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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00012
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: February 5, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00012
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
Full Text



Apalachicola


Carrabelle






THIE:


Capt. Spero
Buzier
celebrates
a century of
adventure


Page B1


,


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


Thursday, FEBRUARY 5, 2009


www.apalachtimes.com


County plans new hangar at Apalach airport


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The county's airport advisory
committee and the five commis-
sioners both like what the future
holds for the Apalachicola Re-
gional Airport, so they have moved
forward with plans to build a new
hangar.
Lee Lewis, regional manager for
Niceville-based Avcon Inc., the air-
port's consulting engineer, outlined
the preliminary concept for a mini-
mum 10,000-square-foot corporate
hangar, along with at least 2,000
square feet of office space, to the
advisory committee Friday night.
They voted to send it on with
their blessing to the commission-
ers, and on Tuesday morning, the
county joined in the approval.
And the best thing of all?
It won't cost Franklin County a
dime, at least not yet.
The project draws on three Flor-


ida Department of Transportation
grants, totaling $1.39 million, which
must be set in motion by Aug. 30 if
they are to be used.
The initial $350,000 TRIP (Trans-
portation Regional Incentive Pro-
gram) grant dates back to August
2007, when the county received a
single proposal to develop a 12,000-
square-foot hangar with 4,000
square feet of office space.
Terms of that proposal included
a 25-year lease with two five-year
extensions and five annual lease
payments. The proposal was ap-
proved by the county commission,
but the developer, Georgia-based
aircraft investing, leasing and sales
company GlobalJet, backed out
based on economic factors such as
rising fuel costs.
Since then, the state has added
two more grants, of $193,219 and
$850,000, and has agreed to extend
See HANGAR A5


N.T.S.K
CORPORATE
HANGARS
T.TIR











AVCON INC. I I 1


i


This drawing shows
the location of
possible expansion
of the Apalachicola
SRegional Airport
to the west of the
'.e existing maintenance
-- hangar and office
facility, unshaded
- at upper right. The
corporate hangars
marked A would
include 12,000
square feet of
hangar space and
6,400 square feet of
office space, while
those marked B
would have 10,000
square feet of
hangar space and
2,000 square feet of
office space.


EARLY MORNING BLAZE 'A TOTAL LOSS'


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
A view of the interior of the Apalachicola mobile home destroyed in a Tuesday morning blaze.




Fire destroys mobile home


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
An Apalachicola family lost every-
thing but their lives Tuesday morning
when their mobile home went up in
flames.
Harry and Chris Coleman and their
14-year-old daughter, Victoria, managed
to escape from the blaze that consumed
their home on the Westmoreland Mobile
Home Park's Lot 28 at 20 Pine Drive in
Apalachicola.
"It's a total loss," said Undersheriff
Joel Norred.
The call came in around dawn, at


6:40 a.m., and first on the scene was
Apalachicola firefighter Mark Creamer,
who lives just a block away.
Harry Coleman had broken out a
window and tried to use a garden hose
to shoot water into the home, but it be-
came clear he would be unable to beat
back the flames.
"If someone had been inside, there
was no way we could have gotten to
them," Creamer said. "The entire home
was in flames when we got there."
Apalachicola firefighters were able
to contain the blaze from spreading out
into the wooded mobile home park, pop-
ulated with several older model homes.


An investigator from the state fire
marshal's office was expected to comb
the scene Tuesday afternoon, following
up on suspicions the fire started with an
appliance at the rear of the home.
"Preliminary indications are that
the fire was caused by a clothes dryer,"
Norred said.
No one was injured in the blaze, al-
though the Colemans lost all of their
possessions.
The sheriff's victim advocate, Cla-
rice Powell, is busy working with the
family to ensure they have sufficient
food, clothing and shelter as they begin
the climb to get back on their feet.


City offers businesses a break


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The Apalachicola city commission
looked to cut some economic slack to
local merchants and commercial fish-
ermen Tuesday night with some well-
timed breaks in their bills.
By unanimous consent, the commis-
sioners approved a plan presented by
City Administrator Betty Taylor Webb
that would waive a portion of the water


and sewer bills for the next two months
for businesses that operate within the
city limits.
The idea is to give these businesses
abreakon theirbills during a time of the
year when revenue declines because of
a seasonal drop in tourist traffic.
In the summer last year, the city
boosted water and sewer rates by 20
percent, and it is this increase that
would be waived on these commercial
accounts. The waiver only would apply


to bills received in March and April,
Webb said.
She said the waiver would cost
the city about $15,000, with the short-
fall made up from a portion of about
$114,000 held in reserve for the water
and sewer funds.
The commission also voted to en-
act a plan outlined by Webb that would
give a break to several tenants, mostly
See BREAK A5


School board


weighs rising


benefit costs

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Addressing the growing cost of insurance
benefits, the school board served notice at a
Jan. 26 special meeting that it wants employ-
ees, both current and retired, to pick up more
of the check.
With the price tag for employee health
insurance rising by 10 percent as of Feb. 1,
Chairman Jimmy Gander said it was his un-
derstanding the increased cost would come
out of the four-year, half-mill operating rev-
enue levy passed last year and earmarked for
employee salaries and benefits.
The cost increase for the Blue Cross-Blue
Shield coverage would run the district about
$130,000 more per year, according to Sam
Carnley, the district's director of financial
services.
Monthly premiums for individual employ-
ees, paid for entirely by district operating rev-
enue, would rise from $636 to $701. The price
tag for families, of which the district pays only
the individual premium cost and the employ-
ee the rest, would go from $1,001 per month
to $1,102.
But Carnley said it was not clear whether
the money to cover the price hike would come
out of the half-mill tax proceeds, which have
been earmarked to provide teachers with a
24-percent pay hike through the 2010-2011
school year.
"We gave the teachers a tremendous
raise," said board member David Hinton, not-
ing the district also pays "a tremendous cost"
of teachers' health insurance premiums.
"No other district in the state pays this kind
of money for our teachers," he said, adding he
was disappointed contract negotiations hadn't
set a cap on how much the district would con-
tinue to pay for health insurance premiums.
Gander proposed the question be handed
over to the teachers, to determine if they want
to leave the insurance as is and thus scale
back coverage or assume the 10-percent in-
crease and tack the cost on to the fourth year
of the half-mill levy.
"I think the referendum money is their
(the teachers') money," he said. "I just think
that they should have a say-so in how we
spend it."
Cathy Wood, president of the Franklin
County Teachers Association, said the two
sides could go back to negotiations by reopen-
ing them in the summer and decide whether
the insurance price hike comes out of half-
mill money.
"We've already signed off on negotiations,"
Wood said. "We're very pleased with what
happened with the referendum. I feel sure we
can sit back down."
She said she could not comment as to how

See BENEFITS A5


Phone: (850) 653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews@starfl.com
Fax:(850)653-8036


Letters to the Editor.................. A4
Sheriff's Report ...................... B5
Church News......................... B3


Society News......................... B2
Tide Chart ........................... A6
Classifieds ........................ B6-B7


FREEDOM
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
School News & Society Friday ai 11 a.m.
Real Estate Ads Thursday ai 11 a.m.
Legal Ads Friday a 11 a.m
Classified Display Ads Friday at 11 a.m.
Classified Line Ads- Monday ai 5 p.m.


*


0


TABLE OF CONTENTS


NE


I





Thursday, February 5, 2009


Shands outlines Arts in Medicine program


Representatives from
the Shands Hospital Arts in
Medicine program plan to be
in the county this weekend to
meet with artists interested
in an innovative program
slated for Weems Memorial
Hospital.
A group from Shands
outlined the program Jan.
24 at That Place in Apalach.
They will return this Saturday,
Feb. 7 for a meeting from 1
to 4 p.m. at Boss Oyster with
prospective artists.
Jill Sonke, a dancer and
assistant director of the Arts
in Medicine (AIM) program,
told last month's gathering
the Florida Division of
Cultural Affairs had provided
funding for two years, the first
to develop the program and
the second to launch it.
The idea is to see how AIM
program, which for nearly
two decades has brought


professional artists in direct
contact with Shands patients
to assist in their healing,
would work at a small, rural
hospital.
Bringing visual, literary,
musical, and performance
arts to serve both inpatients
and outpatients and their
families "makes health care
facilities more beautiful, more
welcoming and more healing,"
said Sonke. "We need a more
holistic approach these days
in health care. Illness is not
just a physical matter."
The program would
involved individuals serving
as artists-in-residence,
volunteers and performers,
and may involve their
spending three weeks at
Shands over the summer to
learn about AIM.
For more information, call
Sonke at (352) 273-1488 or
email her at jsonke@ufl.edu.


Among the
Shands artists
who attended
the Jan. 24
introduction of
Weems hospital's
new Arts and
Medicine
program were,
from left, Lauren
Arce, RN,
a dancer-in-
residence; Cathy
DeWitt, musician-
in-residence; and
Mary Lisa Kitalis,
a visual artist.
DAVID ADLERSTEIN
The Times


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A2 I The Times


Local


,W !


I


4,-






Thursday, February 5, 2009


Local


The Times I A3


Habitat to host Mardi Gras on Saturday


As Habitat for Human-
ity prepares to host its
sixth annual Mardi Gras
celebration Saturday eve-
ning at the Dixie Theatre,
the group is preparing to
embark on its third home
since it formed in 2003.
"For the first time, we've
come up with a couple in
Carrabelle who own their
own lot," said Skip Frink,
chairman of the chapter's
board of directors. "That's
very helpful. It's been a big
problem in the past finding
land on the coast.
"It isn't cast in concrete
yet, but we're beginning
preliminaries," he said.
The home would follow
two others already com-
pleted, one in Apalachico-
la, where the Albert Floyd
family resides, and an-
other in Carrabelle, where
LaTonya Granger lives.
"We're open to build
anywhere in the county,"
said Frink.
Carrabelle already has
stepped up and provided
Habitat with two possible


spots. "The city of Carra-
belle last year donated two
owned lots to the Franklin
County Land Trust with
the understanding that
Habitat would get the first
opportunity to build homes
on the lots," Frink said.
Frink said the local
chapter is rejuvenating
itself, with the board also
led by Ella Bond, historian;
Cliff Butler, treasurer; and
Jill Archer, secretary.
Several committee
chairs remain to be filled,
with Bond overseeing the
Family Selection and Sup-
port Committee, Rob Pe-
terson the Building Com-
mittee, the Rev. John Sink
the Church Relations and
Finance committees, and
Don and Pam Ashley the
Development Committee.
"There is a misconcep-
tion out there that all that
Habitat does is they want
people to come out and
physically build houses,"
Frink said. "But most of
what we do is not building
but is committee-related


work, which can be done
from people's homes."
Reigning over the Mar-
di Gras this year will be
Jerry Hall and Dixie Par-
tington as King Rex and
Princess Pearl, recalling
the first Mardi Gras in
2004 when Dixie's parents,
Rex Partington and Cleo
Holladay, were honorary
sovereigns.
For a $20 contribution,
attendees can enjoy from
6:30-7:30 p.m. a dinner of
shrimp gumbo, Cajun rice
and all the fixings, catered
by Tamara's Caf6. Drink
tickets are $2 with all pro-
ceeds going to Habitat.
Contributionsbothlarge
and small are welcome for
folks to enjoy the fantastic
entertainment on stage
from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
All tickets will be sold
at the door. To volunteer
to help with the event or to
volunteer to help with the
next Habitat house, call
653-3113. Visit www.habi-
tatfranklin.org for more
info.


Gulf Coast Community College is
reaching out to Franklin County, with
two new programs aimed at extending
the influence of the school under way.
Lori Luppino, coordinator of man-
agement and leadership development
at the Center for Business, Continuing
and Community Education, told the
Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Com-
merce luncheon at the Owl Caf6 Jan. 7,
that her department plans to offer one
course a month in Franklin County for
four months, beginning in March.
Classes will have room for up to 10
students and will be non-credit pro-
grams.
Luppino said GCCC is seeking input
on what courses locals would be inter-
ested in and offered Conversational
Spanish, Communications and Collabo-
ration, People Management 101, Heart-
saver Training (including CPR) and Mi-
crosoft Word 2007 as examples of what
is available on the Gulf-Franklin Cam-
pus in Port St. Joe.
She said local businesses have volun-
teered venues where the courses can be
held. To suggest a course for the spring
program, e-mail Luppino at llupino@
gulfcoast.edu or call her at 872-3818.
Further down the road, plans are
under way for an Advanced Technology
Center to be built in Panama City that


will serve Franklin County with both
on-site business and trade education
courses and distance learning.
Dr. Jeff J. Stevenson, chief economic
development officer at the center, said
the project, still in the planning stages, is,
"our effort to stay ahead of the curve."
He said the proposed center will em-
phasize local needs, partnership and col-
laboration with area communities, eco-
nomic development, workforce educa-
tion and high technology. Online classes
will be available for students at the new
consolidated school in Eastpoint.
"High-tech companies are less likely
to invest in communities without a skilled
labor force. The Advanced Technology
Center is designed to address this gap
emphasizing local needs," he said.
Along with offering technical training
and continuing education, the center
will act as a small business incubator, a
facility where young companies can get
reduced rent while they establish a cli-
ent base. Stevens said the combination
of entrepreneurial activity and educa-
tion under one roof will act as a catalyst
for the transition of students into a high-
tech workforce.
The center will offer programs in
renewable energy industries, culinary
arts, aeronautics, health-related fields,
business and management.


News BRIEFS


C.W. Roberts to
refurbish (arrabelle
Airport Road
Bids were opened at
Tuesday's meeting of the
Franklin County Com-
mission for the project of
patching, resurfacing and
redrawing the lines on Car-
rabelle Airport Road.
Clay Kennedy of Preble
Rish, the county's consult-
ing engineers, recommend-
ed C. W Roberts of Hosford


be awarded the contract.
After reviewing two bids
for the job GAC Contrac-
tors of Panama City for
$287,000 and C. W Roberts
for $239,000 Kennedy
said, "Both bids are good,
so I recommend the work
be awarded to the lowest."

Deer disposal sites
attract carcasses
At Tuesday's meeting,
Van Johnson, head of solid


waste and recycling for the
county, told county com-
missioners since four deer
carcass disposal sites were
installed in January, 41 ani-
mal carcasses have been
disposed of there.
The disposal containers
are located near the air-
port on Brownsville Road
in Apalachicola; at Bear
Creek Road of State Road
65 in Eastpoint; at Gully
Branch off State Road 67
near Carrabelle; and at
Cypress Slough, also near


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HeartsaverAED


Carrabelle.
Johnson told the com-
mission he and County Ex-
tension Agent Bill Mahan
are working together on a
plant to compost the car-
casses on site.
At the recommendation
of County Attorney Michael
Shuler, the commission
voted to install biohazard
signs on the side of the
dumpsters dedicated to
carcass disposal.

All-hazard
workshop for
island residents
Franklin County Emer-
gency Management will
host an all-hazard work-


shop aimed at educating
people who live or have
businesses on Franklin
County's barrier islands.
The meeting is sched-
uled at 6 p.m. March 10 at
the Eastpoint Firehouse,
24 Sixth St. The meeting is
free and open to the pub-
lic.
For more information,
call 653-8977.

Master gardener
class seeks recruits
The Franklin UF IFAS
Extension Program is
looking for individuals in-
terested in becoming cer-
tified Florida master gar-
deners.
The Florida Master Gar-


dener Program recruits
individuals who are inter-
ested in gardening and
enjoy sharing what they
learn with others. Partici-
pants complete a 50-hour
(or longer) training course
sponsored by the Univer-
sity of Florida and the local
county extension office.
The training will be
done via distance educa-
tion and begins Feb. 18 and
ends April 15. The class
begins at 9 a.m. and ends
at 2 p.m. The fee to par-
ticipate in this program is
approximately $150, with
$50 refunded upon certifi-
cation.
For more information,
contact County Extension
Agent Bill Mahan at 653-
8977.


Meets February 6


CPR & Basic Life Support for Health Care Professionals Meets February 7
CPR & Basic Life Support for Health Care Professionals Meets February 21


HeartsaverAED
First Aid, AED, & CPR for Day Care Employees


Meets February 27
Meets February 28


I Co pue Tr ing


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Introduction to MS Excel 2007
Intermediate MS Excel 2007


Meets February 7, 1:00 5:00 p.m.
Meets February 21, 1:00 5:00 p.m.
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A4 I The Times


ODinion


Thursday, February 5, 2009


America is headed in the right direction


America is headed in the right direction


As an African American male
born and raised in the South
who is almost 69 years of age, I
can recall living through
times that were not so
good for people who
look like me. During my
college days, I personally
experienced the Civil
Rights struggles when
people of color had to
march in the streets DR.
to get certain liberties, A
like going to the movies, Special
eating in restaurants
or riding the bus. It was a
monumental struggle to survive
those turbulent times.
Even though I was able to


I
,WI
DAI
to th


attend college and obtain an
education, there was still no
guarantee that I'd be able to do
the things I wanted in life
because of my skin color.
But I and many people
like me kept striving
to improve myself in
hopes that America
would one day honor its
commitment of providing
ILLIE the same opportunities
MS to all people, no matter
he Times their race, color or
national origin.
I'm happy today as we
witness the inauguration of
Barack Obama as president
of the United States. This day


says to me that America is
now honoring its commitment
to recognize people based on
their talents, their education
and other characteristics that
have nothing to do with race.
That became apparent with
the election of Mr. Obama, and
while I'm not saying everything
is perfect now, we're certainly
heading in the right direction.
As a black male my age, I
honestly never thought I'd live
long enough to see this day.
I find joy not just in the fact
that Mr. Obama is an African
American, but in the knowledge
that America has come to realize
that it can recognize a person's


talents and skills, whether
the person is black, white or
any other color, and allow that
person to be all he can be.
Just about five years ago,
I witnessed firsthand some of
the same spirit here in Albany,
Ga., that has begun to take
place on a national level. For a
person my age, in what I'll call
the last surges of life, there's a
feeling now that I can relax a
bit, that I will be able to rest in
peace knowing that my kids and
the next generations will not
have to go through some of the
struggles that my generation
faced.
To see this day finally


arrive fills me with pride and
happiness. I am extremely
honored to have received
an invitation to attend the
inauguration of Barack Obama,
to have an opportunity to
witness such a historical event. I
may not be sitting next to Oprah,
but I'll be glad to be a part of the
crowd.

Dr Willie Adams, a native
ofApalachicola, has been an
obstetrician-gynecologist in
Albany, Ga., since 1973. In
2004, he became Albany's first
African-American mayor and
is now serving his second term
of office.


