigging either.


494


SE


HardwareJACKSON'S
Paint
Center Building Supplies
& Auto Repair We Deliver
Carrabelle 697-3333 Anywhere

Builders By The Sea, Inc.

Gary Bartlett


Additions
New Homes
Remodeling
R.R. 0067644


Ph. 850-927-3628
Mobile 850-425-8620
Licensed & Insured


The Mildew Remover
GARLIC
Exterior House Cleaning
Low Pressure Mildew
9 Years Service in Area
(850) 653-8795
Gerald Garlick

DON WILLSON'S
SEPTIC TANK
SERVICE
Serving all of Franklin
County Residential/
Commerical
Septic Tanks &
Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or night
653-9406


Don Lively General Contractors
LICENSED AND INSURED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Plumbing New Construction Roofing
Pressure Washing Additions Vinyl Siding
Painting and More No Job Too Small
RC0066499
P.O. Box 439 RG0065255
Carrabelle, FL 32322
697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603



n Family



Dentistry

DENTURE
LAB ON PREMISES
Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines

Laban Bontrager,





Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417


ROBERTS APPLIANCE
REPAIR
- ALL MAJOR BRANDS -


18 Shadow Lane
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: (850) 653-8122
Cell: (850) 653-7654




Remodel
Repair
New
Construction
Family
Owned &
Operated
Licensed &
Insured
License
#CFC1426645
State Certified


Whitehead tapped



to run county jail


The naming of Tim
Whitehead, a veteran of
the state correctional sys-
tem, to oversee the county
jail highlighted several
organizational structure
and personnel changes an-
nounced Monday by Sher-
iff Skip Shiver.
Shiver chose
Whitehead, retired
after nearly 30 of
years with the Flor-
ida Department
of Corrections, to
serve as captain
of the county cor- WHIl
rectional facility on
State Route 65. Capt. Brad
Segree was named to su-
pervise the Law Enforce-
ment Division.
"I am what I call old-
school," said Whitehead,
who lives in Eastpoint. "I
grew up at Lake Butler in
Union County, where there
was nothing but prisons
and pulp wood. My family
was in law enforcement.
When I graduated high
school, I got a job as a cor-
rectional officer. I climbed
through the entire ranking
order of the correctional
system till I became a war-
den.
"I would never ask any-
one to do anything I haven't
done, and I have the ad-
vantage of having done ev-
ery job there is within the
system," he said.
Asked if he proposed to
make immediate changes
at the jail, Whitehead said,
"Any time you have new
staff, there will be chang-
es. Before I make any deci-
sions, I need to get in there
and talk with the staff and
see what we have.
"Any changes I make
will be for the betterment
of the staff to make the
facility more safe and se-
cure," he said.
In his announcement
of the personnel changes,
which become effective
Monday, Feb. 23, Shiver


said he was moving to
streamline and better
serve the Franklin County
Sheriff's Office.
Other changes included
moving Corrections Officer
John Solomon to Property,
Evidence and Information
Technology and
moving Corrections
Officer R.J. Shelley
to Patrol Opera-
tions and K-9, both
in the Law Enforce-
ment Division.
Pat McWhinnie,
HEAD the 9-1-1 coordina-
tor, was picked to
supervise the Communica-
tions Center, and Sgt. Jim
Watkins was named task
force supervisor. Both po-
sitions are in the Law En-
forcement Division.
On the school front, Sgt.
Carl Whaley was named
school resource officer
at Franklin Consolidated
School, and Sgt. Ryan San-
doval was named school
resource officer over the
DARE program at the
Franklin Consolidated and
Apalachicola Bay Charter
school. School Resource
Officer Jeff Hewitt was
shifted to corrections of-
ficer, and School Resource
Officer Carlos Hill was
moved to patrol operations
in the Law Enforcement
Division.
In addition to the above
personnel changes, Shiver
asked that the public call
the following telephone
numbers for service: 9-1-1
for emergencies; 670-8500
for non-emergency calls
for service; and 670-8519
for the sheriff and adminis-
trative office personnel.
Shiver said he is
pleased with the receptive
response from the affected
employees and knows the
reorganization will greatly
improve service to Frank-
lin County residents and
visitors.
By Lois Swoboda


NOAA seeks water samplers


Are you interested in
sampling local waters twice
a month and identifying
the phytoplankton that are
found? It's OK if the last
time you used a microscope
was back in high school! No
experience is required.
The NOAA Phytoplank-
ton Monitoring Network
(PMN) is holding new vol-
unteer training in Frank-
lin County on March 11-12.
PMN provides volunteers
with the necessary equip-
ment except for a light mi-
croscope. Volunteers com-
mit to sampling their site at
least once every two weeks
for at least one year.
Sampling sites can be
anywhere, as long as you
have easy, safe and legal
access to the site. Sampling
sites must have a salinity


of 15 parts per trillion or
greater throughout most of
the year.
Volunteers need to have
computer access to enter
data into the PMN online
database. Anyone can par-
ticipate: schools, parks, 4-H
clubs, homeschoolers, mas-
ter naturalists, individuals,
etc.
Sound interesting? Then
come and get your hands
wet. Volunteer training will
be March 11 at the Apala-
chicola National Estuarine
Research Reserve from 1-
4:30 p.m.
To reserve a spot, con-
tact Jeff Paternoster at
843-762-8657 or jeff.pater-
noster@noaa.gov For ad-
ditional information about
the network, visit www.
chbr.noaa.gov/pmn.


NE ~*I


I






Thursday, February 19, 2009


Local


The Times | BS


Happy ENDINGS


Flash is



a rare


breed


indeed

My good friends Jeff
and Caroline Ilardi wrote
this tribute to their dog
Flash, also a good friend
of mine. When adopted
into the Ilardifamily,
Flash had some problems
with his health and had
been mistreated, but he
has adapted well and is
now a healthy boy with a
great personality. He was
a jewel in the rough that
Jeff and Caroline polished
until it shined.

