Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00011
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: January 29, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Apalachicola


Carrabelle






...E.


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


Thursday, JANUARY 29, 2009


Cftse encounters




1.


Carrabelle bears

draw a crowd

By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

About 11:30 a.m. Friday, a customer
at Hog Wild Barbeque restaurant in Car-
rabelle noticed three bears in a tall pine
tree beside the building.
Officer Alvin Mitchell and Sgt. Joe
Hamm found a crowd ogling the animals
when they stopped in for lunch. Mitchell
speculated the bears might have been in
the tree since dawn.
"The mother was up 35 feet, and the
cubs were 10 feet higher," Mitchell said.
"They were just up there trying to find a
comfortable place to stay. People stared
up at them all day long and took a gazil-
lion pictures. I watched her for a while
at noontime and checked back a couple
of times during the day and then came
back around 6 p.m. when it was starting
to get dark. We had called it into Florida
Fish and Wildlife, and they sent three of-
ficers over to assess the situation."
"(FWC officer) Adam Warwick was
here at lunch and was concerned about
the bears," said Ken LaPaz, owner of
Hog Wild. "He was here most of the day
keeping an eye on them. "I thought it
was very good what he did and how he
was concerned and that he saw that they
got down safely and everybody else was
safe, too."
Warwick gained national attention in
July when he saved a 375-pound black
bear from drowning after the bear was
tranquilized.
FWC officers told everybody at HoIe
Wild to go back inside and asked the res.
taurant to use an alternative exit to keep)
disturbance of the bears at a minimum
They also placed a caution sign with a
flashing light on U.S. 98 to alert drivers
to the situation.
"We were very concerned that the
bears would come down the tree and
run across 98 and somebody would hit
them," Mitchell said.
As darkness fell, the FWC officers.
working with local police, instructed oin-
lookers from the Franklin Inn to go back
to their rooms and sent curious diners
into the restaurant. They then asked
the hotel and eatery to extinguish most
See BEAR A6

LOIS SWOBODA I StaffWrit.,
Tommy Harris, of Apalachicola,
found this 8-foot constrictor on the
woodpile seen behind him. Above
these three bears in Carrabelle left .
just as it was getting dark outside.


Exotic snake found

dead in Apalachicola

By Lois Swoboda a heart attack until I realized
Times Staff Writer it was dead," said Harris,
who had noticed a sour smell
around the wood pile and
On the morning of Wednes- wondered if it was the smell of
day, Jan. 21, Tommy Harris the snake.
was shocked to find an 8-foot "If it was, I think there may
boa constrictor draped across be another one," he said. "I've
a woodpile behind his home noticed the same smell around
on 25th Street.
a corner of my house."
Harris is restoring a Although the animal had
shrimp boat and has Although the animal had
shrimp boat and has minor damage to its head,
a small sawmill and m possibly from Harris
u-nlhnhhn i psil rm Hri


FRANKLIN COUNTY UNEMPLOYMENT
6.0


-D
C)
- 5.0
0Q_
E
c 4.5
( 4.0
C)
3.5
3.0


D J F
'07 '08


M A M J J A S O N D
Month


County backs


economic council


proposal


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Hoping to attract new
employers and secure
Franklin County's fair
share of federal econom-
ic stimulus dollars, com-
missioners have taken
the first step toward
creating a countywide
Economic Development
Council.
By a 4-0 vote Jan.
20, commissioners ap-
proved a motion by Com-
missioner Pinki Jackel
that outlined in theory
an Economic Develop-
ment Council (EDC) but
left open specifics as to
how it will be shaped, di-
rected and funded.
Commissioner Noah
Lockley was absent
from the meeting, held
the morning and early
afternoon of President
Barack Obama's inau-
guration.
"I've had this idea for
a while, but I'm begin-
ning it sooner than I had


planned to because of
the economic stimulus
package," Jackel said
in a telephone interview
Monday. "The speed
in which that has been
moving has sped this
along."
In her comments
prior to the vote, Jackel
said a council was need-
ed because unemploy-
ment has been steadily
on the rise, the bed tax is
forecast to generate less
revenue this year and
next, and legislation of
the seafood industry is
decreasing the amount
of product that can be
harvested locally, which
affects seafood workers'
livelihoods.
"Today, more and
more of our citizens are
looking for work," she
said. "A lot of folks are
not working now. An
economic development
council will bring re-
sponsible employers to
See ECONOMY A5


City presses for Water

Wars judgment


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
With the end of a 20-
year argument glimmer-
ing on the horizon, the
future of the Apalachico-
la River and Bay looks a
little brighter.
A decision by IS
the U.S. Supreme
Court and hard
work by Apala-
chicola city of-
ficials offer hope
that the waters of
the Apalachicola PATF
River will flow at City a
normal levels
once again.
On Friday,
Apalachicola
City Attorney Pat
Floyd filed a joint
motion for sum-
mary judgment
in the Middle Dis- ANDY
trict of Florida Apal|
federal court in Rive
Jacksonville.
This action was
prompted after the Su-
preme Court two weeks
ago denied a petition by
Georgia to overturn a
ruling by the U.S. Court
of Appeals. That petition
wanted to affirm a se-
cret agreement between


Georgia and the Corps
of Engineers that had
allowed vastly increased
water consumption from
Lake Lanier by Atlanta.
The Supreme Court's
ruling set a strong prec-
edent to be applied in the
ongoing effort
by Alabama and
Florida to have
Atlanta's current
use of the lake
declared illegal.
In his motion,
Floyd argues that
FLOYD the Corps acted
attorney illegally in with-
holding water for
municipal and
industrial uses
without seeking
permission from
Congress.
He also con-
tends the Corps
YSMITH is in violation of
achicola three federal en-
rkeeper vironmental pro-
tection laws, in-
cluding the Coastal Zone
Management Act, and
other Corps regulations.
In an affidavit at-
tached to the motion,
Apalachicola Mayor Van
Johnson points out that
See WATER A5


Phone: (850) 653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews@starfl.com
Fax: (850) 653-8036


Opinion .. ................... A4
Sheriff's Report ....................... B5
Church News ......................... B3


Society News......................... B2
Tide Chart ........................... B4
Classifieds ........................ B6-B7


o FREEDOM
SNEWSPAPERSINTERACTIVE
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
School News & Society Friday at 11 a.m.
Real Estate Ads Thursday at 11 a.m.
Classified Display Ads Friday at 11 a.m.
Classified Line Ads Monday at 5 p.m.


*


www. apalachtimes.com


0


TABLE OF CONTENTS


NE


Panhandle
Players take
the spotlight
Page B1











50CO





Thursday, January 29, 2009


AND THE WALLS COME
TUMBLING DOWN
Demolition of the Apalachicola State Bank
is expected to be complete by Feb. 1. Once
Coastline Construction completes the majority of the
demolition, the bank vault doors will be salvaged
and removed by Diebold Security for use in the new
building. Initially, it was planned to remove the vault
prior to demolition, but construction methods of the
vault prevented that.
The architect expects to present preliminary plans
next week to bank officials. Apalachicola State
Bank Vice-President Donnie Gay said he expects the
majority of subcontractor work will be completed by
local contractors. The overseeing general contractor
in charge of construction is GAC from Panama City.
At right, the last remaining wall of the bank
building, the one that faces Market Street, is shown.
Plans are to preserve the historic bricks and use them
to enhance the new structure.


TraviJ
FICKLING 7
COMPANY MikeHowze
y 850.653.5112


A Full Service Real Estate Company


Kim Davis
850.653.6875


s Stanley
653.6477
ard Jackie Golden
850.899.8433
Jamie Crum
850.899.8758
Ed Mitchem
850.653.5772


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Beautifully decorated interior! cozy home has deeded hardwood floors, fireplace,
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Please call us for a complete selection of properties for


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[] 850.927.2255


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times


WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM



Think Local First

Creating Community

Awareness

When dollars are spent locally, more
money circulates in the community,
creating a more vibrant economy.
Local business owners pay local property
tax which fund schools, police, emergency
services, and recreation programs.

Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce
(850) 653-9419
www.apalachicolabay.org





2 (iIl110) weeks in the Sitaror im e.s
tiilsize 3colx 5 iiain~iiiiiiiieui-(Iii'if ,itl5,Oo()
iiiimpessions on the Star or Hinies ~Il'ebsite


MD ry q

*ENTERTAINMENT.





The Tate s Hllgue and
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DINNER

$20
Contribution
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Beer and Wine
$2.00 Tickets


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Volmnteer.s a1ll:
(850)653-3113


21(TIT'O) wtAeeks in the Star or Times
a tsize3 tolxI I) and i Ibnneriadiiith 5 000
impression on the Staior Times 11'ehbite

Buy Full Color at Half Price!


THE STAR
850-227-1278
135 W. Hwy 98 Port St Joe, FL 32457
Kathleen Smith 850-819-5078


THE TIMESCarirbelle
IO>L' -I-'L M rC' Lfj tEil. I- 4PERf FOR I 0 E I I-' rE4R
850-653-8868
129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
Joel Reed 850-370-6090




.


NE ~*I


r


A2 I The Times


Local


177EW"


I






Thursday, January 29, 2009


Local


The Times I A3


Four county artists at


Tallahassee exhibition


Franklin County is rep-
resented by four artists,
Kristin Anderson, Beth
Appleton, Joyce Estes and
Joan Matey, at "The Art of
Fine Craftsmanship: An
Artport Gallery Exhibition
at the Tallahassee Airport"
now under way.
The exhibition high-
lights the work of artists
who are members of Flor-
ida Craftsmen's Capital
Region, which includes
Leon, Gadsden, Jeffer-
son, Franklin and Wakulla
counties. Florida Crafts-
men Inc. is the statewide
organization that for
nearly 60 years has repre-
sented the interests of the
state's skilled craft art-
ists. The exhibition runs
through March 20.
Eighteen artists have
hand-crafted pieces of art
in media including glass,
paper, metal, wood and fi-
ber. Their themes are as
diverse as their materials.
Some keep to the craft tra-
dition of creating functional
objects that people can uti-
lize in their daily lives, in
addition to appreciating
the aesthetic beauty and
craftsmanship of the object
itself. The jewelers have
mastered the skills to fash-
ion exquisite wearable art
that runs the gamut from


News BRIEFS


Garden Shop to host

camellia show
The Garden Shop, 147 Commerce
St. in Apalachicola, will host the second
annual Franklin County Camellia Show
from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Jan. 31.
At 2 p.m., there will be a "Garden
Talk" on growing and caring for camel-
lias along the coast.
This event is free and open to the pub-
lic. For more information, call 653-1777.

Outreach to assist

exemption, voting changes
Property Appraiser Doris Barber
Pendleton and Supervisor of Elections
Ida Cooper Elliott will host an outreach


throughout the county next month to pro-
vide assistance in any changes to voters'
registration and exemption applications.
There will be someone from their offic-
es at the following locations and dates:
Feb. 10: Eastpoint Post Office from 9
to 11 a.m. and Apalachicola State Bank on
St. George Island from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Feb. 12: Chillas Hall in Lanark Vil-
lage from 9 to 11 a.m. and Alligator Point
Fire Department from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Proof of residency for exemptions in-
clude a Florida driver's license or Florida
license plates, and social security num-
bers must be provided for both spouses.
If you are a registered voter, it must be in
the county where you are claiming your
primary residency.
If you have any questions, please con-
tact the property appraiser at 653-9236 or
supervisor of elections at 653-9520.


BBB accepting applications for Student Ethics Scholarship


Beth Appleton made this cut paper hurricane mask.


the traditional to the avant
garde.
At the other end of the
craft spectrum are artists
who have left the realm
of functionality to pursue
work designed to be appre-
ciated solely for its aesthet-
ic values of form, texture
and color. Yet, like their
functional colleagues, they
employ workmanship and
techniques of the highest
quality.
This is one of several
exhibits curated by the


Council on Culture and
Arts through the City of
Tallahassee's Art in Pub-
lic Places program. For
further information on
this exhibition, upcoming
exhibitions or the Art in
Public Places program,
contact Clint Riley at 224-
2500 or visit www.cocanet.
org.
For free parking dur-
ing reception, park in long
term parking and bring
your ticket into the gallery
to be validated.


The Better Business
Bureau Foundation of
Northwest Florida cur-
rently is accepting applica-
tions for the 2009 Student
Ethics Scholarship.
A total of nine high
school juniors and seniors
will be granted $1,000
scholarships this year.
The award is given to
college-bound students
within the BBB's north-
west Florida service area
who demonstrate overall
personal integrity and eth-


r,




















L.


ical behavior.
Local leaders from
businesses and academia
will serve as judges and
award scholarships based
on leadership, commu-
nity service, academic
achievement and an essay
on building character.
The scholarship will be
awarded in conjunction
with the Torch Award for
Marketplace Ethics and
the Customer Service Ex-
cellence Award. The Torch
Award recognizes busi-


nesses and charities that
insist on exceptionally
high standards of behavior
in dealing with customers,
vendors and employees.
The Customer Service Ex-
cellence Award recognizes
employees who go above
and beyond in their cus-
tomer service activities.
Application deadline is
March 27. For entry forms
and guidelines, visit www.
nwfl.bbb.org/TorchAward
or call 850-429-0002 or 800-
729-9226.


I,


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CELEBRATE "THE YEAR OF THE OX"
WITH THE GULF ALLIANCE for LOCAL ARTS.
As fate would have it, our Annual Meeting coincides with the
beginning of 2009 Chinese New Year of the Ox. The Ox is a sign of
prosperity through fortitude and hard work. The Ox is a born leader,
being quite dependable and possessing an innate ability to achieve
great things. The Ox is unswervingly patient, tireless in work, and
capable of enduring any amount of hardship without complaint.
Become an Ox and make a resolution to support your Local Arts.

COME JOIN THE ARTS ALLIANCE!
Thursday, January 29, 2009 Port St. Joe Garden Club -216 Eighth Street
6:00 p.m. Meet & Greet 6:30 p.m. Annual Business Meeting
7:30 p.m. Reception & Party


A RSVP (ASAP)
GULF ALLIANCE for LOCAL ARTS To Ally Sanxay.
...... .......... ...... ... ....... ......... ............................. .A l .S .........
Sag850-227-2516
agsanxay@gulfalliance.org


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I











Opinion


A4 I The Times


JI


Thursday, January 29, 2009


Wh3ats


YOUR PUBLIC TRUSTEE


i X Why do traffic tickets cost so much?
b Hnoinvvni0


P Bubu.r J -, e


Project Budburst seeks citizen scientists


I love science. I think
it's fun. Actually, I love
math, too, but don't tell
anybody. They might
think I'm a geek.
Do you have an in-
clination toward the
sciences? Want to do
something about global
climate change? Con-
sider registering
to participate
in Project Bud-
burst.
Scientists
concerned about
global climate
change due to
damage to the LOIS S
ozone layer of What'
the atmosphere Whatu
are using plants
to study how fast


and how much the tem-
perature of our planet is
changing.
Project Budburst, a
national field campaign
for "citizen scientists,"
is designed to help re-
cord how the planet is
warming by tracking
the dates that 60 plant
species leaf and flower
this spring and summer.
There already are scat-
tered historical records
of plant growth from
past years for compari-
son, and the organizers
of Project Budburst
hope to create a more
complete record of the
dates plants produce
flowers, leaves and fruit
in years to come.
Students, gardeners
and interested residents
of the 50 states will en-
ter their observations
into an online database
where the information
will be statistically ana-
lyzed and made avail-
able to scientists and to
the public online.
To take part in this
study, you must visit
the Project Budburst
Web site at http://www.
windows.ucar.edu/citi-
zen_science/budburst
and register. The ob-
servations will begin on
Feb.15 so it's important
to register soon.
After registering,
you will look at a list of
plants chosen for obser-
vation and pick one that
can be found in our area.
Box elder, chokecherry,
longleaf pine, red maple,
tulip poplar, Indian pink,
yarrow and dandelions,


all common locally, ap-
pear on the list.
You will be asked to
describe the area where
your plant is located and
then report on the date
the first leaves com-
pletely unfold on your
plant, the date when all
of the leaf buds have


WOBODA
s Bugging
You?


opened, the date
of the first flow-
er, the date when
the plant is in full
flower, the date
the last flower
falls and the date
of the first fruit
or seeds.
You can ob-
serve one type of
plant or several.
Very specific


instructions for deter-
mining the dates and
recording records are
given on the Web site,
and you can download
and print lists and flyers.
There also are lesson
plans for teachers.
After a trial run in
2007 that included re-
ports from 26 states, the
project is in full swing
this year with thousands
of people signed up.
It is especially im-
portant for people in
our area to help by
observing. In the pilot
study, there were no
observations from the
panhandle or anywhere
in Florida. I'll be offer-
ing extra credit to my
environmental science
students this term for
participating.
Project Budburst is
funded by the National
Fish and Wildlife Foun-
dation, the U.S. Geologi-
cal Survey, the National
Ecological Observatory
Network and the United
States Bureau of Land
Management.

Lois Swoboda, staff
writer at the Apala-
chicola and Carrabelle
Times, holds a doctorate
in entomology from Vir-
ginia Tech. If you have
question concerning a
plant or animal you see
in our area, you can ask
the bug doctor by call-
ing 653-1819, e-mailing
lswoboda@starfl.com or
dropping your written
inquiry or a picture off
at the Times office on
Commerce Street.


Q. Why do traffic tickets cost so
much?
A. Most of the money generated
from traffic fines goes to the state
into various trust funds. Senate Bill
12-A, passed during the Jan-
uary legislative special ses-
sion, becomes effective Feb.
1 and increases fines to fund
state courts. This legislation
increases by $25 the fine for
exceeding the speed limit by
15 to 19 miles per hour or 20
to 29 miles per hour and di- CLERI
rects that revenue from the CIRCU
increase to be deposited into Marci
the new State Courts Rev-
enue Trust FRnd.
This legislation also creates a $10
assessment to be paid, in addition to
any other penalties, for noncriminal
moving and non-moving traffic viola-
tions. Of that $10 total, $5 will go to
the State Courts Revenue Trust Fund,
$3.33 will go to the new State Attor-
neys Revenue Trust Rind and $1.67
will be distributed to the new Public
Defenders Revenue Trust Rind.


K'
TIT
a J


The new law also eliminates an
18 percent discount in certain traf-
fic-infraction penalties that drivers
can receive for attending basic
driver improvement courses and di-
rects the revenues to be dis-
tributed to the State Courts
Revenue Trust Rind.
I glanced at a receipt for
a recent speeding ticket, and
r from a total fine of $198, only
approximately $60 was going
to the local government, with
OF THE the clerk receiving a very
COURT small amount. The remainder
ohnson was going to the state. Since
Article V of the Constitution
took effect July 1, 2004, clerks
must rely on service charges, court
costs, filing fees and fines to fund the
court operations of the office.
I'm concerned it appears the leg-
islature is trying to take funds from
the clerk to fund the state. Senate
Bill 12-A also specifies that certain
fines imposed in cases where adju-
dication of guilt is withheld shall be
transmitted to the State Courts Rev-


enue Trust Rind. Previously, that
money was being distributed to the
clerk's office. I believe this portion of
the law will enable an increase to the
state trust funds while causing a sig-
nificant impact on my court budget.
I'm already worried about cuts
in the county's budget, and as the
state's budget is stretched to the
limit, I am concerned the state will
resort to more fee increases to sup-
plement its budget and might enact
more laws that mandate funding at
the local level. This we can't afford.
Nobody needs to rob Peter to pay
Paul. Clerks now have a difficult time
trying to collect the costs imposed,
and increasing those costs will just
make a difficult process even harder.

If you have any questions or
comments about this column, please
forward them to Marcia Johnson,
Clerk of the Court, 33 Market Street,
Ste. 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or
by e-mail to mmjohnson@franklin-
clerk.com. Visit the clerk's Web site
at www.franklinclerk.com.


Time to 'B' part of the solution


"What therefore God
has joined together, let not
man separate" (Mark 10:9)
were the words that rang
out to me from a wedding I
recently attended. I'd like to
apply that phrase to Frank-
lin County.
I've been thinking about
us for a while now. I'm think-
ing that somehow, someway,
we have got to pull together
for the betterment of us all.
We showed great strength
during election time when
we came out in record num-
bers. Now we must continue
that momentum. We've got
to stay in the fight for a bet-
ter Franklin County.
During my campaign for
school superintendent, there
was almost a thousand of
you who for whatever your
reasons believed in me and
my platform. We showed up
in every precinct of Franklin
County. Whatever the part
of the whole you made your
vote count for, let us con-
tinue to pursue our goals.
"We're all in this togeth-
er" was my theme song.
The lyrics I would sing are:
We're all in this together/
once we know that we are
we'll go far and we'll see
that/we're all in this togeth-
er and it'll show/ when we
stand hand in hand/ make
our dreams come true.
That is what came to
mind in my opening Bible
verse. We are all here in
Franklin County for a pur-
pose. We are all a part of


a plan. Whether you came
here as a visitor and decid-
ed to move here or whether
you were born and
raised here and
have been here all
your life or left and
returned, for some
specific purpose and
plan and part, you
are here. Let's get to
work and do what we TEM(
do for the common WIN
good. Staying
As I travel across
our county and look at what
we have, we really have a lot
going on. But from where I
sit and from what I can see,
we have a little doing a lot
when what we need is a lot
doing a little.
Can we join in and do
something? "What can I
do?" you ask. I'm so glad
you did. Volunteer. All across
the county there are needs.
We need people at all of the
decision-making meetings
for the citizens, the people of
Franklin County. Get up, get
out and go to the county and
city commission meetings
or visit the various Web sites
of each.
Be a voice on the issue.
Please, please attend school
board meetings. This is
where the future of Franklin
County is being set. The
future of the county is only
going to be as bright as the
students we graduate. Take
an interest in the educa-
tional process of all county
youth, from the youngest to


T


the oldest. Our future de-
pends on it. Please consider
all the children at all the
schools.
Just because the
elections are over
and people are in
place, whether our
choice was elected
or not, we still have
to be a part of the
LYNN process. We have to
ONS hold each and every
in Tune one accountable.
We need to, as a
community, set a standard
and hold our leadership ac-
countable to it. We need to
establish goals and do what-
ever it takes to reach them.
We have a mission here
and it should be in keep-
ing with the Declaration of
Independence, the most
quoted section being, "We
hold these truths to be self-
evident, that all men are
created equal, that they are
endowed by their Creator
with certain unalienable
Rights, that among these
are Life, Liberty and the
pursuit of Happiness. -
That to secure these rights,
Governments are insti-
tuted among Men, deriving
their just powers from the
consent of the governed,
That whenever any Form
of Government becomes
destructive of these ends, it
is the Right of the People to
alter or to abolish it, and to
institute new Government,
laying its foundation on
such principles and organiz-


ing its powers in such form,
as to them shall seem most
likely to effect their Safety
and Happiness."
This is our duty as citi-
zens of the United States of
America, Florida, Franklin
County, Alligator Point,
Apalachicola, Carrabelle,
Eastpoint, Lanark, St.
George Island. We've got
to pull together for the life,
liberty and happiness we all
so desire and deserve.
We can't let fear keep us
from succeeding at being
the great community we
can be. Remember Plan B?
We have to have B Better
Communications. (By the
way, the newspaper and
radio station are doing their
part, but we've got to help
them by getting the infor-
mation to them).
B Build on positive attri-
butes. We have a great foun-
dation in Franklin County.
Even with the economic
deprivation, if we pull to-
gether and support local and
invest locally, then we help
each other and we'll see it'll
be better for all of us.
We've got to B Believe
in our leadership and each
other for a B -Brighter Fi-
ture of all Franklin County.

Temolynn Wintons is
a professional educator
in Apalachicola, active in
directing youth activities
in her church and commu-
nity. Reach her at lynn@
temolynnwintons.com.


Cold winter nights, hot summer memories


Apalachicola
Carrabelle


THE TiMES

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


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POSTAGE PAID AT
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SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


I've been thinking about
summertime. Real, hot
summer when the heat is
an entity surrounding every
action and air condition-
ing is only an occasional
respite.
At home, there
was none until I was $
10, and then it was
only a wall unit in F
one room. We used .
box fans everywhere
else and slept only
in our underwear as
we hoped the swirl- RED W
ing air would cool AND R
our sweaty bodies. Denise
We envied our neigh-
bors who had attic fans that
cooled the entire house.
During the heat, our
raison d'6tre became stay-
ing cool. Outside, we sought
places with a breeze and
spots of shade. We played
in the hose, squirting our-
selves with the cool water.
Inside, we sat in front of
the fan and consumed vast
quantities of homemade
Kool Aid popsicles.
We got our first air-con-
ditioned car in 1964, and it
was an add-on bulky unit


positioned low on the dash-
board. Before that, we rode
with the windows complete-
ly down, blowing our hair
but not helping much with
the sticky vinyl seats under
our bare legs.
School at Chap-
man High was even
hotter because
there were no fans.
We wore sleeveless
dresses no shorts
allowed according
to the dress code
IHITE and there was no
tOUX shame if a half-moon
Roux of perspiration ap-
peared under our
armpits. Our desktops were
sticky, and sweat trickled
down our spines.
It was no different at
church. We still dressed up,
but hose were just out of the
question.
Summers I spent time
with my grandparents. The
early years were on their
live-aboard yacht moored
in a marina in Miami. With
the breezes off the river,
it seemed cooler there. I
still waited anxiously for
a frozen treat from the


ice-cream man who came
around with his cart every
afternoon. I took a banana
Ridgsicle break every day
at about four.
When I was a little older,
they lived on Great Abaco in
the Bahamas. Their house
was inland, and we took
every chance in the hot af-
ternoons to go to the beach
or swim in a friend's pool.
We took our long walks in
the evening.
Back home in Apalachic-
ola, we adored the isolated
locations of air conditioning.
The Dixie Theater offered
a 4 p.m. matinee on Sunday
afternoons. It was mainly
for the kids, and we flocked
there to relish two hours
of cool darkness, watching
serials of Captain Video,
John Wayne westerns and
Elvis movies.
A few restaurants were
chilled with artificial air, and
they advertised the fact with
"It's Kool Inside" stickers
on the front door. That was
genius advertising from the
cigarette company.
The heat was just a part
of life, and we accepted the


idea that productivity might
slow down a bit. Shelling
peas on the porch made
more sense than mowing
the grass or working in the
garden.
Now, like most of us, I am
a victim of air-conditioning.
I dart from my cool car to
a cool workplace to a cool
home. The heat assaults me
only in short bursts made
even hotter by the contrast.
My students complain if the
temperature in the class-
room rises above 72. I look
at them askance. At least
their papers aren't damp
from sweaty hands.
In our defense, maybe it
is hotter now. In my child-
hood, there were more trees
and less pavement that re-
flected the heat in waves.
After the freezing tem-
peratures of last week, I
hope you now have warm
thoughts.

Denise Roux is a regu-
lar columnist for the Apala-
chicola and Carrabelle
Times. Tb reach her, e-mail
her at rouxwhit@mchsi.
com.


*


NE






Thursday, January 29, 2009


Local


ECONOMY from page Al


Franklin County (who) will help
increase our shrinking tax base."
Commissioner Cheryl Sanders
also spoke in favor of the council
(EDC).
"I don't know how our minds
were running together, but our
minds were running together,"
she said. "We need jobs in this
county."
Jackel said she plans to draw
on existing EDCs and similar
structures as she fleshes out de-
tails over the next month.
"I'm looking at other coun-
ties that have them," she said.
"There's no reinventing the
wheel here. We can talk to a num-
ber of people and learn from their
mistakes. It's going to take me
at least 30 days to put the pieces
together. I'm still in the throes of
the idea."
Jackel said she envisions hav-
ing about 15 people on the EDC,
serving staggered terms, with
each commissioner nominating
two people from his district.
In addition, there might be
a half-dozen or so people from
throughout the county who would
fill slots assigned to different in-
dustries, such as seafood and
tourism, or institutions, such as
the school district or community
college.
"So we can have an influx of
ideas and visions," Jackel said.
"The commissioners are wise
enough to know who would func-
tion well on an economic develop-
ment council, and I'm looking for
their wisdom in those choices.
"Not an average Joe and not
a wheeler dealer tycoon, either,"
she added. "We need visionaries,
people who have vision for what
we can do here, who have contacts
and who can reach out and touch
people. These need to be some of
the county's best and brightest,
very conscientious folks who care
about our environment."
The EDC likely would employ


'Writing letters will not get the job done. We need
to do more, and we need a constant voice for
Franklin County. This is a huge opportunity,
possibly once in a century, for us to receive
infrastructure funding, and Franklin County
needs to have a unified plan for obtaining these
funds.'

Pinki Jackel
County commissioner


a paid director, Jackel said, whose
duties would include traveling
and representing the county's in-
terest.
"A spokesman and good Sa-
maritan to ask them to come to
Franklin County and make it their
home for business," she said.
"When the time comes, I'm
sure we'll have a number of quali-
fied applicants in the county, and
people outside the county may be
thinking about moving into the
county for it," Jackel said.

Securing federal dollars
key
Prominent in Jackel's mind's
eye is a strategy of using the EDC
to help secure some of the mil-
lions of dollars in economic stim-
ulus money expected to soon roll
into the state from Washington.
"If we hope to receive our fair
share of the anticipated economic
stimulus package from the new
administration, we are going to
need someone to lobby constantly
for Franklin County and our citi-
zens' needs on the state level,"
she told her fellow commission-
ers. "Writing letters will not get
the job done. We need to do more,
and we need a constant voice for
Franklin County. This is a huge


opportunity, possibly once in a
century, for us to receive infra-
structure funding, and Franklin
County needs to have a unified
plan for obtaining these funds."
The county jumped in line for
the dollars by responding in De-
cember to a notice from the Flor-
ida Association of Counties that
called for infrastructure ideas
that could be ready to bid in four
months and that qualified for fed-
eral funding.
In a Dec. 22 letter to Cong Al-
len Boyd, D-Monticello, the coun-
ty listed $147.5 million in projects.
Broken down, hese included $25.8
million for each of the five county
commission districts, $6 million
to dredge Eastpoint channel, $3
million for a working waterfront
facility in Eastpoint, $2.5 million
for repairing the Alligator Point
revetment, $2 million for a new
emergency operations center and
$2 million for a new urgent care
clinic.
Also on the list was $1 million
to repair the dredge spoil site
for Two Mile Channel, $1 million
for exterior repairs to the county
courthouse, $500,000 for a new St.
George Island linear park and
$200,000 to replace the island's
lighthouse playground.
"We had about 48 hours to get


that together and really come up
with hard firm numbers for those
projects," Jackel said. "We had
a maximum of 72 hours to send
it. We had to quickly come up
with request numbers, and while
they're are not exact, we had to
speak up. We wanted to let them
know we're thinking. We're on top
of it."
As it turned out, the county
was one of just 29 Florida coun-
ties who turned in letters to their
congressman or the governor.
"Did we have all of our exact
dollars in here? No, that wasn't
the idea," Jackel said. "They
were educated guesses, based
on rounding some numbers. That
was the rationale for that.
"This money coming from the
state and federal government is
going to be huge. If we don't have
a voice there, I'm afraid we won't
get our fair share," she said. "The
county needs to be on their Ps
and Qs, or they're going to miss it.
We've got to stay on top of this."

Possible tie-in with TDC
Jackel said she would like to
see the EDC work closely with
the Tourist Development Council,
perhaps hiring an executive direc-
tor who oversees both councils.


"The TDC has to focus on put-
ting heads in beds; it can't attract
business," she said. "This is a
good time for us to piggyback on
that, if that is what the TDC needs
to do."
She said Curt Blair, who serves
in a primarily administrative ca-
pacity handling TDC's operation,
has told the TDC he wants to step
down to devote more time to the
Water Street Hotel and Marina.
"I think this is good timing if
the TDC is going to looking at hir-
ing a new director," Jackel said.
She said having an EDC will
make the county eligible for a
greater number of grants. As
well, the state might have seed
money available to fund start-up
of the EDC.
"This is an investment in
Franklin County's future long-
term," Jackel said. "We've really
got to rise above the ground level
and really get a mid-range view, a
three- to five-year range, and then
we've got to go a little higher than
that and look at a 10-year plan, a
12-year plan. We need effective,
efficient planning for the county.
If we have a good three- to-five
year plan, we'll take baby steps,
and eventually we're going to get
there."
Former longtime county com-
missioner Jimmy Mosconis said
the EDC idea is similar to an Eco-
nomic Development Authority the
county created in the late 1980s.
Headed by Apalachicola State
Bank President Ed Mingledorff,
the authority, an arm's-length ex-
tension of the county commission,
was able to issue bonds that led to
the creation of a nursing home in
Eastpoint.
"Back then, we had high
hopes; we just didn't have all the
right players involved," he said.
"This is long-term planning that
requires people dedicated to the
cause, to stay the course and have
a positive impact down the road."


WATER from paqe Al


three of Florida's largest
seafood dealers and proces-
sors and more than 2,000 lo-
cal workers are impacted
by the health of the river
and bay.
"The city and surround-
ing area is facing economic
peril as a result of insuffi-
cient water flows to Apala-
chicola," he wrote. "The
Apalachicola River and
Bay support a multi-million
dollar commercial fishing
industry. Recent data docu-
ments that this industry is
being jeopardized as a re-
sult of the reduced inflows.
Continued reductions can
only hasten the catastroph-
ic decline of this important
component of the (city's)
economy. The resulting loss
of jobs will devastate a peo-
ple who have relied on this
industry for generations."
Attorney Andy Smith,
director of the Apalachicola
Riverkeeper, said "It's very
unusual that a small city
like Apalachicola, which is
not normally in the business
of suing people, would bring
a suit against the Corps of
Engineers. We think they
have done a wonderful job.
"Their filing brought a
broad view of importance of
the bay and the ecosystem
to the argument. The state
addressed those issues in
more technical and scien-
tific terms; the city really
talked about it more as an
ecosystem. They went be-


yond just technical legal ar-
guments, and I think that's
good," he said.
"We have worked hard
to create a powerful brief,"
Floyd said. "There are
things in it that are going
to make people livid, that
should have made them
livid for a long time."
Floyd said in favor of
supplying water to munici-
palities, the Corps has all
but abandoned its mandate
to maintain the ACF as a
navigable system and pro-
vide water to hydroelectric
plants downstream. He
said they had sidestepped
proper legal procedures by
claiming contracts with wa-
ter recipients were merely
interim agreements.
"The Corps' contracts
are illegal and invalid, and
they aren't even abiding by
the illegal contracts," he
said. "The people of Atlanta
have been intentionally ad-
dicted to cheap, easy access
to water from the ACF sys-
tem that's not theirs to use.
"Don't bargain with us.
Just do what the law says
you should do. Don't call
it an interim agreement
when you've been doing
this for 26 years."
Floyd said the Corps has
exhibited a flagrant disre-
gard for the law and in the
brief cites the fact that since
2001 and even during peri-
ods of drought, the Corps
has retained water in Lake


*I


Lanier for four to six weeks
each spring to facilitate the
spawning of local sport-fish
such as largemouth bass.
Floyd contends this is a
violation of the Corps' own
regulations concerning wa-
ter allocation. Restricting
springtime water releases
also could inhibit down-
stream spawning of Gulf
sturgeon, an endangered
species.
Now that the brief is
filed, the Corps must file
a response by Feb. 20, and
all parties will have until


March 20 to respond.
"The judge doesn't have
a timeline," Smith said. "He
could respond as early as
April, or he may call for oral
arguments, which would
take place in April and
May."
District Judge Paul A.
Magnuson, who is presiding
over the case, also heard
arguments in 2003 over en-
vironmental issues versus
commercial use concern-
ing the Missouri River. In
that case, he ordered water
levels be dropped to facili-


tate reproduction of three
threatened species in spite
of the fact that the flow
reduction interfered with
navigation.
Smith said the river-
keeper hopes the Obama
administration will live up
to promises put forth in an
October 2008 press release
concerning environmental
issues in Florida.
In the statement, the
Obama Campaign for
Change called on the gov-
ernors of Florida, Georgia
and Alabama to meet and


resolve the ACF issue and
wrote, "The difference this
time would be that Obama
would direct the National
Research Council to con-
duct a study to assess the
water availability, supply
options, and demand-man-
agement alternatives that
factor into ACF River Sys-
tem usage, as well as the
impact of freshwater flow
on the ecology of the Apala-
chicola River and Bay. The
study would provide the sci-
entific basis for reaching an
equitable solution."


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A6 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 29, 2009


Franklin
senior
Charles
Goggins,
left, and .
eighth
grader
Carla
Lewis -"
listen to ... ,7.* ,-.
President .
Barack ...iI'
Obama's
inaugura-
tion.

DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times


County tunes in to inauguration


Franklin County students at the new
consolidated school tuned in to President
Barack Obama's inauguration Jan. 20,
although some were more tuned in than
others.
Several paid little attention to the
television screens that featured the inau-
guration ceremony. Earlier this month,
Superintendent Nina Marks requested
teachers put aside their classwork to al-
low students a chance to witness this his-
toric occasion.
"I can't vouch for my generation's
politics," said eighth grader Carla Lewis,
who sat in rapt attention alongside senior
Charles Goggins in a quiet area of the
school.
"I am glad all my campaigning helped,"
said Lewis, sporting a pair of hoop ear-
rings with bright yellow peace signs inside


them. "I am proud."
Goggins, who voted for Obama less
than a week after he turned 18, was more
modest in his excitement.
I just hope he does a good job, and as
long as he doesn't do anything stupid, I
have no problem with Mr. Obama," he
said.
"Thumbs up," said senior Marty Shir-
ley.
Lewis said she would like to see Obama
make a turnaround in education a top pri-
ority. "Because that's where everything
starts, and without the building blocks,
there is nothing," she said,'
Goggins said he would like to see the
economy improve. "I made the choice and
I just hope I made the right one," he said.

By David Adlerstein


ew Fitness Trails

Across the County

HEA LT H ,N
,.A l ,


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR A
LARGE SCALE AMENDMENT TO THE
CITY OF CARRABELLE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

Public Hearing of the
City of Carrabelle City Commission

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Carrabelle will hold a Public Hearing on Thurs-
day, February 5, 2009, starting on or after 6:30 PRM., at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex, 1001
Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, to consider the following item, First Reading of:

The purpose of the Public Hearing is to receive comments and make decisions regarding the
above matter. The plan amendment includes changes to the Coastal Management Element of the
Comprehensive Plan no changes will be made to the Future Land Use Map.

ORDINANCE NO.: 438

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF THE CITY OF CAR-
RABELLE, SPECIFICALLY CITY-INITIATED TEXT AMENDMENTS TO POLICY 7.G. 1
OBJECTIVE 1.2 OF THE COASTAL MANAGEMENT ELEMENT, OF THE COMPREHEN-
SIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN
CONFLICT HEREWITH AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

A copy of the Ordinance is available for inspection at City Hall. Members of the public are
encouraged to attend the hearing and be heard on this matter.

At this hearing, the City Commission will accept public testimony and will consider the adoption
of Comprehensive Plan Amendment 09-01

All interested parties are invited to attend the public hearing and comment upon the Plan Amend-
ments or submit their comments in writing to the City Commission. Further information con-
cerning the proposed amendments can be obtained from the City Clerk at City Hall, at 1001 Gray
Ave., Carrabelle, Florida, or by calling (850)697-2727, between the hours of 8:30 A.M and 4:30
PM., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

Please be advised that if a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commis-
sion with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, such person will need a record of
the proceedings, and for this purpose such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the ap-
peal is based. The City of Carrabelle does not provide or prepare such record pursuant to ES.
286.0105.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a spe-
cial accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the City Clerk at City Hall,
at 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, or by calling (850)697-3618, no later than three (3)
days prior to the proceedings.

Any person requiring a special accommodation at this hearing because of a disability or physical
impairment should contact the City Clerk at (850) 697-3618 as soon as possible.

Keisha Smith
City Clerk


BEAR from page Al


of their exterior lighting.
"They came down around 7 p.m.,
just as it was getting dark," Mitchell
said. "First, they came 20 feet down and
paused; it was like she was having a little
conference with the cubs. Then they slid
down that last 15 feet. They scampered
across 98 and were gone."
LaPaz said the restaurant has "prob-
lems with them quite a bit getting in our
dumpster. Actually, when I do what I'm
supposed to do and lock the lid down, ev-
erything is OK."
He said he has retrofitted the dump-
ster with plywood and chains to make it
bear-proof.
"It cost me around $200 between
chain, the fittings and plywood," he said.
"It's worth it not to have to clean it up
every day.
"I wouldn't say it helped my business,
but it certainly drew a crowd. It is amaz-
ing how many people have a camera on
their person or in their vehicle. When
we found out about the bears, the din-
ing room almost emptied and everybody
was taking pictures."
With the black bear's return from the
brink of extinction, encounters in rural
Florida become more and more com-
mon. Bears are a protected species in
Florida. To play it safe with bears around
the home, follow these tips.
If a black bear is visible but not
close, alter your route so you will move



SNAKE from page Al

the mid-20s on Thursday morning, Jan.
22. Boas are cold-blooded and prefer a
temperature range of 80 to 90 degrees
during the day, dropping into the 70s at
night.
George Watkins said Harris placed
the dead snake in front of his house on
Thursday evening for trash pickup. But
apparently, some prankster moved the
snake because it turned up in a new lo-
cation the following morning.
Lisa Bailey, of Apalachicola, said she
was leaving the Apalachicola Bay Char-
ter School around noon when she spotted
the snake at the junction of Fred Myers
and 25th Street. She decided to remove it
from the street because she didn't want
children from the school to encounter
the dead animal.
"I had heard about the snake found
the day before. I feel sure it was the same
one," she said. "It had been run over, and
the head had been crushed. There was
a rope tied around it. I think somebody
dragged it to where it was. As I was mov-
ing it from the road, a man appeared and
offered to dispose of it. He threw it in his
truck and left."
On Friday, Jan. 23, John Arnold was
leaving his home at 130 25th St. when he
saw Bailey dragging the snake. It was
Arnold who removed the snake from the
road.
Boas and other constrictors feed on
large lizards, birds, opossums, bats,
mongooses, rats and squirrels. They
are not poisonous. Some hide near wa-
ter and grip their prey when it comes to
drink. Boas hunt at night and use heat-
sensitive scales to locate their prey.
The boa constrictor's preferred
prey is bats, which they catch by hang-
ing from the branches of trees or the


away from its area.
If a black bear approaches, do not
run. Remain calm, continue facing the
bear and slowly back away. If the bear
continues to approach, try to group to-
gether and pick up small children. Try
to scare the bear away by shouting and
acting aggressively.
Minimize odors and the availability
of food rewards throughout your yard
and community.
Put out garbage on the day of pick-
up, not the night before. Store in a sturdy
building or place in a bear- resistant
trash receptacle.
Do not leave pet food out. Hang bird
feeders out of reach of bears. Keep bar-
becues clean and grease-free. Store with
livestock/pet feed inside a sturdy build-
ing.
Pick all ripe fruit from trees and
surrounding ground as soon as possible.
Vegetable gardens and compost
piles might attract bears. Do not put
meat, fish or other pungent scraps in
compost pile. Add lime to reduce odors
and accelerate decomposition.
An electric fence is an effective way
to keep bears out of orchards, gardens,
compost piles and beehives. Follow ap-
propriate safety precautions.
Bear activity might intensify in
spring in the fall and during drought pe-
riods. This is because of the scarcity of
natural foods.


mouths of caves, grabbing them out of
the air as they fly by and killing them by
constriction. That means they kill their
prey by coiling their large, powerful bod-
ies around their victims and squeezing
until their prey suffocates or is crushed
to death and dies from internal bleed-
ing. Then the snake unhinges its jaw and
swallows the victim whole. Occasionally,
they have been known to eat caimans (a
relative of the alligator), other snakes,
deer and even jaguars.
Constrictors are slow-moving, so
they have to rely on stealth and surprise
to catch unsuspecting prey. Their liking
for rats earns them a special place in
humans' tolerance, and they sometimes
are kept as house snakes. Once they've
eaten, they can go for a week without
hunting and eating again.
Constrictors of the size found on 25th
Street are not likely to harm a human
being but might pose a threat to cats or
dogs.
Although escaped pythons and boas
have become a serious problem in South
Florida, these snakes are not native to
North America, and none tolerate cold
well. The snake found on 25th Street
was undoubtedly a pet that escaped or
was released by an owner who no longer
wished to care for it.
People who purchase a 3-foot snake
rarely are prepared for the 8-foot, 50-
pound monster it will become in a few
years, or for the cost of feeding an adult
boa or python.
If you are thinking of purchasing one
of these interesting but delicate crea-
tures, be sure to do some research on
how big they will grow and what their
feeding requirements are. Releasing
them into the wild is at best unkind.


-1v













*'- 4







S CARRABELLE -APALACH COLA




PORTS
M r.


Thursday, January 29, 2009


SPORTS SHORTS
Semi-pro baseball
league in the works
Efforts continue in the
development of the Big
Bend semi-pro baseball
league in the Big Bend
area of north Florida.
The proposed league
consists of two
divisions (eastern
and western)
covering
six counties
immediately east of
the Apalachicola River
and six counties west of
the river. Teams (minimum
of four and maximum of
six in each division) are
now being developed
basically along county
locations.
Teams in the western
division might include
Marianna, Chipley,
Port St. Joe, Bonifay,
Graceville, Malone,
Panama City, Lynn Haven
and Blountstown.
Teams in the eastern
division might include
Tallahassee, Quincy,
Chattahoochee, Wakulla,
Monticello, Apalachicola,
Carrabelle, Lanark
Village and Bristol.
The next league-wide
meeting is scheduled for
Saturday, Feb. 14 at 10
a.m. at the Apalachee
Restaurant in Bristol,
Highway 20 West.
For further information,
contact Harold W. Bailey
at (229) 662-2066 or
(850) 524-2151.

Dixie Youth League
accepting applications
The Franklin County
Dixie League is currently
accepting applications
for the 2009 season. To
be eligible in the 2009
season you child must be
5 years old before May
1 .
Participation fee for
the 2009 season will
be $40. Sign up will be
Saturday, Feb.7 from
10:30 to noon, Thursday,
Feb.12 from 6 to 8 p.m.
and Saturday, Feb. 14
from 10:30 to noon.
For your child to be
eligible to participate
we must receive this
completed form and copy
of his/her birth certificate
and non refundable
participation fee. Late
registration fee after
March 1 will be $50, no
exceptions.


THIS WEEK

WITH THE

SEAHAWKS

Thursday, Jan. 29
Lady Seahawks
Varsity Basketball
plays away against
Wewahitchka. Tipoff
time is at 6 p.m.

Friday, Jan. 30
Seahawks JV and
Varsity Basketball
play away at
Panama City Arnold.
First tipoff is at 6:30
p.m., followed by an
8 p.m. game.

Tuesday, Feb. 3
Seahawks JV and
Varsity Basketball
play away at FAMU.
First tipoff time is at
6 p.m.


A
Section


Page 7


p a I a c h11 t i nI e c o ( i


District co-champ




0ahawks get ready




for tourney


A 70-69 overtime victory at Blountstown
Monday gave the Seahawks boys basketball
team a break for a change.
Now 20-5, and heading into the post-season
with some of the steadiest senior leadership
you can ask for, coach Fred Drake's squad
played lousy defense and nearly let the Tigers
steal a win.
"We blew three games this season but God
blessed us by giving us one back," said Drake.
"He blessed us with one. We were due to win
one when we're not supposed to."
The Seahawks weren't supposed to be-
cause the team played what Drake called
"their worst defensive game of the season,"
letting slip a 14-point lead at the first of the
first quarter by allowing the Tigers to outscore
them 20-4 in the second.
"The offense was fine. We didn't play de-
fense whatsoever," said Drake. "We had a
mental letdown on defense to where the kids
didn't know how to play the zone defense cor-
rectly."
Trailing 26-24 at the half, the Seahawks
knotted it 46-all after three quarters. After
Blountstown tied it at 61-all in the final sec-
onds, the Seahawks had a chance to win but
couldn't clinch.
In the overtime, senior Deshaun Winfield's
free throw in the final seconds gave the Se-
ahawks the go-ahead point, but after Winfield
missed two subsequent tries at the charity
stripe, it took freshman Carlos Morris grab-
bing a rebound and holding on to ice the win.
The Blountstown win marked the third vic-
tory in the last four games for the Seahawks.
The team began by swamping North Flori-
da Christian 103-64 at home Jan. 20, the score
motivated in part by the team's anger over
North Florida coach's comments in the Tal-
lahassee paper that Maclay was the team to
beat.
"The North Florida coach said Maclay was
the best team in the district and the kids took
offense with that," said Drake. "The kids were
fired up about that and they wanted to prove
a point to him. We got motivation out of that
after they read the comment. As it got closer
to 90, the kids said 'Let's get 100."
Three days later, though, the Seahawks fell
to Maclay 45-40 in another defensive struggle.
The loss meant both teams finished with a 5-1
district record, each having lost on the other's
home court.
"It was the third game we gave away," said
Drake. "We were up by 4 points with 39 sec-
onds left and we shot the ball. We didn't have
to and they were told during previous timeout
to let them foul us.
"That goes to decision making skills," said
the coach. "That's just another game we gave
away."
On Saturday night at home, the team
cruised to an 87-64 win over Wakulla in the


W PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The
Times
Junior guard Austin
O'Neal, far left, bends
over backwards in play
Saturday night against
Wakulla.


last home game of the regular season. By
game's end, senior AJ Williams and several of
the younger players, Tydron Wynn, Brandon
Hand, Zach Jones and Dalin Modican, got a
chance for playing time as they prepare for
their chance to be starters.
Whether the Seahawks return home in the
post-season will depend on if, and how, they
advance from the districts, which begin Feb.
13 in Monticello at Jefferson County.
A change in how they are seeding the teams
has Drake disappointed. He said he got a call
the other day that said they wouldn't be using
the point spread to determine the number one
seed between the regular season co-champi-
ons.
That was the way it was done last year at
Maclay, and since the Seahawks beat Maclay
this year by 18, and lost to them by five, the
difference would have given them the number
one slot.
"For some reason they are not going by
point totals," said Drake. "They looked at how
you did against other teams in the district. Ma-
clay beat all the same teams we beat. They're
going to do a coin toss on Monday."
It will be a double coin toss, as Jefferson
County and North Florida are both 1-5.
What has Drake concerned is that the
seeding could mean an opening game against
Jefferson County, a scrappy team with an ex-
plosive point guard. "It's like a home game for
them and they're going to have a big crowd,"
said Drake.
The district winner will stay at home, while
the runner-up will go on the road, and it could
be to Port St. Joe, depending on how it shakes
out between the Tiger Sharks and West Gads-
den in the neighboring district.
"Everybody has all this expectation for us,"
said Drake. "It depends on what guard shows
up that night if we'll go to Lakeland. We're up
and down. I don't know what guard is going to
show up."


Seahawks Tydron Wynn, left, and Brandon
Hand tackle defense Saturday night
against Wakulla.


Seahawks boys

basketball scoreboard

Jan. 20 home vs. North Florida
Christian
North Florida II 17 21 15- 64
Franklin Co. 20 25 27 31 103
SEAHAWKS: Deshaun Winfield 7/1 I 2s,
3/8 3s, 5/6 FTs, 28 pts.; Zan Simmons 3/8 2s,
I/I FTs,7 pts.;Carlos Morris 4/9 2s,5/10 3s,
23 pts.;Jeremy James 2/5 2s, 3/13 3s, 1/2 FTs,
14 pts.;Austin O'Neal 6/15 2s, 1/3 3s, 8/12
FTs, 23 pts.;Arron Prince I/I 2s, 2/5 3s, 8 pts.
Totals: 23/50 2s, 14/43 3s, 15/23 FTs
Rebounds: Simmons 13,Winfield 12,
O'Neal I I, Morris 9,James 6, Prince, Dalin
Modican, P.Jones 2
Steals: Simmons 6, O'Neal 5, Morris,
Winfield,James 4
Assists: O'Neal, Simmons,Winfield,James
3, Morris, Modican
Blocks:Winfield 3, Morris 2, Simmons
Jan. 23 at Maclay
Franklin 14 9 8 9-40
Maclay 14 4 13 14-45
SEAHAWKS: Prince 2/2 2s, 1/2 FTs, 5 pts.;
Morris 2/5 2s, 2/6 3s, 10 pts.;Winfield 4/7 2s,
1/3 3s, 4/4 FTs, 15 pts.; O'Neal 2/7 2s, 2/2 FTs,
6 pts.; Simmons 1/3 2s, 2 pts.; Modican I/I 2s,
2 pts.
Totals: 12/27 2s, 3/12 3s, 7/9 FTs
Rebounds:Winfield 8, Prince, Simmons 7,
Morris 5,James
Assists: Prince, O'Neal 2,Winfield
Steals: Morris,Winfield 2, Prince
Blocks:Winfield 3, Morris 2, Simmons
Jan. 24 at home vs.Wakulla
Wakulla 19 7 22 16- 64
Franklin Co. 28 18 21 20 -87
SEAHAWKS:Winfield 8/13 2s, 2/2 FTs, 18
pts.; Simmons 3/7 2s, I/I 3s, 3/4 FTs, 12 pts.;
Morris 5/7 2s, 3/7 3s, 4/6 FTs, 23 pts.; O'Neal
6/6 2s, 12 pts.; Prince 4/4 2s, 8 pts.; Modican
2/3 2s, 1/2 FTs, 5 pts; James 3/6 2s, 6 pts.;
Brandon Hand I/ I 2s, 2 pts.;Tydron Wynn
I/I Fts, I pt.;
Totals: 32/5 I 2s, 4/16 3s, I 1/19 FTs
Rebounds: Simmons 10, O'Neal,James 7,
Winfield 6, Z.Jones 5, Morris, Modican,A.
Williams 2
Steals:James 5, Morris 2, Simmons
Assists:James, Simmons 6, Morris 5, Prince
3,Williams, O'Neal,Winfield 2,Wynn
Blocks:Winfield 2, Simmons,Jones
Jan. 26 away at Blountstown
Franklin Co. 20 4 22 15 9 -70
Blountstown 6 20 20 15 8 69
SEAHAWKS:Winfield I 1/19 2s, 1/3 3s, 3/7
FTs, 28 pts.; Simmons 2/4 2s, 4 pts.; Morris
3/8 2s, 3/10 3s, 2/4 FTs, 17 pts.;Austin O'Neal
5/6 2s, 2/7 FTs, 12 pts.; Prince 3/6 2s, 3/5 FTs,
9 pts.
Totals: 24/43 2s, 4/14 3s, 10/23 FTs
Rebounds:Winfield 10, Simmons 7, Morris
6, O'Neal 4,James 3, Prince
Steals: Simmons, Prince, O'Neal, Morris 2,
Winfield
Assists: O'Neal 4, Simmons, Prince, Morris


Blocks:Winfield 2


Myers, Simmons key to early wins for Lady Seahawks


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Editor's Note: This is
the first of two stories on
the Lady Seahawks' 2008-
09 season. This week, The
Times looks at the girls


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Appearing at the Jan. 16 Senior Night, senior
guard Ashley Myers, center, is flanked by mom
Michelle Myers, right, and cousin Leon O'Neal.
"After a long layoff, Ashley has stepped up
and proven to a good basketball player, and is
continuing to learn to be a leader, both and off
the court," said coach Justin Long.


Senior forward Ashley
Myers and sophomore
guard Tasia Simmons
have been the key forces
this season for the Lady
Seahawks, sparking the

See SEAHAWKS A8


APALACH 1t(Lk
STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561
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basketball team's first 10
games, and next week
we'll wrap up the second
half of the season. The
Lady Seahawks begin
district tournament play
Friday, Dec. 6 at Jeffer-
son County.


-1


NE


----------






A8 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 29, 2009


SEAHAWKS from page Al


tal Davis adding a bucket.
In the Dec. 12 and 13
trip to Columbus, GA, the
Lady Seahawks didn't shy
away from fierce compe-
tition, as they were out-
matched by two dominant
Georgia programs.
On Dec. 12 the team lost
96-17 to Columbus Carver.
Simmons added 11 points,
while Myers tallied six.
On Dec. 13, Coach Jus-


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IGarden E iX 6

March 6,7,8, 2009
Bay County Fairgrounds

CALL TO VENDORS
Register now for booth space at the 2009 Home &
Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. Share your home
improvement products, services, and enhancements
with thousands of families in the Bay area looking to
renovate, decorate, and landscape their homes.

All vendors receive a FREE quarter- -1
page ad in the official 2009 Home ,
& Garden Expo program, reaching V
more than 80,000 adults in Bay and
seven surrounding counties. The 2009
Expo is also the host site for the Gulf
Coast B-B-Q Cook-Off, an officially C1
sanctioned, crowd-drawing event!

For Vendor Application, as well as information on the
show and program advertising:
visit: www.emeraldcoast.com/events/expo
email: expostradeshows@aol.com
Call: 850-763-8618
LAST YEAR'S SHOW SOLD OUT!
Space Is Limited, So Reserve Yours NOW!

For additional advertising information in the official
program of the 2009 Home and Garden Expo, contact
The News Herald at 850-258-4163.
PRESNTIN SPOSOR


KNOLOGYS


S


NEWS HERALD


SUNTRUST


team to four wins in the
first half of the season.
After opening with
a split of their opening
games, downing and then
falling to Wakulla County,
the team endured four
straight losses.
On Dec. 4 at North Flor-
ida Christian, the team fell
57-22. Myers and Simmons
each contributed 10 points,
with senior center Khrys-


tin Long's squad fell 77-
20 to Columbus Jordan.
Freshman guard Oneika
Lockley led the team with
eight points, with six from
eighth grader Shelby My-
ers, brought up from ju-
nior varsity. Ashley Myers
added four, and junior for-
ward Monet Moron tallied
a bucket.
On Dec. 16 at home, the
Lady Seahawks lost 50-22
to Wakulla. Senior guard
Quanteka Croom had sev-
en points, Simmons six,
Ashley Myers four, Davis
three and Lockley two.
The Lady Seahawks got
back on the winning track
Dec. 18 at Jefferson Coun-
ty, winning 44-32.
Ashley Myers knocked
in 15 points, with Sim-
mons adding 11. Lockley
and Croom each scored
six, with Davis adding four
and Shelby Myers scoring


a bucket.
On Dec. 19 the Lady Se-
ahawks fell 64-37 at home
against Mosley. Simmons
was high scorer with 11,
and Lockley and Croom
each added eight. Myers
scored six and junior guard
Joy Carrino added a trey.
With the start of the new
year, the Lady Seahawks
then knocked off back-to-
back wins. They won 54-15
on Jan. 5 at Altha, and then
topped Liberty County 54-
15 at home Jan. 7.
Against Altha, Myers
scored 16 points, followed
closely by Lockley's 13
and Simmons' 10. Carrino
added five, Davis four and
Croom two.
Against Liberty County,
Myers again led the team,
this time with a dozen
points. Simmons followed
with eight, with Carrino
and Shelby Myers each


MORE SPORTS ONLINE @ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM


Saturday, February 7, 2009
11 a.m.- 2 p.m. Eastern


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Appearing at the Jan. 16 Senior Night, senior
center Khrystal Davis, center, is flanked by parents
Herbert and Sherry Davis. "For a girl to put as much
dedication into one sport for all three seasons shows
she wants to be successful in life and she's definitely
going to be that," said coach Justin Long.

scoring four. Croom, Davis senior guard Patricia
and Moron each tallied a Golden and eight graders
bucket. Megan McClain and Anna
Also on the squad are Lee.


PUBLIC NOTICE

THE FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL HOLD
A PUBLIC HEARING ON WEDNESDAY,
WEDNESDAY, 4, 2009, AT 9:00 A.M., IN THE
COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING ROOM
OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE ANNEX TO CONSIDER THE FOL-
LOWING VARIANCES, APPEALS AND SPE-
CIAL EXCEPTIONS:

1 CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A
VARIANCE TO CONSTRUCT A SINGLE
FAMILY DWELLING 50 FEET INTO THE
CRITICAL HABITAT ZONE ON PROPERTY
DESCRIBED AS LOT 9, BLOCK 35, UNIT 4
EAST, ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST SUBMITTED
BY BEN BLOODWORTH, AGENT FOR JTB,
LLC, OWNERS.

THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS ACTING AS THE BOARD OF ADJUST-
MENT WILL CONSIDER THESE RECOM-
MENDATIONS ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY
17, 2009.


I


NEWSHERALD..o
SHWSP6SS-


I I


59!


1












LIFE


TIMES


B
Section


Thursday, January 29, 2009 w w w. apalach times. com Page BI


SING PRAISE UPON THE HARP

























DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
A standing-room audience Sunday afternoon at
Trinity Episcopal Church enjoyed a remarkable
concert featuring two of the state's premier
harpists. The Apalachicola Area Historical
Society's Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing
Arts series presented Florida State University
harp professor Mary Brigid Roman, pictured
above, and her accomplished student Jamie Ann
Gossett.
In the first half of the program, the two
performed works by Jean-Phillipe Rameau,
Thoinot Arbeau, Johann S. Bach, Felix
Mendelssohn and Carlos Salzedo. In the second
half, the duo performed Franz Poenitz, Francois
Dandrieu, John Marson and Ernesto Lecuons.
At the reception afterward, the audience had a
chance to appreciate the pastel work of local
artist Ed Springer.


Young

actors in

love in 'Star

Spangled Girl'

Oh, to be young, gifted and in
love.
The Panhandle Players'
production of "The Star Spangled
Girl" last weekend filled the
Eastpoint Firehouse's "little
theatre" to capacity as audiences
enjoyed delightful performances by
three young Panhandle actors, all
venturing out for the first time in a
lead role.
Taking control, as it should
be, was Megan Lamb, as Sophie
Rauschmeyer, the "girl next door,"
literally, who manages to beguile
lovestruck Norman Cornell (David
Bowen) to the point of comic
insanity. A Yankee transplant who
works at the Apalachicola National
Estuarine Research Reserve,
Lamb showed she has absorbed
well the magnolia facade and steely
inner core of Southern Girl charm.
The flash of her compulsory
and insincere grins, well timed,
added an indelible signature to an
excellent performance.
With a physical presence honed
by her recent workouts at the
Apalachicola Fitness Center, Lamb
made believable her role as an
Olympic swimmer and brought to
life what so drove Cornell crazy.
With manic weirdness and goofy
innocence, Bowen's performance
reminded the mature audience of
those days when a young man's
heart was capable of being twisted
and turned into a stupefied clump
of dumbstruck love. Now in his
third season with the Players,
mainly backstage, Bowen showed
he belongs front and center in front


of the lights.
His old college buddy and now
publisher of the radical weekly
magazine the two create, Andy
Hobart, played by Ben Bloodworth,
was suitably composed but always
tense as the bills piled up around
the struggling publication. Hobart's
sang-froid remained unrattled by
Rauschmeyer, who grew as crazy
about him as Cornell was for her,
until their kiss sealed the deal.


It was nice to see Bloodworth
stepping into a lead role.
Neil Simon's wit, sharp but
never cutting, sparkled throughout.
Director Dan Wheeler handled well
his debut, maximizing the use of
the tight performance space and
bringing a light-hearted feeling to
the play. It showed why so many
continue to be in love with the
Panhandle Players.
By David Adlerstein


EU IILE1I Dixie ineatre
Appearing in the Dixie Theatre production of "Everybody Loves Opal" are, from
left, Terry Wells, David Caldwell, Dixie Partington, Cleo Holladay and Cara
Partington. The show runs through Sunday.

Partingtons opalescent on stage


Dixie Partington and Terry Wells
stole the show Saturday night in the
Dixie Theatre's return performance of
"Everybody Loves Opal."
In an admittedly unusual and light-
headed vehicle, Partington painted her
character in three dimensions as the
audience saw her transformed from a
hard-hearted shrew to a sentimental
softie.
Wells also gave a striking
performance as he underwent the same
transformation to sweetness under the
influence of ever optimistic and loving


Opal, played by Cleo Holladay.
It was also a treat to see our two
local leading ladies on stage with a
representative of the next generation
of Partington performers. Holladay's
granddaughter, Cara Rose Partington,
appears as a sort of Deus ex machine in
the form of a traffic cop who materializes
out of nowhere when Opal needs help.
For an evening of fun that does not
require a lot of concentration, go see
"Everybody Loves Opal" at the Dixie
through Sunday, Feb. 1.
By Lois Swoboda


Entertainment BRIEFS


Habitat to host Mardi Gras Feb. 7
Habitat for Humanity will host its
sixth annual Mardi Gras celebration Feb.
7 at the Dixie Theatre.
"It's tough economic times, but the
way we see it, in tough times it's the
needy who still need the most. So many
felt it was a good tradition and there was
such community support to continue
Mardi Gras," said Don Ashley, who co-
chairs the event with his wife, Pamela.
Reigning over the event this year will
be Jerry Hall and Dixie Partington as
King Rex and Princess Pearl.
Dinner will be available for $20 at 6:30.
Drink tickets are $2, with all proceeds
going to Habitat.
Entertainment will be on stage from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Musicians to perform are
blues guitarist Slim Fatz, guitarist Allen
Garry, vocalist Candi Robertson and
headliner Tate's Hell Blue Band, which
includes the son of famed blues guitarist


Paul Butterfield.
All tickets will be sold at the door. To
volunteer to help with the event or with
the next Habitat house, call 653-3113.

Chef Sampler to delight
palates Feb. 8
The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of
Commerce will host its 13th annual
Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler on
Sunday, Feb. 8 at the Armory in
Apalachicola, beginning at 6 p.m.
Sixteen area restaurants plan to
take part. Southern Wine & Spirits,
Premier Beverage Company, National
Distributing Company and Lewis Bear
Company also will be a part.
There will be 17 festive tables, each
decorated for the occasion by area artists
and shop owners.
Tickets can be purchased by calling
the chamber at 653-9419.


From LeDebut

or other prizes!

31 Look in next week's paper for the

4 entry form and all the details!


*:


Sophie Rauschmeyer (Megan Lamb) gives Norman Cornell (David
Bowen) a piece of her mind in this scene from "The Star Spangled
Girl."


NE





B2 I The Times


Social


Thursday, January 29, 2009


Always online... www.apalachtimes.com


) Carrabelle contingent attends lighthouse meeting


SILVER( UEST
Weddings STUDIOS
Engagements
Senior Portraits
Children & Babies
Call today to reserve your photo session
850-229-9353
www.SilverQuestStudios.com




EP OF THE
T WEEK
./I


December was a very successful
adoption month. We had puppies
being adopted all over Florida from
Pensacola to Lakeland. I even put
one on a plane to Tucson, AZ.
Unfortunately, the older puppies
and adult dogs (Jojoe pictured above)
are still waiting to be adopted. All of
them are wonderful, affectionate dogs.
They are leash trained and some are
housebroken. Please consider an older
and wiser lifelong companion.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more
details or visit the Franklin County
Humane Society at 244 State Route
65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the
website at www.forgottenpets.org to
see more of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend
for life, you not only save the life of
that pet, you make room for us to save
the life of one more abandoned dog or
cat!


GULF STATE
Community
rBank
Swww.gscb.com


The
Coolest Bank
in the
Hottest Spots


Apalachicola Carrabelle Crawfordville
(850) 653 -2126 (850) 697-3395 (850) 926-8338
Eastpoint St. George Island
(850) 670-8786 (850) 927-2511

DON'T PAY TOO MUCH!
$50 Quarterly
Saves YOU $100 a year!

Aloha Buls Pest Manalement
Franklin County's ONLY LOCAL Pest control company
Call Lois at (850) 653-5857

t.. ***' --.a :..** ** ^-- ..!**-- JB ... I E ^ A -


"A 4 -4 :4 4 I '4 Y4 :.4 =.'4 1:4 .34 "4 .:4 --4
"=:4"=:4":4"-" ".*'*:4 ::4 "::4 : 4:J "c:4"




4 THEATRE

APALACHICOLA, FLA.
Everybody Loves Opal January 21 February 1
Big Bend Lighthouses February 5 (free to the public)
"Patsy" A Musical Tribute by Margo Anderson Feb. 13
Bob Milne Ragtime Piano February 14 & 15
850-653-3200 ~ www.DixieTheatre.com

COUNT. aLOID u COUNCIL
Cify Hmrfte ^^ l


Arlene Oehler, Barbara
Revell, Maryann Shields,
Debbie Kent and Mary
Katzer, members of the
Carrabelle Lighthouse
Association, attended the
Florida Lighthouse As-
sociation (FLA) meeting
Jan. 17 at Ponce Inlet.
During the business
meeting, members ap-
proved a strategic plan
for the organization which
emphasized the sale of the
Florida Lighthouse Asso-
ciation license plate, Save
Our Lights. In order to
keep the specialty license
plate available, 1,000 have
to be sold during the first
year. The additional $25 for
the specialty plate, which
is tax deductible, will pro-
vide sustained funding for
the remaining 30 historic
lighthouses in Florida.
FLA will allocate the finds
to the lighthouses through
a grant process.
Because FLA is an all-


volunteer organization, all
but the funds needed for
marketing the plate will
go to lighthouse preserva-
tion. Legislation creating
the specialty plate was co-
sponsored in the Florida
House by former District
10 State Rep. Will Kendrick
(R-Carrabelle) and signed
into law by Gov. Charlie
Crist earlier this year.
Highlight of the meet-
ing was a trip to the Ponce
Inlet Lighthouse and Park,
where participants were
able to climb the light-
house at night. The Ponce
Inlet 1933 rotating third
order lens has been com-
pletely restored by the lens
restoration team and was
returned to active service
in the tower in 2004. The
station is a private aid to
navigation and a National
Historical Landmark. The
lighthouse is the tallest
in Florida and the second
tallest in the nation.


FLA LIGHTHOUSE MEETING: The Ponce Inlet Lighthouse
Volunteer Guide in the Lantern Room shares the history
of the Ponce Inlet Lighthouse restoration with Maryann
Shields, left, and Arlene Oehler. Photo is from Christi
Sessions.


The Ayres Davies Lens
Exhibit Building on the
grounds, begun in 1994 and
completed in 1995, houses
one of the finest collec-
tions of restored Fresnel
lenses in the world. This
includes the rotating first
order Fresnel Lens from
the Cape Canaveral Light-


Happy 16th birthday,

Kirstie King


Best wishes
on your birthday,
Thursday, Jan. 29,
2009.
Love, Daddy,
Moma, Russell,
1 Granny and Papa,
... Granny King,
V.'Jenna and Caden


Arianna Watson

born


Amber and Domi-
nic Watson would like
to announce the birth of
their daughter, Arianna
Kylie Watson, on Thursday,
Dec. 18, 2008 at Hampton,
VA.
She weighed 6 lbs. 12 ozs.
and was 201/4 inches long.
Maternal grandparents
are Eugene and Delene
King, of Eastpoint. Paternal
grandparents are Glenda
and Royce Watson, both of
Apalachicola.


Dona Polous' bridal

shower Saturday

There will be a bridal shower for Dona Brooke Polous, bride-elect of
Casey Harrell, on Saturday, Jan. 31, 2009.
The shower will be 6 p.m. at the Eastpoint Church of God Fellowship
Hall. Dona is registered at Target.


REGISTER FOR FREE
European facial, eyebrow tint, or eyebrow design


Dry Day Spa (850) 653-1550
(Located in Clipper Shoppe)
Facials, Waxings, Glycolics, etc.


house, restored and put
on display in 1995, and
the newly restored Ponce
Inlet Lighthouse first or-
der Fresnel lens, restored
and put on display in 2003.
Museum Curator Ellen
Henry, described Fresnel
lens restoration in a Power
Point presentation.


Lordy,

Lordy

look

who's 40


'4

April Linton Smith
Jan. 30, 2009


Aubrey Paulk

to turn I

Aubrey Mad-
elyn Paulk will
celebrate her
first birthday on
Wednesday, Jan.
... .. 28, 2009.
She is the
daughter of Pat
Paulk and Erika
Lolley, and grand-
daughter of Carol
Paulk and Bobby
and Brenda Lol-
ley, of Carrabelle.


LET US HELP YOU WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS!
CRIBS TABLES WEDDING ARCHES
HIGH CHAIRS CHAIRS CANDELABRAS
TENTS LINENS PUNCH BOWLS
DINNERWARE BEACH WHEELCHAIR CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN


23 Hgha


NE ~*I


INAUGURATION CELEBRATION

TOASTING THE NEW PRESIDENT: Inauguration night was
a time for elegant celebration as Apalachicola's
Tamara's Caf6 played host to Franklin County's
version of a ball. Throughout the year restaurateur
Danny Itzkovitz opened his doors for Obama cam-
S paign organizers, with the downtown restaurant
S serving as a hotbed of activity. Chef James Ponder,
a diligent Obama volunteer, along with Chef David
Carrier helped prepare the buffet.
Pictured in front at right is Apalachicola Area
.. "- Historical Society President Bill Spohrer, wearing
on his waistcoat the cross he received when he
was knighted by the president of Finland, and
at left, his mother-in-law, 92-year-old Alice Jean
Gibbs, a native of Chicago and former Coca-Cola
girl. In back, at right, are Helen Spohrer, a long-
time Democratic activist, and her husband, wildlife
PHOTO BY DAVIDADLERSTEIN photographer John Spohrer.


850-670-8686
888-670-8686


'We, bdivwv!!






Thursday, January 29, 2009


Church


The Times I B3


Seahawks join in prayer breakfast


Obituaries


A prayer breakfast
was held Saturday at
the Recreation Center
on Sixth Street in
Apalachicola for the
Seahawk junior varsity
and varsity basketball
teams, coaches and
varsity cheerleaders.
The young people were
encouraged to excel in
every area of their lives,
in and out of school.
The theme was: "After
the roar of the crowds,


Editor's Note: The
Times is pleased to
present the following two
letters that we received
last week, from Illinois
and from Wisconsin. We
urge our readers, if they
are so inclined, to help
in sharing the Franklin
County experience with
students around the
country

Dear Editor,
The fourth grade at
Aviston Elementary,
located in southern
Illinois, is learning about
the United States and the
different environments,
climates, resources, and
highlights found in each
region. The kids in the
class think it would be
fun to receive postcards,
souvenirs, resources,
or any information
about our great country
from each of the 50
states.
We hope that people
who read this letter
will be interested in
mailing our class items
pertaining to their state.


the Hoop and Hoopla,
what next?" Options for
college, vocational school
and the military were
discussed.
Coach Fred Drake and
Assistant Coach Carlos
Hill were recognized and
thanked for being such
positive role models for
young people. Statistician
Elinor Mount-Simmons
was also recognized
and thanked for being
a positive example for


Our address 4th Grade
@ Aviston Elementary,
350 South Hull Street,
Aviston, IL 62216
A sincere "Thank
You" to anyone who
is able to contribute!
We appreciate the
excitement you will
add to our learning
experience.
Sincerely,
Mrs. Niemeyer (Along
with signatures of all the
students in her class).

Dear Editor:
I am a fifth grade
student studying the
United States. To find
out as much as we
can, my class and I are
trying to collect as many
postcards from around
the country as we can.
If you would like to
help with our project,
please send a postcard
to Saul, care of Mr.
Neevel Brinckerhoff
Elementary School, 16
Wedgwood Road, Fishkill,
NY 12524.
Sincerely,
Saul Cano


young people and staying
involved outside of her
position as a full-time
educator.
Community leaders
on the panel included
Granville Croom, Jr.,
Pastor David Walker,
Pastor L. D. Martin, and
Dolores Hayward-Croom.
The turnout was great
and all said they enjoyed
the breakfast of pancakes,
grits, eggs, biscuits,
sausage gravy and juice.


Superintendent of
Schools Nina Marks was
not in attendance, due to
being at workshops last
week in New York. But
when told what was being
planned, she thought
it was a wonderful
gesture and immediately
said, "I want to donate
something".
The breakfast was
sponsored by Granville
Croom and Dolores
Hayward-Croom.


Lanark NEWS


Another weekend
full of food, fun, and
entertainment!
Te songbird, you know,
Evelyn, sang for us at
lunch last Thursday.
There was a good crowd
at the Senior Center to
enjoy her songs, and all
that delicious food. You
should join us. We have
the blessing offered by
Rev. Mark Collins, and the
dishing up starts at noon.
Donations collected at the
door.
Breakfast on Friday
is always great. Chef
George and his helpers
serve you biscuits, gravy,
eggs, bacon, and coffee.
Donation collected at
the door. Have a good
morning.
Then it's on to the
new school in Eastpoint
for lunch. A fine meal is
prepared and served by
the students. Join the
crowd and enjoy the food
and fellowship.
At 5 p.m., we gather at
the Legion Post 82 in the
village. Mike will collect


$5 and
take your
order for
hamburger
and fries.
Cecil will
prepare
it like you
LANARK NEWS want it,
Jim Welsh Brady will
serve it,
and David
will serve your favorite
beverage. Chuck is on
hand to play the discs
and sing, and head up the
trivia game. Fun, fun, and
more fun! Happens every
Friday, I told you, you
wouldn't have to cook on
Friday.
Chef Joe M did a
bang-up job preparing
the spaghetti sauce last
Saturday at The Hall.
Members and friends of
The Lanark Golf Club
also did a bang-up job!
Thanks to all who joined
us and supported the
fundraiser and thanks to
the helpers. It was greatly
appreciated.
I am sure the dinner


at the Legion was very
good; they usually
are. Every Saturday
night at 5 p.m., you can
enjoy your dinner. The
public is invited to all
breakfasts, lunches, and
dinners, unless otherwise
mentioned.
Members of the
Lanark Village
Association will have
their monthly meeting at
The Hall, Monday, Feb.
2. Gavel falls at 7 p.m.
See you there and bring
a friend or two. They just
might want to join up.
Soup and sandwiches
will be served at The
Hall, Tuesday, Feb.3,
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
The members of the
association will prepare
and serve your soup,
sandwich, coffee, tea, and
dessert. Hope you will
join us.
Betty, Sharon and
Mary greatly appreciate
all donations for resale
at The Thrift Shop, in
Lanark Plaza. The shop
is open Monday through


Saturday from 9 a.m. to
noon. Please bring your
resale donation at that
time. Please do not leave
items outside and no
items that should go to
the landfill!
Congratulations to all
pet owners on leasing
your pets when walking
them. However, we
need more work on the
cleaning up after them.
The ordinance is on a
sign in front of The Hall.
Thank you!
Be sure to include
a prayer for the family
of Lula Chipman and
for Lula's eternal rest.
She isn't suffering
anymore, but the family
needs your prayers and
comfort.
Be kind to one another
and check in on the
sick and housebound.
Remember contrary to
popular opinion, God's
last name is not damn.
Until next time,
God Bless America,
our troops, the poor,
homeless and hungry.


Carrabelle workshop offers help for parents


The next "Guiding Good
Choices, an interactive
workshop for parents, will
be held Tuesday, Feb. 10
at 6 p.m. at the Carrabelle
Boys and Girls Club.
The workshop
continues for the next
four Tuesdays, through
March 10, offering
participants a chance to
learn and practice skills
for setting clear family


guidelines, strengthening
family bonds, and helping
children develop healthy
behaviors.
The workshops will
help parents develop
strategies to help children
avoid drug use and other
adolescent problem
behaviors, and to increase
children's involvement in
the family.
Kate Jensen, a licensed


clinical social worker, will
facilitate the workshop,
which has been offered
throughout the country
and has been honored
with several citations
of excellence including
"Model Program" from
the Substance Abuse and
Mental Health Services
Administration.
Families who complete
the five-week workshop


will receive a certificate
of completion and are
eligible for a $25 incentive
check from the Florida
State University Center
for Prevention Research.
Don't delay, call today.
Your family is counting on
you.
For info call Cherry
Rankin, club director, at
697-4433 or Jensen at 566-
5283.


Card of Thanks

I would like thank the First United Methodist
Church of Apalachicola and of St. George Island,
the Iron Men, Harry A's and everyone who
contributed to the benefit on my behalf.
I am recovering well and am grateful for
everyone's prayers and support.
Valerie Kidney


In Memory

Bryant Hand Sr.
1940-2008

In loving memory of my
husband and my children's
father, Bryant (Bo) Hand Sr., on
what would be our 48th wedding
anniversary, Jan. 28, 2009.
Your loving wife,
Annie Gene Hand and
children, Bryant Jr., Anita,
Bobby, Barry, Alisa and Bruce.
'We love and miss you.











Call The Times!



St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave. "C" & 6th St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@gtcom.net

PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
MASS SCHEDULE

SATURD AY ......................... ................. 5 PM
SU ND AY ............................ ................. 10 AM
SUNDAY SPANISH MASS ................................ 5 PM
TUESDAY FRIDAY ................................... 8:30 AM
k_____________________


Nancy Holmes


Minister Nancy
Holmes, 65, of Panama
City passed this life on
Jan. 20, 2009.
Holmes, daughter of
Charlie and Lucinda Long,
was born Sept. 3, 1943.
Both parents preceded
her in death. She was a
lifetime resident of Bay
County.
She was married to
Howard Holmes Sr., who
also preceded her in
death. She gave birth to
five beautiful children:
Tonya and Donald of
Tallahassee, Howard Jr.
of Tarpon Springs, and
Tamara and Edward of
Panama City.
She is survived by
three sisters and four
brothers, Gussie L.
Bruce and Thelma Long
of Tallahassee, Frances
Brazelle of Newport, N.C.;
brothers, James Long
(Marian) of Apalachicola,
Percy (Christine) of
Norfolk, Va.; Paul Long
of Panama City, Moses
Long of Rochester, N.Y,
and a cherished and

Bo I

Forrest Burch "Bo"
Hayes Jr. was born in
Port St. Joe on April 7,
1957 to the proud parents
Forrest Burch Hayes
Sr. and the late Dorothy
Evelyn Harrison.
Bo and his family
moved to Michigan where
he met and married his
wife Joan of 29 years. In
1980 his family moved to
Eastpoint and made the
little town their home,
where he later made his
living as a seafood worker.
On Jan. 23, 2009 he
passed on and is now
with his mother Dorothy
Evelyn Harrison, his
brother Jimmy Hayes and


devoted sister-in-law, Mrs.
Rosa Long of Panama
City, grandchildren,
Christopher Amos of
Baton Rouge, La., and Iris
Vanblunt of Tallahassee;
and a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins, family
and close friends.
Holmes was a loyal
and faithful servant
of Greater Praise and
Deliverance Evangelistic
House of Prayer, Apostle
L.S. Thomsa, overseer,
for over 15 years. She
gave many years of
dedicated service as
a head usher, faithful
licensed minister and
also strong support to the
youth department and the
Women of Excellence.
Funeral services were
held on Saturday, Jan. 24,
at the Greater Praise and
Deliverance Evangelistic
House of Prayer, with
elder Myron Long and
Apostle L.S. Thomas
officiating. Arrangements
by Battle Memorial
Funeral Home in Panama
City.

Hayes

his sister Patricia Hayes.
He is survived by his
wife Joan Hayes, two
daughters Bridget Hayes
Pritchett and Andrea
Hayes White, his father
Forrest Hayes Sr., his
sister Jackie Hayes
Golden and his brother
Ronnie Hayes. He also
has five grandsons,
three nieces and three
nephews.
The service was
held on Jan. 27 at the
First Baptist Church in
Eastpoint. Arrangements
by Comforter Funeral
Home.
He was loved and will
be missed always.


www.apalachtimes.com


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


WELCOMES YOU
Church

of the
Ascension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


Trinity
EST. 1836
Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 -2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


It t ti'r'1 epu r I/'(( IL, l( H-|



\io, \ l '/ i 'L ru1, i .. H i i"l/
/ / LO I.',tt L L t \'f lf _I'L L'dI lfl I

l( 1 (L I/ 11 *' .I' \M / lf 1



BThe United Methodist Churches

of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5' St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Friday of each month
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672
Pastor: Julie Stephens
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.mr Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.mr
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis


NE ~*I


Students seek


postcards, etc. from


Franklin County


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services






B4 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 29, 2009


African honeybees visit Sea Oats gardeners


SEA OATS GARDEN CLUB
Bill Mahan, director of the Franklin UF-IFAS Extension Program, presents a
program on African bees and beekeeping in Florida.


Sea Oats Garden Club
members welcomed
County Extension Agent
Bill Mahan to their
January meeting. He
presented a Power Point
program on Beekeeping
with emphasis on the
Southern distribution of
African bees as of March
2008.
African honey bees
respond quicker and in
larger numbers when the
colony is threatened, he
pointed out, and remain
agitated longer than
European honeybees.
Improper removal of nests
can be dangerous for
neighbors and bystanders.
Since anyone who gardens
encounters honeybees, this
was a very pertinent topic.


Lee Norris,
an employee of
Environmental Consulting
Technologies, has the
support of garden club
members to write a grant
to fund a Florida Native
Plant garden at the
Franklin County Public
Library branch. He is in
the process of getting
necessary information
to plan the garden. Nona
Elder, Lesley Cox and
librarian Carolyn Sparks,
will be assisting him.
Garden club members
are also working
with William Massey,
supervisor of Carrabelle's
building and grounds
department, to replace the
boat that has deteriorated
in the Carrabelle Welcome


Park. There is interest
in replacing the boat and
planting a Florida Native
plant garden around it.
Lesley Cox passed out
folders of information for
planning a Florida Native
Plant garden. Lee and
Lesley are also officers in
the Sarracenia Chapter of
the Native Plant Society
that meets at the Wakulla
County Public Library.
The February meeting
of the garden club will be
a trip to Maclay Gardens
in Tallahassee, weather
permitting. Anyone
interested in learning
more about the activities
of the garden club is
invited to call Arlene for
meeting and membership
information at 697-9790.


Honor ROLL

The following is the First Baptist Christian
School honor roll for the third six-weeks and
second nine-weeks periods.

Kindergarten: All A's Ryan Granger, Jadyn
Luberto, Joshua Odom, Emily Shuman, Eva
Strickland and Caden Turrell.
1 st grade: All A's Matthew Gay and Lydia
Strickland. A/B -Jonathan Jones
2nd grade: A/B Trenady Queen, Destiny
Shuman and Seth Silva
3rd grade: A/B Logan Arnett, Nathan
Jones and Chance White
4th grade: All A's Alexis O'Neal and Noah
Strickland. A/B -Juliana Gay
5th grade: All A's Myah Wise. A/B-Weston
Harris
6th grade: A/B Ryan Dobson.
1 0th grade: A/B Emily Kembro
1 1 th grade: All A's Terry Griner





Temperature
Date High Low % Precip
Thu, Jan 29 61o 44 40%
Fri,Jan30 56 34 10%
Sat, Jan 31 56 39 0%
Sun, Feb 1 62 45 10%
Mon, Feb 2 650 450 10%
Tue,Feb3 63 47 0%
Wed, Feb 4 65' 450 0%
TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
Cat Point Minus0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03
APALACHICOLA


01/29 Thu 04:52AM
06:05PM
01/30 Fri 12:04AM
11:55AM
01/31 Sat 12:49AM
12:17PM
02/01 Sun 01:43AM
12:37PM
02/02 Mon 02:53AM
12:43PM
02/03 Tue 04:26AM
02/04 Wed 07:13AM


01/28 Thu 0
0
01/29 Fr 0
0
01/30 Sat 0
0
01/31 Sun 0
0
02/01 Mon 0

02/02 Tue 0
0


1.1
1.2
0.3
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.0
0.5
-0.1
0.6
-0.3
-0.6


11:35AM -0.1 L


05:46AM
06:21 PM
06:50AM
06:41 PM
08:11AM
07:05PM
10:13AM
07:35PM
08:14PM
10:24PM


CARRABELLE
)2:39AM 1.9 H 09:04AM
)4:27PM 1.8 H 09:12PM
)3:27AM 1.8 H 09:22AM
)4:40PM 1.9 H 09:51 PM
)4:21AM 1.6 H 09:42AM
)4:56PM 1.9 H 10:36PM
)5:25AM 1.4 H 10:04AM
)5:16PM 2.1 H 11:30PM
)6:46AM 1.3 H 10:24AM
)5:40PM 2.2 H
)6:46AM 1.3 H 10:24AM
)5:40PM 2.2 H


0.8 L


-0.5 L 06:49PM 2.2 H


Thursday, Jan. 29
The Apalachicola Area
Historical Society will
hold its January meeting
at 5 p.m. in the Carriage
House of the Raney House
Museum, at the corner of
Market Street and Avenue
F in Apalachicola. For info,
call 370-6201.
Wandering Star
Quilting Club. Chillas Hall
Lanark Village. 1 to 3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Luncheon and
Information Specials
at the Franklin County
Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Noon. $3
donation. Call 697-3760.

Friday, Jan. 30
Breakfast at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle.
Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal
at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call
697-3760.
Bocce Club. Franklin
County Senior Center. 1


p.m. Call 697-3760.
Everybody Loves Opal
at Dixie Theatre. 8 p.m.
Reserved Seating $25. Call
653-3200.

Saturday, Jan. 31
Second Annual
Franklin County Camellia
Show. The Garden Shop,
147 Commerce Street,
Apalachicola. 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. Free and open to the
public. Call 653-1777.
Everybody Loves Opal
at Dixie Theatre. 8 p.m.
Reserved Seating $25. Call
653-3200.

Sunday, Feb. 1
Everybody Loves Opal
at Dixie Theatre. 8 p.m.
Reserved Seating $25. Call
653-3200.

Monday, Feb. 2
Breakfast at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle.
Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal


at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call
697-3760.
Free Quit Smoking
Now Class, sponsored
by the county health
department and Boys
and Girls Club. 6 p.m. at
the Carrabelle City Office
complex. Contact David
Walker at 653-2111 Ext 123.
Computer classes
at the Franklin County
Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Call Joyce
Durham 670-5951 and set
up a time.
Billards Club at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. 1
p.m. Call 697-3760.
GED classes are
offered at the Franklin
County School from 3
to 6 p.m. every week in
Building 1100, Room 1105.
Call 670-2800.

Tuesday, Feb. 3
Franklin County Board
of County Commissioners.
Regular meeting at 9 a.m.
in Courthouse annex in


Apalachicola. Call 653-8861.
Apalachicola City
Commission. Regular
meeting at 6 p.m. in City
Hall. Call 653-8715.
Art Club at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. 2 to 4 p.m. Call
697-3760.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Dept. $1 / card.
Proceeds go to St. George
Island Civic Club. Call 927-
4654.
Carrabelle Lighthouse
Association. 5:30 p.m.
Carrabelle Branch Library.
697-5555.

Wednesday, Feb. 4
Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce
Monthly Business
Luncheon. Up the Creek
Raw Bar, 313 Water Street,
Apalachicola. Noon. Call
653-9419.
Card Club. Franklin
County Senior Center. 1
p.m. Call 697-3760.
Bookmobile.
Apalachicola Piggly Wiggly
3:30-4:30 p.m. Eastpoint
Apartments 4:45-5:45 p.m.
Call 556-1556.
Bingo for the Bus.
Chillas Hall in Lanark
village. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Call
697-9626.
GED classes are offered
at the Franklin County
School from 3 to 6 p.m.
every week in Building
1100, Room 1105. Call 670-
2800.

Thursday, Feb. 5
Carrabelle City
Commission. Regular
meeting at 6:30 p.m. at 1005
Gray Avenue. Call 697-3618.
Wandering Star Quilting
Club. Chillas Hall Lanark
Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Luncheon and
Information Specials at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call
697-3760
Organizational meeting
for Forgotten Coast Plein
Air volunteers. 5:30 p.m.
Port Inn in Port St. Joe.
For more information call
323-0176.

Friday, Feb. 6
Franklin County Health
Department will host a
Heart Health Expo. 8 to
10 a.m. at Apalachicola
Fitness Center. Free
Healthy Heart kit. Contact
Nadine Kahn 653-2111 Ext.
123.
Breakfast at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle.
Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal
at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call
697-3760.
Bocce Club. Franklin
County Senior Center. 1
p.m. Call 697-3760.

Saturday, Feb. 7
Habitat for Humanity's
sixth annual Mardi Gras
celebration. Dixie Theatre.
6:30 to 9:30 p.m. For info
call 653-3113
Realtor's Association
Annual Open House
Tour. A tour of real estate
throughout Gulf and
Franklin counties. Call
653-3322.


*I


County CALENDAR


NOTICE TO BIDDERS


The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners
will be accepting separate sealed Request for Propos-
als for the following:


WILL S. KENDRICK SPORT COMPLEX TENNIS
COURT PROJECT


Specifications are on file in the office of the Franklin
County Board of County Commissioners, 33 Market
Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320.


Proposals must be received in the office of the Franklin
County Clerk of the Court 33 Market Street, Suite 203,
Apalachicola, Florida 32320 by 4:30 P.M., EST, on
February 2, 2009. Each proposal must be sealed and
clearly labeled. The sealed proposals will be publicly
open and read aloud at 11:00 A.M. EST, on February
3, 2009, in the County Commission Meeting Room lo-
cated in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. For
further information, contact Van W. Johnson, Sr., Direc-
tor Franklin County Parks & Recreation Department, at
(850) 670-8167. Email: fcswd@fairpoint.net


Bidder shall provide an original and one copy of
each proposal in a sealed envelope of container,
plainly marked "WILL S. KENDRICK SPORTS COM-
PLEX TENNIS COURT PROJECT".


The owner reserves the right to waive any informality
or to reject any or all proposals.


ATTENTION BIDDERS: Franklin County is an equal
opportunity employer and encourages participation by
certified minority enterprises and women's business
enterprises.


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA


JOSEPH PARRISH, CHAIRMAN


102/0 Wrel d .I03uAM






Thursday, January 29, 2009


Law Enforcement


The Times | BS


911 group holds first meeting


The mood was coopera-
tive as the newly formed
Franklin County 911 Com-
munications Group met
Jan. 14 at the Emergency
Operations Center.
St. George Island Fire
Chief Jay Abbott chaired
the meeting, which led off
with a spirited appeal to
have Progress Energy re-
instate a policy that would
ensure at least one line-
man in the county keeps
a truck at their house for
call-out.
County Commissioner
Smokey Parrish strong-
ly urged Bobby Pickels,
Progress Energy's com-
munity relations manager
for North Florida, to ask
the company to change
its current policy, which
could save county officials
at least 30 to 60 minutes in
response time to accident
and fire scenes that require
a utility shutdown.
Pickels said he would
bring his supervisor to the
next meeting when more
time could be given to re-
sponding to this topic, and
he assured the committee
that public safety was of
great concern to Progress
Energy.
Pickels said the pro-
posed collective bargain-
ing agreement, now being
reviewed by union officials,
calls for a clause that re-
quests, but does not man-
date, that workers keep a
truck at their homes dur-
ing evening and weekend
hours.


PHOTO BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Weems Memorial Hospitals' Emergency Management Services staff shared
both praise and problems related to dispatch at the first meeting of the 911
Communications Group. Behind them is Bobby Pickels, Progress Energy's
community relations manager for North Florida.


In addition, he noted the
company has instituted a
change in work shifts that
will make more employees
available during regular
working hours.
There was discussion
regarding having dispatch-
ers to Emergency Man-
agement Services receive
additional training and
possibly implementing a
key card system that would
direct dispatchers through
a series of questions and
directives. The idea was
left for Sheriff Skip Shiver
to consider.
There was discussion
regarding the need for an
additional ambulance in the
county and the need for all


ambulances not to be the
van type, which have less
work area and less func-
tionality on the long runs
made in the county. This
was left to be discussed
with the Weems Hospital
board and staff.
The committee widely
agreed that the sheriff's of-
fice dispatch has improved
for county fire departments
since the last meeting.
Questions remain as to
how best to knit together a
varied assortment of radio
systems in use by law en-
forcement and fire depart-
ments.
A long discussion about
the issue of interoperability
of radios between response


agencies concluded the
meeting. A presentation
was made on one solution
that would enable the coun-
ty to prepare for upcoming
changes in FCC regula-
tions.
Shiver introduced
consultants he was us-
ing to review the radio
equipment and capability
currently in place at the
sheriff's office. It gener-
ally was agreed that this
problem has high prior-
ity, although it has many
complexities that must be
worked through.
The next meeting is
scheduled at 6 p.m. Feb. 11
at the St. George Fire Sta-
tion on Pine Street.


Florida Lottery to host retailer seminar


Business owners looking for new
and exciting products, seeking ways
to bring more customers into their
stores and hoping to add an extra
revenue source are invited to attend
the "How to Become a Florida Lot-
tery Retailer" seminar.
With the addition of Powerball
to the Lottery's portfolio of games,
there has never been a better time
to join the network of more than
13,000 Lottery retailers across the
state. Powerball tickets went on sale
in Florida Jan. 4, and after only one
week of sales, retailers have already
earned more than $797,000 in sales
and cashing bonuses.
The seminar is scheduled from
2 to 4 p.m. Feb. 4 at Aria (formerly
Albert's Provence), 1415 Timberlane


Road in Tallahassee.
Business owners interested in at-
tending are asked to RSVP by Jan.
30 by calling 850-487-7733 or 800-428-
8986, ext. 7733 if calling from outside
the Tallahassee area. To register on-
line, visit www.flalottery.com/retailer.
do
In the spirit of diversifying its
small business partners, the Flori-
da Lottery launched an initiative in
2006 to increase the number of mi-
nority-owned retailers statewide.
Currently, the Florida Lottery has
partnered with more than 13,000
retail outlets consisting of both in-
dependent and multi-location cor-
porate retailers. From inception
through fiscal year 2007-08, more
than $52.09 billion in Florida Lottery


tickets have been sold. This activity
has netted retailers across the state
in excess of $2.92 billion in commis-
sions and incentives.
Business owners who become
Florida Lottery retailers will receive
benefits, such as commissions, cash-
ing bonuses, bonus incentives for
special promotions and support from
the Lottery's district offices and mar-
keting department.
Since the launch of the first
Scratch-Off ticket, Millionaire, on
Jan. 12, 1988, the Florida Lottery has
contributed more than $19 billion to
the Educational Enhancement Trust
FRnd, benefiting Florida students
and schools, as well as funding more
than 1 million annual Bright Futures
scholarships.


The following report is
provided by the Franklin
County Sheriff's Office.
Arrests are made by of-
ficers from the follow-
ing county and state law
enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD), Car-
rabelle (CPD), Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP),
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office (FCSO), Florida
Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission
(FWC), Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection (FDEP) and
Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consum-
er Services (FLDOACS).
All defendants are
considered innocent until
proven guilty in a court of
law.
Jan. 20
William J. Pemberton,
55, Eastpoint, trafficking
in a controlled substance
(FCSO)
Jan. 21
Joseph T. Heafey III,
21, Carrabelle, domestic
battery (CPD)
Lonnie N. Crum, 19,
Carrabelle, battery, aggra-
vated battery with great
bodily harm and violation
of probation (CPD)
Mandy Creamer, 31,
Eastpoint, driving while


license suspended and
leaving the scene of a
crash with damage (FHP)
Jan. 22
Kristopher J. Stanley,
22, Apalachicola, violation
of probation (FCSO)
Robert K. Leonard,
31, Panama City, withhold-
ing child support (FCSO)
Warren L. Aiken Jr.,
21, Carrabelle, violation of
probation (FCSO)
Mandy Creamer, 31,
Eastpoint, violation of pro-
bation (FCSO)
Jan. 23
Hoyt W. Wehunt, 35,
Carrabelle, possession of
paraphernalia, possession
of cannabis, fleeing or at-
tempting to elude, resist-
ing arrest without violence,
driving while license sus-
pendedorrevoked, DUI and
criminal mischief (CPD)
Jeremy Hammontree,
23, Advance, Mo., violation
of probation (FCSO)
Jennifer B. Morgan,
45, Apalachicola, DUI
(FCSO)
Jan. 24
Edwardo Lopez, 22,
Apalachicola, DUI and
no valid drivers license
(APD)
Joseph A. Derosier,
49, Irvington, AL, disor-
derly intoxication (APD)


Law enforcement BRIEFS


Information sought
in eagle shooting
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission is appealing
to the public for informa-
tion about a bald eagle
found dead Jan. 21 in a
burrow pit in the Apala-
chicola National Forest.
FWC Officer Charlie
Mallow found the imma-
ture eagle in a pit off Forest
Road 13 in Wakulla County.
Someone with a rifle appar-
ently shot the bird once.
"At this point, we don't
know if the eagle was shot
there or somewhere else
and dumped in the pit,"
said investigator Charlie
Chafin. "Officers have spo-
ken to one person who was
at the burrow pit Tuesday
afternoon, and he advised
the bird wasn't there."
Both the FWC, through
the Wildlife Alert Reward
Program, and the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service
are offering rewards for


information leading to the
arrest of those involved.
The FWS requires both an
arrest and a conviction be-
fore it can pay a reward.
The Wildlife Alert ho-
tline number is 888-404-
3922.

FWC officers use
deer decoy as bait
Officers with the Flori-
da Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission
earlier this month used a
deer decoy to nail a hunter
for hunting out of season.
On Jan. 10, officers
Steven Cook, Chasen
Yarborough, Woody Cook
and John Allen conducted
a detail utilizing the de-
coy deer to address deer
hunting during closed
season in the Womack
Creek Wildlife Manage-
ment Area.
One hunter was issued
a citation and his rifle was
seized as evidence after
shooting the decoy.


Family



Dentistry

DENTURE
LAB ON PREMISES
Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines


Laban Bontrager,

MDII


The Mildew Remover /
GARLIC
Exterior House Cleaning P 1
Low Pressure Mildew
9 Years Service in Area
(850) 653-8795 Remodel
Gerald Garlick Repair


Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321

TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 I


New -
Cons trction
Family
Owned
Ope4ed
Licqorsed &
I fured
License
#CFC1426645
State certified


DON WILLSON'S
SEPTIC TANK
SERVICE
Serving all of Franklin
County Residential/
Commerical
Septic Tanks &
Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or night
653-9406


ROBERTS APPLIANCE
REPAIR
- ALL MAJOR BRANDS -


18 Shadow Lane
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: (850) 653-8122
Cell: (850) 653-7654


Builders By The Sea, Inc.

Gary Bartlett
Additions


New Homes
Remodeling
R.R. 0067644


Ph. 850-927-3628
Mobile 850-425-8620
Licensed & Insured


Don Lively General Contractors
LICENSED AND INSURED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
WPlumbing New Construction Roofing
Pressure Washing Additions Vinyl Siding


Painting and More No Job Too Small

P.O. Box 439
Carrabelle, FL 32322 A


697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603


RC0066499
R00065255





*I


Sheriff's REPORT


war waJACKSON'S
Center Building Supplies
& Auto Repair
We Deliver
Carrabelle 697-3333 Anywhere







6B The Times Thursday, January 29, 2009


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


0


By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
January 22, 29, 2009
9863T
ANNOUNCEMENT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
1100- Legal Advertising CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
1110 Classified Notices FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
1120 Public Notices/ FLORIDA
Announcements FLORIDA
1130- Adoptions
1140 Happy Ads CASE NO.: 08-000566-CA
1150 Personals
1160 Lost IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
1170-Found 1991 BUICK, VIN NO.
S 1G4CW53L7M1700804

S 1100 NOTICE OF
9825T FORFEITURE
LEGAL NOTICE PROCEEDINGS

Notice is given pursuant to TO: APRIL L. TURNEY,
Florida Self-Storage Facil- and any other person
ity Act, Florida Statutes, claiming an interest in the
Chapter 83, Part IV that described property:
Seminole Safe N Secure
will hold a sale on: The Sheriff of Franklin
County has filed a Com-
February 7, 2009 at 10:00 plaint of Judgment of For-
a.m. at 162 US 98, feature with the Clerk of
Eastpoint, Florida, 32328 Court in Franklin County,
of the contents of Florida, seeking forfeiture
mini-warehouse(s) contain- of the following property:
ing personal property of:
-- 1991 Buick (4DoorO
Jessica Leigh Yorton Tag No. L233HB
April Lashley #1G4CW53L7M1700804
Jerry Gleaton
Wendy Ramirez The Franklin County
Wayne Webb Sheriffs Office seized the
Southern Home Painting above property on Novem-
Jeffrey Lockley ber 17, 2008, in Franklin
County, Florida. The prop-
Before the sale date of erty is presently in the cus-
February 7, 2009, the own- tody of the Sheriff of
ers may redeem their Franklin County.
property by payment of
the outstanding balance An Order finding probable
and cost by mailing it to cause and Directing Claim-
Post Office Box 1054, ant to Respond has been
Eastpoint, Florida 32328, issued by the Court. You
or by paying in person at are required to file a copy
the warehouse location, of your written, defenses
January 22, 29, 2009 with the Clerk of Court and
to serve a copy of your
9862T written defenses on or be-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT fore 30 days from first date
OF THE SECOND JUDI- of publication, J. Patrick
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND Floyd, Esquire, Counsel
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY for Franklin County
FLORIDA Sheriff's Office, 20 Avenue
D, Apalachicola, Florida
CASE NO.: 08-000567-CA 32320. Failure to file your
defenses will result in a de-
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF fault judgment being en-
1989 VOLVO, VIN NO. tered against you.
YVlFX8842K2377183
WITNESS my hand and
NOTICE OF the Seal of the Court this
FORFEITURE 17th day of December,
PROCEEDINGS 2008.
Marcia Johnson
TO: MELISSA W. Clerk of the Circuit Court
THOMAS, and any other By: Michele Maxwell
person claiming an interest Deputy Clerk
in the described property: January 22, 29, 2009

The Sheriff of Franklin 9865T
County has filed a Com- IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
plaint of Judgment of For OF THE SECOND JUDI-
feiture with the Clerk of CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
Court in Franklin County, FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
Florida, seeking forfeiture FLORIDA
of the following property: PROBATE DIVISION

1989 Volvo (White) IN RE: ESTATE OF
Tag No. 134QWI ALTON BROOKS JOR-
V i n DAN, JR.,
#YV1FX8842K2377183 Deceased.

The Franklin County F i I e
Sheriff's Office seized the Number:08-000068-CP
above property on Novem-
ber 17, 2008, in Franklin NOTICE OF
County, Florida. The prop- ADMINISTRATION
erty is presently in the cus-
tody of the Sheriff of The administration of the
Franklin County. estate of ALTON BROOKS
JORDAN, JR., deceased,
An Order finding probable File Number
cause and Directing Claim- 08-000068-CP is pending
ant to Respond has been in the Circuit Court for
issued by the Court. You Franklin County, Florida,
are required to file a copy Probate Division, the ad
of your written, defenses dress of which is the
with the Clerk of Court and Franklin County Court-
to serve a copy of your house, 33 Market Street,
written defenses on or be- Suite 203, Apalachicola,
fore 30 days from first date Franklin County, Florida
of publication, J. Patrick 32320. The estate is tes-
Floyd, Esquire, Counsel tate, and the date of the
for Franklin County will is October 4, 1999.
Sheriff's Office, 20 Avenue The names and addresses
D, Apalachicola, Florida of the personal representa-
32320. Failure to file your tive and the personal
defenses will result in a de- representative's Attorney
fault judgment being en- are setforth below. ALL IN-
tered against you. TERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
WITNESS my hand and
the Seal of the Court this All persons on whom this
23rd day of December, notice is served who have
2008. objections that challenge
Marcia Johnson the validity of the will, the
Clerk of the Circuit Court qualifications of the per-


1100
sonal representative venue
or jurisdiction of-this Court
are required to file their
objections with this Court
WITHIN' THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice is served within
three months after the date
of the first publication of
this notice must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

Any person entitled to ex-
empt property is required
to file a petition for deter-
mination of exempt prop-
erty with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF FOUR
MONTHS AFTER
THEDATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR WITHIN
FORTY DAYS FROM THE
DATE OF TERMINATION
OF ANY PROCEEDING IN-
VOLVING THE CON-
STRUCTION, ADMISSION
TO PROBATE, OR VALID-
ITY OF THE WILL OR IN-
VOLVING ANY OTHER
MATTER AFFECTING ANY
PART OF THE ESTATE
SUBJECT TO SECTION
732.402, FLORIDA STAT-
UTES.

A surviving spouse seek-
ing an elective share must
file an election to take
elective share within the
time provided by law.

All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands
against the decedent's es-
tate must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.

The date of the first publi-
cation of this Notice is Jan-
uary 22, 2009.

Personal Representative:
PATRICIA DIANA TODD
2338 East 34th Place
Panama City, Florida
32405
Attorney for Personal
Representative
J. GORDON SHULER of
SHULER AND SHULER
Post Office Drawer 850
Apalachicola, Florida
32329
(850) 653-9226
Florida Bar NO 0700959
January 22, 29, 2009
9877T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs

JAMIE D. CRUM; EMILY N.
CRUM A/K/A EMILY
NIXON CRUM; UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA DE-
PARTMENT OF THE
TREASURY INTERNAL
REVENUE SERVICE; and
UNKNOWN
TENANTSS,
Defendant.

CASE NO. 08-000443-CA

NOTICE OF SALE PUR-
SUANT TO CHAPTER 45


NOTICE is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated January
5, 2009, in Case No.
08-000443-CA, of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit, in and for
Franklin County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff and
JAMIE D. CRUM; EMILY
N. CRUM A/K/A EMILY
NIXON CRUM; UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA DE-
PARTMENT OF THE
TREASURY -INTERNAL
REVENUE SERVICE; and
UNKNOWN TENANTSS,
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the front
door of the Franklin
County Courthouse in Ap-
alachicola, Franklin
County, Florida at 11:00
a.m. on February 19, 2009,
the property set forth in the
Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure and more particularly
described as follows:

Commencing at the South-
west Corner of Fractional
Section 19, Township
8South, Range 6 South
West, Franklin County,
Florida (marked by a6" x 6"
concrete monument);
thence run South 89 de-
grees 32 minutes 40 sec-
onds East along the South
boundary of Fractional
Section 19, 810.3 feet to a
concrete monument on the
East right-of-way of North
Bayshore Drive (State
Road 65); thence run
North 30 degrees 07 min-
utes East along the East
right-of-way of North
Bayshore Drive 632.1. feet
to an iron pipe and the
POINT OF BEGINNING of
tract described herein.
From the POINT OF BE-
GINNING, continue North
30 degrees 07 minutes
East along the East
right-of-way of North
Bayshore Drive 210.0 feet
to an iron pipe; thence run
South 59 degrees 53 min-
utes East 210.0 feet to an
iron pipe; thence run
South 30 degrees 07 min-
utes West 210.0 feet to an
iron pipe; thence run North
59 degrees 53 minutes
West 210.0 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING.
Situate, lying and being in
Fractional Section 19,
Township 8South, Range
6West, Franklin County,
Florida.

Being Lot 6, Tarpon
Shores, Unit 3, according
to the unrecorded plat to
thereof on file in the Frank-
lin County Planning and
Zoning Office, 33 Com-
merce Street, Apalachi-
cola, Florida.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.

DATED: January 13, 2009

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
Wadsworth & Bowden PA.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
January 22, 29, 2009
9878T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

LOUIS D. PARKER and
UNKNOWN TENANTSS,
Defendants.


CASE NO. 08-000451-CA

NOTICE OF SALE PUR-
SUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated January
5, 2009, in Case No.
08-000451-CA, of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit, in and for
Franklin County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff and
LOUIS D. PARKER and
UNKNOWN TENANTS)
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the front
door of the Franklin
County Courthouse in Ap-
alachicola, Franklin
County, Florida at 11:00
a.m. on February 19, 2009,
the property set forth in the
Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure and more particularly
described as follows:

Lot 14, DRIFTWOOD, a
subdivision, according to
the map or plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 6,
Page(s) 42, Public Rec-
ords of Franklin County,
Florida.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.
DATED: January 13, 2009

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
Wadsworth & Bowden PA.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
January 22, 29, 2009
9890T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

REGIONS BANK, etc.,
Plaintiff,

v.

SHARON Y BRADBERRY,
et al.,
Defendants.

Case No. 08-000288-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given
that, pursuant to a Sum-
mary Judgment and Order
Rescheduling Judicial
Foreclosure Sale entered
in the above-styled cause
in the Circuit Court of
Franklin County, Florida,
the Clerk of Franklin
County will sell the prop-
erty situated in Franklin
County, Florida, described
as:

Description of Mortgaged
and Personal Property

Lot 21, Block "86", ST.
GEORGE ISLAND GULF
BEACHES, UNIT NO. 5,
according to the map or
plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 3, Page(s) 16,
Public Records of Franklin
County, Florida.

The street address of
which is 301 Bradford
Street, St. George Island,
Florida 32328.

at a Public Sale, to the
highest and best bidder,
for cash, at the front steps
of Franklin County Court-
house, 33 Market Street,
Apalachicola, Florida
32320 on February 19th,
2009 at 11:00 a.m.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner, as of
the date of the Lis Pend-
ens, must file a claim


within 60 days after the
sale.

Dated: January 13th, 2009.

Marcia M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
January 22, 29, 2009
9925T
STATE OF FLORIDA DE-
PARTMENT OF ENVI-
RONMENTAL PROTEC-
TION

NOTICE OF INTENT TO
ISSUE PERMIT

This intent to issue a per-
mit (File
No.19-0283781-001-DF) to
Shell Bay Property Owners
Association, LLC, 1827
Powers Ferry Road, Build-
ing 1, Suite 100, Atlanta,
Georgia 30339, requesting
a sovereignty submerged
land lease appurtenant to
the applicant's riparian
ownership on U.S. High-
way 98, associated with
Shell Bay Subdivision, Plat
Book 8, Page 38, Latitude:
2949'9.9'N, Longitude:
-8442'34.6"W, Section 35,
Township 7 South, Range
5 West, Saint George
Sound, Class II Waters of
the State, Franklin County,
for the purpose of con-
structing a 12-slip private
docking facility preempting
14,564 square feet, is
hereby granted unless a
sufficient petition for an ad-
ministrative hearing is
timely filed under sections
120.569 and 120.57 of the
Florida Statutes as pro-
vided below. The proce-
dures for petitioning for a
hearing are set forth be-
low.

A person whose substan-
tial interests are affected
by the Department's action
may petition for an admin-
istrative proceeding
(hearing) under sections
120.569 and 120.57 of the
Florida Statutes. The peti-
tion must contain the infor-
mation set forth below and
must be filed (received by
the clerk) in the Office of
General Counsel of the
Department at 3900 Com-
monwealth Boulevard, Mail
Station 35, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-3000.

Because the administrative
hearing process is de-
signed to re-determine fi-
nal agency action on the
application, the filing of a
petition for an administra-
tive hearing may result in a
modification of the permit
and lease, or even a denial
of the application. Accord-
ingly, the applicant is ad-
vised not to commence
construction or other activ-
ities under this permit/
lease until the deadlines
below for filing a petition
for an administrative hear-
ing, or request for an ex-
tension of time have ex-
pired.

Under rule 62-110.106(4)
of the Florida Administra-
tive Code, a person whose
substantial interests are af-
fected by the Department's
action may also request an
extension of time to file a
petition for an administra-
tive hearing. The Depart-
ment may, for good cause
shown, grant the request
for an extension of time.
Requests for extension of
time must be filed with the
Office of General Counsel
of the Department at 3900
Commonwealth Boule-
vard, Mail Station 35, Tal-
lahassee, Florida
32399-3000, before the ap-
plicable deadline. A timely
request for extension of
time shall toll the running
time period for filing a peti-
tion until the request is
acted upon. If a request is
filed late, the Department
may still grant it upon a
motion by the requesting


party showing that the fail-
ure to file a request for an
extension of time before
the deadline was the result
of excusable neglect.

In the event that a timely
and sufficient petition for
an administrative hearing
is filed, other persons
whose substantial interests
will be affected by the out-
come of the administrative
process have the right to
petition to intervene in the
proceeding. Intervention
will be only at the discre-
tion of the presiding officer
upon the filing of a motion
in compliance with rule
28-106.205 of the Florida
Administrative Code.

In accordance with rules
28-106.111(2) and
b2-110.106(3)(a)(4), peti-
tions for an administrative
hearing by the applicant
must be filed within 14
days of receipt of this writ-
ten notice. Petitions filed
by any persons other than
the applicant, and other
than those entitled to writ-
ten notice under section
120.60(3) of the Florida
Statutes, must be filed
within 14 days of publica-
tion of the notice or within
14 days of such notice, re-
gardless of the date of
publication.

Under section 120.60(3) of
the Florida Statutes, how-
ever, any person who has
asked the Department for
notice of agency action
may file a petition within 14
days of such notice, re-
gardless of the date of
publication.

The petitioner shall mail a
copy of the petition to the
applicant at the address
indicated above at the time
of filing. The failure of any
person to file a petition for
an administrative hearing
or pursue mediation as
provided below within the
appropriate time period
shall constitute a waiver of
those rights.

A petition that disputes the
material facts on which the
Department's action is
based must contain the
following information:

(a) The name and ad-
dress of each agency af-
fected and each agency's
file or identification num-
ber, if known;

(b) The name, ad-
dress, and telephone num-
ber of the petitioner; the
name, address, and tele-
phone number of the
petitioner's representative,
if any, which shall be the
address for service pur-
poses during the course of
the proceeding; and an ex-
planation of how the
petitioner's substantial in-
terests are or will be af-
fected by the agency de-
termination;

(c) A statement of
when and how the peti-
tioner received notice of
the agency decision;

(d) A statement of all
disputed issues of material
fact. If there are none, the
petition must so indicate;

(e) A concise state-
ment of the ultimate facts
alleged, including the spe-
cific facts that the peti-
tioner contends warrant re-
versal or modification of
the agency's proposed ac-
tion; and

(f) A statement of the
specific rules or statutes
that the petitioner con-
tends require reversal or
modification of the
agency's proposed action;

(g) A statement of the
relief sought by the peti-
tioner, stating precisely the
action that the petitioner


wishes the agency to take
with respect to the
agency's proposed action.

A petition that does not
dispute the material facts
on which the Department's
action is based shall state
that no such facts are in
dispute and otherwise
shall contain the same in-
formation as set forth
above, as required by rule
28-106.301. Under sec-
tions 120.569(2) (c) and
(d) of the Florida Statutes,
a petition for administrative
hearing must be dismissed
by the agency if the peti-
tion does not substantially
comply with the above re-
quirements or is untimely
filed.

This action is final and ef-
fective on the date filed
with the Clerk of the De-
partment unless a petition
is filed in accordance with
the above. Upon the timely
filing of petition this order
will not be effective until
further order of the De-
partment.

This permit constitutes an
order of the Department.
The applicant has the right
to seek judicial review of
the order under section
120.68 of the Florida Stat-
utes, by the filing of a no-
tice of appeal under rule
9.110 of the Florida Rules
of Appellate Procedure
with the Clerk of the De-
partment in the Office of
General Counsel, 3900
Commonwealth Boule-
vard, Mail Station 35, Tal-
lahassee, Florida,
32399-3000; and by filing a
copy of the notice of the
appeal accompanied by
the applicable filing fees
with the appropriate dis-
trict court of appeal. The
notice of appeal must be
filed within 30 days from
the date when the final or-
der is filed with the Clerk of
the Department. Requests
for review before the Land
and Water Adjudicatory
Commission must be filed
with the Secretary of the
Commission and served
on the Department within
20 days from the date
when the final order is filed
with the Clerk of the De-
partment.

The application is available
for public inspection dur-
ing normal business hours,
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday,
except legal holidays, at
the Office of General
Counsel of the Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion, 3900 Commonwealth
Boulevard, Mail Station 35,
Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3000.
January 29, 2009
9939T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

VALIDATION OF THE NOT
TO EXCEED $3,325,000
EASTPOINT WATER AND
SEWER DISTRICT WATER
AND SEWER SYSTEM
REVENUE BONDS AND
BOND ANTICIPATION
NOTES, SERIES 2008

THE EASTPOINT WATER
AND SEWER DISTRICT
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA, an independent
special district created and
existing under and by vir-
tue of the laws of the State
of Florida,
Plaintiff,

vs.

THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
and the Taxpayers, Prop-
erty Owners and Citizens
thereof and of the
Eastpoint Water and
Sewer District of Franklin
County, Florida, including
non-residents owning
property or Subject to tax-


1100
action therein, and others
having or claiming any
right, title or interest in
property to be affected by
the issuance of the Bonds
and Bond Anticipation
Notes herein described, or
to be affected in any way
thereby,
Defendants.

CIVIL ACTION NO:
08-000426-CA


ORDER
CAUSE


TO SHOW


TO:
THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
THROUGH THE STATE
ATTORNEY FOR THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, AND
TO THE TAXPAYERS,
PROPERTY OWNERS
AND CITIZENS THEREOF
AND OF THE EASTPOINT
WATER AND SEWER DIS-
TRICT OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN-
CLUDING NON RESI-
DENTS OWNING PROP-
ERTY OR SUBJECT TO
TAXATION THEREIN, AND
ALL OTHERS HAVING OR
CLAIMING ANY RIGHT TI-
TLE OR INTEREST IN
PROPERTY TO BE AF-
FECTED BY THE ISSU-
ANCE OF THE
EASTPOINT WATER AND
SEWER DISTRICT WATER
AND SEWER SYSTEM
REVENUE BONDS AND
BOND ANTICIPATION
NOTES HEREINAFTER
MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED, OR TO BE
AFFECTED IN ANY WAY
THEREBY;

The above cause coming
on to be heard upon the
Complaint filed herein by
the Eastpoint Water and
Sewer District of Franklin
County, Florida (referred
to herein as the "Plaintiff' or
"Issuer") seeking to deter-
mine the authority of the
Plaintiff to issue its not to
exceed $3,325,000
Eastpoint Water and
Sewer District Water and
Sewer System Revenue
Bonds (the "Bonds"), and
its not to exceed
$3,325,000 Eastpoint
Water and Sewer District
Water and Sewer System
Revenue Bond Anticipation
Notes (the "Bond Anticipa-
tion Notes"), a more partic-
ular description of such
obligations being con-
tained in the Complaint
filed in these proceedings,
to determine the legality of
the proceedings had and
taken in connection there-
with, and the legality of the
provisions, covenants and
agreements contained
therein and the revenues
pledged to the payment
thereof, and seeking a
judgment of this Court to
validate the proceedings
for said Bonds and Bond
Anticipation Notes, the rev-
enues pledged for the pay-
ment thereof, and said ob-
ligations when issued pur-
suant thereto, and said
Complaint now having
been presented to this
Court, for entry of an Order
to Show Cause pursuant
to Chapter 75, Florida Stat-
utes, and the Court being
fully advised in the prem-
ises:

IT IS ORDERED AND AD-
JUDGED that the State of
Florida, through the State
Attorney of the Second Ju-
dicial Circuit of Florida,
and the several taxpayers,
property owners and citi-
zens of the Eastpoint
Water and Sewer District
of Franklin County, Florida,
including non-residents
owning property or subject
to taxation therein, and all
others having or claiming
any right title: or interest in
property to be affected in
any way thereby, or to be
affected thereby, be and
they are each hereby re-
quired to appear and show
cause, if any there be, be-


+1+ +1+ +









I 11007s 1100 m 1100 T1100 s 1100 1100 a 3220 I 6100 6140
fore this Court on the 24th irk Eastpoint, Franklin disputed issues of material TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE SECONDS WEST 65.29 1 br house Carabelle, 3 br, 2 ba,
day of February, 2009, at County, Florida, Section fact. if there are none, the AFTER THE DECEDENT'S FEET TO A RE-ROD ANY PERSON CLAIMING 1 W/D, large lot, $700 mo.
1:30 p.m. (EST), at Apa- 29, Township 8 South, petition must so indicate; DATE OF DEATH IS (MARKED #4261), AN INTEREST IN THE c/h/a, w/d incl. $350 dep. call
lachicola, Florida in the Range 6 West, Latitude: (e) A concise statement of BARRED. THENCE RUN SOUTH 04 SURPLUS FROM THE No pets. 850-653-9788 850-545-8813.
Chambers of the under- 29 44'33" North, and Lon- the ultimate facts alleged, DEGREES 41 MINUTES 16 SALE, IF ANY OTHER A New Queen Orthopedic 850-615-0058
signed Judge at the Frank- gitude: 84 52' 3" West. including the specific facts The date of the first publi- SECONDS EAST 258.61 THAN THE PROPERTY Pillowtop mattress set in -_Townhomes for rent,
lin County Courthouse in that the petitioner con- cation of this Notice is Jan- FEET TO THE APPROXI- OWNER AS OF THE DATE sealed plastic $290. Full Building for Ise in Gulf Jones Homestead-
the City of Apalachicola, A person whose substan- tends warrant reversal or uary 29, 2009. MATE MEAN HIGH OF THE LIS PENDENS Warranty. Can Deliver County, (St. Joe), New Ponderosa pines. End
Florida, why the prayer of trial interests are affected, modification of the WATER LINE OF APA- MUST FILE A CLAIM 850-222-9879 5,000sf, warehouse w/ of- of year special. First
said Complaint should not by the Department's action agency's proposed action, Personal Representatives LACHICOLA BAY WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER fices, adjacent to air strip, month rent free with
be granted and why the may petition for an admin- (f) A statement of the spe- Walter J. Armistead THENCE RUN NORTH 88 THE SALE. E. of St. Joe, will Ise w/ month rent free with
proceedings for said istrative proceeding cific rules or statutes that 224 Franklin Blvd. DEGREES 23 MINUTES 41 OTP w/ owner fin. avail. deposit and 12 month
Bonds and Bond Antici- (hearing) under Sections the petitioner contends re- St. George Island, Florida SECONDS EAST ALONG DATED at Apalachicola, Call 850-819-4600 or lease. 2 br and 3br
pation Notes and said 120.569 and 120.57, Flor- quire reversal or modifica- 32328 SAID MEAN HIGH WATER Florida, this 15th day of Beautiful Queen Solid 850-763-3921 units available. Call
Bonds and Bond Antici- ida Statutes (F.S.). The pe- tion of the agency's pro- Jo Ann A. Shiver LINE 112.32 FEET, January, 2009. Wood 7-PC Bedroom Set Convenience store down- 850-227-8404 or 850
pation Notes when issued tuition must contain the in- posed action; and (g) A 228 Franklin Blvd. THENCE LEAVING SAID w/dovetail drawers. Still in town Apalachicola, 47 Ave 227 9732 for more in-
pursuant thereto and the formation set forth below statement of the relief St. George Island, Florida MEAN HIGH WATER LINE Marcia M. Johnson boxes. $2,400 value, must E. Call 850-899-4512 or formation.
revenues pledged to the and must be filed sought by the petitioner, 32328 RUN NORTH 14 DE- CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT sacrifice $999 222-7783 850-227-5052 for info.
payment thereof should (received. by the clerk) in stating precisely the action Attorneys for Personal GREES 52 MINUTES 10 COURT Year round rental on canal
not be validated and con- the Office of General that the petitioner wishes Representatives: SECONDS WEST 39.47 Franklin County, Florida in SGI, 2 br, 2 ba, nice
firmed as therein prayed. Counsel of the Department the agency to take with re- Kateena E. Manners, Esq. FEET TO THE POINT OF By: Michele Maxwell yard. Boats welcome!! No
at 3900 Commonwealth spect to the agency's pro- David J. Hull, Esq. BEGINNING. Deputy Clerk pets. $775 mo. Call
AND IT IS FURTHER Boulevard, Mail Station 35, posed action. Florida Bar No. 0023724 Complete Solid Wood For Rent 413-454-4253
ORDERED AND AD- Tallahassee, Florida Florida Bar No. 278343 TOGETHER WITH AN AC- Attorney for Plaintiff Bedroom Set. Brand New! 3 months free rent on .o- .
JUDGED that this Order to 32399-3000, A petition that does not Smith Hulsey & Busey CESS EASEMENT BEING SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, Top quality. Dovetail Draw- prime office space -
Show Cause be published dispute the material facts Post Office Box 53315 MORE PARTICULARLY LLP ers. Beautiful. Must See. 29Ave E1 6170
in the manner required by Under Rule 62-110.106(4), on which the Department's Jacksonville, Florida DESCRIBED AS FOL- 10004 N. Dale Mabry High- $499 Can deliver 545-7112 Montgomery Building 2 6170
Section 75.06, Florida Stat- Florida Administrative action is based shall state 32201-3315 LOWS: way, Suite 112 Please call 2 br, 1 ba
utes. Code (F.A.C.), a person that no such facts are in Telephone: (904) 359-7700 Tampa, FL 33618 850-653-4321 or huge lot, 3 Rivers Area
whose substantial interests dispute and otherwise January 29, 2009 COMMENCE AT AN IRON (813) 880-8888 305J588 5885 Carrabelle, $495 mo+ utili
AND IT IS FURTHER are affected by the shall contain the same in- February 5, 2009 PIPE MARKING THE 07-85476T 305-588-5885 Carrabties & dep, $498506533270
ORDERED AND AD- Department's action may formation as set forth 9961T SOUTHEAST CORNER OF January 29, 2009 3240For Rent Space available For Sale By owner, 2000
JUDGED that, by such also request an extension above, as required by Rule IN THE CIRCUIT COURT A TRACT OF LAND DE- February 5, 2009 Reuger Mini14 Stainless for small business or f For Sale By owner, 2000
publication of this Order, of time to file a petition for 28-106.301, FA .C. OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL SCRIBED IN DEED FROM range rifle, latest model, fce. Until cities included -Buccaneer Zone 3 single
all taxpayers, property an administrative hearing, CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN W. H. NEEL AND WIFE TOmany extra plus ammo, Downtown Histo Apa wide 16x80 on 2 lots (30 x
owners and citizens of the The Department may, for Under Sections AND FOR FRANKLIN CLARA D. GIBSON, $700 obo, 850-728-0975 lachicola. 29 Ave. E. 100) great condition, 24
Eastpoint Water and good cause shown, grant 120.569(2)(c) and (d), COUNTY DATED DECEMBER, 31, (upstairs) Fo nfo acall514th St. Apalachicola, FI,
Sewer District of Franklin the request for an exten- F.S., a petition for adminis- 1903 AND RECORDED AT Carol 850-653-3871 $70,000,850-653-9231
County, Florida, including sion of time. Requests for trative hearing must be Deutsche Bank National PAGES 242 THROUGHF e i
non-residents owning extension of time must be dismissed by the agency if Trust Company, as Trustee 246, VOLUME T'OF THE 3290 I i
property or subject to taxa- filed with the Office of Gen- the petition does not sub- for the CertificatPUBLIC RECORDS OF 6200
tlon therein and all others eral Counsel of the Depart- stantially comply with the of Soundew Hmce Loaers FRANKLIN COUNTY Needed 6110 Ih
having or claiming any ment at 3900 Common- above requirements or is Trust 2005-OPTI, FLORIDA AND BEING LO- Large Wheel Chair for eld- 1 br 1 ba & 2 b art Beach Rentals
right, title or interest in the wealth Boulevard, Mail untimely filed. Asset -Backed Certificates T D IN SECTION 12, i er- women Call men unu n e pae By Owner
Eastpoint Water and Station 35, Tallahassee, Asset-Backed Certificates, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH 8 50653862 mentunfurn electricwater
Sewer District of Franklin Florida 32399-3000, before The application is availableSeries 2005-PT1 RANGE 8 WEST, FRANK 3100-Antiques 0-653-8620nc. Tile floors, part cy-
County, Florida, or the tax- the applicable deadline, A for public inspection dur- Plaintiff, LIN COUNTY, FLORIDA 3110 Appliances press panelling, private Beach Homes-Condos
able property therein or in timely request for exten- ing normal business hours, AND RUN SOUTH 76 DE- 3120 -Arts & Crafts deck 1 block from beach www.BeachRealtynet
any property to be affected sion of time shall toll the 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., -vs.- GREES 03 MINUTES 57 3130 -Auces 4 /I40 \ 5573 w 5Vacation Rental Homes
by the issuance of said running of the time period Monday through Friday, Frederick S. White, Sr. and SECONDS WEST 379.16 3150 Building Supplies 850653 6459 Exclusively BY OWNER
Bonds and Bond Anticipa- for filing a petition until the except legal holidays, at Marcia W. White, His Wife FEET TO A RE-ROD 3160 Business
tlon Notes or to be af- request is acted upon. If a the Tallahassee Branch of- Defendant(s). (MARKED # 4261), Equipment
fected in any way thereby, request is filed late, the fice of the Department of THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 3170 Collectibles
or the validity of such Department may still grant Environmental Protection, Case #: 07 000445-CA DEGREES 04 MINUTES 55 3180 -CComputers 1t Month
Bonds and Bond Anticipa- it upon a motion by the re- 630-3 Capital Circle North- Division #: SECONDS WEST 60.01 3200 Firewood EMPLOMENT Rent!!!
tlon Notes or of any reve- questing party showing east, Tallahassee, Florida UNC: FEET TO A RE-ROD 3210- Free Pass it On 2 Modern Apt
nues pledged for payment that the failure to file a re- 32301. (MARKED #4261), 3220 Furniture 4100 Help Wanted 2 br, 2 ba, Modern Apt
thereof, or of the proceed- quest for an extension of January 29, 2009 AMENDED THENCE RUN NORTH 14 3230 Garage/Yard Sales 4130 Employment with washer and dryer,
ings authorizing the issu- time before the deadline 9951T NOTICE OF SALE DEGREES 52 MINUTES 10 3240 Guns Information central AC, Ave E, Apa-
ance of said Bonds and was the result of excusable 9951T HE CIRCUIT C OURT SECONDS WEST 255.56 3250 Good Things to Eat lachicola $700 mo.,+ dep. '
Bond AnticipationNotes, neglect. OF THE ECNDUD NOTICE IS HEREBY FEET TO A RE-ROD Healt Call6531240 or6701211.weryClohing
includingBnd AntcpnanyremediesN. OF THE SECOND JUDI- NOTICE IS HEREBY (MARKED #4261) MARK- 3280-Machinery/i
provided for their collec- I a timely andsufficient IAL CIRCUIT IN AND GIVEN pursuant to an Or- N M 320 ime 4100 Apalachicola 7100- Homes
tpon, be andftheyiare made petition for an administra- FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY der rescheduling foreclo- ING THE POINT OF BE Equipment 7110- Bech Home/
tion, be and they are made petition for an administra FLORIDA sure sale dated January GINNING. FROM SAID 3290 Medical Equipment Conflict Management 1 br 1 ba apts. from $400/ 711-Property
parties defendant to this tive hearing is filed, other e0 ened POINT OF BEGINNING Mselaneous Coord mo. Call 850-381-7746 7120C cial
proceeding, and that this persons whose substan- IN RE: ESTATE OF Case No. 07-000445-CA of CONTINUE NORTH 14 3320 Plants & Shrubs/ The Florida Fish and Wild Furnished Loft Apt, in his- 710 Comsrc s
Court sha have usdic- tia, interests wi be af- DEGREES 52 MNUTES 10 T i Fsn i I i 710 Farms & eancges
Court shall have jusdc al, interests will be af VERONICA A. ARMI- the Circuit Court of the 2nd E NEES52 ES Supplies life ConservationCommis- tor district. Cbl/ wtr in 7150-otandAeage
tion of them to the same fected by the outcome of SECONDS WEST 39.46 3330 Restaurant/Hotel sion is seeking a conflict 1 lOOsf hi gh ceilings Pr- 7160- Mobile Homes/Lots
extent as if named as de- the administrative process STEAD, Judicial Circuit in and for FEET TO A RE ROD 3340 Sporting Goods management and outreach vate entrance and deck. 7170-Waterfront
pendants in said Complaint nhavethe rightto pettonto ri County, Floridan ONTE D #426eLY Pp
wheren DetschaBanC(MAKEDn4261vLYIGe330ghtickese(Byi&nell)specialist for a 1-year con- No smkg/pets. $750 mo. 7180 Investlent
and personally served with intervene in the proceed File No.: 08-000660CP National Trust ompan N THE SOUTHERLYtract. The candidate will +$750 dep. 850-653-3838roperly
process in this cause. ing. Intervention will beFRIGHTOFWAYBOUND-7190 Out-of-Town
Division: as Trustee for the Certifi IARY-OF U.G- work with government, citi- Real Estate
ONE AND ORDERED in rmitted only at the di cate holdersof Soundvew NO98 SAID POINTALSO 32 reduce humanbear co
caNbes CNty FRlERoian cretion of the presiding of NOTICE TO CREDITORS Home Loan Trust LYING ON A CURVE CON- flicts. Duties involve work- 612
chambers at Apalayhicola, ricr upon the filing of a 2005-OPT1, Asset-Backed CAVE TO THE NORTH-
mostionhdincompecliance w The administration of the Certificates, SeriesC TOTHENORTCE Seasoned oak firewood. ing with public officials, co 7100
ths24th dayof December, Rule 213-106.205, F.A.C. tTe Veronica A. 2005 OPTi, Plaintiff andWESTERLY, T Reasonable price! Call ordinating volunteers, and St. Geore I 7100
2008. Armistead, deceased, Frederick S. White, Sr and RUN SOUTHWESTERLY 697-4677 or visit us at 150 delivering presentations. Island Port St. Joe, St. George
Armstead, deceased, Frederick S. White, Sr. andelaware St, Lanark. Must to be a selfdirecte d Island and St. James Bay
Petitions must be filed whose date of death was Marcia W. White, Husband RIGHTOFWAY BOUN Delaware St Lanark. Must to be a self-drected $160 wk, elec, Satllit Island and St. James Bay
Honorable James C. within 21 days of publica- October 31 2008 and and Wife are defendantss, ARY AND SAID CIUR- __Du______ r Mprofessionalt awho is inde- ba ,lded. l Previously d wBank Owned
Stiofthisnot Ua ARTANAD SIDCURVEpde onate Garag icuded pool P r P ae bew
Hankinson ton of this notice. Under whose social security I will sell to the highest and A AI pendent, motivated, table. 12'X65' deck with mProperty Priced way below
CIRCUIT JUDGE Section 120.60(3), F.S., number is XXX-XX-2885, is best bidder for cash, AT WITH A RADIUS OF possesses excellent com- Beautiful view, market value! Prices start-
January 29,2009 howeverany person who pending in the Circuit THE WEST FRONT DOOR 3769.83 FEET, THROUGH munication and problem 850-653-51145,000. Please call
February 5, 2009 has asked the Department Court of the Second Judi- OF THE FRANKLIN A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 solving skills. Experience Counts Real Estate Group
9947T for notice of agency action clal Circuit in and for COUNTY COURTHOUSE, DEGREES 52 MINUTES 26 in conflict management or at 850-249-3615.
STATE OF FLORIDA may file a petition within 21 Franklin County, Florida, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN SECONDS, FOR AN ARCoutreach is required. Can- Why Rent
DEPARTMENT OF ENVI- days of receipt of such no- the address of which is 33 APALACHICOLA, FLOR- DISTANCE OF 57.49 didate is responsible for
RONMENTAL PROTEC- twice, regardless of the date Market Street, Suite 203, IDA, AT 11:00 A.M. Febru- FEET, CHORD BEING project-related costs such 6130 When You
TION of publication. The peti- Apalachicola, Florida ary 19, 2009, the following SOUTH 62 DEGREES 34 as travel and lodging, and Can
toner shall mail a copy of 32320. The estate is tes- described property as set MINUTES 28 SECONDS 3 Piece Living Room Set. will work in Franklin N ome?
NOTICE OF the petition to the appi- tate. The names and ad- forth in said Final Judg- WEST 57.49 FEET TO AN New 100% micro fiber, County, Florida. Compen- 3 BR, 2 BA. Unfurnished New Home?
AGENCY ACTION cant at the address indi- dresses of the personal mentto-wit: IRON PIPE, THENCE stain resistant, List $1999. station is $35,000. Email a W/D, D/W, CH& A, Deck, THEAVE-
cated abov a t the time of representatives and of the t: LEAVING SAID Let go for $649, delivery cover letter and resume Poolside. Covered boat NUESat
The Department of Envi- filing. The failure of any personal representatives' COMMENCE AT AN IRON RIGHRUOF-WAY BOUND available. 222-7783 with 3 references to parking. Longterm. PRICE E G
ronmental Protection gives person to file a petition for attorney are set forth be- PIPE MARKING THE ARY RUN SOUTH 04 DEidavid.telescomvfwc.com REDUCED. For appoint- LANDING.
notice s an administrative hearing GREES 41 MINUTES 16 davielco.co ment, Call 850-877-7696. Green
within the appropriate timeARowAT O ND E SECONDS EAST 42.35 certified and
permit/ tert q uer wirdtes O A TRACT OF LAND DE- FEET TO A RE-ROD Snow Birds/ HOP
tification and authorization period shall constitute a All creditors of the dece- SCRIBED IN DEED FROM FEET TO A REROD CustomerSupportBirds/ HOP
to used sovereign sub- waiver of that person's dent and other persons W. H. NEEL AND WIFE TO (MARKEDN NOTH4261) Lanark Village apprved.Lv-
merged lands, (file number stratve determnaton having claims or demands CLARA D. GIBSON DEGREES 05 MINUTES 52 $155 2 Pc Queen Cashier 1 br, 1 ba, Renovated/fur- ing onthe
19-0275116-001-DF) to(hearing) under Sections against the decedent's es- DATED DECEMBER, 31 SECONDS EAST 65.29 Plushtop Mattress Set. Clerk needed at the mini nished end unit, new kitch Forgotten
Magnolia Ridge, LLC, to 120569 and 120.57, F.S. tate on whom a copy of 1903 AND RECORDED AT FEET TO THE POINT OF New in plastic w/warranty convenience store (blue). and bath, mini. 4 month Coast
construct a commercial 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. notice is served must PAGES 242Can deliver (850) 545-7112 Must be able to work lease $545/mo + dep., no 3 bdrm, 2 bath
marina open to the public A. petition that disputes file their claims with this 246, VOLUME L' OF THE nights and/or weekends, smoking, pet considered, homes ranging
on a first come first serve the material facts on which Court WITHIN THE LATER PUBLIC RECORDS OF Call 927-2163 for more info (850) 653-3838. from
basis in an area primarily the Departments al action is OF 3 MONTHS AFTER FRANKLIN COUNTY, 1250-2000
used for commercial oys- based must contain the THE DATE OF THE FIRST FLORIDA AND BEING LO- Home Biz Training -42 sqft in
ter and fishing operations, based must contain the PUBLICATION OF THIS CATED IN SECTION 12, PT $400-$1,200 Mo. FT Carrabelle's
This marina project in- Thefollowing e info addressmation NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF- TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, $2000 to $6,000 Mo. Call | 6140 Newest Subdl-
cludes the construction of he name and address of TER THE DATE OF SERV- RANGE 8 WEST, FRANK- 727-865-6795 1 br house for rent in vision only%
ten slips, six 10' x 2' finger each agency's file or iden- ICE OF A COPY OF THIS LIN COUNTY FLORIDA Carrabelle. remodeled, mile from the
piers, a 152' x 15' terminal tification number, f k NOTICE ON THEM. AND RUN SOUTH 76 DE- w/d hookup, fenced yard, Carrabelle
access way. Upland con- (b) The name, address, All other creditors of the SECONDS WEST 9. Low uti $500 per month River
struction consists of a 10 x and telephone number decedent and persons FEET TO A RE ROD 4130 plus dep. 5Call 850-
s on n acnltsyai1 c o the petitioner; the ee having clamsordnemands MARKED # 4261), POSTALGOTJOB & 2, br the $1 00 0's
grassed parkngYsp10 a ddressn and telephone against the decedent 's es- THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 INO FOA SL 1GV Picke you l ot
and a 3,112 square foot rmres et itif any, tate must file their claims DEGREES 04 MINUTES 55 Apalachicola, FL. Choose
paved access. The appli- representative, if anywth this Court WITHIN 3 SECONDS WEST 60.01 alac F.
cant applied for and re which shall be the address MONTHS AFTER THE FEET TO A RE-ROD Call 850-643-7740. Your Model.
ceived a stormwater au- for service purposes dur- DATE OF THE FIRST PUB- (MARKED #4261), MARK Bookkeekin caution nly8otslef!
thorzaton from the De- ing the course of the pro-LICATION OF THIS NO- ING THE POINT OF BE- Retired nurse for respite eatEC& Com-
iartion from the Daved a ceeding; and an explana- TICE. GINNING. FROM SAID care daytime, night time When you care to send pany, Inc.
pr fo the paved ac- T GN G F S 6110 (850)
cess to the grassed park- tion of howthe petitioner's POINT OF BEGINNING and overnight on week- the very least tothe IRS- You NEVER have to pay (850)
tog a .eot -substantial interests are or ALL CLAIMS NOT SO RIN NORTH 14 DE ends. Housework, shop SMALL BUSINESS for information about 2 br, 2 ba, outdoor pool. 656-2608
Ing area. The project isA VofwllNbe affected by the BOOKKEEPING federal or postal jobs. If 598 Three Rivers Rd.
coated on the south side of will be affectedbythe FILED WILL BE FOREVER GREES 52 MINUTES 10 ing, in your home. Experin BOOKKehelpING e d obI T y
U.S. Highway 98 adjacent agency determination; (c) BARRED. SECONDS WEST 255.56 ence with Alzheimers, se- Let me help you get it you see a job Carabelle. $800 month.
to 4th Street in St. George howtheapet of when and FEET TO A RE-ROD nile dementia, and special ready for the CPA. "guarantee", contact the Call 697-3707 or 519-64684 71 50
Sound, an Outstanding howthepetitionerreceived NOTWITHSTANDING THE (MARKED # 4261) needs child or adult. Call 653-1430 FTC. 75
notice of the agency dec- 850-320-5156a R avalTheFederalTrade 3 br 2 ba, On The
Florida Waterbody and a Commission Carrab ery Ga age Foal e
Class orida Water of the State, son; (d) A statement of all TIME PERIOD SET FORTH THENCE RUN SOUTH 62 8503205156 Refs aval Carrabelle River. Garage For Sale By
n; (d) A statement of all ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED DEGREES 05 MINUTES 52 s Americas consumer $1,000 month $500 de- Owner
7Apalach Newer, 2 br, 2 cleared with trees. Re-
protection agency. posit. 850-545-8813 1 acre lot high and dry, 8
www.ftc.gov/jobscams ba, ch/a, dw, w/d, hkup, duced Price $38K. Call
1-877-FTC-HELP sm. pet ok w/dep $700 mo Captain JR for more de-
ulsi + dep. Call 850-670-8266 tails at 850-670-8858
public service home or cell 653-5030
CALL 610 NTw NUMBE~s Now message from the FTC
and The News Herald
Classified Advertising
10& M 1 LADepartment Carrabelle { i nk
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Franklin County source of news for more than a centuty


SLJ n 11 2--iTm MJ U LJ -,


The Times Thursday, January 29, 2009 7B






B8 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 29, 2009


Delta Kappa's Kelley named to educators hall of fame


Beverly Kelley was
congratulated at the
January Delta Kappa
meeting of Delta Kappa
Gamma International.
She will be inducted into
the Mu State Hall of Fame
at the state convention in
Orlando from May 1-3.
Delta Kappa Gamma is
a 79-year-old international
honor society of more
than 115,000 key
women educators in 16
countries. The goal of the
organization is to promote
professional and personal
development of members
and to support excellence


in education.
Previous members
inducted into the Hall
of Fame include Myra
Ponder and Babs Bailey.
Members awarded
a special grant-in-aid
to Alishia Hendels,
Carrabelle High School
graduate and Florida State
University graduate in
finance and management,
for her diligence and
achievement in the pursuit
of an education.
She is the daughter of
Rachel Hendels, a long
time employee at the
Franklin County School


District office. Delta
Kappa also recently
awarded a grant-in-aid
to Whitney Heyser, an
education major interning
at the ABC Charter
School.
New members initiated
into the local organization
in October were Laura
Baney, Shellie Blackburn,
Traci Moses and Gina
Taranto.
Plans were made for
the February meeting
which will feature author
Richie Bray, who has
written the children's book
"Annalee the Manatee."


Parents and children will
be invited to the meeting
to be held at 3:30 p.m.
at the Franklin County
Consolidated School
Media Center on Feb. 10.
Delta Kappa is also
a strong supporter of
community service. One
of its major projects is
support of the Taunton
Children's Home in Gulf
County. It has provided


financial assistance to
residents at the home
and donated books to
start a library. The home
recently suffered a
serious fire, so continued
financial assistance is
critical at this time. Delta
Kappa plans to continue
to support the Taunton
Home this year by making
a contribution towards the
rebuilding effort.


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Delta Kappa also
supports the Refuge
House Program for
individuals who need
emergency shelter
and/or basic assistance.
Linda Gibson, Franklin
County Refuge House
representative, came to
the December meeting to
describe the program and
to receive donations from
Delta Kappa members.


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CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS
A grant-in-aid check was presented to Whitney Heyser-Martina, center, while
she was a teacher-intern. She graduated from AHS and then FSU in December
2008, and now teaches at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. Pictured from
left are ABC colleagues Traci Moses, Karen Ward, Heyser-Martina, Marie Lee
and Gina Taranto. Below, Delta Kappa initiates are, from left, Laura Baney,
Shellie Blackburn, Traci Moses and Gina Taranto. Back row are Delta Kappa
members Dale Millender, left, and Arlene Oehler.


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Our local real estate experts have identified what they feel are the best

values around and are offering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In

this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port

St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Bias, St. George Island, Carrabelle and

surrounding areas.


St. George Island RJ SAEB

ST. GEORGE
PLANTATION


717, ll00" Located in Sea
Dune Village,
this 3,300 sq. ft.
home has 4 BR,
4.5 BA, 3 separate living areas, furnished,
elevator, very private pool with adjoining
living area with half bath, Great Income
producer! 1 acre high, dry lot, Very near new
tennis court plus other Plantation amenities
of 24 hr security & private air strip.


John Shelby, Broker
800-344-7570
850-927-4777
www.sgirealty.com


I I. o %- %


located at 545 Oyster Road
Apalachicola, FL 32320
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath
Home has boat shed and utility building
Call (850)653-6013 (after 5 PM)
or (850)653-5450


NE ~*I


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