GALA has advocated
art for both counties
Dear Editor,
On Jan. 22, an
article appeared in the
Apalachicola Times
regarding the formation of
a Franklin County Local
Arts Agency. Although
the article was very
informative, there are a
few issues that need to be
clarified.
Yes, Franklin County,
not Gulf County, is eligible
for grants with the
Department of Community
Affairs as a designated
area of critical concern.
GALA has never applied
for any grant under this
department. However,
both Franklin and Gulf,
along with 30 other Florida
counties, are designated
as rural and underserved
and are eligible for grants
under the Rural Economic
Development Initiative
(REDI), which falls under
the Department of Cultural
Affairs.
GALA received a start
up grant in 2003 for $5,000
and received its first salary
assistance grant from DCA
in 2007/2008 for $10,000 and
2008/2009 for $7,500. The
only other grant GALA
received from DCA was
an NEA grant for $5,400 in
2008 in which 40 percent of
the monies were used to
fund an eight-week Youth
Summer Arts Initiative in
Gulf and Franklin counties.
During the period
of time GALA used the
salary assistance grant,
monies raised by Plein Air
(2006-2008), membership
dues and cash on hand
from previous years
of fundraising (2003-
2006) were used to
give American Wind
Symphony $1,500,
Apalachicola Museum of
Art $1,500, Franklin County
Consolidated Schools/
Apalachicola Riverkeeper


$3,000 for Art in the Sky,
Panhandle Players $800
and the Apalachicola
Historic Cotton Exchange
$3,000 (lighting and gallery
walls). The "nice grant,"
as referred to in the Times
article, given to Dixie
Theater four months ago,
was the first $5,000 grant
GALA has ever disbursed!
Most recently, $5,000
was given to the newly
formed Forgotten Coast
Cultural Alliance for Plein
Air 2009. Though Plein
Air 09 is touted as being
cross-county, the Cotton
Exchange will, again, host
the week-long event in
downtown Apalachicola.
This event was held in
Apalachicola in 2008 as
another gesture of goodwill
and fairness. Although the
GALA board of directors
never has had more than
one director from Franklin
County serving on the
board in six years, they
never have thought twice
about disbursing monies to
Franklin County.
In years past, GALA
brought Pensacola Opera
to all Gulf and Franklin
elementary schools, hosted
an art show for three years
in conjunction with the
Apalachicola Antique Boat
Show as well as an all-day
children's art event for Art
Walk the last two years.
We have sent countless e-
mails promoting art events
in both counties and have
maintained a calendar
for art events in both
counties on our Web site,
coordinated two Panhandle
Player performances in
Gulf, exhibited Franklin
County visual artists at
First Fridays and the Salt
Air market, the list goes
on ... GALA has been an
advocate for the arts in
both counties.
How could anyone
seriously look at these
attempts to foster the arts
and say that GALA has


Apalachicola
Carrmbelle


THE TiMES

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
APALACHICOLA, FL 32329
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$23 year $15 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$33 year $20 six months


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


used Franklin County? While
I am truly astounded at
some of the remarks made
in the article, I do feel that
GALA owes Franklin, as well
as Gulf County, an apology
for falling behind in the task
of public relations. How
can the community form an
educated opinion regarding
GALA's contribution to arts
and culture if we don't toot
our own horn by keeping
the community informed?
Obviously, no one else has.
Please don't forget, until
a year and a half ago, no
one has ever been paid to
do what GALA has done.
Volunteers have made this
happen!
In 2003, Franklin County
wasn't ready to start a
separate agency; we did this
together, by choice. A few
people cannot do it all! Yes,
geography can deter the
very best of intentions, and I
can assure Franklin County,
good was the only intention
of GALA.
I hope both arts agencies
are able to look beyond this
glitch and collaborate, share
resources and continue
to expand the arts. The
community members that
have come together to form
the new arts agency in
... -1 1 1-4 ..J .11 1 ....


rrankinn county w
an immensely suc
organization, and
nothing except im
quality of life for al
all the right reason
Let's move on t
business of making
difference where


Precious memc
beloved co
Dear Editor,
I read your new
every week, not m
any articles. I reach
all the new develop]
parks, new boat ra
new businesses cc
along with the gro
Franklin County. I
me proud how Eas
has grown and Ap
developed, new cit
coming in to live in
County, which I ha
very many of then
glad they chose Fr
County as their ho
so many memories
Franklin County a
some of its citizen:
helped make it gre
To mention jusl
Mr. and Mrs. Hous
Miller, who owned
Seafood. They wer
gift to the people o
County, mostly Ea
Books couldn't hol
memories of people
grew up there and
reside there. I see
paper pondering o
shall we name this
should we name tl
memory of. Since
will, I will.
Even though I
in Apalachicola an
there for a while, I
most of my life in
and know them as
growing up there.
glad I came from I
Quarters. We all sl


Xuripha Miller was like a
Mother Teresa to us all that
lived and worked for them.
They worked so hard in their
business, and we all reaped
from it. Free housing, if we
couldn't afford to pay, and
nothing was ever mentioned.
No one ever went without
food. Most of us had chicken
and dumplings every Sunday
dinner. I always remember
the chickens. A couple
disappeared, but there was
always more on the way,
so no one ever said a word.
If anyone countywide had
a home or boat burned,
they always came to the
rescue. She seemed to be
the one that always provided
emergency service. A sick
child, a hurt person, any
need they were there for us.
Now let's get back to what
I'm leading up to. Why not
name something in memory
of these two great people
of Franklin? People, let's
remember our roots, where
we came from, and those
that helped us along the way.
God gave them to us.
Be Proud.
Sincerely,

Irma Nell Polous Lindsey Peddie
Bristol


nlll nave l
cessful When will the road
that can do closure end?
prove the Dear Editor,
11 of us, for
When will it stop? I
ns. moved to Carrabelle in
St 2003, I love Franklin County,
g BUT! The CW Roberts
we live.
we live people tore up U.S. 98 east
Sof Carrabelle and started
Kim arrison repaving sometime before
Thanksgiving of last year.
ries of a They have kept that road
shut down between Lanark
uple Village and Carrabelle ever
since, even on weekends.
ispaper Today, Saturday, Jan. 31, I
missing needed to go into town. I do
i about business at the Dollar Store,
pments, the IGA, the Ace Hardware,
amps, the library, the Fisherman's
,ming in, Wife, I have a PO. box,
wth of and I bank in town as well.
t makes Wouldn't you know, 98 was
stpoint blocked off again, still, and
alachicola when they finally let us go
tizens through, all the Roberts
n Franklin people were standing
.rdly know around doing nothing. I
a. But I'm could see no reason to have
franklin the road blocked at all.
)me. I have There was lots of machinery
s about sitting idle, too.
nd about When Hurricane
s that Dennis tore up 98, it was
eat. totally rebuilt, including
t two, the roadway, paved AND
ston painted in two weeks! I
Miller guess I'll just start doing
e God's business in Wakulla County
if Franklin as I can actually get there
stpoint. (Sopchoppy or Panacea)
d all the in about the same time it
le who takes me the four miles to
I still get to Carrabelle. Of course
your if I have to move my PO.
ver what box and bank accounts,
s, or who re-register my two cars
hat, in and RV and change my
no one else driver's license and voter
card, then maybe I ought
was born to move where I can access
id lived the grocery store and bank
lived ... just that little bit more tax
Eastpoint base shrinkage for Franklin
a child County.
Yes, I'm
Millers Steve Trent
should be. Lanark Village


Letters to the EDITOR


*


Well-guarded


teen world trumps


the adult one

It is that time of year. T.S. Eliot might have
believed that April is the cruelest month, but for
teachers and students in this state, it is February
and March.
Florida Comprehensive Assessment Tests
are looming ahead, and I promise you teachers
are more concerned than students. The writing
portion of the test is on Tuesday, Feb. 10. Fourth-
, eighth- and 10th-grade students write for 45
minutes on a prompt they see only when they
open the test booklet.
For the babies in fourth
grade, the prompt might be
narrative or expository. For the
S kids in eighth and 10th, it will
Sbe expository or persuasive. It
Swill be boring. Essay prompts
are vetted through numerous
committees, including bias and
RED WHITE sensitivity. In other words, every
AND ROUX kid in the state has to be able to
Denise Roux write to the prompt whether they
are homeless, immigrant, rural,
urban, rich or poor. It's not easy
to find a topic that doesn't discriminate.
Unlike reading and math, the 10th grade
writing test is not a requirement for graduation.
Every year, the state warns that it will be,
and every year it is not. The children know
this and respond accordingly. I explain that
scores influence the school grade, go onto their
transcript and reflect on me personally as their
instructor. Some students will give it their best
shot, and others will blow it off completely.
The multiple choice portion of the test has been
eliminated this year in a money-saving measure.
Interesting, because scoring the handwritten
essays is the most expensive part of the test.
Scorers must be trained, and each student essay
is read by at least two people. They sit in a vast
room of computers and read dozens of essays
each day, assigning a score of 1 up to 6. The only
requirement for employment by the vendor is that
they have a college degree. There is oversight
by the Department of Education, but the vendor
conducts the show. There is a huge state contract
that pays for constructing and scoring the test.
It all goes to private industry. I honestly can't
remember whether it's McGraw-Hill, Harcourt or
Pearson.
Starting Tuesday, March 10, we begin the
reading and math tests. The pressure on teachers,
administration and students is incalculable. This
year, our school must show improvement, or the
state department of education will intervene big
time. We are a consistently low-performing school.
They want to make us better. I hope they get to
know us before issuing mandates. It really is
different here.
The students have a phrase for blowing off
multiple choice tests. It's called "Christmas
treeing." It means that they decorate the answer
sheet randomly with blackened in bubbles. I
asked my kids recently if they had ever personally
witnessed this behavior in a high-stakes test. The
response was 100 percent in the affirmative.
Why, I asked. Some said they just got bored or
tired. Others offered that it is better to act like you
blew off the test rather than to really try and fail.
The most amazing answer stopped me cold.
"See, Ms. Roux I'm gonna tell you how it really
is. If you see your friends closing their booklets
and sitting there, you just Christmas tree the rest
of your answers so that you can finish around the
same time they do."
I was aghast. Staying cool with the friends was
more important than passing a test required for
graduation.
I should have known. MySpace, Facebook,
texting, instant messaging and continual cell
phone connection have created a teen world that
trumps anything adults say or do. And they guard
it jealously. Think peer pressure on steroids.
So, what's a teacher to do? I plan to give a
candy bar to every student who works on the test
until time is called. They are still children, and
maybe a bribe will work.

Denise Roux is a regular columnist for the
Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. To reach her
e-mail rouxwhit@mchsi.com.


NE






Thursday, February 5, 2009


Local


HANGAR from page Al


the deadline for procurement of a
contractor until Aug. 30 and final
construction until June 30, 2011.
Avcon's outline estimates con-
struction would run about $1.16
million and professional services
about $218,000, to bring the proj-
ect in just under the $1.39 million
grant total. This translates to an
estimated unit cost of up to $65
per square foot for the hangar
space and up to $115 per square
foot for unfinished office space.
"We're identifying the project
in concept," Lewis said. "I don't
think we've pinpointed every as-
pect of this thing. Our design will
look to make the most cost-effec-
tive way for the money."

Office space a big plus
The proposed hangar is being
considered for the airport's West
Apron, which now has rows of T-
hangars for airplane storage on
its southwestern end.
"The remainder of the West
Apron concrete pavement offers
direct airfield access and can fa-
cilitate new hangar construction
while minimizing new pavement
costs," Lewis wrote in his report.
"The site also enables efficient
landside access and utility con-
nections, again lowering invest-
ment costs."
Now in place on the airport's
East Apron is a 13,300-square-
foot maintenance hangar and
adjacent 1,300-square-foot office
facility leased by the Apalachic-
ola International Aviation Train-
ing Center (AIATC), the airport's
fixed base operator. A separate
60-by-60-foot hangar recently was
constructed by the county.
Avcon's report also recom-
mended the hangar be equipped


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Lee Lewis, regional manager for Avcon Inc., the county's
consulting engineer, outlines a proposal for a new commercial
hangar to the Apalachicola Regional Airport's advisory
committee on Friday.


with at least one 2,000-square-
foot office unit, although both
committee and the commission-
ers are looking to add as much
office space as they can afford.
Lewis said one local resident
has "indicated an immediate
need for at least 1,500 square feet
of office space at the airport. If
budget is available, two separate
"lean-to" units accommodating
approximately 2,000 square feet
of offices per unit should be con-
sidered as a relatively high prior-
ity to ensure immediate revenue
generation.
"Two separate units would give
the county the flexibility to com-
bine the office space into a single
office lease of approximately 4,000
square feet or to divide them into
two similar individual leases," he
wrote. "We think we could gener-


ate some interest in office, even
without a hangar."
Though airport officials would
like to build at least a 12,000-
square-foot hangar, any bigger
would zoom costs upward. Lewis
said the National Fire Protection
Association requires buildings
exceeding 120 feet wide and 100
feet deep be constructed with
fire-resistant materials or be
equipped with foam systems for
fire protection; both options call-
ing for an increase in construc-
tion costs.
In addition, fire protection
rules would keep the door height
under 28 feet, since any larger
would call for expensive foam
systems.
"As a result, a clear door
height of approximately 24 (feet)
should be considered for the han-


gar door to accommodate the
majority, if not all, of general avi-
ation aircraft weighing less than
30,000-pound single-wheel gear,"
the report read.

Immediate demand would
be limited
Beyond new construction jobs
generated by the work, it is not
clear to what extent a new hangar
will sustain economic growth.
"The county may see benefits
multiplied from the proposed
hangar if a future tenant were
able to attract business from out-
side of the local region," Lewis
wrote. "This could be accom-
plished through aviation-related
services such as aircraft mainte-
nance, aircraft painting, aircraft
interior/upholstery services or
avionics."
He said IATC has shown an
interest in providing services
such as aircraft painting and/or
upholstery, but this would call
for the installation of a self-sup-
porting stand-alone "paint booth
insert" structure into the hangar.
Lewis told the committee this
adaptation would call for a coun-
ty investment of an additional
$200,000.
An unnamed out-of-state
company that does airplane
maintenance and operation has
"indirectly indicated an apparent
interest" in the airport project,
Lewis wrote in his report. But
because they work on commer-
cial jets that generally exceed
the size of the proposed hangar,
their operation at the airport
"will be limited by their size and
weight based on the published
strengths of the existing pave-
ment sections."


Avcon's conclusion was that
"the immediate demand for a
large hangar at (the airport) ap-
pears to be limited. Most of the
apparent demand involves rou-
tine maintenance and storage of
various corporate aircraft or es-
tablishing a facility that can sup-
port specific business ventures
such as aircraft painting or up-
holstery. It is rather uncommon
for an entity to commit to such
a facility more than one year in
advance, and it is likely that the
actual demand for such a facil-
ity will grow as the construction
proceeds.
"New demand may also be re-
alized prior to the facility being
certificated for occupancy. There-
fore, it is important that the han-
gar be designed and constructed
to allow flexibility in future uses,"
reads the report.
Lewis urged the committee to
incorporate maximum flexibility
in the bid process, to allow for
firms to specify bid alternatives.
"The use of a based bid with
bid alternates will allow the
county to prioritize the improve-
ments to be awarded while op-
timizing the use and impact of
the grant funding," he wrote. "A
five-year lease period with a five-
year option may represent an
effective approach for maximiz-
ing interest in the facility while
ensuring an equitable bidding
environment. Because the ten-
ant would not need to amortize
a significant capital cost with
this state-funded facility, a long-
term (i.e. 30-year) would gener-
ally not be a necessity; shorter
lease periods may reduce the
risk to prospective tenants and
could increase competition for
the space."


BREAK from page Al


News BRIEFS


shrimpers and other commer-
cial fishermen, on docking fees at
Scipio Creek Marina.
The city's long-standing fee
arrangement expired in Septem-
ber but has been extended at least
until Dec. 31.
Those fees include 13 tenants,
most all of them living in Frank-
lin County, who were grandfa-
thered in at $20 per month, going
back as far as 1988. Another eight
tenants, mostly from Eastpoint,
were grandfathered in at $30 per
month.
The remainder of the 65 slips,
however, now must pay $1.50 per
foot of their boat length, making
their monthly lease payment any-
where from $50 to $96.
The problem is, Webb said, the


decline in shrimping and other
commercial fishing has prompted
many of them not to remit their
monthly payments and put them
in arrears of anywhere from $184
to $642, totaling about $4,000.
The commission chose to adopt
a plan that would drop the monthly
lease payment of 15 of these ma-
rina user down to $30, on the con-
dition that they pay their entire
arrears.
This arrangement only would
apply to those individuals who live
in Franklin County, Webb said,
stressing the plan would benefit
these local fishermen at a time
when business is bad and clear up
these outstanding debts.
"We're trying to do what we can
to work with them," she said.


"That's something the city can
do in a small way," added Mayor
Van Johnson.
One problem that the commis-
sion was unable to resolve Tuesday
was the matter of the "Capt. Fuzz,"
a sunken vessel across from the
newly refurbished Veterans Park
on the riverfront between Avenues
D and E.
Webb said the city has been
persistent with owner Fred Carter,
but he has not responded to their
requests.
She said state law enforcement
officials and state attorneys office
have advised the city that it can
not just declare the boat a der-
elict vessel and have it removed,
which also would cost thousands
of dollars.


BENEFITS from page Al


teachers would feel about Gan-
der's options before polling her
members.
"We would need to go back and
talk again," she said. "The union
does understand what the state
has done to us. Will we agree to
it? I'm not at liberty to say as the
president."
Carnley also put forward sce-
narios in which the district would
trim back the life insurance cover-
age available to retirees.
As it stands now, the district's
life insurance premium costs
have risen 15 percent, from about
$33,000 annually to $39,000 "if we
remain as is," he said.


"As time passes, it's going to
drive costs higher everyyear," said
Carnley, noting that Hartford, the
district's carrier, has guaranteed
the current price for two years.
Currently, all active employees
and retirees have a $30,000 life
insurance benefit until age 70, at
which time it drops to $15,000.
Carnley said the district might
consider following the trend of
dropping the benefit to $15,000
when employees retire and/or
dropping it entirely when em-
ployees reach age 70.
Hinton said he has been pro-
active in support of retirees and
that cutting the benefit to indi-


viduals who have budgeted for it
could pose a financial hardship.
He said he would like to see these
existing staff grandfathered in
to the current benefit and that
future cuts could then be consid-
ered.
The district agreed to consider
Carnley's proposal, which led to
Superintendent Nina Marks' an-
nouncement that the district could
be looking at an upcoming 10-per-
cent cut in state funding, totaling
about $1.14 million.
"We really need to start looking
a little bit harder how we're going
to protect some people's jobs," she
said.


Relay for Life to meet
Feb. 12
Relay for Life of Franklin
County will be holding its
next team meeting at 5:30
p.m. Feb. 12 at the Realtors
of Franklin and Southern
Gulf Counties, 78 llth St. in
Apalachicola.
Anyone interested
in becoming involved
or volunteering for this
American Cancer Society
event, to be held at the
Franklin County School on
May 15, is invited to come.
Be prepared for fun,
food and prizes. For more
information contact Susan
Hoffritz at 323-0560 or at
lakefall@aol.com.

Dog found in Carrabelle
A small, white, long-
haired dog has been found in
Carrabelle. If it's yours or you
know the owner, call 294-9664.

Outreach to assist
exemption, voting
changes
Property Appraiser
Doris Barber Pendleton and
Supervisor of Elections Ida
Cooper Elliott will host an
outreach throughout the
county next month to provide
assistance in any changes
to voter's registration and
exemption applications.
They will have someone


from their offices at the
following locations on the
dates listed:
Tuesday, Feb. 10:
Eastpoint Post Office from
9-11 a.m. and Apalachicola
State Bank on St. George
Island from 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 12:
Chillas Hall in Lanark Village
from 9-11 a.m. and Alligator
Point Fire Department from
1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Proof of residency for
exemptions may be a Florida
driver's license or Florida
license plates, and Social
Security numbers must be
provided for both spouses.
If you are a registered voter,
it must be in the county
where you are claiming your
primary residency.
If you have any questions,
contact the property appraiser
at 653-9236 or supervisor of
elections at 653-9520.

St. Vincent supporters
to meet
Supporters of St. Vincent
National Wildlife Refuge will
hold their annual meeting
from 2-5 p.m. at the Indian
Pass Raw Bar.
Agenda includes board
of director elections, refuge
update with Complex
Manager James Burnett and
guest speaker archeologist
Nancy White.
For more info, call 653-
8808 or e-mail supportstvin@
hotmail.com.


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Good Food, Open
House,
Walking and Riding
Tours of the
Buffer Preserve

Saturday. February 7. 2009
11 a.m.- 2 p.m. Eastern

At the St. Joseph Bay Preserves Center
(the old Treasure Bay Lodge)
3915 State Road 30-A
Port St. Joe, FL


Shrimp Boil Sponsored by
Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves
www.stjosephbaypreserves.org
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70






A6 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 5, 2009


Franklin County HONOR ROLL


ABC Honor ROLL


The following is
the Franklin County
Elementary School's
second nine-week honor
roll for the 2008-2009 school
year.

Kindergarten
Good Citizen Marci
Kelley, Gage Boone, Logan
Smith.
All A's Austin
Gray, Dawson Hooker,
Christopher Barnett,
Maliah Lockley, Tony
Millender, Aaliyah Moran,
Katie Newman, Clinton
Rester, Krystina Arroya,
Tressie Edwards, Bycin
Huckeba, Destanie
Proctor, Justice Smith,


PUBLIC NOTICE

THE ST. GEORGE ISLAND PUBLIC BOAT
RAMP AND FISHING PIER WILL BE CLOSED
TEMPORARILY. THIS CLOSURE WILL BE-
GIN FEBUARY 1 AND CONTINUE THROUGH
FEBUARY 28 OR COMPLETION OF THE
REVEMENT.

PUBLICATION: FEBRUARY 5 AND 12, 2009.


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WEEKLY I~ I


Date
Thu, Feb 05
Fri, Feb 06
Sat, Feb 07
Sun, Feb 08
Mon, Feb 09
Tue, Feb 10
Wed, Feb 11


Temperature
High I
52
61
67
690
70
68
67


% Precip
0%
0%
0%
0%
10%
10%
10%


TIDE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
Cat Point MinusO:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03

APALACHICOLA
02/05 Thu 07:13AM -0.6 L 10:24PM 1.4 H

02/06 Fri 08:13AM -0.7 L 04:42PM 1.2 H
07:00PM 1.1 L 11:51PM 1.5 H
02/07 Sat 09:04AM -0.7 L 04:48PM 1.1 H
08:10PM 1.0 L
02/08 Sun 01:11AM 1.5 H 09:49AM -0.7 L
05:00PM 1.1 H 09:04PM 0.8 L
02/09 Mon 02:21AM 1.5 H 10:27AM -0.6 L
05:11PM 1.1 H 09:52PM 0.6 L
02/10 Tue 03:23AM 1.5 H 11:00AM -0.4 L
05:22PM 1.1 H 10:39PM 0.4 L
02/11 Wed 04:21AM 1.4 H 11:27AM -0.2 L
05:32PM 1.1 H 11:26PM 0.2 L


CARRABELLE
02/05 Thu 05:00AM -1.0 L 08:59PM 2.2 H


02/06 Fr 06:00AM -1.1 L
04:47PM 1.8 L
02/07 Sat 06:51AM -1.1 L
05:57PM 1.6 L
02/08 Sun 07:36AM -1.1 L
06:51PM 1.3 L
02/09 Mon 12:56AM 2.4 H
03:46PM 1.8 H
02/10 Tue 01:58AM 2.4 H
03:57PM 1.8 H
02/11 Wed 02:56AM 2.2 H
04:07PM 1.8 H


03:17PM 1.9
10:26PM 2.4
03:23PM 1.8
11:46PM 2.4
03:35PM 1.8

08:14AM -1.0
07:39PM 1.0
08:47AM -0.6
08:26PM 0.6
09:14AM -0.3
09:13PM 0.3


Makayla Varner, Layla
Chisholm, Hollie Larkin,
Charlee Winchester, Kyle
Campbell, Wilson Roberts,
Brooklyn Turner, Logan
Waller, Landen Millender
A/B Capri Cargill,
Kelson Smith, Alaina
Wilson, Charles Brown,
Stephen Malone, Ashley Jo
Neel, Shirah Pelt, Colson
Shelley, Jasmine Colon,
Trederrion Jones, Dresden
Lambert, Josh Yancey,
Emma Pace

1st Grade
Good Citizen Kylie
Erickson, Mason Shiver
All A's Isaiah Barber,
KynsieErickson,Xazanthia


Mason, Sue Richardson,
Summer Cepull, Alexy
Erickson, Takiah Ford,
Thomas Gragg, Zander
McCalpin, Teri Messer,
Chloe Owens, Keondre'
Sewell, Drake Stanley,
Amber Francis, Jacob
Shirley, LaTessa Taylor,
Shelby Thompson, Mikel
Register, Cale Barber
A/B Krista Fuller,
Peyton Chitty, Rosie Davis,
Honesti Williams, Nicholas
Hutchins,ChasityArd,Darcy
Kelly, Dyna Edgecomb,
Kaleb Foley, Bruce Keith,
Allyson Emswiler, Shaylen
Langely, Morgan Malone,
Patrick Tipton, Kyron
Wheeler, Kristianna Wilson,
Jesse Ray

2nd Grade
Good Citizen Mikalin
Huckeba, Jonathan Ham
All As Mikalin
Huckeba, Casey Riley,
Tonner Segree, Beyla
Walker, Jessica Rudd,
Colby Boatwright, Hannah
Hogan
A/B Merissa Beasley,
Austin Cammarano, Edgar
Ceron, Fisher Edwards,
Aracely Gallegos, Breanna
Murray, Abner Ramirez,
Ethan Riley, Mitchell Sand,
Robyn Suiter, Whitley
Beasley, Michael Bentley,
Michael Drennen, Hunter
Kelley, Taylor Messer,
Joseph Murphy, Haleigh
Mann, Lorenzo O'Neal,
Makenzie Shuman,
Duncan Whaley, Kiana
Foley, Peyton Millender

3rd Grade
Good Citizen Harper
Westbrook, Joshua
Edwards, Hannah Barnett
All A's Amberly
Moseley, Harper
Westbrook, Morgan
Anderson, Josie Kriss,


Emily Owens, Hannah
Westbrook,
A/B Tiffany Glass,
Myah Hunnings, Yanni
Pateritsas, Cassie Moore,
WilliamLee,JustinArellano,
Jacob Stalvey, Evangelina
Ducker, Cypress Earl,
Timothy Shuler, Anastasia
Smith, Madison Smith,
Allison Yowell, John Glass,
Emma Pace

4th Grade
Good Citizen Jill
Diestelhorst, Kimmy
Campbell, Athen Shipman
All A's Scout Segree,
Jackson Copley-Subbarao,
Charles Petty, Adriana
Butler, Thomas Copley-
Subbarao, Alexis Segree,
Bobby Kilgore
A/B Conner
Mathes, Zach May, Marty
Sawesky, Levi Spruill,
Tyanna Townsend, Tyler
Banks, Bryan Boyd, Cash
Creamer, Ann Reeder,
Abby Harris, Melody
Hatfield, Meghan Griffin,
Tylor Novak, Preston
Vinson, Chelsea Register,
Colby Estes

5th Grade
Good Citizen Lael
Parker, Krista Martina,
Rebecca Carroll, Brandon
Walker
All A's Jessica
Schmidt, Lael Parker, Anna
Riley, Hollie Shiver, Riley
Brown, Cayce Daniels,
Kendall Meyer, Amelia
Newman, Brandon Walker
A/B -RickyEdgecomb,
Trenton Lee, Kaleigh
Hardy, Krista Martina,
Gerald Messer, Lett
Smith, Rebecca Carroll,
Shadowrun Earl, Robert
Edwards, Michael Lowe,
Kris Schoelles, Michael
Glory, Jared King, Jaylynn
Lyston


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Almanac Call:

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The Apalachicola Bay
Charter School would
like to announce their
honor roll for the second
nine-week grading period
of the 2008-2009 school
year:

Kindergarten
Perfect Attendance -
Katie Cox, Logan Freeman,
Ashley Kent, Bradley Lee,
Livia Monod, Elizabeth
McAnally, Cody Cassidy,
Gillian Terhune.

First grade
All A's Edy Rash,
Connor Messer, Rebecca
Willis, Chloe Davis, Scout
McLemore, Faith Cooper,
Bailey Herrington, Alyssa
Martina, Savannah Parker,
Camille Williams.
A/B Justice Barfield,
Allison Register, Jake
Norred, Alyssa Robinson,
Kassidy Raffield, Brock
Shiver, Kalahn Kent,
Elan Blitch, Jayden
Justice, Hunter Davis,
Summer Granger, Adrian
Pruett.
Perfect Attendance
- Hannah Sweet, Brock
Shiver, Jayden Justice,
Summer Granger.

Second grade
All A's Christian
Amison, Matthew Cox,
Damien Freeman,
Phoenix Swords, Wesley
Benoit, Kevin Flores,
Jaiden Hill, Alexus
Johnson.
A/B Bryce Kent, Angel
Henning, Antiuana Croom,
Cole Smith, Eva Varnes,
Morgan Vaughn, Charlie
Carter, Hailey Gay, Lexi
Holland, Sophie Kirvin,
Ian Lashley, Christopher
Newell, Brandon Taranto,


Walker, Hannah Pruett,
Austin Smith, Seth Ward,
Tyler Webb.
Perfect Attendance -
Jacob Shuler.


Karo-lynn Myers.
Perfect Attendance
- Christian Amison,
Bryce Kent, Matthew Cox,
Antiuana Croom, Damien
Freeman, Angel Henning,
Lexi Holland, Christopher
Newell.

Third grade
All A's Faith Sapp,
Lucas Sasnett, Savannah
Montgomery, Corie Cates,
Brooke Martina, Kate
McLemore, Andrew
Ngyuen, Jaylunn Obee,
Connor Rash, Camilla
Shiver, Landen Abel,
Rebekah Lee, Natalie
Terhune, Michaela Cassidy,
Allie Zingarelli, Georjanna
Myers.
A/B Simon Hodgson,
Sam Salman, Amanda
Butler, Shaylee Crews,
Sara Gibbs, Nic Joanos,
Ethan Moses, Landon
Nash, Katelynn Denney,
Jacob Pendleton, Sara
Pouncey, Alyssia Shirah,
Joseph Martinez, Cameron
Wynn.
Perfect Attendance
- Landen Abel, Simon
Hodgson, Lucas Sasnett,
Rebekah Lee, Shiloh
Pittman, Natalie Terhune,
Michaela Cassidy, Jacob
Pendleton, Allie Zingarelli,
Valerie Creamer.

Fourth grade
All A's Eve Bond,
Emily Crosby, Maxwell
Davis, Astrid Ramirez,
Emily Zingarelli,
Jayla Alley, Allie Kirvin,
Marena Benoit, Mallorie
Shiver, Kenneth Wilson,
Bianca Huber, Jaylon
Gainer.
A/B Preston Burkett,
Holly Chambers, Hunter
Butler, Marshall Sweet,
Kacey Howard, Landon
Flowers, Katy Spann,
Logan Crosby, Ronald
Henderson, Derone
Philpotts, Anna Smith,
Austin McKee, Brianna
Parker, Alyssa Shiver.
Perfect Attendance -
Eve Bond, Astrid Ramirez,
Emily Zingarelli, Katy
Spann, Hunter Butler,
Marshall Sweet, Makenzie
Griner.

Fifth grade
All A's Adriane Elliott,
Skylah Obee.
A/B: Joshua Patriotis,
Maya Blitch, Celest
Creamer, Gabby Bond,
Daniel Roberts, Dallas
Shiver, Milford Shiver.
Perfect Attendance
- John White, Vailan
Gibbs, Jayla Alley, Allie
Kirvin, Brooke Moore,
Spencer Strickland, Amber
Henning, Brooke Parker,
Xuripha Tiller.

Sixth grade
All A's Brooke Frye,
Kelsey Shuler, Chase
Taranto, Alyssa Varnes.
A/B Logan Allen,
Amanda Anthony, Corey
Bratton, Gracyn Butler,
Sasha Carr, Era Cooper,
Megan Creamer, Trinity
Henderson, Katie Seger,
Hannah Wintker, Jared
Zingarelli.
Perfect Attendance
- Logan Allen, Amanda
Anthony, Corey Bratton,
Travis Moore, Jake
Richards, Justin Spann.

Seventh grade
All A's: Jessica Shields,
Kristen Burkett.
A/B James Bailey,
Jasmine Cooper, Gracyn
Kirvin, Malachi Parker,
Holly ERrr, Ally Millender,
Adriana Reeder, Kevan
Killoran, Graham Kirvin,
Brandy Parker.
Perfect Attendance
- Antonio Croom, Kevan
Killoran, James Newell.

Eighth grade
All A's Whitney
Vause.
A/B Christina Collins,
Elisha Patriotis, Morgan


'"







SCARRABELLE APALACH COLA





PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, February 5, 2009 w ww.apalachtimes.com Page A7


Lady



Seahawks



finish



strong


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Editor's Note: This is the
second of two stories on the
Lady Seahawks' 2008-09 sea-
son. This week, The Times
looks at the girls basketball
team's last 11 regular season
games. The Lady Seahawks
begin district tournament
play Friday, Feb. 6 against
Maclay at Jefferson County
High School in Monticello.

The Lady Seahawks varsity
girls basketball team finished
the regular with a flurry of
victories, winning four of their
last six games.
"We had a good schedule
late in the year, and we were
able to pick up some at the end
of the year. We went through a
streak where we played really
good basketball," said coach
Justin Long, whose squad has
run up a regular season record
of 8-10 and a district record of
2-4.
The Lady Seahawks will
face district co-champ Maclay
on Friday at Jefferson County
in the opener of the district
tournament.
On Jan. 7 at home against
Liberty County, the Lady Se-
ahawks triumphed 31-18, led
by senior forward Ashley My-
ers' dozen points. Sophomore
guard Tasia Simmons added
8, with junior guard Joy Car-
rino and eighth grader Shelby
Myers each scoring 4. Senior
guard Quanteka Croom, se-
nior center Khrystal Davis and
junior forward Monet Moron
each tallied a bucket.
On Jan. 9 at home, the Lady
Seahawks lost 62-26 to the
Maclay Lady Marauders. Sim-
mons scored a dozen points,
while Ashley Myers kicked in
9. Croom and freshman guard
Oneika Lockley each added 2
points, while Davis added 1.
On Jan. 10 at home against
Port St. Joe, the team fell 49-21.
Simmons led the team with 13


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Lady Seahawks senior Teka Croom, shown with her parents, Jeff and Cydell Lockley, was
honored at the Jan. 16 Senior Night. "For a senior that's had so many coaches over her
four years of high school, she's had to make a lot of adjustments," said coach Justin Long.
"She still knows when it's time to put the work hat on and always knows when it's time for a
light moment."


points, followed by 4 fo
ers, and 2 each for Dav
Moron.
On Jan. 13 at Mosle
Lady Seahawks fell 72-
Ashley Myers scored a sc
high 20 points. Simmons
a dozen and Lockley 8,
Croom contributed 3,
and Moron each 2 and
Myers 1.
On Jan. 15 at home a
North Florida Christian
team lost 48-29, although
said the girls showed
strength as a team.
"We were playing right
them; they were scar
death of us," he said. "B
couldn't finish from th
throw line."
Lockley led the tean
13 points, followed with
Ashley Myers, 4 from Sin
and 2 each for Davis an
ron.
On Jan. 16 at home a


At left, sophomore guard Tasia Simmons
has been among the Lady Seahawks' most
consistent scorers this season. At right,
Lady Seahawks senior Patricia Golden
was honored at the Jan. 16 Senior Night.
"It takes a lot of guts for a senior who's
never stepped on a court to come out in
her senior year, with an aggressive group
of females and have perfect attendance
and work hard all the time," said coach
Justin Long. "But she has."

)r My- Jefferson, the girls got a 48-27
is and win, paced by Ashley Myers' four
12, Croom's 10, Carrino's 8, fror
y, the Simmons' 7 and Moron's 4. Da- A
48, as vis, Lockley and eighth grader leach
eason- Anna Lee each added 2, while by
added Shelby Myers scored 1 point, add
while On Jan. 17 at Port. St. Joe,
Davis the team lost 46-29, despite a the
Shelby 15-point effort from Ashley My- this
ers. Carrino added 6, Simmons led
against 5, Davis 2 and Shelby Myers 1. by
n, the On Jan. 22 at home against for
Long Altha, the Lady Seahawks vis
their nailed a 46-13 win. Ashley My- gua
ers led the team with 18 points, her
ht with followed by 6 each for Lockley
red to and Simmons, 4 for Davis and of p
3ut we 2 each from Croom, Moron and lot
e free Shelby Myers. they
On Jan. 23 at Maclay, the saic
n with Lady Seahawks fell 57-26, as "Th
S8 by Ashley Myers tallied 14, Sim- mai
nmons mons 10 and Lockley 2. don
.d Mo- At Liberty County on Jan. And
26, the Franklin County squad to s
against won 36-30. son


'We were down by 10 in the
rth quarter and had to come
n behind," Long said.
Ashley Myers kicked in 18 to
i the team, followed closely
Simmons with 15. Lockley
ed 2 and Davis 1.
On Jan. 29 at Wewahitchka,
Lady Seahawks again won,
time 35-15. Ashley Myers
the team with 11, followed
8 for Lockley and 5 each
Simmons and Croom. Da-
scored 4 points, and senior
rd Patricia Golden scored 2,
first points of the season.
'These girls have got a lot
potential, but they have a
of basketball knowledge
y have to pick up," Long
I, eying next year's season.
ey've been coached by so
ny different people. We
't have a true point guard.
I somebody's going to have
tep up next year and score
ie points."


Sports SHORTS

Dixie Youth League to begin
registration Saturday
The Franklin County Dixie League
is accepting applications for the 2009
season. To be eligible for the 2009 sea-
son, your child must be 5 years old
before May 1.
Participation fee for the 2009 sea-
son will be $40. Sign up will be Satur-
day, Feb.7 from 10:30 to noon at D.W
Wilson Sports Complex in Apalachic-
ola.
On Thursday, Feb.12, from 6-8
p.m., sign-up will be at Vrooman
Sports Complex in Eastpoint.
On Saturday, Feb.14 from 10:30 to
noon., signup will be at Will Kendrick
Sports Complex in Carrabelle.
For your child to be eligible to par-
ticipate, we must receive a completed
form and copy of his/her birth certifi-
cate and non-refundable participation
fee. Late registration fee after March
1 will be $50, no exceptions.

Semi-pro baseball league in
the works
Efforts continue in the develop-
ment of the Big Bend semi-pro base-
ball league in the Big Bend area of
north Florida.
The proposed league consists of
two divisions (eastern and western)
covering six counties immediately
east of the Apalachicola River and
six counties west of the river. Teams
(minimum of four and maximum of
six in each division) are being devel-
oped basically along county locations.
The next league-wide meeting
is scheduled for Feb. 14 at 10 a.m. at
the Apalachee Restaurant in Bristol,
Highway 20 West.
For further information, contact
Harold W Bailey at 229-662-2066 or
850-524-2151.



This week with

the SEAHAWKS


Friday, Feb. 6
Lady Seahawks varsity basket-
ball will play Maclay at the district
semi-finals at Jefferson County in
Monticello. Tipoff is at 6 p.m., fol-
lowed by an 7:30 p.m. game between
North Florida Christian and Jeffer-
son County.
Seahawks JV and varsity basket-
ball play at Mosley. First tipoff time
is at 6 p.m. CST.

Saturday, Feb. 7
Girls basketball district finals
at Jefferson County High School in
Monticello. Tipoff time is at 7 p.m.


Seahawks draw Jefferson


County in district opener


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Seahawks hoop coach Fred Drake
doesn't like it very much, but that's the way
the coin tosses.
Instead of seeding the district tourney
based on the scores of head-to-competi-
tion, the organizers opted for a coin toss.
And as luck would have it, the second-
seeded Seahawks will be facing third-seed
Jefferson County, who they beat twice in
the regular season, in the opening game at
6 p.m. in Monticello on Friday, Feb. 13.
The second game that night will pit
top-seed Maclay, who like the Seahawks
finished 5-1 as district regular season co-
champion, against the Marauders' neigh-
borhood rival North Florida Christian, the
fourth seed.
"I think it was set up the way they want-
ed it, in my opinion," Drake said. "I think
it's a moneymaking thing. You have the two
rival teams playing each other."
Drake said he likes the way his 21-5 Se-
ahawks have been playing of late, but he's
concerned that a spirited hometown crowd,
and sharpshooting sophomore guard Chris
Mays, could spell trouble.
"That's who we got to stop," Drake said.
"It worries me about playing at their home.
It's hard to beat a team three times in a row,
especially when they're playing at home.
"We got to win to get in. We can't think
about Maclay already," he said. "Whoever
loses they're going to be packing up. We've
come too far to let our season end in Jef-
ferson County. We just got to get the kids


JAN. 30 AWAY VS.
PANAMA CITY ARNOLD
Franklin Co. 16 16 17 13 62
Arnold 16 9 12 12-49
SEAHAWKS: Deshaun Winfield
10/15 2s, 0/1 3s, 2/3 FTs, 22 pts.;
Zan Simmons 4/5 2s, 8 pts.; Carlos
Morris 7/10 2s, 1/2 3s, 1/1 FTs,
18 pts.; Jeremy James 2/6 2s, 2/6
3s, 10 pts.; Austin O'Neal 1/4 2s,
0/1 FTs, 2 pts.; Arron Prince 1/1 2s,
2 pts.
Totals: 25/41 2s, 3/9 3s, 3/5
FTs
Rebounds: Morris 10, Simmons
5, O'Neal, James 4, Winfield 3,
Dalin Modican
Steals: Morris, Winfield, James
2, Modican, O'Neal
Assists: O'Neal, Morris 3, James
2, Simmons, Winfield
Blocks: Simmons 3, Winfield

motivated. I think the kids feel they've been
done wrong."
For the third time this season, the Se-
ahawks topped Panama City Arnold, win-
ning 62-49 on the road Friday night.
"It was our third time facing them,"
Drake said. "It's kind of hard to beat a team
three times in one season. I was impressed
by that. Pretty much, they're kind of like a
similar version of Maclay. It was kind of a
tune-up to get ready for the district tourna-
ment."


Lady Seahawk softball prepares for spring


The Lady Seahawk softball team has
been preparing for the upcoming 2009
season since Nov. 3.
The girls have been conditioning for
three months after school with
head coach Christy Thompson
and assistant coach David Walker.
"Expectations are high this
year. ... We are finally at the new
school, surrounded by positive
aesthetics and practicing on a
brand new field," Thompson said.
"It feels good and automatically
serves as motivation for the girls. SE
"We want to be the first Se- KHR
ahawk softball team to make his- D,
tory by placing 'District Champs'
on that field. The goal has been set. The
athletes are available. All we have to do is
remain focused."
Thompson said she considers the
most important job of a coach to keep
these teenaged athletes focused on how
special this season can be.
"Everything else will fall into place. If
we can do this, then only good things will
come out of this season," she said.
The team has one returning senior,


NI

AV


Khrystal Davis, but even as a very young
team, they have the potential to win a lot
of games together over the next three or
four years.
The rest of the varsity team
consists of juniors Kendyl Hardy
and Leigh Redmond, sophomores
Shelbi Maxwell and Shelby Shiver,
freshmen Morgan Newell, Harley
S 'lTucker, and Tiffany Varnes and
eighth grader Chena Segree.
Available as well are members
of the JV squad, sophomores Tif-
IOR fany Carroll, Brooke Harper and
STAL Tasia Simmons, freshmen Mea-
VIS gan Andrews, Emily Hatfield,
Kara Harrelson, Carli Kink, Onei-
ka Lockley, Ciara Moore, Megan New-
ell and Christina Pateritsas and eighth
graders Anna Lee, Megan McClain and
Shelby Myers.
"I look forward to a very fun and posi-
tive year with the Lady Seahawk softball
team," Thompson said. "I would also like
to personally think the community for all
of their generosity during all of the bag-
gingforbucks for the team. The girls have
benefited greatly from your kindness."


APALACHICOLA STATE BANKAP

Edition 00, Sports,

3x 2,0

4505629, 4505629


NE






A8 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 5, 2009


Educators go to Big Apple to improve schools


A team from Franklin County
traveled to New York City last
month to work with school im-
provement experts at a four-day
institute.
The 11th annual Center for
School Improvement Institute
(CSI) was designed to support
union, district and community
partnership efforts to develop
skills needed to raise student
achievement.
Attending were Cathy Wood,
president of the Franklin County
Teachers Association; former
Franklin County School Board
member Denise Butler; Super-
intendent Nina Marks; Deedee
Dasher, president of the Frank-
lin County Support Personnel
Union; and reading coach Lynn
Clark.
It was hosted by the Ameri-
can Federation of Teachers
(AFT) and led by expert facilita-
tors from the United Federation
of Teachers, the AFT's New York


City affiliate.
The team from Franklin
County was joined by 23 other
teams from across the country.
This year's institute was held at
the offices of the United Federa-
tion of Teachers from Jan. 22-25.
"It takes a team approach
to strengthen schools and have
students perform well," said
Marks, team leader of the CSI
trip. "Working alone, neither
parents, the school personnel,
the union, nor the district can
bring about needed changes.
Working together, especially with
the knowledge we gain through
experiences like this meeting,
we can bring about significant
improvements for students in
Franklin County."
The AFT has worked with
numerous school district teams
to develop coordinated school-
improvement plans using re-
search-based strategies which
help foster a cooperative ap-


proach to this important task.
The CSI seminars and work
sessions focused on developing
team building skills, using sta-
tistical data to drive informed
decisions, implementing effec-
tive communication strategies,
and understanding how to use
professional development for
all staff to produce results stu-
dents need to achieve their po-
tential.
"We were very fortunate to
receive the only scholarship
AFT extended to any group this
year" Dasher said. "Our AFT
scholarship and FEA (Florida
Education Association) mon-
etary assistance were awarded
to us because of our collabora-
tion between our unions and
administration during the past
year with Community Conver-
sations, which demonstrated
our sincere desire to show the
highest student achievement
possible."


,n l T UwI I UIItIIVUUtLC pIIULU
Taking in the excitement of Times Square are, from left, Cathy
Wood, Denise Butler, Nina Marks, Deedee Dasher and Lynn
Clark.
Wood said "We look forward eager to continue the work with
to focusing on ways to strength- our administration, parents and
en our school for the students community on this important
in Franklin County, and we are task."


Join us for
Franklin County's

Sh6art
---- TRUTH
fo 117 T I^The Heart Truth & Red Dress are Trademarks of the DH
for Women Day
Eeryone Can uppzor e '5/e zy 4z4fs5 heaf diSease ;n wo/yen
4A/ tjerfiw/ red on ^4ilona/ /^e6- 4fed 'y, A day, fCe.. 6,, 2009 *
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IIIEART DISEASE IS TIIE #1 KILLER OF WOMEN,
z6z uIany/ Zoimen do no konZ'o e/ e/re a, 6e 5.




FCHD will be hosting a Heart Health Expo
on Friday, 2/6/09 from 8 AM -10 AM at the
Apalachicola Fitness Center. Stop by for your free Healthy Heart Kit.
For more information contact:
Franklin County Health Department
Nadine Kahn, Health Educator
653-2111 Ext. 123
e-mail: NadineKahn@doh.state.fl.us
... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... ..


T-Bone Steak $429 3 IFP.

Whole BI Ribeye $439 lb.


SBIRibeye Steaks 469 E p .


Whole Strip Loin $399 b.

N.Y Strip Steaks $429 E p

140 BNLS Chuck Steak 299 P.


BNLS Chuck Roast 279 lb.

whole Boston Butt 119T Ib.

OrWhole Porkloin BNLS $199 Ib.

% Pork Spare Ribs 3 Pack $ 159 Ib


|3Assorted Pork Chops $149 P.


e Leg Quarters 10 lb Bag s490

4 BNLS Chicken Breast S 99Fp.

2 LOCATIN A


FAMILY OWN ENOREK NNTAD
~II '*


GULF BEACH DRIVE PROJECT #7.078
S.C.O.P PROJECT
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person,
company or corporation interested in constructing:
GULF BEACH DRIVE S.C.O.P. PROJECT
Project is located in Franklin County, Florida and consists of approximately 33,500 linear feet of roadway
resurfacing, shoulder work, and striping.
Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
(850) 277-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes.
All bidders shall be FDOT qualified per Section 2-1 of the FDOT Standard Specifications for Road and
Bridge Construction, latest edition.
Completion date for this project will be 120 days from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the
successful bidder.
Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $250.00 per day.
Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for the "Gulf Beach Road S.C.O.P. Project".
Bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. (EDT), on March 2nd, 2009, at the Franklin County Clerk's Office,
Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320-2317, and will be
opened and read aloud on March 3rd, 2009 at the County Commission meeting at 34 Forbes Street, Apala-
chicola, FL.
Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $45.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made
payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC.
The Board of County Commissioners reserved the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or
reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Franklin
County. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening.
All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regu-
lation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida.
If you have any question, please call Clay Kennedy at (850)227-7200.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS-00010


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LIFE


TIMES


B
Section


Thursday, February 5, 2009 w ww.apalachtimes.com Page B1


DEBORAH DAVIS I Contributed photo
Spero and Hazel Buzier at the
outset of World War II.


DEBORAH DAVIS I Contributed photo


Capt. Spero, left, and older brother Costa.


DEBORAH DAVIS I Contributed photo
Spero Buzier and wife,
Hazel, on their 69th
wedding anniversary. She
died in March 2003.


A century of 4x&qztee


Capt. Spero Buzier to

turn 100 years old

By Lois Swobodo
Times Staff Writer
On Wednesday, Apalachicola's Spero
Buzier, the oldest living commercial
fisherman in Franklin County, will
celebrate his 100th birthday.
Last week, he and his family were
kind enough to share stories of his
career on the Gulf with readers of the
Times.
Capt. Spero was born Feb. 11, 1909,
in Cedar Key to Greek immigrant
sponge fisherman Panayiotis
(Peter) Buzier and Alice Knowles of
Apalachicola.
"He and my mother separated, and
I came to Apalachicola for the first time
when I was about 6 or 7," he said.
After returning home, his mother
met and married Henry Rosalis. When
he was about 9, the boy moved with his
family to Miami.
"You couldn't drive to Carrabelle in
those days. You had to travel by shrimp
boat. I remember seeing the boat's
engine running," he said. "We slept on
the beach and then went to Miami by
train."
By the time he was 12, the family
had moved again to Jacksonville,
where he worked as a paperboy, buying
10 papers for a quarter and selling
them for a nickel apiece.
Later, the family moved to Biloxi,
Miss., where, Buzier remembered, he
got his first long pants. He remained
with his family older brother, Costa,
and three sisters, Helen, Cleo and
Angelina in Mississippi, working
as a commercial fisherman. After his
stepfather died, he helped take care of
his mother and small sisters.


He captained a fishing boat for the
first time when he was 16. At 24, he
met Hazel Clara Lashley in Biloxi and
married her on Dec. 2, 1933.
The couple moved to Gulfport,
where Spero continued to fish. Later
they had a son, Peter, and a younger
boy, Spero, who died of pneumonia
when he was only 6 months old.

Fought 'The battle of Algiers,
New Orleans'
After enlisting in the Navy in 1941 at
32, Buzier was sent to New
Orleans to work in the Navy
Yard. Initially, he disagreed
with his commanding officer,
but in the end, his knowledge
of boats saved the day.
"That helped me in the m
long run, too," he said.
"When I went into the Navy,
it didn't take me long to make
chief petty officer."
Because of his vast
experience on the water, he Spero Buzi
entered the service as a first 100 on W
class boat's mate, sending him
to work on a tugboat carrying
passengers between the Navy Yard and
the nearby neighborhood of Algiers.
"The captain was an old serviceman
with hatch marks up to here on his
arm. The tug had an old Atlas and
Imperial engine, and it didn't have
a clutch. It would run forwards and
backwards, but you had to stop it to
switch directions. He didn't know how
to regulate the speed," Buzier said.
"When we'd come up to a dock, he'd
stop and then have to start it again,
stall it out or run it into the pier. I had
had plenty of experience with those
engines on shrimp boats. When I tried
to tell him what to do, he got mad and
sent me back to the personnel office.
I wasn't in the office no time till they
wound up coming and asking me could I


ier
'ed


run that tug. I told them I could as easy
as throwing a rabbit in a briar patch,"
Buzier said. "I spent most of the rest
of the war running the tug. Later when
people asked where I fought, I told them
in the battle of Algiers, New Orleans."
Buzier was one of three captains
who piloted the shipyard's two tugs
during the war. In addition to ferrying
workers, the big boats moved mine
skimmers, destroyers and landing ships
into and out of dry-dock for repairs.
Though he spent most of the war
at home, Buzier eventually rotated out
and served in both the Atlantic
and Pacific theatres. He was
chief boatmate on a destroyer
escorting 30 merchant ships
to Bizerte, Tunisia, in 1943. On
this deployment, he also went
to the real Algiers and the
Rock of Gibraltar and saw the
beautiful, blue Mediterranean
Sea teeming with colorful fish.
"There were a bunch of
ships that had been sunk in
willturn the harbor at Bizerte," he said.
nesday. "We chased a sub one time and
dropped a depth charge on it,
but we never knew if we got
her."
On returning to the states, he
reported to the Philadelphia Navy Yard,
where he saw snow for the first time.
His next assignment was to the U.S.
transport ship Matthews, deployed to
the Pacific. He was on the transport
when it carried Navy construction
crews to Hawaii by way of the
Panama Canal. Later, the boat carried
amphibious forces on several invasions.
He was at Okinawa when the atomic
bomb was dropped on Nagasaki.

Barely escapes death while
shrimping
After the war, Capt. Spero returned
to Apalachicola with his wife and son.


He worked as a shrimper aboard his
first shrimp boat, the Spark Plug.
One fateful night, he and a member
of his crew barely escaped death when
a freak storm struck when they were
traveling along the coast of St. Vincent
Island between Indian Pass and West
Pass.
"We passed all the other shrimp
boats heading back to shore. They
told me about the bad weather, but I
wanted to go through Indian Pass so
I kept on. By the time we got there, it
was so rough we couldn't get through.
We had to go back.
"The sea hit the boat so hard, it
would give you whiplash. A huge wave
washed over the deck and took me and
another man overboard. The nets were
washed overboard, too. They were hung
up in the doors, and I was hung up in
the nets. That propeller went by me just
as pretty while I was underwater.
"The boat had turned around and
was headed toward the beach. There
was one man left aboard. He was able
to grab the net and drag me in as he
passed us. The other fellow was able to
survive by filling his slicker up with air
to help him float. We was able to pull
him in as he floated past. We dropped
anchor and went below. We was about
half drowned.... When another wave
hit and washed the slide that covered
the hatch overboard, water came in
everywhere. We knew we couldn't stay
anchored over night."
They decided to try and run the
boat aground. The tide was low, so
they knew if they beached the boat
it would be possible to get her free
at high tide the next day. Then they
discovered they couldn't draw in the
anchor. Capt. Spero gave one of his
crew a butcher knife.
"I told him I was going to start up
the engine and to wait till a wave had

See SPERO B1


*


NE






B2 I The Times


Birthdays


Lucas Ward turns 1
Lucas Ward celebrated
his 1st birthday on
Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008.
He is the son of Martha
Ward, of Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents
are Lonnie and Sandra
Moses, of Apalachicola.
Maternal great-
grandparents are Martha
Moses and the late Jim
Moses, of Apalachicola.


ETOF THE

PET WEEK


December was a very successful
adoption month. We had puppies
being adopted all over Florida from
Pensacola to Lakeland. I even put one
on a plane to Tucson, AZ.
Unfortunately, the older puppies
and adult dogs, like Elwood pictured
above, are still waiting to be adopted.
All of them are wonderful, affectionate
dogs. They are leash trained and some
are housebroken. Please consider an
older and wiser lifelong companion.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more
details or visit the Franklin County
Humane Society at 244 State Route
65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the
website at www.forgottenpets.org to
see more of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend
for life, you not only save the life of
that pet, you make room for us to save
the life of one more abandoned dog or
cat!







:.4 -.4 :4 :4 .* 4 4 -
g 4 4?


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IXIE

THEATRE

APALACHICOLA, FLA.
**Big Bend Lighthouses FHC February 5
**Dr. Sam Wolf on Menopause February 10
**Perceptions of Paradise February 12
"Patsy" A Musical Tribute by Margo Anderson Feb. 13
Bob Milne Ragtime Piano February 14 & 15
**Denotes Programs Free to the Public
850-653-3200 ~ www.DixieTheatre.com
fS~ i Hii~uftid Q4al3ee
uA Nat &,jiu
AU FLORIDACOUNCIL HOTTL&NiI
fteC*L


Hurray for J!
Jabara
Davasio Pearson
Jr. turned 4 years
old on Sunday,
Jan. 25.
We love our
"Big Boy"!

Mommy
and Daddy


Zoey Burkett turns 3
Zoey Makaela Burkett
celebrated her 3rd birthday on
Thursday, Jan. 29.
She is the daughter of Lee and
Denise Burkett, of Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents are
Michael and Brenda Flowers, of
Eastpoint, and Rusty Clenney,
of Apalachicola. Paternal
grandparents are Jimmie and
Denise Burkett, of Apalachicola.


Shelby Dee's Sweet 16
Happy
birthday
to Shelby
Shiver, who is
turning 16 on
Wednesday,
Feb. 11.
Shelby,
the daughter
of Mike and
Melanie
Shiver, of
Apalachicola,
isa
sophomore
at Franklin
County High
School. She is a varsity cheerleader and plays
for the Lady Seahawks softball team.
Maternal grandparents are Billy and
Glenda Varnes. Paternal grandparents are
Lloyd Shiver and Art and Barbara Clough.
She has a little sister, Mallorie, who is 10.


Hannah Sweet
turns 7
Hannah Ra'shell
Sweet celebrated
her 7th birthday on
Wednesday, Feb. 4.
She is the daughter
of Rosamae Cummings
and Marshal Sweet Sr.
ofApalachicola.
Maternal
grandparents are
Jackie Houston and
Robert Cummings, of
Apalachicola. Paternal
grandparents are the
late Diane Sweet and
Marshall Malveaux.


Ashley Ann Butler celebrated her
13th birthday on Friday, Jan. 23.
She is the daughter of Lena
Luckie and Rhett and Ladonna
Butler, of Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents are
Mary Freeman, of Apalachicola,
and John and Barbra Williamson, of
Chipley. Paternal grandparents are
George Butler and Ginger Butler, of
Apalachicola.
Ashley celebrated her birthday
with Aunt Tiffiny and Uncle James
Williamson.


Benjamin Butler turns 3
Benjamin Rhett Butler
celebrated his 3rd birthday on
Wednesday, Feb. 4.
He is the son of Ladonna and
Rhett Butler, of Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents are Joey
Creamer and Diane Creamer, of
Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents
are George Butler and Ginger
Butler, of Apalachicola.
Maternal great-grandparents are
Dinah and the late Jimmy Taunton,
of Apalachicola. Paternal great-
grandparents are Shirley and Junior
Creamer, of Apalachicola.
Ben also celebrated with his
aunts Ashley, Amanda and Valerie
Creamer and Uncle Austin Taunton.


Weddings and ENGAGEMENTS


Donna
Soderlund,
Tink Corley
to marry
Donna
Soderlund and
James "Tink"
Corley invite you
to their wedding
on Saturday, Feb.
14, 2009, at 6 p.m.
at the park at
Carrabelle Beach.
Reception will
follow immediately
at Wicked Willie's
with a live band. All
family and friends
are invited.


Jill Anna Ponasik to perform Sunday


The Apalachicola Area Historical
Society's Ilse Newell Fund for the
Performing Arts series will present
one of its most popular vocal
performers in an extraordinary
concert Sunday afternoon.
Performing at 4 p.m. Sunday,
Feb. 8, at Trinity Episcopal Church,
singer-actor Jill Anna Ponasik will
present "First Impressions," a
program of songs that have inspired
her over the years. The music spans
four centuries, represents sacred
and secular, and comes from opera,
Broadway shows and rock-'n'-roll.
The reception in Benedict Hall
following the concert will feature
mixed media works of Carrabelle
artist Joan Matey.
With degrees from the University
of Minnesota and the Rice
University Shepherd School of
Music, Ponasik maintains a multi-
faceted career, performing opera
and music-theater with beauty,
vitality and interpretive acumen.
She works regularly with Nautilus
Music-Theater of St Paul, Minn.,
and has appeared in principal roles
at theatres throughout the country,


with a variety of acclaimed theatre
and opera companies.
Royce and Martha Hodge first
brought Ponasik, the daughter-in-
law of their neighbors on St. George
Island, to local attention. She was
invited to sing a few numbers as
part of the Bay Area Choral Society
spring concert at the Dixie Theatre
in 2003. This later blossomed into an
entire program with the Ilse Newell


series, and all who witnessed her
last performance will be looking
forward to Sunday's concert with
great anticipation.
The concert's songs include
"Feelings," "Garden Aria," "Come
Ready and See Me," "Send in the
Clowns," "The Alto's Lament,"
Schubert's "Ave Maria," "I Could
Have Danced All Night," "A Trip to
the Library," "Begin the Beguine,"
"Bedford's Song," "Soldier Boy,"
"Through the Years," "Rainbow
Connection," "Makin' Time,"
"Bridge Over Troubled Water," and
"What a Wonderful World."
The Ilse Newell Fund is
funded primarily by the generous
contributions of committed
sponsors, patrons, associates and
friends. A suggested donation
of $2 is asked of concertgoers to
support the series, administered by
The Apalachicola Area Historical
Society, a not-for-profit organization
dedicated to preserving the rich
history of Apalachicola and the
surrounding area.
For more information, call 370-
6201.


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Thursday, February 5, 2009


Local






Thursday, February 5, 2009


Local


Is everybody happy with
the outcome of the Super
Bowl?
Had a good crowd at our
monthly Lanark Village
Association meeting
Monday at The Hall.
You really need to
join the association,
even if you are only
here on weekends.
Come over to The Hall
during coffee hour,
8:30-11 a.m. Monday
through Saturday. LAN
Pick up an application, J
enjoy a cup of coffee
or two and meet your
neighbors.
Volunteers are needed
in the kitchen for the
breakfast, 8-10 a.m. Monday
through Friday (except for
Thursdays. Help is needed
with lunch on Thursday at
the senior center. We really
need your help; otherwise,
these meals may come to a
screeching halt. Volunteers
make it happen! Back in


AKI
im W


Lanark NEWS

the '80s and '90s, we had
200 volunteers at the senior
center, and Appreciation
Day lunch and awards
ceremonies took three hours.
Those were the days!
Ron Vice will be
on hand for the First
Saturday Dance at
the Senior Center.
Ron will provide
the music for your
dancing and listening
pleasure. You and
CNEWS your sweetheart,
elsh come on over and join
the fun!
The volunteers at
the Camp Gordon Johnston
Museum are happy at their
new home at the old high
school. They are gearing up
for next month's reunion.
They need a new sink. You
can call the museum for info
on the sink at 697-8575 if you
wish to donate to the cause.
Thank you very much.
Everyone's favorite band,
The Journey Band, will


be glad to see you at the
Sweetheart Dance at the Hall
on Saturday, Feb. 14. Same
great talent, same great
music, just a different name.
So grab your dancing shoes,
your favorite beverage, a
covered dish and of course
your main squeeze, and join
us for a fun Valentine's Day
Dance to end a perfect day.
Doors open at 7 p.m.; fun
starts when you walk in the
door! See you there!
Our daily Mass schedule
for this month has been
changed. Please note:
Monday through Thursday at
7 a.m., Friday and Saturday
at 9:30 a.m., and Sunday Mass
at 10 a.m. All masses are held
at Sacred Heart Church, U.S.
98 East, Lanark Village.
Be kind to one another
and check in on the sick and
housebound.
Until next time, God
Bless America, our troops,
the homeless, the poor and
hungry.


First Baptist Church to
screen 'Fireproof'
The film "Fireproof" will be
shown at First Baptist Church at 7
p.m. Sunday, Feb. 8.
Nursery is provided. Donations
for the showing of the movie will be
accepted at the door at the church,
46 Ninth St. in Apalachicola.
"Fireproof" will have you
examining your marriage
and learning ways to love and
understand your spouse as you
are drawn into the world of a
firefighter, his wife and a marriage
worth rescuing.
The 2008 American drama
from Samuel Goldwyn Films
and Sherwood Pictures features
Kirk Cameron as the lead actor,
portraying Caleb Holt, as well as
supporting actress Erin Bethea.
Stephen Kendrick co-wrote the
film with his brother, while serving
as a producer. The supporting
cast is made up of volunteers
from Sherwood Baptist Church in
Albany, Ga., where the Kendrick
brothers serve as associate


pastors.
"Fireproof" was filmed for
30 nonconsecutive days in 2007,
in 16 locations, all of which
were donated. Shot in and
around Albany, the Albany Fire
Department donated its fire
station location, trucks and even
some of its crew for use during
filming.
It was the highest grossing
independent film of 2008. The film
was given an MPAA rating of PG
for "thematic material and some
peril."
For more information, call 653-
9540.

Love Center to host Soul
Food Sunday
The Love and Worship
Center Church at 151 10th St. in
Apalachicola will present Soul
Food Sunday this weekend.
Following the 11 a.m. service on
Sunday, Feb. 8, a Soul Food meal
will be served at 2 p.m. for a $6
donation.
For more info, call 653-2203.


SPERO from page B1

washed over the boat. When the sea
runs over the deck, jump up and
cut the anchor line. He did and we
beached the boat. We ran it right up
into the pine trees. In those days,
there was a watchman on the island
to protect the deer. We walked down
the beach and spent the night with
him in front of a big fire. The next
day, everybody was thinking we were
gone. The Coast Guard sent a big
ship to look for us. They anchored
offshore and ran up a line to pull the
boat free," he said.
Buzier took her home and rebuilt
her good as new.

Quick with his fists
There were adventures on land,
too. Buzier had been a prizefighter
while in the service, and that
experience stood him in good stead
on several occasions. He was known
to enjoy the occasional brawl.
"One guy hit me and broke my
nose. Later on, another fella hit me
and straightened it out," he said.
Once in a juke joint in Eastpoint
near the site of the present-day
Apalachicola Bridge, Spero got
into an altercation over a lady from
Carrabelle.
"I was dancing with her. I couldn't
leave her by herself out on the
floor, but my wife got mad. She was
boiling. She said 'Why don't you just
make a night of it?' I knew it was
time to leave, so I followed Hazel
back to the table, but the other girl's
boyfriend came over and said, 'What
the hell's going on here?'
"I said 'Come over here and I'll


show you.' I hit him so hard he hit
the floor and slid. Everybody said
'He's dead.' I said 'He's all right. Just
throw a bucket of water on him.' He
had a friend who come running over
and I said 'See your friend? That's
how you're gonna be.'
"My wife took her shoe off and
she was standing there. Somebody
asked her what she was doing and
she said she was going to help me.
The guy said 'Lady, don't do that.
He's already killed one man.' She
fainted dead away. When she came
to, I asked her why. She said all she
could think of was the electric chair."
On another occasion, his
daughter said, the family was in Key
West and Capt. Spero took her and
her mother out for a lobster dinner.
When they came on a man sicking
his dog on a smaller one, Buzier, an
animal lover, intervened. The man
grabbed him by his collar.
"That was his bad mistake,"
Buzier said. "He should have hit me.
I knocked him down, and he landed
over by his brother. He didn't try to
come back, but he started explaining
that he was trying to stop the dog
from peeing on his lobsters. Anyway,
we never got our lobster that night."
In 1950, tragedy struck. His 16-
year-old son, Peter, ventured up the
river with a friend in a small boat.
When the boat capsized, the boy
drowned attempting to right the boat
but managed to save his passenger
from drowning.
Pete was an excellent swimmer,
but his companion could not swim.
Pete gave his friend an empty gas
tank to use as a float. Then, while


diving to free the engine of his boat,
he became entangled in a rope and
couldn't surface for air.
"That like to killed me," Buzier
said. "That's when I left Apalachicola
and moved to Texas."

Builds a home, and settles
down
Buzier and his wife moved to
Aransas Pass, and Capt. Spero
attempted to start a new life, even
changing the name of his boat to the
Capt. Pete.
He worked the Gulf Coast from
Port Isabel Texas to Key West aboard
the Texas Pride, and once again, he
was involved in a mishap at sea, and
once again, he emerged a hero.
"We were fishing off Port Isabel.
Just as we were picking our net up, I
looked out of the wheelhouse window
and saw a boat about a half mile from
where we were. When the doors
come out of the water, I looked out
again and it was gone.
"I was working with Jamie Vause.
He got on top of the wheelhouse and
saw the boat turned upside down in
the water. We had shrimp in both nets,
but when he saw that, I knew we had
to let them go. There was a man on
top of the hatch and another hanging
onto a rope.
"I seen this other guy pop up right
then. That was the captain. He had
been trapped in the cabin when the
boat overturned until the space filled
up with water and released the air
pressure so he could open the doors.
See SPERO B5


Obituaries


Sallie May Eubanks


Sallie May Eubanks,
86, passed away Thursday,
Jan. 29, 2009, at her home
in Eastpoint.
She is survived by
two daughters, Virginia
Nowling and husband,
R.J., and Jeanette Paulk,
all of Eastpoint; two
sisters, Juanita Peacock of
Eastpoint and Nellie Ruth
Haulson of Lecanto; two
brothers, Jack and wife,
Eillen Carter, of Lacoochee
and Bobby Seay of Labelle;
six grandchildren; 11
great-grandchildren;
and eight great-great
grandchildren.
She was preceded


Marjorie Hall


in death by a daughter,
De'lois Ann Eubanks of
Bushnell, who passed
away in 1965; three
brothers, Dallas Carter
of Eastpoint, Lonnie Opal
Carter of Eastpoint and
Horris Carter of Plant
City; and one grandson,
Rodney Butch Nowling of
Eastpoint.
Funeral services were
held Monday, Feb. 2, at
First Baptist Church of
Eastpoint. Interment
followed in Eastpoint
Cemetery.
All services are under
the direction of the
Comforter Funeral Home.


Willard Griffith


Willard R. Griffith, 64, of
East Concord, N.Y, died at
home Friday, Jan. 30, 2009.
He was born in 1944
to Willard and Madalyn
(Stone) Griffith, both
formerly of Franklin
County and now deceased.
Griffith is survived by
brother Gerald (Patty)
Griffith of Georgia;


daughters Stacey Griffith
and Gwen Cheek; son Scott
(Christie) Griffith; dear
friend Debbie Penfold; and
two nephews.
A memorial service will
be held at the convenience
of the family. Smith-
Weismantel Rineral
Home Inc. is handling
arrangements.


Marjorie Faye Hall, 88,
died Friday, Jan. 30, 2009,
in Tallahassee.
She was born in
Eastpoint and lived there
until 2001, when she moved
to Crawfordville. She was a
member of Wakulla United
Methodist Church and
worked for the U.S. Postal
Service.
She is survived by
one son, Frederick Reed
Hall (and wife, Darlyn) of
Tallahassee; one daughter,
Erline Hall, Crawfordville;
and one grandson, William
Frederick Hall (and wife,
Lynn) of Michigan. Also


surviving are two sisters,
Doris T. Beaton and Alma
T. Shaffer, both of Lillian,
Ala.; one sister-in-law, Aline
H. Spear of Blountstown;
and four brothers-in-
law, Thomas G. Hall of
Eastpoint, Carl M. Hall of
Alabama, Joseph L. Hall
of Niceville and Raymond
Hall of Eastpoint.
There will be a
memorial service at
1:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb.
7, at Wakulla United
Methodist Church. Harvey-
Young Rineral Home of
Crawfordville is handling
arrangements.


Ronald Lee


Ronald Wayneright Lee,
born in Quincy on March
11, 1948, died Dec. 21, 2008,
in Lanark Village follow a
long battle with cancer.
He was predeceased by
his father, Henry H. Lee,
and his mother, Mellie S.
Lee.
He is survived by two
brothers, Henry A. Lee


of Carrabelle and Tony
Capps of Marianna; four
sisters, Dale Strickland of
Jacksonville, Terry Hicks
of Nashville, Ga., Anna
Chason of Quincy and
Charlene R. Kennedy of
Picayune, Miss.
He was cremated and
will be rested at Goodhope
Cemetery, in Telogia.


First Pentecostal Holiness Church ni H
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola w 7 -h'r r r ITh ,,


Sunday School 9:45 am js W
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm id k ibb s
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm 1/*? (
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm ca
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm \ }
Nursery Provided during regular church services
' ^ **


The next "Guiding
Good Choices, an
interactive workshop for
parents, will be at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 10, at the
Carrabelle Boys and Girls
Club.
The workshop
continues for the next
four Tuesdays, through
March 10, offering
participants a chance to
learn and practice skills
for setting clear family
guidelines, strengthening
family bonds and helping
children develop healthy
behaviors.
The workshops will
help parents develop
strategies to help children
avoid drug use and other
adolescent problem
behaviors and increase
children's involvement in

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


Trinity
EST. 1836
Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


the family.
Kate Jensen, a licensed
clinical social worker, will
facilitate the workshop,
which has been offered
throughout the country
and has been honored
with several citations
of excellence including
"Model Program" from
the Substance Abuse and
Mental Health Services
Administration.
Families who complete
the five-week workshop
will receive a certificate
of completion and are
eligible for a $25 incentive
check from the Florida
State University Center for
Prevention Research.
For info call Cherry
Rankin, club director, at
697-4433 or Jensen at 566-
5283.

THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


WELCOMES YOU

Church

of the

Ascension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM


S St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave. "C" & 6th St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@gtcom.net

PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
MASS SCHEDULE

SATURDAY ................... ......................... 5 PM
SUNDAY ................... ............................ 10 AM
SUNDAY SPANISH MASS.................................. 5 PM
TUESDAY FRIDAY ................................... 8:30 AM




The United Methodist Churches

of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5' St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Friday of each month
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672
Pastor: Julie Stephens
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis


Church BRIEFS


Workshop offers


help for parents


'"


The Times I B3






B4 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 5, 2009


Clinicare


has great


expectations


for facility

By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

Clinicare Medical Resources of
Tampa has expanded its operation
into spacious new quarters at 171
U.S. 98 in Eastpoint.
The new 3,500-square-foot show-
room is more than twice the size of
their former storefront location in the
same mall.
"We have a completely new staff,
we're starting in a new location and
we have great expectations," said
Steve and Mary Price, owners of
Clinicare.
Clinicare began servicing the
county in January 1996. In March
1998, it opened a small office in Car-
rabelle and two years later moved its
operation to Eastpoint
"We started with orthotics in 1996
and branched out in response to a
need within the county," said Tracey
Perez, onsite orthotic fitter for Clini-
care. "This is really a labor of love.
Our motto is Helping Hands Make
the Difference."
The showroom contains medical
supplies ranging from power scoot-
ers to nebulizers to crutches. They
can provide supplies for wound care,
compression hose and CPAP devices
to assist in breathing.
"Some of these things you had to
drive two hours to obtain historically.
We keep standard wheelchair sizes
in stock. Most everything we carry is
available in 24 to 48 hours," said Jack-
ie Etheridge, marketing director.
"If a tourist breaks their leg and
wants to put off treatment until they
get home, we have knee immobiliz-
ers," said site manager Ray Butler.
"Another thing is mobility. We have


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
Site manager Ray Butler shows
off the new smaller CPAP units
for peoples suffering from sleep
apnea. At right, Clinicare
provides sickroom supplies,
such as this penguin nebulizer,
designed to appear non-
threatening to child patients.

scooters, wheelchairs, power lifts and
any kind of mobility product."
Butler said he is about to take the
certification exam to become an as-
sistive technology practitioner and
supplier, offered by the Rehabilitation
Engineering & Assistive Technology
Society of North America.
This will allow him to sell advanced
mobility products like power chairs
with lift seats and high-end electron-
ics like a whisper stick control that
enables one to steer a wheelchair
with the use of hands.
On site at the new location are a
respiratory therapist and an orthotic
fitter for diabetic shoes. In the near
future, a mastectomy fitter might be
available as well.
Clinicare delivers oxygen and car-
bon dioxide to patients as far away as


Marianna. Their gas delivery service
is on call 24 hours a day.
"If your stuff breaks down at 3
a.m., give us a call. We'll come and
trade it out," Butler said.
Etheridge said she plans a grand
opening for the new facility from 1-
5:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 6. There will be
sweet treats and drinks available, and
everyone is invited to attend.
"We just want everybody to know
what we have here. Many people don't
know that a resource like this is avail-
able right here in Franklin County,"
she said.
For more information about Clini-
care, call 670-5555.


FSU talk to address invasive plants


The Florida State University
Coastal and Marine Laboratory next
week will host "Ecological and Evo-
lutionary Misadventures of Invasive
Spartina," the next lecture in the lab's
ongoing series of free public lectures
on coastal and marine conservation.
The Feb. 12 talk, from 7-9 p.m.,
will be given by professor Donald R.
Strong, a biologist from the ecology
and evolution department at the Uni-
versity of California-Davis, whose re-
search includes salt marshes, biologi-
cal control of weeds and insect-plant
interactions.


Refreshments will be served at
the conclusion of the lecture.
Maritime Spartina species are
powerful ecological engineers, defin-
ing shorelines of temperate coasts.
The potential to terrestrialize shore-
lines was the rationale of many of the
scores of Spartina introductions to
Europe, China and the Pacific, but
failing in this purpose and competing
vigorously with native species, Spar-
tina introductions largely have turned
out to be a bane to both the ecology
and human uses of salt marshes. The
study of Spartina introductions is a


rich mixture of social and basic sci-
ences that combines human values,
ecology and evolution.
Overlooking St. George Sound in
St. Teresa, the marine lab is located
at the intersection of highways 98 and
319, halfway between Panacea and
Carrabelle.
For more information on the Feb.
12 seminar or future public lectures
at the Florida State University Coast-
al and Marine Laboratory, visit www.
marinelab.fsu.edu/ or contact Sharon
Thoman at 697-4095 or via e-mail at
sthoman@fsu.edu.


Community CALENDAR

Thursday, Feb. 5
Wandering Star Quilting Club. Chillas Hall Lanark
Village. 1-3 p.m. Call Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Luncheon and information specials at the
Franklin County Senior Center in Carrabelle. Noon.
$3 donation. Call 697-3760.

Friday, Feb. 6
Franklin County Health Department Heart Health
Expo, 8-10 a.m. at Apalachicola Fitness Center. Free
Healthy Heart kit. Call Nadine Kahn 653-2111, ext. 123.
Breakfast at the Franklin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2
donation. Call 697-3760.
Bocce Club. Franklin County Senior Center. 1 p.m.
Call 697-3760.

Saturday, Feb. 7
Habitat for Humanity at Dixie Theatre. Dinner at
6:30 p.m. Music 7:30-9:30 p.m. Donations welcome,
large and small. Call 653-3113.
The Realtors Association of Franklin and
Southern Gulf Counties' annual open house tour, of
real estate throughout Gulf and Franklin counties,
from Mexico Beach to Alligator Point, will be held all
day. Call 653-3322.

Sunday, Feb. 8
Chef Sampler at Armory, 6 p.m. Enjoy food from
16 area restaurants. Call 653-9419 for tickets.
The Realtors Association of Franklin and
Southern Gulf Counties' annual open house tour will
be all day. Call 653-3322.

Monday, Feb. 9
Franklin Cultural Arts Council will meet at 6 p.m.
at the Carrabelle City Hall Complex, 1001 Gray Ave.
Come join in forming the council to enhance the
county's cultural environment and economy through
development and promotion of the arts and cultural
tourism.
Breakfast at Franklin County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2
donation. Call 697-3760.
Free Quit Smoking Now Class, sponsored by
county health department and Boys and Girls Club.
6 p.m. at former Chapman Elementary School in
Apalachicola. Contact David Walker at 653-2111, ext.
123.
Computer classes at the Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. Call Joyce Durham 670-5951
and set up a time.
Billiards Club at the Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. 1 p.m. Call 697-3760.
GED classes are offered at the Franklin County
School from 3-6 p.m. every week in Building 1100,
Room 1105. Call 670-2800.

Tuesday, Feb. 10
Art Club at the Franklin County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. 2 to 4 p.m. Call 697-3760.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George Island Fire Dept. $1 /
card. Proceeds go to St. George Island Civic Club.
Call 927-4654.

Wednesday, Feb. 11
Card Club. Franklin County Senior Center. 1 p.m.
Call 697-3760.
Bingo for the Bus. Chillas Hall in Lanark village.
6:30-8:30 p.m. Call 697-9626.
GED classes are offered at the Franklin County
School from 3-6 p.m. every week in Building 1100,
Room 1105. Call 670-2800.



Auditions set


for 'The Shame


of Tombstone'


DirectorTomLoughridge
is seeking a large cast of
"characters" for the April
Panhandle Players' com-
munity theatre production
of the western melodrama
"The Shame of Tombstone."
Auditions will be 7-9
p.m. Monday, Feb. 9, and
Wednesday, Feb. 11, at the
Eastpoint Firehouse.
The cast includes six
men, six women and one
small child (male or fe-
male), plus additional
musical and dance acts,
vaudeville acts, comedi-
ans and entertainers of all
kinds.
"Come one, come all
if you love theatre," said
Loughridge, who also
seeks people to assist be-
hind the scenes.
In "The Shame of
Tombstone" by Tim Kelley,
the heroine Amanda Good-
sort, once a Boston soci-
ety belle, has journeyed
to Arizona to find employ-
ment so she can support
her infant daughter. Alas,
she must perform on the
stage of Tombstone's fa-
mous Birdcage Theatre,
where soldier lads and sil-
ver miners come to gawk
and applaud. In order that
her true identity never be
revealed, Amanda sings in
disguise and is known far
and wide as The Masked
Canary, but to civic leaders


like the tenacious Flora
Courtland, who is deter-
mined to drive her out of
town, she is ... "the shame
of Tombstone!"
Alas, the wily villain,
Judge Mortimer Harshly,
and a pretty cohort, Peachy
Jamm, discover Amanda's
secret and decide to black-
mail her. The sidesplitting
action begins on the day
Amanda's grown daughter
arrives in town with her
two companions, Lonely
Wolf, a scout, and Lt. Pete
Bogg, a manly chap who
has everything, including
PX privileges and a future
pension.
An outrageous company
of funny characters add to
the confusion: Cantanker-
ous 01' Timer; Wing Tip,
the Oriental philosopher
who is available for witty
sayings and tea-brewing;
Fifi, the French maid from
Bisbee. But above every-
thing is the sheer nasti-
ness (and comic genius) of
the Judge.
An abundance of jokes,
plot twists, dance and
musical interludes will
enhance the music hall,
vaudevillian atmosphere.
The Eastpoint Fire-
house is one block north
of U.S. 98 on 6th Street
in Eastpoint. Call Tom
Loughridge at 927-2899 for
further information.


*I


METAL ROOFING FL15-3 MALONE, FLORIDA
FL15-12AAND 15-12B CARRABELLE, FLORIDA
FL15-18 JASPER, FLORIDA
DOCUMENT 00100

INVITATION FOR BID

Bids for furnishing all labor, materials, equipment, and services required for the Work known as Metal Roofing @ FL15-3
Malone. Florida. FL15-12A & FL15-12B Carrabelle. Florida and FL15-18 Jasper. Florida will be received until 2:30 PM local
time on 26 February 2009 at the office of the Housing Authority (PHA) indicated below. At this time and place all bids received
will be publicly opened and read aloud.

Without force and effect on the Bidding Documents and the proposed Contract Documents, the work required is briefly described
as: Partial modernization of forty four (44) Dwelling Units and two (2) Non-dwelling Units at four (4) sites known as FL 15-3
Malone, Florida, FL 15-12 A & FL 15-12 B Carrabelle, Florida and FL15-18 Jasper, Florida. The work consists of, but is not
limited to, providing deck sheathing repair, thirty pound (301b) felt, one inch by four inch (1"x4") yellow pine lathing, two foot
(2') on center over existing asphalt shingles secured to rooftops with three inch (3") screws secured into the existing trusses, new
metal roofing, new drip edge, rake trim, new plumbing flashings, range hood caps and flashings and heater & water heater flues
at all existing roof penetrations and associated work.

The work required is fully described in the Bidding Documents consisting of the Project Manual and the Drawings.

Proposed Contract forms, Drawings and Project Manual are on file in the office of the Consultant, Mr. Randall O'Barr, Post Of-
fice Box 357, Baldwin, Georgia 30511, telephone (706) 206-1725 or (678) 231-0675. Bidding Documents may be obtained by
providing a NONREFUNDABLE payment of $35.00 per set of Documents to the Consultant, do not contact the PHA. No partial
sets will be issued. Checks should be made payable to Mr. Randall O' Barr and mailed to the above address. Information regard-
ing this Project, including a list of the Plan Holders will be provided upon request.

Each bid shall include Bid Guarantee in an amount equal to five percent of the Bid. Provide as a certified check or bank draft
payable to the PHA; U.S. Government Bonds, or as a properly executed Bid Bond with surety acceptable to the PHA. A Surety
Company executing the Bid Bond must be authorized to transact business in the Project State, and must appear on the most cur-
rent U.S. Treasury Department's Circular No. 570. The successful bidder is required to provide satisfactory Performance and
Payment Bonds prior to execution of the Agreement.

Refer to provisions for equal employment opportunities and payment of not less than minimum salaries and wages indicated in
the Project Manual.

Each bid shall include THE SIGNED ORIGINALAND TWO CONFORMED COPIES of the following:
1. A properly executed Bid Form.
2. A properly executed Bid Guarantee.
3. A properly executed Non-Collusive Affidavit.
4. A fully completed Form HUD-5369-A, "Representations, Certifications and Other Statements of Bidders".

Small businesses and minority firms are urged to submit proposals. Certification as a Minority-business Enterprise (or number
of partners, shareholders, employees who are members of minority classification or are women) should be included in the Bid
proposal. Refer to Articles 38, 39 and 40 of The General Conditions.

The PHA reserves the right to reject any and all bids, and to waive irregularities and formalities in the bidding. No bids may be
withdrawn for a period of sixty days subsequent to the opening of bids without PHA consent.
Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority
Post Office Box 218 (5302 Brown Street)
Graceville, Florida 32440


IV






Thursday, February 5, 2009


Law enforcement


The Times I B5


Police make arrest

in counterfeiting case


Franklin County sher-
iff's deputies have ar-
rested a 30-year-old Apala-
chicola man in connection
with the spate of
counterfeit bills
that have surfaced
in the county in re-
cent weeks.
Michael Gloner,
of 67 Gibson Road,
was arrested Jan.
29 and charged GL
with making or
possessing instruments
for forging bills, a third-
degree felony. He also was


ON


charged with violation of
probation.
Undersheriff Joel Nor-
red said the investigation
is ongoing and is
S being assisted by
the Port St. Joe
police department.
He said the U.S.
Secret Service is
monitoring the
case.
IER "Agencies have
recovered counter-
feit bills from this case,"
Norred said. "Further ar-
rests may be forthcoming."


Jan. 26 worthless bank check
(FCSO)
Reginald D. Giddens, Charles Pruett, 37,
29, Eastpoint, driving Eastpoint, violation of
while license suspended or probation (FCSO)
revoked (FDEP)
Jay L. Thompson, 46,
Carrabelle, driving while Jan. 29
license suspended or Michael Gloner, 30,
revoked (FCSO) Apalachicola, making or
Jeremy J. TArrell, 21 possessing instruments for
Apalachicola, violation of forging bills and violation of
probation (FCSO) probation (FCSO)
Andrew D. McCoy,
25, Carrabelle, unlawful Jan. 30
tattooing without a license,
unlawful tattooing of a Amanda Richards, 20,
minor without parental Eastpoint, grand theft
consent, and violation of (FCSO)
probation (FCSO) Jewayne M. O'Neal, 31,
Apalachicola, trespassing
Jan. 27 and criminal mischief
(FCSO)
Jasmen N. Yon, 20,
Eastpoint, passing Jan. 31
worthless bank check
(FCSO) Jeremy J. Mixon, 21,
April M. Eller, 34, Apalachicola, DUI (FHP)
Eastpoint, uttering and Jackie W Ryals,
violation of probation 48, Sopchoppy, firing a
(FCSO) projectile across private
land without authority
Jan. 28 (FWC)O
Charles W Dean, 65,
Teleda R. Messer, 37, Eastpoint, violation of
Carrabelle, felony passing probation (FCSO)


The AARP Tax-Aide will
be serving taxpayers in and
around Carrabelle from 1
to 4 p.m. Tuesday at the
Carrabelle branch of the
Franklin County Library.
Volunteers will provide
information and assis-
tance and prepare income
tax returns for low- and
middle-income taxpayers,
with special attention to
those age 60 and older. All
Tax-Aide volunteers have
been trained and certified
by the Internal Revenue
Service and AARP
Please bring with you a
valid picture ID and Social
Security numbers for the
taxpayer and all depen-
dents, all W-2 forms, all
1099 forms showing inter-
est, dividends and Social
Security and other retire-


ment income, plus sales
and original purchase in-
formation from any assets
sold.
Taxpayers also should
bring 1099 MISC forms
showing any miscella-
neous income for 2008, all
forms showing any federal
income tax paid, evidence
of property taxes paid,
evidence of any Economic
Stimulus Payment re-
ceived in 2008, dependent
care information (name,
address, employer ID or
SSN), all receipts, canceled
checks and other support-
ing documents if itemizing
deductions.
A copy of last year's tax
returns) would be helpful.
If you have questions,
please call Darrel Acker at
850-349-9593.


Man charged with


killing black bear

A 54-year old Franklin County man landed
in Gulf County Jail on Friday charged with
killing a black bear.
Larry Joe Colson, of Apalachicola, turned
himself in at the county jail in Port St. Joe on
Jan. 27 after Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission investigators told him
they had a warrant for his arrest. Colson re-
portedly told officers he shot a bear Jan. 17 on
his Gulf County hunting lease.
He is charged with intentionally killing a
threatened species, a black bear. The charge
is a third-degree felony, punishable by up to
five years imprisonment and up to a $5,000
fine.
"Initially, uniformed patrol officers re-
ceived information that someone claimed to
have killed a Florida panther on private prop-
erty in Gulf County," FWC investigator Steve
Thomas said. "They made an onsite visit Jan.
20 to the property where the incident suppos-
edly occurred, and at first, they didn't find
anything.
"They returned on Jan. 22 and found the
remains of an adult male bear. Colson was
identified as a suspect, was interviewed
and admitted shooting the bear," Thomas
said.
Thomas said no panther remains were
found during the visits to the property. Offi-
cers seized Colson's Remington .30-06 rifle as
evidence.
FWC officials said there were three sus-
picious bear deaths last year in Gulf and
Franklin counties. If you suspect a wildlife
law violation, either in progress or needing
immediate attention, report it by calling the
FWC Wildlife Alert Reward Program at 888-
404-FWCC (3922).
You also can report violations at http://
myfwc.com/law/alert/Rewards.asp. If your
information results in an arrest, you may be
eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. You may
remain anonymous, and you will not be re-
quired to testify in court.


SPERO from page B3


He had two wetbacks on
there with him headed to
Texas. I had to go take them
off and put them ashore
in Port Isabel. If we hadn't
gone right then, the one
on the hatch would have
been OK and the one on the
rope might have made it
but the captain would have
drowned. I think he'd gone
down three times when we
got there. We rolled up a
mattress and put him over
it and let the water run out
of him.
"We lost everything, the
shrimp and the nets. The
boat belonged to a man
named Vern Crotts. He
wasn't happy, the nets cost
about $500, but he couldn't
say nothing because we
saved their lives."
Over time, the Buziers
were able to open their
hearts again, and in 1952,
they adopted their daughter,
Deborah.
In 1959, they moved
back to Apalachicola, and
Capt. Spero built a home
and continued his pursuit
of the maritime trades. He
constructed several shrimp
boats in his backyard
working not from plans,
but from experience and
knowledge of boats.
In 1977, at age of 69, he


Study seeks to
interview shrimpers
Alex Miller, staff econo-
mist for Gulf States Marine
Fisheries, is conducting
a study on Gulf inshore
shrimping and wants to in-
terview local shrimpers.
He is scheduled to visit
Franklin County on Sunday
and Monday, Feb. 8-9.
If you are willing to
speak to Miller, contact him
at 228-875-5912 to schedule
an appointment.
For more information,
call County Extension Agent
Bill Mahan at 653-8977.

Galloway to fill
veterans post
Retired postal worker
Charles Galloway was cho-
sen to fill the post of part-
time assistant to Veteran's
Service Officer William
Scott, who lost his vision
last year after suffering


"retired from retirement"
to construct his last vessel,
working side-by-side with
friend August Mombert.
Each man built a 40-foot
shrimp boat, Mombert
working from plans and
Buzier from memory.
After his retirement,
Buzier developed an
interest in golf. Though
he refuses to wear
conventional golfing clothes,
he has a distinct talent for
the game and spent hours
practicing his stroke both
on the links and behind his
home on 24th Street. His
daughter reports he has
made several holes-in-one
and has brought home a few
trophies as well.
Today Capt. Spero
retains his independence,
living in a trailer with his
Chihuahua, Boots. Nearby
live his daughter and her
husband, Dave Davis;
his grandson, James
Dansereau is a daily visitor.
James takes him coffee
every morning and fixes his
breakfast, then sits down
and listens to Capt. Spero's
stories.
"We sit with him every
day and listen," said his
daughter. "And every time
I listen to him, I learn
something new."


from a central retinal arte-
rial occlusion.
Galloway will act as a
reader for Scott and help
him with transportation in
the course of his job.
The county commission-
ers voted to create the posi-
tion at their Jan. 6 meeting
and hired Galloway Tues-
day at the recommendation
of Scott.
Scott said eight people
applied for the job, but
three lacked wartime ser-
vice, which the position
requires. He said two of the
remaining five applicants
exceeded the educational
requirements.
Scott said he recom-
mended Galloway because
of his 30 years of National
Guard service, including
service as administrator
of the local Guard unit for
several years.
Galloway will work 29
hours aweekat$10 perhour
and receive no benefits.


fr'


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6B The Times Thursday, February 5, 2009 Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


F0


1000T NOTICE OF SALE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY Notice is hereby given,
PROBATE DIVISION pursuant to an Ex Parte
Order Rescheduling Fore-
IN RE: ESTATE OF closure Sale entered in this
DAVID A. OMAN cause, in the Circuit Court
Deceased. of Franklin County. Florida.
I will sell the property situ-
File No.: 09-00002-CP ated in Franklin County.
Florida described as:
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
COMMENCE AT THE
The administration of the SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
estate of David A. Oman, THE SOUTHWEST QUAR-
deceased, whose date of TER OF THE SOUTH-
death was November 11, WEST QUARTER OF SEC-
2008, is pending in the Cir- TION 32, TOWNSHIP 6
cult Court for Franklin SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST,
County, Florida, Probate AND RUN THENCE
Division, File Number NORTH 00 DEGREES 50
09-00002-CP the address MINUTES WEST 95.16
of which is The Franklin FEET ALONG THE EAST-
County Courthouse, 33 ERN BOUNDARY OF THE
Market Street, Apalachl- SOUTHWEST QUARTER
cola, Florida 32320. The OF THE SOUTHWEST
names and addresses of QUARTER OF SAID SEC-
the personal representa- TION 32 TO A POINT OF
tive and the personal THE SOUTH SIDE OF
representative's attorney STATE ROAD #370 (OR
are set forth below. ALLIGATOR POINT ROAD)
THENCE NORTH 55 DE-
All creditors of the dece- GREES 14 MINUTES
dent and other persons, WEST 1144.84 FEET
who have claims or de- ALONG THE SOUTH SIDE
mands against decedent's OF SAID ROAD TO A
estate, including unma- POINT WHICH IS THE
tured, contingent or unliq- POINT OF BEGINNING OF
updated claims, and who THE LAND TO BE DE-
have been served a copy SCRIBED AND CON-
of this notice, must file VEYED; FROM SAID
their claims with this court POINT OF BEGINNING
WITHIN THE LATER OF RUN THENCE SOUTH 30
THREE (3) MONTHS AF- DEGREES 36 MINUTES
TER THE DATE OF THE WEST A DISTANCE OF
FIRST PUBLICATION OF 276 FEET, MORE OR
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY LESS, TO THE WATERS
(30) DAYS AFTER THE OF ALLIGATOR BAY,
DATE OF SERVICE OF A THENCE RUN IN A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE NORTHWESTERLY DI-
ON THEM. REACTION, MEANDERING
THE WATERS OF ALLIGA-
All other creditors of the TOR BAY, TO A POINT
decedent and other per- WHICH IS NORTH 55 DE-
sons who have claims or GREES 14 MINUTES
demands against the WEST 85 FEET FROM
decedent's estate, includ- SAID LAST POINT,
ing unmatured, contingent THENCE RUN NORTH 30
or unliquidated claims, DEGREES 36 MINUTES
must file their claims with EAST 276 FEET, MORE
this court WITHIN THREE OR LESS, TO THE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB- LINE OF SAID ROAD,
LOCATION OF THIS NO- THENCE RUN SOUTH 55
TICE. DEGREES 14 MINUTES
EAST ALONG THE
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO SOUTHERN BOUNDARY
FILED WILL BE FOREVER OF SAID ROAD 85 FEET
BARRED. TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, BEING A PARCEL
NOTWITHSTANDING THE OF LAND FRONTING 85
TIME PERIODS SET FEET ON SAID STATE
FORTH ABOVE, ANY ROAD #370 (OR ALLIGA-
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) TOR POINT ROAD) AND
YEARS OR MORE AFTER RUNNING BACK TO THE
THE DECEDENT'S DATE SAME WIDTH TO ALLIGA-
OF DEATH IS BARRED. TOR BAY

THE DATE OF FIRST PUB- BEING MORN PARTICU-
LICATION OF THIS NO- LARLY DESCRIBED BY
TICE IS February 5, 2009. SURVEY PREPARED BY
TH U R M A N
Personal Representative: RODDENBERRY AND AS-
LEONARDW. OMAN SOCIATES INC., JOB#
PO. Box 349 04-269 AS FOLLOWS:
Gilbertsville, New York
13776 COMMENCE: AT THE
Attorney for Personal Rep- SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
resentative: THE SOUTHWEST QUAR-
CHARLESA.CURRAN TER OF THE. SOUTH-
Florida Bar No.: 274380 WEST QUARTER OF SEC-
PO. Box 549 TION 32. TOWNSHIP 6
Carrabelle, Florida 32322 SOUTH. RANGE. 1 WEST
(850) 697-5333 FRANKLIN COUNTY
(850) 697-5558 fax FLORIDA AND RUN
February 5, 12, 2009 NORTH 00 DEGREES 50
1025T MINUTES 00 SECONDS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT WEST 95.16 FEET TO A
OF THE SECOND JUDI- POINT LYING ON THE
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR- SOUTHWESTERLY
IDA, IN AND FOR FRANK- RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
LIN COUNTY ARY OF STATE ROAD NO.
CIVIL DIVISION 370, THENCE RUN
NORTH 55 DEGREES 14
THE BANK OF NEWYORK MINUTES 00 SECONDS
AS TRUSTEE FOR THE WEST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-


1100
ARY 1144.84 FEET TO AN
IRON PIPE MARKING THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING AND LEAV-
ING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH
30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES
47 SECONDS WEST
309.63 FEET TO THE AP-
PROXIMATE MEAN HIGH
WATER LINE OF ALLIGA-
TOR HARBOR, THENCE
RUN NORTHWESTERLY
ALONG SAID APPROXI-
MATE MEAN HIGH
WATER LINE AS FOL-
LOWS: NORTH 30 DE-
GREES 59 MINUTES 06
SECONDS WEST 36.31
FEET, NORTH 52 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES 33
SECONDS WEST 33.60
FEET, NORTH 74
DEGREE'S 25 MINUTES
36 SECONDS WEST 19.36
FEET, THENCE LEAVING
SAID APPROXIMATE
MEAN HIGH WATER LINE.
RUN NORTH 30 DE-
GREES 17 MINUTES 07
SECONDS, EAST 299.72
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (MARKED
#2919) LYING ON THE
SOUTHWESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF STATE ROAD NO.
370. THENCE RUN
SOUTH 55 DEGREES 14
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
EAST 85.05 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTAINING 0.58 ACRES
OR LESS.

and commonly known as:
676 ALLIGATOR DRIVE,
ALLIGATOR POINT, FL
32346 at public sale. to the
highest and best bidder,
for cash, at the front door
steps of the Courthouse, at
33 Market St., in Apalachl-
cola, Florida at 11:00 a.m.
on February 19, 2009.

Any persons claiming an
interest in the surplus from
the sale. if any. other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

Dated this 13th day of Jan-
uary, 2009

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Michelle Garcla Gilbert
Kass, Shuler, Solomon,
Spector, Foyle & Singer,
PA.
PO Box 800
Tampa, FL 33601-0800
February 5, 12, 2009
1041T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

WAKULLA BANK, a Florida
banking corporation,
Plaintiff,

v.

OLIN CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY INC., OLIN R.
GRANTHUM, and JIMMIE
CROWDER,
Defendants.

Case No. 08-000237-CA

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure dated January
26, 2009, entered in Case
No. 08-000237-CA of the
Circuit Court of the Sec-
ond Judicial Circuit in and
for Franklin County, Flor-
ida, wherein WAKULLA
BANK, a Florida banking
corporation, is the Plaintiff,
and OLIN CONSTRUC-
TION COMPANY INC.,
OLIN R. GRANTHUM, and
JIMMIE CROWDER, are
the Defendants, the under-
signed will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash at the front door of
the Franklin County Court-


Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after sale.

DATED this 28th day of
January, 2009.

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
As Clerk of said Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
February 5, 12, 2009
9939T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

VALIDATION OF THE NOT
TO EXCEED $3,325,000
EASTPOINT WATER AND
SEWER DISTRICT WATER
AND SEWER SYSTEM
REVENUE BONDS AND
BOND ANTICIPATION
NOTES, SERIES 2008

THE EASTPOINT WATER
AND SEWER DISTRICT
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA, an independent
special district created and
existing under and by vir-
tue of the laws of the State
of Florida,
Plaintiff,

vs.

THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
and the Taxpayers, Prop-
erty Owners and Citizens
thereof and of the
Eastpoint Water and
Sewer District of Franklin
County, Florida, including
non-residents owning
property or Subject to tax-
ation therein, and others
having or claiming any
right, title or interest in
property to be affected by
the issuance of the Bonds
and Bond Anticipation
Notes herein described, or
to be affected in any way
thereby,
Defendants.

CIVIL ACTION NO:
08-000426-CA


ORDER TO
CAUSE


SHOW


TO:
THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
THROUGH THE STATE
ATTORNEY FOR THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, AND
TO THE TAXPAYERS,
PROPERTY OWNERS
AND CITIZENS THEREOF
AND OF THE EASTPOINT
WATER AND SEWER DIS-
TRICT OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA, IN-
CLUDING NON RESI-
DENTS OWNING PROP-
ERTY OR SUBJECT TO
TAXATION THEREIN, AND
ALL OTHERS HAVING OR
CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TI-
TLE OR INTEREST IN
PROPERTY TO BE AF-
FECTED BY THE ISSU-
ANCE OF THE
EASTPOINT WATER AND


The above cause coming
on to be heard upon the
Complaint filed herein by
the Eastpoint Water and
Sewer District of Franklin
County, Florida (referred
to herein asthe "Plaintiff' or
"Issuer") seeking to deter-
mine the authority of the
Plaintiff to issue its not to
exceed $3,325,000
Eastpoint Water and
Sewer District Water and
Sewer System Revenue
Bonds (the "Bonds"), and
its not to exceed
$3,325,000 Eastpoint
Water and Sewer District
Water and Sewer System
Revenue Bond Anticipation
Notes (the "Bond Anticipa-
tion Notes"), a more partic-
ular description of such
obligations being con-
tained in the Complaint
filed in these proceedings,
to determine the legality of
the proceedings had and
taken in connection there-
with, and the legality of the
provisions, covenants and
agreements contained
therein and the revenues
pledged to the payment
thereof, and seeking a
judgment of this Court to
validate the proceedings
for said Bonds and Bond
Anticipation Notes, the rev-
enues pledged for the pay-
ment thereof, and said ob-
ligations when issued pur-
suant thereto, and said
Complaint now having
been presented to this
Court, for entry of an Order
to Show Cause pursuant
to Chapter 75, Florida Stat-
utes, and the Court being
fully advised in the prem-
ises:

IT IS ORDERED AND AD-
JUDGED that the State of
Florida, through the State
Attorney of the Second Ju-
dicial Circuit of Florida,
and the several taxpayers,
property owners and citi-
zens of the Eastpoint
Water and Sewer District
of Franklin County, Florida,
including non-residents
owning property or subject
to taxation therein, and all
others having or claiming
any right title: or interest in
property to be affected in
any way thereby, or to be
affected thereby, be and
they are each hereby re-
quired to appear and show
cause, if any there be, be-
fore this Court on the 24th
day of February, 2009, at
1:30 p.m. (EST), at Apa-
lachicola, Florida in the
Chambers of the under-
signed Judge at the Frank-
lin County Courthouse in
the City of Apalachicola,
Florida, why the prayer of
said Complaint should not
be granted and why the
proceedings for said
Bonds and Bond Antici-
pation Notes and said
Bonds and Bond Anticl-
pation Notes when issued
pursuant thereto and the
revenues pledged to the
payment thereof should
not be validated and con-
firmed as therein prayed.

AND IT IS FURTHER
ORDERED AND AD-
JUDGED that this Order to
Show Cause be published
in the manner required by
Section 75.06, Florida Stat-
utes.

AND IT IS FURTHER
ORDERED AND AD-
JUDGED that, by such
publication of this Order,
all taxpayers, property
owners and citizens of the
Eastpoint Water and
Sewer District of Franklin
County, Florida, including
non-residents owning
property or subject to taxa-
tion therein and all others


1 1100
having or claiming any
right, title or interest in the
Eastpoint Water and
Sewer District of Franklin
County, Florida, or the tax-
able property therein or in
any property to be affected
by the issuance of said
Bonds and Bond Anticipa-
tion Notes or to be af-
fected in any way thereby,
or the validity of such
Bonds and Bond Anticipa-
tion Notes or of any reve-
nues pledged for payment
thereof, or of the proceed-
ings authorizing the issu-
ance of said Bonds and
Bond Anticipation Notes,
including any remedies
provided for their collec-
tion, be and they are made
parties defendant to this
proceeding, and that this
Court shall have jurisdic-
tion of them to the same
extent as if named as de-
fendants in said Complaint
and personally served with
process in this cause.

DONE AND ORDERED in
chambers at Apalachicola,
Franklin County, Florida,
this 24th day of December,
2008.

Honorable James C.
Hankinson
CIRCUIT JUDGE
January 29, 2009
February 5, 2009
9951T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

IN RE: ESTATE OF
VERONICA A. ARMI-
STEAD,
Deceased.

File No.: 08-000660CP
Division:

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of Veronica A.
Armistead, deceased,
whose date of death was
October 31, 2008 and
whose social security
number is XXX-XX-2885, is
pending in the Circuit
Court of the Second Judi-
cial Circuit in and for
Franklin County, Florida,
the address of which is 33
Market Street, Suite 203,
Apalachicola, Florida
32320. The estate is tes-
tate. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal
representatives and of the
personal representatives'
attorney are set forth be-
low.

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against the decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of
this notice is served must
file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands
against the decedent's es-
tate must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.

The date of the first publi-
cation of this Notice is Jan-
uary 29, 2009.


Deutsche Bank National
Trust Company, as Trustee
for the Certificate holders
of Soundview Home Loan
Trust 2005-OPTI,
Asset-Backed Certificates,
Series 2005-OPT1
Plaintiff,

-vs.-

Frederick S. White, Sr. and
Marcia W. White, His Wife.
Defendantss.

Case #: 07-000445-CA
Division #:
UNC:

AMENDED
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der rescheduling foreclo-
sure sale dated January
12, 2009 entered in Civil
Case No. 07-000445-CA of
the Circuit Court of the 2nd
Judicial Circuit in and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein Deutsche Bank
National Trust Company,
as Trustee for the Certifi-
cate holders of Soundview
Home Loan Trust
2005-OPT1, Asset-Backed
Certificates, Series
2005-OPT1, Plaintiff and
Frederick S. White, Sr. and
Marcia W. White, Husband
and Wife are defendantss,
I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash, AT
THE WEST FRONT DOOR
OF THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN
APALACHICOLA, FLOR-
IDA, AT 11:00 A.M. Febru-
ary 19, 2009, the following
described property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:

COMMENCE AT AN IRON
PIPE MARKING THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
A TRACT OF LAND DE-
SCRIBED IN DEED FROM
W. H. NEEL AND WIFE TO
CLARA D. GIBSON,
DATED DECEMBER, 31
1903 AND RECORDED AT
PAGES 242 THROUGH
246, VOLUME "L' OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA AND BEING LO-
CATED IN SECTION 12,
TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH,
RANGE 8 WEST, FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA
AND RUN SOUTH 76 DE-
GREES 03 MINUTES 57
SECONDS WEST 379.16
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED #4261),
THENCE RUN SOUTH 76
DEGREES 04 MINUTES 55
SECONDS WEST 60.01
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED #4261), MARK-
ING THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING
RUN NORTH 14 DE-
GREES 52 MINUTES 10
SECONDS WEST 255.56
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED # 4261),
THENCE RUN SOUTH 62
DEGREES 05 MINUTES 52
SECONDS WEST 65.29
FEET TO A RE-ROD


COMMENCE AT AN IRON
PIPE MARKING THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
A TRACT OF LAND DE-
SCRIBED IN DEED FROM
W. H. NEEL AND WIFE TO
CLARA D. GIBSON,
DATED DECEMBER, 31,
1903 AND RECORDED AT
PAGES 242 THROUGH
246, VOLUME "L' OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA AND BEING LO-
CATED IN SECTION 12,
TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH,
RANGE 8 WEST, FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA
AND RUN SOUTH 76 DE-
GREES 03 MINUTES 57
SECONDS WEST 379.16
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED # 4261),
THENCE RUN SOUTH 76
DEGREES 04 MINUTES 55
SECONDS WEST 60.01
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED #4261),
THENCE RUN NORTH 14
DEGREES 52 MINUTES 10
SECONDS WEST 255.56
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED #4261) MARK-
ING THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTINUE NORTH 14
DEGREES 52 MINUTES 10
SECONDS WEST 39.46
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED #4261) LYING
ON THE SOUTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY
NO. 98, SAID POINT ALSO
LYING ON A CURVE CON-
CAVE TO THE NORTH-
WESTERLY, THENCE
RUN SOUTHWESTERLY
ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY AND SAID CURVE
WITH A RADIUS OF
3769.83 FEET, THROUGH
A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00
DEGREES 52 MINUTES 26
SECONDS, FOR AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 57.49
FEET, CHORD BEING
SOUTH 62 DEGREES 34
MINUTES 28 SECONDS
WEST 57.49 FEET TO AN
IRON PIPE, THENCE
LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN SOUTH 04 DE-
GREES 41 MINUTES 16
SECONDS EAST 42.35
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED #4261),
THENCE RUN NORTH 62
DEGREES 05 MINUTES 52


LEGAL
ADVERTISINGL


Attorney for Plaintiff
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN,
LLP
10004 N. Dale Mabry High-
way, Suite 112
Tampa, FL 33618
(813) 880-8888
07-85476T
January 29, 2009
February 5, 2009



9995T
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Northwest Florida
Transportation Corridor
Authority (NFTCA) would
like to announce that the
U.S. 98, Franklin County
Environmental Impact
Statement (EIS) Project
has a New Project
W e b s i t e,
www.us98-franklin.com ttp://wwus98-franklin.comr>.
This project has proj-
ect limits from the Apa-
lachicola Bay Bridge east
to the Ochlocknee Bay
Bridge, including the evac-
uation routes of SR 65, CR
67, US 319, and CR 370.
February 5, 2009


3100 Antiques
3110 -Appliances
3120 -Arts & Crafts
3130 Auctions
3140 Baby Items
3150 Building Supplies
3160 Business
Equipment
3170- Collectibles
3180- Computers
3190 Electronics
3200 Firewood
3210- Free Pass it On
3220 Furniture
3230 Garage/Yard Sales
3240 Guns
3250 Good Things to Eat
3260 Health & Fitness
3270 Jewelry/Clothing
3280 Machinery/
Equipment
3290 Medical Equipment
3300 Miscellaneous
3310 Musical Instbuments
3320 Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 Restaurant/Hotel
3340 Sporting Goods
3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell)


liBSI:NEtl[l

I pl RETORYJ


0LERYCA


Retired nurse for respite
care daytime, night time
and overnight on week-
ends. Housework, shopp-
ing, in your home. Experi-
ence with Alzhelmers, se-
nile dementia, and special
needs child or adult. Call
850-320-5156 Refs avail


Kako
Bookkeekina
When you care to send
the very least to the IRS-
SMALL BUSINESS
BOOKKEEPING
Let me help you get it
ready for the CPA.
653-1430


+1+ +1+ +


.4%j 0 IA 21, a offl I j L
1 -1 -1 dd% I I


.


)


)








I 3200 3240 4100 4100 4130 6110 6140 7100 7160
Seasoned oak frewoodCustomer Support Sales Manager. Want exp. Apalachicola 2 br, 2 ba, outdoor pool. Port St. Joe, St. George
Seasoned oak firewood. R Mini14 Stainle ust S Sals Manager. Want e 598 Three Rivers Rd. Island and St. James Bay
Reasonable price Call ran rile latest modeBankcard Agents with 1 br 1 ba apts. from $400/ Carabelle. $800 month. Previously Bank Owned
697-4677 or visit us at 150r a la mo Cashier management skills. Salary mo. Call 850-381-7746 Call 697-3707 or 519-6468 Property. Priced way below
6974677 or visit us at 150 many extra plus ammo, Commission + Bonus to
Delaware St, Lanark. $700 obo, 850-728-0975 Clerk needed at the mini Other + Commission + Bonusto market value! Prices start-
convenience store (blue). qualify candidates. Bilin- f ing at $35,000. Please call T s tsR t G
Must be able to work Front Desk gual aplus. Ths s not a Counts Real Estate Group
nights and/or weekends. k job, it's a career. Call at 850-249-3615.
. Call 927-2163for more info Manager 1-800-597-3140x302,Mr. FurnishedLoftApt, inhis-3 br, 2 ba, On The To buy! Used single
_______Penelope's Pet Stop Roberts toric district. Cbl/wtr ncl Carrabelle River. Garage, Why Rent wide edin l
9 3220~ Seeking exceptional team 1100sf high ceilings, Pn- $1,000 month $500 de- When You Countyl Please call
Home Biz Training member, w/ customer vate entrance and deck. posit. 850-545-8813 Brand 509-4987
PT $400-$1,200 Mo. FT service & computer exper- Play in Vegas, Hang i No smkg pets. $750 mo. 653 3838 2 N
d $2,000 to $6,000 M o. C all ence. M ust be w ell organ- J etato Hn gnL _____N wr_2__2 Neo e
Needed $2,000 to $6,000 M. Call ence.Must be well organ- t to New York Hiring 50 dep. 850-653-3838 h/a, dw, w/d, hkup, THE AE-
727-865-6795 zed & energetic, withthe 18+ Girls Guys. sm. pet ok w/dep $700 mo NUES at
5 c 100% LEATHER LIV- Large Wheel Chair for l ability to multi task. Good $400-$800 Weekly. Paid + dep. Call 850-670-8266 KEOUGH's
ING ROOM SET NEW, 850-653-8620 naonskills w e Are you Ener- Carabelle, 3 br, 2 ba, LNDING
hardwood foundation both people & animals re- getic, fun, & looking for a Carabelle, A Green
wfe mewarr d ty, sacin C N A 'S qured. Please send re- Great Job, 1(888)741-2190 Lanark Village 1 br aptW/ large t $700 and
ice $699 (delivery avail).eq t furnished, w/Florida room. $350 dep. call HOP c
PPS PO Box 812 View of Gulf, $350 month 850-545-8813. approved.
Due to recent Eastpoint, FL 32328 850-545-8813 Carrabelle Affordable Liv-
Due to recent Carrabelle Affordable v-
ing on the
growth / 4 br 2 ba w/FP all appl Fngrothen AT OTIVEWaN
incl dishwasher, w/d in Forgotten Coa
The rigeat unit, Pool, hot tub, sauna 3Co -At2 bath 1Collecties
3Bay St Joe llg gus apt wh fl 3 bdrmA 2 bath 8110 Cars
$5 Q eI3+ guest apt with full bath homes ranging 8120 SportsUtilVhi
4130 a Lanark Village $1150/mo- 1 yr lease, se- s rangng 8120 SportsUtilityvehicles
mattress set. New n plas- is seeking. S furnished apt Call for ad- curity deposit, cr check 1250-2000 81 -Vans
tic w warranty Can de- dedicated, caring POSTAL&GOVTJOB E R dona n 937-239-0141 and ref required, sqftin 8150- Commercial
liver. 545-7112 individuals INFO FOR SALE? Non smoke ers Carrabelles 810 Motorcycles
4100 Help Wanted 6100 Business/ .. 1-573-803-0776 Newest Subdl- 8170 Auto Parts
4130 -Employment for the following Commercial N est Sdi & A accessories
Information 6110 Apartments Carrabelle vision only A 8210- Boats
positions: cauton 0 h 6120 Carrabelle ile from the 8220- Personal Watercraft
-.1.C.CNA-FT-11-7 6130 Condo/Townhouse Beach Carrabelle 8230- Sailboats
You NEVER have to pay 6140 Roommatse Rentals 3 br, 2 ba, large lot, w/d, River Marine
Beautiful 7 pc fueen or information bt 610 Room ntdeck, appliances, ref. 8310- Aircraft/Aviation
o d er Stfederal or postal jobs If 6170- Mobile Home/Lot $675/mo 860-233-0676 Pricing from 8320 ATV/Off Road Vehicles
I pc euSeen Y oumewage Ne Vra ntbb6 thhae vetopa's -o m a Supples
w/dovetail drawers. Still in Benefits packages you see a job 6180 Out-of-Town Rentals t ere or email the $100, 8330- Campers & Trailers
boxes. $2400 value, must Other 401K "guarantee", contact the 6190 Timeshare Rentals Iland cla arten bclob-r Lot 8340 Moorhomes
sacrifice $999 222-7783. PTO/Sick time FTC. 6200$160 wk elec, Satellite, Your Model.
Can Deliver. coordinator The Federal Trade Garbage included, pool Only 8 lots left!
TC dina r and more Commission table. 12'X65' deck with BEC&Com-
TRiO is America's consumer Beautiful view, Call pany, Inc.210
(grant funded) to manage Apply in person at protection agency. 6100 850-653-5114 Townhome fo rent .
& direct the Student Sup- Townhomes for rent, (850)
port Services grant, pro- www.ftc.gov/jobscams 1 br house Jones Homestead- Pon-656-2608
Sgram planning, outcome e B S 1-877-FTC-HELP c/h/a, w/d incl. special. Frst month re
Couch, loveseat & chair, assessment and students/ a, i .
NEW. 100% micro fiber, recruitment/retention. Re- A public service No pets. 850-653-9788 6130 free with deposit and 12 7120
stain resistant, List $1999, quires MS degree in 220 9th St, message from the FTC 850-615-0058 month lease 2 br and 3br 1 Ct
0850-615-0058 month lease. 2 br and 3br
Let go for $699, delivery education, social sciences Port St Joe and The News Herald Carrabelle units available. Call 10-Lthane Bowling Cener
available. 222-9879 work managementexp.; work flexible or fax resume to ClassifiedAdvertising Building for Ise in Gulf 3 BR, 2 BA Unfurnished, 850227-8404 or in thrivin town ofp 34' Lhurs Open
available.b222o98eor m me n1;2 Depar3yentr W/D, DIW, CH& A, Deck, 229-734-0717 mately 9000 population. 34' Lhurs Open
schedule & able to travel. 850-229-7129 County, (St. Joe), Newd Grossing approximately Fisherman
E with underrepre- 5,000sf, warehouse w/ of Polsrkingde. Covngerm.ed boatPRICE $250,000+ per year. Ask-
S sented groups in educa- ices, adjacent to air strip, parking. Longterm. PRICE ing $200,000 firm. Owner Boat
tonal settings/federal Librarian, Apalachicola Municipal E e wll s REDUCED For appoint 6170 retiring. Call (660)647-2356 1983
LibaatnnpalchcofoMuicial OTP w/ owner fin. avail. meant, Call 850187787696.
mmoseducation prgms for dsr- Library Apalachicola, Florida Call 850-819-4600 or 2 br, 1 ba Twin 8.2 Detroit Die-
Simmons Beauty Rest advantaged preferred. huge lot, 3 Rivers Area ________ _Bridge, Out
mattress set- Brand New huge t3, 3Rivers
matures s sealed lastd N Starts @ $30k/yr. Open The Apalachicola Municipal Library seeks a part-time Carrabelle, $495 mo ut 7150 Riggers, Diesel Genera-
sratl inse t F159' ilI Filled 30kene0csta rtn --e-- Carrabelle, $495 mo+ utilie 7150 Riggers, Diesel Genera-
war nt astic u Until filed w/revew start librarian to supervise library programs, operations, ties & dep. 850-653-3270 tor (new), full cabin,
warranty.s $ 199 l ing 2/10/09. Additional staff and volunteers. Convenience store down- For Sale By Galley, Trim Tabs, Bait
sacrifice $499. Call info: and volunteers. Convenience store uownO
222-7783 http://www. The librarian reports to a five member Advisory town Apalachicola, 47 Ave Owner Station, Platform with
coastedulhrl. Board. The Apalachicola Municipal Library serves E. Call 850-899-4512 or 1 acre lot high and dry, ladder Boom and
GCCC s an the residents of Apalachicola (population 2500) in 850-227-5052 for info. cleaed with trees. Re- Zoodn W oTdel Ask
EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer Franklin County, Florida. The library is a classic duced Price $38K. Call ing $39,000 OBO At
"small town library" situated in historic Apalachicola, Captain JR for more de- Panama City Marina slip
named by the Trust for Historic Preservation as one For Rent tails at 850-670-8858 603. Call 850-871-9300
$499 Complete Solid 0ECoast of a "Dozen Distinctive Destinations" in 2008. Library 3 months free rent on 72 home or cell 653-5030 or 850-258-0996
Wood bedroom Set. Brand C.~mclt e holdings are approximately 10,000 volumes. The li- prime office space Poolside
Nood bedroom Set. Brander brary is open 40 hours per week. 29 Ave E Townhouse for
Must See. Can deliver. web Id #34025102 We seek a self-motivated, enthusiastic, innovative in- Montgomery Building 7100 Homes
dividual who can preserve the viability and relevance Please call rent in 7110 Beach Home/ 7160
of a small library in the 21st century. The successful 3055885885or Carrabelle 7120 o ercial Easy Qualifying Manu
applicant will continue the library history of friendly 0L; 3 Bedroom/2 Bath Beaut,- 7130 CondoTrownhouse fractured home or home 8240
customer service, while seeking ways to update and fultownhouse in the Sands 7140 Farms & Ranches and land packages, low
expand the library offerings. of Carrabelle, Fully Fur- 7150- Lots andAcreage monthly payments, we
Candidates should have a BA or BS degree. Library w $ a nished, Boat Parking, Stor- 7160- Mo Homes/Lot work all areas, Bay Gulf,
experience and an MLS/MLIS is preferred. age Washer/Dryer. 7180 investment Fank Jackson and Ca
Theand oral communication skills, good planning and For Rent Space available 251-6082 or (850) 7190 Out-or-Town Programs, Beautful frame
supervisory abilities, knowledge of library practices fr e. Utllti es included. ( 7200- Timehare 50-7 85u-4671 4' C co e
Cashier and technology, experience with budgets, and a keen Downtown Historic Apa- ncor
C ashier interest in advocating the goals and programs of the lachcola. 29 Ave. E. D t Motor Yacht
Clerk needed at mini library within the community. If not knowledgeable in (upstairs) For info call Detroit-V71, 15KWGenset
the areas of Florida library procedures and programs, Carol 850-653-3871 3 State Rooms, AC's, TV's
convenience store "Blue". the candidate will be expected to attend training in Snow Birds/ Special FHA Promotion Electronics, Too Much to
M t l t k h these fields. The librarian will also be expected to at- Lanark Village list Must Sell Reduced to
M t be able to work nighs tend monthly Library Advisory Board meetings and to 1 br, 1 ba, Renovated/ fur- Land/ H om eP packages $80, 00 OBO
and/or weekends. submit a monthly report to the City Commission. nished end unit, new ktchPackages 1-727-235-2097 or
The position requires 20 scheduled hours per week 6110 and bath, mini. 4 month1-727-289-304
(to include attendance at monthly Library Advisory lease $545/mo + dep., no february 172
House Keeper's Needed Board meetings). smoking, pet considered.
at Buccaneer Inn on St. Salary negotiable. (850) 653-3838. Lenders on it I
atBuccaneer Inn on St. Interested applicants should send a cover letter and __COMPLETE PACKAGES
George Island a resume to Betty Webb, City Administrator, 1 Bay 1 br, 1 ba & 2 br, apart- OMPefu 4 PAm ES
Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 or e-mail to Bet- ment. unfurn electric/water Use your tax refi nd! OM 4,
ty Webb, apalachadmin@gtcom.net. No telephone nc. Tile floors, part cy- 6140 SmokerlBBQ, Frers
For More Information Call: or fax responses will be accepted. press panelling, private So BQ Fyr
(850) 927-2163 Application deadline is February 15, 2009. EOE/ deck 1 block from beach 1, & 2, br 1023N.TyndallPkwy, Panama C. II 4,1 4 BonifayFloida
DFWP 4 04 4 0 2 55 7 3 Apalachicola FL. (850-785-4671) (1-800-239-4671) www.xtrmeindustries.com
850-653-6459 Call 850-643-7740.









HELP IS ONLY A


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To Place Your Classified ad



TH TAR in ALAcHATIMES
X liJTAR & CARRABEL IMES





Call Our New Numbers Now!



Call: 850-747-5020

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Email: thetimes@pcnh.com


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


The Times Thursday, February 5, 2009 7B






B8 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 5, 2009


News BRIEFS


Chef Sampler to
tempt taste buds
Sunday
The Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce will
host its 13th annual Forgot-
ten Coast Chef Sampler at


6 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 8, at the
Armory in Apalachicola.
Sixteen restaurants
plan to take part: Apala-
chicola Seafood Grill, AJ's
Bar & Grill, Boss Oyster,
Blue Parrot Oceanfront
Caf6, Caroline's Dining on
the River, Eddy Teach's


Raw Bar, Magnolia Grill,
Owl Caf6, My Caterer, Sun-
set Coastal Grill, Tamara's
Caf6 Floridita, That Place
In Apalach, That's A Mo-
ray, Up the Creek, Veran-
das Wine Bar & Bistro and
Clark & Blake Brennan's
School of Fish Restaurant.


WINW Cupid'o



v rJ


Southern Wine & Spirits,
Premier Beverage Com-
pany, National Distribut-
ing Company and Lewis
Bear Company also will be
a part.
Tickets can be pur-
chased by calling the cham-
ber at 653-9419.


choice
V~i~vyiv-


Lanark won't get
new recycling bins
At Tuesday's meeting,
county commissioners vot-
ed not to purchase two new
cardboard recycling con-
tainers for Lanark Village.
Lanark had requested
newbins with smaller open-
ings to discourage foraging
by bears. The presence of
bears at the recycling cen-
ter has drawn attention for
months.
Commissioner Smokey
Parrish said under current
economic constraints, the
county did not have $12,000
for the purchase.


Solid Waste Director
Van Johnson said problems
with the bears stem from
people disposing of house-
hold garbage at the recy-
cling site. To fund the con-
tainers, Johnson sought to
use a portion of $180,000
set aside for capital outlay
in the Solid Waste Manage-
ment Grant.
He said the county is
working with the Lanark
Patrol to close the recy-
cling site at night, making
it more difficult for people
to dump trash there. The
Lanark Village Association
will set the hours of opera-
tion for the facility.


Diana Kane


130 Ave F
(Located in the Clipper Shoppe)
Phone For Appointment
(850) 653-1550

Facials, Waxings,
Glycolics, etc.


'1


THE TIMESpalachol
vii-".-.. *icT.?. rtt:n --c >^i:~-"e s-:- L'-H n" "- *'*


OD< Lucky ID'\t? L"








?fOD()i Le 64De)

CONTEST RULES
1. All entries must be received by February 11 by 5
p.m. to qualify.
2. Contest is open to all participants age 21 and older.
Relatives of The Times and participating sponsors are
not eligible to win.
3. Entry form must be original and not photo copied.
4. Random drawing will take place February 12 and
the winner will be notified on February 12 by 4 p.m.
All prizes must be picked up by February 13 at 5 p.m
or prizes will be forfeited.


(upd's Choice Ps (ne

Enlty Form)
Name
Address
City/State/Zip
SDaytime Phone
IE-mail
Please send in your completed entry form to:
I The Times
Cupid's Choice
129 Commerce St
I Apalachicola, Florida 32329
S Or in person at the Times Office
L ----..- -----


Anderson offers romantic

evening at Dixie


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Looking for a place
to take your Valentine?
Margo Anderson's newest
show "Patsy," at the Dixie
Theatre on Feb. 13, is the
perfect snuggle date for
you and your sweetie.
Anderson's show is
a one-woman tribute to
Patsy Cline in two acts.
The first act is the story of
how Cline became a star,
the second act a recreation
of some of the artist's
glamorous performances.
"Patsy Cline was a
trailblazer with her image
of the more glamorous
country star, rather than a
cowgirl," Anderson said.
Some locals will
remember Anderson's
performance last fall in "A
Tribute to Patsy Cline and
S the Honky Tonk Angels,"
in which she depicted the
women of classic country
music including Tammy
Wynette, Loretta Lynn and
Reba McEntire.
"'Patsy' is more of a
monologue, or rather a
dialogue between me and
the audience," she said.
Anderson has two other
musical productions this
year at other theatres in
the Southeast: "Fabulous
Fifties and Sixties," a
fast-moving, hip-shaking
Journey through the music
of that era, and a tribute to
Celine Dion and Barbara
Streisand. She also has a
compact disc of original
music to be released in the
fall.


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
Gary Click and Judy
Goreau of Tallahassee
and Apalachicola share
a romantic moment
during Margo Anderson's
fall performance at the
Dixie Theatre.
"Apalachicola is one of
my favorite places to visit.
It is so peaceful. It's like
stepping back in time,"
Anderson said. "There is
something magical about
singing on the stage at the
Dixie Theatre. People have
stood on that stage that
have been known far and
wide. You can almost hear
music and voices from
days gone by."
Anderson has opened
for Cole Brothers Circus,
opened the Florida Seafood
Festival for country star
Aaron Tippin and recently
sang in an opening for
Grammy award-winner
Juice Newton.
General admission
tickets are $15 for the show,
which begins at 8 p.m. For
info, call 653-3200.


Our local real estate experts have identified what they feel are the best

values around and are offering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In

this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port

St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Bias, St. George Island, Carrabelle and

surrounding areas.


$325,000 St. George IslandI


ST. GEORGE
PLANTATION


Located in Sea
Dune Village, this
3 BR, 2 BA home
S- -- < has beach cottage
appeal on a 2nd tier, one acre lot. Being one
of the first homes built in the Plantation, it
has been spruced up and generates decent
income. Spacious living room with stone
fireplace, Metal roof. Newly renovated
community tennis court on adjacent lot.
Plantation amenities include air strip, pool,
& 24 hr security.
John Shelby, Broker
LG and 800-344-7570
St. George Island 800-344-7570
Realty .. 850-927-4777
www.sgirealty.com


EQRSAIBJJIDJMERi


Double wide Home
located at 545 Oyster Road
Apalachicola, FL 32320
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath
Home has boat shed and utility building
Call (850)653-6013 (after 5 PM)
or (850)653-5450
<____________________


NE *I


(MLS# 234390


~-~~Cd~c~G




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