This is the story of
Flash, our 6-year-old
basset hound. Well,
actually he's a "Basset
Artesian Normand," but
more about that later.
My wife, Caroline, and I
were living in Homestead,
and we had very casually
discussed getting a dog
without reaching any
conclusion. A fishing trip
down to Sugarloaf Key in
the lower Keys had ended
successfully with Caroline
catching the inshore
Grand Slam of tarpon,
permit and bonefish in
the same day, and we had
just feasted at Mangrove
Mama's Restaurant on
some mangrove snapper
we caught.
As we were heading
back to Homestead,
Caroline picked up one of
those free local papers and
was going through it when
she turned to me and said
"look at this." All the Keys
animal shelters had put in
pictures of their adoptable


pets. There was a photo
of Flash, all long ears and
sad eyes looking up at me.
"Do you want a dog?"
I said.
"Do you?" said she.
"Oh, well, let's take
a look at the little guy,
since we're only about a
mile from the Marathon
shelter."
We called, and they still
had our Flash, but they
said they had received
about 10 inquiries already,
so we rushed right over.
There he was, sitting alone
next to a tree looking
forlorn. A woman was
ahead of us, but since she
had already adopted two
bassets, she let us get first
choice on Flash.
We sat on the couch in
the office, Flash was let in,
and he jumped right up on
the couch and sat between
us. Caroline, romantic that
she is, has always insisted
that we were so redolent
of shrimp and fish that
Flash just could not resist!
Flash was about 7 months
old and had already been
in three homes, none of
which were suitable. He
had been kept muzzled in
a crate all day in his last
home and was removed
by animal control. He had


Apalachicola Fitness

Center alters staff

On Friday, members of the Apalachic-
ola Fitness Center bid farewell to popular
director Tim Whitehead.
He has accepted a position as captain
in charge of the county jail.
Christine Smith will take over as man-
ager of the fitness center. Bradley Vaughn
and Eric Olson also will be on staff. Smith,
Vaughn and Olson are all seeking certi-
fication as personal trainers, and White-
head said he will be available for private
training sessions by appointment.
April Patriotis also has come on staff
at the center to teach Pilates and kickbox-
ing.
Beginning Feb. 17, Dr. Fred Russo will
be seeing chiropractic patients at the cen-
ter from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Russo is a graduate of the National Col-
lege of Chiropractic in Lombardi, Ill. He
practiced at Weems from 1993 to 1995 be-
fore moving to Tallahassee.
Whitehead said he will miss working at
the gym although he looks forward to the
challenges of his new position.
"It's like any place you work: You de-
velop a relationship with the people you
see on a day-to-day basis. The good news


probably had been abused
because he was very shy
and wary of certain people,
but now he was coming
home with us.
We stopped at a pet
shop in Key Largo. They
were just closing, but they
opened up for us so we
could get the basics for
Flash. After some early
health problems caused
by eating practically
anything, he has turned
into a happy, confident dog
who we just love. Flash
has been on Shorelines
Forgotten Coast TV fishing
report. He also won most
obedient dog in Franklin
County at the Dog Days
celebration.
Some folks would look
at Flash and say he looks
to small for a basset, so
I checked a breed book
and there he was, the
aforementioned Basset
Artesian Normand, a "rare
breed" indeed!

Lois Swoboda is
archiving success stories
of animal adoptions
for her series "Happy
Endings"for The Times.
To share a story for
"Happy Endings," please
email Lois at lswoboda@
starfl.com.


LOIS SWOBODA I The limes
Tim Whitehead, center, will leave the
Apalachicola Fitness Center in the
capable hands of Bradley Vaughn,
left; new manager Christine Smith,
seated; and Eric Olson, not pictured.

is, I'm still going to be in the county, and
hopefully I'll continue to see most of the
people I know from the gym," he said. "I
just hope I don't see them in my new set-
ting."
By Lois Swoboda


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will be accepting separate sealed
Request for Proposals for the following:
WILL S. KENDRICK SPORTS COMPLEX TENNIS COURT PROJECT
Specifications are on file in the office of the Franklin County Board of County Commis-
sioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320.
Proposals must be received in the office of the Franklin County Clerk of the Court 33
Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 by 4:30 P.M., EST, on March
2, 2009. Each proposal must be sealed and clearly labeled. The sealed proposals will
be publicly open and read aloud at 10:30 A.M. EST, on March 3, 2009, in the County
Commission Meeting Room located in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. For
further information, contact Nikki Millender, Coordinator Franklin County Parks &
Recreation Department, at (850) 653 8277. Email: fcprd@fairpoint.net
Bidder shall provide an original and one copy of each proposal in a sealed envelope
of container, plainly marked "WILL S. KENDRICK SPORTS COMPLEX TENNIS
COURT PROJECT".

The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all proposals.
ATTENTION BIDDERS: Franklin County is an equal opportunity employer and en-
courages participation by certified minority enterprises and women's business enter-
prises.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA
JOSEPH PARRISH, CHAIRMAN

*m


Community CALENDAR


Thursday, Feb. 19
Apalachicola Community Pride
meets at 6 p.m. at City Hall. For info,
call 653-8715.
Wandering Star Quilting Club.
Chillas Hall Lanark Village. 1-3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Luncheon and information specials
at the Franklin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Noon. $3 donation. Call
697-3760

Friday, Feb. 20
The sixth annual African-American
History festival at Sixth Street
Recreation Park in Apalachicola.
Event opens at noon and runs through
Sunday afternoon. For more info, visit
www.hcola.org.
The Dixie Theatre presents
"Visiting Mr. Green" at 8 p.m.. Mr.
Green (David Poirier), an elderly,
retired dry cleaner, wanders into
New York traffic and is almost hit by
a car driven by Ross Gardiner (David
Caldwell), a young corporate executive.
The young man is given a community
service of helping the recent widower
once a week for six months. What
starts as a comedy about two men
who do not want to be in the same
room together becomes a gripping and
moving drama as they get to know each
other, come to care about each other
and open old wounds they've been
hiding and nursing for years. Call the
Dixie box office for tickets at 653-3200.
Breakfast at the Franklin County
Senior Center in Carrabelle. Coffee at
7:30 a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2 donation.
Call 697-3760.
Bocce Club. Franklin County Senior
Center. 1 p.m. Call 697-3760.

Saturday, Feb. 21
The sixth annual African-American
History festival at Sixth Street
Recreation Park in Apalachicola.
Parade commences at 11 a.m.. For
more info, visit www.hcola.org.
The Dixie Theatre presents
"Visiting Mr. Green" at 8 p.m. Call the
Dixie box office for tickets at 653-3200.

