Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00010
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: January 22, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00010
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

00001-22-2009 ( PDF )


Full Text
k i


Apalachicola


Carrabelle








YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


For


\


THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 2009 www. a palach times. com 50C


An accountability guy

Oehlert named Franklin Schools' acting principal *.


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Superintendent Nina
Marks has reassigned pop-
ular middle school teacher
George Oehlert as acting
principal over the Frank-
lin County School, part of
a broader strategy of work-
ing more closely with the
state to improve educa-
tional performance.
Marks announced her
choice at a Jan. 9 school
board workshop in which
Florida Department of
Education representatives
outlined interventions
they are embarking on to
help the district meet the
Adequate Yearly Progress
goals of the federal gov-
ernment's No Child Left
behind program.
"I feel like George's
past experiences have
given him insight as to or-
ganizational skills, which
we need," said Marks of
her colleague, a man she
worked closely with when
she was dean of the middle
school.
"I've been in a position to
watch him grow," she said.
"He has a way of commu-
nicating his expectations
to students and their par-
ents, and he can continue
that, within this role, what
he's already started on the
middle school level."
Because Oehlert does
not hold state certification
as a principal, his status, as
of Tuesday when he began
his new job, is technically
that of a teacher on special
assignment.
But the 64-year-old mid-
dle school Teacher of the
Year, a native of St. Louis,
has a wealth of job experi-
ence, particularly in the
private sector, to serve him
well in his new role.
During a rough-and-
tumble childhood in a
working class German
neighborhood, Oehlert was
educated both in the public
schools, an all-male prep
school and a co-ed private
high school before earning
a bachelor's in education in


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
George Oehlert sits
in his new principal's
office, together with
Superintendent Nina
Marks.
1967 from Concordia Uni-
versity, a Lutheran school
in Seward, NE. He also
took business courses at
the University of Nebraska
during his undergraduate
years.
Following that he taught
three years in inner-city St.
Louis, at a parochial school
on the Near North Side ad-
jacent to the Pruitt-Igoe
projects, an urban hous-
ing complex notorious for
its extreme crime, poverty
and segregation.
He then went to work
for 11 years for the res-
taurant division of W.R.
Grace, with that company
underwriting the cost of
Oehlert's master's of busi-
ness administration, which
he received from Pepper-
dine University in 1980.
In 1981 he would open
the Grand Cafe restaurant
in St. Louis' theatre district
and in 1986 he went to work
for the Concordia Publish-
ing House as vice-presi-
dent of corporate develop-
ment. He also taught col-
lege level business courses
at his alma mater.
After taking early retire-
ment in 2000, he returned
to education two years
later when, as a member of
a search committee look-
ing for a principal, he was
asked to take the job him-
self.
See OEHLERT A5


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Faye Johnson, foreground, takes notes on a large
easel Tuesday morning at Apalachicola's City Hall
at a meeting of what will be called the Franklin
Cultural Arts Council.

County to form its


own arts council


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

A committee of local cit-
izens are working together
to form an arts council for
Franklin County.
At a meeting held Jan.
19, the new committee
resolved to be known as
the Franklin Cultural Arts


Council. Attendees formed
an ad hoc group to orga-
nize the council and later
develop bylaws.
"The first meeting was
incredibly positive," said
Apalachicola businessman
Joe Taylor. "We had repre-
sentation from all over the
county and, in fact the larg-
See COUNCIL A5


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Pastor Delwynn Williams, from St. Johns Missionary Baptist Church in Panama City, gives the keynote
address at Monday's community celebration of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King.



King Day service celebrate"


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

The anticipated inauguration of
Barack Obama as the nation's 44th
President rippled through the air of
the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day
community celebration at the Love
Center Monday.
The preaching centered on Dr.
King, and a loving God who selected
him for a sacred and sacrificial mis-
sion, but throughout the joyous ser-
vice, speaker after speaker invoked
Obama's name as a symbol of prog-
ress made in America over the last
four decades.
"Rosa Parks sat so Martin Luther
King could march. Martin Luther King
marched so Barack Obama could run.
Barack Obama ran so our children
could fly," said Apalachicola Commis-
sioner Valentina Webb, speaking with
her husband, Pastor Thomas Webb,
on behalf of the Tabernacle of Faith
Church.
Webb's three lines were echoed


later by the service's second presider,
Apostle Dolores Croom, as the audi-
ence filling the seats recited them to-
gether.
The symbolism of the community
celebration was further accentuated
by a large red, white and blue ribbon
that Betty Stephens waved aloft when-
ever she and others danced in front of
the aisles.
It was a celebration not given to
solemn airing of grievance or of com-
memorating fallen heroes of the move-
ment.
Instead reigned a sense of exu-
berant victory, as if the long, painful
climb of the civil rights movement was
finally being soothed by a less strenu-
ous descent down the far side of the
mountain after the peak had been con-
quered.

'Justice meeting joy'

"We've come to a new time, a new
day, within this struggle for racial
equality," said Pastor Delwynn Wil-


liams, of Panama City's St. John Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, the service's
keynote speaker.
"It has come under a different road-
map than was dictated to us in the '60s.
Something had to shift. Something
had to change up," said Williams, a
preacher about Obama's age of 47 who
brought a youthful edge to his impas-
sioned remarks.
He said today's movement is de-
fined more by response than reaction,
and called for African-Americans to re-
new adherence to the high standards
outlined in King's dream.
"A lot of things we did in yesteryear
were merely reactions. We got tired of
our people being called nig---," he said.
"Because we got tired of it, we reacted
to what was presented to us.
"Demonstrations such as marches
have become antiquated and out-
dated," Williams said, stressing the
movement has graduated into "voting
booths and politicians' offices.
"Our actions have to come from au-
See KING DAY A8


Apalachicola library makes



plans for patrons group

By Lois Swoboda--
Times Staff Writer -

On Thursday, Jan. 15, ..
friends of the Apalachicola
Municipal Library met to
elect officers and discuss
obtaining not-for-profit sta-
tus for the group.1
At the same meeting at-
tendees discussed retrofit-
ting the existing building at
Avenue D and Sixth Street
and volunteer librarian Car-
rie Kienzle reported on the
state of the collection.
Lynn Wilson was chosen-
as president of the friends,
Frances Cook vice presi- *
dent and Shirley Taylor sec- -
retary. Charles Kienzle, who
was not present, was tapped
to serve as treasurer.
The group decided to be : .
called Patrons of the Apala-
chicola Library Society, DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Time
(PALS). They plan to send A view of the newly rearranged interior of the Apalachicola Municipal Library,
See LIBRARY A8 about to be made even more spacious with the removal of some interior shelves.


Phone: (850) 653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews@starfl.com
Fax: (850) 653-8036


Letter to the Editor ......... ......A4
Sheriff's Report ....................... B4
Church News ......................... B3


Society News .. ................. B2
Tide Chart ........................... A8
Classifieds ........................ B6-B7


FREEDOM
S0 NEWSPAPERS IERACIV
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
School News & Society Friday at 11 a.m.
Real Estate Ads Thursday at 11 a.m.
Classified Display Ads Friday at 11 a.m.
Classified Line Ads Monday at 5 p.m.


*


0


TABLE OF CONTENTS


NE





Thursday, January 22, 2009


Radicals tangle with 'The Star Spangled Girl' in Eastpoint


ROYCE ROLSTAD
Special to the Times
During
rehearsals
of "The Star
Spangled
Girl," Sophie
Rauchmeyer,
played by
Megan Lamb,
left, confronts
radical
magazine
writer Norman
Cornell,
played by
David Bowen.
Performances
are Jan. 23-25
at the Eastpoint
Firehouse "little
theatre."


The Eastpoint
Firehouse's "little
theatre" will host three
performances of The
Panhandle Players'
production of "The Star
Spangled Girl" this
weekend.
Shows are at 7:30 p.m.
Friday and Saturday, Jan.
23-24, and 3 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 25, at the Eastpoint
Firehouse.
Tickets are $12 for
adults, $10 for students
and $5 for children
under 12. Tickets may be
purchased at the door,
which opens one half hour
before curtain, or call 670-
8200.
In "The Star Spangled
Girl," playwright Neil
Simon scripts a frothy,
romantic comedy
entangling a pair of young


liberal operators of an
underground protest
magazine with a square,
cute, patriotic "girl next
door."
Things are great for
Andy (Ben Bloodworth)
and Norman (David
Bowen), friends since
college and publishers
of the radical weekly
magazine "Fallout," until
a corn-fed girl from the
Midwest moves into the
adjoining apartment.
Everything turns inside
out when Sophie (Megan
Lamb), "the star spangled
girl," enters the young
men's lives.
Dan Wheeler directs
this red, white and blue
mix-up of patriotism and
protest, love and romance
that is "The Star Spangled
Girl."


s 3160o00
S2(TIt \0)\'eeks in the Staror limes
ad size 3 (ol x 5 and a banner ad i'itih 5.000
impiiessions on the Staror Times i\'ebsite


$31000

12 (TI10) \\'eeks in the Star or Times
ad size 3 ix o 10 ani a Iainneriiiiiad iith 5 000
impressions on the Star or Times I1'ebsite
Buy Full Color at Half Price!


THE STAR
850-227-1278
135 W. Hwy 98 Port St Joe, FL 32457
Kathleen Smith 850-819-5078

TH TIM Apalachicol
THE TIME&Carrabelle
lOl'R' HL'AMETiL ij iPElFPE# FO ..-1t E I -" VEAR.
850-653-8868
129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
Joel Reed 850-370-6090


-I


Choice


y, ctuiA


- .--. The Star and The Times are sponsoring a
Valentine Prize package this year, along
I with local advertisers. Look in next
l week's paper for all the details!


S/aeri


6of


u l Call today

to reserve


your ad!

Contact

Kathleen Smith

(850) 819-5078

or loel Reed

(8501370-60900


2009 Schedule
The 2009 Coastal Visitor's Guide will come out five times this
year. Each issue will feature local events for our visitors to enjoy
while they are staying here.
New this year, the Coastal Visitor's Guide will be inserted into
the Star and the Times as well as in racks around the area.
New this year, we are selling a banner ad across the
bottom of the front page of each issue. The price for this is
'350 each issue and includes full color for your ad!
Get your message out first!
We are not publishing a separate tab for each local event this
year. However, we will feature these events in the Coastal Visitor's
Guide.

February 5th issue will cover February, March &
April and feature local events including the Mardi
Gras celebration, Gumbo Festival, Bridal Fair and
the Chili Cook Off.
Advertising Deadline: January 28, 2009


NE ~*I


Think Local First

Business supporting

Business

* Local companies can impact our economy
by purchasing supplies and services
locally. Think creatively about how your
business can support our economy.



Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce
(850) 653-9419
www.apalachicolabay.org


I


A2 I The Times


Local


W-1
"Imp-mv
.






Thursday, January 22, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


Should Apalachicola's Veteran's Park be renamed?


At the Jan. 6 meeting
of the Apalachicola city
commission, there was
discussion of Veteran's
Park on the waterfront
between Avenues D and
E. Since the creation
of Veteran's Plaza on
Market St. to showcase the
Three Soldiers Detail, the
similar names have been
confusing to visitors and
locals alike.
Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce
President Joe Taylor said,
"When we lit the Tree of
Remembrance this year for
Hospice, the director came
down for the ceremony. It
was a big thing. She was


10-minutes late because
she went to the wrong park
and sat there waiting."
Several people said
that the park is sometimes
called Riverfront Park.
Councilwoman
Valentina Webb suggested
that Seafood Workers Park
would be an appropriate
name but a member of the
audience said the county
park being developed
on the western edge
of Apalachicola on the
Lombardi property is also
called Seafood Workers
Park and creating another
park with a similar name
would simply add to the
confusion.


It was suggested the
city might have a contest
to name the park. The city
of Carrabelle held a survey
when choosing a name for
Classic Lowery Park.
What do you think?
Should the name of
Veteran's Park be changed
and, if so, what should the
new name be?
If you have a
suggestion, send it by
email to timesnews@
starfl.com or drop a
written suggestion by the
Times office located at 129
Commerce St. in the High
Cotton Buildings. Please
submit all opinions before
the end of January.


PHOTO BY LOIS SWOBODA
VETERAN'S PARK: Workmen laying down sod at Veteran's Park on the riverfront
between Avenues D and E.


achicola
irrabelle


corn


F"1-4111IP TCirziT,,- TTC'


Travis Stanley
850.653.6477


mi i i." 1'IX LI N -GraysonShepard

& COMPANY 8506535112
Kim Davis
A Full Service Real Estate Company 850.653.6875

I-I-


Jackie Golden
850.899.8433
Jamie Crum
850.899.8758
Ed Mitchem
850.653.5772


UULI- VIW lUWNOiMUM, St ueorge First Tier Plantation 3BR/2 5BA is a GREAT NEW PRICE ON BAYFRONT
Island Nothing between you and Gulf fantastic deal at this price Excellent CARRABELLE LOT! 1% acre lot all on
but a sparkling pooll This 2 BR/ 2 Bath views of the Gulf you can see the south side of Hwy 98 no traffic
Villa is newly renovated with a lovely to cross 150' of beautiful white sandy
interior Enjoy your morning coffee from dolphins play from any of the decks beach with tall mature palms and a
the balcony while watching the dolphins Beautifully decorated interior is sea wall 4 miles west of Carrabelle
play Easy walk to everything from this a perfect beach house Tropical and right across the street from Tate's
central spoil landscaped pool is sure to please Hell Forest Wonderful views of St
MLS# 233812...............$399,000 MLS# 206497 ...............$895,000 George and Dog Islandl
MLS# 200565.................. $299,000






BAYFRONT MAGNOLIA BLUFF, MUST SEE!!!! 2 BR/ 2Bath condo in WILLBUILDTOSUIT!3Bedroom
Eastpoint One acre estate on N the heart of SGIi Beautifully finished 2 bath home, approx. 1,400 sq.
Bayshore Dr Beautiful lot w/ azaleas, w/bamboo floors, custom cabinets, feet in greater Apalachicola. Full
fruit trees, mature pines 100' granted counters Fantastic gulf and acre lot just five minutes from
waterfront w/seawall, dock & hlift Old gtoudowntown. Builder has other
Florida style home w/ 2 br/1 5bath lighthouse view Large enough to live downtown. Builder has other
Numerousoutbuildings & tennis court in full time or put on the vacation rental plans to choose from what a
Neighboring lot also available for sale market deal!
MLS# 208150...............$499,000 MLS# 208202...............$399,000 MLS# 208228...............$259,000
Please call us for a complete selection of properties for
sale in the Apalachicola Bay area! St. 112 Franklin Blvd.
www.ficklt.gofflorida.coGeorge Island FL 32328
www.ficklingofflorida.com E2 850.927.2255


CELEBRATE "THE YEAR OF THE OX"
WITH THE GULF ALLIANCE for LOCAL ARTS.
As fate would have it, our Annual Meeting coincides with the
beginning of 2009 Chinese New Year of the Ox. The Ox is a sign of
prosperity through fortitude and hard work. The Ox is a born leader,
being quite dependable and possessing an innate ability to achieve
great things. The Ox is unswervingly patient, tireless in work, and
capable of enduring any amount of hardship without complaint.
Become an Ox and make a resolution to support your Local Arts.

COME JOIN THE ARTS ALLIANCE!
Thursday, January 29, 2009 Port St. Joe Garden Club -216 Eighth Street
6:00 p.m. Meet & Greet 6:30 p.m. Annual Business Meeting
7:30 p.m. Reception & Party


A RSVP (ASAP)
GULF ..ALLIANCE for LOCAL ARTS To Ally Sanxay
...... .... . ... .......................... .... ...T.A y.........
Sa 850-227-2516
agsanxay@gulfalliance.org


Now, at a $105 savings*, you can try our unlimited local and long distance'
phone with 8 calling features, along with a consistently fast Internet connec-
tion that's not shared with your neighbors, as cable can be.**

Want a triple-play bundle that includes DIRECTV' service? Ask about
special offers and every-month savings on our other bundles.



To learn more or to sign up now, I -
call 877.342.9394 or visit www.FairPoint Point
- ---------------------------------------------- communications
HIGH-SPEED INTERNET 0 PHONE 0 TELEVISION
*Savings reflects a $35/mo. FairPoint bill credit for 3 months. Starting in the 4th month, price will be $89.95/mo. ($84.95/mo. with 12 mo. term commitment). **FairPoint
delivers a dedicated connection to your home from our high-speed Internet network. Unfortunately, cable Internet service shares a connection with other cable modem
customers in the neighborhood. Upgrades to services in bundles available at additional cost.
FullHouse bundles are available to residential customers for a limited time and are subject to change without notification. Eligibility for Full House packages requires
services to be invoiced on a single bill. (DIRECTV services will be billed separately). Customers who subscribe to DIRECTV through providers other than FairPoint are
not eligible for FullHouse with DIRECTV bundles. Not all services available in all areas. The bundled price does not include other applicable charges such as: equipment,
taxes, fees, FCC Line Charge, Universal Service Fee, and other surcharges. Prices apply to bundled service only. 'Unlimited Long Distance: Minutes available on one
phone line only. Excludes 900, international, directory assistance, operator services, and dial-up Internet calls. Long distance minutes apply to residential voice service
only and apply to calls terminating in the United States, its territories and Canada. FairPoint may suspend, restrict or cancel the service if usage is inconsistent with resi-
dential voice usage. High-Speed Internet Service: Prices based on Standard High- Speed Internet service. Free modem to use as long as the customer keeps the service.
Additional terms and conditions may apply. Early Termination: Early termination will result in a fee equal to the current retail rate for High- Speed Internet multiplied
by the number of months remaining in the term. If subscriber decides to upgrade to a larger bundle, that term will begin from the date of the change in service. If the
customer does not renew the term of service or upgrade to a larger bundle the customer will be automatically charged a month to-month rate.
DIRECTV service provided by DIRECTV. Hardware and programming available separately. Receipt of DIRECIV programming is subject to the terms of the DIRECTV
Customer Agreement; copy provided at directv.comnVlegal and mailed to customers in the first month. DIRECTV and the Cyclone Design logo are trademarks of DIRECTV,
Inc. 2008 FairPoint Communications, Inc.All rights reserved. 674SEFH


*I











A4 I The Times ODinion


Thursday, January 22, 2009


Help your


Rep. Bembry: Budget cuts go too far


parents stay on


track financially


In many families,
personal financial details
aren't always shared
freely, especially between
generations. But if you're
not familiar with your
parents' financial situation,
you might be
doing them
- and yourself a
disservice.
Even with
parents in good
health, it's wise to
become familiar
with their financial, JA
medical and legal ALDI
recordkeeping
so you'll be able to help if
needed. You might have to
walk a fine line between
appearing nosey and not
spotting warning signals
that something might be
amiss.
When you visit, keep an
eye out for:
Unpaid bills, late
payment notices or utility
shut-off warnings.
Hints they sometimes
must choose between
filling prescriptions and
buying food, heating or
other necessities.
An overabundance
of junk mail, magazine
subscriptions or cheap
prizes, which could
indicate they might be
targets for telemarketers
or get-rich-quick schemes.
Unnecessary "home
improvements" that
might indicate they've
fallen prey to con artists.
Or conversely, signs
they can't afford needed
repairs.
Signs of overspending
or other indicators they're
living beyond their means.
Uncharacteristic
secretiveness or
defensiveness, possibly
indicating they're
embarrassed about money
problems or afraid their
independence would be at
risk if they confide in you.
Don't be afraid to
initiate conversations
about your parents'
finances. Though it might
be awkward at first, you
might put their minds
at ease by showing that
you're looking out for their
best interests. A good way
to raise the subject is to
ask their advice about
your own situation.
And organize. One
of the biggest problems
people of all ages have with
their finances is getting
organized. Offer to help
your parents create, and
periodically update, files
containing:
Details of major


possessions and relevant
paperwork (property deeds,
car registration, jewelry,
etc.)
Outstanding debts
(mortgage documents, car
loan papers, medical bills,
etc.)
All income
sources, including
Social Security,
pension, 401(k),
IRA and personal
savings.
Bank
SON accounts, credit
ERMAN cards, safe deposit
box and insurance
policies, including
password, agent and
beneficiary information.
Will, trust, power of
attorney, health care proxy
and other documents
showing how they want
their affairs handled.
AARP's Web site www.
aarp.org/families/legal_
issues is a rich source of
information about these
and other legal issues
facing seniors.
Past income tax
returns and accountant or
financial advisor contact
information.
Budget. Chances are,
your parents' medical,
insurance, food and other
inflation-impacted bills
have risen faster than their
income. Your parents need
to know exactly how much
money is coming in every
month and how much is
going out. If they don't
already have a detailed
budget, offer to help create
one.
For tips on creating
a budget, visit Practical
Money Skills for Life,
Visa Inc.'s free personal
financial management site
(www.practicalmoneyskills.
com/budgeting). And
consult an expert. A
financial planner can help
you and your parents
understand the many
tax, income and expense
implications of retirement.
If they don't already
have a planner, www.
plannersearch.org is a
good place to start your
search.
Take care of these
financial planning details
now, so when your parents
need your help, you'll be
able to give them your full
attention.

Jason Alderman
directs Visa's financial
education programs. Sign
up for his free monthly
e-Newsletter at www.
practicalmoneyskills.com/
newsletter.


.4Apalachicola T
Carrabelle


THE TiMES

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
APALACHICOLA, FL 32329
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$23 year $15 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$33 year $20 six months


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Wednesday, Jan. 14 marked the differences between the House
end of a nine-day Special Session and Senate budgets.
held to balance the state's budget "We had the opportunity to
after news of a $2.3 billion shortfall protect Florida agriculture and
in revenues for the fiscal aquaculture from the
year 2008-2009. thrust of many cuts that
Freshman Democrat would have been very
State Rep. Leonard damaging to our future
Bembry, D-Greenville, in District 10," he said. "I
was active in negotiations am relatively pleased with
to deal with cuts in the resolutions we were
agriculture, aquaculture able to negotiate in the
and education. As a LEONARD conference committee and
member of the Natural BEMBRY could support that part of
Resources Appropriations the budget."
Committee, he listened as During debate on the House
heads of agencies and staff of floor, Bembry also had the
the Department of Agriculture opportunity to address the
and Consumer Services, the members on issues that affect
Department of Environmental District 10 constituents. He
Protection, Water Management defended cuts to education,
Districts and the Fish and Wildlife medical care for the elderly and
Conservation Commission made the developmentally disabled,
recommendations they feel had tourism and the environment.
the least impact on the citizens of "I was unable to vote for the
the state. budget as I feel the solutions that
Bembry also was named as a we considered were narrowed too
conferee on the Natural Resources much by the House Leadership
Appropriations Conference and did not reasonably address
Committee, where he had the our budget situation," he said.
opportunity to deal with the "Education and health care


were cut to a point that it could
damage our ability going forward
to properly educate our children
and protect our older generation.
Our children are our hope for
tomorrow, and older generations
brought us to where we are. We
have to protect both areas.
"By law, we had to balance the
budget, but we need to protect the
constituents in District 10, and
that must always be our priority,"
Bembry said.
He has opened a district
office in Madison at North
Florida Community College. The
telephone number for the office is
850-973-5630. He will be opening
his satellite office in Chiefland, at
the old railroad depot adjacent to
the Chamber of Commerce, by the
end of January.
"We were able to get HB
109, Clinical, Counseling, and
Psychotherapy Services through
its first committee for the 2009
Session with an unanimous vote,
and I am excited to have the
opportunity to serve in the Florida
House of Representatives," he
said.


Lawson urges Crist to recall Legislature


Less than 48-hours after
warning Republican lawmakers
that their myopic approach to
plugging the state's financial
shortfall would result in
the loss of critically needed
state employees, Senate
Democratic Leader Al
Lawson, D-Tallahassee,
on Jan. 16 called on the
governor to veto the budget
and recall the Legislature
to Tallahassee to get the job
done right. LA
He also called
on the governor to veto the $10
million approved for his so-called
"economic stimulus" program,
a risky gamble he said had been
"funded by axing existing jobs for
iffy future ones.
"The loss of 66 probation
officers not only jeopardizes public
safety, it puts more strain on law
enforcement and our court system
already stretched to the breaking


point," Lawson said. "These
people are our first line of defense,
the ones who monitor offenders
released from prison, among them
those charged with serious
crimes including sexual
offenders."
The Democratic
leader in the House
was responding to the
announcement that the
Department of Corrections
AL fired 66 probation officers
IWSON in response to the $2.8
billion in cuts levied by the
Republican-controlled legislature
during the recent special budget-
cutting session.
"The Senate Democratic
Caucus repeatedly called on the
Republican leadership, including
Governor Crist, to look beyond
cuts," Lawson said. "We showed
them again and again how closing
some of the special interest tax
loopholes would raise at least $1


billion to stem some of the budget
pain and protect services on which
Floridians depend, including
keeping their communities safe.
But they refused to listen.
"This state has grown weary
of drinking the Republican Kool-
Aid," he said. "We called on the
governor to lead the state forward
by examining alternative options.
Without raising a penny in new
taxes on working families, closing
these loopholes would have
netted critical revenue to avert
the loss of state services and
protections including front line law
enforcement officers.
"But rather than lead us away
from the land of special interests'
protections, he's delivering
Florida into the valley of pink
slips," Lawson said. "I urge him
to rethink his direction, veto
this budget and re-summon the
Legislature to undo the damage
it's done."


Letter to the EDITOR


Does anyone care about
Carrabelle pets?

To the Editor:
I live within the city limits of
Carrabelle. Last week, two of my
pets died. Not of natural causes.
I called Animal Control. No one
returned my two calls. I called the


Humane Society. The nice lady
said she would try to call them and
couldn't get them.
The next day, I called again.
Someone answered. He said,
"Ma'am, you will see me
tomorrow morning." I haven't
seen him yet! Six months ago, I
called (Carrabelle Mayor) Curly
Messer and told him the problem.


Nothing!
What happened to the leash
law? Is it only good at the beach?
When Animal Control came in
the past, they always tell people
"you need to tie your pets." That's
the end of it. What is it, no one
cares?

Pam Meredith


UF adding veterinary forensics program


Call it "CSI: Animal Edition."
But this isn't television. In this
real-life drama, necropsies, assess-
ment of skeletal remains for abuse
and trauma, and crime scene anal-
ysis of hair, fibers and bloodstains
are used to solve cases of cruelty to
animals.
University of Florida officials
are partnering with the American
Society for the Prevention of Cru-
elty to Animals to form the first Vet-
erinary Forensic Sciences Program
dedicated to the teaching, research
and application of forensic science
in the investigation and prosecu-
tion of crimes against animals. The
program will handle cases from
around the country possibly up
to 200 within the first two years
- and provide consultancy and
training. Additional details will be
presented at the North American
Veterinary Conference this month
in Orlando.
"This is a newly emerging field,"
said forensic toxicologist Bruce
Goldberger, director of the William
R. Maples Center for Forensic Med-
icine at UE "We are translating our
knowledge of forensic science to a
new field devoted to solving crimes
against animals."
The Veterinary Forensic Scienc-
es Program will increase the num-
ber of professionals trained in fo-
rensic investigation of animal cru-
elty cases by potentially hundreds
each year, Goldberger said. In so
doing, it also could help uncover
instances in which the abusers also
are targeting people, experts say.


Over the last few years, the
number and stringency of laws
relating to animal cruelty has in-
creased. Penalties can include ex-
tended prison time, such as in the
high-profile dog fighting case in-
volving professional football player
Michael Vick.
"That means the standards of
investigations and of the science
used in documenting what has hap-
pened to animals are much, much
higher than even five years ago,"
said Randall Lockwood, ASPCA se-
nior vice president for anti-cruelty
field services.
There is no national tracking of
animal cruelty cases. Each year,
the ASPCA investigates more than
5,000 cruelty cases and arrests or
issues summonses to more than
300 people. Scenarios include sim-
ple neglect, abandonment, animal
hoarding and blood sports such as
dog fighting. On the basis of media
accounts, the animal advocacy Web
site pet-abuse.com reports 1,620
high profile cases in 2008.
Lt. Sherry Schlueter is credited
with starting the first animal cru-
elty investigation unit within a law
enforcement agency. Today she is
section supervisor of the Special
Victims and Family Crimes section
of the Broward County Sheriff's
Office. She said the new program
will help protect not only animals,
but humans who might be harmed
by the same assailants. She heads
one of the first police units in
the country in which officers are
"cross-trained" to recognize and


investigate links between animal
abuse and violence against hu-
mans, including child abuse, do-
mestic violence and sexual abuse.
She works to educate fellow of-
ficers and others about that link.
"My goal was always to get law
enforcement to recognize animal
cruelty for the crime it is," she said.
"Victims are victims and batterers
are batterers, and it shouldn't mat-
ter what species, what age, what
gender."
The UF program will offer un-
dergraduate and postgraduate
courses and continuing education
for veterinarians, law enforcement
personnel, animal control officers
and others. Courses include foren-
sic entomology, buried-remains ex-
cavation, bloodstain pattern analy-
sis, bite-mark analysis and animal
crime scene processing. Training
will be done in classroom settings,
online and through the just-formed
International Veterinary Forensic
Sciences Association.
Often, veterinarians presented
with cases of animal abuse are not
sure what to look for to establish
cause and manner of death, or to
prove a crime was committed.
"Veterinarians are frequently
asked to participate in cruelty in-
vestigations, yet we don't receive
special training on that in veteri-
nary school," said Julie Levy, di-
rector of Maddie's Shelter Medi-
cine Program at the University of
Florida. "There is a substantial
unmet need for that training to be
provided to veterinarians."


*


NE






Thursday, January 22, 2009


Local


OEHLERT from page Al


After training at the Lu-
theran Church Missouri
Synod's principals acad-
emy, he took on a two-year
assignment as principal of
an elementary and middle
school that was undergoing
a merger of schools in the
parish.
They called it 'unification'
rather than consolidation,"
he said. "They thought it
doesn't sound as bad."
In 2004, Oehlert and
his wife, Margey, moved to
Franklin County, after she
was hired as a teacher at
the Apalachicola Bay Char-
ter School. In 2005 he was
hired to teach fifth grade in
Carrabelle, and she moved
over to Chapman Elemen-
tary School in 2007, when he
taught social science at the
middle school there.
While Oehlert was re-
cently named Middle School
Teacher of the Year (Ha-
rolynn Walker was named
for the elementary grades
and Linda Massey for the
high school), he doesn't
consider himself necessar-
ily the shiniest apple in the
bushel.
"I've always hired people
who were better than me in
some area," he said. "I was
never an expert in anything
except people management.
I know what I'm good at and
one of those things is build-
ing a team.
"I will have to prove my-
self, there's no question
about that," Oehlert said.


"I'm an accountability guy. I
put people's feet to the fire
and I try to do it graciously."

District embraces
school improvement
strategy

Oehlert's hiring is part
of a broader effort, initi-
ated in conjunction with
state officials, to reverse the
district's five-year trend of
falling short of the goals set
by the No Child Left Behind
Program.
At the Jan. 9 workshop,
Nikolai Vitti, the DOE's bu-
reau chief of school improve-
ment, outlined for the school
board a strategy for state in-
tervention prompted by the
district's being in its fifth
year as a School in Need of
Improvement (SINI).
The district's SINI status
is dictated by the fact that it
has been repeatedly unable
to show Adequate Yearly
Progress (AYP), a key mea-
surement of the No Child
Left Behind act. AYP is
based on the performance
of student subgroups, such
as white, African-American,
Hispanic, ESE and free and
reduced lunch.
"These subgroups need
to make mastery in math
and reading, and that stan-
dard is determined by the
individual states," said
Vitti. "If the subgroups do
not make the necessary


rate, then the school is not
making AYP Many Title I
schools in the state are not
making AYP, because Flor-
ida has put the bar really
high in making AYP"
Because Florida's sys-
tem of school grades is sep-
arate from AYP, and can in
some cases send a contra-
dictory message, the state
has implemented a policy of
"differentiated accountabil-
ity" to better coordinate the
federal and state systems
as schools move towards
mastery by 2014.
"The story of AYP was
getting somewhat lost. It
was really difficult to talk
to communities," said Vitti.
"You still have two account-
ability systems but we have
streamlined school grades
and AYP"
The state's "differentiat-
ed accountability" program
created a matrix that incor-
porated school grades, SINI
status and the percentages
of students at a school mak-
ing AYP
Because the new consol-
idated school is considered
a SINI school for the past
five years, is meeting less
than 80 percent AYP and is
a D school, it falls under the
classification of a "Correct
2" school. That category is
considered the most serious
of the state's classifications
but is short of being among
Florida's dozen schools in
the "intervene" category,
which means they must


show progress or risk clo-
sure or being placed under
new management.
"The honus can fall ei-
ther on the state, district
or school, and in the 'Cor-
rect 2" schools, the honus
falls more on the district,"
Vitti said. "There are cer-
tain things Franklin County
must do to be compliant
with Differentiated Ac-
countability."
These requirements in-
clude making sure student
achievement is part of a
teacher's evaluation, creat-
ing common planning times
where teachers can meet
and adding math and read-
ing coaches.
After former interim
principal Nick O'Grady rec-
ommended the state con-
duct an instructional review
in October, the DOE sur-
veyed the school operation
with three specialists, and
came up with a list of com-
mendations, concerns and
action.
But the state has waited
until a new administration
is in place to more forward.
"We really didn't want to
move on that until a new
superintendent and a new
principal was named," said
Vitti. "We're ready to go
and I'm excited about the
possibility of change at this
school. I think the superin-
tendent and principal have
the right expectations."
The state plans a variety
of measures with its inter-


vention team, and Marks
is moving to put them into
place.
Elementary school
dean Deborah Huckeba
has been placed in charge
of the school's curriculum,
while reading coaches Lynn
Clark, for middle school,
and Sharon Philyaw, for
high school, have assumed
expanded duties in a newly
created reading observa-
tion room.
Pam Marshall has been
assigned to teach Oehlert's
middle school history class-
es, with new teachers Cathy
Borders handling high
school math, Jimmy Mar-
shall teaching high school
science and Rod Murphy
teaching high school history
and coaching baseball.
Sara Broker has been
moved over to teach fifth
grade classes, and Fred
Drake has been switched
to the middle school ESE
classes. Connie McGinnis
will teach high school ESE
and Carla Bankston ele-
mentary and middle school
physical education.
"They (the state) are not
here as a threat. The of-
fer was made and we said
'Please, come and help us
with that,'" said Marks.
"They're here to help us
wherever they can. They
see we have a need. This
is our year to work with
people."
Vitti said the interven-
tion team will probably be at


the school every two weeks.
"We plan to create an in-
structional focus calendar
so we identify what the
benchmarks are, and align
standards with resources
and materials," he said.
"We want to create an as-
sessment aligned with the
FCATs so we know if stu-
dents understood that level,
and when FCAT (state test-
ing) comes around we're
not surprised."
Vitti said he especially
liked the idea of the read-
ing coaches being directed
to work with the students
who score is and 2s on the
FCATs.
"To have the better read-
ing teachers teaching low-
est functioning students,
that's ideal. You want your
best teachers teaching the
ones that are struggling,"
he said.
"They (the school dis-
trict) was very receptive
and I think to really trans-
form a school you need the
support from the school
board, the superintendent
and the principal," Vitti
said. "Then there's no weak
link and there's an oppor-
tunity to take advantage of
greater accountability be-
cause you have every level
of administration agreeing
that change needs to hap-
pen.
"It was reassuring to re-
ally hear the board wants
changes and wants higher
standards," he said.


COUNCIL from page Al


est faction was from Carra-
belle. They are excited and
ready to get started. The
structuring of the board will
be a public process."
Taylor said the next
meeting will be in Carra-
belle at the new city govern-
ment complex on Feb. 9 at 6
p.m. All interested parties
are invited to attend.
The creation of the new
board marks a split by the
county's arts community
with the Gulf Alliance for
the Local Arts (GALA), a
group begun eight years
ago to serve the art needs of
Franklin, Gulf and eastern
Bay County.
GALA, initially an all-
volunteer organization, was
formed by a handful of art
enthusiasts to create an in-
frastructure for an umbrella
organization to raise public
awareness of the arts.
Over the years, the three
counties have partnered in
a number of cultural events
under the auspices of GALA,
most notably the highly suc-
cessful Plein Air Paint Out.
Initially, meetings of
GALA moved between the
three participating counties,
but Franklin County mem-
bers say more recently, the
meetings have taken place
only in Gulf County. Others
contend the focus of GALA's
activities are now restricted
to Gulf County, an idea fu-
eled by an email from new-
ly-hired GALA Director Ally
Saxnay that said the focus of
arts development over the
next three years would be
on Gulf County.

Dissatisfaction
builds with GALA
organization

Former GALA director
Kim Harrison points to the
fact Franklin County al-
ready has a museum, a the-
atre and Cotton Exchange,
which now functions as a


local art center, all facilities
that Port St. Joe lacks.
She insists Franklin
County has received its fair
share of grant money, and
said records show that over
the last several years, GALA
has spent more money in
Franklin County than in Gulf
and eastern Bay counties.
"I resigned in August but
I have stayed on to try and
help with the transition to
the new director," she said.
" Joe Taylor and Richard
Carrell now say they don't
want GALA to be the recipi-
ent of anything for Plein Air,
even though we founded it.
They have formed their own
501-c-3organization, the
Forgotten Coast Cultural Al-
liance, to manage the Plein
Air event. GALA gave them
$5,000 in start up money for
the Alliance.
"Everybody from Frank-
lin County who said they
would be on the board for
GALA in 2009 has stepped
off. They say they are no
longer interested in being
on the GALA board," she
said. "We have only had two
people on the board from
Franklin County because
we couldn't find anyone
who wanted to serve. Ed
Tiley served for three years,
which is the limit. We held
the space open for several
years and then Joe Taylor
came along."
Tiley, an actor and the-
atre producer based in
Apalachicola, said GALA
has worked hard since its
inception to serve Franklin
County, although not always
with support of people here.
"There was talk back
then that Franklin County
should have its own arts
council and a number of us
on the original board were
absolutely convinced that
we would be a more suc-
cessful granting agency if
we were to combine forces,
to become a three-county
arts agency," he said.
"One of the reasons I


*I


stepped off the board was to
allow someone else to take
the Franklin County seat
and increase county involve-
ment better than I could,"
Tiley said. "The Franklin
County seat went unfilled
for quite some time. People
said they would serve and
never showed up for meet-
ings. Joe Taylor was asked
to join the aboard because
it was felt he would be an ef-
fective voice for recruiting
Franklin County participa-
tion."
He agreed with Harrison
that "in purely monetary
forms Franklin County has
gotten a lot more in grants
from GALA than were ever
contributed by Franklin
County sources.
"We were very careful
to try to serve the entire
area evenly, there wasn't
any overt favoring of one
county over the other," he
said. "The fact that Franklin
County has largely ignored
GALA has given rise to the
misconception that GALA
favors Gulf County and Mex-
ico Beach. Franklin County
as a whole has never given
GALA an even break."
Tiley said he was op-
posed to the split from
GALA. "The full potential of
GALA will never be realized
if Franklin County breaks
away from GALA," he said.
"I believe the two of us
working together can do so
much more. Combined we
have the ability to be much
more effective."
Harrison said she dis-


liked the conflict that has
arisen. "I think it's a shame.
I think if it's going to be di-
vided up, it should be an am-
icable thing. I'm very upset
about the whole thing be-
cause I have put my blood,
sweat and tears into this for
six years and I'm just walk-
ing away from it," she said.

Apalachicola board
is impetus for new
council

Taylor said creation of
the board is not the result of
a desire to break away from
GALA but rather reflects
the desire of Franklin's arts
community to consolidate
and grow in its own right.
The move to create an
arts board began when the
recently formed Apala-
chicola History, Culture and
Arts Board, an organization
of Apalachicola artists and
art lovers, wrote a letter to
the county commission ask-
ing that an arts council be
endorsed to represent the
county.
According to the let-
ter, signed by Apalachicola
Mayor Van Johnson, the
proposed agency "would
provide services to arts and
cultural organizations, indi-
vidual artists, and the com-
munities within the county.
The agency would encour-
age and contribute to cul-
tural assessments and plan-
ning (and) would support,
develop and/or implement


programs, projects or initia-
tives such as arts in educa-
tion, lifelong learning, art
in public places, marketing
and community outreach.
The agency would facilitate
collaborations that benefit
the community at large and
provide greater quality and
access to arts and cultural
programs and activities."
The letter said forma-
tion of the new board would
enable arts organizations,
artists, and communities to
be eligible for funding from
"Challenge Grants, Cultural
Facilities, Arts in Education,
Culture Builds Florida, and
State Touring Programs in
addition to many others."

County gives its
blessing to proposal

Included in the letter
was the following list of 16
people, and their commu-
nities and affiliations, who
have volunteered to serve
on the council: Liz Sisung,
Eastpoint, Panhandle
Players; Kay Wheeler, St.
George Island, Visual Arts;
Joyce Estes, Eastpoint/St.
George Island, Franklin
County Library; Penny An-
derson, Carrabelle, Boys
and Girls Club Art Program;
Joan Matey, Lanark Village,
Visual Arts; Marian Morris,
and Pat Moore, Carrabelle
Artist Association; Valenti-
na Webb, Apalachicola, Holy
Family Senior/Cultural Cen-
ter; Teresa Martin, Apala-
chicola, Franklin County


invisalign
start smiling mor e


BY C E R I N A T E'


Schools; Pam Mahr, Apala-
chicola Bay Charter School;
Bill Spohrer, Apalachicola
Area Historical Society; Ma-
rie Marshall, Apalachicola
Museum of Art; Ed Spring-
er, Apalachicola, Literary
Arts; Lynn Wilson-Spohrer,
Apalachicola Pastel Society;
Anita Grove, Apalachicola
Bay Chamber of Commerce
and Taylor.
When Taylor and other
supporters of the new board
appeared before the com-
mission on Jan. 6, some
commissioners were less
than enthusiastic about the
proposal, observing that the
new arts board was domi-
nated by residents of the
west end of the county.
"I think it needs to be
opened up more," said Com-
missioner Pinki Jackel.
"We have poets and peo-
ple who have written books
over in Lanark Village and
Alligator Point. They should
be a part of this," said Com-
missioner Cheryl Sanders.
"We want this to be open
to everyone," said Taylor. "If
we don't have this agency,
we can't apply for Depart-
ment of Community Affairs
(DCA) grants in support of
the arts."
"Will other agencies ap-
plying for those grants have
to go through you? What
have we done in the past?"
asked Jackel.
"We've never applied for
DCA grants in the past be-
cause we never had an arts

See COUNCIL A6


Orthodontic Tooth
Alignment W/O Braces
Certified Provider
Lumineers No Shots, No Drilling,
Cosmetic Dentistry Certified Provider -


* Dental Implants "Mini" and Traditional Implants Certified Provider
* Drill-less W hite Fillings
* Comfort Fit Dentures & Partials
* All Natural Crowns & Bridges
* Comfortable Root Canals
* Revolutionary New Non-Surgical Gum Treatment
INCREDIBLE PAINLESS ANESTHESIA TECHNIQUES


CONVENIENT & AFFORDABLE Member
* New Patients Welcome Children & Adults American Academy
* Most Insurances Accepted! We'll Even File It For You! O I of Implant Dentistry
* No Interest Payment Plans (Many Options Available)
aaaa m ia \ MEMBER
is ) 1K 4 *American Academy
1,ht) i of Cosmetic Dentis


S3


stry.


,, FRANK D. MAY, DMD, PA
ea Dental care that's so gentle & so advanced
4!!'t^____________________^^ 1^ ^B B^ ^^ 46 ^^^^m ^^


BILL MILLER REALTY
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MASTER APPRAISERS
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER

2308 Hwy EAST CARRABELLE, FL 32322
MAIN OFFICE (850)697-3761 OR 697-3310 CALL (850) 570-0658
FISH CAMP FOR RENT LANARK OR SALE......................................... $450 MTH
IVM /H LOT FOR RENT UTILITIES................................................. $250 MTH
2 LOTS LANARK CLEARED UTILITIES SHADY 600' TO MARINA.....$125,000
3/2 DISHWASHER FIREPLACE, GARDEN TUB, SCREEN PORCH,
BREEZEWAY-WORKSHOP-3 COR. LOTS........ ............................... $89,500
2 B/R M/H 2 LOTS BEHIND $ STORE.............. $159,500 OWNR.FIN.E OR RENT
2 B/R 1 BATH HOME GULF VIEW.................................... $79,500 OWNR.FIN.
2 B/R APT $85,000 1B/R APT........................ ........................ $65,000
50' GULF LOT w/ WATER AND SEWER ............................................ $275,000
DBL APT LG 2BR 2BATH OPEN VIEW............................$5000 DOWN
COMM. BLDG. 1400s/F 2 COR.L Ts.............................................. $165,000


Try Our New Lumineer "Sapphire"
Tooth Whiting Only $195!
WE PRIDE OURSELVES ON BEING


319 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe www.doctormay.com
Certified Provider for Lumineers, Invisalign, "Mini" and Traditional Implants


The Times I AS


.11M aI. .M I


V J


pm






A6 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 22, 2009


COUNCIL from page A5


council," said County Plan-
ner Alan Pierce.
Joyce Estes of Eastpoint,
owner of Sea Oats Gallery
on St. George Island and
supporter of the new board,
said "GALA is the umbrella
we've been working under
and we don't get our fair
share."


Concern over 'Area
of Critical Concern'

Commissioner Smokey
Parrish said that in her re-
cent email, Saxnay wrote
that the alliance's efforts
over the next three to four


years would be focused on
Gulf County. Parrish said
GALA wants to represent
Franklin County because
Apalachicola is a state-des-
ignated Area of Critical Con-
cern and is eligible for grant
money not available to Gulf
County.
"If we're going to be used
to get funds, then those
funds should be used in
Franklin County," Parrish
said.
The commission ap-
proved a motion to endorse
the new county arts council
with a caveat that member-
ship is open and that there
is fair and equitable repre-
sentation of communities


throughout the county.
County Attorney Michael
Shuler told the representa-
tives of the arts board, "I
want to inform you that, un-
der the Sunshine laws, you
cannot commit the county to
any action without inform-
ing the commission first."
Shuler said he would as-
sist in the preparation of the
bylaws for the arts board,
which must be approved by
the commission.
Commissioner Noah
Lockley said there should
be a county commissioner
on the arts board. Because
no commissioner came for-
ward to serve, Pierce said
a representative from his


office would act as liaison to
the new group.

'To some extent,
we've been used'

The board has already
begun to collect signatures
and solicit donations from
prospective supporters. A
petition in support of the
group can be found on the
counter of Taylor's down-
town business.
Taylor said collecting sig-
natures was not necessary
for formation of the board
or to apply for a particular
grant, but that the petition


would demonstrate general
support of the arts board
and could be used when
seeking future grants.
The group will apply for
an organizational grant
from the Florida Depart-
ment of Cultural Affairs to
offset start-up costs. They
will have to work fast be-
cause the grant is due Feb.
6.
One of the early founders
of GALA, Dixie Partington,
director of the Dixie The-
atre, said she liked the idea
of separating from GALA.
"I'm in favor of it. The
Dixie Theatre was the first
member of GALA. It was
supposed to be a collabora-


tion. I'm not sure what any-
body's intentions were, but
I feel to some extent, we've
been used," she said.
"The first organization-
al meeting was held here
in Apalachicola in Alice
Jean's studio. For a while,
we switched off, but then it
got to be that the meetings
were always in Port St. Joe,"
Partington said. "Not a lot
of us went to the meetings.
I didn't have time for that
with the theatre and every-
thing else. GALA did give us
a nice grant for a DVD pro-
jector, but they haven't done
much for Franklin County
at all. By them, I mean my-
self too."


1 dead, 3 injured

in Carrabelle crash


A man from Lanark
Village died and three
people from Eastpoint
were injured in a wreck
on U.S. 98 on Tuesday.
Donald Bruce Jordan,
48, of Lanark Village was
killed in the crash, ac-
cording to a Florida High-
way Patrol report. He was
not wearing a seatbelt, ac-
cording to the report. He
was taken to Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital.
Injured were Margaret
Lanier Mathis, 40, Allen
Mathis, 34, and Lindsey
Hightower, 10, all of East-
point. Their injuries were
minor, the report said,
and they were transport-
ed to Weems Hospital for
treatment. All were wear-
ing seatbelts, according
to the report.
The accident happened


when the unnamed man,
driving a 1996 Ford pick-
up, was traveling west
on U.S. 98 in a posted con-
struction zone about one
mile east of Carrabelle at
3:50 p.m. The 2001 Chev-
rolet SUV driven by Mar-
garet Mathis was stopped
in the westbound lane by
a flagman.
The Ford failed to stop
as it approached the SUV
The front of the pickup
struck the rear of the
SUV Both vehicles were
totaled, according to the
report, and both came to
final rest facing west on
the north shoulder of U.S.
98.
The FHP was assisted
on scene by the Frank-
lin County Sheriff's Of-
fice and Franklin County
EMS.


Correction
FuRinds for the construction of the new pergola in
front of the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce
and for signage that will hang from the structure were
provided by the Franklin County Tourist Development
Council.


Coral reefs topic of Jan.


From 7-9 p.m. today, Jan. 22, The
Florida State University Coastal and
Marine Laboratory will host "Flori-
da's Coral Reefs: Threats, Decline,
Management and Signs of Hope," the
next lecture in the lab's ongoing se-
ries of free public lectures on coastal
and marine conservation.
The talk will be given by John
Bruno, a noted marine ecologist and
conservation biologist and an associ-
ate professor of marine science at the
University of North Carolina-Chapel
Hill. Refreshments will be served.
Bruno's research has focused on


New work camp to employ 70
At Tuesday's meeting of the
Franklin County commission, County
Planner Alan Pierce said funds have
been allocated for the construction
of a new work camp north of the ex-
isting correctional facility of US 98.
He said the facility is scheduled
for completion in February 2010 and
will employ 70 people.
"Franklin County residents in-
terested in pursuing a career in cor-
rections need to be pro-active and
obtain their correctional officer cer-
tification during the next 10 months,
as those individuals who are already
certified officers will be hired over in-


understanding and conserving the
dynamics of coastal marine commu-
nities. He works in a variety of marine
habitats, including coral reefs, coastal
wetland communities, oyster reefs
and seagrass beds. He currently is
investigating the link between ocean
temperatures and regional-scale cor-
al disease epidemics; the importance
of predator biodiversity in food webs;
and the meta-community dynamics of
marine plants and animals.
Bruno earned his doctorate in
2000 from Brown University; was a
postdoctoral fellow at Cornell Uni-


News BRIEFS
dividuals who do not have certifica-
tion," Pierce said.
Initially, the new facility will not be
subsidizing training for prospective
officers and those seeking work must
pay for the educational program on
their own, Pierce said.

Harris keeps status
as budget officer
At Tuesday's county commission
meeting, Clerk of Courts Marcia
Johnson told commissioners Tax
Collector Jimmy Harris sought ap-
proval to remain a budget officer
funded and salaried by the county,
rather than operate as a fee officer,


2 FSU lecture

versity; and in 2001, joined the marine
sciences faculty at UNC. He serves
as an editor for the journals Ecology
and Ecological Monographs and as
an editor and contributor to The En-
cyclopedia of Earth.
The marine lab is at the intersec-
tion of U.S. 98 and 319, halfway be-
tween the towns of Panacea and Car-
rabelle and about 45 miles southwest
of Tallahassee.
For more information, visit www.
marinelab.fsu.edu or contact Sharon
Thoman at 697-4095 or sthoman@fsu.
edu.


where his department's expenses
would come directly out of his collec-
tions.
She said tax collectors must chose
from the two options following the
election cycle every four years. The
board voted unanimously to accept
his proposal.
Johnson also told commissioners
she has received bonds from Harris,
Property Appraiser Doris Pendleton,
Sheriff Skip Shiver and her Clerk of
Courts office.
She said the sheriff, tax collec-
tor and clerk all pay a $10,000 bond,
and the appraiser and the elections
supervisor pay $5,000 because they
handle less money.


Come Learn about an Exciting

New Program in Apalachicola


Arts in Medicine

An Artistic Healing Collaboration Between Shands
Hospital Arts in Medicine Program and
Weems Memorial Hospital
The Florida Division of Cultural Affairs,
Shands Arts in Medicine, and George E. Weems
Memorial Hospital invite you to learn more about
this nationally recognized program at a
Reception January 24 at That Place in Apalach,
15 Avenue E.

Leaders from the Shands Arts in Medicine Program
will speak about the impact of the Arts at Shands
Hospital, and about how you can become involved in this
new program at Weems Memorial Hospital.


WEEMS
a-^MffiORIAL


Shands
Arts in Medicine


For more info, contact the Apalachicola Bay Chamber or Shands Arts in Medicine at (352) 265-0151


NOTICE TO BIDDERS

The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners
will be accepting separate sealed Request for Propos-
als for the following:

WILL S. KENDRICK SPORT COMPLEX TENNIS
COURT PROJECT

Specifications are on file in the office of the Franklin
County Board of County Commissioners, 33 Market
Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320.

Proposals must be received in the office of the Franklin
County Clerk of the Court 33 Market Street, Suite 203,
Apalachicola, Florida 32320 by 4:30 P.M., EST, on
February 2, 2009. Each proposal must be sealed and
clearly labeled. The sealed proposals will be publicly
open and read aloud at 11:00 A.M. EST, on February
3, 2009, in the County Commission Meeting Room lo-
cated in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. For
further information, contact Van W. Johnson, Sr., Direc-
tor Franklin County Parks & Recreation Department, at
(850) 670-8167. Email: fcswd@fairpoint.net

Bidder shall provide an original and one copy of
each proposal in a sealed envelope of container,
plainly marked "WILL S. KENDRICK SPORTS COM-
PLEX TENNIS COURT PROJECT".

The owner reserves the right to waive any informality
or to reject any or all proposals.

ATTENTION BIDDERS: Franklin County is an equal
opportunity employer and encourages participation by
certified minority enterprises and women's business
enterprises.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA

JOSEPH PARRISH, CHAIRMAN






Thursday, January 22, 2009


Local


The Times | A7


County opts for new probation contractor


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

At their regular meeting
Tuesday morning, Franklin
County commissioners
voted unanimously
to award the contract
to oversee the county
misdemeanor probation
program.
Commissioner Noah
Lockley was absent due
to President Obama's
inauguration.
Beginning March
15, Judicial Correction
Services, Inc. based in
Atlanta, will take charge
of local probationers. The
firm was awarded a three
year contract.
The commission
interviewed both Judicial
and the Salvation Army,
which currently handles
county probations.
Commissioner Smokey
Parrish told Salvation Army
representatives he was
concerned about the lack of
transparency in the current
probation system.
"I went to the Clerk
of Court to try and get
information about the
number of probationers and
whether their fines were


being paid and I was unable
to get any information. It's
hard to sit here and make a
decision based on nothing
really. It does concern me,"
he said.
"We've gone a whole
month and not collected
any money at all. We do
definitely need some kind of
technology because I don't
know how many people are
on probation due to lack of
being informed," said Clerk
of Courts Marcia Johnson.
John McMahon,
spokesman for the
Salvation Army, said they
installed a computer
program last week that
would allow the clerk
and her staff to access
information on probationers
online and generate
reports.
Bobbie Fester, probation
officer in the county under
the Salvation Army, said
there are 83 probationers
in the county. She said
she eventually collects


95 percent of the fines
for her clients and that a
bookkeeping error caused
the county not to receive a
check last November.
Richard Stewart, who
spoke on behalf of Judicial
Correction Services,
told commissioners
his company has up
and running an online
management program
called Probation Tracker.
He said his firm manages
probation programs in
114 counties in the Deep
South, including Bay, Gulf,
Volusia and Osceola in
Florida.
"I can sit in my office
and see everything one of
my correctional officers is
doing," he said.
Stewart said Judicial
increased collections in
Bay County by 62 percent
and that the minimum
collection percentage is 85
percent.
"The county incurs
no costs," he said. "The


6ea Oaz5 l//l /
,To/ as fct 'Jle ,pod&cces- v-.,e .' oP" ',-s s \ ,
tow ',s/7hoPs /ed oPPe /ed!
If 4//a Pri-'ia/P/ein An,- i, Y/enry Vyfv,'ne/
Y ;3yi6 ;// i;l Joyeie Eses
t- 6ro,.,,3' and Perpe ,'e >v's?/-en Vy-fie/ ,
W Th4 & Ja~eredc'/c'r tJih Lian, Zhen
Mied Mediaa Co//lae ,l BI//Ie Ma Ls ,
O, e ll/ Seey &o 7-ofe er & Y/e'ry V/tVine,
Paste/s ,ieh 7o7AM Mars1ha//
Call or email for additional information 850-927-2303 info@forgottencoastart.com
128 East Pine St 1st left on St. George Island


"We will do our best to
hire a local person."

Richard Stewart
spokesman for Judicial Correction Services


money is divided, with the
county taking the first 70
percent and the company
taking 30 percent. We don't
make any money if we don't
collect any money
"We will do our best to
hire a local person," Stewart
told the commission.
He said a bachelor's,
preferably in criminal
science, was required for
the position. He said one
probation officer can handle
up to 250 cases, so that only
one employee will be based
in the county.
Judicial's program
includes training events and
job fairs to help probationers
get back into the system,
Stewart said.
"You'd be surprised how
many people don't know how
to write a resume or how to
dress for a job interview,"
he said.
Stewart said he would
meet with Alan Pierce to
discuss community service,
and alcohol and drug
treatment programs, offered
locally.


GFC has the Continuing Education courses you need!
Register Today!
The Gulf/Franklin Center offers Continuing Education on topics from Microsoft Word to CPR. Take a look at just a few
of the available courses. Claim your seat in class today stop by the Gulf/Franklin Center or register online at
www.gulfcoast.edu/Continuing Ed.
Helt Ca1re F


Therapeutic Blood Withdrawal
Therapeutic Blood Withdrawal
CPR & Basic Life Support for Health (are Professionals
CPR & Basic Life Support for Health (are Professionals
First Aid, AED, & CPR for Day (are Employees


Meets 1/24, 9:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.
Meets 1/31, 9:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.
Meets 2/7
Meets 2/21
Meets 2/28


I Cmue ring


Introduction to MS Word 2007
Intermediate MS Word 2007
Introduction to MS Excel 2007
Intermediate MS Excel 2007


Meets 1/24,1:00 p.m.- 5:00 p.m.
Meets 2/7, 1:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m.
Meets 2/21, 1:00 p.m.- 5:00 p.m.
Meets 3/7, 1:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m.


JIMMIE CROWDER EXCAVATING & LAND CLEARING, INC.
COMPLETE SITE DEVELOPMENT
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
ASPHALT GRADING & PAVING LOT CLEARING
DEMOLITION WORK UTILITY CONTRACTOR
FILL DIRT TOP SOIL GRAVEL MASON SAND DELIVERED
POND BUILDING
C & D DEBRIS ROLL OFF CONTAINERS
FULLY LICENSED & INSURED
SERVING YOU SINCE 1964

. 850.697.8403 850.528.6933 850.528.5122
OFFICE ODIE CELL JIMMIE CELL A


NOTICE

The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners,
Franklin County, Florida will consider application for the
following position:

*Temporary-Part Time Veteran's Affairs Assistant*
Veteran's Affairs Office

Requirements Include: Two year College Degree, and serve
as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States dur-
ing a period of war, Valid Driver's license, Administrative
and Clerical skills, excellent communications skills, com-
puter knowledge with experience in Excel.

Applicants must be able to properly handle confidential
records, be able to multi-task, and must be able to work in a
stressful environment. Veteran's with knowledge about VA
benefits and procedures preferred.

Applications may be obtained from and submitted to the
Board Secretary, Michael Moron in the Clerk's Office,
Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, suite 203,
Apalachicola, Florida 32320. (850) 653-8861, Ext. 100.

Applications must be submitted by Tuesday, January 27,
2009 by 4:00 p.m.


DO Gul Coas
Co mnt olg w~ufcateu1802797

An -/A Intuio


The savings you need

at a price you'll like!


H~~~~~IG-PEINENTJS



$ 9


SAVE s90!


U
U


Save gas, save time, shop online


m Fast downloads

* FREE self-installation and 24/7 tech support


m FREE security package with anti-virus
and firewall (*50 value)

* 100MB of email storage

m Support for email files up to 25MB
(great for photos and music)


Pai-int
-------------------------communications
HIGH-SPEED INTERNET 0 PHONE 0 TELEVISION vwwv FairPointcom
* FairPoint will automatically issue a credit of $15.00 each month for six months to customer's bill, for a total savings of $90.00. Customer must keep the
service the entire six months to receive the full rebate. Offer applies to new HSD customers only (customers who have not had FairPoint High Speed Internet
for at least the preceding 180 days). Standard or above package required. After six months, Standard service will be billed at $44.95 per month, other
packages at their respective prices. Taxes and additional charges may apply. Free modem use as long as you keep the service. Pricing subject to change
without notice. High Speed Internet may not be available in all areas. Call 877.342.9396 or visit www.FairPoint.com for more details. 2008 FairPoint
Communications, Inc.All rights reserved. 674HSN


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
Former Bay County Commissioner Richard Stewart
represented Judicial Correction Services, Inc. at
Tuesday's meeting of the county commission.


.


.. .. ..................






A |I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 22, 2009


KING DAY from page Al


Beyla Walker, smiling from the shoulder of her dad,
Pastor David Walker, of Covenant Word Church.


p

U&A~' f


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Takaya Quann, performing with the Love Center
Chosen Generation group, delivers a rap poem at
Monday's community celebration of the life of Dr.
Martin Luther King.


Date
Thu, Jan 22
Fri, Jan 23
Sat, Jan 24
Sun, Jan 25
Mon, Jan 26
Tue, Jan 27
Wed, Jan 28


Temperature
High I
62
680
670
650
690
68
67


% Precip
0%
10%
30%
10%
10%
30%
10%


TIDE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
Cat Point MinusO:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03

APALACHICOLA
01/22 Thu 08:20AM -0.5 L 04:29PM 1.1 H
07:13PM 1.0 L 11:44PM 1.3 H
01/23 Fri 09:04AM -0.6 L 04:44PM 1.1 H
08:13PM 0.9 L


01/24 Sat 12:47AM 1.3
05:01PM 1.1
01/25 Sun 01:43AM 1.3
05:17PM 1.1
01/26 Mon 02:32AM 1.3
05:30PM 1.1
01/27 Tue 03:18AM 1.3
05:41PM 1.1
01/28 Wed 03:18AM 1.3
05:41PM 1.1


09:41AM -0.6
08:58PM 0.9
10:13AM -0.5
09:37PM 0.8
10:39AM -0.5
10:13PM 0.7
10:59AM -0.4
10:48PM 0.6
10:59AM -0.4
10:48PM 0.6


CARRABELLE
01/22 Thu 06:07AM -0.8 L 03:04PM 1.8 H
05:OOPM 1.6 L 10:19PM 2.1 H
01/23 Fr 06:51AM -1.0 L 03:19PM 1.8 H
06:OOPM 1.4 L 11:22PM 2.1 H
01/24 Sat 07:28AM -1.0 L 03:36PM 1.8 H
06:45PM 1.4 L
01/25 Sun 12:18AM 2.1 H 08:OOAM -0.8 L
03:52PM 1.8 H 07:24PM 1.3 L
01/26 Mon 01:07AM 2.1 H 08:26AM -0.8 L
04:05PM 1.8 H 08:OOPM 1.1 L
01/27 Tue 01:53AM 2.1 H 08:46AM -0.6 L
04:16PM 1.8 H 08:35PM 1.0 L
01/28 Wed 02:39AM 1.9 H 09:04AM -0.5 L
04:27PM 1.8 H 09:12PM 0.6 L


Sponsor the Weekly

Almanac Call:

653-8868


thority," he said. "We have to
fulfill our demanded contri-
bution by representing the
race that will now hold the
keys to the White House."
This embodiment of po-
litical success calls for a
stepped-up effort in social
and cultural areas, Williams
said.
It means you can't be run-
ning around with your south-
paw jeans down around
your..." he said, his voice
trailing off to widespread
amens. "There is a new
standard. You got to raise
up the standard. We got to
be authentic in our prepara-
tion, auspicious in our pre-
sentation and authoritative
in our procedures."
The fiery preacher, orat-
ing in what he called the
Baptist tradition, then fo-
cused his remarks on an un-
abashed Gospel message by
beginning with the concept
of "justice meeting joy."
He called for the audi-
ence to use the Holy Spirit to
deepen their knowledge and
transform it into a greater
understanding, by drawing
on their own experiences
as well as the lessons of the
Gospel.
"You can be wise even
in your youthfulness," he
said. "Wisdom is when the
Holy Spirit takes a hold of
your knowledge to give you
a greater understanding of
what you think you know."
Williams cited an inci-
dent of his youth, when his
grandmother repeatedly
warned him not to touch the
glowing red unit inside the
space heater that so fasci-
nated him. Eventually, he
defied her warning and was
burned.
"You really don't know
something until you go
through some stuff your-
self," he said. "Now that
you're on the other side of
it, you have a greater un-
derstanding of how God can
touch your life."
He referred to his own
youth in Jacksonville, as an
elementary school student,
when he was once taunted
by white youth, and he men-
tioned the funny looks he
has seen on white store own-
ers when someone walks in
with an Obama t-shirt.
"I can appreciate the
struggle when you have a
struggle your own self," Wil-
liams said. "You got to real-
ize God has allowed you to
go through all that so you
can be all the more wiser."
He closed with a focus on
the omniscience, omnipres-
ence and omnipotence of
God, attributes of God that
render unnecessary the of-
fering of "ignorant prayers
and ignorant praise" and
allow one to avoid "ignorant
people."
Following Williams'
speech, attendees organized
outside for a motorcade, co-
ordinated by Croom, that
went down 10th to US. 98,
down to 6th Street, across
to Martin Luther King Blvd
and then back to the Love
and Worship Center.
SheriffSkip Shiver, Apala-
chicola Police Chief Bobby


Varnes and Fire Chief Bert
Simmons all took part in
the motorcade, which was
led by the Franklin County
School's drum line. That en-
semble consists of Deanna
Quick, Haley Lemieux, Mac-
ey Hunt, Carli Hunt, Brook
Pittman, Tomilee Dowden,
Damien Davis and Will Col-
lins, and is conducted by
music teacher Carl Lester.

Exuberant service, for
young and old alike

The service was held un-
der the direction of Apostle
Shirley C. White, overseer of
Love Center Churches, and
hosted by Love Center Pas-
tors Leonard D. and Sheila
White Martin.
Prophetess Temolyn
Wintons served as first pre-
sider, speaking in front of
a slide presentation of Dr.
King's famous "I have a
dream" speech.
After his wife offered an
opening prayer, Leonard
Martin welcomed the audi-
ence. "We're witnessing the
dream become reality," he
said. "We thank our white
brothers and sisters who
have stood beside us in the
face of injustice. We are to-
gether, we are one, we are
united and we are the King-
dom of God."
After two selections from
the Love & Worship Center
Praise Team, White rose to
offer greetings.
"We're not in hurry, as
we are conscientiously tak-
ing the time to celebrate a
life that was given sacrifi-
cially for you and for me,"
she said. "This is a day to
celebrate a dream, a vision.
The dream has come alive
through a series of high-pro-
file events.
"We are witnessing a
breakthrough in the history
of mankind," she said. "A
mighty move of God is here,
and it's time to celebrate the
name of God."
Apalachicola Mayor Van
Johnson offered his greet-
ing, reminding the audience
that "Dr. King's dream did
not begin or end with the
election of Barack Obama.
We still have a lot of work to
do."
Reading from the back
of her daughter Deanna's
shirt, Elinor Mount-Sim-
mons read the poem "A
Dream Deferred" by Langs-
ton Hughes, one of the great
artists to come out of the
early 20th century's Harlem
Renaissance.
"Have you or will you
realize your dream?" asked
Mount-Simmons. "Make
this your goal, to realize
your dream in 2009."

Recalling a march
with Dr. King

After the Webbs spoke
on behalf of their church,
the Love Center's Chosen
Generation performance
group then chanted the
words to Dr. King's "I have
a dream" speech. Takaya


Bishop Ella Speed, of the Love Center Church.


Pastor Barry Hand of the Former Chapman
Mount Zion Missionary Elementary School
Baptist Church. teacher Loraine Banks.


Quann offered a rap song
that she wrote about Presi-
dent Obama.
Following the offering,
Croom introduced former
Chapman Elementary
School teacher Loraine
Banks, from St. Paul AME
Church, who shared her
real-life experience of
marching with Dr. King.
In 1965, Banks was a
senior at Alabama State in
Montgomery when she and
her classmates took part in
a march to the state capitol.
They met at St. Jude Catho-
lic School, and waited for
several hours before "every-
body's excitement just over-
flowed" when King arrived.
As the joined the march,
they heard bystanders ut-
tering "negative remarks.
You heard the N-word over
and over again.
"But being a believer
I had to hold my tongue,"
said Banks. "Dr. King was a
peaceful man and he prac-
ticed what he preached."
When the marchers
reached the capitol, they
were met by a representa-
tive of Gov. George Wallace,
then one of the most vocal
segregationist politicians in
the South.
"And whose name is
signed on my degree? None
other than George Wallace,"
said Banks. "But that didn't
make any difference be-
cause I had my degree."
Banks recounted when
while a teacher at the all-
black high school in Gulf
County in 1966, she was
asked by the principal to
take a teaching assignment
at the white school during
the early years of integra-
tion.
"I thought my heart
would just fall out of my
chest," she said.
Banks, who taught sci-
ence, befriended a white
fifth grade teacher, Betty
Sue Akers, at the school,
whose faculty and parents
she found cordial and ac-
commodating.


Banks closed with praise
of the new President, and
his wife, First Lady Michelle
Obama "God knew right
then and there he needed
a very intelligent wife to be
by his side," she said. "I can
see Barack Obama as being
a bridge builder, as Dr. King
was."
Bishop Ella Speed, from
the Love Center, who is
88, then read a poem "The
Black Man's Plea for Jus-
tice," written by Ephraim
David Tyler, the poet laure-
ate of Shreveport, LA.
Pastor David Walk-
er, from Covenant Word
Church, then spoke, accom-
panied by his young daugh-
ter, Beyla, who offered a
sweet solo rendition of the
song "Wonderful."
Pastor Clifford Williams,
from the First Born Church,
then presented, closing with
the singing of "The Lord's
Been Good to Me."
Pastor Barry Hand, a
native of Apalachicola who
last year was named to head
Mount Zion Missionary
Baptist Church, began by
recalling influential adults
during his school days here.
"My God, what a day in
Apalachicola," he said. "It
is a commandment that we
rejoice and be glad in it."
Hand said he was consid-
ering keeping his young son
home from school Tuesday
to watch the inauguration,
but realizing the child's love
of learning and devotion to
perfect attendance, he de-
cided against it. "I believe
he (Dr. King) would tell me
to send that child to school,"
said Hand.
Sister Marcia Thomas,
appearing on behalf of the
Church of God in Christ,
then gave a reading based
on the letters of Dr. King's
name.
She was followed by
Bishop Robert and Elder
Jacqulyn Davis, from the
Love Center, who closed
with a beautiful duet before
introducing the keynote
speaker.


LIBRARY from page Al


out letters soliciting mem-
berships, which will be of-
fered on a sliding scale in
different categories.
The new friends group
stems from a Jan. 8 meet-
ing at the Water Street Ho-
tel, in which Sandy Newell,
a liaison from the state
library, met with 16 inter-
ested local citizens.
Those in attendance at
that meeting were mem-
bers of the Apalachicola
Municipal Library Board,
chaired by Denise Roux
with members Susan Cle-
mentson, Fred Flowers,
Ina Margaret Meyer and
Harolynn Walker.
Barbara Holmes and
Carrie Kienzle repre-
sented staff at the meet-
ing, which also included
Francis Cook, Rita Sawyer,
Paulette Moss, Candace
Springer, Bill Spohrer,
Charlie and Sally William-
son, Wilson and Taylor.
Out of that Jan. 8 meet-
ing was formed a steering


committee, charged with
establishing a 501-c3. Car-
rie Kienzle said there are
numerous reasons to form
such a group, to be involved
in outreach, fundraising
and volunteer work in and
around the library.
"This community was
founded by people who
thought it would be an in-
tellectual, cultural and
commercial success and
they have not been disap-
pointed," she said. "My
mission is to create more
capacity to serve. The
stewardship has not been
there and that's one of
the major things I think a
Friends group could do.
"When Mrs. (Margaret)
Key left her money to the
library, the library had no
capacity to take it. If we
had a Friends group, they
could receive a bequest,"
Kienzle said, noting that
people before they die of-
ten ask that donations be
made in their name to the


local library.
Kienzle said the stacks
of the municipal library are
strong on both adult and
youth fiction and that au-
diobook collection, largely
donated, is outstanding.
She also said the library
has a very good collection
of books about Florida, but
is weaker on nonfiction.
This is a point which may
need to be addressed as
more and more students
make use of the library.
"Many students will not
have access to the library
of the consolidated school
in the evenings," she said.
Kienzle said the size of
the building is restrictive.
"It's an issue in this town
to be able to have a small
group of people meet. That
is usually the function of
the library," she said.
She said another issue
is that the existing shelves,
which are beautiful hand-
made wood but not ad-
justable. They work well


for adult fiction, but are a
problem for other kinds of
books. She also said the
current front desk is too
large for the space.
Kienzle said that Harry
Arnold, owner of Executive
Office Supply, has offered
to donate to the library fur-
niture from his warehouse
of used fixtures. Mem-
bers of the board will take
measurements and visit
the warehouse to pick out
a new desk and possibly
some adjustable shelves.
Because of the availabil-
ity of Darrell Smith, funded
by Workforce Development
monies, the library is open
40 hours a week, Monday
through Friday from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. On Wednes-
day it's closed from noon to
1 p.m.
There is no charge for
checking out a library book,
and wireless Internet is
available free onsite.
For more info, call the
library at 653-8436.


*I







S CARRABELLE APALACH COLA





PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, January 22, 2009 w w w. apalach times. com Page 9


SEAHAWKS DOWN ST. JOE


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

The Franklin County Seahawks
entered the packed gymnasium in
Port St. Joe Saturday night facing
the possibility of a third regular sea-
son loss on the court to their rivals
to the west.
As the Tiger Sharks were in-
troduced inside the darkened and
noisy gym, many of their fans hold-
ing glowing cell phones aloft, it felt
like St. Joe might be poised to strike
a third, and potentially humiliating,
blow.
Following the opening tipoff, the
Tiger Sharks opened an 8-2 lead and
memories of the two earlier losses
no doubt surfaced in Seahawk fans'
minds.
But everything is not always what
it has been and not what it seems.
Launching a 14-2 run, punctu-
ated by dunks from senior Deshaun
Winfield and freshman Carlos Mor-
ris, the Seahawks stayed ahead the
rest of the way as they combined dis-
ciplined effort and consistent execu-
tion en route to a 71-63 victory.
"The kids finally stuck with the of-
fensive game plan," said coach Fred
Drake, whose squad moved to 17-4
on the year. "The goal was to get the
ball inside and attack them in the
post. On paper there's nobody that
can stop Carlos and Deshaun in the
post. We had the height advantage."
The Seahawks also had the advan-
tage of a boisterous crew of fans, who
didn't stifle their enthusiasm when St.
Joe fans grew quiet.
"We had to get the crowd out of the
game and I think our crowd took them
out," said Drake. "I wasn't expecting
that big of a crowd. I was worried they
might not be as supportive after the
losses.
"I was very surprised and im-
pressed by our fans' turnout and I
think that made a big difference too,"
he said.
Early in the second quarter, Port
St. Joe managed to trim the margin to
24-22, but senior Jeremy James drove
the basket, scored, was fouled and hit
the free throw to widen the margin
back to five.
By halftime the margin was sev-
en, 33-26, which the Seahawks then
widened to 14 points, 51-37, after
Morris hit a trey and a bucket with
about three minutes left in the third
quarter.
In all the freshman added 20
points, two fewer than Winfield, who
hit 11-of-15 from the field.
"Deshaun and Carlos stepped
up to play real big, especially Car-
los," said Drake. "I told him he has
to play physical and he has to play
inside, and he played big like he was


The Seahawks' Arron Prince, left,
battles it out against Port St. Joe
Saturday night.


Port St. Joe's Darrell Smith, left, goes
Winfield in Saturday night action.
supposed to."
Trailing 53-43 at the start of the
fourth quarter, the Tiger Sharks
weren't yet willing to call it a night.
A three-point play by St. Joe's
Calvin Pryor narrowed the margin
to seven, but Seahawks junior Aus-
tin O'Neal and senior Zan Simmons
followed by each hitting both of their
free throws to stop the advance.
In all the Seahawks shot 16-of-27
from the charity stripe, much im-
proved over many of their perfor-
mances earlier in the season.
A thunderous Winfield dunk with
3:17 left in the game once again gave
the Seahawks an 11-point cushion.
But 3-of-4 free throws from Ro-
man Quinn, and a bucket from
Pryor, narrowed the margin to 63-
57 and prompted Drake to go to his
slowdown offense with a little more
than two minutes left to play.
O'Neal hit a free throw, and then
with a little more than a minute left,
Quinn ran the length of the floor and
laid it up to give the Tiger Sharks
hope, 64-59, with a little more than a
minute left.
Quinn would score four more
points for his team in the time re-
maining, but it was junior guard Ar-
ron Prince who coolly nailed 5-of-6
free throws down the stretch to ice
the win for the Seahawks.
"That was big," said Drake. "I
kind of knew he and Austin would
play well. I finally looked in their
eyes before the game and saw they
weren't scared. It looked like they
wanted to prove me wrong."
The coach said that because the
referees didn't make themselves a
part of the game, the Seahawks play-
ers didn't get slapped with question-
able fouls and thus could play their
brand of defense.
"I can only press if my guys not
in foul trouble," said Drake. "The
refs played a part in those previ-
ous games. The refs gave us a fair
adequate game (this time), and it
was the best called game out of the
three."
The Seahawks also managed to
thwart coach Derek Kurnitsky's full
court pressure. "During the week
we practiced against that pressured
defense, that man-to-man trap or
what most coaches call the run-
and-jump," said Drake. "We spent
one day just practicing that, against
the press.
"That was a must-win game, not

See SEAHAWKS Al 0


rnuius Bi UAVIU AULE KTIOII | Te limes
up against Seahawk Deshaun


SEAHAWKS STATS
Jan. 16 home vs.
Jefferson County
Jefferson Co. 12 7 15 20 54
Franklin Co. 15 24 1 6 1 9
-76
SEAHAWKS: Arron Prince
1/3 2s, 1 / 4 3s, 5 pts. Carlos
Morris 4/8 2s, 3/5 3s, 2/2
FT, 19 pts.; Deshaun Winfield
7/9 2s, 1/4 3s, 1/5 FTs, 18
pts.; Austin O'Neal 5/11 2s,
3/6 FTs, 13 pts.; Jeremy James
1/6 3s, 6/8 FTs, 9 pts.; Zan
Simmons 1/4 2s, 2/6 FTs, 4
pts.; Patrick Jones 2/2 FTs, 2
pts.; A.J. Williams 1/3 3s, 3
pts.; Brandon Hand 1/2 3s,
3 pts.
Totals: 1 8/43 2s, 8/29
3s, 16/33 FTs
Rebounds: Winfield 1 0,
Morris 8, Simmons 6, O'Neal
5, James, P. Jones 4, Williams
3, Zack Jones
Steals: O'Neal 3, Prince,
Winfield 2, Simmons, Hand,
James
Assists: O'Neal 6,
Winfield 3, Morris, Simmons,
Williams, James 2
Blocks: Winfield 2

Jan. 17 at Port St. Joe
Franklin 16 1720 18 -71
PSJ 13 13 17 20 63
SEAHAWKS: Prince 2/2
2s, 5/8 FTs, 9 pts.; Morris
7/9 2s, 1/4 3s, 3/3 FTs, 20
pts.; Winfield 11/15 2s, 22
pts.; O'Neal 4/8 2s, 4/8 FTs,
12 pts.; Simmons 3/5 FTs, 3
pts.; James 1/2 2s, 1/1 FTs,
3 pts.; Dalin Modican 1/2 2s,
2 pts.
Totals: 26/42 2s, 1 /6 3s,
16/27 FTs
Rebounds: Morris 7,
Simmons, Winfield, O'Neal 6
Assists: Morris 7, O'Neal,
Simmons 5, Winfield 4
Steals: Simmons, O'Neal,
Morris 2
TIGER SHARKS: Fonda
Davis 2 pts.; Roman Quinn
23 pts.; Raheem Clemmons
10 pts.; Darrell Smith 7 pts.;
Willie Quinn 6 pts.; Calvin
Pryor 15 pts.


Montevallo guard, No. 5 Dorian Evans, in action
Jan. 15 at home against Alabama-Huntsville.


Dorian Evans joins


Montevallo Falcons


By DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Times City Editor
After completing two
successful years playing
on the community college
level, former Apalachicola
Shark point guard Dorian
Evans has moved on to the
University of Montevallo
for his junior and senior
seasons.
Initially planning to at-
tend Florida A & M Uni-
versity, Evans was a late
addition to Montevallo's
roster, playing for the first
time this season on Jan. 3
in Monticello, AK, when the
Falcons fell to No. 5 Univer-
sity of Arkansas Monti-
cello 71-62.
Evans, wearing No.
5, played 24 minutes and
contributed two assists
and two steals, while turn-
ing the ball over once. He
added seven points, nailing
a trey on his only try.
The 2004 Apalachicola
High School graduate
joined the team over the
Christmas break after de-
ciding Florida A & M Uni-
versity wasn't where he
wanted to finish his college
career.
"He started to go to
FAMU but he ended up not
going," said Montevallo
Coach Danny Young, now
in his sixth season at the
school.
"We had the departure
of a kid who quit on us. We
were looking for a point
guard and we saw him
(Evans) last year," said
the coach, who last season
guided the Falcons to their
fifth consecutive Gulf South
Conference Tournament.
The program has trans-
formed into one of the
stronger NCAA Division II
programs in the country.
In a four year span, the
Falcons appeared in two
"Elite Eight" appearances,
four consecutive NCAA
Division II South Regional
Tournaments, includ-
ing back-to-back regional
championships and three
Gulf South Conference
championships.
Montevallo is home to
approximately 3,000 stu-
dents on a beautiful 160-
acre central campus in the
geographic center of Ala-
bama, 35 miles south of Bir-
mingham. Founded in 1896,
the school is one of only 25
public liberal arts universi-
ties in the United States.
Evans and his Fal-
con teammates play in
the 3,500-seat People's
Bank and Trust Arena
and are currently 9-10 on
the year, 1-2 in Gulf South


Conference play.
Evans, backcourt lead-
er of Coach Joe Hayes'
2004 Shark squad (25-7)
that played in the Class A
state championship game,
proved himself a standout
over the last two seasons
for the Alabama Southern
Community College.
Last year the 5'10 guard
finished with nearly seven
assists per game, ranking
him third in the Alabama
Community College Con-
ference's Div. I. He also
shot 40 percent from the
field and averaged about
six points a game.
In his second game for
Montevallo, Jan. 8 at the
Coliseum in Carrolton,
GA, against West Georgia,
Evans scored four points
and snared an offensive re-
bound in the 16 minutes he
played in this conference
opener. The Falcons won
74-65.
On Jan. 10 in Florence,
AL, when the Falcons lost a
heartbreaker 75-72 to con-
ference leader North Ala-
bama, Evans led the team
with five assists in the 21
minutes he played. He also
added two defensive re-
bounds and five points and
a steal.
At home Jan. 15 against
Alabama-Huntsville, Ev-
ans started his first career
game at Montevallo, and
dished out eight assists and
grabbed seven rebounds in
the 34 minutes he played.
Although he didn't hit any
of the four shots he took, he
had two steals and seven
defensive boards in the Fal-
cons' 64-61 loss.
On Saturday, when
Montevallo romped 100-59
over Carver Bible College,
Evans played 19 minutes.
He contributed four as-
sists, three steals and one
blocked shot, while hitting
a bucket and grabbing two
defensive rebounds.
"He's doing a good job,"
said Young. "He's very de-
pendable and can run the
team and play defense
and get people involved.
He's done pretty good be-
ing thrown into the fire like
that. He's working very
hard."
The Falcons return to
action Thursday, Jan. 22 at
7:30 p.m. as they host the
University of West Florida
in Gulf South Conference
action.
On Jan. 24 they are at
home against No. 18 Valdo-
sta State University, and on
Jan. 29 travel to Livingston,
AL to face the University of
West Alabama in confer-
ence action.


This week WITH THE SEAHAWKS
Thursday. Jan. 22 Seahawks JV and Varsity Basketball
Lady Seahawks Varsity Basketball play at home against Wakulla. First tipoff
plays at home against Altha. Tipoff time is is 6 p.m., followed by a 7:30 p.m. game.
at 6 p.m.
Friday. Jan. 23 Monday. Jan. 26
Seahawks JV and Varsity, and Lady Seahawks JV and Varsity, and Lady
Seahawks Varsity, Basketball play at Seahawks Varsity, Basketball play at
Tallahassee Maclay in district action. First Blountstown. Tipoff time is 6 p.m. Eastern.
tipoff is at 4:30 p.m., followed by 6 and 7:30 Thursday. Jan. 29
p.m. games. Lady Seahawks Varsity Basketball
Saturday. Jan. 24 plays at Wewahitchka. Tipoff time is 6 p.m.


APALACH 1t(Lk
STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561






A 10 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 22, 2009


GOLFERS COMPETE ON LANARK LINKS


Seahorse bids farewell to Miss Dolores


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
The weather was perfect for a golf tournament at Lanark Village on
Saturday, Jan. 10. Five teams of three, pictured above, competed
in the semiweekly golf tournament at Lanark's six-hole course.
This week's winners were Ricky Beattie, Ray Courage and Ward
Godburn, who won with a score of two over par. Beattie said
this is his fourth consecutive win. The next Lanark tournament will
be Jan. 31. If you are interested in competing in an upcoming
tournament, call Joe or Joyce Manzanares at 697-5146.


SOCCER THRILLS AND CHILLS


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

After 21 years of faithful
service to a series of employ-
ers, Dolores Buzzett is retiring
from her position at the Sea-
horse Florist and Gift Shop in
downtown Apalachicola after
Valentine's Day.
The hands that have
brought the beauty of flowers
into thousands of lives are lay-
ing down their clippers for the
last time. Or at least for right
now.
Buzzett began working at
the Seahorse on June 30, 1988,
and has watched the busi-
ness pass through four sets of
owners, beginning with Mary
Ann Siprell and Margaret
Stokes and culminating with
the Thompsons, who own the
store now.
"The people I worked with
have all been super nice," she
said. "I've never had any prob-
lems other than an occasional
cut from the clippers and
we've all had them."
Buzzett began as a deliv-
ery person but started doing
flower arrangements when
Anne and Frank Page bought
the business.
"She didn't know anything
about flowers and we had to
learn together," Buzzett re-
called.
She said the shop has had
some unusual requests for
floral arrangements over the
years. There was an arrange-
ment in the shape of a man's


Dolores Buzzett at work.
hat, a spray wrapped in fish
net with butterscotch candies
glued to it and a diamond ar-
rangement for the funeral of a
woman who loved jewelry.
"It's always uncomfortable
when you come into a new
job," said co-worker Jeffrey
Jones. "Ms. Dolores went out
of her way to make me feel
comfortable and is now one
of my best friends. One of the
nicest perks of my job."
Sammy Thompson, owner
of the shop, said, "You don't re-
alize how many lives you touch
in this business, how many
families with weddings and fu-
nerals and proms. Ms. Dolores
has touched people and people
come in here and ask for her by
name. We will miss her. I hope
she comes back and helps us
from time to time."
Buzzett said she was not
sure what she would do with


"You don't realize
how many lives
you touch in this
business, how
many families
with weddings
andfuilrals and
proms."

Sammy Thompson
owner, Seahorse Florist and Gift
Shop

her new leisure time and that
she might come back occa-
sionally to help out.
"You just put in there that I
love Jeffrey and Sammy," she
said.


SEAHAWKS from page A9


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
The Newell family kept warm Friday night at Seahawks Stadium
as they took in the soccer team's only home game of the year,
held under chilly conditions. The co-ed team for the fledgling
program fought hard against Port St. Joe's boys reserve team but
eventually fell 7-1. The Franklin County goal came from Megan
Newell with an assist from Casey Sapp, warming the hearts of the
Newell family in the bleachers. From left are Maegan Andrews,
Christopher Newell (in Gator blanket), mom Rhonda Newell, dad
James Newell and Michael Newell.


really for our district purposes but to
get the community and fans back on
our side," said Drake. "The kids need-
ed that win for their confidence. The
players really wanted to win that game
for themselves and it always helps get
the community and fans back on your
side."
Drake noted that seniorJames, still
nursing a nagging injury from football
that he fell on wrong Friday night, de-


Izzkrn'aRmentlCmean] MUf


"REGISTER FOR FREE I
European facial, eyebrow tint, or eyebrow design LET US HELP YOU WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS!
CRIBS TABLES WEDDING ARCHES
HIGH CHAIRS CHAIRS CANDELABRAS
.130 Ave F TENTS LINENS PUNCH BOWLS
D L' Sp (850) 653-1550 DINNERWARE BEACH WHEELCHAIR CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN


a:.


I








a
26 i1 8
EatonF 22


SRO

a









I


cided to call it quits after
scoring just three points
against St. Joe.
"He wasn't feeling good
and playing good. He took
himself out of the game,"
said Drake. "I'm glad he
was honest and said that
to me. That shows senior
leadership. I really appre-
ciated that."
On Friday night at home,
the Seahawks scored an
easy 76-54 win over Jeffer-
son County to stay unde-
feated in the district.
"I think Jefferson Coun-
ty has the ability to come
out a rival," said Drake.
"They're young, and they


American


have probably the best
guard in the district, soph-
omore Chris Mays. They're
who we'll probably end up
playing in the first round in
the district, which is at Jef-
ferson County."
With seven more regu-
lar season games to go,
including a Saturday night
home game against Wakul-
la, Drake likes the way his
team is playing.
"I think we're starting to
peak now. We're starting to
get that confidence all the
way around," he said. "The
guards' play has crossed
that hurdle. I just hope it
stays consistent."


I CONVENTION
S SERVICES CO.


SRed Cross Is



^Hi^^aa


Home
&Garden &A -

March 6,7,8, 2009
Bay County Fairgrounds

CALL TO VENDORS
Register now for booth space at the 2009 Home &
Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. Share your home
improvement products, services, and enhancements
with thousands of families in the Bay area looking to
renovate, decorate, and landscape their homes.


All vendors receive a FREE quarter-
page ad in the official 2009 Home
& Garden Expo program, reaching
more than 80,000 adults in Bay and
seven surrounding counties. The 2009
Expo is also the host site for the Gulf
Coast B-B-Q Cook-Off, an officially
sanctioned, crowd-drawing event!


oVmt



"On


For Vendor Application, as well as information on the
show and program advertising:
visit: www.emeraldcoast.com/events/expo
email: expostradeshows@aol.com
Call: 850-763-8618
LAST YEAR'S SHOW SOLD OUT!
Space Is Limited, So Reserve Yours NOW!
For additional advertising information in the official
program of the 2009 Home and Garden Expo, contact
The News Herald at 850-258-4163.
PRESENTINGSPOS oRS.


KNOLOGY6


ANEWSAMHERALDCITY
NEWq HERALD


I NEWSHERALID.or



SSUNTRUST


- ~a I


NE ~*I


'We, bdivwv!!


