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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00013
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: February 12, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00013
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
        Page B 9
        Page B 10
Full Text



Apalachicola


Carrabelle






YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS
YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


Throwing

Valentines


Thursday, FEBRUARY 12, 2009 www. apalachtimes.com 50C
0 0U


ST. VINCENT ISLAND NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE I Special to the Times
Elgin Wefing makes his way down a creek on St. Vincent Island. In this picture, the firebox
of the Tumbler's steam engine is rounded and the gunwales are finished and enclosed. This
is probably the early 1930s.









TUMBLER?

Maritime Museum seeks help for interpretive exhibit


ST. VINCENT ISLAND NATIONAL WILDLIFE
REFUGE I Special to the Times
This may be the earliest
picture of the Tumbler. Here
it is pictured with a squared
firebox. Notice the gunwales
are unfinished in this picture
and lines carrying steam to the
wheelhouse are visible. This
picture probably dates from
the late 1920s or very early
1930s.


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

Do you remember the Tum-
bler?
If you do, the Apalachicola Mar-
itime Museum is asking for your
help.
On display at 103 Water Street
in downtown Apalachicola is an old
duck boat, once the property of El-
gin Wefing. This remarkable boat
was known to old-timers as the
Tumbler. It was one of the earliest
fuel-powered personal pleasure
boats and may well have been the
smallest steamboat in Florida, or
for that matter the entire South-
east.
The Tumbler is built of heart cy-
press. Louis Van Vleet and George
Wefing wrapped the boat in fiber-
glass in the 1960s because it was
beginning to decay and open up at
the joints.
The boat was designed to hunt
and fish in the shallow wetlands of
the barrier islands off the coast of
Franklin County.
Dan Sangaree, of Apalachicola,
who once worked for Wefing, put
the age of the craft at 70 years or
older.
Van Vleet, who worked at Wef-
ing's Marine Supply Store for 39
years, remembered the boat well.
He and George Wefing hunted and
fished in it many times.
"My first dealing with the boat
was when I was about 12 (Circa
1935)," he said. "My daddy and I
were mullet fishing I sa\\ the boat
had its engine in the trolnt and I
questioned by ratIher about it I
said 'Look, the entgne is ipullingh
that boat instead ot Ipushin it' Ibut
he said no, it had a hon~ dnl\e shaltt
down the middle ot the boat that
turned the propeller It \\as an 1old
boat the first time I sa\\ It "
Dolores Rou,. a close tril(d oat
George Wefing in school, thinks
the boat may ha\ r beein con struct-
ed in the 1920s. making t about
90 years old. She treel-s sure Elmin
built the boat himiselt
She remem-
bers he was
a skilled
wood-
worker.


"Knowing Mr. Elgin, I don't be-
lieve he would have trusted any-
body else to build it," she said. "He
could do anything he wanted to. I
remember, when he was in his 60s,
he had a stroke. He was left-hand-
ed and the stroke left him was par-
alyzed on one side so he couldn't
shoot his guns. He converted the
stocks of all of his guns to he could
fire them right-handed."
She believes the engines were
fabricated in Lucious Allen's ma-
chine shop, adjacent to Wefing's
Store.
Other people tentatively attri-
bute the boat to the Marshall Boat
Company and legendary Greek
shipbuilder Demo George, who
was active in Apalachicola around
1900.
The earliest pictures of the Wef-
ing duck boat show it fitted with a
steam engine and a paddle wheel.
Like his son George, Elgin was
known for his love of machines
and talent for manipulating them.
It is possible Elgin converted a
boat meant to be rowed or poled
into a steam-powered vessel.
Pictures found in the collection
of the St. Vincent National Wildlife
Refuge show two different fire-
See TUMBLER A5

LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
Louis Van Vleet recollects
memories of the Tumbler from
his youth.


/


/~F


BRAD SHIVER I Special to the Times
Buttercup was Breanna Shiver's constant
companion.





Pet horse




killed in





Eastpoint


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

Breanna Shiver is
heartbroken. She doesn't
understand why her min-
iature horse, Buttercup
has gone to join her dog in
heaven and neither does
her father Brad.
He appeared at the Feb.
3 meeting of the county
commission to tearfully
demand that somebody
look into the large number
of dogs wandering loose in
Franklin County.
Miniature horses are
valued at around $1,000,
some considerably more,
but Buttercup was Bre-
anna's Christmas gift two
years ago. He has been her
constant companion ever
since, following her like a
puppy.
The story began on Su-
per Bowl Sunday. Shiver
left his daughter's horse
tethered to a small lead
anchor in the back yard
of his home at 737 Ridge
Road. Buttercup could
roam the yard, which is
fenced on three sides. He



Audit co

in schoc

fraud
By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Accountants hired by
the architectural firm
that built the consolidated
school have completed
their audit of an invoic-
ing scandal last year that
cost the project manager
his job.
Forensic examiners
Chris Poulos and Deette
Preacher, both certified
public accountants in Tal-
lahassee, found that the
$130,583 in overcharges
that Peter Brown Con-


was frequently left outside
on the anchor to graze. On
this particular evening, the
Shivers attended a Super
Bowl party and when they
returned home at about
10:30 p.m., Shiver forgot to
put the horse in his shed.
It was a mistake he still
regrets.
He remembers, "About
midnight, I sat up and said
to myself, I'd better go
check on Buttercup. When
I went outside, everything
was quiet, which was
strange. Usually, if I walk
out the door, he starts yell-
ing for me. He's spoiled.
He thinks you're going to
feed him an apple or some-
thing."
Buttercup was gone.
Shiver said he looked until
1:30 a.m. and then called
the police. Deputies Kit
Mashburn and Donnie
Segree responded and
helped him look until about
2:30 or 3 a.m.
"I thought somebody
had found him and tied
him up. He was a pet. He
would have come to any-
See BUTTERCUP A6



mpleted

1 billing

case
struction repaid the
school district in April
2008 covered the entire
loss to the district.
The district last month
handed the forensic audit
over to the state attor-
ney's office. In a Jan. 28
letter to School Board At-
torney Barbara Sanders,
Robert C. Hale, assistant
state attorney, thanked
her and said there may be
criminal activity involved.
When the incident first
surfaced last spring, the

See FRAUD A5


I

)

t


Phone: (850) 653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews@starfl.com
Fax:(850)653-8036


Letter to the Editor ................... A4
Sheriff's Report ...................... B5
Church News......................... B3


Society News ... ................... B2
Tide Chart ........................... A9
Classifieds ........................ B6-B7


FREEDOM
F PA PRS ENTER CT I
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
School News & Society Friday ai 11 am.
Real Estate Ads Thursday ai 11 am.
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Classified Display Ads Friday a 11 a.m.
Classified Line Ads- Monday ai 5 p.m.


*


WHEN SAILING
WAS CHILD'S PLAY
ON THE BAY

By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

In the first half of
the 20th Century, the
children of Apalachicola
were as at home in a
sailboat as on a bicycle.
E.E. (Big Red)
Sizemore shared this
childhood adventure with
the readers of the Times.
When Pete Harrell,
Junior Montgomery and
See SAILING A5


0


TABLE OF CONTENTS


;mdL-


NE






A2 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 12, 2009


Chef's Sampler a feast for the senses


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
This year's banquet
celebrating the
outstanding cuisine of
Franklin County and
its environs was a huge
success serving 250
diners including almost
50 volunteers. It was a
sell out house on Sunday
night.
Anita Grove, director
of the Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce
said "It went fantastic. We
had wonderful talented
people decorating the
tables and the food was
amazing. What else can I
say?"
The entry to the
armory glittered with a
six-foot crystal replica
of the Eiffel Tower and
inside the main hall the
magically decorated
tables sponsored by
local businesses and
individuals were as much
a treat for the eye as the J
extensive buffet was for
the palate.
There were 19 tables
decked out in an array
of colors and themes.
Persnickety and Lemon
Grass interiors created a
dazzler with a sequined
silver cloth and white
orchids. Beverly Coxwell
and Norma Hewell used
flotsam and jetsam
borrowed from the
Tin Shed to create a
nautical ambience. Joe
and Jeanette Taylor
used the Sampler as an
opportunity to debut
their new line of Made in
Apalach art objects and
the Green Door presented
a pair of light hearted arty
offerings.
Architect George
Coon's oyster themed
table was the talk of the
evening. An ambitious
garden table for eight


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
lim Kerley, president of Gulf Coast Community College, and his wife, Donna,
were among the distinguished diners at the 2009 Chef's Sampler.


designed by Amanda
Kollar of Garden's Inc.
dominated the center of
the room.
"I didn't have time to
be very creative, I just
went for elegance," said
Lynn Wilson Spohrer, of
the Coombs House Inn,
displaying her glittering
table themed "The Golden
Touch."
Serving up samples
in this year's event were
Apalachicola Seafood
Grill. AJ's Bar and Grill,
Blue Parrot Oceanfront
Caf6, Boss Oyster,
Caroline's Dining on
the River, Eddy Teach's
Raw Bar, Magnolia Grill,
Owl Caf6, Lulu's Sweet
Expectations, My Caterer,
Sunset Coastal Grill,
Tamara's Caf6 Floridita,
That Place In Apalach,


That's A Moray, Up the
Creek Raw Bar and
Verandas Wine Bar and
Bistro.
Beginning with pan
roasted grouper with
lump crab meat, lemon
thyme, corn and roasted
garlic from Caroline's,
diners could work their
way through crab stuffed
flounder from the Grill,
Apalachicola Bay chowder
from the Owl to ceviche
oysters from Boss Oyster.
There was silky crab
bisque from That Place in
Apalach, pickled shrimp
from Eddie Teach's and
killer chicken soup from
Cafe Floridita.
For those with a sweet
tooth, there were pralines
from Lulu's Sweet shop,
chocolate bread pudding
with bourbon sauce


T AR GRIL7


from That's a Moray
and a decadent key lime
margarita cake with
dark chocolate from the
Magnolia Grill.
AJ's brought a variety
of wings and dipping
sauces. Up a Creek
served tasty red beans
and rice to their first
Sampler. Suffice it to say
there was something for
everyone.
Grove said she wants
to thank everyone who
participated in this year's
Chef's Sampler held at the
Coombs Armory on Feb.
8. In addition to hours of
hard work by a number
of Chamber members,
seven students from
Cheryl Creek's Culinary
program at the Franklin
County Consolidated
School helped out with the
dishes and clean up. They
were Lakota Humble,
Russell Simmons, Maggie
Langston, Hannah
Schooley, Brianna Gordon,
Kiarra Tolliver, Robert
Henry, Savannah Salyer
and Asenath Thomas.


S CONVENTION
SERVICES CO.
______


Kacee Cruson of Caroline's on the River prepares
pan roasted grouper with lump crab meat, lemon
thyme, corn and roasted garlic, a new signature dish
that debuted at this year's Chef's Sampler.


Architect George Coon designed his table around
our local specialty, oysters.

ff;I M. wf~t^


Amanda Kollar lights garden candles
from a green umbrella in preparation
Sampler.


suspended
for the Chef's


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crackers and French Baguettes
SOyster Rockefeller Stuffed Mushrooms
Dinner Salad:
Seasoned Balsamic Dressing
Entrees:
* Chipotle-Honey Pork Loin topped with Tropical Mango Salsa
* Chicken Florentine: Baked Chicken breast stuffed with Spinach
and Cream Cheese topped with an Orzo Basil Cream Sauce
* Crab Stuffed Grouper topped with a lemon/line Bearnaise sauce
Prime Rib Au jus served with a horseradish sauce
Shrimp Tortellini Primavera: Sauteed Shrimp and Fresh
Vegetables Tossed with Tortellini and Alfredo Sauce
Sides, choice of two:
Rice Pilaf Stuffed Tomatoes
Duchess Garlic Potatoes
Squash Ratatouille
*Sesame Asian Green Beans
Dessert:
Tiramisu: Italian Coffee Cream Cheese Cake
Banana Walnut Bread Pudding with HazelnutCreamSauce


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Thursday, February 12, 2009


Local


The Times I A3


The Shriners are coming! The Shriners are coming


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN


The Shaddai Shriners of Panama City every year are the miniature car tail end of the Florida Seafood Festival parade.


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
At the Feb 5 meeting of the Carrabelle city commission, David Jackson, of Car-
rabelle, told the commissioners that the Shaddai Shriners of Panama City are
coming to town for their Spring Ceremony on Friday and Saturday, April 17 and
18.
Jackson, who is in charge of this year's ceremony, is one of 10 members of the
Carrabelle Shrine Club, all of whom belong to the Shaddai Shrine.
"Normally, the Spring Ceremony would be held in Panama City. I convinced
them to have it here and I want to show them up. We will probably have anywhere
from 150 to 200 Shriners and their families in town for the weekend," he said.
He said the Spring Ceremony is when new candidates are inducted into the
Shrine and is like an initiation.
The weekend will kick off on Friday with a ladies luncheon for Shrine wives to
be held at the St. James Bay Gulf Club.
On Friday evening, the Shrine will host a "Fun with the Candidates Night" at
the Carrabelle City Complex. This will be an adults-only event with food and a live
band and is free and open to the public.
On Saturday morning at 9:30 a.m. there will be a parade.
"It will probably be the biggest parade Carrabelle has ever seen. We have con-
firmed that units from Alabama, Florida and Georgia will attend," Jackson said.
On Saturday afternoon there will be a closed session when the last part of the
new member initiation will take place.
On Saturday night there will be a cookout at C-Quarters Marina. The dinner
will be open to the public with a cover charge.
"This will be an economic boon to the area," said Commissioner Jim Brown.
Ron Baas, treasurer for the Shaddai Shrine, said, "We are working with two
hotels on accommodations. We hope to fill them up. The entire Divan (ruling body)
of the Shrine will be spending the night. We also have people coming in from out
of state and I don't think they'll be down just for the day."
He said that the Spring Ceremony was last held in Carrabelle in 1998.
"It's been a long time since Carrabelle has been actively involved in the Shrine
but I think now they are coming back strong and we're glad to see this," he said.


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Opinion


A4 I The Times


I.


Thursday, February 12, 2009


Major victories


accumulating for


Apalachicola Bay


By Mike Sole
Special to the Times

Although efforts have
been lengthy and complex,
the state of Florida has
never wavered in its efforts
to protect the beau-
tiful estuary known
as the Apalachicola
Bay and River. This
ecosystem is known
widely as the south-
ernmost region of
an Apalachicola,
Chattahoochee and
Flint (ACF) River MIKE
basin that takes in
eastern Alabama and cen-
tral-southwest Georgia, en-
compassing 20,000 square
miles.
Two years ago and
in his first year in office,
Gov Charlie Crist hosted
a tri-state meeting of the
three states' governors in
Tallahassee. Although an
enormous amount of infor-
mation was exchanged and
good, high-level talks went
forward with the three
states and federal partners,
consensus was unable to be
reached on an operations
plan forwater management
and the needs of the Apala-
chicola River and Bay.
Meanwhile, Florida al-
ways has been confident
in the merits of its legal
claims. Now that all the
various lawsuits have been
consolidated in one court
before one judge, activity
during this past year has
picked up considerably and
continues forward:
February 2008: The U.S.
Court of Appeals in Wash-
ington, D.C., invalidates a
2003 agreement between
the U.S. Army Corps of En-
gineers, the state of Geor-
gia, Southeastern Federal
Power Customers Inc. and
a group of Georgia water
supply providers. The deci-
sion is a victory for Florida
in protecting water flows to
the Apalachicola River and
the ecosystem. The ruling
squarely supports Florida's
position that the Corps and
Georgia cannot agree be-
tween themselves to real-
locate storage in the Lake
Lanier reservoir for water
supply without Congressio-
nal approval.
May 2008: The same
court denies Georgia's peti-
tion for a rehearing.
Jan. 12: The U.S. Su-
preme Court denies Geor-
gia's petition to review the
two activities above; this
leaves the previous ruling
as standing in law.
These developments
and milestones represent
an enormous amount of
effort by lawyers and scien-


tists working to protect our
state's natural resources.
Just weeks ago, on Jan.
23, Florida and Alabama
filed a newjoint motion with
the judge hearing the now-
consolidated case. Based
on the legal activi-
ties above, Florida
and Alabama have
challenged the
Corps' operation
of Lake Lanier (a
federal reservoir)
solely for the benefit
of Georgia munici-
SSOLE pal and industrial
water supply rather
than the three authorized
purposes approved by Con-
gress: hydro-power gener-
ation, navigation and flood
control.
Florida and Alabama
have asked the court to
find that the Corps' actions
are unlawful reallocation of
storage in Lake Lanier and
that the Corps has imple-
mented its draft 1989 water
control plan, including its
"action zones" (regarding
the "triggers" at which the
Corps uses to supply water
out of the federal reservoir).
We believe these actions
are in clear violation of the
procedural requirements
contained in numerous
federal laws, including the
National Environmental
Policy Act, the Water Re-
sources Development Act
and the Water Supply Act,
as well as the Corps' own
regulations.
The city of Apalachico-
la, which made a decision
to devote resources to the
lawsuit back in 2007 as a
lawsuit participant, adopt-
ed Florida and Alabama's
motion and memoranda.
The court now has
scheduled oral arguments
on this motion in May.
Recent months in the
courts have reaffirmed
Florida's position, and we
appreciate our continued
partnership with Alabama
on comprehensively ad-
dressing these legal ques-
tions.
As we move forward,
the state of Florida remains
as committed as ever in
protecting this important
ecosystem, the water re-
sources, the Bay estuary
and the long-standing qual-
ity of life for the people of
the region.
To keep up with the ACF
issue and to receive oc-
casional e-alerts from the
DEP go to www.dep.state.
fl.us/mainpage/ACE

Michael Sole is secre-
tary of the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection.


Apalachicola
Carrabelle

T I
THE rME'

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
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The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


To quote a phrase, it's time for action


"I'm going to shoot from the hip"
(to make a snap decision in a matter
of seconds) in writing this article to-
day because I am going with my first
instincts and choosing to react quick-
ly about our given situations.
I have tendencies of "lol-
lygagging around" (to fool
around or dawdle, primarily
to avoid actual work or to start
other unappealing activities),
but there is no time to waste
or weigh possible options. It is
time to speak up and choose a TEMI
wise course of action for a de- WIN
sirable outcome. It is time to Stayin
get to work and do what might
seem unappealing, but what is
a very necessary task.
My experiences make it possible
for me to arrive at the proper course
immediately. That course is action.
Someone once wrote a story about
a starving man who, when asked did
he believe if he ate some food set be-
fore him, then he would be filled and
live, he replied, "Yes, I am no fool;
sure if I ate the food, I would live."
Well, he did not eat the food and
died instantly. That man's belief was
not enough; he needed to do some-
thing. That is what I write today: Our
belief is not enough; we have to do
something.
I know "I'm preaching to the
choir" (trying to make believers out
of people who already believe), but as
I said earlier, our belief is not enough.
You might say, "You're wasting your
time trying to convince people who
already agree with you instead of go-
ing out and talking to the people who
need to be convinced."


3
IT
g


Certainly, it is possible to "preach
to the choir" in a way that simply
wastes my time and that of the per-
son I'm speaking to in hopes some-
one else who is reading might know
they are not alone and maybe
become ignited by that fact.
I realize people who attend
meetings and read newspa-
pers are the ones who are
informed and doing. Many of
you wrote me and told me last
week's article was motivation-
LYNN al and inspirational. Maybe,
OHNS just maybe, in doing this, we
in Tune will enlarge the choir!
Maybe I'm just "a glutton
for punishment" (to willfully
take on difficult or disagreeable tasks
that might be very uncomfortable)
because I say to myself, why are you
so burdened with this? Why are you
so willing to put yourself out there
like this?
Then I look at the lives of so many
risk-takers like myself and say: "What
if this is the purpose of my life? What
if this is the only thing I was sent
here to do?" When we celebrated Dr.
King's birthday last month, I thought
long and hard on why him. Why was
he remembered in such a way? I
concluded it was because he chose to
fulfill his purpose. I am inspired by
the likes of Dr. King. No, not to start
another civil rights movement, but a
"knowledge" rights movement.
"No bones about it" (discussing
or stating something in a very open,
clear way, which leaves little room
for dispute or argument), there are
some people and things that have to
be exposed and confronted in order


for us to move forward. We cannot
"dance around the truth" (to avoid
speaking truthfully outright or to
evade truth by lying). We have to "hit
the nails on the head" and address
the issues.
"It really gets my goat" (extreme-
ly irritated) to have to "walk on egg-
shells," but I think it's time we take it
"to the hilt" (all the way), "the whole
nine yards," (roughly taken to mean
everything or all of it) or it will be
"back to square one" for us. Some-
times it seems like progress is on a
"slow boat to China" (usually means
that something is taking a very long
time).
Maybe we should decide to take
"the road not taken," even though we
might regret a choice in life or simply
wonder what would have happened
if we had chosen to make a differ-
ent choice at one point. On the other
hand, I might make a single choice
that will enrich my life and the life of
others tremendously, and that a path
I did take will "make all the differ-
ence" in a positive way.
"Through thick and thin" (de-
scribes pressing on through any ob-
stacle or sticking with something to
the very end) and "to each it's own"
(each person is entitled to his or her
own personal tastes and opinions).
So let us be on our way, "chop chop"
(hurry up and be about a specific
task).

Temolynn Wintons is a profes-
sional educator in Apalachicola, ac-
tive in directing youth activities in
her church and community. Reach
her at lynn@temolynnwintons.com


Letters to the EDITOR


Two cents on
the black bear
Dear Editor:
I would like to put my
two cents in about the
black bear in Florida.
I want you to know that
I am not as educated as
the scientists, research-
ers and biologist who
conducted these studies.
They used their higher ed-
ucation to get the power to
be, such as governors, leg-
islators and the FWC com-
missioners, to believe that
everything they reported
was factually accurate.
Walter McCowen, out of
the FWC office in Gaines-
ville, directed me to the
information I needed. The
last question I asked was,
"What number must the
bear population need to
get to for them not be clas-
sified as threatened?" His
answer: "We don't know."
All of the information I
read came from the FWC.
I was dazzled with com-
plex calculations explain-
ing why they placed bears
on the threatened list, but
some of the information is
a tad confusing.
The first report was
titled "Statewide Assess-
ment of Road Impacts on
Bears in Six Study Areas
in Florida from May 2001-
September 2003."
Pages 17-18 indicate
"that 2,129 hair samples
were analyzed using DNA
methods."
Page 20, titled "Bear
Population Estimates,"
states, "In total 23,887
hair samples were collect-
ed across six study areas
from May 2001-September
2003."
On Page 27, research-
ers state, "The Florida
black bear has declined
since the 1500s from
11,000 bears to 1,282 bears
in 1998." I could not locate


A female black bear looks on as her two cubs explore
last month on a tall pine tree outside Carrabelle.


records for bear census
dated 1500s.
Maybe if the other
21,758 hair samples of the
total 23,887 had been ana-
lyzed, the researchers may
have found out there could
be more than 2,042 to 3,213
bears in the study areas.
With 23,887 hair samples,
until all are tested, there
may be more than 20,000
bears in Florida.
Pages 54 through 59
show computerized maps
of the study areas in Flori-
da. This equals to approxi-
mately 2,400 square miles.
Florida covers about
54,252 square miles. The
FWC counted the bears
in about 4.4238 percent of
Florida.
Page 54 shows the three
year study area within the
Apalachicola National
Forest.
In this study, the FWC
calculated the black bear
total for Florida as:
A total of 2,042 to 3,213
bears in the Apalachic-
ola National Forest, Big
Cypress, Eglin, Ocala,
Osceola and St. John com-
bined.
Move up to Sept. 17,
2008 and Kipp Froelich's
report, FWC "Update on


the Black Bear Manage-
ment."
Page 4 is titled "Black
Bear Distribution in Flor-
ida."
A total of 2,042 to 3,213
bears were found in the
Apalachicola National
Forest, Big Cypress, Eg-
lin, Ocala, Osceola and St.
Johns.
Page 11 states "515
bears had been killed by
vehicles from 2003-06."
It's amazing that from
Sept. 2003 to Sept. 2008,
there has been no increase
or decrease in the popula-
tion of bears in Florida.
I have never wanted to
hunt bears and don't think
that I ever will. I feel that
if the numbers of bears
can be miscalculated, then
maybe deer, turkeys, how
about bream? They may
be next if a researcher
can't catch one in a river.
Scientists, researchers
and biologists have al-
ready done this with red
snapper and mullet. Hey,
how did they conduct the
census for red snapper
and mullet in the gulf?
The FWC needs our
help. Please e-mail any
pictures and all pictures
of bears that you may have


to the FWC.
Mickey Larkins
Bristol

Obituaries ought to
be posted
To the Editor:
I think the people of
Apalachicola should be
able to post an obituary
on the door of the post of-
fice. It was always a tra-
dition and I would like to
see it done again because
there are a lot of people
that look for that and half
the time they don't know
somebody's dead until af-
ter they're buried.
Faye Sharit
Former Apalachicola
resident

Editor's note: After an
inquiry made to postal
officials, the Times has
learned the U.S. Postal
Service plans to reinstate
the longstanding practice
of allowing obituaries to
be posted on the post of-
fice door Bill Tyler, postal
spokesman for the North
Florida district of the U.S.
Postal Service, said he
spoke on Tuesday to Shir-
ley James, who is serving
as temporary postmaster,
and to Cathy Watts, who
remains officially as the
postmaster but has taken
a temporary position in
Panama City as she pre-
pares for her retirement
March 31.
"It appears to be a local
option that the local post
office has determined has
been a customer service
issue," said Tyler. "It's
been a rule of thumb that
the funeral home would
post those and give out vir-
tual real time information.
(Both James and Watts)
are in agreement it's a pro-
cedure that should remain
in place and we'll continue
business as usual."


Legislative delegation hearing set for Apalachicola
State Rep. Leonard L. State Sen. Al Lawson these meetings is to bring up local
Bembry (D-Greenville), (D-Tallahassee), State Rep. issues and any proposed local legis-
chairman of the Frank- Jimmy Patronis (R-Panama lation.
lin County legislative del- City) and Bembry look for- To ensure full participation and
egation, has announced the ward to meeting with citi- accessibility for all meeting attend-
annual local public hear- zens and elected officials ees, according to the Americans
ing will be held on Feb. 19 in a town hall meeting to with Disabilities Act, please let us
beginning at 5 p.m. in the discuss issues of interest to know of any special accommoda-
Franklin County Commis- BEMBRY both elected officials and the tions you might require by calling
sion Chambers, 34 Forbes general public. Bembry's Tallahassee office at 850-
Street, Apalachicola. More specifically, the purpose of 488-7870.


* -






Thursday, February 12, 2009


Local


The Times | AS


TUMBLER from page Al


ST. VINCENT ISLAND NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE I Special to the Times
This picture is dated both 1932 or 1933 in the album at St. Vincent, but the
sleek lines of the Tumbler suggest it may be the late thirties. The Tumbler is in tow
of the Sinbad III, Wefing's motor yacht. There is no steam engine on the Tumbler
as seen here.


boxes mounted on the boat.
One, probably the older of
the two, was squared off.
The second is sleek and
round.
Sometime in the 1930s,
Elgin Wefing converted the
boat from a steam engine
to a two-cylinder, gas-fu-
eled, inboard motor. At the
same time the paddlewheel
was replaced with a small
propeller that did not clear
the base of the stern, pos-
sibly the same one that can
be seen on the boat today.
The propeller was designed
to push the boat through
very shallow water without
catching in weeds or de-
bris.
A letter from George
Wefing to Pam Vest, curator
of the former Apalachicola
Maritime Museum, states
that Elgin Wefing built the
inboard motor. The current
engine is housed in the front
of the Tumbler and connect-
ed to the propeller by a long
steel driveshaft to make the
flat-bottomed boat sit per-
fectly flat in the water.
"He could do things
like that," said Van Vleet.


school board and Peter
Brown both avoided men-
tion of the employee in-
volved.
But in his letter, Hale
names project manager
Casey Kelley as the individ-
ual who "admits the indis-
cretion" to Peter Brown.
At the time Kelley was
let go, Peter Brown did not
disclose his name. John
Stewart, Peter Brown ex-
ecutive vice president, said
only that "our client (the
school district) has asked
us to let them speak to this
issue and we want to honor
their request."
Hale's letter last month
said that Kelley "implicates
the owner of the company
whose name ap-pears on
the fraudulent invoice." It
also notes that Kelley's wife
"also works (or worked) for
this com-pany."
Hale's letter describes
the overcharges as being
for "a security system that
was never made a part of
the project."
In Sept. 2007, the school
district approved budget-
ing $956,500 for a state-of-
the-art security sys-tem on
the consolidated campus,
complete with 108 cam-
eras, digital video-record-
ing capabilities and card
reader access.
"Are we buying a Rolls-
Royce when we can get
along with a Buick?" asked
Chairman Jimmy Gander,
after Kelley first unveiled
details of the system. "My
main concern is we don't
buy a white ele-phant."
Kelley told board mem-
bers in Sept. 2007 that So-


"He was very mechani-
cal. There was a full-blown
machine shop in the back
of Wefing's store. They had
the craftsmanship and the
ability. That engine had a
unique firing system. Most
engines have a built-in igni-
tion.
This boat had a long pro-
peller shaft. About halfway
back, he put a cam on the
shaft and that was what
opened and closed the
points to fire the coil. The
coil was a set in a manufac-
tured wooden box. At that
time, they used that type of
coil on a lot of engines," he
said.
Later, Wefing made a fur-
ther change to the inboard.
He took it out and cut the
block in half converting it to
a single-cylinder engine.
Pictures of the 'Tmbler
from the early 1930s show
a peculiar raised housing
on the bow that was prob-
ably to accommodate the
two-cylinder inboard motor.
A picture from the late '30s
or early'40s shows the lines
of the bow returned to their
more aerodynamic original


nitrol, of Tallahassee, was
the low bidder, with Martin
Security Agency, of Apala-
chicola, as one of its sub-
contractors. Greg Williams
Electric, of Can-tonment,
and Martin Security Agen-
cy had also submitted bids.
In Hale's letter to Sand-
ers, he said that "Kelley's
misappropriation of funds
was not limited to this
$130,000 invoice and ex-
tended to other parts of the
school project; however,
the remainder of Kelley's
activities did not impact
the school board."
Hale noted that Peter
Brown had not lodged a
complaint with the state
attorney's office as of the
date of his letter.
Hale forwarded the
school board's forensic
audit to the sheriff's office
with the suggestion that a
crime had occurred. ""At
first blush it appears that
a theft has occurred and
the School Board and quite
possibly the State of Flori-
da are indirect victims in
this matter," he wrote.
Hale said that as a pros-
ecuting agency, and not
an investigative agency,
he was not in a position to
conduct an investigation
and said the sheriff's office
was better equipped to do
so.
"It's been referred to us
and we're in the process of
reviewing it," said Under-
sheriff Joel Norred.
He said he expected "a
protracted investigation"
given the amount of docu-
ments and interviews in-
volved in the case.


form. This probably reflects
the conversion of the motor
to the smaller one-cylinder
configuration.
The inboard engine was
water cooled and everyone
familiar with it remembers
the peculiar "poof poof
poof" sound it made when
it ran as bursts of water jet-
ted out of the stern of the
boat.
Elgin frequently towed
the boat behind his 37-foot
motor yacht, Sinbad. He
was the caretaker of St. Vin-
cent Island, property of his
family for several genera-
tions, and spent much of his
time on the island hunting
and fishing.
Spiro Buzier said the Sin-
bad was routinely docked at
the Gulf dock in Apalachic-
ola when Elgin was not on
St. Vincent.
The maritime museum
is in the process of build-
ing an interpretive exhibit
for the Tumbler. If you have
pictures or further informa-
tion about this boat, please
contact Lois Swoboda at
653-5857 or email Iswobo-
da@starfl.com.


SAILING from page A1

Sizemore were about 12, they had
sailboats. These were really old
wooden boats the boys rigged up
with makeshift masts and sails made
of chickenfeed or flour sacks. They
spent hours on the bay racing in
their boats.
Sizemore's boat was an old duck
boat.
One day, the three decided to
take their little ships for a spin. After
some discussion, they decided all
three would store their shoes in the
bow of Sizemore's boat because he
was a good sailor and less given to
cutting up than the other boys.
"We were having a good
time when the wind came along
and flipped me over," recounted
Sizemore. "All three pairs of
shoes went to the bottom of the
bay. The bridge attendant saw


ST. VINCENT ISLAND NATIONAL
WILDLIFE REFUGE I Special to the
Times


PUBLIC NOTICE

THE ST. GEORGE ISLAND PUBLIC BOAT
RAMP AND FISHING PIER WILL BE CLOSED
TEMPORARILY. THIS CLOSURE WILL BE-
GIN FEBUARY 1 AND CONTINUE THROUGH
FEBUARY 28 OR COMPLETION OF THE
REVEMENT.

PUBLICATION: FEBRUARY 5 AND 12, 2009.












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Date
Thu, Feb 12
Fri, Feb 13
Sat, Feb 14
Sun, Feb 15
Mon, Feb 16
Tue, Feb 17
Wed, Feb 18


what happened and he called
Dorothy Rolstad's daddy, Salvadore
Lichardello, who was working on
his shrimp boat. He came out in his
boat and pulled me from the water.
I probably would have been alright
anyway."
"Junior never forgave me for that
and he didn't let me forget it for
years. He said, when he got home,
he got the whipping of his life. His
daddy whipped the stew out of him
because those were brand new
shoes."
Sizemore's sailboat was
eventually lost to a marsh fire.
"I left it dragged up on the bank
and, when I came back, there was
nothing left but the outline and the
nails. That was the only boat I've
ever owned. Boats are like women,
always costing money," he said.


This picture
shows Elgin and
his second wife,
Eunice, seated
in the Tumbler.
Notice the long
Drive shaft. The
arched housing
.tV.on the bow may
have been added
to accommodate
the two cylinder
engine. Delores
Roux remembers
that when George
Wefing was a
child, his father
would seat him
under the arch to
keep him out of the
wind. This photo
was probably
taken in the late
1930s.








Temperature


High
70
680
68
64
64
650
650


% Precip
10%
40%
40%
30%
30%
40%
0%


TIDE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
Cat Point Minus0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03

APALACHICOLA
02/12 Thu 05:18AM 1.2 H 11:50AM 0.1 L
05:43PM 1.2 H

02/13 Fri 12:14AM 0.1 L 06:17AM 1.1 H
12:08PM 0.3 L 05:58PM 1.3 H

02/14 Sat 01:05AM 0.0 L 07:23AM 1.0 H
12:23PM 0.5 L 06:18PM 1.3 H

02/15 Sun 02:03AM -0.1 L 08:45AM 0.8 H
12:35PM 0.7 L 06:44PM 1.4 H


-0.1 L 07:17PM 1.4 H

-0.2 L 08:OOPM 1.3 H

-0.2 L 08:59PM 1.3 H


CARRABELLE
02/12 Thu 03:53AM 1.9 H 09:37AM 0.2 L
04:18PM 1.9 H 10:01PM 0.2 L

02/13 Fri 04:52AM 1.8 H 09:55AM 0.5 L
04:33PM 2.1 H 10:52PM 0.0 L

02/14 Sat 05:58AM 1.6 H 10:10AM 0.8 L
04:53PM 2.1 H 11:50PM -0.2 L

02/15 Sun 07:20AM 1.3 H 10:22AM 1.1 L
05:19PM 2.2 H

02/16 Mon 01:00AM -0.2 L 05:52PM 2.2 H

02/17 Tue 02:22AM -0.3 L 06:35PM 2.1 H

02/18 Wed 03:40AM -0.3 L 07:34PM 2.1 H


Sponsor the Weekly

Almanac Call:

653-8868


*I


FRAUD from paqe Al


02/16 Mon 03:13AM

02/17 Tue 04:35AM

02/18 Wed 05:53AM


--






A6 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 12, 2009


BUTTERCUP from page Al


body. Finally, I went back to
bed," Shiver said.
He said he got up the
next morning and started
searching the area in his
truck. Then his neighbor,
Henry Smith, called and told
him to come home. He knew
this was not good news.
Smith had investigated a
pond in Shiver's back yard.
He threw a hook in and it
snagged a rope. When he
pulled on the rope, Butter-
cup floated to the surface.
"My buddy and I pulled
him out," Shiver said. "We
noticed his face was torn.
The soft tissue from his
eye to his cheek was peeled
back. My buddy said a turtle
had done it but Buttercup
had only been in the pond
a few hours. He had to have
disappeared between 5:30
p.m. when my father-in-law
saw him in the yard and
midnight, when I went to
look for him."
Shiver thought it looked
like the horse had been in
a struggle. Then he noticed
blood on Butter-cup's fur.
On closer examination, he
found two small round holes
on the horse's neck. There
were exit wounds on the
other side. Buttercup had
been shot.
Shiver also found But-
tercup's hoof prints inter-
mingled with paw prints of
a large dog in an area near
the pond.
"I assume the horse was
attacked by a dog," said
Shiver. "Then somebody
shot it and threw it in the
pond to hide what had hap-
pened.
"The anchor had been
thrown way out in the mid-
dle of the pond to weight
him down," he said. "He
didn't fall in."
Shiver says there is a his-
tory of problems with dogs
in the neighborhood. There
are a number of dogs run-
ning loose on Ridge Road.
Michael Allen of East-
point said, "I can't even ride
my bike down the street
there."
Mentioning first that
he did not intend to accuse
anyone, Shiver brought up
a problem with bull-dogs in
the neighborhood. "They
run loose. They have killed


rabbits and chickens on my
property. They tore into a
rabbit hutch and pulled the
rabbit out in pieces.
"I called the sheriff's de-
partment when one of the
dogs, Jake, killed a hunting
dog in the street in front of
my house. By the time they
got there, Jake was tied
up and the deputy said he
couldn't do any-thing. Jake
killed a little brown dog one
street over. The people who
saw it happen thought it was
my dog and called me.
"We had problems with
the people who own the
bulldogs throwing their gar-
bage in the ditch in front of
their house. We called the
police. They came and sat
over there and blew their
horn but they couldn't get
out of the car because of the
dogs."

Reward for conviction
of Buttercup's attacker

Shiver is offering a $500
reward for information lead-
ing to the arrest and convic-
tion of the person who shot
Breanna's horse. He asks
that anyone with informa-


tion contact the sheriff's de-
partment and not call him.
While he is not happy
about the situation with
loose dogs on Ridge Road,
he said he feels some prog-
ress is being made.
"At least there's some-
thing being done now. Sher-
iff's deputies have visited
the scene of the attack twice
and Albert Floyd, the county
dogcatcher, came and spoke
to me. There's a lot fewer
dogs running loose now
than there was a week ago,"
he said.
"I don't believe in my
mind that, if the dog hadn't
caught the horse it would be
dead. It never would have
been shot. Everybody talks
about budget problem. Let
the dogcatcher pay his sal-
ary with fines. Let him start
picking up loose dogs.
"Buttercup is dead and
that didn't even rate an in-
vestigator. It rated a deputy.
Everybody said they were
appalled that this has hap-
pened. The deputy was real
sympathetic. He said they
had a problem with people
shooting two pet pigs too.
He said they thought it was
kids. He said they didn't


know what they could do
about it."
Undersheriff Joel Nored
said the attack on the pigs
occurred three or four years
ago in Carrabelle and there
is no reason to think it has
any connection with what
happened to Buttercup.
He said, "There is an on-
going investigation into this
matter. We are investigat-
ing whether dogs or other


BRAD SHIVER I Special to the Times
individuals are involved in
the horse's death. A deputy
did observe what appeared
to be dog tracks around
the pond and also observed
what he thought might be
bullet wounds in the ani-
mal's neck.
"There were no shell
casings or other evidence of
foul play found in the area.
It is very difficult to deter-
mine if the horse was actu-


ally shot without an autopsy.
We have had not reports of
anyone hearing gunshots on
the evening the horse disap-
peared."
Animal cruelty, defined
as intentionally causing
suffering to an animal for
personal enjoyment, is a
crime in all 50 states and the
District of Columbia. It is a
felony in 43 states including
Florida.
According to the Nation-
al Association of District At-
torney's, there is a definite
link between animal cruelty
and violent crime against
human beings. FBI records
show that the majority of
serial killers abused ani-
mals in childhood or adoles-
cence. Other studies found
that there were reports of
animal abuse in over 80
percent of homes where
child abuse takes place; 70
percent of Massachusetts
animal abusers also had
a history of violent crime,
drug abuse, and other prob-
lems; and every individual
ever convicted of sexual ho-
micide in Sydney, Australia,
had a self-reported history
of cruelty to animals.
If you believe an animal
is being abused, you should
report it to the local authori-
ties or visit www.pet-abuse.
com.
If you have any informa-
tion about Buttercup, please
contact the Franklin County
Sheriff's De-partment.


Eu

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HIGH-SPEED INTERNET 0 PHONE 0 TELEVISION


Different from word one'


BRAD SHIVER I Special to the Times
Brad Shiver, who raised mules as a child, fashioned this red harness for
Buttercup so he could pull a little cart for Breanna.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR A
LARGE SCALE AMENDMENT TO THE
CITY OF CARRABELLE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

Public Hearing of the
City of Carrabelle City Commission

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Carrabelle will hold a Public Hearing on Thurs-
day, February 5, 2009, starting on or after 6:30 PM., at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex, 1001
Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, to consider the following item, First Reading of:

The purpose of the Public Hearing is to receive comments and make decisions regarding the
above matter. The plan amendment includes changes to the Coastal Management Element of the
Comprehensive Plan no changes will be made to the Future Land Use Map.

ORDINANCE NO.: 438

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF THE CITY OF CAR-
RABELLE, SPECIFICALLY CITY-INITIATED TEXT AMENDMENTS TO POLICY 7.G.1
OBJECTIVE 1.2 OF THE COASTAL MANAGEMENT ELEMENT, OF THE COMPREHEN-
SIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN
CONFLICT HEREWITH AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

A copy of the Ordinance is available for inspection at City Hall. Members of the public are
encouraged to attend the hearing and be heard on this matter.

At this hearing, the City Commission will accept public testimony and will consider the adoption
of Comprehensive Plan Amendment 09-01

All interested parties are invited to attend the public hearing and comment upon the Plan Amend-
ments or submit their comments in writing to the City Commission. Further information con-
cerning the proposed amendments can be obtained from the City Clerk at City Hall, at 1001 Gray
Ave., Carrabelle, Florida, or by calling (850)697-2727, between the hours of 8:30A.M and 4:30
PM., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

Please be advised that if a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commis-
sion with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, such person will need a record of
the proceedings, and for this purpose such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the ap-
peal is based. The City of Carrabelle does not provide or prepare such record pursuant to FS.
286.0105.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a spe-
cial accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the City Clerk at City Hall,
at 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, or by calling (850)697-3618, no later than three (3)
days prior to the proceedings.

Any person requiring a special accommodation at this hearing because of a disability or physical
impairment should contact the City Clerk at (850) 697-3618 as soon as possible.

Keisha Smith
City Clerk

c I:


* I







SCARRABELLE APALACH COLA





PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, February 12, 2009 w ww.apalachtimes.com Page 7



Drake wants intense focus on district opener


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

The Franklin County Se-
ahawks should have one thing
and one thing only on their minds
Friday night.
Taking care of an opponent
that would rather go up against
them than their chief rival.
"We kind of take it as an in-
sult that Jefferson wanted to
play us," said Coach Fred Drake,
still pained and put out that the
district tournament folks in Jef-
ferson County relied on a coin
toss, via a telephone call, rather
than the more usual practice of
seeding co-champions in the dis-
trict based on total point scored
against each other.
"When I was told Jefferson
wanted to play us, I thought
we're going to give them what
they want on Friday," said Drake.
"That's an insult to us. We're kind
of fired up about that."
But, he continues in the same
breath, the Seahawks have to
take that insult seriously and not
look toward a possible contest
Saturday night against Maclay,
the other district co-champ.
"We can't look ahead. We've
got to be ready for Jefferson,"
said Drake, coach of a team that
went 21-5 in the regular season
(23 wins if you count pre-season).
Shutting down a Jefferson
squad that boasts of a franchise
player in sophomore guard Chris
Mays means putting in a special
game plan. "He'll see a lot of gim-
mick defenses that he hasn't seen
all year," said Drake.
"That's what your life waits
for," said the coach. "We played
20-some games to get ready for
this one game that means the
most. We know we're the better
team on paper; we just have to
prove it."
The Seahawks go into the
post-season healthy, buffeted by
five wins in a row as they eye a
berth in Lakeland.
On Feb. 3, the Seahawks trav-
eled north to take on FAMU High,
one of the elite squads in Class 1A
basketball that used to be year-
after-year a rugged adversary


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Freshman forward Carlos Morris goes up against Jefferson County in Jan. 16 action at home.
The Seahawks won that game 76-54 as Morris scored 19 points, and Coach Fred Drake wants a
repeat performance from his team Friday night.


for the Class 1A Apalachicola
Sharks.
But Franklin County, gelling
around senior center Deshaun
Winfield's leadership, shrugged
off FAMU Div. 1 senior star Alex
Williams, already signed with
the University of Mississippi,
and two Baby Rattler juniors al-
ready being recruited by Div. 1
programs.
Ranked no lower than seventh
statewide in Class 1A basketball,
FAMU spotted the Seahawks a
37-31 halftime lead before bust-
ing out a 22-15 third quarter to
pull ahead 53-52.
"That's our weakness the
whole year. We come out flat the
third quarter after we have big
leads," said Drake. "We have to
learn to dominate when we have
a team down."
The situation was complicat-
ed by Winfield having to sit out


the last two minutes of the third
quarter because he carried four
fouls. "That put a strain on us,"
said Drake. "We just managed to
get by with it. Arron Prince came
in and gave us a couple points
off of the bench. I knew Deshaun
couldn't play the whole eight min-
utes in foul trouble, so we ran a
stall in the fourth quarter."
The Seahawks came back to
eke out a 73-70 victory, a sweet
boost of confidence as Franklin
County eyes the cream of one
Florida division up from Class 1A
in the days ahead.
But a dismal shooting night
against FAMU from outside the
arc, a bleak 2-of-19, has Drake
serving notice that now is not
the time for fancy desserts, but
for the solid food of outsprinting,
outshooting and outhustling their
opponents.
"We're going to get away from


that three-point line altogether.
We've missed shooting it well all
year," he said. "It has to go in the
post. I'm not even authorizing
anyone to shoot the three but one
person."
The Seahawks closed the
season on the road with an 81-71
win against Panama City Mos-
ley, their second win against that
squad this year.
Winfield and freshman for-
ward Carlos Morris both hit for
26 points in that game.
Drake is hoping that the Se-
ahawks will rely on what has
brought them so far this year,
teamwork and careful play.
"I've tried to break it down on
their individual roles. This is not
the time to experiment on your
basketball," he said. "We're em-
phasizing the ball goes inside the
post, stay away from turnovers
and play great defense."


FEB. 3
AWAY VS. FAMU

FCHS 28 9 15 21 -73
FAMU 21 1022 17-70
SEAHAWKS: Deshaun
Winfield 11/14 2s, 0/3
3s, 3/6 FTs, 25 pts.;
Zan Simmons 4/6 2s,
4/4 FTs, 12 pts.; Carlos
Morris 6/8 2s, 1/7 3s,
3/4 FTs, 18 pts.; Jeremy
James 2/4 2s, 1/7 3s,
1/2 FTs, 8 pts.; Austin
O'Neal 3/8 2s, 0/1 3s,
2/3 FTs, 8 pts.; Arron
Prince 1/4 2s, 0/1 3s,
2 pts.
Totals: 27/44 2s,
2/19 3s, 13/19 FTs
Rebounds: Simmons
11, Morris 9


FEB. 6
AWAY VS. PANAMA
CITY MOSLEY

FCHS 1721 14 29 -81
Mosley 12 16 19 25 72
SEAHAWKS: Winfield
9/13 2s, 1/5 3s, 5/8
FTs, 26 pts.; Simmons
4/8 2s, 1/2 FTs, 9 pts.;
Morris 5/9 2s, 4/11 3s,
4/8 FTs, 26 pts.; James
2/4 2s, 0/3 3s, 1/3
FTs, 5 pts.; O'Neal 3/9
2s, 0/1 3s, 8/11 FTs,
14 pts.; Prince 0/2 2s,
1/2 FTs, 1 pts.
Totals: 23/45 2s,
5/21 3s, 20/34 FTs
Rebounds: O'Neal
13, Morris 11, Winfield
10


Take me out to Lady Seahawks fall in district tournament


the ballgame
The following are the
remaining games in the
month of February

2009 Seahawks
high school baseball
Feb. 12-13: Away at
Classic Tournament in
Bristol. First pitch at 4
p.m.
Feb. 17: Away vs. Port
St. Joe. First pitch at 7 p.m.
Feb. 20: At home vs.
East Gadsden. First pitch
at 4 p.m.
Feb. 26: At home vs.
Liberty County. First pitch
at 4 p.m.

2009 Lady Seahawks
high school softball
Feb 13: At home vs.
Wewahitchka. First pitch at
4 p.m.
Feb. 17: Away vs. Ma-
clay. First district match-
up. First pitch at 4 p.m.
Feb. 19: At home vs.
R.F Munroe. First pitch at
4 p.m.
Feb. 25: Away vs. Bay
High. First pitch at 6 p.m.
Feb. 26-28: Cougar
Classic at Godby. Oppo-
nents to be announced.

2009 Lady Seahawks
middle school softball
Feb. 16: At home vs.
Tolar. First pitch at 4 p.m.
Feb. 17: At home vs.
Maclay. First pitch at 4
p.m.
Feb. 20: Away vs.
Blountstown. First pitch at
4 p.m.
Feb. 23: Away vs. Port
St. Joe. First pitch at 5 p.m.


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

The Lady Seahawks varsity
girls basketball team finished the
2008-09 season just below the .500
mark, falling in the opener of the
district tournament in Jefferson
County on Friday.
The team fell 54-35 to eventual
district champion Maclay, ending
the season at 8-11, a respectable
showing given the struggles of re-
cent years.
"We had a rough start playing
a lot bigger schools," said Coach
Justin Long. "Five of our first six
games were monster schools. By
the time you come back from that,
you're fighting a losing battle. We


JOY CARRINO


ONEIKA MONET
LOCKLEY MORON


definitely played well against all
the teams that were our school
size and competitive level."
Long said the team's inability
to score consistently cost the Lady
Seahawks a shot to upset Maclay.
"We played really well. But at
the end of the first half, we fell


ANNA LEE


apart," he said. "We don't have
very many scorers and it hurts
us."
After they jumped to an 8-6 first
quarter lead, the Lady Seahawks
were down 26-13 at halftime and
were unable to make up the lost
ground.


MEGAN COACH
MCLAIN JUSTIN LONG


Sophomore guard Tasia Sim-
mons led the team with 9. Senior
guard Quanteka Croom, senior
center Khrystal Davis, freshman
guard Oneika Lockley and senior
forward Ashley Myers each scored
6 points. Freshman forward Me-
gan McLain had 2.


Sports SHORTS


Dixie youth
league continues
registration
The Franklin County
Dixie League is currently
accepting applications for
the 2009 season at three
locations throughout the
county.
Signups are at D.W
Wilson Sports Complex
in Apalachicola, Vrooman
Sports Complex in East-
point and Will Kendrick
Sports Complex in Carra-
belle.
From 6 to 8 p.m. Feb.12,
sign-ups will be at all three
locations. Sign-up will be
repeated on Feb.14 from
10:30 to noon also at the
three locations.
To be eligible for the


2009 season, your child
must be 5 years old be-
fore May 1. Participation
fee for the 2009 season
will be $40.
For your child to be
eligible to participate, we
must receive a completed
form and copy of his/her
birth certificate and non-
refundable participation
fee. Late registration fee
after March 1 will be $50,
no exceptions.
For more information,
call 653-9557.

Booster Club offers
spirit bus Saturday
The Seahawk Booster
Club Inc. is sponsoring a
"spirit" bus to the boy's
varsity game in Mon-
ticello on Feb. 14, con-


tingent, of course, on the
results of Friday night's
district tournament
opener, in which Franklin
County will face Jefferson
County.
The cost of the spirit
bus is $25 per person; how-
ever, you can receive a $5
discount if you board the


bus wearing a "Seahawk"
shirt.
Individuals must be at
least 18 years or older to
travel alone or at least 16
accompanied by someone
21 years or older to attend
the game on the spirit bus,
no exceptions.
Boarding will begin


promptly at 3:45 p.m.
and depart at 4:30 p.m.
from the Franklin County
school campus in front of
the gym.
Seating capacity of the
bus is 32, so to reserve
your seat, call 850-323-
0099. Limit two seats per
caller.


ABALACHIC 19k
STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561
U


NE





AS I The Times Local Thursday, February 1 2, 2009


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NE ~*I


Thursday, February 12, 2009


A8 I The Times


Local


Introducin













LIFE


TIMES


B
Section


Thursday, February 12, 2009 w ww.apalachtimes.com Page 1


DAVID ADLERSTE


By Despina Williams
S Florida Freedom Newspa-
4! pers

," : Long ago, an army
fr of Cupids roamed the
i. streets of Apalachicola,
minds fixed on a single
Their crept stealthily
-4 H' to the tront porches of
their best friends and
c '(sclhoolfmates to perform
1an annuaI I a valentine'ss Day
ntual
Beteore curtains parted
and t heir derds were
d(Isco'redI they gave a
(jilck knock and dropped
a caIl i ne card on the
Worc1h floor
The trick in this
\alentiie's Day
tnck-or-treat was to
n(Lt rLt caught red-




.o C that reverberated
throughout the city.
"Valentine!"
In planning
Monday's Trinity
Episcopal Church
Valentine's tea, Susan
Clementson was inspired
by the lost tradition of
"throwing Valentines."
She'd been among
a generation of
Apalachicola children
who took to the streets
on Valentine's Day
afternoon, delivering
7- ) cards to close friends.
c, a"Your mother
usually took you around,
and you had your box
t 1 -,. of Valentines," said
i Clementson, who can
still recall the proper
pronunciation of the
Feb. 14 greeting.
"You had to say it with
inflection, 'VAL-en-tine!'" she said.
With the help of her fellow Episcopal
churchwomen, Clementson crafted invitations to the
Valentine's tea out of construction paper, doilies and
candy hearts.
Clementson delivered the Valentines just as she
had in the 1950s by throwing them door to door.


Many longtime Apalachicola residents smiled with
recognition at Clementson's Valentine's surprise.
Though long dormant, the tradition of "throwing
Valentines" extends back at least 80 years in the city,
with children of pre-school and elementary school age
the chief participants.
Clementson's uncle, Harry Buzzett, 85, travelled
throughout Apalachicola by foot or on bicycle to
deliver Valentines as a boy.
"We didn't do it in school," Buzzett remembered.
"We went to the Catholic school and the nuns wouldn't
put up with that nonsense."
Like all of her school friends, Buzzett's wife, Cathy,
80, dressed in a festive Valentine's Day shirt on Feb.
14.
She delivered Valentines that she purchased at one
of Apalachicola's two 10 Cent stores.
"They had books you could get that had the little
punch outs. They had little doilies, things to make
Valentines with," said Buzzett, noting that they were
much less sophisticated than the Valentines of today.
"Mostly they were simple they said, 'Would you
be my Valentine,'" she remembered.
Buzzett's friend, Dorothy Hannon, 89, purchased
her Valentines for a penny apiece. "They were just
ugly Valentines," she laughed. "We thought they were
pretty."
Hannon, now a Port St. Joe resident, delivered
her Valentines accompanied by a posse of 10 school
chums, including Port St. Joe's late pharmacist,
Gannon Buzzett.
"We'd walk in the middle of the street," Hannon
recalled. "We had a good time. We had a wonderful
crowd, all about the same age."
An adult always accompanied the group on their
jaunts through the neighborhood.
"Usually the parents would send us with some
older person. We didn't know it was a chaperone, but
that's what it was," said Hannon.
Helen Quackenbush, 79, another Port St. Joe
transplant, delivered her Valentines with sister,
Dorothy Hill, and father, G. Rodman Porter.
The trio set out before dark on foot.
"It was nothing to walk in those days. Most people
didn't have cars," said Quackenbush, whose father
did not buy an automobile until after she departed for
college.
In addition to their Valentines, Hill and
Quackenbush carried oyster shells, which they tossed
at doors to get their friends' attention.
Quackenbush was always anxious to get back
home in time to surprise her Valentine-wielding
friends.
"It was easy to catch them because they came up
that long front walk," she said.
The tradition of "throwing Valentines" continued
with the subsequent generation.
During his time in the Army, Harry Buzzett, a
retired colonel, was stationed on military bases
throughout the world, and his children delivered
Valentines door-to-door wherever they lived.


Joined by Jan Thomas,
center, and June Dosik,

pours a cup of tea at
Trinity Episcopal Church's
Valentine's tea, held
Monday in the rectory of
Sthe Rev. Martha Harris.
Attendees received
Valentine shaped
invitations "thrown"
the old-fashioned
Apalachicola way.
IN I Florida Freedom Newspapers






INES

Quackenbush's daughter, Lynn Todd, delivered her
first Valentine at age three, and continued well into
her elementary school years.




Though Clementson always enjoyed throwing
Valentines as a kid, she abandoned the tradition
when she became a teenager.
She set her sights on loftier goals, like
receiving the prettiest box of
Valentine's candy from the
towering display at Buzzett's
drug store.
Drug store owner Johln Joe
Buzzett always set out the
candy in January, stackinn
the boxes on shelves behind
the soda fountain.
The candy stayed there
until Valentine's Day, with
shoppers reserving boxes
for their sweethearts in
advance of the big day.
"If you had a
boyfriend, you'd
say,'I hope he gives
me that one,' and
you didn't know
until Valentine's
Day which box of s
candy you got,"'
remembered
Clementson.
"We went from
throwing Valentines
in elementary school
to getting Valentine's
candy in high school."
Just as it is not
exactly clear when
throwing Valentines
became a trend in
Apalachicola, it's also not
clear when it ended. ,.
Many of the Baby Jg FOR
Boom generation threw
Valentines as children, but
their children are mostly
unaware of the tradition
The majority of those _
interviewed for this
article had not even ,. .
thought about throwing I"-
Valentines in decades.
Though Clementson
said she was not trying 1960s era
to revive a lost tradition
in throwing her Valentine Valentines courtesy
invitations, she had fun while of Mary Williams
it lasted. and Despina
"I felt just like I did when I George of
was a kid," she said. Apalachicola


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
This sign available at Garden's Inc. on Commerce St. is the work of Tallahassee artist Ann Hempel. A
small work of romantic art could turn this Valentine's Day into a memory that will last for decades.


Love locally

By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

Need a Valentine's treat or sweets for the sweet?
Think locally. The truth is you couldn't be in a better
spot to steal his heart or capture her fancy. For one
thing, this is the oyster capital of the world and
nothing encourages loving like those tasty tidbits
from the bay.
A dozen oysters, on the half shell, steamed or
baked is a great way to kick off a romantic interlude.
Papa Joe's, Oyster Bay Bar and Grill, The Blue
Parrot, Wicked Willie's and, of course, Boss Oyster,
all specialize in preparing oysters the old Florida
way. You can suck shellfish in a variety of settings
and at a range of different prices.
Want a fancier dining experience for that
particular girl or guy? Chef Eddie's Magnolia
Grill and Caf6 Floridita both have special menus
planned for Valentine's. "We're planning a heavy
tapas for that evening," said Chef Danny Itzkovitz,
at Tamara's. "We'll be serving lots of aphrodisiac
specials like oysters, asparagus, avocado and Viagra
glazed pork loin."
See LOVE LOCALLY B7


*


NE


C,;4 gaftaxyuot





B2 I The Times


Births and BIRTHDAYS


Anniversary


Dean's LIST


Happy birthday, Ruth
Varner


Ruth Varner will turn 92 on
Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2009.
Happy Birthday, Mom!
Nancy, Thelma and Buddy

Haven RyLee Johnso


Denim Johnson and
Timothy Custer would like
to announce the birth of
their son, Haven RyLee
Johnson.
Baby Haven was born
Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008
at 2:15 p.m. at Capital
Regional Medical Center.
He weighed 5 pounds
and 5 ounces and was 18
inches in length.
Maternal grandparents


Kelson Smith turns 6


..
Kelson Tyler Smith celebrated his 6th
birthday on Thursday, Jan. 8, 2009.
Happy birthday, We love you!
Mom, Hunter and Kylee

n born I


are Angie Johnson and
the late Pete Johnson.
Paternal grandparents
are Debbie Velasquez and
Otis Russell.
Great-grandparents
are Mary and Harvey
Daughtry, Jean and Billy
Lolley, and Faye and
Orlando Velasquez.
He is also the nephew
of aunt Jessica Johnson
Williams.


Happy anniversary,
Terri and Eddie
Terri and Eddie Woodall
will celebrate their 13th
wedding anniversary on
Saturday, Feb. 14.
We love you, mom and
dad!

Theresa, Daniel and Wade


Erica
Sapp
makes
Dean's
List
Erica
Sapp,
Eastpoint,
has been
named
to the
fall 2008
Dean's
List at Lee
University,
Cleveland,
Tenn. To make the Dean's List, students must
achieve a grade point average of 3.7 in a given
semester.
Sapp, a 2008 graduate of Franklin County
High School, is the daughter of Paula Sapp
and Jimmy Sapp.
She is a freshman at Lee University,
a comprehensive four-year liberal
arts university about 25 miles north of
Chattanooga. Founded in 1918, the accredited
Christian university has an enrollment of
more than 4,000 and offers degrees in 42
majors in more than 100 programs of study,
as well as 14 graduate programs.


Elizabeth Dantzler Butler of
Carrabelle has been named to the
Dean's List at the University of the
South for the Advent 2008 term. She is
the daughter of Eugenia D. and David K.
Butler.
To earn a place on the Dean's List,
a student must earn a minimum grade
point average of 3.625 on a 4.0 scale.


The University of the South, popularly
known as Sewanee, is an independent
liberal arts college on 13,000 acres
atop the Cumberland Plateau between
Nashville and Chattanooga and owned
by 28 Southeastern dioceses of the
Episcopal Church. It is consistently
ranked among the top tier of national
liberal arts colleges.


Sovere2fns o( Avenne g


Jerry Hall, as King Rex, and Dixie
Parhlnglon, as Princess Pearl, rule
over Ihe Habilal for Humanity s
Mardi Gras feslivilies Saturday
nighl The nighl .i .as less la..ish
than in years posi bul every bit as
raucous as the local chapter raised
money io complete is ilhird house
The crowd -as up orn Is feel for
Ihe music. v.,hich included Slim
Fatz. pictured at riqht, the Tale s
Hell Blues Barnd featuring guioarisi
Stephern Holl arnd vocalist Coandi
Roberison arnd guitarist Allen
Garry


A Call To All Vendors,
Coming March 5th, 2009





taste home

COOKING OL

#^5ptlng S&IiAnfto


FSU talk to address

invasive plants
The Florida State University Coastal and Marine
Laboratory will host "Ecological and Evolutionary
Misadventures of Invasive Spartina," the next lecture in
the lab's ongoing series of free public lectures on coastal
and marine conservation, from 7-9 p.m. today, Feb. 12.
The talk will be given by Prof. Donald R. Strong, a
biologist from the ecology and evolution department
at the University of California-Davis, whose research
includes salt marshes, biological control of weeds and
insect-plant interactions.
Refreshments will be served at the conclusion of the
lecture.
Overlooking St. George Sound in St. Teresa, the
marine lab is at the intersection of highways 98 and 319,
halfway between Panacea and Carrabelle.
For more information on future public lectures at the
Marine laboratory, visit www.marinelab.fsu.edu.









SILVER UEST
Weddings STUDIOS
Engagements
Senior Portraits
Children & Babies
Call today and ask about our Senior Portrait specials
850-229-9353
www.SilverQuestStudios.com


--^^yRntlCm an


Get on the Menu
Connct \\ ilh ic 111-C onuI and be part ol thi lul h :cl popular lli\c c\ cn
For dcliiil and morc inl rmldioln. call Niill Ht-olbrook (85i 1 258-4163


LET US H
CRIBS
HIGH CHAIRS
TENTS
DINNERWARE


ELP YC


a:.8


)U WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS!
TABLES WEDDING ARCHES
CHAIRS CANDELABRAS
LINENS PUNCH BOWLS
BEACH WHEELCHAIR CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN


2 H
E S.pitF


NE *I


Elizabeth Butler makes Dean's List


Thursday, February 12, 2009


Local


?J 'We, ebdiewv!!






Thursday, February 12, 2009


Card of thanks -


Eubanks Family


We would like to thank
Covenant Hospice and
a special thanks to Miss
Linda and Miss Dee
for the all the care and
compassion and the days
they made her laugh.
Thanks also to the
First Baptist Church of
Eastpoint, especially


Pastors Gary Kent and
Sonny Crosby. Thanks
to all the friends and
family for all the flowers,
food, and prayers in
this difficult time. A
special thanks to Aretha
Nowling.
The Family of Sallie
Mae Eubanks


Church BRIEFS


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Work camp inmates moved lumber that had been recycled from the dock at Veteran's Park (now Riverfront
Park) to the garden site, where it is being used to define the plots for the Food Pantry and the Charter
School.


Community garden


begins to spror

By Karla Ambos used to define the plots for the Food
Special to the Times Pantry and the Charter School. The
exterior borders of those plots were
What a month it has been at City outlined that same day.
Square Community Garden! If you The next step toward completion
haven't taken the opportunity to of those plots involves moving
visit the site, you really should. It topsoil within the quadrants, then
is, of course, a work in progress. placing more recycled lumber
Who knew change could look so around the interior borders.
good? Additionally, the installation of
The first and most obvious water taps began recently. If you
change in the landscape was the happen to see someone working
arrival of yet more topsoil. Then, at the site, stop and tell them what
within the past two weeks, raised you think about the project.
beds have been sprouting like The following is a partial listing
dollar weed. The garden can now of what remains to be done:
broadly boast a total of 14 beds. The completion of the rest of the raised
initial bed design was determined beds, perimeter fencing, gates,
by several able-bodied volunteers, and signage. Of course, planting
Bill Kollar, Andrew Kahn, George will begin prior to completion of all
Watkins, Charlie Kienzle, and those tasks.
Dieter Ambos. There has been a lot of activity
After completing the first three behind the scenes, also. The
beds, the work camp inmates steering committee has been
built an amazing nine beds in a meeting weekly since the first of
little more than a day. The garden the year to make sure that this
volunteers have been busy filling project comes to fruition in a timely
the beds with topsoil, as time and manner. Eindraising is an ongoing
weather permit. And, on a recent process; grant proposals have been
weekend, they moved lumber that written and submitted. You may
had been recycled from the dock have seen several members taking
at Veteran's Park (now Riverfront pictures of gardens and of people
Park) to the garden site. It is being admiring their gardens; these are


beds


necessary to support and document
the written proposal.
Collaboration with outside
resources is being investigated. A
couple of interesting ideas came
from one of these conversations:
trying to collect local heirloom
seeds from long-time gardeners
that may have been passed down
through families, and including
a Southern heritage vegetable
garden as part of the project. The
committee members are pursuing
both of these ideas. If you have any
interest or information about these,
the garden can be contacted by e-
mail at citysquaregarden@gmail.
com.
City Square Community Garden
will have an informational booth
at the upcoming H'COLA festival.
For those of you who have already
requested a garden bed, we would
like for you to stop by to see one of
the volunteers that day to complete
the paperwork for participation in
the garden. If you don't much about
this new project, this is a perfect
opportunity to learn and become a
part of this exciting development.

Karla Ambos is the chair of the
new community garden.


Obituaries


William Scott Lindsey,
53, born Dec. 29, 1955 in
Valdosta, GA and died Jan.
20, 2009 in Tallahassee.
He graduated from
Florida State University
College of Law in 1981 with
honors, and was a partner
in the law firms Lindsay
& Williams, and then
Boyd, Lindsey & Sliger,
in Tallahassee before
founding the Lindsey Law
Firm in Tallahassee in
2006.
He was a member
of the Tallahassee Bar
Association since 1984,
and actively participated
in the association's pro
bono program, personally
handling a variety of
family law and civil cases
at no charge for those
who could not afford legal
counsel.
He helped to finance
and redevelop the
riverbank area in
Carrabelle, and loved the
outdoors, often spending
free time on his boat with
friends along the Gulf
Coast and the St. Marks
and Carrabelle rivers.
He is survived by his
wife, Marguerite Suber
Lindsey, of Tallahassee;
daughter, Andrea Lindsey


Dr. Jackson McNeil


Barber (and husband
Mark Barber) of Villa
Rica, GA; stepchildren,
Miller Gay, of Broomfield,
CO, and Stephanie
Bubien, of Pensacola; and
grandchildren, Berkley
and Bryce Gay, and Shelby
Bubien.
He is survived by
his parents, Dr. William
Frederick Lindsey and
Mrs. Jimmie Moore
Lindsey, of Tallahassee;
sister Fredda Lindsey
Ellis, of Malibu, CA;
brothers Robert Burton
Lindsey, of Tallahassee,
David Moore Lindsey,
of New York City, and
John Brett Lindsey, of
Birmingham, AL; as well
as eight nephews and
nieces.
Family and friends met
in honor of his memory
at the Fellowship Hall
at Faith Presbyterian
Church, Jan. 24, 2009.
The family asks that
contributions be made
in Scott's name to the
Children's Lighthouse,
7771 Mahan Drive,
Tallahassee, FL 32309,
or to the Leon County
Humane Society, 413
Timberlane Road,
Tallahassee, FL 32312.


Dr. Jackson "Jackie"
Malcom McNeil, 75, Lynn
Haven, died Monday
morning Feb. 9, 2009, at
Satilla Regional Medical
Center, Waycross, GA.
He was a native of
Apalachicola, and had
resided in Lynn Haven
since his retirement in
1990. He retired as a
professor of business
education at Savannah
State College. He spent 25-
plus years as an educator
at the college and high
school level. He educated
students at Savannah
State College, Macon Jr.
College, Lenior Rhyne in
NC, Georgia Southwestern
College in Americus, GA
and Gulf Coast Community
College in Panama City.
He was a 1951 graduate
of Chapman High School,
served in the U.S. Navy
during the Korean War,
did undergraduate studies
at Troy State College,
master's studies at The
University of Mississippi,
and doctoral studies at
Auburn University. He was
a proud member of the F &
A M and Shriners, taking
pride in aiding children.
He is predeceased by his
wife, Mary Anderson Booe


McNeil and four siblings,
L. Fred Meyer, John B.
Meyer, Lena M. Gustafson,
and Conrad D. Meyer, all
natives of Apalachicola.
Surviving are his son,
John Anderson McNeil,
and daughter-in-law,
April James McNeil, and
four grandchildren, John
Anderson McNeil, Jr.,
Harrison James McNeil,
Mary Margaret McNeil,
and Benjamin Jackson
"Jack-Jack" McNeil, all of
St. Mary's, GA.
The family extends
a special thank-you and
blessing to all family,
caregivers, and medical
professionals that have
aided Jackson through
his fight with Alzheimer's
disease.
Services will be held at
Tinity Episcopal Church,
Apalachicola, on Saturday,
Feb. 14, at 11 a.m. Burial
will follow in Magnolia
Cemetery. The family will
receive friends on Friday,
Feb. 13 from 6 to 8 p.m. at
Kelley Eineral Home.
Funeral arrangements
will be jointly overseen
by Miles-Odum Funeral
Home, Waycross, GA and
Kelley Eineral Home of
Apalachicola.


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola 7 r/. ,


Sunday School 9:45 am i
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm y k1ib7e
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm 1' A l
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm ti l' Cl
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm ,, i
Nursery Provided during regular church services


Covenant Word to focus
on banishing cancer
Covenant Word Christian
Center, at 158 12th Street in
Apalachicola, will share an
Evening of Praise and Wor-
ship this Sunday, Feb. 15.
All are welcome to join
us at Covenant Word, be-
ginning at 6 p.m., for an
evening of praise, worship
and prayer, featuring local
voices. The Prayer Focus
will be that the spirit of can-
cer be broken off from this
region and from the lives of
individuals.
All donations will ben-
efit the American Cancer
Society's Relay For Life of
Franklin County.

Knights of Columbus to
host spaghetti dinner
The Knights of Colum-
bus, Bishop O'Sullivan
Council #1648 will hold their
annual Spaghetti Dinner
on Sunday, Feb. 15, at St.
Patrick Catholic Church, 27
Sixth Street, Apalachicola.
Serving will begin at
11:30 a.m. and continue un-
til all the food is sold out.
Price per ticket is $7, eat-in
or carry-out, and includes
spaghetti with meat sauce,
coleslaw, Italian bread and
iced tea.
The money raised is used
in our community to support
the charitable functions of
the Knights. For more infor-
mation, call 653-2100.

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


Trinity
EST. 1836
Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


Weems to host Gracie
Vaughn benefit
Weems Memorial Hos-
pital will host a benefit lun-
cheon for longtime employ-
ee Gracie Vaughn on Friday,
Feb. 20 at the hospital.
The hospital plans to set
up an outdoor tent, deco-
rated with festive balloons,
to help in offsetting the cost
of Vaughn's treatment for
chronic inflammatory de-
myelinating polyneuropathy
(CIDP).
The benefit will feature
boiled shrimp, fried fish and
barbecued chicken, which
includes side orders of cole
slaw, baked beans, hush
puppies and dessert. Plates
are available for a donation
of $10.
For more information,
call Jennifer Brandon at
653-8853 ext. 101.

Chosen Generation to
present musical service
The Chosen Generation
Youth Ministry presents
"Blacks in HIS-tory" and
"Marks of Distinction" Ser-
vice on Sunday, Feb. 22 at
the Love Center, in Apala-
chicola.
The service will be a mu-
sical dramatic presentation
and recognition of commu-
nity members whose efforts
have assisted with the ad-
vancement of the African-
American community.
Everyone is welcome to
attend.

THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


WELCOMES YOU

Church
of the
Ascension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave. "C" & 6th St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@gtcom.net

PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
MASS SCHEDULE

SATURDAY ................... .......................... 5 PM
SU ND AY ............................................... 10 AM
SUNDAY SPANISH MASS. ................................. 5 PM
TUESDAY FRIDAY ................................... 8:30 AM



The United Methodist Churches

of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5' St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Friday of each month
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672
Pastor: Julie Stephens
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis


Church


William Scott Lindsey


'"


The Times I B3






B4 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 12, 2009


County CALENDAR


Thursday, Feb. 12
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Luncheon and Informa-
tion Specials at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Noon. $3 do-
nation. Call 697-3760
The Florida Humani-
ties Council Series "Look
Where We Live!" returns


to the Dixie Theatre with a
program entitled "Percep-
tions of Paradise: How Art-
ists Have Helped Shape
Florida's Mythic Image."
Mallory O'Connor, author
and teacher, degree in
painting, American history
and art history, presents
this program. Admission
is free. Call the theatre at
850-653-3200 for more de-
tails.


PET OF THE

PET WEEK


Pepper, a 5-month-old tabby kitten,
arrived at the Adoption Center with his
three siblings four months ago. They are
all beautiful, affectionate, playful kittens
waiting patiently for a loving home.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more
details or visit the Franklin County
Humane Society at 244 State Route
65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the
website at www.forgottenpets.org to see
more of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend
for life, you not only save the life of that
pet, you make room for us to save the life
of one more abandoned dog
or cat!


Don't forget the Bow Wow Ball
at the Armory in Apalachicola on
Saturday, Feb. 14. Cocktails are from
6:30 to 7:30 p.m.; dinner is at 7:30
p.m. Tickets will be available at the
door. Happy Valentine's Day


Friday, Feb. 13
Apalachicola History,
Culture and Arts Board
meets at 8:30 a.m. at
Apalachicola City Hall. For
info call 653-8715.
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Coffee at
7:30 a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2
donation. Call 697-3760.
Bocce Club. Franklin
County Senior Center. 1
p.m. Call 697-3760.

Saturday, Feb. 14
Bob Milne's annual
concert at the Dixie The-
atre. Bob is regarded by
many to be the best living
ragtime piano player on
the planet. But he does
more than just play the
music, he brings it alive
with stories and anecdotes
from the barrel houses
and brothels this uniquely
American music sprang
from. Bob's shows are al-
ways full of laughs as he
puts the music into its his-
torical perspective. Bob's
tours in Japan have been
such fantastic successes
that he was designated a
"Musical Ambassador" by
the U.S. State Department.
Bob now enjoys a success-
ful career as a concert pia-
nist in concert halls, opera
houses and arena stages
from coast to coast. He has
published 10 albums of pi-
ano rags and boogies and
is an author of four books.
Call the Dixie box office for
tickets at 653-3200.

Sunday, Feb. 15
Bob Milne's matinee


We had a sad start for last
weekend. Our longtime friend
and neighbor, Henry "Bucky" Lee
passed away. Pray for
Bucky's eternal peace and
for strength for this family.
We will miss him.
Monday night was
the monthly meeting for
members of the Lanark
Village Association. Had
a good meeting and
our commissioner, The LANARI
Honorable Cheryl Sanders, Jim
was there. She gave us a
rundown on the budget crunch for
our county. The stretch in the village
is on the list for paving.
Our sidewalks could use a little
attention! After the meeting we had
a friend and neighbor trip and fall on
her way home.
The Soup and Sandwich was a
big success last Tuesday, lots of
support. Sheriff Shiver came to join
us. Thanks to all who supported the
lunch and thanks to all who helped.
Thanks to our sheriff; hope to see
you often.
For the senior citizens in the
area who need help with their


concert at the Dixie The-
atre. Call the Dixie box of-
fice for tickets at 653-3200.
Supporters of St. Vin-
cent National Wildlife
Refuge will hold annual
meeting from 2 to 5 p.m. at
the Indian Pass Raw Bar.
Agenda includes board of
director elections, refuge
update with Complex Man-
ager James Burnett and
guest speaker archeologist
Nancy White, a University
of South Florida professor,
discussing the long history
of human use of St. Vincent
Island. Lunch features
Gants BBQ. For more info
call 653-3904 or email sup-
portstvin@hotmail.com.

Monday, Feb. 16
Apalachicola Library
Board. Special Meeting at
5 p.m. at the Library. For
info call 653-8715.
Breakfast at Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30
a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2 do-
nation. Call 697-3760.
Computer classes at
the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Call Joyce Durham 670-
5951 and set up a time.
Billiards Club at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. 1
p.m. Call 697-3760.
GED classes are of-
fered at the Franklin
County School from 3 to 6
p.m. every week in Build-
ing 1100, Room 1105. Call
670-2800.

Tuesday, Feb. 17
Franklin County Com-


(N
/els


mission regular meeting
at 9 a.m. in the courthouse
annex. For info call 653-
8861.
Apalachicola Commu-
nity Gardens meeting at
6 p.m. at the Apalachicola
Bay Chamber of Com-
merce. Call 653-9419.
Apalachicola Commu-
nity Redevelopment Au-
thority at 5:30 p.m. at the
Apalachicola Bay Cham-
ber of Commerce. For info
call 653-9419.
Art Club at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. 2 to 4 p.m. Call
697-3760.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Dept. $1 / card.
Proceeds go to St. George
Island Civic Club. Call 927-
4654.

Wednesday, Feb. 18
Sea Oats Garden Club
meets at 11:30 a.m. at the
Carrabelle Branch of the
Franklin County Library.
For info call Arlene Oe-
hler, president, at 697-
9790
Card Club. Franklin
County Senior Center. 1
p.m. Call 697-3760.
Bingo for the Bus.
Chillas Hall in Lanark vil-
lage. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Call
697-9626.
GED classes are of-
fered at the Franklin
County School from 3 to 6
p.m. every week in Build-
ing 1100, Room 1105. Call
670-2800.
Apalachicola Traffic
Safety Team meets at 5
p.m. at City Hall. For info


call 653-8715.
The Dixie


Lanark NEWS

taxes, Darryl and Gordon will be at
our library every Tuesday from 1
to 4 p.m. to assist you. Darryl and
Gordon are the tax men from
AARP They will be glad to
assist you.
Wednesday night Bingo
for the Bus, Chillas Hall, fun
starts at 6:30 p.m. Everyone
welcome and we could
use some support from
Carrabelle, please!
EWS Had a great lunch
sh Thursday at the Senior
Center. Big crowd on hand to
enjoy it and visit with our friends
and neighbors. They could use
some more help in the kitchen. Talk
to Sue Reed if you can help out.
I hear that there was a good
crowd on hand to enjoy the
Valentine's Day Dance last
Saturday and the music provided
by deejay Ron Vice. I just know you
had a good time. Thanks for your
support.
Don't forget about the
Valentine's Day Dance at Chillas
Hall this Saturday. Fun starts at
7 p.m. when you walk in the door.
Better line up an extra pair of


Theatre


opens its 12th profession-
al season with "Visiting
Mr. Green," the story of
Mr. Green, an elderly, re-
tired dry cleaner, played
by David Poirier who wan-
ders into New York traffic
and is almost hit by a car
driven by Ross Gardiner,
a young corporate execu-
tive, portrayed by David
Caldwell. The young man
is given a community ser-
vice of helping the recent
widower once a week for
six months. What starts
as a comedy about two
men who do not want to
be in the same room to-
gether becomes a grip-
ping and moving drama
as they get to know each
other, come to care about
each other, and open old
wounds they've been hid-
ing and nursing for years.
Expect fireworks from
this one. The show runs
until March 1 with mati-
nees on Wednesday and
Sunday and evening per-
formances on Friday and
Saturday. Call the Dixie
box office for tickets at
850 653-3200.

Thursday, Feb. 19
Apalachicola Commu-
nity Pride meets at 6 p.m.
at City Hall. For info call
653-8715.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Luncheon and Informa-
tion Specials at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Noon. $3 do-
nation. Call 697-3760


dancing shoes. The Journey Band
will keep you hopping. See you
there!
Join us for lunch after church,
Sunday, for our covered dish. Chillas
Hall, at 1 p.m. is where you can
have a great lunch and fellowship,
right after Rev. George Briesacker
blesses the food.
Hope you make it to Chillas Hall
this morning, 8:30 a.m., because
the bus committee will hold a
bake sale and not only that, there
will be goodies on the counter
for you to enjoy. Supervisor of
Elections Ida Cooper will be there
to explain voter registration to
us, and field questions regarding
homestead exemption in the
property appraiser's office. She also
furnished the goodies.
Saturday, Feb. 14, at Chillas
Hall, from 8:30 to 11 am, the Lanark
Village Golf Club will have a
pancake breakfast. A donation will
be taken. Everyone welcome.
Be kind to one another and check
in on the sick and housebound.
Until next time, God Bless
America, our troops, the poor,
homeless, and hungry.


GULF STATE
Community
S Bank
www.gscb.com

Apalachicola Carrabelle Cra fordville
(850) 653-2126 (850) 697-3395 (850) 926-8338
SEastpoint St. George Island
(850)670 8786 (850)927 2511

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$50 Quarterly
Saves YOU $100 a year!
for residential accounts

Aloha Bugs Pest Management
Franklin County's ONLY LOCAL Pest control company
Call Lois at (850) 653-5857


IXIE

THEATRE


APALACHICOLA, FLA.
*Perceptions of Paradise February 12
"Patsy" A Musical Tribute by Margo Anderson Feb. 13
Bob Milne Ragtime Piano February 14 & 15
Visiting Mr. Green February 18 March 1
*Florida's Delicious History March 5
*Denotes Programs Free to the Public
850-653-3200 ~ www.DixieTheatre.com

COUNTY Hu titis NI


County hits record
cold for Feb. 5
On Feb. 5, the tem-
perature at the Apala-
chicola Airport plunged to
a record 23 degrees Fahr-
enheit. That broke the
longtime record of 31 for
this date, set in 1947. The
average low temperature
for February is 45 degrees
Fahrenheit.

Camp Gordon
secures Google
grant
The Camp Gordon
Johnston Museum in
Carrabelle has received
a grant from the Google
search engine through
the Google Grants pro-
gram.
The program helps
nonprofit organizations
promote their cause via
advertising on Google.
Google AdWords ads ap-
pear when users search
on Google, and when
someone clicks on one,
they are brought to the
Web site being advertised,
which in this case is www.
campgordonjohnston.com.


When Google users
search on keywords re-
lated to an organization
such as the museum, an
ad appears next to rel-
evant Google search re-
sults under the Sponsored
Links sections. Museum
director Linda Minichello
said the museum pro-
vided Google with a long
list of keywords when
they applied for the grant,
including phrases like
"world war" and "fishing
village."
Because this is an in-
kind grant, Google will
not contribute funds to
the museum.
"We will be able to
do fundraising through
Google for our future mu-
seum," Minichiello said.
"People who want to do-
nate money will be able to
give through their charge
card over the Internet,
and since we have the
grant, there will be no cost
to us. Otherwise we would
have to pay a percentage.
The executive board will
meet to discuss our fund-
raising strategy."
Using a Google grant
account, museum work-


ers also will be able to
review the performance
statistics of the ad cam-
paign and see the number
of times an ad is viewed.
"Fundraising was the
main reason we applied
for the grant. We were
thrilled to death to get the
publicity that's going to go
with it," Minichiello said.
She said she plans on
activating the account
this week, which must
be done before the ad for
Camp Gordon Johnston
will appear on the Google
Web site.

School, library
honored as partners
The Capital Area Com-
munity Action Agency
honored two Franklin
County institutions at its
annual volunteer recogni-
tion dinner Jan. 28 at the
Ramada Inn Hotel in Tal-
lahassee.
The Franklin County
School District won the
Outstanding Education
Partner award for provid-
ing space to place porta-
ble classroom and use of
facilities for the agency's


Head Start.
The Franklin County
Public Library was the re-
cipient of the Outstanding
Community Partner for
their classroom time at
Head Start, reading good
books to the children and
training parents on use of
the library.
The Zonta Club of Talla-
hassee won the Outstand-
ing Community Partner of
the year for creating the
Keys in Her Hand Service
Project to help single, fe-
male- headed households
with training, employ-
ability skills, financial lit-
eracy, mentoring, and job
shadowing. The mission
of Zonta International and
Zonta Club of Tallahas-
see, a professional wom-
en's service organization,
is to improve the status
of women in communities
throughout the world.
RiverTown Church in
Blountstown partnered
with the agency by provid-
ing monthly funding to as-
sist low-income residents
to meet their utility bill.
They were honored as the
Outstanding Faith-based
Partner.


*I


News BRIEFS


'V






Thursday, February 12, 2009


Local


The Times I BS


Franklin County School

HONOR ROLL


DEBRA ELLIOTT I Contributed photo
Attending the Reading by the Bay conference were, front row, from left, Cassandra Davis, Tara Ward,
Stacey Herrington, Traci Moses, Brittanie Thompson, Lena Allen, Karen Ward, Jennifer Vaughn and
Tanya Joanos. Seated are Kathy Varnes and Beth Childress. Not pictured are Whitney Martina, Heather
Friedman and Lindsay Bockelman.


ABC teachers attend Reading by the Bay


Teachers from Apalachicola
Bay Charter School attended the
24th annual Reading by the Bay
conference, "Fiesta of Reading," on
Jan. 31 in Panama City.
Each year, the Bay County
Reading Association presents
the Bob McSpadden Award to
the county outside of Bay County
that has the highest number of
registrants at the conference. This


year, the award was presented to
the ABC School. Previous winners
were Gadsden County in 2006 and
Jackson County in 2007 and 2008.
The keynote speaker was Dr.
Roger C. Farr. He has written
several national and state
standardized tests and discussed
the validity of them. He was very
energetic and inspiring. There were
many other excellent speakers


and presenters on a variety of
topics including Willie Spears, a
motivational speaker. He spoke
on "Reaching the Unreachable
Student." Also, April DeCesare
gave a presentation on "Smart
Centers" and "Writing Portfolios."
All of the teachers enjoyed the
conference and learned a great
deal that can be brought back to
their classrooms.


Franklin County School
would like to congratulate
the following students for
achieving all A's for the first
semester of the 2008-09
school year:

Middle school
7th grade: Laura
Gallegos
8th grade: Carla Lewis

High school
9th grade: Tiffany Varnes
and Jessica Dempsey
10th grade: Shelby
Shiver, Kaleigh Harper,
Isabel Pateritsas, Ashley
Moseley and Breanna Cook
llth grade: Kendyl
Hardy and Russell
Simmons
12th grade: Alana
Hutchins, Jami Giametta,
Derek Salyer, Paula Cheree
Whiddon and Zachary Ward

Franklin County School
would also like to commend
the following students for
earning all As and Bs for
the 1st semester grade:

Middle school
6th grade: Morgan
Martin, Bria Walker,
Summer Medley, Macey
Hunt, Zoie Lance,
Tressie Buffkin, Aaliyah
West, Samantha Hand,
Erin Riley, Samantha
Marxsen, Chance McLead,
Curtis Gordy and Julie
Diestelhorst


7th grade: Selina Kahn,
Deborah Dempsey, Austin
Martina, Cynthia Duncan
and Leonard Ward
8th grade: Katie Wood,
Chena Segree, Kyndyl
Schoelles, Miranda Pilger,
Morgan Kelley, Taylor
Herrington, Chelsea Cash
and Stephanie Marxsen

High school
9th grade: Kristine
Thompson, Jordan King,
Caroline Campbell,
Deanna Quick, Tanner
Klink, Carli Klink, Sami
Coulter, Chance Buffkin,
Adreenah Wynn, Megan
Newell, Emerald Norris,
Anne Marie Brown, Adrian
Hendels, Maranda Moses
and Cierra Russell
10th grade: James
Winfield, Nai'Kycia Mitchell,
Lakota Humble, Nicholas
Koch, Jessica Galloway,
Robbie Dale Butler, Tiffany
Carroll, D'Andre Robinson,
Lenanya Morris, and
Jimmy Goggins
llth grade: Josh Dooley,
Shelby Nowling, Jessica
Velasquez, Miranda
Kilbourn, Cecillia James,
Damien Davis, Dustin
Putnal, Maranda Coatney
and Heather Kemper
12th grade: Chelsea
Soderholm, Angie Ochala,
Andre McQueen, Tomilee
Dowden, Katrisha Williams,
Tevin Ray, Elodie Pierdona,
Patrick Jones and Whitley
Wilson


Apalachicola watershed

to highlight UF symposium


The University of Flor-
ida College of Design,
Construction and Plan-
ning will host the National
Academy of Environmen-
tal Design's Water and
Sustainability Symposium
Feb. 16-17.
The symposium will
bring academics and pro-
fessionals together with
scientists and engineers
to identify needed legisla-
tion and other action for
reducing water demand
and improving water flow
and quality.
The two days of discus-
sions will address how
patterns of human settle-
ment, cities and their
infrastructure and build-
ings and their plumbing
have changed the historic
quantity and quality of wa-
ter flow.
The Apalachicola wa-
tershed will be used as an
exemplary case study. This
watershed and its rivers
extend from North Geor-
gia and eastern Alabama
into Florida and discharge
into the Gulf of Mexico.
Rapidly growing urban
areas in the watershed,
including the Atlanta met-
ropolitan area, are plac-
ing increased pressure on
the finite available water
supply and diminishing
water quality. The result
is increased competition


among the region's hu-
man populations, natural
systems, and energy and
agricultural interests.
The National Academy
of Environmental Design
gathers experts in the
environmental design dis-
ciplines to discuss critical
sustainability issues and
give advice to government
and to the public.
The UF symposium is
part of a series the acad-
emy has planned for 2009
at major research univer-
sities to identify the coun-
try's key sustainability
issues and make recom-
mendations for further re-
search and Congressional
action.
"We are privileged
to sponsor this national
gathering of experts from
academic and professional
backgrounds focusing on
the critical issue of water
use," said Peggy Carr, the
college's associate dean for
undergraduate students
and academic affairs. "All
the decisions we make in
the built environment from
land use to plumbing fix-
tures affects the quality of
human life and the health
of natural systems. It's
time for the design com-
munity to become a major
contributor in determining
responsible strategies for
water use."


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Investment advisory services offered through Famsley Financial Consultants, LLC,
A Registered Investment Advisor.


GULF BEACH DRIVE PROJECT #7.078
S.C.O.P PROJECT

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person,
company or corporation interested in constructing:
GULF BEACH DRIVE S.C.O.P. PROJECT
Project is located in Franklin County, Florida and consists of approximately 33,500 linear feet of roadway
resurfacing, shoulder work, and striping.
Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
(850) 277-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes.
All bidders shall be FDOT qualified per Section 2-1 of the FDOT Standard Specifications for Road and
Bridge Construction, latest edition.
Completion date for this project will be 120 days from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the
successful bidder.
Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $250.00 per day.
Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for the "Gulf Beach Road S.C.O.P. Project".
Bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. (EDT), on March 2nd, 2009, at the Franklin County Clerk's Office,
Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320-2317, and will be
opened and read aloud on March 3rd, 2009 at the County Commission meeting at 34 Forbes Street, Apala-
chicola, FL.
Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $45.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made
payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC.
The Board of County Commissioners reserved the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or
reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Franklin
County. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening.
All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regu-
lation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida.
If you have any question, please call Clay Kennedy at (850)227-7200.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS-00010

~*


REACHING OUT TO
WOMEN'S HEARTS





















LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
To raise awareness among local women
that heart disease is their No. 1 health
threat, Franklin County Health Department
organized a Heart Health Expo from 8-10
a.m. Feb. 6 at the Apalachicola Fitness
Center. Visitors were able to look at models
of the heart and arteries, pick up brochures
and take home a Healthy Heart Kit.
"Our Heart Health Expo is a great
opportunity to reach out to women in
our community and alert them to their
personal risk factors for heart disease," said
Nadine Kahn, the county's health educator
consultant, pictured above. "By joining
together, we can raise awareness locally
about heart disease and help lead women
on the path to prevention."


NOTICE TO BIDDERS

The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will be accepting separate sealed
Request for Proposals for the following:
WILL S. KENDRICK SPORTS COMPLEX TENNIS COURT PROJECT
Specifications are on file in the office of the Franklin County Board of County Commis-
sioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320.
Proposals must be received in the office of the Franklin County Clerk of the Court 33
Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 by 4:30 P.M., EST, on March
2, 2009. Each proposal must be sealed and clearly labeled. The sealed proposals will
be publicly open and read aloud at 10:30 A.M. EST, on March 3, 2009, in the County
Commission Meeting Room located in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. For
further information, contact Nikki Millender, Coordinator Franklin County Parks &
Recreation Department, at (850) 653 8277. Email: fcprd@fairpoint.net
Bidder shall provide an original and one copy of each proposal in a sealed envelope
of container, plainly marked "WILL S. KENDRICK SPORTS COMPLEX TENNIS
COURT PROJECT".

The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all proposals.
ATTENTION BIDDERS: Franklin County is an equal opportunity employer and en-
courages participation by certified minority enterprises and women's business enter-
prises.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA
JOSEPH PARRISH, CHAIRMAN

':






B6 I The Times


Local


County unemployment continues to rise


Franklin County's unem-
ployment rate continued its
steady rise since last sum-
mer, topping 5.6 percent
last month, two percentage
points worse than one year
ago.
According to preliminary
labor market statistics re-
leased Jan. 23 by the Florida
Agency for Workforce Inno-
vation, 264 people out of a
county labor force of 4,707
were jobless in December.
A month earlier, in No-
vember, the labor force was
larger, with 4,755 people, and
the jobless rate was lower,
at 5.3 percent, as 254 people
were without jobs.
December's numbers
were 2 percentage points
worse than a year ago, when
the county's jobless rate
was at 3.6 percent, with 169
people unemployed out of a


smaller labor force of 4,683.
Still, the county is among
the better for jobless num-
bers among Florida's 67
counties. Last month Frank-
lin ranked fifth, just behind
Liberty County at 5.0 per-
cent, Alachua's 5.2 percent,
Leon's 5.4 percent and Sum-
ter's 5.5 percent.
The state unemployment
rate last month was 8.1 per-
cent, seven-tenths of a point
higher than the November
rate of 7.4 percent and up 3.6
percentage points from one
year ago.
Florida's unemployment
rate nearly 1 percentage
point worse than the na-
tional rate of 7.2 percent is
the highest since Sept. 1992,
when the rate was 8.9 per-
cent.
"Every day the people of
our agency are touching the


lives of hundreds of thou-
sands of Floridians seeking
assistance in weathering
these challenging econom-
ic times," said Monesia T.
Brown, director of the Agen-
cy for Workforce Innovation.
"We are encouraged by the
many efforts of our state and
local partners as together
we pursue federal funding
and generate new job oppor-
tunities to advance Florida's
economy."
The Florida Legislature
recently approved an eco-
nomic stimulus plan pro-
posed by Governor Crist
that provides $10 million in
loans and support services
for businesses of 10 to 50 em-
ployees. The stimulus plan
will help create long-term
growth through capital pur-
chases, employee training
and salaries for new jobs.


Thursday, February 12, 2009


Students crash at entrance to consolidated school


A two-car crash Friday af-
ternoon on the entrance road to
Franklin County High School sent
four students to the hospital with
minor injuries.
According to the Florida High-
way Patrol report prepared by
Trooper S. T. Wilson, Kylie Erickson,
16, was leaving the school grounds
with passenger Jessie Hicks, 16, in
a 2005 Chevy four-door at about 2:54
p.m.
Wilson said Erickson was trav-
eling southbound in excess of the
posted speed limit of 15 miles per
hour when she failed to negotiate
the curve.


The right front of her vehicle
struck the left front of a 1995 Chevy
Suburban driven by Glenn Rich-
ards, 19, with passenger Bo Hard-
man, 17, headed northbound into
the school grounds.
Erickson's vehicle continued in
a southerly direction and struck
the black chain link fence. The im-
pact caused Richards' vehicle to
be knocked on to the east shoulder,
also striking the fence. Both ended
up facing south on the east shoul-
der of the entrance to the Franklin
County School, Wilson said.
"It was one heck of a smack,"
said the trooper. "I have no ideas


why she was going that fast. She
didn't negotiate that curve and
went straight and nailed him on
that curve."
All four individuals were trans-
ported to Weems Memorial Hospi-
tal and treated for minor injuries.
The trooper said Monday he
planned to cite Erickson for care-
less driving. He said that based
on what hospital staffers told him
about the nature of her injuries, he
concluded that Erickson was not
wearing a seatbelt. He said he did
not know for certain whether the
other individuals involved in the
crash were wearing seatbelts.


TR A


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FWC Fish and Wildlife

REPORT


FWC enforces
deer, duck and
oystering rules

Officers with the Flori-
da Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission
last month enforced rules
regarding unlawful hunt-
ing practices of deer and
ducks, along with several
oystering violations.
On Jan. 18, Officer
Steven Cook received a
complaint of an antler-
less deer being killed in
the Tate's Hell Wildlife
Management Area. The
complainant described
the hunter's vehicle and
Cook located the antler-
less deer, and within a
short period of time also
located the hunter.
The hunter admitted to
shooting the deer and was
issued a misdemeanor ci-
tation. His firearm was
seized.
On Jan. 23, Officer
Carmon Brownell re-
ceived a complaint in
reference to a pair of in-
dividuals harvesting oys-
ters from a closed oyster
bar in Apalachicola Bay.
Brownell located the two
harvesters "hogging"
(harvesting by hand) oys-
ters on the closed oyster
bar, but due to the size of


Brownell's vessel, he was
unable to approach the
harvesters in the shallow
water.
When the harvesters
recognized the patrol ves-
sel, they immediately fled
to the shore where they
loaded their oysters into a
vehicle and left the area.
With assistance from the
Franklin County Sheriff's
Department, the harvest-
ers were stopped and
directed to an area boat
ramp where Brownell was
waiting.
The harvesters were
issued six misdemeanor
citations for oystering in
closed waters, no saltwa-
ter products license and
no Apalachicola Bay oys-
ter harvest permit. The
harvester's eight bags of
oysters were seized and
returned to the water
alive.
On Jan. 25, Officers
Woody Cook and Steven
Cook were working in
the area of Lanark Reef
when an inspection of
three duck hunters re-
vealed several violations.
The hunters were issued
three citations and three
warnings for no non-resi-
dent hunting license, pos-
session of lead shot and
hunting migratory birds
with unplugged shotguns.


( Always online
www.apalachtimes.com


NE *I


FREE TAX HELP AVAILABLE
IN CARRABELLE ON TUESDAYS

The AARP Tax-Aide will be serving taxpayers in and around
Carrabelle, on Tuesdays from 1 to 4 p.m., at the Carrabelle
branch of the Franklin County Library.
Volunteers will provide information and assistance and prepare
income tax returns for low- and middle-income taxpayers,
with special attention to those age 60 and older. All
Tax-Aide volunteers have been trained and certified by the Internal
Revenue Service and AARP.
Please bring with you a valid picture I.D., and Social Security
numbers for the taxpayer and all dependents, all W-2 forms,
all 1099 forms showing interest, dividends, and Social Security
and other retirement income, plus sales and original purchase
information from any assets sold.
Taxpayers should also bring 1099 MISC forms showing any
miscellaneous income for 2008, all forms showing any federal
income tax paid, evidence of property taxes paid, evidence of
any Economic Stimulus Payment received in 2008, dependent
care information (name, address, employer ID or SSN), all
receipts, cancelled checks and other supporting documents if
itemizing deductions.
A copy of last year's tax returns) would be helpful.
If you have questions, please call Darrel Acker at
850-349-9593.


IPea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417


,,


I I I.. -


9F


I






Thursday, February 12, 2009


Local


The Times I B7


A plate of
fresh shucked
Apalachicola
oysters
makes a
perfect
Valentine's
Day snack.




LOIS SWOBODA I The Times


LOVE LOCALLY from page B1


Valentine's Day at the
Magnolia Grill will feature
live music by Alan Gary
and Carol Harris. Specials
for the evening include
roast rack of lamb with
rosemary dijon and mint
jelly, quail stuffed with
peanuts and currants,
oysters Rockefeller and
prime rib. Reservations
are suggested.

Valentine's Day
Babysitting Service
Wondering what to
do with the kids? The
eighth graders at the
Apalachicola Bay Charter
School can help. They are
offering a Valentine's Day
babysitting service for
children ages two through
ten at the First United
Methodist Church in
Apalachicola from 6 to 10
p.m. The first child is $12
per family and the charge
is $8 for each additional
youngster. Kids will
participate in supervised
games and watch movies.
Call Heather Friedman
at 653-1222 for more
information or email
friedmanabc@ gmail.com.
Want to try something
a little different? How
about attending a partner
massage workshop at
the Waterstreet Hotel?
There will be full day
sessions on both Saturday
and Sunday. Not into a
group experience? How
about a gift certificate for
a massage from a local
therapist like Hollie Stott
or Riverfront Massage?
Local salons and tanning
studios also offer gift
certificates. Le Debut
offers a variety of facials,
manicures and pedicures
and will even tint your
eyebrows for the gift that
keeps on giving.
The Lazy Daisy,
Bayside Gallery and the
Seahorse Florist and
Gift Shop are all offering
specials for the big day and
make a great alternative
to online floral delivery
services for petals with
a personal touch. Chef
Jeanine at That's a
Moray is preparing heart-
shaped cookies, chocolate
dipped strawberries
and cheesecake on a
stick. Garden's Inc. has
heart-shaped topiaries in
stock. Artemis is offering
heart-shaped sterling
silver pendants created
by renowned local jeweler
Kristin Anderson.
Many local businesses,
including the Apalachicola
Chocolate Company, the
Honey Hole, the Stuffed


Owl and Riverlily can
make up a gift basket at a
moment's notice designed
to tickle the fancy of your
mate whatever their
special interest may be.
Riverlily has All You Need
is Love soap in stock for
the occasion.
Romantic Retreats and
Nights on the Town
Perhaps a romantic
retreat is in order. The
Witherspoon Inn, The
Bryant House and the
Coomb's Inn all offer
cozy honeymoon suites
for an evening's intimate
diversion. Jasmine by
the Sea plantation and
butterfly garden in
Carrabelle is another spot
that specializes in romance
with a honeymoon suite
available for short or
long term rentals and a
private beach. Fickling
Vacation Rentals on St.
George Island is offering
a 10 percent discount for
Feb. 13 and 14 for available
beach homes so why not
spend a dreamy weekend
at the beach?
In the mood for some
entertainment? Margo
Anderson will appear at
the Dixie Theatre on Feb.
13 in "Patsy," her musical
tribute to songstress Patsy
Cline. You can sit and
snuggle or slow dance to
her sultry voice.
You could give a
Valentine's gift that serves
double duty as a charitable
donation. Why not take
your honey to the annual
party for supporters of St.
Vincent Island National
Wildlife Refuge from 2
to 5 p.m. on Sunday Feb.
15? For $20 you and your
main squeeze can join the
Friends and stay for lunch
and a lecture at the Indian
Pass Raw Bar. The meal
will be catered by Paul
Gant Barbeque and Dr.
Nancy White will speak on
the ancient inhabitants of
St. Vincent Island. Call 653-
8808 for more information.
Last, but certainly not
least, don't forget about
the Bow Wow Ball. The
annual dance to benefit the
Franklin County Humane
Society will be held on
Valentine's Day at the
Coombs Armory. There
will be music, dancing,
prizes and more. A prime
rib dinner will be catered
by Harry As. Tickets are
available at the door.
With all these options
why would you choose
to spend Valentine's Day
anywhere but here in
Franklin County, Love
Capital of the Western
Hemisphere? Love locally!


Happy ENDINGS


Shy Sylvester's story


This story comes from Gina and
Eddie Woodward, of Tallahassee.
The Woodwards e-mailed me to
say they had adopted two Franklin
County cats from the shelter and
wanted to share their own happy
ending with the readers of the
Times. I was especially touched
when I read this because their first
cat, Sylvester, was not a kitten but
a special needs adult cat. My own
sweet boy, Cyril, was a shy adult
when I brought him home, and he
is truly a treasure. Though kittens
and puppies are cute, adopting
an adult animal can be just as
rewarding, and a grown cat or dog
is often in even greater need than
a cuddly infant. Make adoption
an option, and consider an adult
companion animal.
Dr. Lois Swoboda

We moved to Tallahassee in
February 2007, and our beloved,
black and white cat Hubert passed
away in August 2007. He passed
away at home with both of us by his
side, and though it was so painful
and sad and we could not imagine
our household without him, we were
thankful that it happened in this
way.
The day he passed away, we did
not know what to do with ourselves
other than cry and talk about him,
but we decided what we needed to
do was drive to St. George Island,
our favorite place, where we
vacationed with Hubert every year
starting in 2000 on our honeymoon.
We lived in Virginia prior to
Tallahassee, and Hubert made that
long drive with us and was always a
real trooper, so we felt we needed to
be there where the three of us spent
many happy times.
Six months passed before we
even considered adopting a new cat.
We always said when we got a new
cat, it would be from the Franklin
County Humane Society because
we wanted a cat from our favorite
area. One day, I was looking at their
Web site and saw a black and white
kitten named Henry and told Eddie
about him. We decided this was the
cat for us. We drove to the shelter
on a Saturday, but when we got
there, it was closed, so I called the
number listed on the sign and left a
message about Henry. We went to
Apalachicola to walk around and to
see if we would get a call back.
We did get a call but were told
Henry had been adopted but that
there was another black and white
cat named Sylvester that had been
at the shelter for most of his life
(he was almost 2) but that he was
very shy and spent most of his time


Sylvester and Henry

hiding. We had seen his picture
on the Web site, so we knew about
him. We said we would think about
him and went home and quickly
decided that the next weekend, we
were going to get Sylvester because
it sounded like he really needed
a good, loving home, and without
children and other pets, we could
really devote time to him.
We took time off of work on a
Friday afternoon and drove down
and met Kam Marxsen, who
introduced us to Sylvester. When
we first saw him, we looked at each
other and smiled because he was
such a handsome, big cat, and we
liked him right away. When Eddie
went to take him from Kam's arms,
he squirmed away and ran as fast
as he could to a large kennel in the
other room. Although he was leery
of me, he did let me scratch him
through the kennel as I talked to
him. Kam told us when his litter
mate was adopted as a kitten,
Sylvester became depressed and
lost most of his hair, and this is when
he started being so shy. We finished
the paperwork and drove home with
him. He was a good traveler and did
not make a peep on the way home.
We learned quickly that
Sylvester was not going to just walk
out of the cat carrier and start living
in his new home! I felt very anxious
about how to make him comfortable
and even wondered if it was good
for him to be taken away from the
only home he really knew. After
asking some questions to people
who knew about cat behavior, we
put him in our room with food,
water and the litter box so he
could get accustomed to his new
surroundings in a smaller space.
We paid lots of attention to him.
I started brushing him, and slowly,
slowly we all started to bond. After
two weeks, we let him out of our


GINA WOODWARD I Contributed photo


room, and he very slowly began
making his way into each room
until he finally came into the family
room, where we spend most of our
time.
Now the family room is his
favorite place, full of his toys and
comfy places to nap. He is such
a happy, sweet (but still a little
shy around strangers) cat who
loves to sit on our laps to sleep or
be brushed, which he loves and
I am happy about because he is
a medium, longhaired cat. After
having him almost a year now, we
are still amazed at how far he has
come from the shy boy he was when
we first got him.
Because we are gone all day
and Sylvester loves to see the
neighborhood cats who come to
our door, we thought that maybe
another cat in the house would be
good for him. Although I really did
not want to take all my attention
away from him, I went to the
Franklin County Humane Society's
Web site once again to see what
cats they had. And lo and behold
there was another black and white
kitten named ... Henry!
So, two weeks before Christmas,
we went to adopt him, and within
no time, Sylvester and Henry were
playing and snuggling up together
to sleep. Henry is affectionate,
fun and a purr machine. They are
best buddies and make us laugh
like crazy when they are running
through the house chasing each
other.
We feel like Sylvester's story
deserved a Happy Endings!

Lois Swoboda is archiving
success stories of animal adoptions
for her series "Happy Endings"
for The Times. Tb share a story for
"Happy Endings," please e-mail
Lois at lswoboda@starfl.com.


*I


METAL ROOFING FL15-3 MALONE, FLORIDA
FL15-12AAND 15-12B CARRABELLE, FLORIDA
FL15-18 JASPER, FLORIDA
DOCUMENT 00100

INVITATION FOR BID

Bids for furnishing all labor, materials, equipment, and services required for the Work known as Metal Roofing @ FL15-3
Malone. Florida. FL15-12A & FL15-12B Carrabelle. Florida and FL15-18 Jasper. Florida will be received until 2:30 PM local
time on 26 February 2009 at the office of the Housing Authority (PHA) indicated below. At this time and place all bids received
will be publicly opened and read aloud.

Without force and effect on the Bidding Documents and the proposed Contract Documents, the work required is briefly described
as: Partial modernization of forty four (44) Dwelling Units and two (2) Non-dwelling Units at four (4) sites known as FL 15-3
Malone, Florida, FL 15-12 A & FL 15-12 B Carrabelle, Florida and FL15-18 Jasper, Florida. The work consists of, but is not
limited to, providing deck sheathing repair, thirty pound (301b) felt, one inch by four inch (1"x4") yellow pine lathing, two foot
(2') on center over existing asphalt shingles secured to rooftops with three inch (3") screws secured into the existing trusses, new
metal roofing, new drip edge, rake trim, new plumbing flashings, range hood caps and flashings and heater & water heater flues
at all existing roof penetrations and associated work.

The work required is fully described in the Bidding Documents consisting of the Project Manual and the Drawings.

Proposed Contract forms, Drawings and Project Manual are on file in the office of the Consultant, Mr. Randall O'Barr, Post Of-
fice Box 357, Baldwin, Georgia 30511, telephone (706) 206-1725 or (678) 231-0675. Bidding Documents may be obtained by
providing a NONREFUNDABLE payment of $35.00 per set of Documents to the Consultant, do not contact the PHA. No partial
sets will be issued. Checks should be made payable to Mr. Randall O' Barr and mailed to the above address. Information regard-
ing this Project, including a list of the Plan Holders will be provided upon request.

Each bid shall include Bid Guarantee in an amount equal to five percent of the Bid. Provide as a certified check or bank draft
payable to the PHA; U.S. Government Bonds, or as a properly executed Bid Bond with surety acceptable to the PHA. A Surety
Company executing the Bid Bond must be authorized to transact business in the Project State, and must appear on the most cur-
rent U.S. Treasury Department's Circular No. 570. The successful bidder is required to provide satisfactory Performance and
Payment Bonds prior to execution of the Agreement.

Refer to provisions for equal employment opportunities and payment of not less than minimum salaries and wages indicated in
the Project Manual.

Each bid shall include THE SIGNED ORIGINALAND TWO CONFORMED COPIES of the following:
1. A properly executed Bid Form.
2. A properly executed Bid Guarantee.
3. A properly executed Non-Collusive Affidavit.
4. A fully completed Form HUD-5369-A, "Representations, Certifications and Other Statements of Bidders".

Small businesses and minority firms are urged to submit proposals. Certification as a Minority-business Enterprise (or number
of partners, shareholders, employees who are members of minority classification or are women) should be included in the Bid
proposal. Refer to Articles 38, 39 and 40 of The General Conditions.

The PHA reserves the right to reject any and all bids, and to waive irregularities and formalities in the bidding. No bids may be
withdrawn for a period of sixty days subsequent to the opening of bids without PHA consent.
Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority
Post Office Box 218 (5302 Brown Street)
Graceville, Florida 32440


FIREFIGHTERS HONOR

MIRABELLA
















PALMER PHILYAW I Contributed photo
Members of the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire
Department held a dinner Feb. 2 at City Hall
and presented an award to one of their own,
Alfia Mirabella, who has served for more than
50 years and is still an active member of the
department. Fire chief Burt Simmons, right,
presented a plaque to Mirabella for his many
years of tireless service and dedication to the
department.


IV







8B The Times Thursday, February 12, 2009 Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


E6002


1000T Case No.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 19-2008-CA-0171
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY Division
PROBATE DIVISION
NOTICE OF SALE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DAVID A. OMAN Notice is hereby given,
Deceased. pursuant to an Ex Parte
Order Rescheduling Fore-
File No.: 09-00002-CP closure Sale entered in this
cause, in the Circuit Court
NOTICE TO CREDITORS of Franklin County. Florida.
I will sell the property situ-
The administration of the ated in Franklin County.
estate of David A. Oman, Florida described as:
deceased, whose date of
death was November 11, COMMENCE AT THE
2008, is pending in the Cir- SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
cult Court for Franklin THE SOUTHWEST QUAR-
County, Florida, Probate TER OF THE SOUTH-
Division, File Number WEST QUARTER OF SEC-
09-00002-CP the address TION 32, TOWNSHIP 6
of which is The Franklin SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST,
County Courthouse, 33 AND RUN THENCE
Market Street, Apalachl- NORTH 00 DEGREES 50
cola, Florida 32320. The MINUTES WEST 95.16
names and addresses of FEET ALONG THE EAST-
the personal representa- ERN BOUNDARY OF THE
tive and the personal SOUTHWEST QUARTER
representative's attorney OF THE SOUTHWEST
are set forth below. QUARTER OF SAID SEC-
TION 32 TO A POINT OF
All creditors of the dece- THE SOUTH SIDE OF
dent and other persons, STATE ROAD #370 (OR
who have claims or de- ALLIGATOR POINT ROAD)
mands against decedent's THENCE NORTH 55 DE-
estate, including unma- GREES 14 MINUTES
tured, contingent or unliq- WEST 1144.84 FEET
updated claims, and who ALONG THE SOUTH SIDE
have been served a copy OF SAID ROAD TO A
of this notice, must file POINT WHICH IS THE
their claims with this court POINT OF BEGINNING OF
WITHIN THE LATER OF THE LAND TO BE DE-
THREE (3) MONTHS AF- SCRIBED AND CON-
TER THE DATE OF THE VEYED; FROM SAID
FIRST PUBLICATION OF POINT OF BEGINNING
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY RUN THENCE SOUTH 30
(30) DAYS AFTER THE DEGREES 36 MINUTES
DATE OF SERVICE OF A WEST A DISTANCE OF
COPY OF THIS NOTICE 276 FEET, MORE OR
ON THEM. LESS, TO THE WATERS
OF ALLIGATOR BAY,
All other creditors of the THENCE RUN IN A
decedent and other per- NORTHWESTERLY DI-
sons who have claims or RECTION, MEANDERING
demands against the THE WATERS OF ALLIGA-
decedent's estate, includ- TOR BAY, TO A POINT
ing unmatured, contingent WHICH IS NORTH 55 DE-
or unliquidated claims, GREES 14 MINUTES
must file their claims with WEST 85 FEET FROM
this court WITHIN THREE SAID LAST POINT,
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE THENCE RUN NORTH 30
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB- DEGREES 36 MINUTES
LOCATION OF THIS NO- EAST 276 FEET, MORE
TICE. OR LESS, TO THE
SOUTHERN BOUNDARY
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO LINE OF SAID ROAD,
FILED WILL BE FOREVER THENCE RUN SOUTH 55
BARRED. DEGREES 14 MINUTES
EAST ALONG THE
NOTWITHSTANDING THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY
TIME PERIODS SET OF SAID ROAD 85 FEET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY TOTHEPOINTOFBEGIN-
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) NING, BEING A PARCEL
YEARS OR MORE AFTER OF LAND FRONTING 85
THE DECEDENT'S DATE FEET ON SAID STATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED. ROAD #370 (OR ALLIGA-
TOR POINT ROAD) AND
THE DATE OF FIRST PUB- RUNNING BACK TO THE
LOCATION OF THIS NO- SAME WIDTH TO ALLIGA-
TICE IS February 5, 2009. TOR BAY

Personal Representative: BEING MORN PARTICU-
LEONARDW. OMAN LARLY DESCRIBED BY
PO. Box 349 SURVEY PREPARED BY
Gilbertsville, New York T H U R M A N
13776 RODDENBERRY AND AS-
Attorney for Personal Rep- SOCIATES INC., JOB#
resentative: 04-269 AS FOLLOWS:
CHARLES A. CURRAN
Florida Bar No.: 274380 COMMENCE: AT THE
PO. Box 549 SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
Carrabelle, Florida 32322 THE SOUTHWEST QUAR-
(850) 697-5333 TER OF THE. SOUTH-
(850) 697-5558 fax WEST QUARTER OF SEC-
February5, 12,2009 TION 32. TOWNSHIP 6
1025T SOUTH. RANGE. 1 WEST,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY
OF THE SECOND JUDI- FLORIDA AND RUN
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR- NORTH 00 DEGREES 50
IDA, IN AND FOR FRANK- MINUTES 00 SECONDS
LIN COUNTY WEST 95.16 FEET TO A


I 1100
POINT LYING ON THE
SOUTHWESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF STATE ROAD NO.
370, THENCE RUN
NORTH 55 DEGREES 14
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 1144.84 FEET TO AN
IRON PIPE MARKING THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING AND LEAV-
ING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH
30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES
47 SECONDS WEST
309.63 FEET TO THE AP-
PROXIMATE MEAN HIGH
WATER LINE OF ALLIGA-
TOR HARBOR, THENCE
RUN NORTHWESTERLY
ALONG SAID APPROXI-
MATE MEAN HIGH
WATER LINE AS FOL-
LOWS: NORTH 30 DE-
GREES 59 MINUTES 06
SECONDS WEST 36.31
FEET, NORTH 52 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES 33
SECONDS WEST 33.60
FEET, NORTH 74
DEGREE'S 25 MINUTES
36 SECONDS WEST 19.36
FEET, THENCE LEAVING
SAID APPROXIMATE
MEAN HIGH WATER LINE.
RUN NORTH 30 DE-
GREES 17 MINUTES 07
SECONDS, EAST 299.72
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (MARKED
#2919) LYING ON THE
SOUTHWESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF STATE ROAD NO.
370. THENCE RUN
SOUTH 55 DEGREES 14
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
EAST 85.05 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTAINING 0.58 ACRES
OR LESS.

and commonly known as:
676 ALLIGATOR DRIVE,
ALLIGATOR POINT, FL
32346 at public sale. to the
highest and best bidder,
for cash, at the front door
steps of the Courthouse, at
33 Market St., in Apalachi-
cola, Florida at 11:00 a.m.
on February 19, 2009.

Any persons claiming an
interest in the surplus from
the sale. if any. other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

Dated this 13th day of Jan-
uary, 2009

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Michelle Garcla Gilbert
Kass, Shuler, Solomon,
Spector, Foyle & Singer,
PA.
PO Box 800
Tampa, FL 33601-0800
February 5, 12, 2009
1041T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

WAKULLA BANK, a Florida
banking corporation,
Plaintiff,

v.

OLIN CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY INC., OLIN R.
GRANTHUM, and JIMMIE
CROWDER,
Defendants.

Case No. 08-000237-CA

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure dated January
26, 2009, entered in Case
No. 08-000237-CA of the
Circuit Court of the Sec-


Lots 1 through 18, Block
46 (Old Block 25) Kellys
Plat of the City of
Carrabelle, as per map or
plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 2, Page 20, of
the Public Records of
Franklin County, Florida.

Less and except any own-
ership interest in the name
of Jimmle Crowder in Lots
10 and 11, Block 46 (Old
Block 25) Kellys Plat of the
City of Carrabelle, as per
map or plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 2,
Page 20, of the Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after sale.

DATED this 28th day of
January, 2009.

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
As Clerk of said Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
February 5, 12, 2009
1046T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK F/K/A WASHING-
TON MUTUAL BANK, FA.,
Plaintiff,

VS.

KAREN BETH MIL-
LENDER, et al,
Defendantss.

CASE NO.:
19-2008-CA-0191
DIVISION:

NOTICE OF
RESCHEDULED SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN Pursuant to an Or-
der Rescheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale dated January
26, 2009, and entered in
Case No. 19-2008-CA-
0191 of the Circuit Court of
the Second Judicial Circuit
in and for Franklin County,
Florida in which Washing-
ton Mutual Bank f/k/a
Washington Mutual Bank,
FA., is the Plaintiff and Ka-
ren Beth Millender, Tenant
#1 n/k/a Nicki Kilby, Ten-
ant #2 n/k/a Robert Bel-
din, are defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash in/on,
Franklin County, Florida at
on the 26th day of Febru-
ary, 2009, the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure:

LOT 4, BLOCK 2, GULF
TERRACES, UNIT NO.
ONE, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 3, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF


Albertelli Law
Attorney for Plaintiff
PO. Box 23028
Tampa. FL 33623
(813)221-4743
08-05474

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act. persons needing spe-
cial accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
ing should contact the
Clerk of the Courts. Marcia
M. Johnson. 33 Market
Street. Suite 203. Apalach-
icola. Fl. 32320: telephone
number (850) 653-8861.
not later than seven (7)
days prior to this proceed-
ing. If you are hearing or
voice impaired. please call
(850) 577-4400.
February 12,19,2009
1047T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

U.S. BANK NATIONAL AS-
SOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR MASTR ALTERNA-
TIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-5
PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY FOGLEMAN A/K/A
GARY R, FOGLEMAN; RE-
BECCA FOGLEMAN; AMY
WRIGHT A/K/A AMY E.
WRIGHT, UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF AMY
WRIGHT A/K/A AMY E.
WRIGHT IF ANY; ANY
AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)

CASE NO. 07-00178CA

RE- NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Granting the Motion to
Reset Foreclosure Sale
dated January 26, 2009
entered in Civil Case No.
07-00178CA of the Circuit
Court of the 2nd Judicial
Circuit in and for FRANK-
LIN County, Apalachicola,
Florida, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash at on the front steps
of the courthouse of the
FRANKLIN County Court-
house, 33 Market Street,
Apalachicola, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 26th day
of February, 2009 the fol-
lowing described property
as set forth in said Sum-
mary Final Judgment,


Marcia M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons with disabilities need-
ing a special accommoda-
tion should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse at
8 5 0 6 5 3 8 8 6 1 ,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.

DAVID J. STERN, PA.
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND
ROAD SUITE 400
PLANTATION, FL
33324-3920
(954) 233-8000
07-84202(ASCF)
February 12, 19, 2009
1048T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

NATIONAL CITY MORT-
GAGE CO.
PLAINTIFF

VS.

EDWARD C. CASS;
BETTYE CASS; ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED IN-
DIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)

CASE NO. 07-000463-CA

RE- NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Granting the Motion to
Reset Foreclosure Sale
dated January 26, 2009
entered in Civil Case No.
07-000463-CA of the Cir-
cuit Court of the 2nd Judi-
cial Circuit in and for
FRANKLIN County, Apa-
lachicola, Florida, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at on the
front steps of the court-
house of the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse, 33
Market Street, Apalachl-
cola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m.
on the 26th day of Febru-
ary, 2009 the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Summary Fi-
nal Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 8, BLOCK 11, OF THE
CITY OF APALACHICOLA,
COUNTY OF FRANKLIN
AND STATE OF FLORIDA.


IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons with disabilities need-
ing a special accommoda-
tion should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse at
8 5 0 6 5 3 8 8 6 1 ,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.

DAVID J. STERN, PA.
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND
ROAD SUITE 400
PLANTATION, FL
33324-3920
(954) 233-8000
07-15857(NCM)
February 12, 19, 2009
1102T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

VS.

RICK PETRONELLA A/K/A
RICK J. PETRONELLA,
LISA A. PETRONELLA and
UNKNOWN TENANTSS,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 08-000442-CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated January
28, 2009, in Case No.
08-000442-CA, of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit, in and for
Franklin County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff and
RICK PETRONELLA A/K/A
RICK J. PETRONELLA,
LISA A. PETRONELLA and
UNKNOWN TENANTS)
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the
Front door of the Franklin
County Courthouse in Ap-
alachicola, Franklin
County, Florida at 11:00
a.m. on March 12, 2009,
the property set forth in the
Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure and more particularly
described as follows:

Lot 19, Palmetto Village,
according to the map or
plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 7, Page(s) 47,
Public Records of Franklin
County, Florida.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.

DATED: January 28, 2009.

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,


BETTY J. PETERSON
A/K/A BETTY PETERSON,
APRIL L. GILES A/K/A
APRIL GILES, MAGNOLIA
RIDGE ESTATES PROP-
ERTY OWNERS' ASSOCI-
ATION, INC., and UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS,
Defendants,

CASE NO. 08-000469-CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated January
28, 2009, in Case No.
08-000469-CA, of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit, in and for
Franklin County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff and
BETTY J. PETERSON
A/K/A BETTY PETERSON,
APRIL L. GILES A/K/A
APRIL GILES, MAGNOLIA
RIDGE ESTATES PROP-
ERTY OWNERS' ASSOCI-
ATION, INC., and UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) are
the Defendants, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the front
door of the Franklin
County Courthouse in Ap-
alachicola, Franklin
County, Florida at 11:00
a.m. on March 12, 2009,
the property set forth in the
Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure and more particularly
described as follows:

Lot 3, BLUE HERON VIL-
LAGE, according to the
map or plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 7,
Page(s) 51, Public Rec-
ords of Franklin County,
Florida.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.

DATED: January 28, 2009

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
Wadsworth & Bowden PA.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
February 12,19, 2009

1109T
PUBLIC NOTICE

The next meeting of The
Northwest Florida Trans-
portation Corridor Author-
ity will be held on Thurs-
day, February 19, 2009 at
10:00 a.m. CST at the Wal-
ton Area Chamber of Com-
merce, 63 South Centre
Trail, Santa Rosa Beach,
Florida 32459. Any person
requiring special accom-
modations to participate in
this meeting is asked to
advise the Corridor Author-
ity at least 48 hours prior
to the meeting by contact-
ing Amber Perryman at
(850) 215-4081 or by emall
at Amber.Perryman
@hdrnc.com.
February 12, 2009


KAREN BETH MIL-
LENDER; UNKNOWN
HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES,
DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES AND ALL
OTHERS WHO MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST IN
THE ESTATE OF CLAUDE
CRAWFORD RICHARDS
DECEASED; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF BARBARA
ELLEN MARTIN ROMAN;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
KAREN BETH MIL-
LENDER; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF ROBERT B
ARNOLD; JOHN DOE;
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY
Defendants.

CASE NO.:
19-2008-CA-0234

RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE


NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Mo-
tion and Order Resetting
Foreclosure Sale Date
dated the 27th day of Jan-
uary, 2009, and entered in
Case No.
19-2008-CA-0234, of the
Circuit Court of the 2ND
Judicial Circuit in and for
Franklin county, wherein
WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK, FA is the Plaintiff
and KAREN BETH MIL-
LENDER; UNKNOWN
HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES,
DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES AND ALL
OTHERS WHO MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST IN
THE ESTATE OF CLAUDE
CRAWFORD RICHARDS ,
DECEASED; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF BARBARA
ELLEN MARTIN ROMAN;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
KAREN BETH MIL-
LENDER; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF ROBERT B
ARNOLD; JOHN DOE;
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANT (S) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY are defend-
ants. I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash at the ON FRONT
STEPS OF COURTHOUSE
at the Franklin County
Courthouse, in APA-
LACHICOLA, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 5th day
of March, 2009, the follow-
ing described property as
set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:

LOTS 3, 4, 5, AND 6,
BLOCK 3 (BLOCK 178 OF
OFFICIAL MAP OF CITY
OF CARRABELLE, DE-
CEMBER 1956),
KEOUGH'S FIRST ADDI-
TION, CITY OF
CARRABELLE, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF FRANK-
LIN COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA), disabled per-


+1+ +1+ +


EGAL::;I
ADVERTISING







06100
1 1100 | 1100 2100 1 3220 4100 100 6130
sons who, because of their sell to the highest and best Golden Retriever Puppies Other 1 br house Snow Birds
disabilities, need special bidder for cash at the Reg., First shots & Sn Birds/
accommodation to partic- Front Door of the Franklin wormed. Red & Blond Front Desk c/h/a, w/d incl. Lanark Village
pate in this proceeding County Courthouse, Apa- $400 653-2212/ 653-5558 No pets. 850-653-9788 a, enae
should contact the ADA lachicola, Florida, on Duncan Phyffe sofa & Manager850-615-0058 1 br, 1 ba, Renovated/fur
Coordinator at 33 Market Thursday, February 26, dinning table $399 each Penelope's Pet Stop nished end unit, new kitch REALESTATE F SAlCREAT
Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl- 2009, at 11;00 a.m., the Marble top English wash Seeking exceptional team For Rent Space available and bath, mini. 4 month Antiqu
cola FL 32320 or Tele- following described prop- stand $250 850-697-3555 member, w/ customer for small business or of- lease $545/mo + dep., no 7100 Homes 810 Antiqu Collectibles
phone Volce/TDD (904) erty: or 850-323-0713 service &computer exper- fice. Utilities included. smoking, pet considered. 71 opety 810 Sports Utlity ehes
653-8861 prior to such ence. Must be well organ- Downtown Historic Apa- (850) 653-3838. 7120 Commercial 8130 -Trucks
proceeding. FIRST PARCEL -owned by sized & energetic, with the lachicola. 29 Ave. E. 7130- Condo/rownhouse 8140 -Vans
Defendant JADAR PROP- ability to multi task. Good (upstairs) For info call 7140 Farms & Ranches 8150 Commercial
Dated this 28th day of ERTIES,LLC communications skills, w/ Carol850-653-3871 7150 Lts and Acreage 81 Motoryces
January, 2009. both people & animals re- 7170 waterfront & Accessories
Lot 2, Block "B", Gulf quired. Please send re- 11 6140 7180- Investment 8210- Boats
Marcia Johnson Wynn, a Subdivision as 3100 Antiques FURNITURE sume w/salary req to. I Property 8220 Personal Watercraft
Clerk of the Circuit Court per map or plat thereof re- 3110 -Appliances LIQUIDATION PPS PO Box 812 11 1, & 2, br 7190- Out-of-Town 8230 Sailboats
By: Michele Maxwell corded in Plat Book 4, at 3120 Arts & Crafts Everything must go!! New Eastpont, FL 32328 1 br 1 ba & 2 br, apart- Apalachicola FL. 7200 -Tiehare S Marine
Deputy Clerk Page 64, of the Public 3130 Auctions household furniture: MAT 1 br, 1 ba & 2 br, apart- Apalachicola, FL. 7200-Timeshare Supplies
Deputy Clerk Page 64, of the Pli3140 Baby Items TRESSES, Living Room, ment. unfurn electric/water Call 850-643-7740. 8310 -Aircrafl/Aviation
Records of Franklin 3150 Building Supplies Bedroom Sets and MOREl inc. Tile floors, part cy- 8320- ATV/OffRoad Vehicles
Law Office of Marshall C. County, Florida, 3160 Business Bd m press panelling, private j 8330 Campers & Trailers
Watson Equipment Brand name furniture all 4130 deck 1 block from beach 2 br, 2 ba, outdoor pool. 7100 8340- Motorhomes
1800 NW 49th Street, SECOND PARCEL 3170- Collectibles brand New with full war- It's a Lifestyle, Not Just a 4 0 4- 4 0 2 5 5 7 3 598 Three Rivers Rd.
Suite 120 owned by Defendant APA- 3180-Computers ranty. Call to set upanap Job Travel/Work/Party/ 850-653-6459 Carabelle. $800 month.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida LACH RIVER PROPER- 3190 Electronics pointment 850-222-2113. Play 50 States. National Call 697-3707 or 519-6468
33309 TIES, LLC 3210- Free Pass it On Everythng s first come co. now hiring 18+ sharp Furnished Loft Apt, in his-
Telephone: (954) 453-0365 3220- Furniture rs serveguys & gals to work & toric district. Cbl/wtr ncl Port St Joe, St. George 8110
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Lot 47 Rivers Edge Phase 3230 Garage/Yard Sales travel entire USA. 2 weeks 1100sf high ceilings, Prl- Island and St. James Bay
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 II, a subdivision as per 3240 -Guns paidtraining, transportation vate entrance and deck. Previously Bank Owned
08-19344 map or plat thereof re- 3250 -eGodThingsto Eat & lodging furn'd. Paid No smkg/pets. $750 mo. Property. Priced way be- Lincoln Town Car 1992
February 12,19, 2009 corded in Plat Book 7, 3270- Jewelry/Clothing daily. Returns guaranteed. +$750 dep. 850-653-3838 3 br, 2 ba, On The low market value! Prices Cartier, New Michelin tires,
1129T Page 19, of the Public 3280- Machinery/ Call Today, Start Today. Carrabelle River. Garage, starting at $35,000. Please New battery, $1,000
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Records of Franklin Equipment 1 888 741 -2190. Lanark Village 1 br apt $1,000 month $500 de- call Counts Real Estate Please Call 697-2758
OF THE SECOND JUDI County, Florida. 3290 Medical Equipment MTV/ROAD RULES types furnished, w/ Florida room. posit. 850-545-8813 Group at 850-249-3615.
3300 Miscellaneous please apply View of Gulf, $350 month
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND 3310 Musical lnstmments 850-545-8813
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY DATED ON February 4, 3320 Plants & Shrubs/ POST850545 Carrabelle
FLORIDA 2009. Supplies POSTAL & GOVT JOB Carrabelle
3330 Restaurant/Hotel INFO FOR SALE? 4br 2 ba w/FP all apple
GULF STATE COMMU Marcia M. Johnson 3340 Sporting Goods dishwasher wd WhyRent
Clerk of court 3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell) 4100410Help Wanted-Eployment cautionin
NITY BANK, a By: Renee Stone 4130 EmploymentLanark Village 2 br apt, unit, Pool, hot tub, sauna When You Can 8140
State-Chartered Bank, Re e Information caution L or + guest apt withfull bath OwnABrand
Plaintiff, As Deputy Clerk LG Florida room, Some $1150/mo- 1 yr lease, se-
el f Platff Y N h t p furniture $450 mo + $200 curity deposit, cr check New Home?
vs.Counsel for Plaintiff 3170 You NEVER have to pay dep 850-545-8813 and ref required, THE AVENUES at
Mary Ellen Davis, Attorney Autographed Rolling o1i v for information about N o n s m o k e rs KEOUGH s LANDING.
JADAR PROPERTIES, Penson, Duchemln & Da- Stones guitar, Perfect con- 4100 federal or postal jobs. If Lanark Village 1-5738030776 Green certified and HOP 1992 Dodge Converson
LLC, a Florida Limited Lla- vls A. dition, appraised at $2900 you see a job furnished apt Call for ad- approved. AffordableLiv Van, 78K miles, V6, good
ability Company, APALACH Post Office Box 1720 asking $400 ALSO Signed guarantee", contact the ditional info 937-239-0141 ing on the Forgotten Coast condition $2700, Call
blVty Company, APALACH Crawfordvllle, FL 32326 Led Zeppelin guitar ap- FTC. ing onthe For gote Cat o nio $2700, Call
RIVER PROPERTIES, L (850) 9266003 raised at $3100 asking The Federal Trade Carrabelle 3 bdrm, 2 bath homes 850-653-8121
a Florida Li MIELabll February 12, 19, 2009 $400 comes w/ COA and Customer Support Commission Beach an gin Carraoells N s___m
CRUM, DANIEL W. HART- appraisal 850-474-1555 is Aericas consume 6120 3 br, 2 ba, large lot, w/d, Subdivision only 4 mile
MAN, and CHARLES RAY Cashier protection agency deck, appliances, ref. from the Carrabelle River
WEBB, II Clerk needed at the mini $675/mo. 860-233-0676
Defendants. conveniencestore (blu. 877ftC-HEP obams or emall Pricing from the $100,000s
S 3220 Must be able to work L anark lclapoaarten(3sbclob- Pick your Lot. 8210
CASE NO: 08-000543-CA nights and/or weekends. Lanark Village, 2 bo ba alnet Choose Your Model.
CIVIL DIVISION I Call 927-2163 for more info A public service W/D, CH/A. $700 mo. utli-
message from the FTC ties incl with max. Call Only 8 lots left!
and The News Herald 937-603-8100 BEC & Company, Inc.
NOTICELOSURE SAL F $165QUEEN PILLOWTOP Classified Advertising St, George Island (850) 656-2608
mattress & box.Manufaci T Hm 0 T Department 3 br 15 ba House near
2100- Pets turer wrapped, full war PT $400-$1,200Mo FT the water. $800 monthly, 34' Lhurs Open
NOTICE IS GIVEN that 20- Pf:DFreerto n pwappSe l 34' Lhurs Open
NOTICE IS GIVEN that 2110- Pets: Free to ranty. 222-7783 Delivery $2,000 to $6,000 Mo. Call Island $400 deposit. Please Call
pursuant to a Consent Fi- Good Home available 727-865-6795 $160wk, elecSatellte, 850-545-8813 7160 Fisherman
nal Summary Judgment of 2120- Pet Supplies a e Garbage included pl Boat
Foreclosure dated January 2130 Farm Animals/ Garbage Included poolBoat
~Supplies table. 12'X65' deck with 1983
26, 2009, a n the 2140- Pes/Livestock IBeautul ew Ca Townhomes for rent,198
above-styled cause, I will Wanted 850-653-5114 Jones Homestead- Pon- Twin 8.2 Detroit Die-
derosa pines. End of year To buy! Used single sels, Fly Bridge, Out
S3 -20 special. First month rent wide located in Franklin Riggers, Diesel Genera-
REALESTATEFORR free with deposit and 12 County!! Please call tor (new), full cabin,
month lease. 2 brand 3br 509-4987 Galley, Trim Tabs, Bait
6100-Business/ 6130 units available. Call Station, Platform with
Commercial 850-227-8404 or ladder, Bottom and
SCashier 0 Apartmentsl 229-734-0717 Zlnc's good. Runs
6120 Beach Rentals --i
6130 -Condo/Townhouse Good! Wll Trade! Ask-
Clerk needed at mini 14 House Rentals A L Ing $39,000 OBO At
6150 Roommate Wanted ABSOLUTE Panama City Marina slip
Convenience store "Blue". 6160 -Rooms for Rent REAL ESTATE 603. Call 850-871-9300
6170 -Mobile Home/Lot 6170 or 850-258-0996
Must be able to work nights 80 Out-of-Twn Rentals AUCTION
8190 -Timeshare Rentals
Kako and/or weekends. 6200- vacation Rentals Poolside 2 br, 1 ba BAY FRONT
Retired nurse for respite Townhouse for huge lot, 3 Rivers Area STGEORGEISLAND
care daytime, nightime Bookkeekina rent in Carrabelle, $495 mo+ utili- HOME
and overnight on week- When you care to send Kee er N6100 l ties & dep. 850-6533270 HOME SELLS TO HIGH-
ends. Housework, shopp- the very least to the IRS- oCarrabelleESTBIDDER!
ein in your home he r- SM L BUSIESS at Buccaneer Inn on St. For Rent 3 Bedroom2 Bath Beauti- 1431 EVODIE CT. COMPLETE PACKAGES
Ing, in your home. Experl- SMALL BUSINESS months free rent on l95
ence with Alzhemers, se- BOOKKEEPING George Island 3 months free rent on fultownhouse in the Sands February 21st@ 12PM FROM *4,995
nile dementia, and special Let me help you get it prime office space of Carrabelle, Fully Fur- Plantation Community, AWeldedAAluminum Boats
needs child or adult. Call ready for the CPA. 29Ave E nished, Boat Parking, Stor- 3 Bed / 2 Bath, Smoker/BBQ, Fryers
850-320-5156 Refs avail 653-1430 For More Information Call: Montgomery Building age Washer/Dryer. Carrabelle 3 br, 2 ba, 3000 Sq. Ft. BonifayFloida
Please call $1100.00/month, (850) MH C/H/A, No pets, $600 a AffillatedAuctions.com www.xtremeindustries.com
(850) 927-2163 850-653-4321 or 251-6082 or (850) month. 1st, last, security 850-294-7121
305-588-5885 562-6906 dep. Call 697-2758 J. Whltworth 10% BP









HELP IS ONLY A


PHONE CALL


AWAY


Your Classified ad


TAR


in


the ,, IMES
APALACHICC.T I M ES
& CARRABEL I E


Call Our New Numbers Now!


Call:


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Fax:


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Email:


850-747-5020

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I i


To Place


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


The Times Thursday, February 12, 2009 9B


Port St. Joe, Florida 32456






B 10 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 12, 2009


Philaco arts competition uncovers hidden talents


Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
On Jan. 15, the Philaco Ladies Club
held their annual arts and crafts competi-
tion at the St. George Island United Meth-
odist Church.
The show was judged by local painter
Marilyn Bean of St. George Island and by
Professor of Fine Arts Henry Vyfvinkel
and his wife, Junie, who are visiting the
island from Kingston, Ontario. During his
annual winter visits to St. George, Vyfvin-
kel conducts workshops in painting at the
Sea Oats Gallery.
Of about a dozen entries, five club
members walked away with blue ribbons.
Once again Celeste Wall, who took a
blue ribbon at the state level for her nee-
dlework last year, won a first for a cross
stitch representation of a Christmas tree.
Barbara Padgett was a double winner
with hand-woven baskets and a Pysanky
egg. Padgett said her daughter piqued her
interest in egg dyeing and she now makes


one egg a year.
Pysanky is an ancient and beautiful
form of folk art from the Ukraine. It con-
sists of decoration of eggs using beeswax
and dyes. The design begins by drawing
on a plain white egg with hot beeswax.
These lines will protect the white when
egg is dyed. When the designs to be white
are complete, the egg is dipped into yel-
low dye and then dried. The process con-
tinues, alternating waxing designs and
using dyes that progressively get darker
until the egg receives a final dip into black
pigment.
Janet Christianson took the blue rib-
bon for a cool, earthy watercolor of a for-
est stream.
Dawn Radford's photograph of succu-
lent plants in an arid landscape is vivid
with an unusual eye-catching color pal-
ette.
Winners of the Philaco Arts and Crafts
Show will go on to compete in the district
Arts and Crafts Festival to be held in Pan-
ama City on February 21.


Frankli


H'COLA's
6th Annual African-American History Festival


February 20 22, 2009
n Square 6th Street Apala


.

C 00 COUNTY' FLDRID
oe '.5 w eo colo e st vG(.. W or- e Ist g
SA Naw E&,,
For additional information, forms, and a full list of eve
850.653.7515, 850.323.0544 or www.hcola.org


Barbara Padgett took blue ribbons for her skill in
unusual art of Pysanky egg decoration.


SFICKLING
& COMPANY
A Full Service Real Estate Company


k ---


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
basket weaving and the


Travis Stanley
850.653.6477
Grayson Shepard Jackie Golden
850.653.6713 850.899.8433


Mike Howze
850.653.5112


Jamie Crum
850.899.8758


Kim Davis Ed Mitchem
850.653.6875 850.653.5772


FANTASTIC PRICE ON NEW LISTING BAYFRONT CARRABELLE LOT! 1/2 GULF VIEWTOWNHOME,St George
ST. GEORGE ISLAND $235,000. 3 BR/ acre lot all on the south side of Hwy 98 Island Nothing between you and Gulf
2 BA, only 2 /2 blocks to the beach no traffic to cross 150' of beautiful but a sparkling pooll This 2 BR/2 Bath
Many upgrades-new roof, newtile floor white sandy beach with tall mature Villa is newly renovated with a lovely
in kitchen, new deck Mother-in-law palms and a sea wall 4 miles west of interior Enjoy your morning coffee
suite downstairs and a two car enclosed Carrabelle and right across the street from the balcony while watching the
garage from Tate's Hell Forest Wonderful dolphins play Easy walk to everything
MLS # 234623 ..............$235,000 views of St George and Dog Islandl from this central spot
MLS #200565............$329,000 MLS# 233812...................... $399,000


BAYFRONT ST. GEORGE WILLBUILDTOSUIT!3Bedroom BAYFRONT ST. GEORGE ISLAND!
ISLAND.4BR/4Bathsbeautifully 2 bath home, approx. 1,400 sq. 3BR/2Bath home on one acre lot,
decorated with views of the Bay feet in greater Apalachicola. Full East end of SGI Lovely interior w/
and the Gulf. Community poo, acre lot just five minutes from vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, lots
dock and sandy bay beach. of windows Screen porch overlooking
Many extras elevator stainless downtown. Builder has o there e long dock and excellent fishing
appliances, granite counters, plans to choose from what a opportunitiesright from your backyard
screen porches! deal! Plenty of enclosed storage
MLS# 209238............$1,100,000 MLS# 208228...............$259,000 MLS#234599...................... $529,000
Please call us for a complete selection of properties for
sale in the Apalachicola Bay area! 112 Franklin Blvd.
www.ficklgofflorida.St. George Island FL 3850.927.2255
www.ficklingofflorida.com m 850.927.2255


Our local real estate experts have identified what they feel are the best

values around and are offering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In

this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port

St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Bias, St. George Island, Carrabelle and

surrounding areas.


$625,000 St. George IslandI


BEACHFRONT
LIVING


i .r i Located in the
vII 1 center of St.
i George Island
within walking
distance to shops, restaurants, and the
Lighthouse park. This is one of the nicest
Boardwalk Cottages with 3 bedrooms &
3 baths, tile floors, tastefully decorated
and beautifully furnished. This is the
least expensive BEACHFRONT home
on the island. Truly a bargain!

.- John Shelby, Broker
SSt Gere an 800-344-7570
Realty www.sgirl850-927-4777
Realy www.sgirealty.com


jFRI JAIBIDWJN Eli


Double wide Home
located at 545 Oyster Road
Apalachicola, FL 32320
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath
Home has boat shed and utility building
Call (850)653-6013 (after 5 PM)
or (850)653-5450
<____________________


NE *I


(MLS# 234522


I


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chicola




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