Sunday, Feb. 22
The sixth annual African-American
History festival at Sixth Street

LYONIA from page B1

fragrant and they last for several
weeks.
Lyonia is a very showy little shrub
when in flower. It deserves more
attention from gardeners who like
to use native plants. You can trim
fetterbush into hedges or use it in
mixed shrub plantings.
Lyonia should thrive anywhere
blueberries do well. It prefers acidic
soil. It grows well in partial shade to full
sun. Lyonia grows naturally in moist to
fairly dry sandy soils. Once established,


Recreation Park in Apalachicola runs
through Sunday afternoon. For more
info, visit www.hcola.org.
The Dixie Theatre presents
"Visiting Mr. Green," at 3 p.m. Call the
Dixie box office for tickets at 653-3200.

Monday, Feb. 23
Breakfast at Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30
a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call
697-3760.
Computer classes at the Franklin
County Senior Center in Carrabelle.
Call Joyce Durham 670-5951 and set up
a time.
Billiards Club at the Franklin
County Senior Center in Carrabelle. 1
p.m. Call 697-3760.
GED classes are offered at the
Franklin County School from 3 to 6 p.m.
every week in Building 1100, Room
1105. Call 670-2800.

Tuesday, Feb. 24
The Gulf Coast Workforce Board
Rating Committee will meet at 9 a.m.
CT in the conference room of the
Workforce Development Building, 5230
W U.S. 98, Panama City. The rating
committee will be selecting a three-
year proposal for auditing services.
Please contact Donna Williams at 850-
913-3285 for questions.
Apalachicola Community Gardens
will meet at 6 p.m. at the Apalachicola
Bay Chamber of Commerce For more
info, call 653-9419.
Art Club at the Franklin County
Senior Center in Carrabelle. 2-4 p.m.
Call 697-3760.
Bingo. 7 p.m. St. George Island
Fire Dept. $1/card. Proceeds go to St.
George Island Civic Club. Call 927-4654.

Wednesday, Feb. 25
The Dixie Theatre presents
"Visiting Mr. Green," at 3 p.m. Call the
Dixie box office for tickets at 653-3200.
Card Club. Franklin County Senior
Center. 1 p.m. Call 697-3760.
Bingo for the Bus. Chillas Hall in
Lanark village. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Call 697-
9626.
GED classes are offered at the
Franklin County School from 3-6 p.m.
every week in Building 1100, Room
1105. Call 670-2800.


it should not need to be watered, which
makes it an excellent choice for this
area. It will grow in USDA Zones 7-10.
We are in zone 8.

Lois Swoboda holds a doctorate in
entomology from Virginia Tech. If you
have question concerning a plant or
animal, ask the bug doctor by calling
653-1819, e-mailing lswoboda@starfl.
com or dropping your written inquiry
or a picture off at the Times office on
Commerce Street.


JEFF ILARDI I Contributed photo
Flash is the Ilardi's 6-year-old Basset Artesian
Normand.


NOTICE OF ZONING CHANGE

The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners propos-
es to adopt the following by ordinance: An Ordinance Rezoning the
following tracts of Land in Franklin County:

A 0.65 acre parcel in Section 14, Township 7 South, Range 4
West, Lanark Beach to be rezoned from C-4 Mixed Used Residential to
C-3 Commercial Recreation.

A public hearing on the proposed changes to the Zoning Map
series will be help on Tuesday, March 3, 2009, at 10:15 a.m., at the
County Commission meeting room in the Franklin County Courthouse
Annex in Apalachicola, Florida. More information can be obtained and
the proposed change may be inspected at the Franklin County Planning
Department, 34 Forbes Street, Suite #1, Apalachicola, Florida, tele-
phone (850) 653-9783.

Persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public
hearing or in writing to the Franklin County Board of County Com-
missioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320.
Transactions of this public hearing will not be recorded. Persons who
wish to appeal any action resulting from this hearing should make the
necessary arrangements to assure that a verbatim record is made, in-
cluding testimony and evidence, if any, upon which the appeal is to be
based.


'- -- _- -- ---- - i '.,F -- i :"
-_7
--


-. -- --:, .....- - "
--4-




Rezone from C-4 Mixed Use Residential-to





C-3 Commercial Recreation
I- i i_ .
.' .I! "
I- : i

:- 1 1-, .11. .




Rezone from C-4 Mixed Use Residential-to
C-3 Commercial Recreation

I:







6B The Times Thursday, February 19, 2009


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


E 6100-7200


1100- Legal Advertising participate in this proceed
08-05474

P c N / In accordance e with the
Annauemet Americans with Disabilities
A1ct. persons needing spe-
S1170NNOUNCEM c lal accommodation n to
1100 Legaldvertising participate in this proceed-
1110 Classified Notices ing should contact the
1120 Public Notices/ Clerk of the Courts. Marcla
Announcements M. Johnson. 33 Market
1130 -Adoptions Street. Suite 203. Apalach-
1150Personals Icola. FI. 32320: telephone
1160 -Lost number (850) 653-8861.
1170 Found not later than seven (7)
S days prior to this proceed-
-f ~ ing. If you are hearing or
1100 voice Impaired. please call
(850) 577-4400.
1046T February 12, 19, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI- 1047T
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL
FLORIDA CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
CIVIL ACTION FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA
WASHINGTON MUTUAL GENERAL JURISDICTION
BANK F/K/A WASHING- DIVISION
TON MUTUAL BANK, FA.,
Plaintiff, U.S. BANK NATIONAL AS-
SOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
VS. FOR MASTR ALTERNA-
TIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-5
KAREN BETH MIL- PLAINTIFF
LENDER, et al,
Defendantss. VS.

CASE NO.: GARY FOGLEMAN A/K/A
19-2008-CA-0191 GARY R, FOGLEMAN; RE-
DIVISION: BECCA FOGLEMAN; AMY
WRIGHT A/K/A AMY E.
NOTICE OF WRIGHT, UNKNOWN
RESCHEDULED SALE SPOUSE OF AMY
WRIGHT A/K/A AMY E.
NOTICE IS HEREBY WRIGHT IF ANY; ANY
GIVEN Pursuant to an Or- AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
der Rescheduling Foreclo- TIES CLAIMING BY,
sure Sale dated January THROUGH, UNDER, AND
26, 2009, and entered in AGAINST THE HEREIN
Case No. 19-2008-CA- NAMED INDIVIDUAL
0191 of the Circuit Court of DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE
the Second Judicial Circuit NOT KNOWN TO BE
in and for Franklin County DEAD OR ALIVE,
Florida in which Washing- WHETHER SAID UN-
ton Mutual Bank f/k/a KNOWN PARTIES MAY
Washington Mutual Bank, CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
F.A., is the Plaintiff and Ka- SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
ren Beth Millender, Tenant SEES, GRANTEES OR
#1 n/k/a Nick Kilby, Ten- OTHER CLAIMANTS;
ant #2 n/k/a Robert Bel- JOHN DOE AND JANE
din, are defendants, I will DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
sell to the highest and best ANTS IN POSSESSION
bidder for cash in/on, DEFENDANT(S)
Franklin County, Florida at
on the 26th day of Febru- CASE NO. 07-00178CA
ary, 2009, the following de-
scribed property as set RE- NOTICE OF
forth in said Final Judg- FORECLOSURE SALE
ment of Foreclosure: N
NOTICE IS HEREBY
LOT 4, BLOCK 2, GULF GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
TERRACES, UNIT NO. der Granting the Motion to
ONE, ACCORDING TO Reset Foreclosure Sale
THE PLAT THEREOF AS dated January 26, 2009
RECORDED IN PLAT entered in Civil Case No.
BOOK 3, PAGE 3, OF THE 07-00178CA of the Circuit
PUBLIC RECORDS OF Court of the 2nd Judicial
FRANKLIN COUNTY Circuit in and for FRANK-
FLORIDA. LIN County, Apalachicola,
Florida, I will sell to the
A/K/A 139 APALACHEE highest and best bidder for
STREET, CARABELLE, FL cash at on the front steps
32322 of the courthouse of the
FRANKLIN County Court-
Any person claiming an in- house, 33 Market Street,
terest in the surplus from Apalachicola, Florida, at
the sale, if any, other than 11:00 a.m. on the 26th day
the property owner as of of February, 2009 the fol-
the date of the Lis Pend- lowing described property
ens must file a claim within as set forth in said Sum-
60 days after the sale. mary Final Judgment,
to-wit:
Dated in Franklin County,
Florida this 28th day of LOT 6, BLOCK N, ST
January, 2009. GEORGE ISLAND GULF
BEACHES, UNIT NO. 2,
Clerk of the Circuit Court ACCORDING TO THE
Franklin County, Florida PLAT THEREOF, RE-
By: Michele Maxwell CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
Deputy Clerk 2, PAGE 15, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF FRANK-
Albertelli Law LIN COUNTY FLORIDA.
Attorney for Plaintiff
PO. Box 23028 Any person claiming an in-
Tampa. FL 33623 terest in the surplus from
(813)221-4743 the sale, if any, other than


1100
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Dated this 28th day of Jan-
uary, 2009.

Marcia M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons with disabilities need-
ing a special accommoda-
tion should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse at
8 5 0 6 5 3 8 8 6 1 ,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.

DAVID J. STERN, PA.
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND
ROAD SUITE 400
PLANTATION, FL
33324-3920
(954) 233-8000
07-84202(ASCF)
February 12, 19, 2009
1048T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION


NATIONAL
GAGE CO.
PLAINTIFF


CITY MORT-


VS.

EDWARD C. CASS;
BETTYE CASS; ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED IN-
DIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)

CASE NO. 07-000463-CA

RE- NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Granting the Motion to
Reset Foreclosure Sale
dated January 26, 2009
entered in Civil Case No.
07-000463-CA of the Cir-
cuit Court of the 2nd Judi-
cial Circuit in and for
FRANKLIN County, Apa-
lachicola, Florida, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at on the
front steps of the court-
house of the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse, 33
Market Street, Apalachl-
cola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m.
on the 26th day of Febru-
ary, 2009 the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Summary Fi-
nal Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 8, BLOCK 11, OF THE
CITY OF APALACHICOLA,
COUNTY OF FRANKLIN
AND STATE OF FLORIDA,
ACCORDING TO THE


1100
MAP OR PLAT OF SAID
CITY IN MOST GENERAL
USE.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Dated this 28th day of Jan-
uary, 2009.

Marcia M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons with disabilities need-
ing a special accommoda-
tion should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse at
8 5 0 6 5 3 8 8 6 1 ,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.

DAVID J. STERN, PA.
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND
ROAD SUITE 400
PLANTATION, FL
33324-3920
(954) 233-8000
07-15857(NCM)
February 12, 19, 2009
1102T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

VS.

RICK PETRONELLA A/K/A
RICK J. PETRONELLA,
LISA A. PETRONELLA and
UNKNOWN TENANTSS,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 08-000442-CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated January
28, 2009, in Case No.
08-000442-CA, of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit, in and for
Franklin County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff and
RICK PETRONELLA A/K/A
RICK J. PETRONELLA,
LISA A. PETRONELLA and
UNKNOWN TENANTS)
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the
Front door of the Franklin
County Courthouse in Ap-
alachicola, Franklin
County, Florida at 11:00
a.m. on March 12, 2009,
the property set forth in the
Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure and more particularly
described as follows:

Lot 19, Palmetto Village,
according to the map or
plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 7, Page(s) 47,
Public Records of Franklin
County, Florida.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of


1100
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.

DATED: January 28, 2009.

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
Wadsworth & Bowden PA,
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
February 12,19,2009


1103T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

BETTY J. PETERSON
A/K/A BETTY PETERSON,
APRIL L. GILES A/K/A
APRIL GILES, MAGNOLIA
RIDGE ESTATES PROP-
ERTY OWNERS' ASSOCI-
ATION, INC., and UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS,
Defendants,

CASE NO. 08-000469-CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE Is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated January
28, 2009, in Case No.
08-000469-CA, of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit, in and for
Franklin County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff and
BETTY J. PETERSON
A/K/A BETTY PETERSON,
APRIL L. GILES A/K/A
APRIL GILES, MAGNOLIA
RIDGE ESTATES PROP-
ERTY OWNERS' ASSOCI-
ATION, INC., and UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) are
the Defendants, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the front
door of the Franklin
County Courthouse in Ap-
alachicola, Franklin
County, Florida at 11:00
a.m. on March 12, 2009,
the property set forth in the
Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure and more particularly
described as follows:

Lot 3, BLUE HERON VIL-
LAGE, according to the
map or plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 7,
Page(s) 51, Public Rec-
ords of Franklin County,
Florida.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.

DATED: January 28, 2009

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
Wadsworth & Bowden PA.


| 1100
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
February 12, 19, 2009

1127T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION


WASHINGTON
BANK, FA,
Plaintiff,


MUTUAL


VS.

KAREN BETH MIL-
LENDER; UNKNOWN
HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES,
DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES AND ALL
OTHERS WHO MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST IN
THE ESTATE OF CLAUDE
CRAWFORD RICHARDS
DECEASED; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF BARBARA
ELLEN MARTIN ROMAN;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
KAREN BETH MIL-
LENDER; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF ROBERT B
ARNOLD; JOHN DOE;
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY
Defendants.

CASE NO.:
19-2008-CA-0234

RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE


NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Mo-
tion and Order Resetting
Foreclosure Sale Date
dated the 27th day of Jan-
uary, 2009, and entered in
Case No.
19-2008-CA-0234, of the
Circuit Court of the 2ND
Judicial Circuit in and for
Franklin county, wherein
WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK, FA is the Plaintiff
and KAREN BETH MIL-
LENDER; UNKNOWN
HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES,
DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES AND ALL
OTHERS WHO MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST IN
THE ESTATE OF CLAUDE
CRAWFORD RICHARDS ,
DECEASED; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF BARBARA
ELLEN MARTIN ROMAN;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
KAREN BETH MIL-
LENDER; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF ROBERT B
ARNOLD; JOHN DOE;
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANT (S) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY are defend-
ants. I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash at the ON FRONT
STEPS OF COURTHOUSE
at the Franklin County
Courthouse, in APA-
LACHICOLA, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 5th day
of March, 2009, the follow-
ing described property as
set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:

LOTS 3, 4, 5, AND 6,
BLOCK 3 (BLOCK 178 OF
OFFICIAL MAP OF CITY
OF CARRABELLE, DE-
CEMBER 1956),
KEOUGH'S FIRST ADDI-
TION, CITY OF
CARRABELLE, ACCORD-


1100
ING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA), disabled per-
sons who, because of their
disabilities, need special
accommodation to partici-
pate in this proceeding
should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Suite 203, Apalachl-
cola FL 32320 or Tele-
phone Volce/TDD (904)
653-8861 prior to such
proceeding.

Dated this 28th day of
January, 2009.

Marcia Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49th Street,
Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
08-19344
February 12, 19, 2009

1129T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

GULF STATE COMMU-
NITY BANK, a
State-Chartered Bank,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JADAR PROPERTIES,
LLC, a Florida Limited Lia-
bility Company, APALACH
RIVER PROPERTIES, LLC,
a Florida Limited Liability
Company, JAMIE D.
CRUM, DANIEL W. HART-
MAN, and CHARLES RAY
WEBB, II
Defendants.

CASE NO: 08-000543-CA
CIVIL DIVISION

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS GIVEN that
pursuant to a Consent Fi-
nal Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure dated January
26, 2009, in the
above-styled cause, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the
Front Door of the Franklin
County Courthouse, Apa-
lachicola, Florida, on
Thursday, February 26,
2009, at 11;00 a.m., the
following described prop-
erty:

FIRST PARCEL owned by
Defendant JADAR PROP-
ERTIES, LLC

Lot 2, Block "B", Gulf
Wynn, a Subdivision as
per map or plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 4, at


1100
Page 64, of the Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida,

SECOND PARCEL
owned by Defendant APA-
LACH RIVER PROPER-
TIES, LLC

Lot 47 Rivers Edge Phase
II, a subdivision as per
map or plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 7,
Page 19, of the Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida.

DATED ON February 4,
2009.

Marcia M. Johnson
Clerk of court
By: Renee Stone
As Deputy Clerk

Counsel for Plaintiff
Mary Ellen Davis, Attorney
Penson, Duchemln & Da-
vis PA.
Post Office Box 1720
Crawfordville, FL 32326
(850) 926-6003
February 12,19, 2009

1150T
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Eastpoint Water and
Sewer District is desig-
nating the position of Of-
fice Manager from Regular
Membership Plan to Sen-
ior Management Service
Class with the Florida Divi-
sion of Retirement. If you
have any questions please
contact Loretta Whaley at
the District office (850)
670-8177.
February 19, 26, 2009

1158T
REQUEST FOR PROPOS-
ALS FOR LEGAL AND
OFFICIAL ADVERTISE-
MENTS

Franklin County, a political
subdivision of the State of
Florida, requests propos-
als for legal and official ad-
vertisements pursuant to
chapter 50, Florida Stat-
utes.

Each such proposal shall
set forth their qualifications
as a publisher of periodical
matters within the meaning
of 50.031, Florida
Statutes (2008), the size of
the point type to be used
for such advertisements
and the cost per square
inch of all such advertise-
ments. Each proposal
shall describe the proce-
dure used by the newspa-
per for submitting adver-
tisements for publication,
such as deadlines for sub-
mission of advertisements
and contact information.

Each such proposal shall
be submitted to Alan
Pierce, Director of Admin-
istrative Services, 34
Forbes Street, Apalachl-
cola, Florida 32320 no
later than 4:00 p.m. (ET)
on March 9, 2009. All pro-
posals shall be sealed and
marked on the outside of
the envelope with the
statement "Request for
Proposals for Legal and
Official Advertisements."
Each proposal shall sub-
mit seven copies.

The proposal shall be
opened at the March 17,
2009 County Commission
meeting at 10:00 a.m.
(ET).


1100

Franklin County reserves
the right to reject all pro-
posals.
February 19, 26, 2009

1184T
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

KAREN A. MURPHY ROY
K. LODDESOL, SCOTT S.
LODDESOL, and GARY A.
LODDESOL
Plaintiff,
vs.

W. RUTH URBAN, if alive,
and if deceased, her un-
known spouse, heirs, devl-
sees, grantees, creditors
and all other parties claim-
ing by, through, under or
against her; and all un-
known natural if alive, and
if dead or not known to be
dead or alive, their several
and respective unknown
spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees and creditors, or
other persons parties
claiming by, through, un-
der or against those un-
known natural persons,
and the several and re-
spective unknown assigns,
successors in interest,
trustees or any other per-
son claiming by, through,
under or against any cor-
poration or other legal en-
tity named as a defendant;
and all claimants, person
and parties, natural or cor-
porate, or whose exact le-
gal status unknown, claim-
ing under any of the above
names or described de-
fendants or parties or
claiming to have any right,
title or interest in and to
the lands described in
complaint,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 08-000315-CA

NOTICE OF ACTION

You are Notified that an
action to Cancel a Mort-
gage and Note on the fol-
lowing property in Franklin
County; Florida:

Lots 14,15 and 16, Block 8
(192) Keough's Second
Addition to The City of
Carrabelle as per the map
or plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 2, Page 20,
Franklin County, Florida.

Has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it
on Thomas M. Shuler,
Plaintiff Attorney, whose
address is Post Office Box
850, Apalachicola, Florida
32320, on or before March
23, 2009, and file the origi-
nal withthe Clerk of this
Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint.

Marcia M. Johnson,
Clerk of Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
February 19, 26, 2009
March 5, 12,2009

1187T
PUBLIC NOTICE

There will be an Executive


+1+ +1+ +







1 1100 | 3220 1 3220 4100 4100 6100 6140 7100
Committee Meeting of The For Rent
Northwest Florida Trans- 3 months free rent on 1, & 2, br Port St. Joe, St. George I
portation Corridor Author- Customer Support prime office space Apalachicola, FL. Island and St. James Bay
ity on Thursday, February 2 T29 Ave E Call 850-643-7740. Previously Bank Owned
Ity on Thursday February 2 Tone DINETTE SET: SOLID Cashier Home Biz Training Montgomery Building Property. Priced way be- T M
19, 2009.Thismeetingwll sofa/ioveseat/swvel chair WOOD table with 4 Clerk needed at the mini PT $400-$1,200 Mo FT Pleasecall low market value! Prices
immediatelyfollowthe reg- & ottoman set. $1199 fro cha rs-$150 NEW IN BOX $400 $1,00 Mo F all low me
ularly scheduled meeting whole set! Never usede 99 convenience store (blue). $2,000 to $6,000 Mo. Call 850-653-4321 or starting a $35,000 Pease 8100 Antique & Collectibles
of The Northwest Florida and still in boxes. Must be able to work 7278656795 3055885885call Counts Real Estate 8110 -ars
Transportation Corridor -resistant, hardwood nights andor weekends. Group at 850-249-3615. 8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
Authority onfounda fete war Call 927-2163 for more info For Rent Space available 2 br, 2 ba, outdoor pool. 8140-Vans
CST at the Walton Area foundation, i ^etime war 1 for small business or of- 9r a, out p00. 8140---ns
CST at the Walton Area ranty, new in crate, del for small business or of- 598 Three Rivers Rd. 8150- Commercial
Chamber of Commerce, avail 545-7112 rice. Utihties included. Carabelle. $800 month. Why Rent 180 Motorcycles
63 South Centre Trail, 5711Simmons Beauty Rest 4130 Downtown Historic Apa- Cal 97-707 o519- W y ent 81 70 Auto Parts
Santa Rosa Beach, Florida Mattress set-Brand New It's a Lifestyle Not Just a lachcola. 29 Ave. E. When You Can Accesories
32459. Any person requir- still in sealed plastic. Full It's TravLifes orktyle, Not (upstairs) For info call n A ran 8210- Bots
Ing special accommoda- warranty. $499. Call I T Job!Travel/Wor k/Partyo 3 bi Own A rand 8220-PersonalWatercraft
tin s asked toadvise $170 Queen Pllow-Top co. now hiring 18+ sharp Carrabelle River. Garage, New Home 820 aoa rine
meeting isaskedtoadvise $08240 QBoat w Marine
the Corridor Authority at Mattress Set. unused in Food Serv/Hospitality guys & gals to work & $1,000 month $500 de- THE AVENUES at Supplies
least 48 hours prior to the plastic wpad trang, transportaon Green certified and HOP 8320 -ATV/OffRoad Vehicles
meeting bycontactingAm 222-9879. Delivery avaFl. paid training, transportaion68310- Campers &llTailers
meeting by contacting Am 9879. Every Front Desk & lodging furnd. Paid 1 br, 1 ba & 2 br, apart- approved. Affordable Lv- 330Campers & Tralers
ber Perryman at Solid Wood Sleigh Bede & daily. Returns guaranteed. ment. unfurn electric/water Carrabelle ing on the Forgotten Coast 8340- Motorhomes
850-215-4081 or by emall $250. New, in box. Call Today, Start Today. inc. Tile floors, part cy- 3 bdrm, 2 bath homes
at Amber.Perryman. 545-7112 Ho usek e Call Today, Start Today. inc. Tile floors, part cy 4b 2 b a w ala bdrm 2 bath homes
0t 5-Abe4Prr yma 507112N n box Housekeeper a 74 219. press panelling, private 4 br 2 ba w/F, all appl nin from 12502000
@hdrinc.com. Both positions must be MTV/ROAD RULES types deck 1 block from beach incl dishwasher, w/d in Carrabelle from Newest
February 19, 2009 A Brand new 3 pc King expeenced. Apply n lease ly 404 402 5573 unit, Pool, hot tub, sauna S n nl
experienced. Apply In pleaseapply Subdivision only 1/4 mile 8130
mattress set. Still in personn at Best Western, 850-653-6459 + guest apt with full bath from the Carrabelle River
wrapper. $269. Can 249 Hwy 98, Aalachl- $1150/mo 1 yr lease, se-
deliver. 222-7783 3300 cola betweenPOSTAL & GOT JOB Furnished Loft Apt, in his- curty deposit, cr check Pricing from the $100,000s
9cola between POSTAL & GOVT JOB toric district. Cbl/wtr incl and ref required, Picing from the $100000
STEEL 9 am and 2pm. INFO FOR SALE? 1o f hi c s Peqred' Pick your Lot.
S BUILDING Please bring resume. 100s ceiigs N n s mok ers Choose Your Model. Ford Bronco 4x4, 1988,
BUILDINGS vate entrance and deck. 1-573-803-0776 Only 8 lots left! great motor, transmission,
4 Only 25x36, 30x48, caution No smkg pets. $750mo. BEC & Company, Inc.8 good condition $900. Call
A New 100% Leather Ci- 40x54, 45x74, caution +$750 dep. 850-653-3838 Compa,56-2608 tnc. go see n85d 00. Call
MEHAN gar Back & Rolled armed Must Move Now! Lanark Village 2 br apt, Carrabelle ______
I.. DSB Sofa. Love seat & large Will Sell for Balance ------ You NEVER have to pay LG Florida room, Some Beach
3100 -Antiques Storage Ottoman. Es- Owed/Free Delivery! I for information about furniture $450 mo + $200 Beach
3110 -Appliances press, Solid oak founda- 1-800-411-5869x34 federal or postal jobs. If dep 850-545-8813 3 br, 2 ba, large lot, w/d,
3130 AurtsoCraft deck, appliances, ref. 8140
31 Art & Crafts tion. No vinyl. Never used. you see a job deck, appliances, ref. 140
3140 Baby Items Still in crates. Asking I Restaurant/Food Serv "guarantee", contact the $675/mo. 860-233-0676 7150
3150 Building Supplies $1575 for set. FTC. or email 1992 Dodge Conversion
3160 Business 425-8374,can deliver. SERVERS The Federal Trade 6120 cla artensbclob- Van, 78K miles, V6, good
3170 Collectibls .COOKS Commission t Ge e al.net condition $2700, Call
3180 Computers _%9_I IS America's consumer 850-653-8121
3210- Free Pass it On $160 wk, elec, Satellite, St. George Island mantra Florida. Hwy front-
3220 Furniture Bedroom: Complete BLUE PARROT www.ftc.gov/jobscams Garbage included, pool 3 br, 1.5 ba House near age boarders National For-
3230- Garage/Yard Sales Designer 7 piece set, all HIRING 1-877-FTC-HELP table. 12'X65'deckwith the water. $800 monthly, rest assessed value
32 ns new. Sacrifice $849. Hep aneas a Beautiful view, Call $400 deposit. Please Call $44,000 Asking $28,000 8210
3250 Good Things to Eat 4100 Hlp Wanted Please apply in person A public service 850-653-5114 850-545-8813 Can be divided. 653-8792
3260 -ealth Fitness 545-7112. Deive 4130 Employent between 9a-5pm 7 days message from the FTC 850653 4 850545883 Can be dded 6538792
3270 Jewelry/Clothing possible. Information message from the FTC or 653-7777
3280 Machinery/ a week@ I and The News Herald -
Equipment Blue Parrott Classified Advertising '*i I Townhomes for rent,
3300- Miscellaneous ii L St. = = = Island =Department 6130 Jones Homestead- Pon- Aalahila
3300 Miscelianeous Ed _ofyea r
3310 Musicalinstmments 410 derosa pines. End of year t 66, Lots 12 15pal
3320 -Plants & Shrubs/ DINETTE SET: SOLID special. First month rent 266 Lot 5
Sup3330 pli Resauran/Hote abe wh 4 free with deposit and 12 $90,000 or can divide.
333- Restaurantotel OOD tab wth 2 r a Nice private neighborhood Lhurs Open
3340 Sporting Goods chairs-$150 NEW IN BOX month lease. 2 br and 3bon e3rivate neighbor
3350 -Tickets (Buy&Sell) 222-9879 units available. Call on 23rd 6538792 or Fisherman Boat
M 850-227-8404 or 6537777 34' 1983
I 229-734-0717 Twin 8.2 Detroit Die-
1,& -sels, Fly Bridge, Out
i Poolside .. Riggers, Diesel Genera-
SREALESTE E Townhouse for tor (new), full cabin,
"Cashier _8100- Business/ rent in Station, Platform with
Clerk needed at mini 6110 ommaria Carrabelle ABSOLUTE ladder, Bottom and
Rre ^^ ^ = ^ ^Zinc's good. Runs
6120- Beach Renlals 3 Bedroom/2 Bath Beautl- REAL ESTATE GooZinc s good. Runsk-
convenience store "Blue". 61302- CondofTownhouse ful townhouse in the Sands REAL ESTATE Good! Will Tradel Ask
6140 House Rentals of Carrabelle, Fully Fur- AUCTION Ing $39,000 OBO At
Must be able to work nights 6150 Roommate Wanted nished, Boat Parking, Stor- R T FBAY FRONT anama City Marina slip
6160 Rooms for Rent nshed, BoatParkngStor REAl. ~I 603. Call 850-871-9300
RKdk and/or weekends. 6170-Mobile Home/Lot age Washer/Dryer ST. GEORGE ISLAND or 8502580996
Retired nurse for respite 6180 Out-of-Town Rentals $1100.00/month, (850) 7100 Homes HOME0-258-0996
etie n e B190 Timeshare Rentals 251-6082 or (850) 7110-Beach Home/
care daytime, night time Bookkee ina House Keeper's Needed 200 Vacation Rentals 62-6906 Property HOME SELLS TO HIGH-
and overnight on week- When you care to send House Ke p r Needed 7120- Commercial ESTBIDDER!
ends. Housework, shopp- the very least to the IRS- t Buccaneer Inn on St. Snow Birds 7130CondoTownhouse 1431 EVODIE CT.
ing, in your home. Experi- SMALL BUSINESS Lanark 7 as February 21st @ 12PM OMPLETE PACKAGE
ence with Alzheimers, se- BOOKKEEPING George Island 61 7160- Mobile Homes/Lots Plantation Community, FROM$4,995
nile dementia, and special Let me help you get it 1 br, 1 ba, Renovated/fur- 7170 waterfront 3 Bed /2 Bath, iu
needs child or adult. Call ready for the CPA. 1 br house nished end unit, new kitch 7180- Investment 3000Sq Ft. 1Wdefl minuBoats
850-320-5156 Refs avail 653-1430 For More Information Call: and bath, mini. 4 month Property AffilatedAuctions.com SmokerBBQ, Fyers
50) 927-2163 c/h/a, w/d incl. lease $545/mo + dep., no 7190- Out-of-Town 850-2947121 BonifayFlonida
(850) 927-2163 No pets. 850-653-9788 smoking, pet considered. Real Estate 1 www.xtremeindustries.com
850-615-0058 (850) 653-3838. 7200- Timeshare J. Whitworth 10% BP











HELP IS ONLY A



PHONE CALL


St AWAY




To Place Your Classified ad



the
THE STAR tJ AinPA TIMES
& CARRABEL


SCall Our New Numbers Now!




Call: 850-747-5020


SToll Free: 800-345-8688


Fax: 850-747-5044


SEmail: thestar@pcnh.com


1 Email: thetimes@pcnh.com


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


The Times Thursday, February 19, 2009 7B






B8 I The Times


Local


A


renovation


made in


heaven

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Like any good marriage, the
gazebo in Lafayette Park need-
ed a little refurbishing.
The cypress rails worn by
pressing hands, reliable for lean-
ing upon, took some smoothing
out.
The holes made by staples
and tacks where they'd pierced
the beams, as callous words do
the heart, called for plugging
up.
The gleam of freshness on
the surface had dimmed.
The luster of love, smooth as
fresh coats of paint, had to be re-
applied.
Working with a $6,200 grant
from the Tourist Development
Council, the city of Apalachicola
just finished a complete renova-
tion of the triumphant gazebo,
thanks to the craftsmanship of a
two-man crew under the direc-
tion of general contractor Mike
Parrish.
Chris Stokes and Pachee
Vause replaced rotten wood, re-
paired the sheet metal master
rib roof, repainted the entire



She scoops

sea foam by

the seashore

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Dr. Patricia Van West scoops
up sea foam from the Gulf of
Mexico and hauls it in a cake car-
rier back to her house on Cape
San Bias.
She is not a research scientist,
as her doctorate is in education
and she teaches teachers how to
teach.
She is not a lunatic, either, be-
cause she lives most of the year
up north in a town named Normal,
Ill., not far from Peoria, which as
everyone knows is about as nor-
mal a place as there is.
But during her month-long
sojourn as a snowbird here, Van
West is an artist, drawing on all


Chris Stokes and Pachee Vause prepare to come down from the roof of the gazebo after replacing
the wooden finial that snapped off after one of the hurricanes of recent years.


structure with several coats of
brilliant white paint, added the
eave drips and, to top it all off,
replaced the finial that sticks
like a spire from the rooftop.
Parrish said key to preven-
tive maintenance was replacing
the roofing nails, which were
used originally to attach the
sheet metal roof, with watertight
screws that keep wind and rain
from loosening and weakening
the metal sheets.
As the two men described the
work they put in over the last
several weeks, Vause remem-


the inspiration, ingenuity and fe-
verish devotion the title implies.
One day, Van West took a
break from her reading and her
conventional painting, and while
strolling the beach, looked down
at the sea foam swirling at her
feet. She wondered what effect
the foam would have if used in
the painting process.
She hauled it back to her
house and began experimenting


bered how he used to play in the
park as a child, when the previ-
ous gazebo was a smaller struc-
ture they climbed on.
Stokes' memories were even
fresher, as he turned to Nov. 13,
2004, when he married his wife,
Christy, under the watchful can-
opy of the gazebo.
She had entered the park in
a decorated golf cart, bringing a
smile to Chris and a vivid recol-
lection to his wife.
"There was a mom and a
little girl sitting on one of the
picnic tables. There's this little


with it as part of the medium for
watercolors.
She appears to be the only
person on the planet to do, or at
least to have announced publicly
that they have done so.
Van West applied the sea foam,
before it turned flat, to a painted
surface and watched how it inter-
acted with the watercolors.
She watched how long it took
to dry and discovered there was


girl, and she's just in awe. She
waved to me like I was a celeb-
rity," Christy said.
"The whole thing was fun,"
she said. "It wasn't one of those
big-to-do weddings. It was just
fun."
If Chris Stokes puts the
same amount of love and care
in his marriage as he and Vause
did with the gazebo, they both
should stay healthy and beauti-
ful.
"He even goes out in the bay
from the Lafayette Park pier, and
he'll throw his cast net," Christy


good foam and better foam, de-
pending on the concentrations of
impurities, such as salts, chemi-
cals, dead plants, decomposed
fish and excretions from sea-
weed, that form the foam.
Because the weather has
been fairly calm this year, with-
out strong winds to whip up the
bubbles into a froth on the waves,
Van West's cup hasn't been run-
ning over with sea foam this past


Thursday, February 19, 2009

said. "And every time he goes,
he says, 'I went and threw my
net where we got married.' It's a
pleasant memory for him."
The first couple to make
memories under the newly com-
pleted gazebo will be Keith Vasil-
inda of Tallahassee and Macie
Tapper of Port St. Joe, who will
tie the knot at 11 a.m. Saturday.
"I suggested it to them when
they sprang it on me quite sud-
denly that they wanted to get
married," said Keith's mom,
Marci Daniels. "I said to Keith
'What about Lafayette Park?'
I've just always looked at it and it
looked perfectly beautiful to me.
"They went and came back,
and she just flew in the door and
said 'That's absolutely where I
want to get married,' Daniels
said.
"Keith used to go to the park
after we moved here when he
11," Daniels said. "When he was
14, he got a little boat. He called
it Kermit, and he learned to cast
net. We went and got him a real
cast net from Golden's. He used
to go just past where the pier is.
"He would get bait fish down
there," Daniels said. "He's fa-
miliar with the park. He used to
ride his bike all over there."
Daniels said Trinity Episco-
pal's the Rev. Martha Harris
will conduct the nuptials at the
small, family wedding. She said
she is overjoyed at the work
Parrish, Vause and Stokes have
done.
"It's amazing, the transfor-
mation. It's absolutely lovely,"
she said. "They did a great job.
I think it's going to encour-
age more brides to choose that
location."


month.
But she has produced a bum-
per crop of"Sea Foam Paintings,"
which are available at the Sea
Oats Art Gallery, at 128 E Pine
Ave, on St. George Island.
Van West plans to open her
home, at 6123 Nassau Lane at
Cape Shoals, for a showing from
1-4:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 22.
For more information, call
229-7013.


Our local real estate experts have identified what they feel are the best

values around and are offering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In

this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port

St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Bias, St. George Island, Carrabelle and

surrounding areas.


$115,000 St. George Island"


COMMERCIAL
/ RESIDENTIAL
LOT ON THE
ISLAND


Unique property zoned C-4 Mixed Use allows a
business downstairs and residential unit above
(Great Gulf View!). Excellent location on main
paved road (East Gulf Beach Dr.) to State Park
for maximum exposure for commercial use. Easy
beach access on East Third Street.
Least expensive lot on Gulf Beach Drive.


John Shelby, Broker
800-344-7570
850-927-4777
www.sgirealty.com


1994 Fleetwod 28' x 70' Moblie Home *to
be moved. It has 4 bedrooms- Garden Style
Master B/R Tub- Kitchen skylights.
Den-Living Room-Office Area-Utility Room.
See at 293 Woodill Road- Carrabelle
Asking $14,500.00- Financing Available For
Property Owner.


BILL MILLER REALTY
(850)697-3751(3310)
CELL (850)570-0658


YOUR

* BEST PICK

S. HERE!


850-227-1278


NE *I


(MLS#107389


..
* r'm ~ K--;.,:,..- m,-: :;;-. -.; .; ,


l \
/ St. George Island
Realty




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs