Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00009
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: January 15, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 2009 www. a palach time s.com 50C


Pendleton's closes:

A sign of the times


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
Lisa Mitchem, left, and Judy Denham, right, cut the ribbon opening the doors of St. James Health and
Rehabilitation to the public. Behind them is Dr. Stephen Miniat, left, physical therapist Tom Brocato, center,
and County Commissioner Smokey Parish, right. At far left is Director of Nursing Beverly Martin.



Nursing home opens doors


St. James to
be largest
private-sector
employer

By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

About three dozen
people were on hand Jan.
8 when the new St. James
Health and Rehabilitation
Center officially opened its
doors to the public with a
ribbon-cutting.
The facility is at 239
Crooked River Road, east
of Carrabelle, adjacent to
the St. James Bay housing
development.
"We're out here to cel-
ebrate the opening of this
facility, which will provide a
much needed service," said
Commissioner Smokey
Parrish, on hand for the
ribbon-cutting. "This will
increase and enhance the
quality of life for a lot of
people in Franklin County."
The new facility brings
nursing home services to
Franklin County for the
first time since August2002,


The dining room at St. James is bright and spacious.


when the Bay St. George
facility in Eastpoint, no
relation to the current St.
James facility, shut down.
The St. James nursing
home was built by Third
Street Management LLC
of Hickory, N.C., and is one
of about 40 nursing homes
owned and managed by the


firm.
"We want to provide a
facility not only to put the
community to work, but
to provide a service to the
community," said Joyce
Denham, vice president for
strategic development for
Third Street. "Many of your
health professionals are


lom brocato of Apalachicola will oversee physical therapy at bt. James bay.


Phone: (850) 653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews@starfl.com
Fax: (850) 653-8036


driving to Tallahassee and
Panama City to work. We
want to bring those people
back home."
Denham said St. James
will employ 125 workers
when it is in full operation
and will house 90 residents,
making it the largest pri-
vate-sector employer in the
county.
Linda McCord, assistant
director of nursing, said
interviews for the house-
keeping and dietary depart-
ments and the office and
the nursing staff will begin
in mid-January. She said St.
James will employ about 25
certified nursing assistants
(CNA), and the facility will
provide in-house training
for CNA applicants.
"I'll be teaching CNA
classes," she said. "The
program prepares them
to take the certification
course. Classes will be 8
a.m. to 5 p.m., five days a
week for two weeks, and
there is no charge. We only
ask that they stay and work
with us for a year after they
are certified."
McCord said applica-
tions to work at St. James
are available at the Cham-
See ST. JAMES A5


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Three service stations
in the county closed their
doors during the last
quarter of 2008.
Two were victims of
a struggling economy,
while the third, one of the
last full-service stations
in the Panhandle. had a
different reason for clos-
ing shop after more than
half a century.
Latest to go under
was the Chevron sta-
tion at the intersection
of Market Street and Av-
enue E in Apalachicola,
which closed Jan. 1.
A sign reading "closed
for winter" has been cov-
ered by a "for rent" sign.
Owner of the Chevron
franchise, Gary Jones of
Ritz Stores, out of Crest-
view, said he does not
plan to return and hopes
the property's owner,
John L. Miller, soon will
find a tenant to take over
in the last year of Ritz's
five-year lease.
Jones said he has
closed two of his 15 ser-
vice stations and can-
celed plans to open two
new ones. He told Apala-
chicola Chamber of Com-
merce Director Anita
Grove he chose to close
properties he leased but
did not own.
He said his reason for
the closures was simple.
"Economics," he said
on Jan. 2, as he and fel-
low staffers cleared out
inventory from the ser-
vice station, which locals
often refer to as "the
Taco Bell" because of its
previous status.
"We enjoy doing busi-
ness in Franklin County
and are members of the
chamber, but these are
tough economic times,"
he said.
Much of the equip-
ment and goods was
moved to the Ritz loca-
tion in Eastpoint, which
remains open. Jones said
he acquired that store


--


'It wasn't due to
any financial
problem. We
had a healthy
business. It was
killing me and
my son. I stood
it as long as I
could, 54 years.
I don't think
anybody else
could have stood
it as long.'

Jimmy Pendleton
Owner, Pendleton's

from the former owner,
"Mr. Cheap Butts."
The service station
down the street from
Jones' Eastpoint loca-
tion, Rick's BP closed
late last year as well, vic-
tim of a bankruptcy.

Last full-service gas
station in the county
Pendleton's in Apala-
chicola, the last full ser-
vice station in the county,
shut down in October.
"Daddy decided he
had had enough," said
Tommy Pendleton, who
operated the station with
his father, Jimmy Pend-
leton. "He was ready to
retire. He had been in
business since 1954.
See PENDLETON A5


ONDRACEK NAMED
COUNTY LIBRARIAN


At the Jan. 6 meeting of the Franklin County
Commission, Denise Butler, right, introduced
Glenda Ondracek of Cape San Bias as the
new director for Franklin County Public Library.
Ondracek holds a master's in library, media
and information studies from the University of
South Florida and has more than 30 years of
experience as a librarian. She has worked as a
librarian in the Florida public school system and
at the University of Tampa. She was also law
librarian at the Gulf Correctional Institution.


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Letter to the Editor ................... A4
Sheriff's Report ....................... B5
Church News ......................... B3


Society News......................... B2
Tide Chart ........................... A7
Classifieds ........................ B6-B7


o FREEDOM
NEWSPAPERS*INTERACTIVE


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
School News & Society Friday at 11 a.m.
Real Estate Ads Thursday at 11 a.m.
Classified Display Ads Friday at11 a.m.
Classified Line Ads Monday at 5 p.m.


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YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


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A2 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 15, 2009


Officer commended for nabbing gang members


Apalachicola

Sgt. Chet Turner

tracked suspects

for 18 hours

By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

At the Jan. 6 meeting
of the Apalachicola City
Commission, Mayor Van
Johnson presented Sgt.
John Chester Turner Jr.


with the following com-
mendation for outstand-
ing police work:
"Your dedication to
justice has led to several
arrests and has created
a safer community for all
the citizens of our city.
Through your actions,
these subjects will no lon-
ger be a threat to the citi-
zens of Apalachicola. You
are an asset to your com-
munity, and it is an honor
to have you as a member
of the Apalachicola Police
Department."
The commendation
came after Turner spear-
headed an investigation


that led to the arrests of
two South Florida gang
members who were
charged with aggravat-
ed battery with a deadly
weapon.
Turner said the pair
threatened a juvenile
in Apalachicola with a
handgun and kicked him
repeatedly in the face af-
ter knocking him to the
ground. They were inter-
rupted by a neighbor who
was able to give the police
a tag number for a van
that was driven by the at-
tackers.
"I tracked them for
18 hours," said Turner.


"They ran and hid in the
woods, and they threw the
gun, a .38 revolver, off the
Apalachicola Bridge. They
threw the bullets into the
woods, and I got those."
Turner said he was
aided in the investigation
by Apalachicola Deputy
Spence Massey and Car-
rabelle Sgt. Craig Kin-
caid.
"We knew they were
going to go pick up a girl-
friend in Carrabelle, and
we knew where the girl
lived. Sgt. Kincaid went
and waited for them, made
the arrest and brought the
two back to Apalachico-
la."
Apalachicola Police
Chief Bobby Varnes said,
"As a result of his investi-
gation, we found out that
some people who are now
in jail are gang members
from South Florida. The
state's attorney said his
work on this case is so
good that there will al-
most certainly be prison
time."


PHOTO BY LOIS SWOBODA
Sgt. John Chester Turner of the Apalachicola Police
Department.


CELEBRATE "THE YEAR OF THE OX"
WITH THE GULF ALLIANCEfor LOCAL ARTS.
As fate would have it, our Annual Meeting coincides with the
beginning of 2009 Chinese New Year of the Ox. The Ox is a sign of
prosperity through fortitude and hard work. The Ox is a born leader,
being quite dependable and possessing an innate ability to achieve
great things. The Ox is unswervingly patient, tireless in work, and
capable of enduring any amount of hardship without complaint.
Become an Ox and make a resolution to support your Local Arts.

COME JOIN THE ARTS ALLIANCE!
Thursday, January 29, 2009 Port St. Joe Garden Club 216 Eighth Street
6:00 p.m. Meet & Greet 6:30 p.m. Annual Business Meeting
7:30 p.m. Reception & Party


A RSVP (ASAP)
GULF..ALLIANCEfor LOCAL ARTS To Ally Sanxay
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customers in the neighborhood. Upgrades to services in bundles available at additional cost.
FullHouse bundles are available to residential customers for a limited time and are subject to change without notification. Eligibility for Ful House packages requires
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Collins Realty, Inc.


"St. George Island's

Real Estate Specialists"1


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GULF VIEW CONDO 2BR/ SECLUDED BAY FRONT 3BR/ GULF VIEW beachside 3BR/
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MLS#208460......$369,000 MLS#207443............ $875,000 MLS#208961 ........$1,200,000


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MLS#208823........ $1,295,000 MLS#201207........... $390,000



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CANAL FRONT homesite with boat dock. Beautiful vegetation and located in
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Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce
(850) 653-9419
www.apalachicolabay.org


U






Thursday, January 15, 2009


Local


The Times I A3


Supreme Court says no to


Georgia 'water grab'


By Ben Evans
The Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court
said Monday it will let stand
a lower court ruling that
threatens to unravel Geor-
gia's long-term water plans
for the Atlanta region, giv-
ing Florida and Alabama a
pivotal victory in the states'
long-running water wars.
The court's decision rais-
es fundamental questions
about Georgia's rights to
Lake Lanier, a huge federal
reservoir outside Atlanta
that serves as the city's
main water source. It also
could play a key role in de-
ciding related water-rights
disputes in lower courts.
"Today's decision by the
U.S. Supreme Court con-
firms that federal law does
not permit Atlanta to take
more and more water from
Lake Lanier to the detri-
ment of downstream inter-
ests," said Alabama Gov.
Bob Riley. "Georgia tried
to pull off a massive wa-
ter grab, and this decision
makes clear that Georgia's
actions were in blatant vio-
lation of federal law."


The case involves a 2003
water-sharing agreement
with the Army Corps of En-
gineers that would have al-
lowed Georgia to take far
more water from Lanier for
its drinking supply through-
out the coming decades. Ex-
perts say withdrawals from
Lake Lanier could have
increased from 13 to 22 per-
cent of the lake's capacity.
Florida and Alabama
contested the pact, say-
ing the lake was built for
hydropower, and providing
water to Georgia was not
an authorized use.
A federal district court
sided with Georgia. But in
February, the U.S. Court
of Appeals in Washington
overturned that decision
and invalidated the agree-
ment, writing that the pact
"constitutes a major opera-
tional change on its face"
and, therefore, required
Congressional approval.
Georgia had appealed to
the Supreme Court for an-
other review.
Although Georgia has
sought to cast the case as
a narrow part of the overall
dispute, Florida and Ala-


bama officials have said it
sets a strong precedent
and should compel the
lower courts to invalidate
Georgia's withdrawals
from Lanier.
"After nearly 20 years of
legal discussions, today's
decision should provide the
framework needed for reso-
lution of this matter," Flori-
da Gov Charlie Crist said.
U.S. Rep. Allen Boyd
(D-Monticello) said the rul-
ing "reaffirms" Florida's
position in the "fight for the
responsible management
of the Apalachicola-Chatta-
hoochee-Flint River System.
"With this latest legal vic-
tory under ourbelts, ournext
step is to make sure that this
ruling by the highest court in
the land is recognized by the
corps (of Engineers) and re-
flected in the corps' update
of the water control manu-
als for the ACF System,"
said Boyd, whose district
includes Apalachicola.
"After a two-decade dis-
pute, Floridians can rest a
little easier today because
Georgia won't be allowed
to swipe their water," said
Florida Sen. Bill Nelson.


To/; its /for d7e roadest- variety o ar-is-s \
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I aNi'n and Perfs peceiVe s/enry Vytfi e/
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128 East Pine St 1st left on St. George Island


The Carrabelle Area Chamber of Commerce would like to say Thank
You to the following businesses, individuals, organizations and vol-
unteers who were a part of making the 2008 Holiday on the Harbor,
Boat Parade of Lights and Music Fest a huge success. We could not
have done it without all of your hours of endless work and dedication
in making this coastal holiday event happen for the locals and visitors
to our great city.


TowBoatU.S.
Captain Russell Cohoon
City of Carrabelle
WCTV-Channel 6
Lamar Advertising
Carrabelle Cares
Carrabelle Lighthouse Association
Franklin County Library-Carrabelle Branch
Franklin County Sheriff Dept.
Carrabelle City Police
William Massey
Sandy Beach Properties
Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission
Florida Marine Patrol
Sunset Isle
David and Gail Allen
Gaye Lass
Royal American Construction
Inovia Consulting
Dan Hartman
Progress Energy
Apalachicola Maritime Museum
Paul Osterbye
Gary Barber
CDM Engineers
ECT
Consolidated Pipe
Expeditions in Hell
Moorings Marina
Dockside Marina
Wefings Marine
The Sports Authority
Sportsman's Warehouse
Wilderness Way
Georgia Russell
Coastal Treasures and Florists of Eastpoint


Charles Curran, Atty.
Carrabelle Palms RV Resort
Marks Insurance
Matthews Wholesale Bait and Tackle
NRS
Blue Water Sports
Superior Bank
St. George Inn
Jolly Roger Beach Shop
Old Carrabelle Hotel
The Gibson Inn
Cooks Insurance
Dixie Theater
Cakes By Amy
Crum's BP
Vickie L Campbell
Atlanta Urological Group
Hometown BP
B.E.C. & Co.
C-Quarters Marina
Barbers Seafood
Rascal Enterprise
LLCCW Roberts Contracting, Inc.
Dan and Lesley Cox
David Zeigler
Sunset Isles and Yacht Club
Bayside Florists
Rod Gasche
Mike's Fireworks
Oyster Radio
Gulf State Community Bank
Apalachicola State Bank
The Funky Oyster Shack
Carrabelle Area Chamber of Commerce
Forgotten Coast TV
Comcast Cable of Tallahassee


TCC SHOWCASES BICKEL PHOTOGRAPHY


PHOTO BY LOIS SWOBODA
The Fine Arts Center at
Tallahassee Community
College unveiled Jan.
9 the photographic
collection "Apalachicola
River: An American
Treasure." The exhibit,
which debuted in
the Apalachicola Art
Museum, showcases
photographs of Clyde
Butcher and Apalachicola
photojournalist Richard
Bickel. The photographs
will be on display from
noon-4 p.m. weekdays
until Feb. 12 and is free
and open to the public.
Bickel said the collection
has been on a tour
sponsored by the Brogan
Museum in Tallahassee
for the past two years
and has hung in Atlanta,
Albany and Panama
City. Bickel said he now
is planning a book of
written vignettes dealing
with the residents of
_ Franklin County.


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COMPLETE SITE DEVELOPMENT
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
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DR-529
R. 11/08
Rule 12D.16.002
I Florida Administrative Code
Effective 10/08
DEPARTMENT
OF REVENUE NOTICE

TAX IMPACT OF VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD
County of Franklin Tax Year 2008


Members of the Board


Honorable Joseph Parrish Board of County Commissioners,
District No. 4
Honorable Cheryl Sanders Board of County Commissioners,
Ditrict No. 2

Honorable Teresa Martin School Board, District No. 3

Citizen Member Vance Millender Businessowner within the school
district

Citizen Member Walter Armistead Homestead property owner


The Value Adjustment Board (VAB) meets each year to hear petitions
and make decisions relating to property tax assessments, exemptions,
classifications, and tax deferrals.


Summary of Year's Actions

Number of Parcels Reduction in
-------------------------- nauci Shin hft i Tae
Type of Property ExemAns Assessments* Both County Taxable toB d
Withdrawn Value Due to Due to Board
Granted Requested Reduced Requeed d or Resolved Board Actions Actions
Residential 0 5 21 101 45 $1,015,200 $3,365
Commercial 0 0 30 47 0 $5,131,314 $17,010
Industrial and
miscellaneous 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0
Agricultural or
classified use 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0
High water recharge 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0
Historic commercial or
nonprofit 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0
Business machinery
and equipment 0 $0 0 0 0 $0 $0
Vacant lots and acreage 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0
TOTALS 0 5 51 148 45 $6,146,514 $20,375

Included transfer of assessment difference (portability) request.
If you have a question about these actions, contact the chair or the

clerk of the Value Adujusment Board.

Chair's name: Joeseph Parrish (850) 653-8861

Clerk's name: Penny Sutton (850) 653-8861


I
*








A4 The Times


A4 I The Times DlnlOn


Thursday, January 14, 2009


RED, WHITE, AND ROUX


Newspaper ritual


brings weekly


satisfaction


I have a ritual on
Thursday afternoons.
I stop and buy a Times
newspaper on the way
home from work. I walk in
the door of my house, fix
a cocktail, then take my
paper and my pup into the
backyard patio. I play with
my potted herbs, plug in
the fountain, and settle in
for some intensive
reading.
I devour the ""
paper like a book,
starting on the '-
front page reading
every story, pic-
ture caption, and L
column. I even
read my own stuff, RED
although I have AND
written and ed- Denis
ited it to the point
where it is almost
committed to memory.
There is still the thrill of
seeing my words in print.
I read all of the legal ads
(and now give a shiver
at the number of fore-
closures), all of the clas-
sifieds, and every display
ad, (mostly real estate)
and even the requests for
bids from government
entities.
The Times has been
the paper of record for
our Franklin County com-
munity for numerous de-
cades. My earliest memo-
ries of the paper stem
from the days when Joe
Maloney was in charge,
and his editorials ap-
peared on the front page.
Ironically, I was working
at the Times as a food
writer when he died in the
Eighties. I was charged
with writing the obituary,
and I remember inter-
viewing Ben Watkins for
memories and insight into
that irascible old cuss.
In this era of print
panic, the Times seems a
remarkably stable entity
- kind of like an old pre-
dictable friend. We can
count on coverage of the
county and city commis-
sion meetings. Then we
turn the page and see the
birthdays, cards of thanks,
church schedules, and
incredible high school
sports pictures. Local
concerts are reviewed
and new businesses get a
bump with a feature story.
The fate of newspapers
elsewhere is not so rosy.
I have two acquaintances
from Tampa who have
been dismissed from the
Tribune. One was a film
critic and the other a


senior Metro columnist.
Both are in their late fifties
and neither has a job. Who
will hire a newspaper per-
son with 30 years experi-
ence in these tough times?
The Tallahassee
Democrat has eliminated
dozens of positions, some
senior columnists, and
downsized the paper
Monday through
Thursday. The
Ocala Star Banner
has shrunk the
size of their paper.
The Christian Sci-
ence News Moni-
tor will publish
less regularly. The
WHITE New York Times
ROUX is even looking at
se Roux bankruptcy.
My classroom
receives around 30
Tallahassee Democrats
every day. Other teachers
grab a few, and my kids
glom onto the sports pag-
es and horoscopes. I read
the Democrat online be-
fore I go to work, but there
is still a real satisfaction
turning the pages of a real
paper every day.
I confess, I spend
about half an hour every
morning reading papers
on-line. I go to the St. Pe-
tersburg Times (mostly
for their education report-
ing), the Miami Herald
(mostly for Carl Hiassen),
the London Times (for
their international cover-
age and food writing),
and the Huffington Post
(for their liberal writing
and links to other news
sources.)
I adore reading papers
on the Internet, and I
think they have done a
fairly decent job obtain-
ing advertising to support
that Internet effort. It is
not the Internet that is de-
bilitating newspapers. It
is the loss of advertising.
As retail and real estate
falter, so do the funds for
big display ads.
I am grateful for the
Times. I have a good feel-
ing that it is here to stay,
bringing us the news and
opinion important to our
community. We live in a
unique place with unique
needs and values. The
Times reflects our history
and will document our
future.
Denise Roux is a
regular columnist for the
Apalachicola and Carra-
belle Times. To reach her,
email her at rouxwhit@
mchsi.com.


Ipalachicola
Carrabelle


THE TiMES

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
APALACHICOLA, FL 32329
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Keyboard KLATTERINGS






A lesson in a life


To easy would it be to frame next
week's celebration of the life of Rev.
Martin Luther Kin. .Jr to tile inaugu-i-
ration of President Barack Obania
How difficult it nust hale seemed
from a Birmingham jail or during a
march from Selna or a Memphis gar-
bage workers strike tor King to -see
that such an e-ient mihlit liapp)en in
his lifetime.
King would be in his 80s had an
assassin's bullet not cut him down in
his prime and he might still be around
to see what the movement he helped
lead and mold had produced, a presi-
dent of color.
But King was much more than a
ciil rights advocate and the times \"e
tace no\\. \\ith economic troubles and
people inll desperate need, call out tor
thle kind of wordss lie wrote more than
y ,years ago
FolloiMng are portions at an es-
say King rotee in 1'',:C entitled --The
Dimensions ot a Complete Lite," one
essay in the book "iThe Measure ot a
Man" \\hich provides insillt into tohe
philosophical and taitlh-b.ased under-
pinnings ot King's \ork
Thie book. a mere 61 pages. \\as
glen to me by mIny father \" ho \"as
before his time inll advocating tor ci\ill
and social justice \- Ile \vntinl tor the
new paper at whichh lie spent much ot
his career
I hale treasured it tor sentimental
reasons, and look back at thle \ ords
tor reasons not easily captured in
\\ words
KinI \\rote. "-Many. many Clcentules
ago. out on a lonel- obscure island
called Patmos. a man by- the name
ot iJohn caught a ILsion of thle ne\m
Jerusalem descending out ot heamen
troml God One ot thle greatest glories
ot this ne\\ city ot God that John sa\w
\%as its completeness It \%as not par-
hal and one-sided, but it \\as complete
in all three ot its dimensions And so.
in describing the city in the t\\ enty-
first chapter ot the book ot Re-elation.
John says this -The length and the
breadth and the height ot It are equal
In other words this ne\w city of God.,
this city ot ideal humlanlity. is not an
unbalanced entity but it is complete
on all sides
"No\: .John is saying something
quite significant here What .John
is really saying is this that life as it


should be and life at its best is
the life that is complete on all
sides
-"There are three dien- .l-
sions of any comlpleteIe i to
\\ hchl we can lilly.\ gi\e the
\words ot this text length.
breadth and height The TIM(
length ot lite as we shall think Times N
ot it here is no iits duration or
its longevity, but it is the push
of a life forward to achieve its person-
al ends and ambitions. It is the inward
concern for one's own welfare. The
breadth of life is the outward concern
for the welfare of others The height of
life is the upwl)ard reach for God.
"These are the three dimensions
ot lite, and without tle three beinMl
correlated woU:rkino harnloniously
together lite is incomlplete
."No\, let us notice first the length
ot lite Some years ago a learned
rabbi. tle late .Joshua Lielmian. wrote
a book entitled Peace ot Mind He lias
a chapter in the book entitled -Loe
Thy selt Properly' In this chapter lhe
says in stiubstance that it iS i impossible
to l:te other sellers adequately unless
.you (l\ e your oini selt properly So
eLel individual has a responsibility
to Ibe conceriled al)bout hImelt enough
to dIsco\er what lie is made tor A.ter
lie discovters his calling lie should set
out to do it lith all the strength and
poIt er of his being No matter how
small one thinks his lite's work is in
termIs lot tle norms t thle world and
tiIe so-called biti job)s, lie Imust realize
that it hlas cosmic sinliicance it lie is
sering humanity and doingo the \will
ot God
--To (:carr'y this to one extreme, iit it
talls your lot to be a street-sweeper
sweep streets as Raphael painted
pictures, as Michelani lo, car ed
marble, as Beethoven composed
music, as Shlakespeare wrote poetyN
In the words ot Douglas Mallock It
you can't be a highway. just be a trall.
It you can't lie thle sun. lie a star. For
it isn't thle size that you \Tin o i ou LItall
- Be thle best ot %i hateeryouL alre
--But don't stop here. it is danoer-
ous to stop here
--"Thlie breadth at life is that dimen-
sion ot lite iIn which we are con11celled
about others An indlidual hlas not
started ing until hIle can rise albo e
the narrow confines t Is InsnliduI-


alistic concerns to broader
concerns of all humanity.
"So often racial groups are
concerned about the length of
life, their economic privileged
position, their social status.
- So often nations of the world
CROFT are concerned about the
ew Editor length of life, perpetuating
their nationalistic concerns
and their economic ends. May
it not be that the problem in the world
today is that individuals as well as
nations have been overly concerned
with the length of life, devoid of the
breadth? ...
"As long as there is poverty in
the world I can never be rich, even
if I have a billion dollars. As long as
diseases are rampant and millions of
people in this world cannot expect to
live more than twenty-eight or thirty
years, I can never be totally healthy
even if I just got a good checkup at
the Mayo Clinic. I can never be what
I ought to be until you are what you
ought to be ... No individual or nation
can stand out boasting of being inde-
pendent. We are interdependent ...
When we discover this, we master the
second dimension of life.
--Finally. there is the third dimen-
sion. Some people never get beyond
the first two dimensions of life. They
master the first two. They develop
their inner powers: they love human-
ity, but they stop eight there ... They
seek to live life without a sky.
"But if we are to live the complete
life we must reach up and discover
God. H G ellss w\as right: 'The man
who is not religious begins at no-
where and ends at nothing.'... In a
real sense everything that we see is a
shadow cast by that which we do not
see. Plato was right: 'The visible is a
shadow cast by the invisible.'
"Love yourself, it that means
rational, healthy and moral self-inter-
est. You are commanded to do that.
That is the length of life. Love your
neighbor as you love yourself. You
are conllmmanded to do that. That is
the breadth of life. But never forget
that there is a first and even greater
commandime(nti Love the Lord thy
God with all thiy heart and all thy soul
and all thLy mind (This is the height of
lite And then you do this you live the
complete life""


Letters to the EDITOR


Set an example, clean up our backyard
Dear Editor, water situation, the primary causa- their own back yard and set an ex-
As a homeowner in Apalachicola, tion of the situation Georgia, Florida ample for the municipalities upriver?
I'd like to add my two cents about the and Alabama faces is DROUGHT! It seems that the local area is a large
bay water issue. I am totally in love with the Apala- contributor of a significant amount of
I live just south of Lake Lanier. I chicola area and will eventually live pollution in the Bay that we all love.
have not watered my lawn or washed there full time, the sooner the better! I am a member of ABARK and the
my car in two years due to our As we know, the primary issue Upper Chattahoochee Riverkeeper
drought conditions and I'm happy to with water that enters the bay is flow. although I am by no means an envi-
help as are millions of other Atlanta There is one other issue that should ronmental crackpot. What I am pro-
area residents. bring equal attention and that is posing here is that the surrounding
The low levels have caused eco- polluted stormwater from the local bay area set in place a very intense
nomic ruin for many businesses that region. "let's clean up our own backyard cam-
serve the Lake Lanier area. I have I have been to Scipio Creek Ma- paign." We do not need new laws; they
been up many miles of the Apala- rina and seen very large oil slicks, are already on the books but they are
chicola River and have never seen I have been upriver and have seen being minimally enforced. "We do not
low river levels. Over 80 percent of the ILLEGAL houseboats that are have the resources" is a lame excuse.
the water that eventually finds its way dumping raw sewage into the river I'm involved in this very enforcement
to the Bay comes from SOUTH of (how do they get away with THAT?). activity in my city that lies on the
Atlanta, not Lake Lanier, however the And, large areas of Apalachicola are Chattahoochee River and the enforce-
Corps is penalizing Atlanta and Lake a pig sty. Trash, junk cars, dilapidated ment program more than pays for
Lanier. I see no change in the current buildings, and stray animals contrib- itself through fines.
release rates of the Buford Dam, how- ute greatly to the pollution of our bay. I trust that this letter initiates
ever, keep in mind that although the Can't the local governments of Apala- some form of a clean up of the area.
growth of Atlanta contributes to the chicola and Franklin County clean up Mike W.


Cutting Medicaid hospice benefit will cost more


Dear Editor:
Over the next few weeks, state law-
makers will be meeting to find ways
to resolve Florida's looming budget
deficit. Ironically, one of the cuts being
considered eliminating the Medicaid
Hospice benefit to the state's most
fragile citizens -will actually end up
costing the state more money than it
currently spends.
Last year, Florida's hospices pro-
vided care for more than 16,000 Med-
icaid patients. These patients were
able to receive medical, emotional
and social services in their residence
(whether a private home or nursing
home) instead of seeking care in hos-
pitals and emergency rooms, which is
much more expensive.
In a just-released survey conduct-
ed by the Moran Company for Florida
Hospices and Palliative Care (FHPC),
eliminating the Medicaid Hospice
benefit for our most needy patients


at the end of life would have actually
increased Florida's healthcare costs
by $3.7 million in 2007 alone.
But the real tragedy is the quality
of care that these vulnerable and of-
ten over-looked citizens stand to lose.
Hospice care is all inclusive; every
home visit by a nurse, home health
aide, family support counselor, chap-
lain, music therapist, physician and
community volunteer is covered by
one daily fee. That fee also covers pre-
scription drugs, medical equipment
and medical supplies associated with
the patient's hospice diagnosis. Med-
icaid patients living in a nursing home
have these additional services added
to their care as well for one fixed fee.
Families facing a life limiting ill-
ness often face non-medical crises
as well, such as poverty, homeless-
ness and complex family dynamics.
Because hospice care deals with the
emotional and practical needs of the


entire family, these potentially crush-
ing burdens are addressed by the hos-
pice family support counselor. Fami-
lies without the safety net of the Med-
icaid hospice benefit will be forced to
turn to already overwhelmed local
social service programs instead of
one of the 42 Florida hospices.
Quality end of life health care
should not belong only to the power-
ful, wealthy and influential; it should
be the right of every Florida citizen.
Not only does eliminating the Hos-
pice Medicaid benefit not make good
financial sense, it takes a terrible toll
on human beings. Get all the facts
about the bottom line cost of hospice
care before eliminating this important
human service. A little research will
show you can save both money and
human dignity by maintaining the
Hospice benefit to Medicaid patients.
Carlo Braveman, RN, MEd
Big Bend Hospice President and CEO


*


NE






Thursday, January 15, 2009


Local


The Times | AS


PENDLETON from page Al


"If we could have found half-
way decent help, we would still
have it open," Jimmy Pendleton
said. "It wasn't due to any finan-
cial problem. We had a healthy
business. It was killing me and
my son. I stood it as long as I
could, 54 years. I don't think
anybody else could have stood
it as long."
Actually, Tommy still is doing
repair work including brakes
and tires at his home at 1199
Bluff Road. To call and set up an
appointment, reach him at 653-
6584.
Pendleton senior said fluc-
tuating gasoline prices were an
annoyance but not a factor in
closing.
"You don't make anything on
gasoline. It's something you had
to have. Some days I actually
lost money on it. The other two
stations went under because of
the economy," he said, pointing
out that neither offered prod-
ucts that couldn't be obtained
at their competition.
"We had the mechanic
work," he said. "I still had peo-
ple coming that were trading
with me when I had the Gulf
station where the NAPA store is
now in the '50s. Their kids and
grandkids traded with me."
The original Pendleton's gas
station was also a full service
facility located at 230 U.S. 98.
Born in Pensacola, Jimmy
moved to Apalachicola to open
the station with his brother,
C.E. who was one year, one
month and one day his senior.
He moved down from Missouri,
where he had been service
manager at an automobile fac-
tory belonging to Ford Motors.
C.E. Pendleton met his fu-
ture wife, Louise Nedley while
driving a delivery truck between
Pensacola and Apalachicola.
He married her and moved to
Franklin County. After a stretch
in the service, C.E. asked his
younger brother to move back
to Florida and open the station.
Apalachicola was much
smaller then, said Jimmy, with
nothing beyond the cemetery
on Brownsville Road but a cou-
ple of fish camps.
"Downtown there was an
Austin men's store, a five-
and-dime and a few little mom
and pop businesses," he said.
"When I first got here, I come
in that night and I said 'What in


JIMMY PENDLETON I Contributed photo
Pendleton's Gulf on US 98 was the first service station of its kind in Apalachicola.


the world has my brother done
to me?'
"After a couple of weeks and
a trip up the river with a boy I
met, I knew I'd fell in love. This
was where I wanted to be for
the rest of my life," he said.
Later, he met his wife, San-
dra Miller, who grew up in
Apalachicola. She was work-
ing as a waitress at the Dairy
Freeze across the street from
his station when the romance
began.

'I just didn't like to go
there anymore'
As the only station in town
offering diesel fuel, the Gulf
station thrived, employing five
workers.
"We had a monstrous good
business. We ran two shifts and
the station was open from 6 a.m.
till 10 p.m. We was closed one
day a year. You know which day
that was? Christmas," Jimmy
said.
"I ran the day shift and did
all of the repair work. We could
overhaul motors and trans-
missions. My brother came on
at night," he said. "There was
two men that went to the front
when a customer came. They
cleaned your windshield and
pumped the gas. One of them
even swept the sand out with
a little broom he carried in his
pocket. We had a guy named
Goldy who did all of the wash-
ing and detailed cars inside and
out. It was the first gas station
that offered that kind of service
here."
When the station opened, a


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
This Chevron station at the corner of Market and Avenue E is
available for lease.


gallon of gas was 23 to 27 cents,
and diesel was 11 cents. Oil was
35 cents a quart, and a grease
job cost 50 cents. Tire repair or
a complete inside-outside detail
cost 75 cents, but, of course, sal-
aries were $25 to $35 a week.
In 1961, tragedy struck unex-
pectedly when C.E. died, possi-
bly of a stroke.
"I'm not much in politics, but
my brother was," Jimmy said.
"He was a county commission-
er. He was very popular. He was
just 33 when he died. He had
been playing baseball that eve-
ning with some boys."
"He drove his jeep home,
showered and had supper and
then he walked down to the
station. It was closed by then.
He was sitting there talking to
Milton Houseman, a policeman.
He stood up and said 'God that
hurts' and fell down dead," he
said. "After that, I just didn't like
to go to the station anymore,
and my sister in law didn't like
it. That's when we moved down-
town."


Eight trophies a weekend,
with a good following
There were good times, too.
The Pendletons are motor sports
enthusiasts, with dad a huge fan
of Dale Earnhardt Sr. He has a
collection of posters and memo-
rabilia, and he and his son partic-
ipated in many drag races, leav-
ing home for Panama City, Tal-
lahassee or Andalusia, Ala., on
Friday night and making it back
in time for work on Monday.
Many people have heard the
story of the Dale Earnhardt
coke machine that stood before
Pendleton's for many years. Jim-
my told the Coca Cola people to
remove their machine from his
property because they failed to
keep it working properly.
Soon afterwards, Coca Cola
came out with the Dale Earn-
hardt-themed machine. Pendle-
ton agreed to reinstate the soft
drink company only if they gave
him a machine bearing the im-
age of his hero. Obviously, he got
what he wanted.


Pendleton said Chocolate My-
ers, Earnhardt's fuel man, once
was staying at the Gibson Inn
with his wife, when somebody
told him to go across the street
and see the memorabilia at
Pendleton's.
"He had a fit," said Jimmy. "I
talked to him and it turned out
his wife had lived here and went
to school with one of my daugh-
ters. The next day we all had
breakfast together at Dolores's
Sweet Shop. He sent me a letter
giving me a private tour of Earn-
hardt Incorporated any time I
wanted."
Pendleton said Earnhardt
was killed soon after, and he nev-
er used the pass. He did meet his
idol once after attending a race
with Roger Flowers.
The Pendletons were racing
stars in their own right.
"We had an awesome car.
We won over 300 trophies. We
won every weekend. We'd win
about eight trophies in different
divisions," said Jimmy. "A lot of
people followed us, too. We had
good support. Then the little lo-
cal tracks started closing, and it
got to where you had to drive too
far for a race to make it back in
time to work."
Like his days of racing,
Pendleton's days in the auto re-
pair business are finally over,
although he does occasionally
come to the rescue of stranded
former customers. Now he says
he mostly does yard work and
fishing.
"I have to do something to
keep busy. I've got too much ner-
vous energy," he said. "I'd give
anything to be back in business
again. I miss it."


ST. JAMES from page Al


ber of Commerce offices
in Carrabelle and Apala-
chicola. She encouraged
anyone interested to ap-
ply. She said applications
already submitted still
are on file at St. James,
and she will begin going
through existing applica-
tions this week.

'Truly a wonderful
facility'
Lisa Mitchem will be
the administrator oversee-
ing the operation. Origi-
nally from Georgia, she
holds a degree in behav-
ioral and social sciences
from Brewton Parker Col-
lege of Mt. Vernon, Ga.
She said she has worked
in Florida nursing homes
for the last eight years and
is a licensed nursing home
administrator.
Some familiar faces
are already on staff at St.
James. Physical therapist
Tom Brocato will oversee
therapy in a new exercise
center. He said the facil-
ity also is installing for
residents a Nintendo Wii
room, featuring the com-
puter game that guides
the player through sports,
dance and other forms of
exercise.
"They have Wii rooms
at some of their other
locations, and it's very
popular," Brocato said.
"There's a waiting list to
use the game."
Dr. Stephen Miniat is
medical director for St.
James.
"This is truly a wonder-
ful facility," he said. "These
people have brought pro-
fessionalism to the facility
from the ground up."
Denham said St. James
also is working closely with
Weems Hospital.
"(Weems CEO) Chuck
Colvert was one of the first


people I contacted when
we got here," she said.
"They're going to be pro-
viding a lot of services to
our residents."

Variety of services
The 39,000-square-foot
building has two wings
that share a dining facil-
ity serviced by a spacious
kitchen. The dining room
is fitted with tables for four
with hunter green table
cloths. Brass chandeliers
twinkle overhead.
There is also a formal
private dining room for
eight and private dining/
activity rooms on each
wing. There are several
comfortable lounges, some
furnished with big-screen
televisions.
St. James has four pri-
vate rooms and 43 semi-
private with two beds.
Every room has a win-
dow, and every room has
a bathroom in addition to
large bathing rooms fitted
with whirlpool baths and a
lifting chair found on both
wings
The atmosphere at St.
James is quite inviting
and cozy from the rocking
chairs on the front porch
to the nightlights to the
pictures on the walls of
every room including the
bathrooms.
"Some color, some
lighting and pretty pic-
tures make it nice," Mc-
Cord said.
Director of Nurs-
ing Beverly Martin said
St. James will partner
with a number of locals
to provide enrichment
activities for residents,
including nondenomina-
tional church services on
site. She said artist Joan
Matey of Lanark Village
and dance instructor Pam
Nobles of Apalachicola
already are signed up to


Assistant Director of Nursing Linda McCord shows
off the assisted bathing area at St. James.

offer classes. Martin en- to contact the home at
courage anyone inter- 697-2020.
ested in volunteering or St James will offer a
partnering with St. James variety of services rang-


ing from traditional nurs-
ing care to rehabilitation
for individuals who expect
to regain independence.
There will be occupation-
al and speech therapists
on staff. The home will
provide hospice care and
short-term "respite care"
to give home caregivers a
break for a weekend or a
few weeks.
"I am so excited about
this facility," said Bert
Ivey, director of Elder-
Care Services for Frank-
lin County. "It's wonderful
to have another option for
seniors in the county. This
will allow so many people
to remain close to home
and family."
Mitchem said the facil-
ity now is waiting for the


Agency for Health Care
to inspect and certify the
building so they can begin
accepting residents.
"We have had a num-
ber of inquiries and have
several people waiting to
move in. There have been
inquiries from Chattanoo-
ga and honestly just ev-
erywhere," she said, add-
ing that a number of local
families had dropped by or
called to inquire.
"We're seeing a lot of
people who want to bring
family members closer
to home. I've talked to
families from Eastpoint,
Apalachicola and Port St.
Joe, but in my experience,
the majority of locals in-
quiring live on St. George
Island."


DQe FRANK D. MAY l DMD, PAdac
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A6 I The Times


Dixie kicks off 12th theatre season


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

On the weekend of Jan. 9 and 10, the Di-
xie Theatre in Apalachicola kicked off their
2009 season with performances by six out-
standing artists.
On Friday, Ken Sizemore is an "Old
Folkie" lit up the stage with a tour de force
featuring the music of Glen Campbell, John
Denver, Buddy Holly and Harry Belafonte
to name just a few. The audience was en-
raptured when he led them through a sing
along of "Puff the Magic Dragon." Sizemore,
based in Panama City, was one of the first
performers to grace the stage of the Dixie
and is always welcome. In addition to per-
forming classic folk and rock music of the
50's, 60's, and 70's, he performed original
pieces like "Daddy was a Music Man."
On Saturday, Grant Peeples returned
to the Dixie. Peeples was born in Tallahas-
see and now lives with his wife in Wakulla
County. His song "Summer Camp," a sting-
ing parody of the St. Joe development in


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Lis Williamson told the crowd that Jan. 9 was only the second public
performance for the new group, Lonesome Dove.


Franklin County, ruffled a few feathers. He
was joined onstage by a new group called
the Lonesome Doves. The Lon and Lis Wil-
liamson band and Curt Johnston opened
the show with a special Gram Parsons trib-
ute performance.
Cult figure Gram Parsons, born in Win-
ter Haven, in 1946, was an American singer,
songwriter, guitarist and pianist. A member
of the International Submarine Band, The
Byrds and The Flying Burrito Brothers, he
was later a solo artist who recorded and
performed duets with Emmylou Harris.
Parsons died of a drug overdose at the age
of 26. The birth of'70's country rock and the
early '90's alternative country movement
have been attributed to his influential song-
writing.
During the second set, the Lonesome
Doves accompanied Peeples and the four
were later joined on stage by trained con-
cert pianist Carrie Hamby of the Mayhaws.
This weekend of music is just the pre-
cursor to one of the Dixie's most ambitious
seasons to date. Dixie Partington, who di-
rects the theatre on behalf of the non-profit
Dixie Theatre Foundation, said the theatre
plans 40 performances over the next 80
days.
Next on the marquee is "Revolution-
ary Wizard: Ben Franklin," a new one-man
play by Eric Peterson. The play will be per-
formed Jan. 14, 16, 17 and 18 and reserved
seats cost $20.
Hear about some of Franklin's lesser
known inventions such as the "air bath,"
and some of his maxims, as printed in his
Poor Richard's Almanac, such as "an ounce
of prevention is worth a pound of cure," "no
gains without pains" and "he that lies down
with dogs shall rise with fleas." This por-
trayal by professional actor David Poirier


Grant Peeples of Wakulla brought an
edgy, political intelligence to the stage
of the Dixie Theatre.

gives wonderful insight into the life and
soul of a marvelously interesting Ameri-
can, for whom this county is named.
On Thursday, Jan. 15 at 7:30 p.m., The
Florida Humanities Council will present a
program in the "Look Where We Live!" se-
ries, Weeki Wachee, City of Mermaids. Lu-
cinda Vickers hosts the presentation about
one of Florida's longest running attractions.
There will be general seating and the pro-
gram is free to the public.
Author Vickers tells us of this wonder-
ful Florida attraction, its history and future.
She tells us of its mermaids and mermen,
and her discussion captures the enduring
appeal of this unique Florida landmark and
reveals the remarkable history of a park
that began as a local curiosity and became
an international attraction.
Other upcoming performances include
"Everybody Loves Opal," Lighthouses of
the Big Bend, "Patsy A Musical Tribute,"
starring Margo Anderson and Florida's
Delicious History.


News BRIEFS


Building Green comes to
Carrabelle
New projects come every day, but the
newest project seems to be a hit. Affordabil-
ity along the coast is now a possibility. Build-
ing Green not only helps save the Earth and
its resources, but offers superior energy ef-
ficiency by using eco friendly materials.
Not onlywill the new home's owner enjoy
savings in energy costs, but new homes that
are Green Certified and HOP (Housing Op-
portunity Partnership) compliant are also
eligible for state and federal government
allowances which give fantastic rebates on
tax returns, Estimated at $7,500 per home,
they allow customers to now afford homes
where they live.
An example is The Avenues at Keough's
Landing in Carrabelle, now in the process
of completing the first two homes of this na-
ture in the 16-lot subdivision. Both homes
will be H.O.P and Green Certified, allowing
for the special funding and rebates. The


homes are being built by BEC & Co., owned
by Barney Crutchfield.
These homes will be showcased in The
Realtors Association's Open House Tour on
Feb. 7 and 8. Call BEC & Co at 850-656-2608
or Jill Archer at 850-528-5804.

TDC holds public meetings
The following is a list of upcoming meet-
ings, all open to the public, of the Tourist
Development Council.
On Tuesday, Jan. 20, the Marketing
Committee will meet at 1:30 p.m. at the St.
George Island Firehouse.
On Thursday, Jan. 22, there will be a spe-
cial marketing workshop at the St. George
Island Firehouse from 9 a.m. to noon.
On Tuesday, Feb. 3, the full TDC council
will meet at 3 p.m. at the Carrabelle City Of-
fices, at the former high school at 1001 Gray
Ave.
On Tuesday, Feb. 17, the Marketing
Committee will meet at 1:30 p.m. at the St.
George Island Firehouse.


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Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 674HSN


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
Ken Sizemore, the "Old Folkie."


NOTICE

The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners,
Franklin County, Florida will consider application for the
following position:

*Temporary-Part Time Veteran's Affairs Assistant*
Veteran's Affairs Office

Requirements Include: Two year College Degree, and serve
as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States dur-
ing a period of war, Valid Driver's license, Administrative
and Clerical skills, excellent communications skills, com-
puter knowledge with experience in Excel.

Applicants must be able to properly handle confidential
records, be able to multi-task, and must be able to work in a
stressful environment. Veteran's with knowledge about VA
benefits and procedures preferred.

Applications may be obtained from and submitted to the
Board Secretary, Michael Moron in the Clerk's Office,
Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, suite 203,
Apalachicola, Florida 32320. (850) 653-8861, Ext. 100.

Applications must be submitted by Tuesday, January 27,
2009 by 4:00 p.m.


Thursday, January 15, 2009


Local






Thursday, January 15, 2009


Local


The Times | A7


Lanark NEWS


The members of The
Lanark Village Golf Club
would like to thank all
who came to the Hall and
supported the Pancake
Breakfast. There will
be a Pancake
Breakfast on the
second Saturday
of February,
March and April.
The doors at The
Hall will open at 8
a.m., and serving
will be until 11
am. Come on LANARI
over and enjoy Jim
pancakes, French
toast, sausage,
orange juice and coffee
with us. Your donation of
$5 will be collected at the
door. Proceeds to benefit
our golf course.
Chef Joe M. and other
members of The Lanark
Golf Club will cook up
a Spaghetti Fest on
Saturday, Jan. 24. See
you at Chillas Hall at 4
p.m. Serving is until 7
pm. Your donation of $8
will be collected at the
door. Children under the


Date
Thu, Jan 01
Fri, Jan 02
Sat, Jan 03
Sun, Jan 04
Mon, Jan05
Tue, Jan 06
Wed, Jan 07


K'
Wel


age of 10 can enjoy their
spaghetti free. Hope you
will join us.
Our next Second
Saturday Dance with be
on Hearts and Flowers
Day, Saturday, Feb.
14. The Journey
Band members will
be on hand to keep
us jumping. We will
also have a dance
on the second
Saturday of each
month.
NEWS Sure wish
Isl you would join
us at The Hall
on Wednesday
evenings for Bingo for
the Bus. Doors open at 5
p.m., and the games begin
at 6:30 p.m. Soft drinks
coffee, and homemade
cookies are available
yum, yum!
Don't forget the
Covered Dish Dinner will
be this Sunday at The
Hall. Bring a dish to share
and a donation and join
in the fun and fellowship,
which begins at 1 p.m. We
have entertainment once


% Precip
10%
0%
0%
0%
30%
0%
0%


TIDE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
Cat Point Minus0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03
APALACHICOLA


01/15 Thu 06:07AM 1.1 H
07:15PM 1.1 H

01/16 Fri 07:17AM 0.9 H
07:32PM 1.2 H

01/17 Sat 08:45AM 0.7 H
07:54PM 1.3 H

01/18 Sun 10:55AM 0.7 H
08:21 PM 1.3 H


01/19 Mon 08:56PM

01/20 Tue 09:41PM

01/21 Wed 10:38PM


12:59PM 0.0 L

01:20PM 0.2 L

01:35PM 0.4 L

01:33PM 0.6 L


1.3 H

1.3 H

1.3 H


CARRABELLE
01/15 Thu 04:42AM 1.8 H 10:46AM
05:50PM 1.8 H 11:27PM


01/16 Fr 05:52AM 1.4 H
06:07PM 1.9 H

01/17 Sat 12:37AM 0.2 L
11:22AM 0.6 L

01/18 Sun 01:53AM -0.2 L
11:20AM 1.0 L


01/19 Mon 03:09AM

01/20 Tue 04:17AM

01/21 Wed 05:16AM


0.0 L
0.3 L


11:07AM 0.3 L

07:20AM 1.1 H
06:29PM 2.1 H

09:30AM 1.1 H
06:56PM 2.1 H


-0.3 L 07:31 PM 2.1 H

-0.6 L 08:16PM 2.1 H

-0.8 L 09:13PM 2.1 H


Sponsor the Weekly

Almanac Call:

653-8868


again. Be good to see you!
Got a call from my
longtime friend, Zelma
Nolton Bailey. She called
to let me know her sister-
in-law, Ann Bailey, had
passed away. She and
her husband, Horace,
who preceded her in
death, lived in the village
for many a year. They
were members of The
Community Church, and
Ann was in the choir. She
was also a past president
of The Lanark Village
Association. Pray for
Horace and Ann's eternal
rest and for strength for
the family.
Be kind to one another
and check in on the sick
and housebound. Until
next time, God bless
America, our troops,
the poor, homeless and
hungry.


Brick pavers granted to
Chapman House owner
At the Jan. 6 meeting of the Apala-
chicola city commission, Helen Tudor,
who recently purchased the historic
Chapman House at 82 Sixth St., received
permission to replace a section of city-
owned sidewalk with brick pavers. The
section of sidewalk runs next to the
house parallel to U.S. 98. Tudor plans to
restore Chapman House, and the brick
pavers are in keeping with the historic
appearance of the house and grounds.

Ulrich appointed to county
planning and zoning
At the Jan. 6 meeting of the Frank-
lin County commission, the commission
voted unanimously to appoint realtor
Jean Ulrich of St. George Island to fill
the position on the planning and zoning
board earmarked for a real estate pro-
fessional. Ulrich will replace Bob Landis,
whose resignation was announced at the
same meeting.


Municipal library getting
new funding
At the Jan. 6 meeting of the Apala-
chicola city commission, Susan Clem-
entson, spokeswoman for the Apalachic-
ola Municipal Library board, announced
that the board has approved a monthly
book budget of $500 and a supply budget
of $200 for the library.
This funding will come from interest
accrued from the Margaret Key estate's
money market fund. The principal of
the fund, which was established after a
$400,000 bequest from Key's estate, will
remain intact. Clementson said in the fu-
ture, the principal will be employed for
improvements to the building.
She said the board plans to form a
Friends group to support the library, and
representatives will meet with Sandy
Newell from the State Library to work
on the charter. The Friends group will be
a tax-exempt, not-for-profit organization
and will raise funds, provide volunteer
support and act as a liaison between the
library and the community.


Iow


Io


I-.


IW


I
The Panhandle Players present



Neil Simon's







L








Kim
KIr"
Ew



rim


starring

David Bowen Ben Bloodworth Megan Lamb

Directed by Dan Wheeler

January 23 24 at 7:30 p.m. and January 25 at 3 p.m.
Eastpoint Firehouse

OR TUCIRIETS CAU.- 67@420@9
Produced by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc.

Funded in part by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council


*I


Area BRIEFS


BILL MILLER REALTY
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MASTER APPRAISERS
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
2308 Hwy EAST* CARRABELLE, FL 32322
MAIN OFFICE (850)697-3761 OR 697-3310 CALL (850) 570-0658
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3/2 DISHWASHER FIREPLACE, GARDEN TUB, SCREEN PORCH,
BREEZEWAY-W ORKSHOP-3 COR.LOTS............................................... $89,500
2 B/R M/H 2 LOTS BEHIND $ STORE.............. $159,500 OWNR.FIN.E OR RENT
2 B/R 1 BATH HOME GULF VIEW.................................... $79,500 OWNR.FIN.
2 B/R APT $85,000 1B/R APT.......................... ...................... $65,000
50' GULF LOT w/WATER AND SEWER ............................................ $275,000
DBL APT LG 2BR 2BATH OPEN VIEW............................$5000 DOWN
COMM. BLDG. 1400S/F 2 COR.LOTS.......................................... $165,000


S- la
'lA I--- IDR-408
Certificate to Roll R.06/91




I, the undersigned, hereby certify that I am the duly qualified and
acting Property Appraiser in and for Franklin County, Florida; as such I
have satisfied myself that all property included or includable on the Real/
Tangible Personal Property Assessment Roll for the aforesaid county is
properly taxed so far as I have been able to ascertain; that the said roll was
certified and delivered to me by the Value Adjustment Board on the 30th
day of December, 2008; and that all required extensions on the above
described roll to show the tax attributable to all taxable property included
therein have been made pursuant to law.


I further certify that upon completion of this certificate and the
attachment of same to the herein described Assessment Roll as a part
thereof, that said Assessment Roll will be delivered to the Tax Collector
of this county.


In witness whereof, I have subscribed this certificate and caused the
same to be attached to and made a part of the above described Assessment
Roll this the 30th day of December, 2008.




Property Appraiser of Franklin County, Florida


Temperature
High I
600
530
550
63
64
650
650


PRO

l


PON






A8 |I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 15, 2009


Winter harvest festival both fun and educational


On Fri, Dec. 19, from 8
a.m. to noon, the Friends
of the Franklin County
Public Library had a Win-
ter Harvest Festival at the


Franklin County School
for the students.
They had a "Field Day"
for the elementary stu-
dents and the high school


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
At the Dec. 19 Harvest Festival at the Franklin
County School, David Walker, who directs the
county's anti-tobacco program, at left, addresses
high school students on the many health problems
associated with using tobacco products.


and middle school -!
students had a
choice of workshops
regarding different
teen issues. When
the day started, the
elementary stu-
dents were getting
ready for their field AdreeA
day, while the high Adree
school and middle
school students met in the
gym to learn how the day
was going to go.
Once everyone got
the understanding of
the workshops, we could
choose to go to where we
wanted and we were off.
Some of the choices of the
nine workshops we had
were Conflict Resolution,
Teen Alcohol Prevention,
Teen Pregnancy Preven-
tion, Nutrition, Learning
How You Present Yourself,
Teen Violence, Effects of
Tobacco and more. Each
of these workshops had
different issues that teens
go through.


LWK TALK
nah Wynn


The meaning
of the workshops
to me was to help
us prevent the
worst and over-
come to be the
best. We only had
to go to six of the
nine workshops.
After we went to


six of the work-
shops, we went to lunch.
For lunch, they provided
grilled hotdogs and ham-
burgers. At the end of the
day, they gave out dozens
of prizes including gift
cards and MP3 players.
Overall, the workshops
gave me a new way of see-
ing some of the issues my
friends and I go through
and I have a better idea of
how to overcome them. I
hope this won't be the last
festival like this because
my friends and I had fun
while being educated.
Thanks to everyone at the
Franklin County Public Li-
brary.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Sliding down the new playground equipment at
the Dec. 1 9 Harvest Festival at the Franklin County
School are, from left, fifth graders Roberts Edwards,
Lacey Hutchins and Jacob Montgomery. Standing at
top are River Banks, left, and Brendan Hutchins.


Retired educators to take part


in fifth grade

The January meeting of the Franklin/
Gulf Retired Educators Association was
held at Caroline's Restaurant in Apala-
chicola. Members reviewed recommen-
dations shared previously by Daniel Hall,
Florida Retired Educators Association
District 2 Director.
F/GREA will participate in the fifth
grade essay contest for the fourth year.
The topic will be "What My Grandparent
or Grandparent Figure Means to Me." Es-
says will be collected on Feb. 2. The unit
award for the winner will be a $25 U.S. Sav-
ings Bond. The three top winners in both
counties will also receive a $5 certificate
for Burger King or McDonald's. The state
winner will receive $25 and a $200 U.S.
Savings Bond.
F/GREA Unit Scholarships will be
available again for graduating seniors who
pursue a career in education. Information
regarding the Florida Retired Educator
Association Trustee Scholarship, which
contributes toward expenses for four
years of college, needs to be returned by
Feb. 15. The Franklin County Retired Edu-
cator Scholarship representative is Babs
Bailey and the Gulf County Representa-
tive is Martha Sanborn.
Documenting community service vol-
unteer hours continues to be a priority
for members. Awards are given to units
if 40 percent or more members document
their volunteer hours. The F/GREA Unit
won a community service volunteer award
last year. Babs Bailey is a former District
2 Florida Retired Educator Association


essay contest


ARLENE OEHLER I Special to the Times
Daniel Hall, current District 2 FREA
Director, left, and Beverly Kelley,
former District 2 FREA Director find
time to share ideas.
Community Service Volunteer Award win-
ner.
Annada Faircloth, membership chair-
man, will be inviting educators who have
recently retired to join the organization.
After the business meeting, members
shared names of books that they have en-
joyed reading.
F/GREA membership is open to any
person who has retired from the education
field under the Florida Retirement Sys-
tem with five years or more of service or
any person who has retired from the edu-
cational system of any other state or from
any privately funded or parochial school
with five or more years of service.
For information contact Margarita at
697-4200.


Library gets grant for claymation project


Carrabelle art-
ist and educator
Joan Matey is
among three teach-
ers from three
North Florida
schools and orga-
nizations to receive
funding from Com- JOAN
munity Classroom
Consortium.
The award winners have
received up to $400 for their
projects.
Matey, who works with
the KIT (Kids In It Togeth-
er) program at the Frank-
lin County Library branch
in Carrabelle, was awarded
funds for a claymation (clay
animation) project that will
allow students ages 10 to
18 to create a short ani-
mated film. The project will
provide opportunities for
students, some of them at-
risk, to create 3-D, stop ani-
mation films and develop
writing and artistic skills,
patience, dexterity, organi-
zational and team skills.
"Each child is going to
make a character out of
clay on a wire armature,
so they're kind of learn-
ing principles of sculpting.
Every child is a natural for
sculpting and they just love
it," she said. "After they fin-
ish their character they'll


create a story about
that character and
then we'll weave it
all together.
"They will also
learn a great deal
of patience be-
cause stop-action
IMATE:Y animation is very
tedious," she said.
"We'll probably do
it at 12 frames per second,
rather than the usual 24
frames per second."
She said the Character
and Heritage Institute of
Tallahassee, which teaches
Operation Filmmaker, will
be editing the film once it's
complete.
Also receiving grant
funds was Brian McClain,
Godby High School in Tal-
lahassee, for a Technology
in Earth Sciences project.
The project will increase
students' skills in graph-
ing, graph analysis, and ex-
perimental design as well
as content knowledge of lo-
cal and state groundwater
systems. The Florida De-
partment of Environmen-
tal Protection is a project
partner.
In addition, Patricia
McElhaney, Rickards High
School in Tallahassee, was
awarded funds that will al-
low students to participate


in The Memory Project, a
unique initiative in which
advanced high school art
students create original
portraits for abandoned,
orphaned, abused, or ne-
glected children. To do this,
the art students receive
pictures of children who
are waiting for portraits,
and then work in their art
classrooms to create the
portraits. Once finished,
the portraits are delivered
to the children, and the
children are then invited
to create drawings or write
letters to send back to the
art students.
The Community Class-
room Consortium is a
coalition of more than 30
cultural, scientific, natural
history, and civic organiza-
tions in North Florida and
South Georgia that provide
educational experiences
and resources to the pub-
lic, especially K-12 teach-
ers and students. It was
established in 1989 through
a grant from the Smithson-
ian Institution's "Regional
Workshop Program," and
offers two grant cycles to
fund formal and non-formal
educational projects each
year. For more information,
visit www.communityclass-
room.com.


School BRIEFS


School Advisory Council
to meet Tuesday
The Franklin County School Advisory
Council meet at the new school in the li-
brary on Tuesday, Jan 20 at 6 p.m. "We
have not had a quorum the last few times
we have met. I would like to discuss new


members and spending issues. I hope to
see most of you there," said Chairman
Tress Anderson.

GCCC hosts financial aid
workshop
Gulf Coast Community College will


be conducting a financial aid workshop
at Franklin County High School in the
library on Thursday, Jan. 22 from 5:30 to
6:30 p.m.
This will be for all students wanting
to attend post secondary school, not just
those planning to attend GCCC.
On January 21 and 22 Gulf Franklin


Center will be giving the College Place-
ment Test at the high school for juniors
and seniors and for those sophomores
who are dual enrolled.
FCAT Writes for 4th, 8th and 10th
Grades will be held Tuesday, Feb. 10.
Please make sure your child is in school
that day.


m I
*


COUNTY ROAD 376
S.C.O.P. PROJECT PROJECT #7.079
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person,
company or corporation interested in constructing:
COUNTY ROAD 376 S.C.O.P. PROJECT
Project is located in Franklin County, Flordia and consists of approximately 5,100 linear feet of roadway
resurfacing, shoulder work and striping.

Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Flordia 32456,
(850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes.

All bidders shall be FDOT qualified per Section 2-1 of the FDOT Standard Specifications for Road and
Bridge Constrution, latest edition.

Completion date for this project will be 90 days from the date of Notice to Proceed presented to the
successful bidder.

Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $250.00 per day.

Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for the "County Road 376 S.C.O.P. Project".

Bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. (EDT), on February 2nd, 2009, at the Franklin County Clerk's Office,
Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Flordia 32320-2317, and will be
opened and read aloud on February 3rd 2009 at the County Commission meeting at 34 Forbes Street,
Apalachicola, FL.

Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $45.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made
payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC.

The Board of County Commissioners reserces the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or
reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgement will be in the best interest of Franklin
County. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening.

All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and
regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Flordia.

If you have any questions please call Clay Kennedy at (850) 227-7200.


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS-00010


ST. GEORGE ISLAND BOAT RAMP PROJECT #7.068
ROCK REVETMENT
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person,
company or corporation interested in constructing:
ST. GEORGE ISLAND BOAT RAMP
ROCK REVETMENT
Project is located in Franklin County, Florida and consists of removal and on site storage of approximately
1,200 SY of existing rip rap, installation of filter fabric, bedding stone, and rip-rap as proposed in the
construction drawings.
Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity
crimes.
Completion date for this project will be 30 days from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the
successful bidder.
Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $250.00 per day.
Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for the "St. George Island Boat Ramp Rock
Revetment".
Bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. (EDT), on January 19 2009, at the Franklin County Clerk's
Office, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320-2317, and
will be opened and read aloud on January 20~, 2009 at the County Commission meeting at 34 Forbes
Street, Apalachicola, FL.
Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $ 25.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made
payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC.
The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or
reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Franklin
County. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. A mandatory Pre-Bid
Conference shall be held at the Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, FL
(850) 653-9783 at 10:00 am Eastern Time, January 13, 2009.
All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and
regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida.
If you have any questions, please call Clay Kennedy at (850) 227-7200.


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS-00010







S CARRABELLE -APALACH COLA





PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, January 15, 2009 www. apalachtimes.com Page A9




Seahawk hoopsters win 4, but fall to St. Joe


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Strictly speaking, the first two weeks
of January were a good stretch for the
Franklin County Seahawks varsity bas-
ketball team.
The team won all three of its games at
the Wakulla Holiday Tournament Jan. 2
and 3, edging out Arnold in overtime for
the second win over the Marlins this sea-
son.
The next day they downed a 5A school
out of Miami and then topped it all off by
deftly handling host Wakulla High School.
And last Friday at home, the Seahawks
moved atop the Class 2A District 4 ladder
with an easy win over Tallahassee Maclay,
considered a chief rival this year for the
district crown.
Four in a row is a pretty good start for
the year.
But it all came apart when the wheels
rolled off the wagon before a packed home
gymnasium Saturday night.
For the second time this season, the
Seahawks fell to archrival Port St. Joe,
this time by a 61-54 score despite holding
a six-point lead with less than two minutes
to play in the game.
It isn't the loss that's so much on coach
Fred Drake's mind, since he's been busy
drumming into his players' heads that
it's the district games, and reaching your
peak in the playoffs, that make the differ-
ence.
"The rival game is for the players, my
main concern is for the district," said
Drake, whose squad now stands at 15-4 on
the year and undefeated in district play.
"I want to win it but I'm not going to
worry about it. We'll see them again and
as long as we take care of it when it really
counts, that's what matters," he said. "It's
obvious we're the better team."
What has Drake concerned, though, is
that his talented squad has let Port St. Joe
get under their skin. "I'm worried that St
Joe has their mind mentally. Tradition and
expectations can help you win the game.
Those kids at St. Joe expect to win be-
cause of tradition," he said. "Some of our
kids are trying to live up to community
pressure, or are over-intimidated.
"I think some of the kids are trying to
play Port St. Joe for family and friends and
not themselves. They're trying to please
too many family and friends and they're
not playing their game," Drake said. "In
their head it s a two-game season, which
to me is not important."
Last Saturday's debacle, in which the
Seahawks fell apart in the final minutes,
may be an example of such a mind game
at work.
Franklin County, especially the back
court players, committed at least four
turnovers in the final two minutes, part of
a 10-turnover quarter for the Seahawks,
and the Tiger Sharks were swift to capi-
talize on them.
"The guards had a perfect game the
night before, and this was their second
worst game of the year. It looked like a
Cairo flashback, probably worse," said
Drake, referring to the opening game of
the Bay Barnstorm Classic over Christ-
mas break in which the Seahawks were


A.J. WILLIAMS


COACH FRED DRAKE
outscored 20-12 in the final quarter after
leading the entire game.
"They stunk it up in the fourth quar-
ter against St. Joe. I hate to put blame on
people but point blank they gave it away.
Right now our guards are young and they
are making too many mistakes," said the
coach. He said the referees "made some
ridiculous calls" but stopped short of
blaming officials for the loss.
Drake is sensitive to the charge he is
being overly critical of his three starting
guards senior Jeremy James, and junior
Austin O'Neal and Arron Prince but is
convinced they can blossom under pres-
sure.
"They're going to have to," he said.
"You can't play college basketball if you
can't handle high school pressure, espe-
cially when you're small. When you're un-
der 6 feet, you have to be almost perfect
"I just want them to run the offense
and not turn the ball over," Drake said.
"We have people who can score. Let's get
the ball inside. The question is 'Can the
guards get it there?'
"That's the nature of the game. All the
good teams have a good point guard," he
said. "There's no way we can go deep (in
the playoffs) if our guard play doesn't get
better."
The coach has decided it may be time
to make some personnel changes to see if
he can strike the right combination for his
team's strengths.
"I'm at a point now I have to shake
some things up. I look at all four of our
losses because of our guard play," he said.
"We're fixing to make some changes; we
need consistent guard play.
"We need some personnel changes even
if it hurts some egos. I want to give some
other kids a try," said Drake. The coach
mentioned possible replacements as se-
nior A.J. Williams and sophomore Marcus
Allen, who as a junior varsity standout has
been scoring around 20 points a game.

Three wins at Wakulla tourney
After a disappointing finish at the
Bay Barnstorm Classic, the Seahawks
swooped back to win three games at


ZAN SIMMONS


Wakulla High School's Holiday Tourney
the weekend after New Year's Day.
After being tied 50-50 in regulation, the
team outscored Arnold 6-4 in overtime pe-
riod to win the opener.. "We were mentally
down from the St Joe game (in Panama
City) and we didn't play good," said Drake.
"The main thing was we just needed a win.
We didn't play good basketball, especially
defensive transition."
Senior Deshaun Winfield led the team
with 24 points and 10 rebounds.
The next day, the Seahawks defeated
Class 5A Miami Mariner 53-50. "I knew
coming into it they were probably going to
be the toughest team, and they had some
great shooters from the outside," said
Drake.
The Seahawks trailed 42-37 going into
the final stanza, but outscored their oppo-
nents 16-8 in the fourth quarter to secure
the win.
Franklin County closed the day by
breezing to a 79-65 win over host Wakul-
la. "They had some athletes and they
matched up with us," said Drake. "I think
we just wore them out, we constantly ran
them. Our top seven players were proba-
bly a little better than theirs. We basically
took care of business like we were sup-
posed to on paper."
The coach was most pleased with the
team's dismantling of Maclay 62-44 on
Jan. 9.
"I was a little surprised myself. Our
guards stepped up to the challenge and
outplayed them," he said. "They didn't
turn the ball over. We came out and played
man-to-man defense. I said 'we're just go-
ing to keep it simple.'"
One bright spot for the team was the
return of senior Zan Simmons, after he
had sat out the road trip. "It was a coach's
decision not to play Zan. He had some per-
sonal issues he needed to take care of, and
so he didn't travel with us," said Drake.
"Zan came in and played the way I expect
him to play."
Seahawk fans are invited to come out
Friday to the gym to enjoy Senior Night,
for both the girls and boys senior players.
There are three games that night boys
junior varsity, girls varsity and boys var-
sity and the Senior Night ceremony will
come between the two varsity games,
likely some time around 7 p.m.

Jan. 2 vs. Arnold
at Wakulla Holiday Tournament
Franklin 13 20 8 9 6 56
Arnold 20 11 5 14 4 54
SEAHAWKS: Arron Prince 1/5 2s, 2
pts.; Carlos Morris 2/7 2s, 4/6 3s, 3/6 FT,
19 pts.; Deshaun Winfield 10/17 2s, 4/7
FTs, 24 pts.; Austin O'Neal 1/3 2s, 2 pts.;


JeremyJames 3/7 2s, 1 /4 FTs, 7 pts.; Dalin
Modican 1/3 2 pts.
Totals: 18/42 2s, 4/8 3s, 8/21 FTs
Rebounds: Winfield 10, Morris 7
Assists: Morris 6, O'Neal 4, Winfield 3
Blocks: Winfield 2

Jan. 3 vs. Miami Mariner
at Wakulla Holiday Tournament
Franklin 8 16 13 16 53
Mariner 7 16 19 8 50
SEAHAWKS: Prince 2/4 2s, 4 pts.;
Morris 6/13 2s, 1/2 3s, 1/2 FT, 16 pts.;
Winfield 7/12 2s, 2/4 FTs, 16 pts.; O'Neal
6/10 2s, 12 pts.; Modican 2/3 2s, 1 /2
FTs, 5 pts.
Totals: 23/45 2s, 1/6 3s, 4/9 FTs
Rebounds: Winfield 17, Morris 11,
O'Neal 6, Prince, Modican 5, James 3
Assists: O'Neal 5, Morris 4, Winfield 2,
Prince, James
Blocks: Morris 3, Winfield 2, Modican

Jan. 3 vs. Wakulla
at Wakulla Holiday Tournament
Franklin 16 21 18 24 79
Wakulla 12 12 16 25 65
SEAHAWKS: Prince 1/1 3s, 1 /2 FTs,
4 pts.; Morris 5/12 2s, 4/9 3s, 1/2 FT, 23
pts.; Winfield 4/6 2s, 1/2 3s, 1 /2 FTs,
12 pts.; O'Neal 5/9 2s, 1 /2 FTs, 11 pts.:
Modican 3/5 2s, 6 pts.; James 3/5 2s, 2/3
3s, 1/5 FTs, 13 pts.; A.J. Williams 1/3 2s,
2 pts.; Marcus Allen 3/3 2s, 6 pts.; James
Winfield 1/1 2s, 2 pts.
Totals: 25/47 2s, 8/16 3s, 5/16 FTs
Rebounds: Morris 8, James 5, D. Win-
field 4,Joseph 3, O'Neal, Modican 2,
Prince, Allen
Assists: O'Neal 7, D. Winfield 3, Prince
5, James 4, J. Winfield

Jan. 9 home vs. Maclay
Maclay 9 7 10 18 44
Franklin 14 16 16 16 62
SEAHAWKS: Prince 2 /4 2s, 1 /2 FTs,
3 pts.; Morris 4/10 2s, 2 /3 FT, 10 pts.;
Winfield 9/16 2s, 2/3 3s, 3/6 FTs, 27 pts.;
O'Neal 3/8 2s, 3/5 FTs, 9 pts.; Modican
1/2 2s, 2 pts.; James 1/1 2s, 2 pts.; Zan
Simmons 2/5 2s, 3/5 FTs, 7 pts.
Totals: 22/46 2s, 2/7 3s, 12/21 FTs
Rebounds: Simmons 12, Winfield 11,
Morris 8, James 2, O'Neal 3, Modican 4,
Prince 4
Assists: O'Neal 4, D. Winfield 8, Morris
4, Prince, Simmons 2, James 3,
Block: Winfield 2, O'Neal, Morris, Sim-
mons
Steals: Winfield 3, O'Neal, James, Sim-
mons 2, Modican

Jan. 10 home vs. Port St. Joe
PSJ 13 11 11 26 61
Franklin 18 11 15 10 54
SEAHAWKS: Prince 1/3 2s, 3/6 FTs, 5
pts.; Morris 6/9 2s, 2/9 3s, 18 pts.; Win-
field 6/10 2s, 1/3 3s, 8/10 FTs, 23 pts.;
O'Neal 2/7 2s, 4 pts.; Simmons 2/4 2s,
4 pts.
Totals: 17/36 2s, 3/12 3s, 11/17 FTs
Rebounds: Simmons 11, Morris 8, James
3, Winfield 12, O'Neal 7, Modican 2,
Prince 5
Assists: O'Neal 6, Prince 3, Simmons 3,
James 3, Winfield, Morris
Block: Morris 2, Winfield
Steals: Winfield 4, Morris 3, Prince 2


Soccer team debuts


at home Friday I

The public is invited to the first home match for the
charter members of the Franklin County High School
soccer team.
Admission is free for the game, slated for the high
school stadium on Friday, Jan. 16 at 6 p.m. The team
will be completing the first year with a match against
Port St Joe.
Though this is the first year playing soccer for
much of the team, the Seahawks' enthusiasm and
commitment to learning the game is compensat-
ing well for the lack of experience. This season has .
set the groundwork for the 2009-2010 season which
will include both a Lady Seahawk and a boys' Seahawk SOCCER
team with a full round of 10 to 12 matches for each left, Hur
team. Second
Friday provides an opportunity for the Franklin William
County community to enjoy an entertaining match and Andrew
support these hardworking Seahawks. team m

THIS WEEK WITH THE SEAHAWKS


Friday, Jan. 16
Seahawks JV and Varsity, and Lady
Seahawks Varsity, Basketball play at
home against Jefferson County in district
action. First tipoff is at 4:30 p.m., followed by
6 and 7:30 p.m. games. Seniors will be hon-
ored at Senior Night ceremonies between
the two varsity games.
Saturday, Jan. 17
Seahawks JV and Varsity, and Lady
Seahawks Varsity, Basketball play at Port


A W- K i 'W .. -
SEAHAWKS: Charter members of the Franklin County High School soccer team are, front row, from
enter Shiver, Jessica Dempsey, Emerald Norris, Carla Lewis, Megan Newell and Shelby Lipscomb.
row, from left, are Charles Goggins, Derick Rhodes, Derek Salyer, Casey Sapp, Frank Gerking,
Sapp and Javeion Winfield. Third row, from left, are Coach Robert VanSickle, Oscar Godinez,
v Waller, Jordon King, JJ Golden and Coach David Cox. Not pictured are Briana Whittington and
manager Tommilee Dowden. Photo courtesy of Sue Cox.


St. Joe. First tipoff is at 4:30 p.m., followed
by 6 and 7:30 p.m. games.
Tuesday, Jan. 20
Seahawks JV and Varsity, and Lady Se-
ahawks Varsity, Basketball play at home
against North Florida Christian in district
action. First tipoff time is at 4:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 22
Lady Seahawks Varsity Basketball
plays at home against Altha. Tipoff time is
at 6 p.m.


APALACH 1t(Lk
STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561
C


NE






A 10 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 15, 2009


COX NEW KEEPER OF CROOKED RIVER LIGHT
At the Jan. 8
meeting of the
Carrabelle city
commission,
former city
attorney
Dan Cox
was named
lighthouse
keeper of the
newly restored
Crooked --
River Light. In
a telephone ..
interview,
Cox said, "I
volunteered to /
do it because / .
I live near ..
by. The lamp .
constantly has
to be repaired
because it
sticks. It will be
OK for a few
weeks, and
then it sticks
again. I'm glad
to help out
in any way I
can."


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
The Lanark Village
Association and the
Lanark Golf Club both are
involved in fund drives.
On Saturday, Jan. 10,
Lanark Village hosted a
fundraiser breakfast in
support of Lanark's six-
hole golf course, followed
by a golf tournament.


The Franklin County Tourist Development Council

2009 PUBLIC MEETING SCHEDULE CHANGE


January 20, 2009 -



January 22, 2009 -




February 3, 2009 -




February 17, 2009


(Tuesday) Administrative
Committee, SGI Firehouse
1:30 pm

(Thursday) SPECIAL
MARKETING WORKSHOP,
SGI Firehouse 9:00 am to
12:00 pm

(Tuesday) Full Council,
Carrabelle City Offices,
1001 Gray Ave (Old High
School), 3:00 pm

(Tuesday) Marketing
Committee, SGI Firehouse,
1:30 pm


At the breakfast, the
Wandering Star Quilting
Club displayed a quilt the
members have created
to be raffled in aid of the
golf course. Club member
Jean Sewell said members
would continue to sell
tickets until they collect
$1,000 and then hold a
drawing.
President Ward
Godburn and the vice
president are working
hard to revitalize the
course and create interest
in the club.
"We're trying to get
more play on the golf
course. We just don't have
the membership we used
to have," Courage said.
"Our greens are in the
best shape in years, and
we're buying a bush hog to
keep the grass cut, mostly
with donations. Carrabelle
has made it possible for us
to store our tractor in the
old water board building."
Courage said the club
has 55 members. He
said anyone can join for


$50 a year. Member can
play all day for $2, and
nonmembers pay only $5
for a day pass.
The club is sponsoring
tournaments every other
Saturday. Entrants play
in teams of three, and it
costs $5 to compete. If you
want to compete, call Joe
or Joyce Manzanares at
697-5146.
"This is a great place to
compete for a little fun and
a great golf course to learn
on," Courage said.
The Lanark Village
Association also is raising
funds to repair a bus that
will be used to transport
elderly residents to
shop, to the library or for
appointments. Currently,
the association is hosting
Bingo for the Bus from
6:30-8:30 p.m. every
Wednesday in Chillas Hall.
Barbara Lasher said
cards are three for $2. She
said coffee and cookies are
on sale during the game,
and there is a pie raffled
off each week.


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Members of the Wandering Star Quilt Club display the "puzzle quilt" they are
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Lanark fundraisers under way

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LIFE


TIMES


B
Section


Thursday, January 15, 2009 www. apalachtimes. com Page 1


Painter in search

of a labor force

fading in the South


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

On a sunny afternoon
last month, Wade Barber
sat patiently on the edge of
a concrete wall behind an
abandoned oyster house at
Two Mile with his chin up
as he squinted out over the
placid water, his white boots
rested on a pile of shells.
Afewfeet away, the sun at
her back, a tall woman with
a ball cap on and straight
brown hair cropped across
her shoulders stood behind
an easel with a paintbrush
in her hand.
She worked without de-
lay, diligently applying wa-
tercolors from a palette of
bright choices. Her jaw, like
Barber, was relaxed as she
worked, her long fingers
moving nimbly in sync with
her deliberate glances at
the oysterman.
There was little to be
gained by her dawdling.
The nine days she allot-
ted for her stay in Franklin
County were drawing to a
close. She needed to com-
plete her work before Bar-
ber vanished.
It was not that Barber
had plans to go anywhere.
No doubt he would be out
on the bay the next day, pos-
sibly wearing a flannel shirt
like the one he had on that
Dec. 8 afternoon and prob-
ably the same red knit cap.
But how long will it be
before there are no more
Barbers tonging oysters in
the bay?
How soon will it be until
the last of them disappears,
falling away like the sun
that slowly unfurled a dark-
ened orange glow as it sunk
below the horizon?
That is the deadline Mary
Whyte is working against.

Mill closure
stirs the artist

Whyte, a distinguished
watercolorist and illustra-
tor with nearly two dozen
books to her credit, arrived
in Apalachicola Dec. 1 to be-


gin work on Florida's seg-
ment of a three-year proj-
ect to capture in a series
of paintings the "Vanishing
Industries of the South."
Her curiosity had been
sparked by a handful of
newspaper articles about
Apalachicola's threat-
ened oyster industry and
Florida's ongoing conflict
with water users upriver
in Georgia that she read in
her hometown newspaper,
The Post and Courier in
Charlestown, S.C.
The industry's plight
resonated well with a proj-
ect she has begun to set
her brushes to, prompted
by a discussion with a bank
president in Greenville, S.C.,
who sat for a portrait by the
nationally recognized artist
whose works grace hun-
dreds of corporate, univer-
sity and private collections.
"The headline in the lo-
cal newspaper was that one
of the major mills was being
shut down. He said to me in
five years, these mills will
be gone, at least the major-
ity of them," said Whyte.
The article's photo of a
woman in front of a loom
caught the artist's eye.
Whyte wondered whether a
series of paintings on work-
ers would become her next
project, an even more so-
cially conscious undertak-
ing than her last, a book ti-
tled "Alfreda's World," about
Gullah women who live on a
barrier island off the South
Carolina coast.
Three years ago, Whyte
compiled into the paper-
back (published in 2005
by Wyrick and Company)
10 years of drawings and
sketches done after she and
her husband, Smith Cole-
man, closed their gallery
on the mainland and moved
to Johns Island to live and
work in the African Ameri-
can community populated
historically by descendants
of slaves.
It was there Whyte be-
friended Alfreda Gibbs Smi-
ley LaBoard and the other
people of the Hebron Zion
St. Francis Senior Center.
"Itwas quite by accident,"


A 27" by 1 8" painting of Sister Heyward, done
in 2001 by Mary Whyte and found in her book
"Alfreda's World."


she said. "I needed mod-
els and met Gullah women
and started painting them.
I think that's what brought a
lot of attention to my career.
Nobody had really told that
story in that way."

From ferry captains
to gravediggers

As Whyte's current proj-
ect evolves, she wants to
tell another story, this time
of men and women whose
livelihoods are fading about
as fast as inexpensive im-
ports flood American mar-
kets and old-fashioned ways
of doing things are replaced
by more modern and imper-
sonal methods of operation.
"First, there were tex-
tile workers," said Whyte.
"From there, I'd been driv-
ing along in central South
Carolina and saw a museum
on the cotton industry. I got
one of the cotton pickers.
"While I was there, I
went to a mom-and-pop
diner and did a painting of a
woman, now in her late 70s,
who still goes in every day
to cook," she said.
Another time, Whyte en-
countered five men, their
tattooed bodies covered with
black soot, who travel the
South cleaning industrial
factory equipment. "They're
cleaning the equipment that
makes Coca Cola cans, and
these factories are shutting
down," she said.
"I found one of the last
shoeshine guys in New Or-
leans and a guy who sold
vegetables out of the back of
a pickup. His father had sold
them out of a wheelbarrow,
shouting, 'I got tomatoes; I
got cucumbers,'" she said.
Whyte has ventured as
far north as Kentucky, last
summer traveling to Val-
ley View to do a portrait of
ferry workers with the old-
est business in the state,
which had been granted a
franchise by the Virginia
legislature in 1785.
She painted workers
for the Valley View Ferry
Authority the vessel is
now owned and operated
by three neighboring coun-
ties as they managed the
small, rudderless cable ferry
capable of carrying no more
than three cars at a time.
"It's the same ferry
that took Lincoln and his
troops," she said.
With intellectual curios-
ity to match her artistic tal-
ents, Whyte stayed at a bed
and breakfast there that
raised goats, and she paint-
ed a woman who quilted all
her life.
"One has led into an-


other," she said. "I'm look-
ing into researching drive-
in movie theaters. And I'd
like to find maybe someone
still digging graves by hand
somewhere in the South."

Exhibition to open
in spring 2011

Whyte found what she
wanted in Apalachicola
while staying at a rented
house west of town owned
by Centreville, Ala., optom-
etrist David Allgood.
Darrell and Connie
McKinley, who take care of
the house, were fascinat-
ed by the project and lent
Whyte their knowledge. "It
was really Darrell," said
Whyte. "He spent an entire
day with me driving me
around to different sheds,
talking to the oystermen."
Barber captured the
artist's eye, and he agreed
to sit, both for photos and
for his portrait. "I was tak-
ing photos, researching,
thinking about it, going back
to my makeshift studio. Pic-
tures help me remember his
temperament and coloring,"
she said. "This will probably
be at least a 3' to 4' painting.
I hope to have it done by the
middle of February."
Whyte's plans to assem-
ble 30 of her major works,
ranging from 3' to 7', togeth-
er with 20 smaller studies
at an exhibition slated for
spring 2011 for the Green-
ville County (S.C.) Museum
of Art.
The last painting will be
completed by summer 2010,
and each will be reproduced
in her book, scheduled for
release when the first show
opens. She won't start writ-
ing for several months,
though.
"I wanted to hold off on
the writing," Whyte said.
"Originally, I thought I
would be doing lengthy in-
terviews. I found something
profound about their face
and features. I didn't think
it was necessary to get to
know them personally. It's
more of an artist's journey,
in some ways haphazard,
throughout the South with
people I have had the good
fortune to meet."
A native of Chagrin Falls,
Ohio, Whyte has been a ded-
icated artist, able to make a
living at it, back to her mid-
dle school years when she
sold her first painting. "The
very first painting I ever
sold, I was in eighth grade. I
was visiting an aunt in New
Jersey, was bored and did a
pen-and-ink of a rambling
old restaurant and bar.
"She said 'I bet they


.4

'V


ABOVE: The 37.5" x 45.5" watercolor on paper
entitled "Spinner" was done in 2007 by Mary
Whyte of a textile mill worker in Gaffney, SC.
TOP: Wade Barber and Mary Whyte


would buy that,' and she
goes and walks over and she
comes back three minutes
later and puts a $20 bill in my
hand. I went 'Wow,' it never
occurred to me they'd actu-
ally pay me to draw some-
thing," Whyte remembered.
The 55-year-old artist
has come a long way since
then, with the average price
of her watercolors now in
the $25,000 to $50,000 range.
She and her husband, who
met during her first week at
Tyler School of Art in Phila-
delphia, now own a gallery
in Charleston.
Whyte is among about a
half-dozen featured artists
at the gallery, Coleman Fine
Arts, where her husband
works as a gilder, restoring
frames for museums and
collectors using gold leaf,
each one hand carved, gild-
ed, toned and signed by him.
With high-end por-
trait commissions coming
her way "the mayor of
Charleston, a lot of deans
and doctors and that type of
thing" Whyte's livelihood
as an artist is secure, but
she still has that realist's
yearning to capture the
world as it is, without privi-
lege or prejudice.
"To paint a senator is
nice, but I think it's a lot
more interesting to paint
the person who cleans the
senator's office," she said.

Cancer prompts change
in couple's life

The couple's career to-
gether began after they
started a gallery outside
Philadelphia after gradua-
tion "that sort of sputtered
along."
Their lives changed radi-
cally in about 1990, when she
was diagnosed with breast
cancer and they decided
to relocate to Charleston.


"It certainly changes your
priorities," she said. "You
may not have forever to fool
around and may not get to
what's important in life.
"We closed the business,
packed up and moved down.
Had it not been for that, I
don't think we'd have been
so brave," she said.
With Whyte's expert
drawing skills and desire to
paint people more than land-
scapes, she's embraced wa-
tercolors, a translucent me-
dium particularly conducive
to capturing skin tones.
"Watercolor is not forgiv-
ing," she said. "If you make
a mistake, you can't paint
over it without making a pile
of mud. You can't really hide
what's underneath it. You
need sound drawing skills;
you only get one shot at it."
Because of her battle
with cancer, Whyte is now
focused each day on mak-
ing her work deeper and
richer than the children's
books she illustrated so suc-
cessfully. "My health's great
now," she said. "I think at
that time and since, it made
me want to make my work
more meaningful.
"I want to make it engag-
ing. I want to engage people
who might not otherwise
want to look at paintings,"
she said.
In a recent exhibition of
Andrew Wyeth and his con-
temporaries, she recalled
that the mother of one of
her subjects dragged her
husband to the gallery to
see Whyte's work. "It en-
gaged people who might not
otherwise consider paint-
ings," she said.
When she offers to paint
people, such as Barber, she
finds their initial reaction is
often one of surprise. "Their
initial reaction is 'You want
to paint me?' They're
amazed," she said. "I think
that's where you find real
humanity, in people."


*


NE






B2 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 15, 2009


'The Star-Spangled Girl' brightens January


"The Star Spangled
Girl" is the second pro-
duction in The Panhandle
Players' 2008-09 Dinner
and a Show season. A ro-
mantic comedy written by
Neil Simon and directed
by Dan Wheeler, the play
entangles three charac-
ters in a red, white and
blue love triangle.
Protest and patriotism,
noble ideals and intellect
all collide with sex appeal
and romance in three per-
formances, Friday and
Saturday evenings, Jan.
23 and 24, at 7:30 pm, and
Sunday afternoon, Jan. 25,
at 3 pm, at the Eastpoint
Firehouse's "little theatre"
on 6th Street, Eastpoint.
Call for tickets or additional
information 670-8200.
Andy Hobart (Ben
Bloodworth) and Norman
Cornell (David Bowen) are
radicals who barely make
a living working on their
protest magazine, "Fall-
out," which is dedicated to
fighting "the system" and
corruption in America. So-


"The Star Spangled
Girl" tickets are $12
for adults, $1 0 for
students and $5
for children under
12. "Dinner and a
Show" season tickets
are still available.

phie Rauchmeyer (Megan
Lamb), a former Olympic
swimmer, is an all-Ameri-
can, Southern girl who
moves into the apartment
next door.
It's love at first encoun-
ter for Norman, who is the
brains behind "Fallout." He
may be one of the best writ-
ers in America, but he is a
helpless, hapless adoles-
cent once he meets Sophie.
Unfortunately, his feelings
are not reciprocated.
Norman's obsession
with Sophie makes Andy,
who is trying to stay ahead
of the bill collectors, hire
her just to keep the maga-
zine going. Then Sophie
falls for Andy, though they


are at odds politically,
threatening to destroy the
magazine and the men's
friendship.
"The Star Spangled
Girl" has "charm, bright-
ness, deft inventiveness
and capacity for good, hon-
est hilarity" New York
Post
"Mr. Simon can do
wonders ... with casually
tossed-off fantasies that
pop up from nowhere and
whistle as they go by." -
The New York Times
Suitable for young peo-
ple, "The Star Spangled
Girl" tickets are $12 for
adults, $10 for students and
$5 for children under 12.
"Dinner and a Show" sea-
son tickets are still avail-
able for $24 for two Pan-
handle Players productions
and 10 to 15 percent dinner
discounts at participating
restaurants for season tick-
et holders. Call 670-8200.
The production is fund-
ed in part by the Franklin
County Tourist Develop-
ment Council.


ROYCE ROLSTAD I Special to the Times
Ben Bloodworth, left, Megan Lamb and David Bowen rehearse for upcoming
performances of "The Star Spangled Girl," Jan. 23, 24 and 25, at the Eastpoint
Firehouse "little theatre."


LOST & FOUND!
A 15 year old blind poodle was dropped
off at the Adoption Center about one week
ago. He was found around the old high
school in Apalachicola. If you know who this
dog belongs to, please call 670-8417.
December was a very successful adoption
month. We had puppies being adopted all
over Florida from Pensacola to Lakeland.
I even put one on a plane to Tucson, AZ.
Unfortunately, the older puppies and adult
dogs are still waiting to be adopted. All
of them are leash trained and some are
housebroken. Please consider an older and
wiser lifelong companion.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more details or
visit the Franklin County Humane Society
at 244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You may
log onto the website at www.forgottenpets.
org to see more of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend for
life, you not only save the life of that pet,
you make room for us to save the life of one
more abandoned dog or cat!

' DON'T PAY TOO MUCH! "
$50 Quarterly
Saves YOU $100 a year!
for residential accounts
Aloha Bugs Pest Management
Franklin County's ONLY LOCAL Pest control company
Call Lois at (850) 653-5857


GULF STATE
Community
rBank
Swww.gscb.com


The
Coolest Bank
in the
Hottest Spots


Aplchcl .- .4 *4:bel4 *- *Cravvf44 4 :4 :
(8 50) 65*3- 2 2 6 850 69733:4(84.0) 2 4 -8 3


Allison Yowell turned 9
years old on Sunday, Jan. 4,
2009.
She is the daughter of
T.J. and Amanda Yowell,
of Eastpoint, and Carman
Horton, of Apalachicola.
Her brother, Steven Dalton,
and sister, Audry Yowell,
celebrated with her.
Grandparents are
Sheila and Billy Ray Hall,
of Sumatra, and Phyllis and
Tony Yowell, of Sumatra,
Diana and Don Lanier, of
Mexico Beach, and Howard
Horton, of Apalachicola.
She is the great-
granddaughter of the late


Herbert and Elizabeth
Shiver.
She was joined by friends
and loved ones and all had a
great time. We love you girl!


Dewayne Page turns


Dewayne
Allen Page
celebrated his
first birthday on
Tuesday, Dec. 9,
2008.
He is the son
of Donald D.
Page and Jasmen
Yon.
Maternal
grandparents are
Debbie Velasquez
and James
Yon. Paternal
grandparents are
Nelda Smith and
Durwood Smith.


Lillie Gaskill born
Tasha and Jason Gaskill would like to announce the
birth of their daughter, Lillie Grace Gaskill, on Thursday,
Dec. 18, 2008 at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama
City
She weighed 7 lbs. 3 ozs and was 20" long.
Maternal grandparents are
Lucretia Taylor and
Shorty Shiver, both
of Eastpoint.
Paternal
grandparents
are Kathy
and Ronnie
Raffield, and
Tommy Gaskill,
all of Apalachicola.


Weddings and ENGAGEMENTS

Linda Munroe,

Terry Hughes

engaged -n. t

Mr. Perry Lawrence, Jr.
and Ms. Betty Johnson, both
of Tallahassee, announce the
engagement of their daughter, Linda
L. Munroe, to Terry Nelson Hughes
Terry is the surviving son of the .
late Charles Hughes and the late
Mildred Edenfield, both formerly ot .
Tallahassee. "
Terry proposed to Linda on Sept 2.
2007. After a long, happy engagement '
the loving couple will marry on
March 21, 2009.


Bridal shower for Heather Osburn on Saturday


A bridal shower will be held for 17, from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Carrabelle
Heather Osburn on Saturday, Jan City Hall meeting room.



SILVER(<,UEST
Weddings STUDIOS LET US HELP Y,
Engagements CRIBS
Senior Portraits HIGH CHAIRS
Children & Babies TENTS
Call today and ask about our Children & Babies specials DINNERWARE
850-229-9353
www.SilverQuestStudios.com


All friends and family are invit-
ed.



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TABLES WEDDING ARCHES
CHAIRS CANDELABRAS
LINENS PUNCH BOWLS
BEACH WHEELCHAIR CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN


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Allison Yowell turns 9


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Thursday, January 15, 2009


Church


The Times | B3


Hospice to host tag-burning ceremony


For most, the holidays
mean family, home-cooked
meals, and celebration. The
holidays can also be a time
when we miss loved ones no
longer with us the most.
For 14 years, Big Bend
Hospice has hosted the Tree
of Remembrance at the Tal-
lahassee Mall, offering the
community a means of writ-
ing a message of love and
taking a moment to reflect
on the love we hold for family
and friends long after they've
journeyed on. Messages at-
tached to the ornaments are
the community's testament
to the power of remember-
ing. Big Bend Hospice thanks
all who have generously sup-
ported the Tree of Remem-
brance these many years.
The special tags attached
to over 2,000 ornaments
on the 30 Trees of Remem-
brance in the eight-county
Big Bend area this year are
so poignant and sacred that


to discard them would be ter-
ribly wrong. Big Bend Hos-
pice has annually conducted
a tag-burning ceremony with
staff and volunteers. After
the tags have burnt to ash,
they are scattered in the
Margaret Z. Dozier Hospice
House garden at Big Bend
Hospice.
On Friday, Jan. 23, the
public is invited to partici-
pate in the tag-burning cer-
emony for the first time.
The service will begin at 4:30
p.m. at the Elaine C. Bartelt
Hospice Center, 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd. A reception will
be held immediately after
the ceremony.
Anyone may attend; you
don't have to have used Big
Bend Hospice's services or
donated to the Tree of Re-
membrance. For more infor-
mation, please contact Lau-
ra Glenn at (850) 701-1341 or
(850) 878-5310 or laurag@
bigbendhospice.org.


PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


The Love Center Min-
istries Worldwide "Com-
munity 2009 Martin Lu-
ther King Jr. Holiday"
celebration will be held
Monday, Jan. 19 at 11 a.m.
at the Love & Worship
Center Church, 151-10th


Street, in Apalachicola.
The national theme for
this year is "Remember!
Celebrate! Act! A Day
On... Not A Day Off." The
keynote speaker for this
event is Pastor Delwynn
G. Williams, senior pas-


tor of St. John Missionary
Baptist Church in Pana-
ma City.
This event is open to
the public. All individu-
als and groups that would
like to participate in the
celebration are asked to


Clergy invited to breaking bread
Big Bend Hospice chap- lowship with community ral care coordinator.
lains invite area clergy clergy. At this quarterly meet-
and other leaders in the "We have planned a very ing, Wendy Vargo, MSW,
congregation to attend a special time for our clergy Big Bend Hospice's grief
special luncheon at noon to gather, fellowship and to and loss department
on Tuesday, Feb. 3 at Big discuss issues that impact manager, will speak on
Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan them in ministering to "Meeting the Bereave-
Center Blvd., Tallahassee. those who are dying," said ment Needs of Your Con-
Come enjoy a compli- Rev. Candace McKibben, gregants." The meeting is
mentary meal and fel- Big Bend Hospice's pasto- open to all clergy in Leon,


Area BRIEFS


Bay Medical pours
praise on big blood
donors
Aimee Palmer, of Bay
Medical Blood Donor Cen-
ter, sent her congratula-
tions to Susan Richardson,
of Apalachicola, and Mi-
chael Allen, of Eastpoint.
During the December
blood drive, Richardson
donated her eighth pint of
blood reaching the mile-
stone of one gallon donated.
Allen donated pint number
32, reaching a lifetime do-
nation record of four gal-
lons. "I wish a more people
would do it. It helps people.
It's an easy donation to
make. It doesn't hurt and it
doesn't cost anything," said
Allen, in a telephone inter-
view.
There are many reasons
to give blood, not the least
of which is knowing your
donation may save a hu-
man life. Actually, a single


pint of blood may save up to
four lives.
There are also health
benefits to donating blood.
Each time you give blood,
you remove some of the
iron stored in your body.
Some research seems to
show that high iron levels in
the blood increase the pos-
sibility of a heart attack.
Blood donation is also
believed to stimulate the
production of strong, new
red blood cells. In addition,
you burn about 650 calories
when you donate blood and
lose a pound.
The next Franklin
County blood drive will be
on March 24 from 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m. For more informa-
tion about donating blood,
call the Bay Medical Blood
Donor Center at (850) 747-
6570 or contact the South-
eastern Community Blood
Center at (850) 877-7181 or
check out SCBC's website
at www.scbcinfo.org.


Relay for Life opens
registration
Susan Hoffritz, chair
for this year's Franklin
County's Relay For Life,
is invite local residents
to join them on Thursday,
Jan. 15 at 5:30 p.m. for a
team meeting and volun-
teer registration. It will be
held at the Realtors Assoc.
of Franklin and Southern
Gulf Co. office located at
78 11th St., Apalachicola.
This year's Relay will
be held Friday, May 15
and 16, beginning at 6 p.m.
through the night end-
ing at noon on Saturday.
Our relay will be held at
the new Franklin County
School in Eastpoint, and
we are very excited about
this great location! The
reason it is through the
night is because cancer
never sleeps.
The committee has
been working hard to reg-


call the church at 653-2203
or contact Apostle Shirley
White, celebration coordi-
nator at (850) 896-0650.
The celebration cul-
minates with a memorial
motorcade and recep-
tion.


gathering
Jefferson, Madison, Taylor,
Wakulla, Franklin, Liberty
and Gadsden counties.
Please RSVP to Can-
dace McKibben if possible
by Jan. 30 at 878-5310, ext.
250 or candace@bigbehd-
hospice.org. Please feel
free to invite other clergy
or leaders.


ister teams, recruit volun-
teers, plan the entertain-
ment and events at the
Relay BUT they still need
your help. "We are hoping
to have the best year ever
in our fundraising efforts
to help our fellow neigh-
bors in Franklin County
with monies raised," said
Hoffritz. "We are asking
for survivors and caregiv-
ers to contact us so that
we may honor and cele-
brate you at the Relay. We
all realize that in these ex-
tremely difficult economic
times, fundraising seems
like the last thing that we
might be able to accom-
plish; but it is especially at
these times when people
need help the most.
"Remember, some-
times the smallest of acts
makes the greatest differ-
ence in a person's life,"
she said.
For more info, call her
at 323-0560.


Joe Byron Blan, Sr.
was born Febuary 12, 1932
in Bagdad. He left us on
Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2008.
He is survived by his
wife, Eleanor Blan; one
son, Joe Jr.; six grandchil-
dren, Milissa Varnes, Paula
Medley, Joe Byron Blan III,
Mitzi Coates, Ashley Lingo
and Kayla Busbey; and


Joseph
Joseph Sim Vickery,
50, of Brunswick, GA, died
Dec. 7, 2008, at Hospice of
the Golden Isles.
Graveside service was
held at St. Andrews Cem-
etery in Darien, GA.
His co-workers of the
Georgia Department of
Natural Resources, Coast-
al Resources Division,
served as honorary pall-
bearers.
Survivors include his
wife, Susan Vickery; two
sons, Buck Vickery and
Jesse Vickery, all of Bruns-
wick; and his father, Sim


Clifford William Nowling
was born Dec. 12, 1943, in
Jay to the now late Daisy
and Curtis Nowling.
He died Thursday, Dec.
25, 2008, in Apalachicola at
the age of 65.
A long-time resident
of Eastpoint, he retired
from Franklin County as
a heavy equipment opera-
tor. He was an avid hunter
and loved being with his
hunting buddies. He was a
devoted member of Deliv-
erance Tabernacle.
Nowling is survived by
his wife; Aritha Smith, of
Eastpoint; children, Terry
Nowling (Sheila), Walt
Nowling (Alice), and Sha-
ron Odom (Ellis); brothers,


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


WELCOMES YOU

Church

of the
Ascension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM


nine great-grandchildren.
His daughter, Vicki Busbey
preceded him in death.
The memorial service
will be held on Saturday,
Jan. 17, at the First Baptist
Church in Apalachicola,
officiated by the Rev. Bill
Plazarin. He was loved by
many and will be missed
greatly.


Vickery
Vickery and wife Donna, of
Ocala. He was preceded in
death by his mother, Virgie
Howard Vickery.
A native of Glynn Coun-
ty, GA, he was a graduate of
Apalachicola High School.
He was employed by the
Georgia Department of
Natural Resources for the
past 33 years, most recent-
ly as the captain of the re-
search vessel Marguerite,
and was of the Methodist
faith.
Chapman Funeral Cha-
pel & Crematory was in
charge of arrangements.


Riley Nowling (Virginia)
and Jack Nowling (Bev-
erly); eight grandchildren
and three great-grand-
children; a host of nieces,
nephews, and cousins; and
his hunting crew.
He was preceded in
death by his parents; sister,
Betty Nowling; brothers,
Leon Nowling, Roy Nowl-
ing, and Wayne Nowling;
and great-grandson, James
Ellis Paul.
Funeral services were
held Sunday, Dec. 28, 2008,
at Deliverance Tabernacle
with the Rev. Larry Hat-
field officiating. Burial was
in Eastpoint Cemetery. Kel-
ley Funeral Home handled
all arrangements.


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


Trinity
EST. 1836
Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


Sarah Gay Family
Thank you so much to our wonderful community who
responded with your prayers, visitations, food and flowers
during our Mother's lengthy illness and recent passing. A
special thank you to Dr. Nitsios, Dr. Sanaullah, physician
assistant Larry Applebee, Dr. Marsh, and physical thera-
pist Tom Brocato, for your care and devotion.
Thank you to the staff of Weems Memorial Hospital.
Thank you to Rev. Lois Long, Rev. James Wiley and Rev.
Dave Fernandez of Port St. Joe. A special thanks to Kelley's
Funeral Home for the wonderful job from beginning to end.
Thank you again to Jerry McClain, Felicia Boone, and all of
the home health care staff. Thank you Sue Bodiford, Kathy
Jones, and Danielle Martina for making Maw Maw even
more beautiful with the hair, makeup, and nails. Also, to any
we may have missed, we love and appreciate you all!
The Family of Sarah Gay

Katherine Robinson family
The family of the late Katherine Bennett Robinson
would like to express our sincere thanks to you for your
acts of kindness during the illness and passing of our be-
loved "Nana."


Minnie Lee Clark Family
The family of Mrs. Minnie Lee Clark would like to ex-
press our appreciation and thanks to the entire community
for the kindness that was shown to us during her passing.
Be it food, flowers, cards, telephone calls, or prayers, we
thank you.
We would like to offer a special thank-you to Kelley Fu-
neral Home, Franklin County Sheriff's Department, Frank-
lin Work Camp, Franklin County High School, and Apala-
chicola Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses. During times
like this, we realize the wonderful community we reside in.
For all you did, we thank you from the bottom of our heart.
The Clark Family

Wallace Hill
I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the
people that so generously donated blood on my behalf
during the recent Red Cross Blood Drive. I am so grate-
ful to live in a community that really cares about their
neighbors and is willing to help those in need. Again, I
sincerely thank all of you.
Sincerely,
Wallace Hill

St. Patrick Catholic Church -
Ave. "C" & 6th St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@gtcom.net

PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
MASS SCHEDULE

SATURDAY ............. ........... ................ 5PM
SUNDAY ........................... ............... 10 AM
SUNDAY SPANISH MASS ................................ 5 PM
TUESDAY FRIDAY ................................... 8:30 AM


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services



IThe United Methodist Churches

of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5* St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Friday of each month
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672
Pastor: Julie Stephens
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis


*I


Obituaries


Joe Blan Sr.


Love Center to celebrate Dr. King holiday


Clifford Nowling


Cards of THANKS


I1






B4 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 15, 2009


Saveur magazine prefers Apalachicola oysters


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

Saveur, a gourmet magazine that combines love of
travel with love of food, has given the nod to Apalachic-
ola.
Each year, Saveur publishes a list of the editorial
staff's 100 favorite people, places and things in Decem-
ber. In January, the publisher throws a gala bash to cel-
ebrate the list. This year, one of the dishes featured at
dinner was Shrimp and Oyster Perloo.
An editor for Saveur, Todd Coleman, has paid several
visits to Apalachicola, and he decided that the only oys-
ters good enough for the celebratory perloo were Apala-
chicola oysters. He requested Apalachicola Bay Cham-
ber of Commerce Director Anita Grove help him acquire
the shellfish, and she arranged to have Leavins Seafood
FedEx a gallon of the local delicacy to New York City. The
shellfish were served on the evening of Jan. 8.
Perloo is a Carolina low country specialty that evolved
from the old world dish pilaf. The following is Saveur's
recipe for perloo reprinted from issue 117.

Shrimp and Oyster Perloo
2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 lb. county ham, finely chopped
2 lb. kielbasa, cut on the diagonal into 1/4-inch thick
slices
2 medium onion, chopped
1 red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and chopped


1 jalapeno, stemmed, seeded and chopped
3 tbsp. chopped flat-leaf parsley
1 tsp. dried thyme
2 tsp. cayenne pepper
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
3 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and chopped
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 cup long-grain rice
3/4 cup chicken broth
25 medium oysters, shucked (about 9 ozs.)
2 cup of their liquor reserved
35 large shrimp (about 1 2 lbs) peeled
5 scallions, chopped, to garnish

In a 6-qt. pot, heat olive oil over medium-high heat.
Add ham and kielbasa and cook, stirring occasionally,
until lightly browned, about 5 minutes.
Add inions, peppers, jalapenos, parsley, thyme, and
cayenne and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring
occasionally, until soft, about 10 minutes. Add tomatoes
and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until liquid
from the tomatoes thickens, about 10 minutes. Stir in
rice, chicken broth, ad oyster liquor. Bring to a boil; re-
duce heat to low, and simmer, covered, until rice is al-
most cooked through, about 20 minutes.
Stir in shrimp and oysters. Cover and continue to
cook on medium-low heat until the shrimp are bright
pink and the edges of the oysters have curled, about 10
minutes. Season with salt. Serve perloo sprinkled with
the chopped scallions.


PHOTO BY LOIS SWOBODA
Steve Rash of St. George Island is another admirer
of local oysters.


CHAMBER GETS A FACE LIFT


R. W. Thomas Construction of Eastpoint installed a new pergola on the face of the
Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce building on Commerce Street. Chamber
Director Anita Grove said that the pergola was paid for out of the chamber's
regular operating funds. Chamber President Joe Taylor said the pergola has been
planned for a year. When the work is completed, flowering vines will be planted
to climb on the frame and benches will be placed underneath. "We wanted to
soften the front of the building and provide some shade. The pergola will also
allow us to have signage visible in three directions. We are doing renovation on
the inside of the building to dress it up as a visitor center, too," he said. Taylor also
said that work on the building's stormwater drainage is now complete.



TDC to host marketing workshop


The Franklin County
Tourism Development
Council will host a mar-
keting workshop from 9
a.m.-noon Jan. 22 at the St.
George Island Volunteer
Fire Department on Pine
Avenue.
This workshop is de-
signed primarily for grant
recipients who have re-
ceived TDC funding to
promote tourism-related
events in the county, but
the public is invited to at-
tend, as well.
The workshop will be


led by Helen Spohrer, a
longtime real estate in-
dustry leader with an
extensive marketing
background. This year's
workshop will focus on
the marketing assistance
available to TDC event-
related grant recipients,
as well as recommenda-
tions and tips on getting
the most exposure from
marketing efforts.
Cynthia Clark, owner of
Bay Media Services, will
assist in the workshop by
outlining recommended


procedures to make the
most effective use of the
TDC marketing assistance
program and the steps in-
volved in creating individ-
ual marketing packages for
grant recipients.
The next regular meet-
ing of the TDC marketing
committee is scheduled
at 1:30 p.m. Feb. 17 at the
St. George Island Fire-
house.
For additional TDC in-
formation, contact the ad-
ministrative offices at 653-
8678.


Winter gardening is



difficult but rewarding


Winter is always the
most difficult time to gar-
den in our area for both the
gardener and the plants.
Rapidly-changing weath-
er can be hard on tender
plants, especially when a
cold spell is preceded by
warm weather that pre-
vents plants from
being completely
dormant. These 'j
warm one day, cold
the next periods
can also confuse
our fruit trees and
winter vegetables.
Extended periods BILL M
of warm weather The
can cause our fruit Arou
trees to bloom too
soon and cause our winter
vegetables to "bolt" and go
to seed.
Despite these difficul-
ties, the winter is my favor-
ite time to garden. The fol-
lowing gardening tips are
just some of the informa-
tion contained in the Janu-
ary/February Issue of the
UF IFAS Gardening in the
Panhandle Newsletter writ-
ten by our Horticulture and
Florida Yards & Neighbor-
hood Extension agents who
work in the region. The tips
are provided by Theresa
Friday, horticulture agent
in Santa Rosa County.

Flowers
Prune rose bushes in
early February. For more
information on how to grow
roses, request the Growing


M,
W
nd


Roses in Florida publica-
tion from our Extension Of-
fice or visit http://edis.ifas.
ufl.edu/EP339.
There's still time to
plant some cool season an-
nual flowers, such as car-
nations, foxglove, nemesia,
pansies, petunias and snap-
dragons. All need
a well-drained site
and four to six hours
of full sun a day.
Re-fertilize cool
season flowerbeds,
using a liquid or dry
form of fertilizer.
AHAN In February,
worldd prepare flowerbeds
d You for spring plant-


ed in the garden are beets,
broccoli, cabbage, carrots,
cauliflower, celery, Chinese
cabbage, kale, kohlrabi,
leek, mustard, bunching
onions, parsley, English
peas, Irish potatoes, rad-
ishes and turnips.
Start seeds of warm
season vegetables in late
January in order to have
transplants in March.
Irish potatoes can
be started from January
through March by planting
seed pieces 3 to 4 inches
deep in rows. Always pur-
chase certified seed pota-
toes.
Prepare spring veg-


ing by incorporat- etable and
ing soil amendments like planting b
mushroom compost, ma- incorporating
nure or homemade com- ments like r
post. Till or spade the bed post, manui
to incorporate the amend- compost. W
ments with the existing soil before plan
to a depth of 6 to 8 inches.
Allow the prepared bed to Next w
lie undisturbed for 3 to 4 trees and s
weeks before planting. lawns. If yi
This provides time for copy of thE
some important biological the Panhar
activity to take place, and please let r
new plants are less likely to can mail yo
suffer from stem and root it to you ele
rots as a result. Have a soil Take ca
test done. Sometimes lime gardening!
is needed. However, a lime
application should be made Bill Mah
only if the need is indicated Sea Grant
by the test. director oft


Vegetable Garden
Cool season vegeta-
bles that can still be plant-


IFAS Exter
Contact hi
697-2112 x 3
at bmahan


herb beds for
y adding and
ng soil amend-
mushroom com-
re or homemade
Vait 3 to 4 weeks
ting.

eek, I'll cover
hrubs, fruit and
ou would like a
e Gardening in
idle Newsletter,
me know, and I
u a copy or send
ctronically.
ire and happy


han is a Florida
Agent and the
'heFranklinUF-
nsion Program.
4m at 653-9337,
360 or via e-mail
@ufl.edu.


County CALENDAR


Thursday, Jan. 15
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Luncheon and Infor-
mation Specials at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call
697-3760
Weeki Wachee, City of
Mermaids. 7:30 p.m. Gen-
eral seating at the Dixie
Theatre. Lucinda Vickers
hosts a presentation about
Weeki Wachee, one of
Florida's longest running
attractions. This Florida
Humanities Council pro-
gram in the "Look Where
We Live!" series is free
and open to the public. Call
653-3200.

Friday, Jan. 16
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30
a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2 do-
nation. Call 697-3760.
Revolutionary Wizard:
Ben Franklin. Dixie The-
atre. This is a new play and


this portrayal by actor Da-
vid Poirier gives wonder-
ful insight into the life and
soul of a marvelously in-
teresting American. 8 p.m.
Reserved seating $20. Call
653-3200.

Saturday, Jan. 17
Revolutionary Wizard:
Ben Franklin. Dixie The-
atre. 8 p.m. Reserved Seat-
ing $20. Call 653-3200.

Sunday, Jan. 18
Revolutionary Wizard:
Ben Franklin. Dixie The-
atre. 3 p.m. Reserved Seat-
ing $20. Call 653-3200.

Monday, Jan. 19
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30
a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2 do-
nation. Call 697-3760.
Computer classes at
the Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. Call
Joyce Durham 670-5951
and set up a time.
Billards Club at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. 1 p.m.


Call 697-3760.
GED classes are of-
fered at the Franklin
County School from 3
to 6 p.m. every week in
Building 1100, Room 1105.
Anyone who is interested
in taking these classes
should come to this class
during these hours or call
Linda Massey at 670-2800
ext. 2105.

Tuesday, Jan. 20
Local Arts Agency Or-
ganizational Meeting.
Apalachicola Community
Center in Battery Park. 10
a.m. 323-0176.
Art Club at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. 2 to 4 p.m. Call
697-3760.
The Franklin County
School Advisory Council
will be meeting at 6 p.m.
in the Media Center at the
Franklin County School.
Parents and anyone else
interested are invited to at-
tend. Call 670-2800.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Dept. $1 per
card. Proceeds go to St.
George Island Civic Club.
Call 927-4654.


Wednesday, Jan. 21
Card Club. Franklin
County Senior Center. 1
p.m. Call 697-3760.
Sea Oats Garden Club
meets at 11:30 a.m. at the
Carrabelle Branch of the
Franklin County Library. For
information, call 697-9790.
GED classes are of-
fered at the Franklin Coun-
ty School from 3 to 6 p.m.
every week in Building
1100, Room 1105. Anyone
interested in taking these
classes should come to this
class during these hours or
call Linda Massey at 670-
2800 ext. 2105.
Bookmobile. Apalachic-
ola Piggly Wiggly. 3:30 to
4:30 p.m. Eastpoint Apart-
ments 4:45 to 5:45 p.m. Call
556-1556.
Everybody Loves Opal
by John Patrick at the Dixie
Theatre. 3 p.m. Attempted
murder wouldn't seem to be
funny, but in John Patrick's
magic hands, it is uproari-
ous. It has been 10 years
since this play was produced
at the Theatre. It will be as
much a hit now as then be-
cause of Patrick's timeless
wit. Reserved seating $25.


Bingo for the Bus.
Chillas Hall in Lanark Vil-
lage. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Call
697-9626.

Thursday, Jan. 22
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Luncheon and Infor-
mation Specials at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. Noon.
$3 donation. Call 697-3760
Carrabelle Waterfront
Partnership Steering
Committee meets at 1 p.m.
at the Carrabelle Branch
of the Franklin Public Li-
brary. 670-2366.

Friday, Jan. 23
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30
a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2 do-
nation. Call 697-3760.
Bocce Club. Franklin
County Senior Center. 1
p.m. Call 697-3760.
Everybody Loves Opal
by John Patrick at Dixie
Theatre. 8 p.m. Reserved
Seating $25. Call 653-3200.


Saturday, Jan. 24
Apalachicola River-
keeper and Franklin
County Parks and Rec-
reation will sponsor a
free educational paddling
program at Indian Creek
Public Park. 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. A short educational
talk will be followed by a
3.5 hour kayak/canoe trip
led by experienced River-
keeper staff and volun-
teers. Participants should
bring water and lunch and
be comfortable paddling
open water, tidal streams
and narrow creeks teem-
ing with wildlife. Exact
location of trip will be
governed by weather
conditions and skill level
of the participants. Res-
ervations required. Call
653-8936.
Everybody Loves Opal
by John Patrick at Dixie
Theatre. 8 p.m. Reserved
Seating $25. Call 653-3200.

Sunday, Jan. 25
Everybody Loves Opal
by John Patrick at Dixie
Theatre. 3 p.m. Reserved
Seating $25. Call 653-3200.


*I






Thursday, January 15, 2009


Local


The Times I B5


TO PROTECT AND SERVE
It was a busy day for new
beginnings Jan. 6 as the ...
county commission played
host to the swearing in of the

right, Sheriff Skip Shiver, left,;
administers the oath of office i Ofi:0.
to Undersheriff Joel Norred.
Prior to that, County Judge Van
Johnson swore in Shiver, Clerk ..
of Courts Marcia Johnson,
Property Appraiser Doris
Pendleton and Supervisor of
Elections Ida Elliot.
After the ceremony, Shiver
presented supporters with the
following signed letter: LOIS SWOBODA I StaffWriter
"Today is a new beginning for
the Franklin County Sheriff's Office. It is an honor and a privilege to serve the citizens
of Franklin County and to begin implementing new goals and objectives for this office,"
he wrote. "I am grateful to the citizens for believing in me to carry out the duties and
responsibilities of the Office of Sheriff. Today will be shared with my family, friends and
the employees of the Franklin County Sheriff's Office."



Withers protests award of boat ramp bid


At the Dec. 2 meeting of the
Franklin County commission,
county planner Alan Pierce
opened bids for the contract to
build the proposed Eastpoint
boat ramp and turned the bids
over to consulting engineers
Bailey, Bishop and Lane of Port
St. Joe for a recommendation.
Ben Withers of Panacea came
in with the lowbid at $206,000, fol-
lowed by Poloronis Construction
of Apalachicola, at $ 239,000.
At the Dec. 16 commission
meeting, Bailey, Bishop and
Lane recommended Poloronis


be awarded the contract be-
cause the submission packet
from Withers was incomplete.
They said it lacked a schedule
of base bid prices and a detailed
breakdown of pricing of items
included in the bid. The commis-
sion then awarded the contract
to Poloronis.
At the Jan. 6 meeting, Pierce
said Withers has protested the
award of the bid with a letter.
He is represented in the case by
attorney Nick Yonclas of East-
point.
"I have never been in this


situation," said Pierce, who
thought a bid protest hearing
would be necessary to resolve
the dispute.
"We will speak with Mr. Polo-
ronis, and I believe he will work
with the county," said County At-
torney Michael Shuler.
Pierce said the county still
is awaiting several permits, so
construction cannot begin im-
mediately anyway. Commission-
er Pinki Jackel requested Shul-
er investigate whether Withers'
request was valid.
By Lois Swoboda


Officers from the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission's Division of Law En-
forcement were busy last week
searching out violators of oyster-
ing and net regulations.
Officer Carmon Brownell an-
swered a complaint from an indi-
vidual who said there was a still
hunter hunting over bait (corn)
in the Womack Creek Wild-
life Management Area. When
Brownell arrived, the hunter
had exited the tree he was hunt-
ing from and was at his vehicle.
Brownell found kernels of corn
in the back of the hunter's ve-
hicle. When asked, the hunter
took Brownell back to the tree
he was hunting from, which had
bait scattered around it. He ad-
mitted to hunting over the bait.
The hunter was issued a citation
for hunting over bait in a wildlife
management area.
Officer Chasen Yarborough
was performing camp inspec-
tions in Franklin County. At
Gardener's Landing, he encoun-
tered an 18-year-old consuming
an alcoholic beverage. Further
inspection revealed a water
bong (pipe) in a vehicle at the
campsite. The subject admitted
the bong belonged to him, and
Yarborough issued citations for
possession of alcohol by a per-
son under 21 years of age and
possession of drug parapherna-
lia.
On Jan. 5, officers Woody Cook,
Travis Huckeba, Don Walker and
John Allen conducted an oyster
detail in Apalachicola Bay. The
officers boarded nine vessels and
inspected 21 harvesters. The in-
spections revealed several viola-
tions including oystering in con-


ditionally restricted waters, no
saltwater products license, no
Apalachicola Bay oyster harvest
permit, no Apalachicola Bay oys-
ter harvest permit numbers dis-
played on the harvesting vessel,
no hull identification number on
a vessel and various vessel safe-
ty equipment violations. Seven
misdemeanor citations and two
written warnings were issued
for the violations.
Officers Michael Slotin and
John Allen and Lt. Rama Shus-
ter were on nighttime patrol on
the offshore patrol vessel "Orion"
when they observed a shrimp
boat inside the three-mile line
near Cape St. George. A closer
pass at the vessel revealed three
nets in the water.
The officers boarded the ves-
sel and issued the captain a cita-
tion for using more than two nets
in near shore waters. When con-
cluding the boarding, the officers
observed another vessel shrimp-
ing in near shore waters with
three nets. While approaching
the second vessel, the officers
observed the captain run out on
the back deck and attempt to pull
the net up before the patrol ves-
sel pulled alongside. The vessel
was boarded, and the captain
issued a citation for using more
than two nets in near shore wa-
ters.
On Jan. 3, Slotin conducted a
fisheries inspection on a vessel
as it offloaded along the Carra-
belle River. He observed several
coolers being unloaded and car-
ried to a truck. Among the day's
catch were five red snapper. The
captain was issued a citation for
possession of red snapper during
closed season.


TRA)DES &








Family



Dentistry

DENTURE
LAB ON PREMISES
Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines

Laban Bontrager,

DMD MD


I Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417


Don Lively General Contractors
LICENSED AND INSURED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
S Plumbing New Construction Roofing
Pressure Washing Additions Vinyl Siding
Painting and More No Job Too Small


P.O. Box 439
Carrabelle, FL 32322
697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603


DON WILLSON'S
SEPTIC TANK
SERVICE
Serving all of Franklin
County Residential/
Commerical
Septic Tanks &
Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or night
653-9406
ROBERTS APPLIANCE
REPAIR
- ALL MAJOR BRANDS -


18 Shadow Lane
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: (850) 653-8122
Cell: (850) 653-7654


RC0066499
R00065255


awardJACKSON'S ,
Center Building Supplies .
& Auto Repair WeDeer
Carrabelle 697-3333 Anywhere
The Mildew Remover
GARLIC
Exterior House Cleaning
Low Pressure Mildew
9 Years Service in Area
(850) 653-8795
Gerald Garlick

Builders By The Sea, Inc.

Gary Bartlett
Additions
New Homes Ph. 850-927-3628
Remodeling Mobile 850-425-8620
R.R. 0067644 Licensed & Insured


NE ~*I


FWC REPORT







6B The Times Thursday, January 15, 2009


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


0


1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1130- Adoptions
1140- Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160 Lost
1170 Found


I 1100
9661 T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

SUNTRUST MORTGAGE,
INC. d/b/a
BACFINANCIAL,
Plaintiff,

VS.

JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY,
et. al.
Defendants.

CASE NO: 08-000184CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a final
judgment of foreclosure
dated December 22,
2008, and entered in Case
No. 08-000184-CA of the
Circuit Court of the Sec-
ond Judicial Circuit in and
for Franklin County, Flor-
ida wherein SUNTRUST
MORTGAGE, INC. d/b/a
BANCFINANCIAL, plaintiff
and JEFFREY S. GALLO-
WAY et. al., are defend-
ants, I will sell to the high-
est bidder and best bidder
for cash at the front of the
Courthouse steps at 33
Market Street, Apalachi-
cola, FL 32320, at 11:00
A.M. on February 12, 2009,
the following described
property as set forth in
said order or final judg-
ment, to-wit:

Lot 4, BAY COVE VIL-
LAGE, according to the
Plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 5, Page(s) 18, of
the Public Records of
Franklin County, Florida

commonly known as 2027
Sand Dollar Trail, St.
George Island, Florida
32328.

Dated at Apalachicola Flor-
ida this December 22,
2008.

MARCIA JOHNSON
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Franklin; County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons in need of a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
ing, shall, within a reason-
able time prior to any pro-
ceeding, contact the ADA
coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Apalachicola, FL
32320 or telephone
850-653-8861 not later
than five (5) business days
prior to such proceeding.

BLOCH, MINERLEY &
FEIN, PL.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
980 N. Federal Hwy,
Suite 412
Boca Raton, FL 33432
561-362-6699
January 8, 15, 2009
9662T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

SUNTRUST MORTGAGE,
INC.
Plaintiff,

VS.


I 1100

JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY,
et. al.
Defendants.

CASE NO: 08-000185CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a final
judgment of foreclosure
dated December 22,
2008, and entered in Case
No. 08-000185-CA of the
Circuit Court of the Sec-
ond Judicial Circuit in and
for Franklin County, Flor-
ida wherein SUNTRUST
MORTGAGE, INC., plaintiff
and JEFFREY S. GALLO-
WAY et. al., are defend-
ants, I will sell to the high-
est bidder and best bidder
for cash at the front of the
Courthouse steps at 33
Market Street, Apalachi-
cola, FL 32320, at 11:00
A.M. on February 12,2009,
the following described
property as set forth in
said order or final judg-
ment, to-wit:

Lot 29, CASA DEL MAR
SUBDIVISION PHASE I,
according to the Plat
thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 6, Page(s) 2, Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida

commonly known as 2266
Sailfish Drive, St. George
Island, Florida 32328.

Dated at Apalachicola Flor-
ida this December 22,
2008.

MARCIA JOHNSON
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Franklin; County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons in need of a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
ing, shall, within a reason-
able time prior to any pro-
ceeding, contact the ADA
coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Apalachicola, FL
32320 or telephone
850-653-8861 not later
than five (5) business days
prior to such proceeding.

BLOCH, MINERLEY &
FEIN, PL.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
980 N. Federal Hwy,
Suite 412
Boca Raton, FL 33432
561-362-6699
January 8, 15, 2009
9712T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION

AURORA LOAN SER-
VICES, LLC.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

CLYDE OLIVER; KEN-
NETH FRIENDLY; MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REG-
ISTRATION SYSTEMS,
INC. AS NOMINEE FOR
PRIMARY CAPITAL ADVI-
SORS, LC MIN MO.
1002293-3000020639-5;
ONE CHARLESTON
PLACE HOMEOWNERS'
ASSOCIATION, INC.; UN-
KNOWN TENANT NO. I;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO.
2; and ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING IN-
TERESTS BY THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO
THIS ACTION, OR HAV-
ING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE
OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DE-
SCRIBED,
Defendants.

CASE NO.
192008CA000001XXXXXX

RE-NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45


1100

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der or Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated June 23, 2008, and
an Order Resetting Sale
dated December 22, 2008
and entered in Case No.
192008CA000001XXXXXX
of the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit in
and for Franklin County,
Florida, wherein AURORA
LOAN SERVICES, LLC. is
Plaintiff and CLYDE OLI-
VER; KENNETH
FRIENDLY; MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRA-
TION SYSTEMS, INC. AS
NOMINEE FOR PRIMARY
CAPITAL ADVISORS, LC,
MIN NO.
1002293-3000020639-5;
ONE CHARLESTON
PLACE HOMEOWNERS'
ASSOCIATION, INC.; UN-
KNOWN TENANT NO. 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO.
2; and ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING IN-
TERESTS BY THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO
THIS ACTION, OR HAV-
ING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT TITLE
OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DE-
SCRIBED, are Defendants,
I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at the
Front Door of the Franklin
County Courthouse, 33
Market Street, Apalachi-
cola, FL 32320 at Franklin
County, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on the 5th day of Feb-
ruary, 2009, the following
described property as set
forth in said Order or Final
Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 43, BLOCK 10
(WEST), ST. GEORGE IS-
LAND GULF BEACHES,
UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 7 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990, persons need-
ing special accommoda-
tion to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the Clerk of the Court no
later than five business
days prior to the proceed-
ing at the Franklin County
Courthouse. Telephone
850-653-8861 or
1-800-955-8770 via Florida
Relay Service.

DATED at Apalachicola,
Florida, on December 23,
2008.

Marcia M. Johnson
As Clerk Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ,
PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
PO BOX 11438
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339
Telephone: (954) 564-0071
January 8, 15, 2009
9749T
PUBLIC NOTICE

The next meeting of The
Northwest Florida Trans-
portation Corridor Author-
ity will be held on Thurs-
day, January 22, 2009 at
10:00 a.m. CST at the Pan-
ama City Commission
Chambers, 9 Harrison Ave-
nue, Panama City, FL
32401. Any person requir-
ing special accommoda-
tions to participate in this
meeting is asked to advise
the Corridor Authority at
least 48 hours prior to the
meeting by contacting Am-


1100
ber Perryman at (850)
215-4081 or by email at
Amber.Perryman@hdrinc.
com.
January 15, 2009
9770T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR FRANKLIN
COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

21ST MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION,
Plaintiff, vs

vs.

DANA M. TAYLOR; CAL-
VIN RAY TAYLOR; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
CALVIN RAY TAYLOR;
GERALDINE TAYLOR
NASH; ELOISE TAYLOR
MILLENDER; THE UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF EL-
OISE TAYLOR MIL-
LENDER; IF LIVING, IN-
CLUDING ANY UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF RE-
MARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPEC-
TIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUS-
TEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants)

CASE NO. 08 384 CA

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given
that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Franklin
County, Florida, I will sell
the property situate in
Franklin County, Florida,
described as:

From a point of 10.5 feet
due South from the North-
west corner of the SW 1/4
of the NE 1/4 of Section
31, Township 8 South,
Range 6 West, run North
61 degrees 17.5' East
along the Northern bound-
ary of a public right-of-way
251.5 feet for the point of
beginning; continue
thence along said
right-of-way 64 feet;
thence North 28 degrees
42.5'West 200 feet; thence
South 61 degrees 17.5'
West 108.5 feet; thence
Southeasterly on a line 200
feet equidistant from the
old 60 foot Ferry Road for
a distance of 205 feet to
the point of beginning.
Thus forming a tract in the
NE 1/4 of said Section 31,
fronting 64 feet on the
right-of-way, running back
200 feet and measuring
108.5 feet across the back.
To include a:
2005 Prestige VIN
N812615A 95011617
2005 Prestige VIN N
812615B 95011673
A/K/A
375 Avenue A
Eastpoint, FL 32328

at public sale, to the high-
est and best bidder, for
cash, Front steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, 33 Market Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320 at
11:00 AM, on February 5,
2009.

DATED THIS 29TH DAY
OF DECEMBER 2008.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Witness, my hand and seal
of this court on the 29th
day of December, 2008.


1100
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
By Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Law Offices of Daniel C.
Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the
American with Disabilities
Act of 1990, persons need-
ing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceedings. If
hearing impaired, please
call (800) 955-9771 (TDD)
or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.
January 15, 22, 2009

9771 T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
IDA IN AND FOR FRANK-
LIN COUNTY

SUNTRUST BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JORGE LUIS RODRIGUEZ
et. al.
Defendants.

CASE NO. 08-000334 CA

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated December 23, 2008
and entered in Case No.
08-000334 CA, of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit in and for
FRANKLIN County, Flor-
ida, wherein SUNTRUST
BANK, is a Plaintiff and
JORGE LUIS
RODRIGUEZ; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JORGE LUIS
RODRIGUEZ; SUNTRUST
BANK; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #1; UNKNOWN
TENANT #2 are the De-
fendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder
for cash at, 11:00 AM on
February 5, 2009, the fol-
lowing described property
as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:

LOT 2, BLOCK K, ST.
GEORGE ISLAND GULF
BEACHES, UNIT NO. 3, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 16, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

Marcia M. Johnson
As Clerk of the Court
By Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

Dated this 29th day of De-
cember, 2008.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tion to participate in this
proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days
prior, contact the Clerk of
the Court's disability coor-
dinator at 850-697-2112,
PO. BOX 340, APALACHI-
COLA FL, 32320. If hearing
impaired, contact (TDD)
800-955-8771, via Florida
Relay System.

Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road,
Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
January 15, 22, 2009


9772T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

U.S. BANK NATIONAL AS-
SOCIATION AS TRUSTEE
ON BEHALF OF GSR
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2005-AR4
PLAINTIFF

VS

JEFFREY D. ORMSBY;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JEFFREY D. ORMSBY IF
ANY; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY THROUGH, UN-
DER AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVID-
UAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC.; BRIAN K.
KRONTZ; LUCY H.
KRONTZ; JOHN DOE AND
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS IN POSSES-
SION
DEFENDANTS)

CASE NO.: 08-000003CA

RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Granting the Motion to
Rest Foreclosure Sale
dated December 22, 2008
entered in Civil Case No.
08-000003CA of the Circuit
Court of the 2ND Judicial
Circuit in and for FRANK-
LIN County, Apalachicola,
Florida, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash at the Front Steps of
the FRANKLIN County
Courthouse at 33 Market
Street, Suite 203, Apalachi-
cola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m.
on the 29th day of Janu-
ary, 2009, the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Summary Fi-
nal Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 3, BLOCK 21, WEST
OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND
GULF BEACHES, UNIT
NO. ONE, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 7, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Dated this 23rd day of De-
cember, 2008.

Marcia M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons with disabilities need-
ing a special accommoda-
tion should contact
COURT ADMINISTRATION
at the FRANKLIN County
Courthouse at (850)
653-8861, 1-800-955-877'
(TDD) or 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.

DAVID J. STERN, PA.
900 South Pine Island
Road, Suite 400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
(954) 233-8000
January 15, 22, 2009


DANIEL SIMMONS; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
DANIEL SIMMONS; FRAN-
CIS E. SIMMONS; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
FRANCIS E. SIMMONS; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPEC-
TIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUS-
TEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants)

CASE NO. 2008 332 CA

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given
that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Franklin
County, Florida, I will sell
the property situate in
Franklin County, Florida,
described as:

Lot 6, Block '2', Sun N'
Sand Subdivision, ac-
cording to the plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book
4, Page 12, of the Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida.
To include a:
2006 Nobility Home Inc
Manufactured Kingswood
Model VIN N812956A
96596507
2006 Nobility Homes Inc
Manufactured Kingwood
Model VIN N812956B
96595657
A/K/A
642 Magnolia St
Panacea, FL 32346

at public sale, to the high-
est and best bidder, for
cash, Front steps of Frank-
lin County Courthouse, 33
Market Street Apalachi-
cola, FL 32320 at 11:00
AM, on February 5th,
2009.

DATED THIS 29TH DAY
OF DECEMBER, 2008.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Witness, my hand and the
seal of this court of the
29th day of December,
2008.

CLERK OF CIRCUIT
COURT
By Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Law Offices of Daniel C.
Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the
American with Disabilities
Act of 1990, persons need
a special accommodation
to participate in this pro-
ceedings should contact
the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceedings. If
hearing impaired, please
call (800) 955-9771 (TDD)
or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.
Janaury 15, 22, 2009


9777T 9780T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI- OF THE SECOND JUDI-


SUSAN T GLADSTONE,
et. al.
Defendants

CASE NO 08000526CA

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
SUSAN T GLADSTONE
Whose residence is: 362 E
BAY DR., EASTPOINT FL,
32328 & 866 FOREST AC-
RES DR., NASHVILLE, TN,
37220 & 49 MUSIC SQ W
STE 300, NASHVILLE, TN,
37203

TO:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SUSAN T GLADSTONE
Whose residence is: 362 E
BAY DR., EASTPOINT FL,
32328 & 866 FOREST AC-
RES DR., NASHVILLE, TN,
37220

If alive, and if dead, all par-
ties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
SUSAN T. GLADSTONE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SUSAN T GLADSTONE
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the prop-
erty described herein.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure
of Mortgage on the follow-
ing described property:

SEE EXHIBIT "A' AT-
TACHED HERETO AND
MADE A PART THEREOF

PARCEL I:

COMMENCING AT THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF FRACTIONAL SEC-
TION 19, TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST,
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA (MARKED BY AN
OLD 6" X 6" CONCRETE
MONUMENT); THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 32
MINUTES 40 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF FRAC-
TIONAL SECTION 19,
810.30 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT ON
THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
OF NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE (STATE ROAD NO.
65)1 THENCE NORTH 30
DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00
SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
OF NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE 2006.20 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT;
THENCE NORTH 59 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST, 80.00
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE
WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE (THE
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE NARROWS FROM
100 FEET TO 60 FEET AT
THIS POINT); THENCE
NORTH 30 DEGREES 07
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE WEST
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DIRVE, 690.00 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT
ON THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF A 60
FOOT ROADWAY;
THENCE NORTH 59 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST ALONG
THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
AFORESAID SIXTY-FOOT
ROADWAY 392.30 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 30 DE-
GREES 07 MINUTES 00
SECONDS EAST, 630.00
FEET TO AN IRON PIPE
AND THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE
NORTH 59 DEGREES 53
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST, 375.49 FEET TO
AN IRON PIPE ON THE


1 1100
EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
EAST BAY DRIVE;
THENCE NORTH 31 DE-
GREES 34 MINUTES 30
SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
OF EAST BAY DRIVE,
140.02 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 59 DEGREES 53
MINUTES 09 SECONDS
EAST 371.94 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 30 DE-
GREES 07 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST, 139.91
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.

PARCEL II:

COMMENCING AT THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF FRACTIONAL SEC-
TION 19, TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST,
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA (MARKED BY
ACT OLD 6" X 6" CON-
CRETE MONUMENT);
THENCE SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 32 MINUTES 40
SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE SOUTH BOUNDARY
OF FRACTIONAL SEC-
TION 19, 810.30 FEET TO
A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT ON THE EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE (STATE ROAD NO.
65)1 THENCE NORTH 30
DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00
SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
OF NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE 2006.20 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT;
THENCE NORTH 59 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST, 80.00
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE
WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE (THE
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DRIVE.NARROWS FROM
100 FEET TO 60 FEET AT
THIS POINT); THENCE
NORTH 30 DEGREES 07
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE WEST
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
NORTH BAYSHORE
DIRVE, 690.00 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT
ON THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF A 60
FOOT ROADWAY;
THENCE NORTH 59 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST ALONG
THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
AFORESAID SIXTY-FOOT
ROADWAY 392.30 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 30 DE-
GREES 07 MINUTES 00
SECONDS EAST, 769.93.
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE
NORTH 59 DEGREES 5,3
MINUTES 09 SECONDS
WEST, 371.94 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF EAST
BAY DRIVEL THENCE
NORTH 31 DEGREES 34
MINUTES 30 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF EAST
BAY DRIVE, 140.01 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 59 DE-
GREES 52 MINUTES 37
SECONDS EAST 368.32
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 30
DEGREES 07 MINUTES
0 0
SECONDS WEST, 139.91
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. SITUATE,
LYING AND BEING IN
FRACTIONAL SECTION
19, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST, FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA.

PARCEL IIl:

COMMENCING AT A
CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF FRAC-
TIONAL SECTION 19,
TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST, FRANK-
LIN COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 32 MINUTES 40
SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE SOUTH BOUNDARY
OF FRACTIONAL SEC-
TION 19 (AS MONU-
MENTED), A DISTANCE
OF 810.30 FEET TO A


+1+ +1+ +






Franklin County's source of news for more than a century The limese Thursday, January 15, 2009@ 7B


1 1 100
CONCRETE MONUMENT
LYING ON THE EASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF NORTH
BAYSHORE DRIVE;
THENCE RUN NORTH 30
DEGREES 07 MINUTES
0 0
SECONDS EAST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 2006.20
FEET, THENCE LEAVING
SAID EASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN NORTH 59 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST 80.00
FEET TO THE WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF SAID NORTH
BAYSHORE DRIVE,
THENCE RUN NORTH 30
DEGREES 07 MINUTES
0 0
SECONDS EAST ALONG
SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 690.00 FEET TO THE
INTERSECTION WITH
THE NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF ROSE DRIVE,
THENCE RUN NORTH 59
DEGREES 53 MINUTES
0 0
SECONDS WEST ALONG
SAID NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 392.30 FEET TO AN
IRON PIPE, THENCE
LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN NORTH 30 DE-
GREES 08 MINUTES 52
SECONDS EAST 209.82
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (MARKED
NO. 679), THENCE RUN
NORTH 30 DEGREES 06
MINUTES 27 SECONDS
EAST 279.96 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT
(MARKED NO. 4261)
MARKING THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING
RUN NORTH 59 DE-
GREES 52 MINUTES 13
SECONDS WEST 379.1.5
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKED
NO. 4261) LYING ON THE
EASTER LY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF EAST BAY DRIVE,
THENCE RUN NORTH 31
DEGREES 34 MINUTES
3 0
SECONDS EAST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 139.97 FEET
TO AN IRON PIPE,
THENCE LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN SOUTH 59 DE-
GREES 52 MINUTES 49
SECONDS EAST 375.56
FEET TO AN IRON PIPE,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 30
DEGREES 06 MINUTES
2 7
SECONDS WEST 139.99
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
a/k/a 362 E BAY DR.
EASTPOINT FL 32328
has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it,
on Nwabufo Umunna, At-
torney for Plaintiff, whose
address is 2901 Stirling
Road, Suite 300, Fort
Lauderdale, Florida 33312
within 30 days after the
first publication of this no-
tice, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
30th day of December,


1 1100 I 3200 3300 4100 6110 6140
2008. STEEL 51 Pine St, Lanark Village, 3 br, 2 ba, On The
MARCIAM. JOHNSON Seasoned BUILDINGS Other 2 br 2 ba with large Carrabelle River. Garage,
MARCIA M. JOHNSON Firewood BUILDIN S screened porch, end unit $1,000 month $500 de-
As Clerk of the Court the load or b the stick Only 25x34, 30x48, Merchandiser a l S facing golf course & posit. 850-545-8813 .
By: Michele Maxwell By the load or by the stick. 40x64, 45x86, 80x150 bay ,w/s included. 550
As Deputy Clerk 670-8808 or 670-8851 Must Move Now! Part Time to service read E ESTE R RENT de. REALESTATERSALE
Will Sell for Balance lachicola. 2.50 hrs/month 6100- Business/ Smith @ 850-927-2838 or 7100 -Homes
In accordance with the Owed/Free DeliveryCo Home computer & auto re commercial 864-356-5949 7110 Beach Home/
Americans with Disabilities 1-800-462-7930x20 ome computer & auto re 6110- Apartments Apalach Newer, 2 br, 2 Property
Act, persons needing a quired. Call Wendy 6120 Beach Rentals 1/2 Off First Month ba, ch/a, dw, w/d, hkup, 7120- Commercial
tion to participate in this 6140 House Rentals Rent!!! sm. pet ok w/dep $750 mo 7130 Condo/Townhouse
reasonable accommoda- 3210 800-283-3090 x2378 x130 -Condo/Townhousse nta. sm. pet ok w/dep $750 mo 7130-Condoffewnhouse
tion to participate n this Roommate anted 2 br, 2 ba, Modern Apt + dep. Call 850-670-8266 7 Farms & Ranches
proceeding should, no 7150 Lots and Acreage
proceeding should, no 6160 Rooms for Rent with washer and dryer, Carabelle 3 br 2 ba 7160- Mobile Homes/Lots
later than seven (7) days 170- Mobile Home/Lot central AC, Ave E, Apa- W/D large lot, $700 mo 7170-Waterfront
prior, contact the Clerk of I 'd 180 Out-of-Town Rentals lachicola $700 mo.,+ dep. $350 de call 7180o Investment
the Court's disability coor- 5 Piece 100% MicroFiber 6190- Timeshare Rentals Call 653-1240 ora670 1211. e Property
dinator at 850-697-2112 Living Rm set complete -I SERVERS I 6200 Vacation Rentals Call 653-1240or670-1211.850-545-8813. 7190-Out-of-Town
PO. BOX 340 APALACHI- w/tables:$599, ALL NEW In l 7COOKS I Real Estate
COLA, FL 32320. If hearing boxes. Delivery available EMPLOYMECOOKS Carrabelle 7200 Timeshare
impaired, contact (TDD) 222-7783 4100 Hep Waled BLUE PARROT Beach
Relay System. Infor4130 Emplayment HIRING I 1BR/1BA furnished apart- 3 br, 2 ba, large lot, w/d, ____________
Information Please apply in person ---] ment, e downtown Apa- deck, appliances, ref. F67100
This is an attempt to col- between 9a-5pm 7 days lachcola satelite, WiFi, $750mo 8602330676
lect a debt.Anyforma- 3220 a week@ 1 br house newly renova ed, balcony, or emalLet' Trade
tion will be used for that 410Bllaundry on site. Short or clanaarten(&sbcao Let's Trade
ton wll be used for that 4100 Blue Parrott c/h/a, w/d incl. long term rental. Call al.net Houses
S 15, 22, 2009 t. George Island No pets. 850 -653-9788 850-653-8801 My beautiful $275,000
January15,22,2009l... .850-370-5113Carrabelle home in Tenn., with low
$160 Brand Name Queen Administrative/Clerical Apalachicola Fabulous taxes and ins., or my
Mattress Set Unused with inis 1 br 1 ba apts. from $400/ beautiful $170,000 home in
. ^ warranty (850) 222 7783m Recepioi Coo. Call 850-381-7746 rive North Carolina for your
SReceptionist Commercial 4 br 2 ba w/FP all apple beautiful home in the Pan-
Busy medical practice has 130 uilFurnished Loft Apt, in his- incl dishwasher, w/d Pool, handle, Call 252-926-9525
an opening for Recep- Building toric district. Cbl/wtr incl hot tub, sauna + guest apt or tomandritac@
Stionist. Full time with bene PO AL & OT JOB 0 12th Street 1100sf high ceilings, Prn- with full bath $1200/mo 1 earthlink.net
Sfits. Please apply at Shore INFO FOR SALEJOB 850-653-9788 vate entrance and deck. yr lease, security deposit,__________
A New Queen Orthopedic line Medical Group 419 INFO FOR SALE? 850-370-5113 No smkg/ pets. $750 mo. cr check and ref required,
ETS & ANI Powtop mattress set in Baltzell Avenue, Port St +$750 dep. 850-653-3838 N o n s m o k e r s
sealed plastic $279. Full Joe, or call Linda at 1-229-403-7701
2100- Pets Warrenty. Can Deliver. 229-8010. Lau IIo
2110 Pels: Free to 850-222-7783 web id# 34022285 St. George Island Home Port St. Joe, St. George
2120 Pet Supplies _- You NEVER have to paySmlStdo. a Island and St. James Bay
2130 Frm Animals/ for information about Ap forma 5 Owned
Supplies federal or postal jobs. If Convenience store down- ture, single person, $5 Furnishedvel 32 br, 1.5 ba Property Priced way below
2140 Pets/Livestock you see a job town Apalachicola, 47 Ave everything furnished, Call beach o/s shower market value! Prices start-
Wanted Customer Support "guarantee", contact the E. Call 850-899-4512 or 850-697-8623 screened porch roof deck ng at $35,000. Please call
Cherry- NEW QUEEN, FTC. 850-227-5052for info. large living and dinning Counts Real Estate Group
Sleigh 7pc bedroom set. Cashier The Federal Trade room, laundry $800 month at 850-249-3615.
S$2400 value, must sell Clerk needed at the mini Commission p-mlus utilities Please Call
2100 $1,000. 425-8374. Delivery convenience store (blue). is America's consumer 6120 Joe at 215-570-9977 avail.
available. Must be able to work protection agency For Rent Space available Jan4
nights and/or weekends, for small business or of-
Seasoned oak firewood. Call 927-2163 for more info www.ftc.gov/jobscams fice. Utilities included. Townhomes for rent,
Reasonable price! Call 5 Other 1-877-FTC-HELP Downtown Historic Apa- $160 wk, elec, Satellite, Jones Homestead- Why Rent
697-4677 or visit us at 150 her lachcola. 29 Ave. E. Garbage included pool Ponderosa pines. End When You
Delaware St, Lanark. S W A A public service (upstairs) For info call table. 12'X65' deck with of year special. First Can
Complete Solid Wood Attention!!! message from the FTC Carol 850-653-3871 Beautiful view, Call month rent free with Own A Brand
Bedroom Set. Brand New! Home Computer work!!!, and The News Herald 850-653-5114 deposit and 12 month New Home?
Top quality. Dovetail Draw- Flexible hours, great pay, Classified Advertising deposit an 1 mon TEAVE-
ers. Beautiful. Must See. will train, Call Department lease. 2 br and 3br NUES at
$499 Can deliver 545-7112 727-865-6795 units available. Call KEOUGH's
S, r 850-227-8404 or 850 LANDING.
i W l_ i[ iState of Florida- Franklin County Health Department | ..1 6130 227 9732 for more in- Green
SPJob Announcement Carrabelle formation. certified and
S3230 Community Health Nursing Director ADVERTISE 1 br, 1 b & 2 br, apart- BR, 2 BAUnfurnshed, Year round rental on canal approved.
Community Health Nursing Director- SES 1 br, 1 ba & 2 br apart W/D, D/W, CH& A, Deck, in SGI, 2 br, 2 ba, nice Affordable Liv-
MERCHANISEPosition Type: Full Time ment. unfurn electric/water Poolside. Covered boat ard. Boats welcome No ing on the L
0 A ePositionsnumer: 64027996 inc. Tile floors, part cy- parking. Long term. PRICE pets. $775 mo. Call Forgotten
3100Antiques Annual Salary: $45,000.00- $70,000.00 press panelling, private nCEn r p t 454 453 Forgotten
3110-Appliances Closing Date: 01/29/09 deck 1 block from beach REDUCED. For appoint 413-454-4253Coast
3120 Arts & Crafts 4 0 4 4 0 2 5 5 7 3 meant, Call 850-877-7696. 3 bdrm, 2 bath
3130 Auctions EducationalRequirements: 850-653-6459 Snow Birds homes ranging
3140 Baby Items AA: Carrabelle Beach, FL, A minimum of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Snow Birds/ from
3160- Busing Supplies 1953 Highway 98 W (B.S.N.) required. A Master of Science in Nursing Lanark Village 6170 1250-2000
Equipment Carrabelle, FL, 3 miles (M.S.N.) is preferred. 1 5 years of Public Health 1 br, 1 ba, Renovated/fur- 2 br, 1 ba sqft in
3170 -Collectibles west of Carrabelle; just be- Nursing experience and previous supervisory 1 br, 1 ba Efficiency, in nished end unit, new kitch huge lot, 3 Rivers Area Carrabelle's
3180 Computers fore Crooked River Light- experience preferred. Apalachicola, quiet, 2 blks and bath, mini. 4 month Carrabelle, $495 mo+ until Newest Subdl-
3190 Electronics house, Saturday only, 9:00 Licensure Requirements: from boat ramp, deck, AC, lease $545/mo + dep., no ties & dep. 850-653-3270 vision only I
3210- Free Pass it On am to 3:00 pm Licensed with the State of Florida Board of Nursing pet OK, $600/mo+ first, smoking, pet consideredle
3220 Furniture last & deposit. Call (850) 653-3838. Carrabelle
3230 Garage/Yard Sales Beach House Estate Sale: This is an administrative nursing position requiring 850-697-5000. Rver
3240 Guns Everything must GO planning and dire...... .1 . I .. h.. i .......... .5 River
3250 GoodThings to Eat Living room, bedrooms, gram in a county. ......., 1.. For Sale B owner 2000Pricingfrom
3260 Health & Fitness kitchen and bathroom fur- serves a county population of approximately 11,000yowner th0 10
3270 Jewelry/Clothing inhabitants. The individual in this position exercises Bu6140_ | Buccaneer Zone 3 single the $100,000's
3280 Machinery/ nture, tools, yard and gar- independent judgment in formulating policies and 1 br, 1 ba, and 1 room effi- 1 br house for rent in wide 16x80 on 2 lots (30 x Choo
Slots more. procedures which have significant impact on service ciency, all utiltes included, Carrabelle. emodeed 0) great condition, 24 choose
3290 Medical Equipment NO previews on Friday delivery and accountability. The employee performs Apalachicola, no smoking, wd hookup fenced yard, 14th St. Apalachicola, Fl, Your Model.
3310 MusicalInstrments duties under the supervision and direction of the CHD walk to groc store, furn. Low utl. $500 oo per month$70,000,850-653-9231 BEC & Com-
3320 Plants & Shrubs/ Administrator, and may serve as the Acting Admin- lease, 1st mo sec. req at plus dep. Call 850- Rent to Own pany, Inc.
Supplies istrator in the Administrator's absence. This position signing. 653-6375 697-4080 or 850-591-5899 ent to wn (850)
3330 Restaurant/Hotel is responsible for the integrity and confidentiality of (850)
3340 Sporting Goods 3240 data sets under his/her control. Incumbents may be 1 &, r Own your piece of para- 656-2608
3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell) required to perform emergency duty before, during, 1, & 2, br dise now. $0 down, $500
and/or beyond normal work hours or days. Apalachicola, FL. mo. 2 br, 1 left, MH, each
- The State of Florida is an AA/EEO employer. Vet- Call 850-643-7740. with its own dock on
R S erans' preference will be given to eligible veterans 3 br, 2 ba MH, Carrabelle Crooked River in
0 Reuger Mini14 Stainless and their spouses in accordance with Chapter 295 of Carabelle, call 509-2460 71SO
range rifle, latest model, the Florida Statues. Notification to the hiring author 2 br, 1 ba, two area, Quiet, 6 mos lease, Carabelle 5092460
many extra plus ammo, ity must be made in advance to allow sufficient time units available $600 month 814-282-9933
Pizzeria equipment for $700 obo, 850-728-0975 to provide the accommodation. Emergency Duties, $600 and $800 per month
sale, bakers pride brick __Background screening and fingerprinting required. 850-653-9087 6200
oven, Hobartment coolixers w/ Please, choose one of the following for submitting Beach Rentals For Sale By
worktop, meat slicer, :. *. .. .'- By Owner Owner
beautiful hand crafted i I 32I i .. i ..3 br, 2 ba, house for rent Owner
woobeau bootifu hs & tables 3280 I . .. 3 br, 1 ba Lanark Village, in Apalachicola. Cntrl air, 1 acre lot high and dry,
Complete set up for pizza King Kutter Post hole dig-' oo t h"'" t"t''".. $700 mo +deposit. no fireplce, W/D, D/W, sun Beach Homes-Condos cleared with trees. Re-
Complete set up for pizza King Kutter Post hole dig- t64027996. Please, post to People First Web site." s0okinono petsSusan ecklcsad cDi sun Beach~e Hohm e t duced Price $38K. Call
business, call for more gerfor 3pt-PTO, 40 in drill- Faxto: 904 6 2627. smoking no pets Susan deck, shady fncd in yard, www.BeachRealty.net dued Pince $38K. Call
info, 850-227-8669 or ing depth, includes 9 & 12 3 Fa .t1 9 .0 ,, .... ,6,3 2 6 Jones Bluewater Realty work shed, ample parking Vacation Rental Homes Captain JR for more de-
850-653-8578 in. bits, $450850-653-2897 t,,-. ,, .. ,, i Group (850) 566-7584 $800 mo, $500 sec dep. Exclusively BY OWNER tails at 850-670-8858
Call Brenda 227-5380. home or cell 653-5030


41


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APALACHICOL M ES
& CARRABELL ,


Call Our New Numbers Now!


Call:


Toll Free:


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Franklin County source of news for more than a century


The Times Thursday, January 15, 2009 7B


rogool






B8 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 15, 2009


Celebrating the Great Florida Birding Trail


Signs marking 78 des-
ignated birding sites
along the 2,000-mile Great
Florida Birding Trail be-
gan appearing in the Pan-
handle in December. The
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commis-
sion (FWC) hopes to have
all the signs in place from
Tallahassee to Pensacola
by the end of this month.
The FWC will cele-
brate with a sign-dedica-
tion event, complete with
birding tours by FWC and


U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service staff and volun-
teers, beginning at 9 a.m.
on Saturday, Jan. 17 at St.
Marks National Wildlife
Refuge. The sign dedica-
tion will take place at 1
p.m. at the Environmen-
tal Education cabin next
to the Visitor Center.
The Great Florida
Birding Trail is a conser-
vation program initiated
by the FWC in response
to the rapidly expanding
activity of bird watching.


More than 485 excep-
tional sites throughout
Florida have been chosen
based on their quality and
compiled into trail guides
representing four geo-
graphic regions.
The signs help bird
watchers find the desig-
nated sites. Gateway sites
at St. Marks National
Wildlife Refuge, near Tal-
lahassee, and Big Lagoon
State Park, in Pensacola,
provide extensive trail-
related resources, with


loaner optics available on
site. They also act as hubs
of regional birding infor-
mation. Field guides in
English and Spanish also
are provided to enable
visitors to identify which
birds they are viewing.
Additional materials for
beginning bird watchers
also are available at each
gateway site.
The Florida Panhandle
offers outstanding birding
experiences and fewer
crowds, with sought-after


species such as the red-
cockaded woodpecker,
swallow-tailed and Mis-
sissippi kites, snowy plo-
ver, Swainson's warbler,
Sprague's pipit and a
remarkable diversity of
winter visitors (including
hummingbirds) not typi-
cally found in the penin-
sula. The Panhandle's
coastline is an important
migration corridor for
waterfowl, shorebirds,
songbirds and birds of
prey.


Birding is big business
in Florida, and the Great
Florida Birding Trail is an
integral part of the Sun-
shine State's $5.2 billion
wildlife viewing indus-
try. More people travel
to Florida to see wildlife
than to any other state,
and approximately 3.3
million residents and vis-
itors watched birds and
wildlife in Florida in 2006,
according to a recent U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service
survey.


Unusual owl, hummingbird spotted in county

By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
Alan Knothe, avid birder and environmental educator
for the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Re-V
serve said two rare birds have been spotted recently in the 17
county.rrwinowl w s nS orglndner
A hburrowing owlA wa seen on St Geo~rge Island nearn 1


Government Cut. While these owls range as far north as
Canada in summer and to the southern tip of South Amer-
ica, they are not normally found in the Panhandle. Bur-
rowing owls are small, long-legged owls, 10 inches tall that
nest in holes excavated in the soil. The feathery visitor is
reported to be living under a low boardwalk and observers
have not determined if it has dug out a burrow.
In Apalachicola, Robin Vroegop noticed an unusual hum-
mingbird at her feeder and called Knothe to have a look. He
verified that what she spotted was a buff bellied humming-
bird native to southern Texas and Central America.
The sighting was so unusual that Fred Bassett, a field
ornithologist for the Hummer/Bird Study Group, traveled
to the county to document and band the tiny creature.
The Hummer/Bird Study Group, a non-profit organi-
zation founded by Bob and Martha Sargent of Clay, AL, is
dedicated to the study and preservation of hummingbirds
and other Neo-tropical migrants (songbirds). The organi-
zation's research programs with hummingbirds and mi-
grating songbirds have been under way since 1987. Each
winter, Bassett and others like him band birds to study
their life history and migratory patterns. Bassett was the
first person ever to band a buff bellied hummingbird in the
US.
The capture of a local hummer took place on Friday,
Jan. 9. Bassett arrived in Apalachicola during a swing
through the Panhandle.
After capturing the hummingbird in a trap hung around
Vroegop's feeder, Bassett weighed it, measured its wing-
span, tail and other aspects and photographed it from ev-


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA
Fred Bassett displays the unusual hummingbird for a
fascinated crowd.
ery angle. He affixed a tiny band to its ankle, which he said
was equivalent in weight to a wrist watch on an adult hu-
man being.
Vroegop's exotic visitor turned out to be a large, mature
buff bellied male hummingbird weighing six grams. Bas-
set said it was possibly the largest he had handled.
After the bird was photographed in Vroegop's hand, she
released it and it flew away. Bassett said it would probably
be back at the feeder before he could pack up and leave.
He said that buff bellies are believed to live seven to
nine years in the wild and have a high rate of return (16
percent) when migrating so Vroegop may well see her
little traveler in years to come. Bassett believes that buff
bellies, calliopes and other tropical hummingbirds have
always been occasional visitors to the southeast, but their
presence was not noticed until the Hummer/Bird Study
Group began banding and keeping records.
Knothe asked that anyone who notices an unusual or
unfamiliar bird contact him at 653-8068.


The tiny bird was placed in a soft sack to be
weighed.


The V in the hummer's tail identifies it as a male.


Riverkeeper, county parks sponsor paddling trip


The Apalachicola Riverkeeper
and the Franklin County Parks and
Recreation Department will spon-
sor the ninth in a series of free
educational paddling programs at
the county's newly acquired Indian
Creek Public Park.
The park is located on North Bay-
shore Drive in Eastpoint; paddling
trips are scheduled for the fourth Sat-
urday of every month year round.
The upcoming trip is scheduled


for 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Jan.
24. A short educational talk will be
followed by a three and a half-hour
kayak/canoe trip led by experienced
Riverkeeper staff and volunteers.
No boat? A limited number of kay-
aks, personal flotation devices, and
paddles are available through the
Apalachicola Riverkeeper. Partici-
pants should bring water and lunch
and be comfortable paddling open
water, tidal streams, and narrow


creeks teeming with wildlife. Par-
ticipants should be prepared to use
their vehicles as shuttles to water
access locations.
The exact location of the paddle
trip will be governed by weather
conditions and the skill level of the
participants.
Reservations are required and
can be made by e-mail or by calling
the Apalachicola Riverkeeper office
at 653-8936.


Our local real estate experts have identified

what they feel are the best values around and

are offering them to you in Real Estate Picks!

(In this section), Discover the best real estate

values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe,

Apalachicola, Cape San Bias, St. George Island,

Carrabelle and surrounding areas.


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Custom Full Upper or Lower.............................$385
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Simple Extraction (each)........................ ...... $65
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Truly a Beachfront Best Buy!


>- -'S John Shelby, Broker Call Today!
St. George Island 800-344-7570
Realty 850-227-1278
www.sgirealty.com 7


617 W. 23rd Street
Panama City Square
Panama City, FL 32405
(850) 872-6155


NO APPOINTMENT
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INCREASE DEPENDING ON THE TREATMENT REQUIRED THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE
FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY
OTHER SERVICE EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF
RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE,
EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT"
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