I


I















ThursdaY. Janiiai i 22. 2009)


LIFE


www. ap ala chtimes.com


TIMES


For the


birds


Ducks dominate Christmas Bird Count


By Lois Swoboda
Tuin m -St.atl \Vit, i

Once again, the Christmas
Bird Count, held Dec. 28, enjoyed
glorious weather.
And lots of ducks.
Seven teams of bird-counters
went into the field. The volun-
teers traveled a total of 186 miles
by foot, car and boat and dedicat-
ed 320 man hours to the count.
The National Audubon Society
Christmas Bird Count is an early
winter survey of birds that began
in 1900. The count takes place
within "count circles" about 15
miles in diameter, which focus on
specific geographical areas. Vol-
unteers count all birds they see
in the circle during a single day.
The bird count is scheduled
between Dec. 14 and Jan. 5 each
year. Local counts occur on one
designated day, usually a Sunday,
between those inclusive dates.
The birders working in each cir-
cle are led by a count compiler,
who organizes the event.
Beginning birders can join a
group that includes one or more
experiencedbirdwatchers. Ifyour
home is within the boundaries of
a count circle, then you can stay
home and report the birds that
visit your feeder or join a group of
birdwatchers in the field.
The energy that drives this in-
stitution is not purely scientific;
other motivations include the de-
sire to find rarities and to social-
ize with other birders. Despite
its limitations, the cird count still
can have great value as a barom-
eter of overall population trends.
Researchers have found that
population trends reflected in
count data tend to correlate well
with those from censuses taken
by more stringent means.
Nationwide, more than 1,500
counts were carried out last year,
and a total of more than 32 mil-
lion observations of birds already
have been turned in with only 825
counts reporting in so far. The to-
tal number is being tabulated.
In Franklin County, birders
focus their attention on six ar-
eas: Apalachicola Bay and the
Gulf, North and South St. Vin-
cent Island, the Miles west of
Apalachicola, the former Box R
ranch, Apalachicola and Little St.


PHOTO BY ALAN KNOTHE
This bald eagle was spotted from a boat up the river above Scipio Creek during the bird count.


George Island.
"The count went very well this
year with the number of species
being a bit higher than in previ-
ous recent years and the number
of individuals increasing by in-
credible numbers," said organiz-


er Alan Knothe. "The individual
birds counted were two-and-a-
half times the number counted
last year (16,400) and almost four
times those counted in 2005 and
2006 (approximately 10,500).
"The main reason for this large


number of individuals counted
was due primarily to large num-
bers of one species, lesser scaup,"
he said. "There were more lesser
scaup counted on this count than
all the individual birds counted
on last year's count. Just in the


area south of St. Vincent Island, I
estimated a group of 20,000 birds.
I observed more individual ducks
there than anywhere I have ever
been in 18 years of birding."
Based on back records of the
local count, this was the largest
group of a single species observed
during the Christmas count here.
Birders participating in the count
reported seeing flock after flock
of lesser scaups, a small duck
named for its mating call, landing
on Apalachicola Bay at the end
of the day. The sound of the birds
hitting the water as they came to
rest for the night was discernable
from a quarter-mile away.
The birders recorded a total
of 40,959 birds belonging to 145
species. There were 40 species
found by only one team of bird-
ers. This year, the team working
in Apalachicola sighted the most
species, 104, and the team work-
ing on the Gulf and Bay sighted
the least, 59.
Notable among the unusual
birds spotted were a group of 20
American white pelicans, three
rusty blackbirds, a reddish egret,
a merlin, a surf scoter and a sin-
gle wood stork spotted on St. Vin-
cent Island.
Birders on Little St. George
sighted a pair of red knots, a red-
headed woodpecker, a small flock
of grasshopper sparrows and a
large group of American green-
winged teal. Osprey, cedar wax-
wings, yellow and orange-crested
warblers, and American wood-
cock were found only in Apala-
chicola. A pair of rare and elusive
sprague's pipits was spotted at
the airport once again.
Knothe said John Murphy
spotted a yellow warbler in
Apalachicola, an extremely un-
usual sighting during the winter
months.
Bald eagles were seen in ev-
ery one of the seven designated
areas. A total of 40 were noted, 10
of which were immature. This is
a new high for the count, topping
the 37 eagles observed last year.
"The upturn in the local eagle
population just shows that con-
servation methods are paying
off," Knothe said.


Birds in Art/Art in Birds Whooping cranes return to winter at St. Marks

CHALLENGE


People of all ages are invited to go outside and look
for Birds in Art/Art in Birds for a contest sponsored by
the Celebrate Urban Birds project at the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology.
Celebrate Urban Birds is a free, year-round citizen sci-
ence project focused on birds in neighborhood settings.
For the Birds in Art/Art in Birds challenge, you can
take photos, do some painting, write a story or create
a sculpture. What do you see in a bird that is beautiful,
stirring or inspirational? It could be a broken-down nest
in winter, a song recording, video of a bird perching on
your window, something that makes you stop, look twice,
laugh, cry.
Prizes include bird sound recordings, books, gift cer-
tificates, "green" products and more. We'll send the first
50 entrants a copy of our "Doves and Pigeons" poster by
Julie Zickefoose. Selected images will be posted on the
Celebrate Urban Birds Web site.
How to enter:
E-mail your photo, art or video entry to urbanbirds@
cornell.edu. Links are acceptable for videos.
Write "Art in Birds/Birds in Art contest" in the sub-
ject line.
Include your name and mailing address.
Tell us why you submitted your entry to the Art in
Birds/Birds in Art contest.
Deadline for entries is Feb.28.
Visit the Celebrate Urban Birds Web site for more in-
formation.
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is a membership in-
stitution dedicated to interpreting and conserving the
earth's biological diversity through research, education
and citizen science focused on birds. Visit the Lab's Web
site at www.birds.cornell.edu.


Apalachicola's A.J. Smith was
among the estimated 2,000 people
who gathered in the bitter cold Sat-
urday morning to watch the seven
endangered whooping cranes and
their ultralight companions fly over
St. Marks.
At about 8:45 a.m., the cranes
made their first appearance in the
distance just above the eastern
treeline. Quickly, it was over, and the
birds made their way to their safe
haven near Live Oak Island. Offi-
cials who tracked the cranes said at
one point, the birds were close to 10
miles off course and heading more
easterly.
Finally the cranes, led by lead pi-
lot Richard Van Heuvelen and wing-
men Brooke Pennypacker, Chris
Gullikson and Joe Duff, ended the
long flight that originated out of the
cranes' summer grounds at Nece-
dah National Wildlife Refuge in
Wisconsin on Oct.17. The birds will
winter at St. Marks in a holding pen
built especially for them by St. Marks
National Refuge staff and volunteers
before heading north to their sum-
mering grounds in the spring.
Whooping cranes were on the
verge of extinction in the 1940s. To-
day, there are only about 500 birds
in existence, 350 of them in the wild.
Aside from the 74 Wisconsin-Florida


PHOTO BY A.J. SMITH
A view of the seven endangered whooping cranes, led by an
ultralight, as they fly over St. Marks.


birds, the only other migrating popu-
lation of whooping cranes nests at
the Wood Buffalo National Park in
the northwest territories of Canada
and winters at the Aransas National
Wildlife Refuge on the Texas coast.
Whooping cranes, named for their


loud and penetrating unison calls,
live and breed in wetland areas,
where they feed on crabs, clams,
frogs and seeds. They are distinctive
animals, standing five feet tall with
white bodies, black wing tips and red
crowns on their heads.


*


B
Section


Page 1


NE






B2 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 22, 2009


www.apalachtimes.com Lil' Tebow


SILVER gUEST
Weddings SIUDIOS
Engagements
Senior Portraits
Children & Babies
Call today and ask about our Engagement specials
850-229-9353
www.SilverQuestStudios.com




OET THE

PET WEEK


Baby named after Gators'
star quarterback

By Despina Williams
Florida Freedom Newspapers

Three-year-old Tyler Mason
returned home from his first Gator
game with a singular preoccupation.
In the Swamp, amid fans
cheering Florida to a 63-5 victory
over Kentucky, Tyler arrived at a
name for his new baby brother.
He'd heard the name called
repeatedly over the loudspeakers
at the Gators' homecoming game.
He liked the way it sounded,
appreciated its one-word superhero
quality. Though unorthodox, Tyler
decided it would be a fine name for
his little brother.
The decision made, Tyler lacked
only parental approval.
When his pregnant mother,
Kelley, asked him for name
suggestions, Tyler repeated his two
favorite syllables.
"Te-bow."
"I thought it was just the word
of the day, but it stuck," recalled
Kelley. "Anytime anybody asked
him, he said, 'Tebow.'"
Tyler's suggestion sparked
an immediate Mason family
controversy.
Dad, Jack, made no secret of his
preference for the name "Cody"
and called Tebow not a name, but a
nickname.
Kelley, however, was torn. A


CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Tyler Mason holds his baby brother, Cody Tebow, born the day after
the Florida Gators won the national championship. Tyler suggested the
name "Tebow" after attending his first Gator game last October.


lifelong Gator fan, Kelley had
inherited her love of Florida football
from her parents, Duane Bartley of
Apalachicola and Michelle Bartley
of Orlando.
A season ticket holder since
a teenager, Kelley traveled with
former coach Steve Spurrier on a
golfing tour through Ireland at age
17 and was in New Orleans when
Spurrier led his team to their first
national championship.


A die-hard Gator fan, no doubt,
but could she name her son after
quarterback Tim Tebow?
By Christmas, she was heavily
leaning toward including the name
in some fashion, even as a JLo-style
nickname.
If she gave her son the middle
name, "Bo," all she'd need was a first
name that began with the letter T.
See TEBOW B8


Weddings and ENGAGEMENTS


December was a very successful
adoption month. We had puppies
being adopted all over Florida from
Pensacola to Lakeland. I even put
one on a plane to Tucson, AZ.
Unfortunately, the older puppies
and adult dogs (Jojoe pictured above)
are still waiting to be adopted. All of
them are wonderful, affectionate dogs.
They are leash trained and some are
housebroken. Please consider an older
and wiser lifelong companion.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more
details or visit the Franklin County
Humane Society at 244 State Route
65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the
website at www.forgottenpets.org to
see more of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend
for life, you not only save the life of
that pet, you make room for us to save
the life of one more abandoned dog or
cat!


GULF STATE
Community
BBank
www.gscb.com


The
Coolest Bank
in the
Hottest Spots


(850) 653-2126 (850) 697-3395 (850) 926-8338
Eastpoint St. George Island
(850) 670-8786 (850) 927-2511

DON'T PAY TOO MUCH! L
$50 Quarterly
Saves YOU $100 a year!
for residential accounts

Aloha Buls Pest Manalement
Franklin County's ONLY LOCAL Pest control company
Call Lois at (850) 653-5857 f


Mommy, Gabe, Daddy, Crystal, Bob, Nana and
Papa, Granny, Grandma Linny and Papa Gaven,
Matthew, Elizabeth, and Emily

Austin Taunton to turn 5
Austin
James
Taunton will
celebrate his
5th birthday on
Tuesday, Jan.
27, 2009.
He is the
son of Diane
Creamer of -
Apalachicola.
Maternal
grandparents
are Dinah and
the late James
Taunton of
Apalachicola.
He will
celebrate with
his sisters,
LaDonna,
Ashley,
Amanda and
Valerie.


"::4"4::..'4"'N 4".4":.4":C. :4 :: 4:.'l --:44 1:4 :;41"



IXIE

THEATRE

APALACHICOLA, FLA.
Everybody Loves Opal January 21 February 1
Big Bend Lighthouses February 5 (free to the public)
"Patsy" A Musical Tribute by Margo Anderson Feb. 13
Bob Milne Ragtime Piano February 14 & 15
850-653-3200 ~ www.DixieTheatre.com

L A OUN, COUNCIL LORI I&aM
A j


Anastasia Townsend,
Jerrod Watson to wed
God is a good God.
And we wholeheartedly
appreciate His favor. We
honor God for blessing
the up and coming unity
of Anastasia Townsend, of
Apalachicola, and Jerrod
Watson, of Panama City,.
They will join together
in Holy Matrimony on
Saturday, Jan. 24, 2009
at 1 p.m. at the Love
and Worship Center
Church at 151 10th St.,
in Apalachicola. The
ceremony will be officiated
by the Honorable, Apostle


Our Princess is 4
Brooklyn
Faith Freeman
celebrated her
4th birthday on
Monday, Jan.
19, 2009.
She is the
daughter of
Renae Fincher
and David
Freeman,
both of
Apalachicola.
She is the
granddaughter
of Bobby
Fincher
and Anna
Fincher of
Apalachicola
and Kenny
and Shirley
Freeman of
Eastpoint.
Happy
Birthday
Brooklyn! With love,


Shirley C. White.
The bride-elect is
the daughter of Daren
and LaTonya Wallace,
of Dothan, Ala. Her
grandparents are Pastors
Rufus and Annie Townsend,
also Mr. Rufus Wallace and
the late Mrs. Carolyn Clark.
Great-grandmother is Ms.
Frankie Mae Wallace.
The future groom is
the son of Ms. Karen Scott
of Panama City and Mr.
Tommy Welch Jr. of Port St.
Joe. His grandparents are
Mrs. Gennie Mae Watson
and the late Mr. Cleophus
Watson; also the late Ms.
Selma Welch.


Births and BIRTHDAYS


Stephen and
Emily Smith
celebrate
S birthdays
Stephen and
c e Emily Smith
4jr celebrated their
birthdays on
Saturday, Dec. 13,
2008, at the Pirate
Ship on Carrabelle
Beach.
Stephen turned 7 on Friday, Dec. 19, and Emily turned 4 on
Sunday, Jan. 11.
Stephen and Emily's dad, Richard; stepmom, Sissy; and Sissy's
children, Kaley and Alex Causey, joined the festivities.
Grandparents Richard and Morna Smith, Winfred and Estelle
Register, and Aunt Susette Davis, along with other friends and
family members, enjoyed hot dogs, chips, punch, birthday cake and
loads of fun on the pirate ship!


Curtis Whiddon
born
Curtis and Krista
Whiddon are proud to
announce the birth of
their beautiful baby
boy, Curtis Dwayne
Whiddon II.
He was born on
Tuesday, Dec. 23,
2008, at 8:20 p.m. He
weighed 8 pounds, 15
ounces and was 20
inches long.


Allison Yowell turns 9
Allison Yowell turned 9 years old on
Sunday, Jan. 4,2009.
She is the daughter of T.J. and
Amanda Yowell of Eastpoint and
Carman Horton of Apalachicola. Her
brother, Steven Dalton, and sister.
Audry Yowell, celebrated with her
Grandparents are Sheila and Billy
Ray Hill of Sumatra, Phyllis and Tonyi
Yowell of Sumatra, Diana and Don
Lanier of Mexico Beach, and Howard
Horton of Apalachicola.
She is the great-granddaughter ot
the late Herbert and Elizabeth Shiert,
She was joined by friends and hlo\ ed
ones, and all had a great time. We love you girl!


NE ~*I






Thursday, January 22, 2009


Church


The Times | B3


Obituaries


Lanark NEWS


Bettie Holtzclaw Post
Cleghorn MacRae, a
longtime resident of Maine
as well as Pennsylvania
and Florida, died Sunday,
Jan. 11, 2009 at Gosnell
Memorial Hospice House
in Maine.
Born Oct. 12, 1918 in
Candler, a town founded
by her grandfather, Bettie
was raised in Florida and
California. As a young
woman during World
War II she was married
to Van Post who served
as a colonel under Gen.
Douglas MacArthur and
who died in Okinawa.
Bettie had a daughter,
Pamela, from that
marriage.
Several years later
she married Edward
Cleghorn in Ocala. The
family moved to Reading,
PA where Ed pursued a
career in the newspaper
business and later
advertising. Bettie had
two children, Charlotte
and Christopher, with Ed
Cleghorn who died in 1965
at the age of 46.
In 1971 Bettie married
Alexander MacRae, who
died 10 years later. She
lived in Wyomissing, PA
until a few years ago.
For 35 years she was a
summer and year-round
resident of Islesboro,
Maine as well as having
homes in Florida, most
recently Apalachicola.
Bettie was very active
as a community volunteer
and leader. In the Reading
area, she served on
numerous boards of
cultural and human
service organizations
including the League of
Women Voters, Berks
County Historical Society,
and the Reading Area


Jackson Peter
"JP" Encalade, 71, of
Carrabelle, died Monday,
Jan. 19, 2009.
He was born Sept. 29,
1937, in Golden Meadow,
LA, to Jack and Emma
Encalade. He graduated
from Golden Meadow
High School in1956 and
moved to New Orleans,
and graduated from
Draughon Business
School in 1957.
He moved to Carrabelle
where he married Laverne
Carroll in 1961. He served
in the U.S. Air Force from
1960 through 1964. He
was in the construction
business most of his life,


Representatives from
the Shands Hospital Arts
in Medicine Program
will be in Apalachicola
on January 24 to host an
informal reception an-
nouncing a new Arts in
Medicine program at
George E. Weems Memo-
rial Hospital.
The Apalachicola Arts
in Medicine (AIM) Pro-
gram, is a collaborative
effort between the Flor-
ida Division of Cultural
Affairs, Shands Arts in
Medicine and George E.
Weems Memorial Hospi-
tal.
The reception will be
held Saturday, Jan 24, at
5:30 p.m. at That Place in
Apalachicola. During the
informal meeting, lead-
ers from the Shands Arts
in Medicine program will
speak about the impact of


most recently with Couch
USA.
He is survived by his
wife of 48 years, Laverne
Encalade; daughter Laurie
Williams and husband
Brian; daughter Jan Cook
and husband Bobby; and
granddaughter, Jolie.
He was preceded in
death by his parents, Jack
and Emma Encalade,
and four siblings,
Harold Encalade, Leroy
Encalade, Rena Encalade,
and Bernice Carroll.
Services were held Jan.
21 at Carrabelle Assembly
of God Church with burial
at Evergreen Cemetery in
Carrabelle.


Community College.
She was responsible for
establishing a new camp
for the Berks County
Girl Scouts for which she
served as a leader for a
number of years. She had
a career in the 1960's as
director of volunteers for
St. Joseph's Hospital.
Her life was
characterized by a
deep interest in arts
and culture. She was
a collector of antiques
and works of art. She
befriended and provided
for many. Especially
as she grew older she
developed friendships
across generations. Bettie
nurtured a deep love of
nature, loved living near
the ocean and cultivated
a lifelong knowledge and
appreciation for trees,
plants and flowers.
She is survived by her
children, Pamela Keith
Post Cleghorn, Charlotte
Dudley Cleghorn, and
Christopher Gaskill
Cleghorn, in addition to
three grandchildren, two
great grandchildren, a
sister, Virginia, and she
was predeceased by her
brother Keith.
A memorial service
was held in St Alban's
Episcopal Church, Shore
Road, Cape Elizabeth on
Saturday, Jan. 17.
In lieu of flowers,
contributions may be
made to the charity
of your choice or to a
fund created in Bettie's
memory by her children
to support Islesboro
women seeking to further
their education: Bettie
H. MacRae FuRnd, Maine
Community Foundation,
One Monument Way, Ste.
200, Portland, ME 04101.


MORE INFORMATION

The reception will be held Saturday, Jan 24,
at 5:30 p.m. at That Place in Apalachicola.
During the informal meeting, leaders from the
Shands Arts in Medicine program will speak
about the impact of the Arts at Shands Hospital
and about how the public, as well as professional
artists, can become involved in this new program.


the Arts at Shands Hos-
pital and about how the
public, as well as profes-
sional artists, can be-
come involved in this new
program. The public is
welcome and encouraged
to attend.
Apalachicola is the lat-
est community chosen
by Shands to participate
in the national program
which been in place at
Shands Hospital since
1990, according to Jill


Sonke-Henderson, direc-
tor of the Shands Arts
in Medicine Program in
Gainesville.
Shands Arts in Medi-
cine (AIM) was founded
in 1990 at Shands Hos-
pital at the University
of Florida. AIM is a mul-
tidisciplinary organiza-
tion, with programs in
the visual, literary, mu-
sical, and performance
arts. AIM serves inpa-
tients and outpatients of


Phil Shiver


Martin Nelson was born
Sept. 18, 1925, to the now
late Mary Ellen and Martin
Nelson, in Boston, MA.
He died Sunday, Jan.
18, 2009, in Panama City at
Bay Medical Center at the
age of 83.
He was a vocational
technical instructor in St.
Petersburg prior to moving
to Eastpoint where he has
resided for some 25 years.
He was a United States
Navy veteran of World War
II.


Kenneth Philip "Phil"
Shiver, of Carrabelle,
a native and longtime
resident of Pompano
Beach, passed away
Sunday night, Jan. 18, 2009.
He was preceded in
death by his parents,
Kenneth Edgar Shiver and
Annie Ruth Shiver.
He is survived by his
wife of 51 years, Delores
Shiver; children, Kenneth
Phillip and Sharon Shiver,
Laurel and Bob Egan,
Bartow Jefferson and
Marie Shiver and Matthew
Warren Shiver; brother,
Larry Shiver; sisters Sylvia
and Dale Gallagher and
Coral and John Tribble;
aunt Evelyn Jacquess;
grandchildren, Katherine,
Phillip, Sarah, Christina,
Morgan and Victoria; and
many wonderful nieces,


nephews and cousins.
He was born and raised
in Pompano Beach. He
served honorably in the
U.S. Navy, after which he
became a Pompano Beach
lifeguard. He served
on the Pompano Beach
Fire Department for 24
years and was Fireman
of the Year for the state of
Florida in1976.
He retired from his
job as assistant fire chief
in 1982 and moved to the
north Florida Gulf coast.
He spent many years
fishing from his dock and
enjoying his grandchildren.
He will be greatly missed.
Services will be
held Saturday, Jan. 24,
2009 at Kraeer FRneral
Home, with burial at the
City of Pompano Beach
cemetery.


Lula Chipman


Lula Jane Chipman,
69, passed away Jan. 15,
2009 in Carrabelle. She
was a lifelong resident
of Franklin County. She
was a member of the
Carrabelle Assembly of
God.
FRneral services were
Jan. 17 at the Carrabelle
Assembly of God. Burial
followed at Evergreen
Cemetery.
She is survived by
three sons; Hubert
Chipman, Curtis Chipman
and Edmond Chipman,
all of Carrabelle; one


daughter; Ruby Gilliard,
of Carrabelle; three
brothers, Buddy Crum,
of Sopchoppy, Albert
Nichols, of Hosford, and
Steve Nichols, of Albany,
GA; one sister; Frankie
Gray, of Carrabelle; three
grandchildren; William
Chipman, Brittany
Prichardo, and Heather
Mulkey; and two great-
grandchildren; William
Chipman and Ethan
Prichardo.
Harvey-Young Funeral
Home, Crawfordville,
handled arrangements.


He is survived by
his wife, Irene Nelson,
of Eastpoint; children
Brian Nelson and Cynthia
Howard; granddaughter
Eva Smith; and great-
grandson Blake Smith.
Rineral services will be
held on Saturday, Jan. 24
at 4 p.m. at Kelley Funeral
Home, 149 Avenue H,
ApalachicolaViewing will
be held from 2 p.m. until
service time on Saturday,
Jan. 24. Memorialization
by cremation.


Fred Lively


Fred "Blimp" Nelson
Lively, 57, a commercial
fisherman, died
Sunday, Jan. 18, 2009 in
Carrabelle.
Survivors include three
sons; Freddie Kilgore,
of Eastpoint, Jonathan
Kilgore, of Crawfordville,
and Jimmy Kilgore, of
Perry; a daughter; Tina


Kilgore, of Crawfordville;
two brothers; Donald
Lively, of Carrabelle,
and Harrison Lively, of
Panacea; a sister, Marie
Bill, of Carrabelle, and six
grandchildren.
Service will be held at
a later date. Independent
Funeral Home, Quincy, is
handling arrangements.


all ages, their families,
visitors, health care pro-
viders, the Gainesville
and statewide commu-
nities. The program is
focused on transforming
healthcare environments
through the arts, and
providing leadership for
hospital arts programs
throughout the nation.
AIM has active pro-
grams in three hospitals
and numerous out-pa-
tient clinics, and is known
internationally as one of
the leaders in the field
of arts in healthcare. In
2006, AIM for Africa, a
project sponsored by the
University of Florida and
Shands Healthcare, es-
tablished the first-known
formal arts in medicine
program in Africa at the
Mater Hospital in Nairobi,
Kenya.


Bettie MacRae


BCL gets island boat
ramp contract
On Tuesday morning,
the Franklin County
commission awarded the
contract to enhance the St.
George Island boat ramp
to BCL Civil Contractors of
Panama City. BCL was one
of five companies who bid
on the job and at $39,800
was the lowest.
Because there was
a wide range of bids
submitted, with CW
Roberts of Hosford offering

THM
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


WLCOMS YOU




Ascension
101 NE Frt Wire

SUNDAY
10:00 AM


You did get your ticket
for the Spaghetti Fest,
didn't you? We will be a
Chillas Hall to enjoy Chef
Joe M's dinner that he and
his helpers have prepared.
You may get your ticket at
the door
$8 each,
children
under
10 get to
eat free.
Serving
begins at
4 p.m. and
LANARK NEWS closes at
Jim Welsh 7 pm. The
members
of The
Lanark Golf Club will be
happy to serve you. See
you Saturday, Jan. 24.
Glad to see one of the
county's great ladies has
finally been honored. The
late Classie Lowery now
has a park named for her.
Thank you. I know she
would be proud.
Be sure to mark you
calendars for Saturday,
Feb. 14. We will have the
Second Saturday Dance at
Chillas Hall. You bet The
Journey Band will be there
to play your favorite old
songs. FAn starts at 7 p.m.
Enjoy pancakes or
French toast? Well you
need to be at Chillas Hall
on the second Saturday
from 8 to 11 a.m. Chef
Joe M., along with other


the highest estimate,
$192,000, the commission
asked Clay Kennedy of
Preble Rish, consulting
engineers for the county,
to review bids while the
commission met and
to come back with a
recommendation.
After examining
the bid packages he
recommended BCL saying,
"They're (BCL) aware of
what they're in for. They
moved the rock out there
and they're the lowest
bidder."

THE
EHlPMALCHUICH
WELCOME YOU


Trinity

Hwy. W&%A S.SL


-a-
SUNDAY: mB iw Aem

n-A'r I1= murn

T"lU Ar 30- 3aMr


*I


members of The Lanark
Golf Cub, will prepare
pancakes, French toast,
sausage, coffee, and
orange juice for you. Your
donation of $5 will be
collected at the door and it
will help our golf club.
You can holler "Bingo"
every Wednesday night
at Chillas Hall. Bingo
for the Bus starts at 6:30
p.m. Homemade cookies,
coffee, and soft drinks are
on hand. Come on over to
The Hall and have a fun
evening with us.
Pizza is still being
served on Wednesdays
and Sundays at The
Legion. Friday night is
hamburger and fries,
and we have dinner on
Saturday. Serving for all
the above starts at 5 p.m.,
and as always, they are
open to the public. Along
with the hamburgers and
fries, our very own Chuck
Spicer spins the platters
and heads the trivia game.
Hope to see you there.
Be kind to one another
and check in on the
sick and housebound.
Remember friends are like
stars, you don't always see
them, but you know they
are there!
Until next time, God
Bless America, our troops,
the poor, homeless and
hungry.


Martin Nelson


News BRIEF


J.P. Encalade


Weems to unveil Arts in Medicine program


First Pretecostal Holiness Church
379 Bmwville mdal Apal.hkah



Sulaywo-a Srbi m -

MmmbJ. YlDiT Gnq fk3a
wOWf*"lfly UMGAPz. 70k]a
WfBldyWflK04 & fl ?:3]IL
If___ towTIi ciiglrat momc __


Il e United N-do-dist OC-mrdni

Sf Frankhian QCunIy Wlmr You









Itkdingser eli het ahu d mesh
W. .04 35-- j_-. .. f


l w-L aal ia



,a -mi: d bl. niL'imi bta
H ingnSvi c femry A MVofeh --bam,


r St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave. "C" & 6ti St Apalaicda, FL 32329
(s5) 653-5453 arEmil-g SjcasWaogam t

PASTTR- FATHER RXKIERIATESYMSIK[
MASS SCREIULE

n MAv ----............................................. A-3m
SUNDAY ............................................... XiAll
STUfAY -SfRaa'aAYA..................................m
-__________----------------- &


I






B4 I The Times


Law enforcement


Thursday, January 22, 2009


Sharo A. BroTtum, 28, Mrtin L. Giwnellnn, 51, probation (FCSO)
38, Eastpoint, withholding
child support (FCSO) Jan. 14 mischief and battle
Fred J. Thompson, 50, Amy M. Joyner, 24, (FCSO)
Eastpoint, driving while Apalachicola, violation of Jason Shuman, 35,
license suspended (FDEP) probation (FCSO) Apalachicola, violation of
Eric A. Tatum, 28, Martin L. Ginn, 51, probation (FCSO)
Eastpoint, sale of a Packwaukee, WI, violation Jeremy L. Matheny,
prescription drug (FCSO) of probation (FCSO) 29, Eastpoint, violation of
Michael S. Hales, 54, Robert J. Register, 22, probation (FCSO)


Niceville, possession of
cannabis, possession of
paraphernalia, reckless
driving and possession of
a firearm by a convicted
felon (FCSO)

Jan. 13
Thomas J. Smith, 33,
Apalachicola, served
Floyd County GA warrant


Eastpoint, violation of
probation (FCSO)
Loreal L. Daniels, 27,
Apalachicola, battery
and possession of a
legend drug without a
prescription (FCSO)

Jan. 15
Charles L. Fasbenner,
39, Apalachicola, criminal


Jan. 16
Marion B. Wilson, 22,
Crawfordville, failure to
appear (FCSO)

Jan. 17
Michael L. Hendels,
23, Apalachicola, trespass
after warning (APD)


Counterfeit money



surfaces in county


The Franklin County sheriff's of-
fice is investigating a rash of coun-
terfeit bills that surfaced last week in
the county. No one has been arrested,
and authorities are being tightlipped
about the matter.
Undersheriff Joel Norred con-
firmed that both $5 and $50 bills have
surfaced. Both the Gulf State Com-
munity Bank and the Piggly Wiggly
have said they have received bogus
bills.
"There's an ongoing investigation
with the Franklin County Sheriff's
Office, and the U.S. Secret Service
will be involved, although we don't
know to what extent," Norred said.
He declined comment on whether
any of the bills were linked to a lo-
cal counterfeiting operation. He also
declined comment on rumors the


bills had arrived here via an Atlanta-
based counterfeiting operation.
"I encourage readers to take a
close look at these bills, and there's
a strip in these bills they can look at.
If there's no strip, I wouldn't take it,"
Norred said.
He said individuals and business
owners are not required to take a bill
they suspect is counterfeit.
"They can refuse to accept it for
payment. What we don't want them
to do is get into a confrontation with
someone," said Norred, noting that
the individual using the bills for pay-
ment may not be aware they are bo-
gus.
Those who want law enforcement
to take a closer look at a bill are asked
to call the sheriff's office at 670-8500
and an officer will help, Norred said.


Restored Jeep donated to World War II museum


Sue Stallman of Thom-
asville Georgia recently
contacted Franklin Coun-
ty's Camp Gordon John-
ston Museum in Carrabelle
with a unique request.
Her late husband, John
Stallman, was a veteran
of the 28th Infantry Di-
vision and trained here
during World War II. He
later shipped overseas and
fought with the division un-
til wounded. He then was
assigned to the Ninth Air
Force for the duration of
the war.


Stallman never forgot
his time here in Franklin
County and was overjoyed
when he learned of the mu-
seum's existence. He regu-
larly attended the Camp
Gordon Johnston Days
reunions and drove his be-
loved jeep in the parades
both here and elsewhere.
He was excitedly looking
forward to the 2007 reunion
when he passed away just
one week before the event.
His wife said Stallman
never forgot the museum's
efforts to preserve the


camp's history, and neither
did she.
"In donating his re-
stored Willys jeep, she feels
he will always be a part of
the organization he grew
to admire and support. And
we feel the same," said
Museum Director Linda
Minichello.
Currently housed in the
new museum locations re-
search library, the plan is
to put it on display in a cor-
ner of the "War Room" with
a special tribute to John
Stallman.


"We also hope to drive
the jeep in the March
14th Annual Camp Gordon
Johnston Days parade,"
Minichello said.
The Camp Gordon John-
ston World War II Museum
is located at the Carrabelle
City Complex at 1001 Gray
Ave. Operating hours are 1-
4 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on
Saturday. Tours are wel-
come, and the entrance fee
is a donation. Call 697-8575
or visit www.campgordon-
johnston.com.


Ficklding and Co. debuts rental management service


Fickling and Company of Ma-
con, Ga., and Fickling of Florida
LLC are offering a new
service at their St. George -
Island offices.
Wanda Alonzo, Fick-
ling's rental office man-
ager, said after several
months, the company has
developed a new rental
division to manage both
long-term and short-term W
rental properties. AL
"In July 2008, we got Reni
the reservation system ma
in place, and the Web site
is still a work in progress," she
said.


I
AN
LON
tal
anc


An experienced property
manager, Alonzo worked in long-
term property rental in
Kansas City and then
was employed by Resort
Vacation Properties for
several months in short-
term rentals before ac-
cepting her current post.
Alonzo said Fickling
is taking a different ap-
IDA proach to property man-
ISO agement in that unlike
office other rental companies,
ger it charges no assess-
ment fee for inspection
to determine if a house is ready
for occupation by renters.


"To me, it's to my advantage
to make sure a home is ready for
a renter. I shouldn't charge for
that," she said.
Fickling's rental division of-
fers a flexible approach to prop-
erty management.
"There are no tack-on reser-
vation or rental fees. What you
see is what you get," she said.
"Items like bulbs and filters can
be provided by the owner, or we
can provide them. We have main-
tenance staff to do the work.
Right now, we're contracting
with maintenance personnel.
"We have wonderful people
we can send out for any situa-


tion. We are on call for emergen-
cies," she said. "We try to make
a partnership with our renters.
We feel we do that really well.
Each owner has my cell phone
number."
She said there is no rental
deposit from the renter but that
Fickling asks for a 50-percent
good faith payment upfront. Also,
there is a nonrefundable charge
for pets in some homes.
Fickling also is seeking to
woo homeowners who want to
change property managers.
"If it's a new property that's
never been a transient rental,
there's a $5 registration charge


and then we bring it under our
Fickling umbrella. If they al-
ready have a license, there's no
charge," she said. "We are ready
to work with owners who might
have had a bad experience with
another company or just want
some alternatives."
Fickling Vacation Rentals'
Web site is www.ficklingvaca-
tionrentals.com or call 927-2218.
Fickling is licensed with the
Florida Division of Hotels and
Restaurants under Chapter
509 of the Florida Department
of Revenue. Homes listed with
Fickling are covered under the
same license.


The Mildew Remover
GARLIC
Exterior House Cleaning
Low Pressure Mildew
9 Years Service in Area
(850) 653-8795
Gerald Garlick


Family



Dentistry

DENTURE
LAB ON PREMISES
Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines

Laban Bontrager,

MIi


Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321

TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 |1


DON WILLSON'S
SEPTIC TANK
SERVICE
Serving all of Franklin
County Residential/
Commerical
Septic Tanks &
Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or night
653-9406


ROBERTS APPLIANCE
REPAIR
- ALL MAJOR BRANDS -


18 Shadow Lane
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: (850) 653-8122
Cell: (850) 653-7654


Builders By The Sea, Inc.

Gary Bartlett
Additions


New Homes
Remodeling
R.R. 0067644


Ph. 850-927-3628
Mobile 850-425-8620
Licensed & Insured


Don Lively General Contractors
LICENSED AND INSURED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
WPlumbing New Construction Roofing
Pressure Washing Additions Vinyl Siding


Painting and More No Job Too Small
P.O. Box 439
Carrabelle, FL 32322


697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603


RC0066499
R00065255


Ir


*I


HardwareJACKSON'
Center Building Supplies
& Auto Repair We Deliver
Carrabelle 697-3333 Anywhere


PLUMVARNER
I!-i BINGInc


850-670-4369J2
llCar.850-653-5722 a






Thursday, January 22, 2009


Local


The Times I B5


Three generations of Partingtons premiere at Dixie


By Marsha Gitkind
Special to the Times

If you have ever doubted the
power of how genetics works
in families, you will have a
chance to test your skepticism
when you see the production
of "Everybody Loves Opal,"
beginning its run at the Dixie
Theatre on Jan. 21 and playing
through Feb. 1.
Veteran actresses Dixie
Partington and her mother, Cleo
Holladay, will be joined onstage
for the first time by Cara
Partington, daughter of Cleo's
son Tony. These fine thespians
have a collective 88 years of
acting experience among them,
and there is no question the
acting genes have been passed
on to the third generation of
Partingtons.
Cara makes her professional
debut at the Dixie after seven


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
Dixie Partington, Cleo Holladay and Cara Partington.


years of acting at performing
arts schools in the Minneapolis
area. She is joining the cast
by special arrangement with
Perpich Center for the Arts in


Golden Valley, Minn., where she
is a theatre major in her senior
year of high school.
Growing up in Abingdon, Va.,
home of the Barter Theatre,


where grandfather Rex was
artistic director for 20 years,
Cara had many chances to
learn the trade by watching her
relatives perform.
"I am so excited about this
opportunity" Cara said. "It is a
dream come true to act with my
grandmother and my aunt. Ever
since the theatre opened, I'd
hoped I would act on this stage."
Cara plays a policewoman
in this comedy based on
the shenanigans of Opal, an
eccentric older woman who
collects anything she can cart
around in her little red wagon. It
is an uplifting comedy, especially
in these bleak economic times,
as Opal's goodness and belief in
the human spirit shines through.
It should be a magical
evening watching Cleo, whose
illustrious career has led her
to Apalachicola as a resident
artistic treasure, performs


alongside her daughter, Dixie,
who took over the theatre's
artistic direction from her
father in 2004. The addition of
the youngest Partington actress
to the cast of this production is
a treat for all those wise enough
to purchase tickets during the
run of the show. Don't miss the
rare opportunity to watch these
three generations light up the
stage as you laugh your way
through an evening with Opal
and her "frens."
Sharing the stage with the
Partington women is audience
favorite David Caldwell, best
remembered for his work in
"Smoke On The Mountain," and
newcomer Terry Wells, who
also will appear this season in
"Murderers."
Call the box office at 653-3200
for reservations or visit www.
DixieTheatre.com for more
information.


Keep plants alive in January and February


Brrr, if you recall I mentioned
in part one of this story that winter
is the hardest time of year for
gardening because of the rapid
temperature changes.
Hopefully, our latest cold
front didn't damage any of
your plants! As promised,
here is part two of
Panhandle gardening tips
for January and February.


Lawns
* Check soil moisture


BILL
World


lMA
Arou


during winter and water as needed.
Once the grass is dormant, water
your lawn every 10-14 days. Of
course, a rain event counts as a
watering.

Trees and shrubs
Select and plant camellias. For
more information about Camellias
in Florida, visit http://edis.ifas.
ufl.edu/documentep002 or call
the Franklin UF IFAS Extension
Office.
Pick up and destroy fallen
camellia blooms to help control
camellia petal blight.
Florida's Arbor Day is
the third Friday of January.
Celebrate by planting a native


Thursday, Jan. 22
Wandering Star Quilting Club.
Chillas Hall Lanark Village. 1-3
p.m. Call Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Luncheon and Information
Specials at the Franklin County
Senior Center in Carrabelle. Noon.
$3 donation. Call 697-3760.
Carrabelle Waterfront
Partnership Steering Committee
meets at 1 p.m. at the Carrabelle
Branch of the Franklin Public
Library. 670-2366.
Apalachicola Community
Pride Partnership at 6 p.m. at the
6th Street Recreation Center. For
info, call 653-9419.

Friday, Jan. 23
Breakfast at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30 a.m.,
meal at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call
697-3760.
Bocce Club. Franklin County
Senior Center. 1 p.m. Call 697-3760.
Everybody Loves Opal by John
Patrick at Dixie Theatre. 8 p.m.
Reserved seating $25. Call 653-
3200.

Saturday, Jan. 24
The Apalachicola Riverkeeper
and Franklin County Parks and
Recreation will sponsor a free
educational paddling program at


tree in the right place. For a list of
recommended trees, request the
Trees for North Florida publication
from our local Extension Office or
visit http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
EP007.
*Prune dormant
shade trees, if needed. For
information on pruning
techniques, request the
Pruning Landscape Trees
and Shrubs publication
LHAN from your local Extension
und You Office or visit http://edis.
ifas.ufl.edu/MG087.
Prune summer flowering
deciduous shrubs such as althea
and hibiscus. Because they flower
on current season's growth,
flowering actually can be enhanced
by proper pruning.
Do NOT prune the spring
flowering shrubs yet. Azaleas,
spiraeas and forsythia flower
during early spring because buds
were formed last summer and
fall. Pruning now would therefore
remove most of the flower buds.
Cold damaged trees and
shrubs should NOT be pruned until
new growth appears. You want to
preserve as much healthy plant
material as possible.
If cold weather has damaged
your palms, proper care may


Indian Creek Public Park. 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. A short educational talk will
be followed by a 3.5-hour kayak/
canoe trip led by experienced
Riverkeeper Staff and Volunteers.
Participants should bring water
and lunch and be comfortable
paddling open water, tidal streams
and narrow creeks. Reservations
required. Call 653-8936.
Reception for Arts and Health
in Apalachicola. That Place in
Apalach. 5:30 p.m. Wine and light
refreshments. Call 653-9419.
Everybody Loves Opal by John
Patrick at Dixie Theatre. 8 p.m.
Reserved Seating $25. Call 653-3200.

Sunday, Jan. 25
Everybody Loves Opal by John
Patrick at Dixie Theatre. 3 p.m.
Reserved Seating $25. Call 653-3200.

Monday, Jan. 26
Breakfast at the Franklin
County Senior Center in Carrabelle.
Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2
donation. Call 697-3760.
Computer classes at the
Franklin County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Call Joyce Durham 670-
5951 and set up a time.
Billiards Club at the Franklin
County Senior Center in Carrabelle.
1 p.m. Call 697-3760.
GED classes are offered at the
Franklin County School from 3-6


prevent loss of the palm and
encourage recovery. For more
information, see Treating Cold
Damaged Palms at http://edis.ifas.
ufl.edu/MG318.

Fruits
Citrus might need protection
from extreme cold. Kumquats
and satsumas can survive
temperatures in the low 20s if
they are dormant. Other citrus
types won't tolerate such cold
temperatures.
Apply dormant oil spray to
peach, plum, nectarine and other
deciduous fruit trees to help
control scale insects.
Prune dormant fruit trees if
needed.
In January, plant fruits such
as apples, peaches, nectarines,
plums, pears, figs, pecans,
blueberries, blackberries, grapes
and persimmons.



Bill Mahan is a Florida Sea
Grant Agent and the Director of
the Franklin UF-IFAS Extension
Program. Contact him at 850-653-
9337, 697-2112, ext. 360; or via e-
mail at bmahan@ufl.edu.


p.m. every week in Building 1100,
Room 1105. Call 670-2800.

Tuesday, Jan. 27
Art Club at the Franklin County
Senior Center in Carrabelle. 2-4
p.m. Call 697-3760.
Franklin County Community
Partnership for Children and
Youth. Eastpoint Church of God
3:30-5 p.m. Call 653-4789.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George Island
Fire Dept. $1/card. Proceeds got to
St. George Island Civic Club. Call
927-4654.
Carrabelle Historical Society
at 5:30 p.m. at the Carrabelle
Library. For info, call Tamara Allen
at 697-8380

Wednesday, Jan. 28
Card Club. Franklin County
Senior Center. 1 p.m. Call 697-3760.
Bookmobile. Apalachicola
Piggly Wiggly 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Eastpoint Apartments 4:45-5:45
p.m. Call 556-1556.
Everybody Loves Opal by John
Patrick at the Dixie Theatre. 3 p.m.
Reserved seating $25.
Bingo for the Bus. Chillas Hall
in Lanark Village. 6:30- to 8:30 p.m.
Call 697-9626.
GED classes are offered at the
Franklin County School from 3 to 6
p.m. every week in Building 1100,
Room 1105. Call 670-2800.


CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Harpists Mary Brigid Roman and Jamie Gossett will
perform Sunday at Trinity Episcopal Church.



Harp duo to


perform Sunday


The Apalachicola
Area Historical Society's
Ilse Newell Fund for the
Performing Arts series
will present an unusual
concert on Sunday, a
renowned harp duo.
The concert features
a harp professor and her
accomplished student,
Mary Brigid Roman and
Jamie Gossett, and will
be at 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan.
25, at Trinity Episcopal
Church.
Roman, associate
professor of harp at the
Florida State University
College of Music, heads
one of oldest harp
departments in the
country. After training
at Eastman School of
Music, she joined the
FSU faculty in 1968 and
since has appeared as
a solo and ensemble
performer throughout
the Southeast. A special
interest in chamber music
for flute and harp has led
to collaborations with
Albert Tipton and Charles
DeLaney.
As an orchestral
harpist, she has
performed under such
conductors as Dorati,
Gould, Kachaturian,
Shaw and Stravinsky and
currently is principal
harpist with the Valdosta
Symphony (Ga.) Orchestra
and the Tallahassee
Symphony Orchestra.
Roman has served
as adjunct faculty for
Valdosta State University,
Stetson University and
Mercer University and has
served as a competition
judge and been a member
of the board of directors
of the American Harp
Society.


Gossett began studying
harp with Roman while
pursuing a bachelor's in
political science at FSU.
She has been principal
harpist with the FSU
Symphony and currently
is second harpist with the
Tallahassee Symphony
Orchestra.
She has performed
in numerous orchestras
in Florida, Georgia and
Alabama and with several
touring companies when
they came to Tallahassee,
such as the John Phillip
Sousa Band, Johnny
Mathis, The Moody
Blues and the Broadway
production of Peter Pan
during the farewell tour
with Cathy Rigby.
Her solo and chamber
playing includes
performances and
recordings with Trefoil,
a trio of harp, guitar and
violin. They have produced
two CDs, the first, "Latin
Connection," featuring
music from South America
and the second traditional
Christmas music from
around the world in
unique arrangements by
the trio.
The Ilse Newell FRnd
is funded primarily by the
generous contributions
of committed sponsors,
patrons, associates and
friends. A suggested
donation of $2 is asked of
concertgoers to support
the series, administered
by The Apalachicola Area
Historical Society, a not-
for-profit organization
dedicated to preserving
the rich history of
Apalachicola and the
surrounding area.
For more information,
call 853-9550 or 370-6201.


Helen Spohrer, Paul Parker reappointed to TDC


Franklin County Commis- cal real estate professional and
sioner Cheryl Sanders recently executive producer for Forgot-
was appointed by the county to ten Coast TV as well as Paul
serve on the county's Parker, owner of Harbor
Tourism Development Point Realty, recently
Council (TDC) Board. were reappointed by the
She replaces Rus- county commission to
sell Crofton, who served the TDC board for four-
from 2007to 2008 as the year terms. Spohrer will
previous county repre- serve as the TDC chair-
sentative to the TDC man.
board. Sanders will SPOHRER In other news, the
serve as vice-chairman TDC and county com-
of the board. mission have formalized a con-
Helen Spohrer, a longtime lo- tract extension with Geiger


and Associates for another me-
dia tour scheduled in 2009 for
Franklin County. Geiger and
Associates has conducted three
media tours over the past year
and a half.
These "fam" tours are in-
tended to familiarize writers
from high-profile publications
throughout the country to the
amenities and resources of the
county. The idea is to encourage
writers to develop feature arti-
cles for their respective publica-
tions, which will in turn attract


visitors to the county.
The fam tour concept is
considered an effective mar-
keting tool by tourism develop-
ment professionals because it
increases visibility for an area
without a direct advertising ex-
penditure.
"Media tours help our TDC
meet its marketing objective
of bringing new people to the
area," Spohrer said.
The next Franklin County
media familiarization tour is
expected to occur in early sum-


mer 2009.
In addition to the fam tour
marketing, the TDC has devel-
oped its own compatible mar-
keting vehicle for promoting
the county through the use of a
monthly electronic newsletter
to more than 2,000 media con-
tacts and web-based subscrip-
tions, strong internet market-
ing and television production
services.
For additional TDC informa-
tion, please contact the admin-
istrative offices at 653-8678.


*I


County CALENDAR







6B The Times Thursday, January 22, 2009


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1130- Adoptions
1140- Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160 Lost
1170 Found


S 1100
9770T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR FRANKLIN
COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

21ST MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION,
Plaintiff, vs

vs.

DANA M. TAYLOR; CAL-
VIN RAY TAYLOR; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
CALVIN RAY TAYLOR;
GERALDINE TAYLOR
NASH; ELOISE TAYLOR
MILLENDER; THE UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF EL-
OISE TAYLOR MIL-
LENDER; IF LIVING, IN-
CLUDING ANY UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF RE-
MARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPEC-
TIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUS-
TEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants)

CASE NO. 08 384 CA

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given
that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Franklin
County, Florida, I will sell
the property situate in
Franklin County, Florida,
described as:

From a point of 10.5 feet
due South from the North-
west corner of the SW 1/4
of the NE 1/4 of Section
31, Township 8 South,
Range 6 West, run North
61 degrees 17.5' East
along the Northern bound-
ary of a public right-of-way
251.5 feet for the point of
beginning; continue
thence along said
right-of-way 64 feet;
thence North 28 degrees
42.5' West 200 feet; thence
South 61 degrees 17.5'
West 108.5 feet; thence
Southeasterly on a line 200
feet equidistant from the
old 60 foot Ferry Road for
a distance of 205 feet to
the point of beginning.
Thus forming a tract in the
NE 1/4 of said Section 31,
fronting 64 feet on the
right-of-way, running back
200 feet and measuring
108.5 feet across the back.
To include a:
2005 Prestige VIN
N812615A 95011617
2005 Prestige VIN N
812615B 95011673
A/K/A
375 Avenue A
Eastpoint, FL 32328

at public sale, to the high-
est and best bidder, for
cash, Front steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, 33 Market Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320 at
11:00 AM, on February 5,
2009.

DATED THIS 29TH DAY


I 1100
OF DECEMBER 2008.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Witness, my hand and seal
of this court on the 29th
day of December, 2008.

CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
By Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Law Offices of Daniel C.
Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the
American with Disabilities
Act of 1990, persons need-
ing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceedings. If
hearing impaired, please
call (800) 955-9771 (TDD)
or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.
January 15, 22, 2009
9771 T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
IDA IN AND FOR FRANK-
LIN COUNTY

SUNTRUST BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JORGE LUIS RODRIGUEZ
et. al.
Defendants.

CASE NO. 08-000334 CA

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated December 23, 2008
and entered in Case No.
08-000334 CA, of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit in and for
FRANKLIN County, Flor-
ida, wherein SUNTRUST
BANK, is a Plaintiff and
JORGE LUIS
RODRIGUEZ; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JORGE LUIS
RODRIGUEZ; SUNTRUST
BANK; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #1; UNKNOWN
TENANT #2 are the De-
fendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder
for cash at, 11:00 AM on
February 5, 2009, the fol-
lowing described property
as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:

LOT 2, BLOCK K, ST.
GEORGE ISLAND GULF
BEACHES, UNIT NO. 3, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 16, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

Marcia M. Johnson
As Clerk of the Court
By Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

Dated this 29th day of De-
cember, 2008.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tion to participate in this
proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days
prior, contact the Clerk of


1 1100
the Court's disability coor-
dinator at 850-697-2112,
PO. BOX 340, APALACHI-
COLA FL, 32320. If hearing
impaired, contact (TDD)
800-955-8771, via Florida
Relay System.

Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road,
Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
January 15, 22, 2009
9772T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

U.S. BANK NATIONAL AS-
SOCIATION AS TRUSTEE
ON BEHALF OF GSR
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2005-AR4
PLAINTIFF

VS

JEFFREY D. ORMSBY;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JEFFREY D. ORMSBY IF
ANY; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY THROUGH, UN-
DER AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVID-
UAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC.; BRIAN K.
KRONTZ; LUCY H.
KRONTZ; JOHN DOE AND
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS IN POSSES-
SION
DEFENDANTS)

CASE NO.: 08-000003CA

RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Granting the Motion to
Rest Foreclosure Sale
dated December 22, 2008
entered in Civil Case No.
08-000003CA of the Circuit
Court of the 2ND Judicial
Circuit in and for FRANK-
LIN County, Apalachicola,
Florida, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash at the Front Steps of
the FRANKLIN County
Courthouse at 33 Market
Street, Suite 203, Apalachi-
cola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m.
on the 29th day of Janu-
ary, 2009, the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Summary Fi-
nal Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 3, BLOCK 21, WEST
OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND
GULF BEACHES, UNIT
NO. ONE, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 7, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Dated this 23rd day of De-
cember, 2008.

Marcia M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons with disabilities need-


S 1100
Ing a special accommoda-
tion should contact
COURT ADMINISTRATION
at the FRANKLIN County
Courthouse at (850)
653-8861, 1-800-955-877'
(TDD) or 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.

DAVID J. STERN, PA.
900 South Pine Island
Road, Suite 400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
(954) 233-8000
January 15, 22, 2009
9777T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR FRANKLIN
COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

21ST MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.

DANIEL SIMMONS; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
DANIEL SIMMONS; FRAN-
CIS E. SIMMONS; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
FRANCIS E. SIMMONS; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPEC-
TIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUS-
TEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants)

CASE NO. 2008 332 CA

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given
that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Franklin
County, Florida, I will sell
the property situate in
Franklin County, Florida,
described as:

Lot 6, Block '2', Sun N'
Sand Subdivision, ac-
cording to the plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book
4, Page 12, of the Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida.
To include a:
2006 Nobility Home Inc
Manufactured Kingswood
Model VIN N812956A
96596507
2006 Nobility Homes Inc
Manufactured Kingwood
Model VIN N812956B
96595657
A/K/A
642 Magnolia St
Panacea, FL 32346

at public sale, to the high-
est and best bidder, for
cash, Front steps of Frank-
lin County Courthouse, 33
Market Street Apalachi-
cola, FL 32320 at 11:00
AM, on February 5th,
2009.

DATED THIS 29TH DAY
OF DECEMBER, 2008.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Witness, my hand and the
seal of this court of the
29th day of December,
2008.

CLERK OF CIRCUIT
COURT
By Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Law Offices of Daniel C.
Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive


In accordance with the
American with Disabilities
Act of 1990, persons need
a special accommodation
to participate in this pro-
ceedings should contact
the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceedings. If
hearing impaired, please
call (800) 955-9771 (TDD)
or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.
Janaury 15, 22, 2009
9780T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
IDA IN AND FOR FRANK-
LIN COUNTY

SUNTRUST MORTGAGE,
INC,
Plaintiff,

vs.

SUSAN T. GLADSTONE,
et. al.
Defendants

CASE NO 08000526CA

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
SUSAN T. GLADSTONE
Whose residence is: 362 E
BAY DR., EASTPOINT FL,
32328 & 866 FOREST AC-
RES DR., NASHVILLE, TN,
37220 & 49 MUSIC SQ W
STE 300, NASHVILLE, TN,
37203

TO:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SUSAN T. GLADSTONE
Whose residence is: 362 E
BAY DR., EASTPOINT FL,
32328 & 866 FOREST AC-
RES DR., NASHVILLE, TN,
37220

If alive, and if dead, all par-
ties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
SUSAN T. GLADSTONE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SUSAN T. GLADSTONE
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the prop-
erty described herein.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure
of Mortgage on the follow-
ing described property:

SEE EXHIBIT "A' AT-
TACHED HERETO AND
MADE A PART THEREOF

PARCEL I:

COMMENCING AT THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF FRACTIONAL SEC-
TION 19, TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA (MARKED BY AN
OLD 6" X 6" CONCRETE
MONUMENT); THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 32
MINUTES 40 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF FRAC-
TIONAL SECTION 19,
810.30 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT ON
THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
OF NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE (STATE ROAD NO.
65)1 THENCE NORTH 30
DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00
SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
OF NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE 2006.20 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT;
THENCE NORTH 59 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST, 80.00
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE
WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE (THE
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE NARROWS FROM
100 FEET TO 60 FEET AT
THIS POINT); THENCE
NORTH 30 DEGREES 07
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE WEST
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF


NORTH BAYSHORE
DIRVE, 690.00 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT
ON THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF A 60
FOOT ROADWAY;
THENCE NORTH 59 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST ALONG
THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
AFORESAID SIXTY-FOOT
ROADWAY 392.30 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 30 DE-
GREES 07 MINUTES 00
SECONDS EAST 630.00
FEET TO AN IRON PIPE
AND THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE
NORTH 59 DEGREES 53
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST, 375.49 FEET TO
AN IRON PIPE ON THE
EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
EAST BAY DRIVE;
THENCE NORTH 31 DE-
GREES 34 MINUTES 30
SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
OF EAST BAY DRIVE,
140.02 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 59 DEGREES 53
MINUTES 09 SECONDS
EAST 371.94 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 30 DE-
GREES 07 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST, 139.91
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.

PARCEL II:

COMMENCING AT THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF FRACTIONAL SEC-
TION 19, TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST,
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA (MARKED BY
ACT OLD 6" X 6" CON-
CRETE MONUMENT);
THENCE SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 32 MINUTES 40
SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE SOUTH BOUNDARY
OF FRACTIONAL SEC-
TION 19, 810.30 FEET TO
A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT ON THE EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE (STATE ROAD NO.
65)1 THENCE NORTH 30
DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00
SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
OF NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE 2006.200 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT;
THENCE NORTH 59 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST, 80.00
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE
WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE (THE
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE.NARROWS FROM
100 FEET TO 60 FEET AT
THIS POINT); THENCE
NORTH 30 DEGREES 07
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE WEST
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DIRVE, 690.00 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT
ON THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF A 60
FOOT ROADWAY;
THENCE NORTH 59 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST ALONG
THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
AFORESAID SIXTY-FOOT
ROADWAY 392.30 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 30 DE-
GREES 07 MINUTES 00
SECONDS EAST, 769.93.
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE
NORTH 59 DEGREES 5,3
MINUTES 09 SECONDS
WEST 371.94 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF EAST
BAY DRIVEL THENCE
NORTH 31 DEGREES 34
MINUTES 30 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF EAST
BAY DRIVE, 140.01 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 59 DE-
GREES 52 MINUTES 37
SECONDS EAST 368.32
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 30
DEGREES 07 MINUTES
0 0
SECONDS WEST, 139.91
FEET TO THE POINT OF


BEGINNING. SITUATE,
LYING AND BEING IN
FRACTIONAL SECTION
19, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA.

PARCEL IIIl:

COMMENCING AT A
CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF FRAC-
TIONAL SECTION 19,
TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA
AND RUN SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 32 MINUTES 40
SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE SOUTH BOUNDARY
OF FRACTIONAL SEC-
TION 19 (AS MONU-
MENTED), A DISTANCE
OF 810.30 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT
LYING ON THE EASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF NORTH
BAYSHORE DRIVE;
THENCE RUN NORTH 30
DEGREES 07 MINUTES
0 0
SECONDS EAST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 2006.20
FEET, THENCE LEAVING
SAID EASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN NORTH 59 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST 80.00
FEET TO THE WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF SAID NORTH
BAYSHORE DRIVE,
THENCE RUN NORTH 30
DEGREES 07 MINUTES
0 0
SECONDS EAST ALONG
SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 690.00 FEET TO THE
INTERSECTION WITH
THE NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF ROSE DRIVE,
THENCE RUN NORTH 59
DEGREES 53 MINUTES
0 0
SECONDS WEST ALONG
SAID NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 392.30 FEET TO AN
IRON PIPE, THENCE
LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN NORTH 30 DE-
GREES 08 MINUTES 52
SECONDS EAST 209.82
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (MARKED
NO. 679), THENCE RUN
NORTH 30 DEGREES 06
MINUTES 27 SECONDS
EAST 279.96 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT
(MARKED NO. 4261)
MARKING THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING
RUN NORTH 59 DE-
GREES 52 MINUTES 13
SECONDS WEST 379.1.5
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKED
NO. 4261) LYING ON THE

RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF EAST BAY DRIVE,
THENCE RUN NORTH 31
DEGREES 34 MINUTES
3 0
SECONDS EAST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 139.97 FEET
TO AN IRON PIPE,
THENCE LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN SOUTH 59 DE-
GREES 52 MINUTES 49
SECONDS EAST 375.56
FEET TO AN IRON PIPE,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 30
DEGREES 06 MINUTES
2 7
SECONDS WEST 139.99
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.

a/k/a 362 E BAY DR.
EASTPOINT FL 32328

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it,
on Nwabufo Umunna, At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose
address is 2901 Stirling
Road, Suite 300, Fort
Lauderdale, Florida 33312
within 30 days after the


1100
first publication of this no-
tice, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
30th day of December,
2008.

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
As Clerk of the Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tion to participate in this
proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days
prior, contact the Clerk of
the Court's disability coor-
dinator at 850-697-2112
PO. BOX 340 APALACHI-
COLA, FL 32320. If hearing
impaired, contact (TDD)
800-955-8771 via Florida
Relay System.

This is an attempt to col-
lect a debt. Any informa-
tion will be used for that
purpose.
January 15, 22, 2009
9825T
LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is given pursuant to
Florida Self-Storage Facil-
ity Act, Florida Statutes,
Chapter 83, Part IV that
Seminole Safe N Secure
will hold a sale on:

February 7, 2009 at 10:00
a.m. at 162 US 98,
Eastpoint, Florida, 32328
of the contents of
mini-warehouse(s) contain-
ing personal property of:

Jessica Leigh Yorton
April Lashley
Jerry Gleaton
Wendy Ramirez
Wayne Webb
Southern Home Painting
Jeffrey Lockley

Before the sale date of
February 7, 2009, the own-
ers may redeem their
property by payment of
the outstanding balance
and cost by mailing it to
Post Office Box 1054,
Eastpoint, Florida 32328,
or by paying in person at
the warehouse location.
January 22, 29, 2009
9862T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 08-000567-CA

IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
1989 VOLVO, VIN NO.
YV1FX8842K2377183

NOTICE OF
FORFEITURE
PROCEEDINGS

TO: MELISSA W.
THOMAS, and any other
person claiming an interest
in the described property:

The Sheriff of Franklin
County has filed a Com-
plaint of Judgment of For-
feiture with the Clerk of
Court in Franklin County,
Florida, seeking forfeiture
of the following property:

1989 Volvo (White)
Tag No. 134QWI
V i n
#YV1 FX8842K2377183

The Franklin County
Sheriff's Office seized the
above property on Novem-
ber 17, 2008, in Franklin
County, Florida. The prop-
erty is presently in the cus-
tody of the Sheriff of
Franklin County.


An Order finding probable
cause and Directing Claim-
ant to Respond has been
issued by the Court. You
are required to file a copy
of your written, defenses
with the Clerk of Court and
to serve a copy of your
written defenses on or be-
fore 30 days from first date
of publication, J. Patrick
Floyd, Esquire, Counsel
for Franklin County
Sheriff's Office, 20 Avenue
D, Apalachicola, Florida
32320. Failure to file your
defenses will result in a de-
fault judgment being en-
tered against you.

WITNESS my hand and
the Seal of the Court this
23rd day of December,
2008.
Marcia Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
January 22, 29, 2009
9863T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 08-000566-CA

IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
1991 BUICK, VIN NO.
1 G4CW53L7M 1700804

NOTICE OF
FORFEITURE
PROCEEDINGS

TO: APRIL L. TURNEY,
and any other person
claiming an interest in the
described property:

The Sheriff of Franklin
County has filed a Com-
plaint of Judgment of For-
feiture with the Clerk of
Court in Franklin County,
Florida, seeking forfeiture
of the following property:

1991 Buick (4DoorO
Tag No. L233HB
#1G4CW53L7M 1700804

The Franklin County
Sheriff's Office seized the
above property on Novem-
ber 17, 2008, in Franklin
County, Florida. The prop-
erty is presently in the cus-
tody of the Sheriff of
Franklin County

An Order finding probable
cause and Directing Claim-
ant to Respond has been
issued by the Court. You
are required to file a copy
of your written, defenses
with the Clerk of Court and
to serve a copy of your
written defenses on or be-
fore 30 days from first date
of publication, J. Patrick
Floyd, Esquire, Counsel
for Franklin County
Sheriff's Office, 20 Avenue
D, Apalachicola, Florida
32320. Failure to file your
defenses will result in a de-
fault judgment being en-
tered against you.

WITNESS my hand and
the Seal of the Court this
17th day of December,
2008.
Marcia Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
January 22, 29, 2009
9865T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALTON BROOKS JOR-
DAN, JR.,
Deceased.

F i I e
Number:08-000068-CP

NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION

The administration of the
estate of ALTON BROOKS


761070-772]00


K K K






Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| 0100 1001|00 | 1100
JORDAN, JR., deceased, January 8, 2009 from the Bayshore Drive 210.0 feet
File Number City of Apalachicola for ret- to an iron pipe; thence run Notice is hereby given
08-000068-CP is pending rofit of an existing South 59 degrees 53 mmn- that, pursuant to a Sum-
in the Circuit Court for stormwater system on Ave- utes East 210.0 feet to an mary Judgment and Order
Franklin County, Florida, nue G. The project ex- iron pipe; thence run Rescheduling Judicial
Probate Division, the ad- tends from the corner of South 30 degrees 07 mmn- Foreclosure Sale entered
dress of which is the Avenue G and Water utes West 210.0 feet to an in the above-styled cause
Franklin County Court- Street to the corner of Ave- iron pipe; thence run North in the Circuit Court of
house, 33 Market Street, nue G and Market Street, 59 degrees 53 minutes Franklin County, Florida,
Suite 203, Apalachicola, Apalachicola. West 210.0 feet to the the Clerk of Franklin
Franklin County, Florida POINT OF BEGINNING. County will sell the prop-
32320. The estate is tes- Interested persons may Situate, lying and being in erty situated in Franklin
tate, and the date of the comment upon these ap- Fractional Section 19, County, Florida, described
will is October 4, 1999. plications or submit a writ- Township 8South, Range as:
The names and addresses ten request for a staff re- 6West, Franklin County,
of the personal representa- port containing proposed Florida. Description of Mortgaged
tive and the personal agency action regarding and Personal Property
representative's Attorney the application by writing Being Lot 6, Tarpon
are set forth below. ALL IN- the Northwest Florida Shores, Unit 3, according Lot 21, Block "86", ST.
TERESTED PERSONS Water Management Dis- to the unrecorded plat to GEORGE ISLAND GULF
ARE NOTIFIED THAT: trict's ERP Office, Suite thereof on file in the Frank- BEACHES, UNIT NO. 5,
2-D, The Delaney Center lin County Planning and according to the map or
All persons on whom this Building, 2252 Killearn Zoning Office, 33 Com- plat thereof as recorded in
notice is served who have Center Blvd., Tallahassee, merce Street, Apalachi- Plat Book 3, Page(s) 16,
objections that challenge FL. Such comments or re- cola, Florida. Public Records of Franklin
the validity of the will, the quests must be received County, Florida.
qualifications of the per- by 5:00 p.m. within 14 Any person claiming an in-
sonal representative venue days from date of publica- terest in the surplus from The street address of
or jurisdiction of-this Court tion. the sale, if any, other than which is 301 Bradford
are required to file their the property owner as of Street, St. George Island,
objections with this Court No further public notice the date of the lis pend- Florida 32328.
WITHIN' THE LATER OF will be provided regarding ens, must file a claim
THREE MONTHS AFTER these applications. Per- within sixty (60) days after at a Public Sale, to the
THE DATE OF THE FIRST sons wishing to remain ad- the sale. highest and best bidder,
PUBLICATION OF THIS vised of further proceed- for cash, at the front steps
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS ings or to receive a copy DATED: January 13, 2009 of Franklin County Court-
AFTER THE DATE OF of the Technical Staff Re- house, 33 Market Street,
SERVICE OF A COPY OF port should request that in MARCIA M. JOHNSON Apalachicola, Florida
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. writing to the address Clerk of the Circuit Court 32320 on February 19th,
above or by e-mail to By: Michele Maxwell 2009 at 11:00 a.m.
All creditors of the dece- ErpPermits@nwfwmd.stat Deputy Clerk
dent and other persons e.fl.us. Any person claiming an in-
having claims or demands Garvin B. Bowden, Esq, terest in the surplus from
against decedent's estate Substantially affected per- Gardner, Bist, Wiener, the sale, if any, other than
on whom a copy of this sons are entitled to re- Wadsworth & Bowden PA. the property owner, as of
notice is served within quest an administrative 1300 Thomaswood Drive the date of the Lis Pend-
three months after the date hearing, pursuant to Title Tallahassee, Florida 32308 ens, must file a claim
of the first publication of 28, Florida Administrative January 22, 29, 2009 within 60 days after the
this notice must file their Code, regarding the pro- 9878T sale.
claims with this Court posed agency action by IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
WITHIN THE LATER OF submitting a written re- OF THE SECOND JUDI Dated: January 13th, 2009.
THREE MONTHS AFTER quest after reviewing the CIAL F RNCUOT IN AND
THE DATE OF THE FIRST staff report. CIALR CIRCUIT IN ANDMarcia M. Johnson
PUBLICATION OF THIS January 22, 2009 FLORFRANKINDA Clerk of the Circuit Court
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYSg9877T Franklin County, Florida
ATERVICTHOE A COPYTE OF IN THE CIRCUIT COURT CAPITAL CITY BANK, By: Michele Maxwell
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. OF THE SECOND JUDI Plaintiff,January22292009
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND January 22, 29, 2009
Any person entitled to ex- FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY vs.
empt property is required FLORIDALOUIS D. PARKER and 1160
to file a petition for deter CAPITAL CITY BANK, UNKNOWN TENANTSS,
mination of exempt prop- Plain TY BANKiff UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Tri Colored Sheltie Male
erty with this Court WITHIN ait Defendants. Name is Keefer, Has a few
THE LATER OF FOUR CASE NO 08-000451 CA teeth missing in front. Lost
MONTHS AFTER vs 08000451CA on the 16th in Barrier
THEDATE OF THE FIRST JAMIE D. CRUM; EMILY N. NOTICE OF SALE PUR- Dunes. 227-9348/229-9018
PUNOTBLICATION OR WITHISN CRUM A/K/A EMILY SUANT TO CHAPTER 45
FORTY DAYS FROM THE NIXON CRUM; UNITED
DATE OF TERMINATION STATES OF AMERICA DE- NOTICE is given pursuant
OF ANY PROCEEDMININ APARTMENT OF THE to a Final Judgment of
ANYPROC ING IN- TREASURY INTERNAL Foreclosure dated January
STRUCTION, ADMISSIONRAT RVAD UNKNOWN 08-000451-CA, of the Cir-
ITY OF THE WILL ,O R INVAL- TENANTSS, cuit Court of the Second
VOLVING ANY OTHER Defendant. Judicial Circuit, in and for
ATTR AF ANYR C4RFranklin County, Florida, in MERCHANDISE
MATTER AFFECTING ANY CASE NO. 08-000443-CA which CAPITAL CITY
PART OF THE ESTATE BANK is the Plaintiff and 3100-Antiques
SUBJECT TO SECTION NOTICE OF SALE PUR- LOUIS D. PARKER and 3110-Applian Ces
732.402, FLORIDA STAT- SUANTTO CHAPTER 4 UNKNOWN TENANTS) 3120-Arts & Crafts
UTES. 3130SUANT TO CHAPTER 45 UNKNOWN TENANTS) 3130- Auctions
are the Defendants, I will 3140 Baby Items
A surviving spouse k NOTICE is given pursuant sell to the highest and best 3150 Building Supplies
in surv tive s se use to a Final Judgment of bidder for cash at the front 3160 Business
ng an elective share must Foreclosure dated January door of the Franklin Equipment
file an elective share within take 5, 2009, in Case No. County Courthouse in Ap- 3170- Compulletibles
elective share within thelaw. 08-000443-CA, of the Cir- alachicola, Franklin 3190-Electronics
time provcuit Court of the Second County, Florida at 11:00 3200- Firewood
All other creditors of the Judicial Circuit, in and for a.m. on February 19, 2009, 3210- Free Pass it On
All other creditors of the Franklin County, Florida, in the property set forth in the 3220 Furniture
decedent and persons which CAPITAL CITY Final Judgment of Foreclo- 3230 Garage/Yard Sales
having claims or demands BANK is the Plaintiff and sure and more particularly 3250 Good Thingsto Eat
against the decedents es JAMIE D. CRUM; EMILY described as follows: 3260- Health &Fitness t
tate must file their N. CRUM A/K/A EMILY 3270 Jewelry/Clothing
THREE MONTHS AFTER NIXON CRUM; UNITED Lot 14, DRIFTWOOD, a 3280 Machinery/
THREE MNT AFTERS STATES OF AMERICA DE- subdivision, according to 3290 Equipment
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PARTMENT OF THE the map or plat thereof as 3290 Medical Equipment
PUBLICATION OF THIS ME O THE e map orp t r 3300 Miscellaneous
NOTICE. T TREASURY -INTERNAL recorded in Plat Book 6, 3310 Musical instruments
REVENUE SERVICE; and Page(s) 42, Public Rec- 3320 Plants & Shrubs/
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS UNKNOWN TENANTSS, ords of Franklin County, Supplies
AND OBJECTIONS NOT are the Defendants, I will Florida. 3330-Restaurant/Hotel
sell to the highest and best 3340 Sporting Goods
SO FILED WILL BE FOR- bidder for cash at the front Any person claiming an in- 3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell)
EVER BARRED. door of the Franklin terest in the surplus from
The date of the first publl- County Courthouse in Ap- the sale, if any, other than
ation of this Notice is Jan- alachcola, Franklin the property owner as of
catonofthsNotceJan- County, Florida at 11:00 the date of the lis pend- 1 3130
uary 22, 2009. a.m. on February 19, 2009, ens, must file a claim
Personal Representative: the property set forth in the within sixty (60) days after AbalAuction.com
PATRICIA DIANA TODD Final Judgment of Foreclo- the sale.AbalAuction.com
2338 East 34th Place sure and more particularly DATED: January 13, 2009 Estate Trust Coins
aCtlda described as follows: 850-510-2501 AB 2387
Panama City, Florida MARCIA M. JOHNSON
32405 rsonal Commencing atthe South- Clerk of the Circuit Court
Representative west Corner of Fractional BY: Michele Maxwell
J. GORDON SHULER of Section 19, Township Deputy Clerk
SHULER AND SHULER 8South, Range 6 South
Post Office Drawer 850 West, Franklin County, Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Apalachicola, Florida Florida (marked bya6"x6 Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
32329 concrete monument); Wadsworth & Bowden PA.
(850) 653-9226 thence run South 89 de- 1300 Thomaswood Drive
Florida Bar NO 0700959 grees32 minutes 40 sec- Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Ca-
orda Bar NO 00959 onds East along the South January 22, 29, 2009 CaS
January 22, 29, 2009 boundary of Fractional9890T Clerk nee
9871T Section 19, 810.3 feet to a IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
Notice of Receipt of concrete monument on the FR FRA Tii convenience
Stormwater Application East right-of-way of North FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
Bayshore Drive (State FLORACTION MUSt be able
Notice is hereby given that Road 65); thence run
pursuant to Chapter 373, North 30 degrees 07 mmn- REGIONS BANK, et and/or v
Florida Statutes and Chap- utes East along the East Pi c.,
ter 62-346, Florida Admin- right-of-way of North Plaintiff, House Kee
istrative Code (F.A.C.), the Bayshore Drive 632.1. feet House Keep
following application for an to an iron pipe and the v at Buccane
Individual Stormwater Per- POINT OF BEGINNING of SHARON Y BRADBERRY
mit has been received by tract described herein. t AD Georg
the Northwest Florida From the POINT OF BE- efal.,
Water Management Dis- GINNING, continue North Defendants.
trict: 30 degrees 07 minutes Case No. 08000288 -CA For More lnf
East along the East ase No. 08-000288-CA
Application #583 received right-of-way of North NOTICE OF SALE


Call:

V^ Toll Free:

Fax:

,i Email:

Email:


shier
ded at mini
Store "Blue",
to work night
weekends.

per's Neede
eer Inn on St.
e Island

ormation Call:
127-2163


HELP IS ONLY A


10,PH ONE CALL





To Place Your Classified ad


THE STAR


in


t6v
APALACHIC E
&CARRABEl IM ES


850-747-5020

800-345-8688

850-747-5044

thestar@pcnh.com

thetimes@pcnh.cor


The Times Thursday, January 22, 2009 7B


S 4100 | 6100 I 6110 | 6170
Small Studio Apt. for ma- For Sale By owner, 2000
ture, single person, $500 Buccaneer Zone 3 single
everything furnished, Call wide 16x80 on 2 lots (30 x
stick. Conflict Management 850-697-8623 100) great condition, 24
stic. Conlinag etr114th St. Apalachicola, FI,
Coordinator 1 br house $70,000, 850-653-9231
iood. The Florida Fish and Wild- c/h/a, w/d incl --9ett
Call life Conservation Commis- C/h/aN w/d incl. 8 Rent to Own
at 150 slon is seeking a conflict No pets. 850-653-9788 Very nice 1 br apartment
management and outreach 850-615-0058 in Carrabelle, fully fur- Own your piece of para-
- specialist for a 1-year con- nished, patio, carport, dise now. $0 down, $500
tract. The candidate will must see to appreciate, mo. 2 br, 1 left, MH, each
work with government, citi- Convenience store down- $750 month, includes dish with its own dock on
zens, and businesses to town Apalachicola, 47 Ave network & all util. $300 de- Crooked River in
reduce human-bear con- E Call 850-899-4512 or posit, Minimum of 6 mo. Carabelle, call 509-2460
flicts. Duties involve work- 850-227-5052 for info. lease required. Call
ing with public officials, co- 850-697-3246 *
ordinating volunteers, and J311F-1
WTOP delivering presentations. | 6200
ITOP Must to be a self-directed For Rent Space available Beach Rentals
Del professional who is inde- for small business or of- B 6120
Del pendent, motivated, and fice. Utilities included. By Owner
possesses excellent com- Downtown Historic Apa- St. Georae
munication and problem lachicola. 29 Ave. E. Island Beach Homes-Condos
solving skills. Experience (upstairs) For nfo call $160 wk ee Satelite, www.BeachRealtynet
in conflict management or Carol 850-653-3871 Garbage included. pool Vacation Rental Homes
outreach is required. Can- table. 12X65' deck with Exclusively BY OWNER
giving didate is responsible for Beautiful view, Call
Never project-related costs such 850-6535114
List, as travel and lodging, and 85-63-11
$675 will work in Franklin .1iJq i ,ei
County, Florida. Compen- | 6110 *
station is $35,000. Email a61
cover letter and resume 13s
with 3 references to Carrabelle
david.telesco@myfwc.com 3 BR 2 BA Unfurnished
plete by February 6, 2009. 3 BR, 2 BA. Unfurnished
et all by February 6 1 br, 1 ba & 2 br, apart- W/D, D/W, CH& A, Deck,
$849. ment. unfurn electric/water Poolside. Covered boat REALESTATEFORSALE.
$49. inc. Tile floors, part cy- parking. Longterm. PRICE 710- Homes
r press panelling, private REDUCED. For appoint- 7110- BeachHome/
d- l? i ,* deck 1 block from beach ment, Call 850-877-7696. Property
| 4130 4 0 4 4 0 2 5 5 7 3 7120 Commercial
850-653-6459 Snow Birds/ 7130- Condo/Townhouse
Lanark Village 7140- Farms & Ranches
d POSTAL & GOVT JOB Village 7150 Lots and Acreage
wood POSTAL & GOVT JOB1 br, 1 ba, Renovated/ fur- 7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
$150 INFO FOR SALE? nished end unit, new kitch 7170- Waterfront
BOX 2 br, 1 ba, tWO and bath, mini. 4 month 7180- Investment
cautin units available lease $545/mo + dep., no 7190Pr- Out-of-Town
IcaULIUo i $600 and $800 per month smoking, pet considered. Real Estate
850-653-9087 (850) 653-3838. 7200 Timeshare
Y- ou NEVER have to pay _1[]1
PI for information about
set in federal or postal jobs. If 3 40 l 7100
War- you see a job 3 br, 1 ba Lanark Village, 6140 7100
ar "guarantee", contact the $700 mo + deposit no 1 br house for rent in Let's Trade
Can guarantee contact e smoking no pets Susan Carrabelle. remodeled, Houses
Th" Td Jones Bluewater Re-alty w/d hookup, fenced yard, oss
The Federal Trade Group (850) 566-7584 Low util. $500 per month My beautiful $275,000
is Americas consumer plus dep. Call 850- home in Tenn., with low
protectionage 697 4080 or 850 591 5899 taxes and ins., or my
protection agency. beautiful $170,000 home in
Bed ww.c.govjobscams 1/2 Off First Month 1, & 2, br North Carolina for your
vetail 1 o877 /oFTCHELP Rent!!! Apalachicola, FL. beautiful home in the Pan-
uality 2 br, 2 ba, Modern Apt Call 850-643-7740. handle, Call 252-926-9525
ul sell A public service with washer and dryer, or tomandritac@
avail. message from the FTC central AC, Ave E, Apa- earthhlink.net
and The News Herald lachicola $700 mo.,+ dep.W Port St. Joe, St. George
Classified Advertising Call 653-1240 or 670-1211. 3 br, 2 ba, On The Island and St. James Bay
Department __Carrabelle River. Garage,Prevusly Bank Owned
$1,000 month $500 de-Property. Priced way below
1BR/1BA furnished apart- posit. 850-545-8813 market value Prices start
unless ment, downtown Apa- ing at $35,000. Please call
nodel lachicola. satellite, WF, Apalach Newer, 2 br, 2 Counts Real Estate Group
nmmo, i h newly renovated, balcony ba, ch/a, dw, w/d, hkup, at 850-249-3615.
r975 laundry on site. Short or sm. pet okw/dep $750 mo Why Rent
long term rental. Call + dep. Call 850-670-8266 When You
850-653-8801 Carabelle, 3 br, 2 ba, Can
W/D, large lot, $700 mo. Own A Brand
3 --$350 dep. call New Home?
850-545-8813. THE AVE-
H EALESTATEOfRRENT Apalachicola NUESat
6100- Business/ 1 br 1 ba apts. from $400/ Carrabelle KEOUGH's
Commercial mo. Call 850-381-7746 Beach LANDING.
6110 Apartmens Green
6120 Beach Rentals 3 br, 2 ba, large lot, w/d, certified and
6130 Condo/Townhouse deck, appliances, ref. HOP
t 6140 -House Rentals Furnished Loft Apt, in his- $750/mo. 860-233-0676 approved.
6150- Roommate Wanted toric district. Cbl/wtr incl or e-mail Affordable Liv-
6160- Roomfor Rent 1100sf high ceilings, Pn- clapparten@sbclob- ing on the
6180-Out-of-Town Rentals vate entrance and deck. al.net Forgotten
6190- Timeshare Rentals No smkg/ pets. $750 mo. Coast
6200 Vacation Rentals +$750 dep. 850-653-3838 Carrabelle 3 bdrm, 2 bath
Fabulous homes ranging
State of Florida-Franklin County Health Department Private! from
Job Announcement P 1250-2000
4 br 2 ba w/FP, all apple sqft in
THIS POSITION IS BEING RE-ADVERTISED mcl dishwasher, w/d Pool, Carrabelle's
mini Community Health Nursing Director SES hot tub, sauna + guest apt Newest Subdi-
blue). Position Type: Full-Time with full bath $1200/mo 1 vision only /4
work Position number: 64027996 yr lease, security deposit, mile from the
ends. Annual Salary: $45,000.00 -$70,000.00 cr check and ref required, Carrabelle
e nfo Closing Date: 01/29/09 N o n s m o k e r s River
Educational Requirements: 1-229-403-7701
A minimum of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Townhomes for rent, Pricing from
(B.S.N.) required. A Master of Science in Nursing Jones Homestead- ick $1our Lot
(M.S.N.) is preferred. 1 5 years of Public Health Ponderosa pines. End Choose
ng Nursing experience and previous supervisory of year special. First Your Model.
FT experience preferred. month rent free with Only 8 lots left!
. Call Licensure Requirements: deposit and 12 month BEC & Com-
Licensed with the State of Florida Board of Nursing lease. 2 br and 3br pany, Inc.
This is an administrative nursing position requiring units available. Call 656-260
S planning and directing c ,i i.i. i....... pro 850-227-8404 or 850
S grain a countyhealth. i. ....... i,, I. CHD
serves a county population of approximately 11,000 227 9732 for more in-
inhabitants. The individual in this position exercises formation.
independent judgment in formulating policies and 1n7150
procedures which have significant impact on service Year roundrental on canal
delivery and accountability. The employee performs In SGI, 2 br, 2 ba, nice or Sale y
duties under the supervision and direction of the CHD yard. Boats welcome!! No Owner
Administrator, and may serve as the Acting Admin- pets. $775 mo. Call 1 acre lot high and dry,
istrator in the Administrator's absence. This position 413-454-4253 cleared with trees. Re-
data sets under his/her control. Incumbents may be Captain JR for more de-
required to perform emergency duty before, during, tails at 850-670-8858
S and/or beyond normal work hours or days. 6170 home or cell 653-5030I
S The State of Florida is an AA/EEO employer. Vet-
erans' preference will be given to eligible veterans
and their spouses in accordance with Chapter 295 of
the Florida Statues. Notification to the hiring author 2 br, 1 ba
%d ity must be made in advance to allow sufficient time Ar
to provide the accommodation. Emergency Duties, huge lot, 3 Rivers Area
Background screening and fingerprinting required. Carrabelle, $495 mo+ utili-
ties & dep. 850-653-3270
Please, choose one of the following for submitting
your application: AUTOMOTIVEZ MNAI
1. Onlineathttps://peoplefirstmyflorida.com/logon.htm
2. Fax your application to People First Staffing-Attn:
Data Entry. Put on the fax cover letter: "For position 3 br, 2 ba MH, quite 1 8100 Antique & Collectibles
#640279',. ,... ,. . . .,.1.. First Web site." acre lot, Carabelle area 810 Sprs Utility vehicles
Faxto: ,,4 ... semi furnished, ref., sec, 8130 Trucks
.3... l .... . h I . i .... 81..... ".. dep., lease req., $550/mo, 8140 Vans
Si." I i' .. ni .. --i Call 814-282-9933 8150 Commercial
8170 Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210- Boats
8220 Personal Watercraft
A P 8230 Sailboats
8240 Boat & Marine
Supplies
8310- Aircraft/Aviation
Apalachee Center Inc. is a Joint Commission Accred- 8320- AT'/off Road Vehicles
ited behavioral health center dedicated to assisting 8340 Motorhomes
consumers of mental health and addiction services. We =._-
are making a difference in our community by empow- 82lO 0
ering our clients to manage their illness and take back
control of their lives. We are recruiting for the fol-
lowing available positions:

Staff Assistant:
Qualifications Include: High school diploma or its 34' Lhurs Open
equivalent; three years of secretarial experience; must Fisherman
possess a typing score of at least 55 CWPM Boat
S Responsibilities Include: Secretarial/clerical functions Twin 8. Derot Die-
to include typing correspondence, memorandums, sels, Fly Bridge, Out
forms, reports and confidential information; answering Riggers, Diesel Genera-
tor (new), full cabin,
telephone lines for assigned staff; handle various tasks Galley, Trim Tabs, Bait
related to maintenance of office systems, records and Station, Platform with
ladder. Bottom and


files; may provide supervision to assigned staff Zinc's good. Runs
Good! Will Trade! Ask-
ing $39,000 OBO At
To view a complete listing of our opportunities, Panama City Marina slip
please visit our website: www.apalacheecenter.org 603. Call 8508- 71-9300
Applications are received in person or mail to:
Human Resources
2634-J Capital Circle N.E., COMPLETE PACKAGES
Tallahassee, FL 32308 FROM $4,995
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE background check A Welded,MAlumin um Boats
SmokerIBBQ, Fryers
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer BonifayFlorida
m Drug-Free Workplace www.xtremeindustries.com


Call Our New Numbers Now!


K K K


, m n L11 ll**J.L^-1 2jj 'M-A


]






B8 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 22, 2009


Poirier engaging as Ben Franklin


Actor David Poirier opened the 12th
annual theatre at the Dixie Theatre last
weekend with a stellar performance
in the one-man show "Revolutionary
Wizard: Ben Franklin."
Dressed in resplendent 18th-century
attire, Franklin shared lessons of his
life, describing himself as a newspaper
publisher who today might be regarded
as a "media baron."
He touched on controversial details
of his past, such as being the cause of
creating "a naughty girl with child" and


his "intrigues with low women."
Mostly, though, Poirier brought to
life the range of warm emotions in this
great American's life, from losing his
wife to becoming estranged from his
son. All performed with wonderful good
humor by an accomplished actor, slated
to appear again in shows this season.
One point that did not come up in
the script, written by Eric Peterson,
is the fact that Franklin County was
named after the great inventor and
statesman when it was formed in 1832.


The entire Mason clan championed Tyler's suggestion
to name their brother "Tebow." Rhiannon, Tyler,
Katie (holding Cody Tebow) and Daniel are fourth-
generation Gator fans.


TEBOW from page B2


&, Gulf Coast
Medical Center ,

Edgewater ]
Beach Resort y-

y, _., jui


Vendors: FREE Internet access available, sponsored by KnoEogy!

Major Media Sponsors:MA
D. ] ISCO]1:Do] :[o] E IGFREEPHY IC I P RES PRESENED]BY
DI:1ECTORIESANDMEDoICA[e JTIlONCAR DSANDCLEARCHANNlELRADIOPE RSONA1L ITIES
SURGI CAL EQUIPM ET:CH1NNE L 7l ON -AIR P iRS iNALI













Major Med a Sponsors:


I


WPAP


KNOLOGY+


"I played with it and
played with it," said Kelley,
who ultimately abandoned
the pursuit. "There were
no names that I liked that
started with a T."
When creative spelling
failed, Kelley looked to the
universe for a sign.
When Tebow lost the
Heisman to Oklahoma
quarterback Sam Bradford,
Kelley fixed her eyes on
the national championship
game.
If she gave birth during
the game, Kelley decided,
she'd have no choice but to
name her son Tebow.
Kelley watched the
game at her Groveland
home with her mom and
kids Rhiannon, Daniel,
Katie and Tyler. It was a 24-
14 victory, full of thrills, but
lacking in labor pains.
Those came the
following day, as Kelley
checked into the South
Lake Women's Center in
Clermont.
At the hospital, Kelley
and Jack continued the
debate. Kelley consented
to the name Cody but could
not let go of Tebow.
"I kept going back to
wanting Tebow in there
because of Tyler," Kelley
said. "I couldn't break his
heart."
As the couple considered
the Gator quarterback, they
thought of his Christian
upbringing and missionary
work throughout the globe.
Suddenly, the name didn't
seem such a bad choice
after all.
"I know that had he not
been a Christian and not
been the person he is off
the playing field, it would


not have been an option.
We would not have named
our kid after someone who
only played football well,"
Kelley said.
At 10:59 p.m. on Friday,
Jan. 9, Cody Tebow Mason
entered the world, looking
as fit and sturdy as the
quarterback for whom he is
named.
He weighed 9 pounds,
8 ounces and measured 21
inches long.
All the Gator-loving
Mason children were
thrilled with the baby's
middle name, especially
Tyler.
"He was happy, but no
matter what we told him,
he wouldn't have called him
anything else," Kelley said.
"He tells people, 'That's
my brother, I named him
Tebow Mason."'
The day after little
Tebow's birth, the elder
Tebow announced he
would return to Florida for
a final season.
Kelley, who is scouring
the Internet for a number
15 infant jersey, was thrilled
to hear the news.
"I can put the baby in all
the Gator stuff one more
year," she said.
Kelley is anxious to see
if the moniker sticks.
When her infant finally
enters school, his teachers
undoubtedly will call him by
the first name listed on the
roll not Tebow, but Cody.
"Whether he corrects
them and says, 'Well I use
my middle name' that will
really be up to him," Kelley
said.
But for now, he's Tebow,
a welcome addition to the
Gator Nation.


Our local real estate experts have identified what they feel are the best

values around and are offering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In

this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port

St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Bias, St. George Island, Carrabelle and

surrounding areas.


'ILS# 234282 $530,000 St. George Island)
ST GEORGE
PLANTATION

S Located on a
2nd tier lot in
Pelican Beach
Village, this
lovely home has
recently been renovated with new furniture,
bamboo flooring, carpet, granite, tile, paint,
and light fixtures. Creative floor plan has wall
of windows, vaulted ceilings, 2 bedrooms
plus loft bedroom, 3.5 baths, and the large
PRIVATE POOL has direct beach access.


John Shelby, Broker
800-344-7570
850-927-4777
www.sgirealty.com


I-FQALIEOB 0F(I ERi


Double wide Home
located at 545 Oyster Road
Apalachicola, FL 32320
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath
Home has boat shed and utility building
Call (850)653-6013 (after 5 PM)
or (850)653-5450


712 .Call Today!

850-227-1278


NE ~*I


and other to hl




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs