Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00007
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: January 1, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Apalachicola


Carrabelle






YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS
YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


Cops for Kids
share bikes for
Christmas
A8


THURSDAY, JANUARY 1, 2009 www. a palach times. com 50C


Wildlife
biologist
Adam
Warwick
rescued
this bear
in June
after it
suffered
the effects
of a seda-
tive and
began to
drown.


Carrabelle firefighters were among the many depart-
ments that helped fight the Apalachicola State bank fire
in the early morning hours of Nov. 15.


Year of landmark changes


TEKKRRY BAKNEK
The county lost one of its greatest
aviators this past year, when Col.
Steve Heyser, the U-2 pilot who
snapped the photos that led to the
Cuban Missile Crisis, died.


By David Adlerstein and Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writers

n a year in which the entire nation's
watchword was change, Franklin County
had many changes of its own.
Whether it was in the interest of
education, recreation or cultural legacy,
2008 was a year in which the county
completed what had to be a record number of new
projects.
Millions of dollars in long-term structural
improvements resulted in changes to the
landscape that will be felt for many years to come.
There is no question that leading the list of
Top 10 stories of the year is the completion of new
projects, and taken separately, probably could
populate the entire list.
The largest project by far was the completion of
the nearly $50 million new consolidated school, a
remarkable achievement and one that will benefit
the community for years to come. The school
opened in time for the August start of school, and
the football facility was ready for the first home
game.
This story probably was the biggest of the year,
followed closely by the creation of the Veterans
See 2008 A5


Gen. Joseph Schroedel, left, and Col. Byron Jorns spent
20 minutes on the bay in July exchanging ideas with Linda
Raffield of the Franklin County Seafood Worker's Associa-
tion and Dave McLain of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper.


Jimmy Mosconis, right, Lindy Hart, center, and Jan Scruggs
place a wreath at the newly dedicated Three Servicemen
Statue Detail in Apalachicola in July.


Gulf Alliance


focuses on


economic impacts

By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

On Dec. 10, the Apalachicola National Estua-
rine Research Reserve hosted the Gulf of Mexico
Alliance Governor's Action Plan Workshop II at
the Apalachicola City Hall meeting room.
About 30 representatives of
state government agencies and
private citizens attended the
meeting.
The Gulf of Mexico Alliance,
a partnership among Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi,
and Texas, has the goal of signifi-
ANERR direc- cantly increasing regional collab-
tor Seth Blitch oration to enhance the ecological
was keynote and economic health of the Gulf of
speaker at the Mexico.
workshop. The five U.S. Gulf states have
identified six regionally signifi-
cant priority issues that can be effectively ad-
dressed through increased cooperation at local,
state, and federal levels: Water quality for healthy
beaches and shellfish beds; wetland and coastal
conservation and restoration; environmental
education; identification and characterization of
Gulf habitats; reducing nutrient inputs to coastal
ecosystems; and coastal community resiliency.
The workshop opened with a welcome from
See GULF ALLIANCE A6


Taranto back walking,

a step at a time


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I Times City Editor
Last month, Anthony Taranto, with wife, Toni, took in
a middle school basketball game at the new Franklin
County gymnasium. Their grandson, Apalachicola Bay
Charter School sixth grader Chase Taranto, was playing
for the Eagles against the Seahawks.


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
A little over a year ago,
Anthony Taranto was doing
something so simple, so
taken for granted, so mat-
ter of fact, that it's the basis
of a very common joke.
He was screwing in a
lightbulb.
In the case of the retired
Apalachicola seafood deal-
er, it only took one person
to replace the fan light in
the bathroom, himself, on
Oct. 27, 2007.
But it's taken him more
than 14 months to recover.
Standing on a small
12"-high stool and reach-
ing out, Taranto fell, hit his
neck on a high chest and
was knocked out.
They took him to Weems
Memorial Hospital, and af-
ter two days was ordered to
Panama City for an MRI.
"The technician came
back and told me not to
dare hit a bump on the way
back to the hospital," said
Taranto.
What had happened is
the vertebrae "had jumped
track or something" but
fortunately hadn't severed
the spinal chord.


"They tried putting me
in traction to try to pull it
back out," said Taranto.
Eventually, doctors at
Gulf Coast Medical Center
operated to put the verte-
brae back in place, secured
with plates and screws.
Taranto, 76, didn't have
to wear a collar, but there
were problems. "I didn't
have feeling in my legs and
no feeling in my hands, al-
though I could move my
arms. He didn't know if I'd
walk again or not," he said.
"The only thing he would
say is it would take a long
while for my feeling to
come back."

Four hospitals, and
then Shepherd Center
Once he left the hospital
in Panama City, Taranto's
next stop was rehabilita-
tion at HealthSouth, and af-
ter a month there, at Select
Specialty Hospital, also in
Panama City.
"They couldn't get my
blood pressure up, it stayed
so low all the time, but they
got it regulated over at Se-
lect," Taranto said.
See TARANTO A6


Phone: (850) 653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews@starfl.com
Fax: (850) 653-8036


TABLE OF C
Letter to the Editor ....................A4
Sheriff's Report ....................... B5
Church News ......................... B3


CONTENTS
SocietyNews......................... B2 0 FREEDO M
Tide Chart ...........................A8 F L O R ID A
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE
Classifieds ........................ B6-B7


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
School News & Society Friday at 11 a.m.
Real Estate Ads Thursday at 11 a.m.
Classified Display Ads Friday at11 a.m.
Classified Line Ads Monday at 5 p.m.


*


0
Volumne xx Number xx


NE






A2 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 1, 2009


From autopsies to art, sponge business growing


Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

In this time of economic
uncertainty, it's nice to know
that somebody's business is
growing.
Gerry Garlick of Apala-
chicola, proprietor of the
Apalachicola Sponge Ex-
change says business is
good. He has based his busi-
ness plan on the marketing
of what some might consider
an obsolete commodity, nat-
ural sponges.
Garlick said he has seen
the market for sponges grow
as people become familiar
with the interesting proper-
ties of these ancient crea-
tures.
According to Wikipedia,
sponges, known as porifer-
ans, are animals, with fossils
found rocks dated from 580
million years ago. Sponges
have no nerves, stomachs,
heart or blood, and like oys-
ters spend there lives fixed
on a solid surface. Most of
the 9,000 known species feed
on bacteria and other food
particles in the water.
Sponges reinforce their
bodies in different ways and
some sponges produce skel-
etons out of calcium. Most
people are more familiar
with demosponges that use
a soft protein called spongin
to support their bodies, and
constitute about 90 percent
of all known species."
These soft sponges have
been used by humans over
thousands of years as pad-
ding and as cleaning tools.
However, by the 1950s soft
sponges had been overfished
so heavily in areas including
Apalachicola Bay that the


Photo Courtesy of GERRY GARLIC
Gerald and Joyce Garlick pose with Dr. G, Jan
Garavaglia at the medical examiners convention in
Louisville.


industry almost collapsed.
Most sponge-like materials
are now synthetic.

Who is buying
sponges now?

Garlick markets sponges
online as well as out of his
local storefront and said his
website had 367,000 hits over
the last 12 months. He said
sponge sales are up 20 per-
cent from last year.
Sponges have a variety of
uses and are great for clean-
ing almost any thing from a
baby's bottom to a Churchill
Downs thoroughbred. The
fabled Kentucky racetrack is
home to several purchasers
of Garlick's products.
Natural sponges are
also sought after by artists
and interior decorators who
use them to create unique
textures in paint. Research-
ers see sponges as possible
sources of medicines for
treating diseases. Dolphins
also apparently use sponges
as tools while foraging.
Garlick said a growing


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market is medical profes-
sionals and forensic patholo-
gists. Two of his biggest
forensics customers to date
are the medical examiner's
office in Pontiac, MI and the
coroner's office in Orlando.
"They'll last as long as
you take care of them," said
Dr. Charles Smith, of Pon-
tiac, about natural sponges.
"When they dry out, they go
back to their natural shape.
You can also disinfect them
in the microwave and you
can't do that with synthet-
ics. I used them 35 years
ago when I started here. We
have been using man-made
sponges because natural
ones were hard to find. Now
that the availability is there
they look pretty attractive.
I just reintroduced them af-
ter my bosses brought some
back from a convention."
Perhaps Garlick's most
famous customer resides in
Orlando.
Jan C. Garavaglia, M.D.,
chief medical examiner for
Florida's District Nine office
in Osceola/Orange counties
is better known as "Dr. G":


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PUBLIC NOTICE

THE FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL HOLD
A PUBLIC HEARING ON WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, AT 9:00 A.M., IN
THE COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING ROOM OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY
COURTHOUSE ANNEX TO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING VARIANCES, AP-
PEALS AND SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS:

1 CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO CONSTRUCT
AN OPEN DECK 15 FEET INTO THE CRITICAL HABITAT ZONE ON
PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS LOT 94, BLOCK 10, UNIT 1, SOUTHERN
DUNES, ALLIGATOR POINT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST
SUBMITTED BY DANIEL COX, AGENT FOR DAVID AND JANET
FOSHEE, OWNERS.

2 CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO CONSTRUCT A
BOAT RAMP WITHIN THE CRITICAL HABITAT ZONE ON PROPERTY
DESCRIBED AS THE COMMON AREA OF RIVER' S EDGE SUBDIVISION,
LOCATED OFF OF BLUFF ROAD, IN SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 8 WEST, NORTH OF APALACHICOLA, FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA. REQUEST SUBMITTED BY V. WILLIAM POLORONIS,
OWNER.

3 CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO CONSTRUCT A
SINGLE FAMILY HOUSE FIVE FEET INTO BOTH SIDE SETBACK LINES
ON PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS LOT 9, BLOCK 2, UNIT ONE EAST, ST.
GEORGE ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST
SUBMITTED BY GARY ULRICH, AGENT FOR NANCY WRIGHT, OWNER.

4 CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO CONSTRUCT A
WOODEN RETAINING WALL WITHIN THE CRITICAL HABITAT ZONE
ON PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS LOT 30, UNIT 7, PENINSULAR POINT,
ALLIGATOR POINT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST
SUBMITTED BY DEC ENGINEERING, AGENT FOR ROBERT W. HALL,
OWNER.

THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ACTING AS THE BOARD OF AD-
JUSTMENT WILL CONSIDER THESE RECOMMENDATIONS ON JANUARY 20,
2009.
il -*I


Photo by LOIS SWOBODA
Antique sponge diver's gear on display at the Sponge Exchange, a gift shop
where Garlick markets his natural sponges as well as maritime antiques.


Chief Medical Examiner on
the popular forensics pro-
gram of the same name
aired weekly on Discover
Health. She has played a part
in many high profile criminal
investigations and has been
involved in the investigation
of the high-profile disappear-
ance and apparent murder
of Caylee Anthony.
Garavaglia implemented
the use of natural sponges in
her work stations after meet-
ing Garlick in Louisville this
past year at a medical exam-
iners' convention.
Dr. Steven Hanson, chief
medical examiner in Ga-
ravaglia's Orlando office is
enthusiastic about natural
sponges. "Our forensic tech-
nicians were so impressed
with (natural sponges) they
asked me to order one for
each of the autopsy sta-
tions," he said. "They are the
best thing they have found
for soaking up blood and
other fluids from the chest


and skull cavities. They are
super absorbent and easy
to wring out and use over
and over. They have found
them far superior to syn-
thetic sponges and the terry
cloth towels they used to use.
They also clean up well with
detergent or soap."

Sponge harvesting
making a comeback

In "Apalachicola Bay,"
published by Pineapple
Press. in 2004, author Kev-
in McCarthy wrote that
sponge gathering was big
business in Apalachicola.
In 1901, the peak year for
the industry locally, spong-
ing generated over $20,000
in revenue, a hefty sum at
that time.
The building that houses
Garlicks's store is the origi-
nal sponge exchange, built
around the turn of the cen-
tury, and one of only three


existing brick buildings
downtown dating to that
period. As elsewhere, over
fishing depleted the sponge
beds here and the industry
collapsed in the 1920s.
Recently, researchers
found the bay's disused
sponge beds are recover-
ing nicely and commercial
sponging in this area is once
again a possibility. In 2007,
a Tarpon Springs sponge
boat ventured north to seek
new fishing grounds, but
ran aground and eventually
departed without collecting
any sponges.
A licensed sponger, Gar-
lick envisions the day when
the sponge boats will once
again dock downtown and
unload their wares for him
to market worldwide.
"Currently I meet
sponge boats at different
places to buy. When this
dock gets built, the sponge
boats can come right here
again," he said.


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Thursday, January 1, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


Camp Gordon Johnston


Museum to reopen Jan. 9


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Reporter
Museum Director Linda
Minichiello is delighted to
invite everyone to visit the
Camp Gordon Johnston
Museum at its new home
in the Carrabelle City Hall
Complex located in the old
Carrabelle School at 1001
Gray Avenue.
The museum will re-
open to the public Jan. 9;
grand opening is scheduled
for March.
"We have almost 3,400
square feet of display space
here," Minichiello said.
"That's almost 1,000 square
feet more than at the old lo-
cation, and we can use the
hall for some exhibits, as
well. The ceilings here are
much higher, which means
that some artifacts, like


flags, can be much better
displayed."
Minichiello said the en-
tire collection has been
moved. She and volunteer
Mary Britz are working fe-
verishly to prepare for the
opening, and welcome any
and all volunteers who can
offer time to help with the
project.
Popular displays, such
as the barracks room with
its sand floor and a collec-
tion of captured enemy
weapons, will be recreated
at the new site with some
additions, as well.
"The city has provided
the museum with a num-
ber of wooden display cas-
es that will allow many new
articles to be exhibited.
We're going to be putting
out things we didn't have
room for before, including


A pair of candlesticks and a vase fashioned from
spent ordnance are examples of the objects featured
in the new trench art exhibit at the Camp Gordon
Johnston Museum.


an exhibit of trench art,"
she said.
Trench art was fash-
ioned by soldiers in the
field or in hospitals and
prisoners of war. Often
these objects were cre-
ated from shell casings and
shrapnel.
Minichiello said another
benefit of moving the mu-
seum is economic. "At our
old location, we had to pay
rent and utilities every
month. Here, it's a flat fee,"
she said.


Another new artifact
that will appear at the
Camp Gordon Johnston
Museum is this cast iron
statue donated by a vet-
eran from the Midwest
after his son visited the
old location.


Director Linda Minicello said that the higher ceil-
ings at the new museum location will show battle
flags off to better effect.


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I











Opinion


A4 I The Times


JI


Thursday, January 1, 2009


RED, WHITE AND ROUX


Just about as



good as it gets


Christmas was just
fine. My home was festive
and the food was plenti-
ful. There were plenty of
presents. Our tradition is
to pop a bottle of cham-
pagne, pour the bubbly
into flutes and then begin
the distribution of
gifts. We follow a
very strict proto- 4,.
col. The giver gets
to choose which *.F
gift to distribute to (
the receiver. -
"OK, this is
your boring one."
"I don't really RED,
know if this is go- AND
ing to work." Denis
"All right, this is
the really big gift."
The rhythm is that
everyone is always open-
ing something. The giver
is watching for response
while pausing to unwrap
his or her own gift. Our
ritual focuses on the thrill
of giving. We stretch the
whole business out as
long as possible, pausing
for snacks and refills of
champagne.
The favorite snack this
year has become a staple
in the family. Buy some
high-quality unseasoned
round crackers. Put out
whipped cream cheese,
small slices of salmon and
capers. Spread the crack-
er with the cream cheese,
plop on a couple of pieces
of salmon and top the
whole thing with a sprin-
kling of capers. Practical-
ly perfect in every way. My
sister supplied the mak-
ings along with a basket
of sweets, a spiral sliced
ham and mini-biscuits. It
was an embarrassment of
riches.
My sister works all day
at a demanding job and
then comes home and
bakes during the holi-
days. She makes pecan
diamonds, ginger snaps,
Chex mix, banana nut
bread, and bourbon and
rum balls. She eats very
little. The point of it all is
to fix platters of goodies
to give away to neighbors
and co-workers.
Mother used to do the
same thing when she was
finance officer for the
county. Not only her fel-
low workers in the court
house, but also the road
camp received platters
and tins of cookies and
candy from Audrey.
I am not my mother or
my sister.
My son, Jesse, request-
ed a red velvet cake with


e


double frosting. That was
the extent of my holiday
baking.
For Christmas dinner,
Aunt Dolores made beef
tenderloin, crab casserole,
scalloped oysters, mashed
potatoes, corn pudding,
lemon chess pie
and banana pud-
ding. I brought the
green beans and
a cranberry sauce.
One year Jesse
was charged with
-.ij -carrying in the
. pot of beans. It
NHITE slipped out of his
ROUX hands just inside
e Roux the front gate. So
now, he is bur-
dened with the
consistent family joke,
"Did Jesse spill the beans
this year?"
Of such memories are
holiday traditions made.
I missed my Nana's
dressing this year, so I
have a plan. After all the
Christmas food is eaten,
I'll make a small turkey
breast (covered with ba-
con, of course) and make
a half recipe of the dress-
ing. Sounds like the per-
fect New Year's dinner to
me.
In our family, food is in-
extricably bound up with
memories, tradition, shar-
ing and good times had by
all. There is a generosity
of spirit that transcends
hard times and old griev-
ances. Many of the reci-
pes we make come with
memories, and the anec-
dotes are told 'round the
table.
Years ago, I wrote
a food column for The
Times called "Good Eat-
ing." I did a great deal
more cooking in those
days and had something
to say about food. I also
interviewed local cooks,
made a baskillion tele-
phone calls perfecting
recipes and hounded fam-
ily members for ways to
make special dishes. It
was great fun, and I still
have a scrapbook of all
the columns. I refer to it
frequently.
With apologies to Na-
tional Public Radio, this I
believe: Traditional food
shared with friends and
family is just about as
good as life gets.

Denise Roux is a reg-
ular columnist for the
Apalachicola and Carra-
belle Times. To reach her,
email her at rouxwhit@
mchsi.com.


Apalachicola T
Carrabelle


THE TiMES
USPHS #027-600
Published Every Thursday at 129 Commerce St
Apalachicola, Florida 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone (850) 653-8868


PERIDICALRATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
APALACHICOLA, FL
32329
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements the publishers do
not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for
such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Community garden brings pride, benefits


By Karla Ambos
Special to the Times

Have you noticed an un-
usual amount of activity at
the corner of Eighth Street
and Avenue F and wondered
what was going on? That
particular location, known
as City Square, is the site of
Apalachicola's new commu-
nity garden. And because of
that location, the name of
the garden is City Square
Community Garden.
The idea for a communi-
ty garden "grew" from two
particular needs that had
been expressed. First, the
local food pantry has seen
a tremendous increase in
food costs and very limited
availability of fresh veg-
etables.
Second, the city's new-
est program, Community
Pride, wanted to focus on
integrating all facets of
Apalachicola with com-
mon goals. The creation
of a community garden
achieves several goals:
It creates space where
citizens can come together
and derive actual benefit
from participation in a city
program (the harvest)
*It provides a source
of fresh vegetables for the
food pantry (they will have
a large tilled plot and per-
haps excess from other
participant's harvest)
It educates our young-
er citizens about com-
munity participation and


rnulu OB UAVI
Apalachicola's community garden is expect
have 28 raised beds and two large tilled pi
plot dedicated to the food pantry and the ot
Apalachicola Bay Charter School.


sources of food, thereby in-
stilling a sense of pride and
accomplishment.
The garden is expected
to have 28 raised beds and
two large tilled plots; one
plot is dedicated to the
food pantry and the other
to the Apalachicola Bay
Charter School. There will
be a nominal annual fee to
participate. The organiz-
ers want the gardeners to
take "ownership" of their
raised beds with appropri-
ate weeding, watering and
harvesting. The northeast


and northwest c
City Square are
to planting. The
corner (behind
Cemetery) will r
touched. The
corner eventually
a covered area t
for vegetable soi
cation and othe
nity gatherings.
What has haj
far? The garde:
adjacent lot und
massive clean-u
by a group of Flo
University stude


community service. It was
all made possible through
the efforts of Mayor Van
Johnson; City Administra-
tor Betty Taylor-Webb; and
Andy Smith, of Riverkeep-
ers.
The official ground-
breaking took place Nov.
9. More than 40 citizens
joined the mayor, city ad-
ministrator, City Commis-
sioner Valentina Webb,
Police Chief Bobby Varnes,
Anita Grove, Clarice Pow-
ell, Joe Taylor and myself
for this occasion. Several
attendees signed up to
participate in the garden.
Currently, city-sponsored
water lines are being in-
stalled. Once that work
is complete, compost and
D ADLERSTEIN topsoil will be delivered to
the site. The raised beds
ed to will then be constructed
ots, one by the work camp inmates.
other to the The organizers have set
Feb. 1 as the official open-
ing date, allowing ample
corners of time for a spring garden.
dedicated If you want to show
southeast your community pride and
Chestnut benefit from participation
emain un- in this unique use of city-
southwest owned greenspace, you
y will have can contact city hall at 653-
;o be used 8715 with your name and
rting, edu- number. You can also keep
r commu- abreast of ongoing devel-
opments at the city's Web
ppened so site, www.cityofapalachico-
n and an la.com.


derwent a
ip Nov. 2
)rida State
ents doing


Karla Ambos is the
chair of the new commu-
nity garden.


Boyd votes against auto bailout


Congressman Allen
Boyd (D-North Florida) vot-
ed against legislation Dec.
3 to bailout the U.S. auto
industry, citing his concern
that this bailout would not
be beneficial to the taxpay-
ers in the long run.
The Auto Industry Fi-
nancing and Restructuring
Act (HR 7321) passed in the
House of Representatives
by a vote of 237 to 170 and
now awaits consideration
by the Senate.
"My top priorities are
to grow our economy and
protect the taxpayers, and
I am not convinced that
bailing out the U.S. auto
industry will do either of
those things," said Boyd.


"I believe
capitalism
economic


that American
is the greatest
system in the


world, and we have
to let the markets
work. The U.S. auto
industry has been
struggling for quite
some time, and it's
very clear that they
need to make sub-
stantive structural
changes so that
they can compete in
a global economy."
The Auto Indus-


ALLEN
D-Mon


try Financing and Restruc-
turing Act would provide up
to $15 billion in short-term
bridge loans to aid the U.S.
auto industry. Under this
legislation, the president


would designate one or
more individuals, known as
a "car czar," to hold the car
companiesaccount-
able for developing
4!! and implementing
viable long-term
restructuring plans
and to ensure com-
pliance on financ-
ing efforts.
"Our nation is
BOYD facing serious eco-
itcello nomic challenges,
and there is a role
for the federal gov-
ernment to play in stimu-
lating our economy," Boyd
said. "However, commit-
ting taxpayer dollars to a
specific industry without
any clear strategy that the


money will be put to good
use or repaid is not the ap-
propriate role for the fed-
eral government."
"I am hopeful that this
economic downturn will
result in a renewed inter-
est in Washington to clean
up the federal budget and
address our long-term fis-
cal challenges," he said..
"The first step is for our
government to stop spend-
ing more than it has and
start living within its
means. I look forward to
working in the next Con-
gress to implement fiscal
policies that will put our
country back on a path to-
ward economic prosperity
for years to come."


Financial responsibilities for the self-employed


By Jason Alderman

One of the fastest grow-
ing segments of America's
workforce is the self-em-
ployed. Being your own
boss can be liberating, but
it's also hard work: Many
bothersome details your
employer used to handle
become your responsibility
- things like finding health
insurance, deducting taxes
and setting up retirement
savings.
Here are a few consider-
ations before hanging out
your own shingle:
Health insurance. Sure,
it's expensive, but going
without health insurance is
extremely risky. More than
half of all personal bank-
ruptcies stem from over-
whelming medical bills.
(The silver lining: Health
insurance premiums are
fully deductible for the self-
employed, considerably
lowering taxable income.)
Options include:
Coverage through your
spouse's plan or a trade or
professional organization
to which you belong.
COBRA continuation
coverage through your
former employer's plan.
(Double-check eligibility
requirements and enroll-
ment deadlines.) Typically,
COBRA provides benefits
for 18 months (sometimes
longer) and costs 102 per-


cent of the full premium.
*Private insurance. An
insurance broker can help
you find appropriate
coverage. Try the
National Association
of Health Under- I
writers if you don't
know one (www.
nahu.org). Be aware
that even minor pre-
existing conditions JA
might render you ALDE
ineligible.
*High-deduct-
ible plans provide com-
prehensive coverage for
catastrophic illnesses that
could otherwise deplete
your savings, but their
monthly premiums are
considerably cheaper than
comparable low-deductible
plans.
*Combining a high-de-
ductible plan with a Health
Savings Account (HSA) can
yield additional savings.
These accounts let you save
pre-tax dollars in an inter-
est-earning account and
later withdraw the money,
tax-free, to pay for medical
expenses. HSA contribu-
tions are tax-deductible,
even if you don't itemize
deductions. To learn more,
visit www.treas.gov/offices/
public-affairs/hsa or www.
hsafinder.com.
*Many states provide
high-risk insurance for
people who don't qualify for
private insurance. It's cost-


ly, but no one can be turned
away. Visit www.naschip.
org for information.


*Health Insur-
ance Portability
and Accountability
Act (HIPAA) insur-
ance might provide
coverage if your
COBRA has expired


" and you don't qual-
SON ify for private in-
ERbMAN surance. Eligibility
rules are very com-
plicated, so consult
a knowledgeable insurance
broker.
Tax implications. The
good news is, self-employed
people can deduct many
business-related expenses
from their taxes. The bad
news is, you must pay the
full 15.3 percent tax for So-
cial Security and Medicare.
Although you can deduct
a portion of this so-called
self-employment tax, de-
pending on your net earn-
ings, you still effectively
pay more than someone
whose employer pays half
the amount (called "FICA"
on a W-2 form).
Also, because you don't
have an employer with-
holding taxes from each
paycheck, you are respon-
sible for making quarterly
estimated tax payments;
otherwise, you'll face un-
derpayment penalties.
Search "Self-employed" at
the IRS website (www.irs.


gov) for more information
on your tax responsibili-
ties.
Saving for retirement.
Because you won't be earn-
ing employer-provided pen-
sion or 401(k) benefits, you
must manage your own re-
tirement savings strategy.
Fortunately, there are many
options available, including
regular and Roth IRAs (to
which you may contribute
up to $5,000 a year, or $6,000
if over 50), and Simplified
Employee Pension (SEP)
IRAs, which let you save
even more up to 25 per-
cent of pay in many cases.
Consider hiring a tax
professional or financial
planner specializing in
self-employment issues;
they'll probably more than
pay for their fees through
sound advice. A good place
to start your search for a
financial planner is www.
plannersearch.org.
Many self-employed
people would never go
back to the old 9 to 5; just
be sure you understand the
financial responsibilities
involved before taking the
plunge.

Jason Alderman directs
Visa's financial education
programs. To sign up for
a free monthly personal
finance e-Newsletter, go
to www.practicalmo-
neyskills.com/newsletter.


*


NE






Thursday, January 1, 2009


Operation

Compassion

delivers

17 tons of food

By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

The Carrabelle Church
of God and Franklin's
Promise have joined forc-
es to bring relief to some
Franklin County citizens
hard pressed by the recent
economic turndown.
On Monday Dec. 22, Op-
eration Compassion deliv-
ered 34,000 pounds of food to
Franklin County from their
storage facility in Lakeland.
Operation Compassion,
a subsidiary of the Church
of God, is a 501(c) 3 tax-ex-
empt charitable organiza-
tion based in Cleveland TN
that focuses on three priori-
ties: Responding to natural
disasters nationally and
around the world; establish-
ing local networks to meet
the needs of disaster vic-
tims; and providing inspira-
tion, information, training,
food and basic necessities
to the poor and needy and;
international distribution of
food to widows, single moth-
ers and children.
Rev Kevin Swiney and
Deputy R.J. Shelly of the
Carrabelle Church of God
arranged for the delivery.
The food was received and
temporarily stored at the
Carrabelle city hall com-
plex. The city of Carrabelle


Dep. RJ. Shelley and Rev. Kevin Swiney of the Car-
rabelle Church of God worked together to coordinate
the delivery of more than 30,000 pounds of food to
Franklin County.


donated the storage space
until the food could be move
to final distribution points
around the county. Prison-
ers from the Franklin Cor-
rectional Institute worked
with Church of God volun-
teers to unload the semi.
Swiney's father, Bishop
Michael Swiney of Tavares
was also on hand to help re-
ceive the offering.
Franklin's Promise will
make up food boxes, which
will then be distributed
through several channels.
Swiney said that his
church has been distribut-
ing food for some time and
will deliver boxes to some
needy families. "We've been
doing box truckloads of food,
but nothing as extensive as
this," he said.
Franklin's Promise will
distribute some of the provi-
sions through their regular
Apalachicola food pantry.
Swiney said that several
local businesses includ-
ing Barber's Seafood and
GreenSteel will also distrib-
ute food to their own em-
ployees on the basis of need


and that ElderCare Servic-
es plans to submit a list of
names to receive boxes.
Donated food is a com-
bination of reclaimed food
items, surplus food and
government released food
resources. In addition to
food, Operation Compas-
sion may provide other es-
sential items like cleaning
supplies or basic sanitary
and grooming products.
Swiney said the food
will be distributed through-
out Franklin County and is
potentially enough to feed
1,000 families for a week. He
said there are no require-
ments to be eligible for the
groceries.
"It's on a need basis. Just
because you make $30,000 a
year, doesn't mean you don't
have a need." he said. "This
is a combined effort of Car-
rabelle Church of God and
Franklin's promise to eradi-
cate hungerin Franklin Coun-
ty a truckload at a time."
Swiney said the food will
be distributed, "From Alliga-
tor Point to Apalachicola and
every place in between."


Local


Thursday, Jan. 1
Apalachicola City Hall,
Carrabelle City Hall and
County Courthouse closed
Friday, Jan. 2
Breakfast at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle.
Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal
at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call
697-3760.
Monday, Jan. 5
Breakfast at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle.
Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal
at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call
697-3760.
Computer classes at
the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Call Joyce Durham 670-
5951 and set up a time.
Billards Club at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. 1
p.m. Call 697-3760.
50 plus Dance Night.
Franklin County Senior
Center. 7 p.m. Bring your
own refreshments. Call
697-3760.
Tuesday, Jan. 6
Art Club at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle 2 to 4 p.m.
Call 697-3760.
Carrabelle Lighthouse
Association. Carrabelle
branch of the Franklin
County Library. 5:30 p.m.
697-5555.
Apalachicola City
Commission regular
monthly meeting 6 p.m.
Community Center at


Battery Park. For info call
653-9319
Sheriff's Oath of Office
Ceremony. County Judge
Van Russell will swear in
Sheriff-elect Skip Shiver
at 11:30 a.m. at conclusion
of the county commis-
sioners' meeting. Public
invited. Call 653-9319.
Wednesday, Jan. 7
Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce
Business Luncheon. Owl
Caf6. Noon. Call 653-9419.
Card Club. Franklin
County Senior Center. 1
p.m. Call 697-3760.
Thursday, Jan. 8
Carrabelle City Com-
mission Meeting. City
Hall Complex. 6:30 p.m.
Call 697-2727.
Franklin County
School Board regular
meeting. Willie Speed
Board room at Chapman
Elementary. 6 p.m. Call
653-8831.
Financial Aid Work-
shop presented by Gulf
Coast Community Col-
lege. 6 p.m. Sixth Street
Recreation Center, Apala-
chicola. For information
call Myrtis Wynn at 774-
8844.
Apalachicola Chamber
of Commerce Business
After Hours. Chef Eddie's
Magnolia Grill. 5:30 p.m.
Call 653- 9419.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.


The Times I AS


Luncheon and Infor-
mation Specials at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call
697-3760.
Friday, Jan. 9
Breakfast at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle.
Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal
at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call
697-3760.
Bocce Club. Franklin
County Senior Center. 1
p.m. Call 697-3760.
The Old Folkie, Ken
Sizemore. 8 p.m. at Dixie
Theatre in Apalachicola.
$15. Sizemore is an "Old
Folkie" who has been
performing classic folk
and rock music of the
50's, 60's, and 70's for over
40 years. He has a reper-
toire of over 500 songs
and wants passionately
to keep the music from
those exciting times of
creativity and hope alive.
Call 653-3200.
Saturday, Jan. 10
Grant Peeples and the
Lonesome Doves. Dixie
Theatre. 8 p.m. $15. Don't
miss your chance to hear
this brilliant, "outlaw
country" songwriter and
performer. Environmen-
tal and socio-political
themes. In addition, the
Lonesome Doves, Lis
and Lon Williamson, will
be on hand with a special
tribute to Gram Parsons
and Emmylou Harris.
Call 653-3200.


2008 from page Al


Memorial Plaza, featuring
a detail from the Three
Servicemen Statue.
Finded entirely by private
donations, with the help of
land contributed by the city
of Apalachicola, the July
dedication drew thousands
of people to the city.
Jimmy Mosconis, who
spearheaded the effort,
brought in his comrade in
arms from Vietnam, Jan
Scruggs, who founded
the Vietnam Memorial
Wall in Washington, D.C.
Apalachicola's native son,
retired Army Col. Harry
Buzzett, once again gave
a moving tribute, as did
Lindy Hart, the widow
of the statue's sculptor,
Frederick Hart.
Another huge
infrastructure project,
financed largely through
private donations, was the
erection of the lighthouse
on St. George Island. After
toppling in the aftermath
of Hurricane Dennis
three years ago, a group
of dedicated citizens took
on a near impossible task
of transporting the bricks
from Little St. George to
the Eastpoint mainland,
cleaning them carefully and
using them as the outer
shell of a rebuilt structure
in the center of St. George
Island.
Thanks to a concerted
effort by State Rep Will
Kendrick, and a boost from
Gov Charlie Crist, the
project got a nice chunk of
state funding and by year's
end had been opened to the
public.
If these three projects
were all that had happened
this past year, it would have
been enough, but there was
plenty more, particularly in
parks and recreation.


Thanks to state dollars,
Kendrick Park, a multi-
faceted recreational
complex outside
Carrabelle, was christened
in the spring. Plus there
was the completed
acquisition by the county
of two seafood landing
parks, the Indian Creek
Park in Eastpoint and the
Seafood Workers Park
on the former Lombardi
property at Two Mile in
Apalachicola.
Sprinkle in
Apalachicola's
reconstructed Battery Park
marina, an impressive
engineering feat, and the
transformation of the
former Carrabelle School
into a municipal complex,
and you have one of the
most robust years in recent
memory for the completion
of significant infrastructure
projects that promise to
benefit both the tourist
and seafood industries, the
county's two largest.
Not sure how it all adds
up, but we'll say these
stories are half the Top 10
list, so make it five.
Now beginning the
second tier of stories has
to be the downturn in
the economy. The county
experienced what appears
to be a record number
of foreclosures, a steady
rise in the jobless rate and
stepped-up pressure on
local food banks.
In September, Anchor
Vacation Properties LLC
shocked the industry
when the corporation
abruptly dissolved.
Later that month, owner
Jereme Neill declared
bankruptcy, sealing the
fate of more than $1 million
in outstanding debt to a
variety of homeowners,


renters and vendors.
The ongoing conflict
over the fate of the water
in the Apalachicola-
Chattahoochee-Flint basin
didn't subside last year, as
the water wars raged, even
a year after the governors
of Alabama, Florida and
Georgia vowed to resolve it.
In January, Apalachicola
filed suit against the Army
Corps of Engineers in
Tallahassee federal court
to block future reductions
in flow in a highly unusual
legal action. In February,
the U.S. Court of Appeals
in Washington ruled a
settlement agreement
entered into between
Georgia, the Corps and
Atlanta-area water users
was illegal.
In March, the House
Subcommittee on Water
Resources and the
Environment convened a
hearing on the effects of
the prolonged drought and
in July, the Apalachicola
Riverkeeper and the
Franklin County Seafood
Workers Association
arranged an early morning
field trip to the oyster beds
for leaders of the corps.
At a congressional
forum at the Woodruff
Dam in late July, County
Commissioner Smokey
Parrish's voice broke
as he enumerated the


S3


symptoms of the decline of
Apalachicola Bay seafood
industry. In October,
the corps came to town
with a widely criticized
"scoping meeting,"
and shortly before the
November presidential
election, a representative
of Democratic candidate
Barack Obama released
a statement supporting
Florida's claim to a fair
share of the water.
Who knows what the
future will bring with this
ongoing issue, but the
health of the Apalachicola
Bay is at stake.
An Alligator Point
struggle that spanned
almost nine years, and
cost more than half million
dollars of Franklin County
taxpayers' money, drew to a
close in March 2008.
For years the
Alligator Point Taxpayers
Association sought to
funds to add an artificial
sand dune along the length
of the eroding shoreline.
Following a heated debate
and several workshops
and special meetings, in
January, 772 ballots for an
unusual freeholder election
were mailed out to Alligator
Point landowners.
Of the ballots distributed
to property holders,
whether or not they are
locally registered voters,


564 were returned,
with 300 against the
renourishment project and
264 in favor of the project,
a 53- to 47-percent spread.
Although the vote was
not binding, the Franklin
County Commission voted
unanimously to uphold
the decision of the voters,
putting an end to the
renourishment project,
likely forever.
The ballot box was a
busy place this year, as
county voters agreed at
a spring special election
to a four-year, half-mill
property tax to go towards
raises for all school district
employees.
A new sheriff, school
superintendent and
supervisor of elections
all were swept into office
in the fall, as was the
first Republican county
commissioner in memory.
Several incumbents won
as well, and although the
county went for John
McCain for president,
county residents sounded
a supportive and optimistic
note on the nation's historic
choice of its first African-
American president.
In sad news, the
county was stunned to
learn in November of
the destruction of the
Apalachicola State Bank
in downtown, after a


despairing Joseph Mixon
ran a seafood truck he had
used without permission
smack into the front of it.
Mixon's life was saved, but
the building could not be,
and will be rebuilt next year
in keeping with its historic
roots.
But the last of our Top
10 story list would not be
complete without mention
of one of the most inspiring
stories of the year.
Wildlife biologist Adam
Warwick watched in
despair in June as a fully-
grown male bear, estimated
to weigh 325 to 375 pounds
began to sink beneath
the waves off Alligator
Point from the effects of a
sedative administered by
law enforcement personnel.
So Warwick dove in and
rescued the bear, and for
that earned international
recognition, including a
national TV appearance
and even a marriage
proposal for this happily-
married man.
All in a day's work.
So with all that's
happened, let's continue
the good work of the
past year, the immense
investment made in
this county we all call
home. Best wishes for a
wonderful, healthy and
happy new year.


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A6 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 1, 2009


GULF

ALLIANCE

from page Al

Rosalyn Kilcollins and
Brigit Washburn, coastal
training program coordina-
tors for the Federal Refuge
System.
Newly elected District
10 state representative,
Leonard Bembry (D-
Greenville), who replaced
State Rep. Will Kendrick,
introduced himself and was
on hand with questions and
comments.
The objective of the
workshop was to inform
the public of the goals and
accomplishments of the
Alliance and seek input
from interested citizens.
This is the second set of
workshops held by the Al-
liance. The first series of
eight helped publicize the
Governors' Action Plan, a
group of 73 specific goals,
to enhance the ecological
and economic state of the
Gulf.
According to the web-
site for the Alliance, 16
of these goals have now
been implemented, six are
pending and the remain-
ing 51 are in progress. Ac-
complishments include
the implementation of a
Beach Reporting System in
Florida to inform the public
about potentially harmful
algae blooms, a Regional
Sediment Management
Plan to facilitate the use
of dredged material in eco-
logically beneficial projects
and Floodplain Strategies
Workshops coordinated by
ANERR.
Currently the Alliance


State Representative Leonard Bembry, left, debates economics versus ecology
with conservationist Ed Gardener.


has obtained a little over $8
million in funding for vari-
ous projects.
Just released are a se-
ries of 40 Gulf of Mexico
minute podcasts that can
be heard on WFSU on Sat-
urday mornings. Kilcollins
said the podcasts will soon
be available in Spanish and
distributed to public radio
stations around Florida.
"We have also been dis-
cussing the spots with the
local radio station," she
said.
ANERR director Seth
Blitch, a lead coordinator
for the alliance in Florida,
gave a talk on the state of
the Alliance. He said drafts
exist for an updated 2009
action plan, but that the
program will not be final-
ized until all five states
complete a series of work-


The regularly scheduled

meeting for the City of

Carrabelle has been rescheduled

to January 8, 2009 at 6:30 PM

at Carrabelle City Hall located

at 1001 Gray Ave.







FRIEDMAN FINANCIAL


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Apalachicola, FL 32329
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Investment advisory services offered through Farnsley Financial Consultants, LLC,
A Registered Investment Advisor.


GCilrdf iCoscula
l Gulf Co:i)st l


... .. .


\ss


shops like the one held in
Apalachicola.
He told the assembly
that the Gulf of Mexico,
including the five Mexi-
can states with Gulf
coastline, is the sixth
largest economy in the
world, larger than China.
Half of all U.S. wetlands
border the Gulf. One
slide showed how wa-
tersheds as far north as
the Canadian border ul-
timately empty into the
Gulf.
Blitch said everyone
living within the drain-
age area feeding the Gulf
must be educated about
the needs of the estuaries
of the southern US. He
displayed a map marked
with the image of the oxy-
gen depleted dead zone
that has been growing at
the mouth of the Missis-
sippi River for several de-
cades as a result of waste
chemicals emptying into
the Gulf, many originat-
ing in cropland hundreds
of miles from the coast.
He said a group of Iowa
farmers received a Gulf
Guardian Award this year
for working to offset nu-
trient loading into their
drainage basin which ul-
timately empties into the
Mississippi.

Revised plan is
more economically
oriented
Blitch said that since
the initial workshops, re-
siliency has been added
as a priority issue, in part
due to a series of record
storms that pounded the
Gulf coast.
"Since the start of this
project, all of the commit-
tees have changed their
names slightly as they
come to terms with real
issues and that's a good
thing," he said.
He said the first plan
was largely conceptually
based and the revised
plan is more economi-
cally oriented with more
on-the-ground action. He
said that the project was
now focused on valuation
of the Gulf and associated
coastal areas. Several au-


dience members balked
at this statement.
"The real issue is not
economics, it's ecology,"
insisted one man. "We
should consider the ex-
ample of the New Eng-
land fishery. Fish species
were overharvested, the
fishery collapsed and
some species have never
recovered."
Blitch pointed out that
economic impacts were
a way to gain the ear of
decision makers; Bem-
bry voiced his support for
Blitch's statement.
Rodney DeHan of the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protec-
tion Geological Survey
said, "The reason orga-
nizations like this don't
work is that they are too
large. You have to break
it down to watershed or
ecosystems."
Kilcollins said the Al-
liance plans to hire a co-
ordinator whose job it will
be to bring some of these
issues to local communi-
ties.
Blitch said that he
couldn't predict how
many committees the
Alliance would consist
of down the road or how
they would be divided. He
said that the stakeholders
are working now to stan-
dardize monitoring pro-
cedures and vocabulary
so that everyone "speaks
the same language."
When questioned
about offshore drilling,
Blitch said the Alliance
has no policy on pe-
troleum resources. He
said that the Alliance is
seeking the cooperation
of their sister states in
Mexico, and several Ca-
ribbean nations, possibly
including Cuba.
"The Alliance is suc-
cessful because it focus-
es on things that can be
accomplished in the near
curve. Is the Alliance a
panacea for everything
in the Gulf? No," said
Blitch. "We are seeking to
create an alliance rather
than doing things that
are potentially divisive.
Changes in behavior (by
stakeholders) is what we
are working for."


ir C e n te r f .... .......... ....... .
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Are YOU at Risky


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TARANTO from page A]


After a month there, he
was then sent to Consul-
ate Health Care in Talla-
hassee, formerly known as
Tandem, where he stayed
97 days.
Finally, on April 11, after
five hospitals and extensive
rehab, Taranto returned
home to Apalachicola. "I
was gone five-and-one-
half months before I came
home at all," he said.
Taranto stayed here in
town nearly six months,
but on Oct. 15, he took his
biggest step of all, a chance
for intensive therapy at
Atlanta's Shepherd Center,
one of the nation's premier
rehabilitation hospitals.
For the next two months,
until he returned home
Dec. 10, "it was therapy all
the time," Taranto said.
Before they went down,
Taranto's wife, Toni, was
chatting with Anita Grove,
director of the Apala-
chicola Bay Chamber of
Commerce, when Grove
mentioned that the wife of
a fellow member of the Wa-
terfronts Florida commit-
tee, Keith Gartin, was an
administrator at the Shep-
herd Center.
And so the Taranto's
connect with Perryann
Williams helped to smooth
their adjustment to the
bustling program. "They
were just so glad to have
somebody to connect with,"
said Grove.
After beginning with
Shepherd's day care pro-
gram, Taranto transitioned
to the NeuroRecovery
Network, a partnership of
the Christopher and Dana
Reeve Foundation, the
Centers for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention, and
seven of the nation's lead-
ing rehabilitation centers.
The network uses locomo-
tor training to help patients
with motor-incomplete
spinal cord injuries regain
functional recovery and im-
prove their overall health.
Locomotor training in-
volves repetitive stepping
exercises with body weight
support on a moving tread-
mill. "I mostly stayed on
the treadmill all the time,"
said Taranto, who was also
taught how best to walk
with the aid of a walker and
canes.
His progress has been
steady. "(When I began)
they tested me to see how
far I could walk with the
walker, to see how far I
could go in six minutes, and
I went 555 feet," he said.
"Before I left they tested
me and I went 767 feet. I
also went 650 feet with the
canes; I never had tried
that before."
Taranto's advances
were so significant that
he managed to handle all
they tasked him with. "Ev-
erything they wanted to
try I did it all," he said. "I
told them I'm going to walk
out of this place. Y'all can
roll me to the front door if
you want to but I'm going
to walk the rest of the way
out. And so I did. I walked
all the way out."
Taranto stayed a lot less


br a


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time than he could have,
thanks to this progress, but
he's thinking about going
back for additional rehab.
"I would recommend it
to anybody; I think it's one
of the best places I could
go," he said. "I can't dress
myself, that's the biggest
problem. My hands don't
work exactly right. I can
close one but I can't open
it, and the other one I can't
quite close it. They don't
want me to drive. They
want me to be evaluated
before I drive."
Taranto also had a
chance to see others, like
a solder who fought in Iraq
but who was paralyzed
from the waist down after a
botched operation, and oth-
ers who sustained paralyz-
ing injuries.
"A lot of these were freak
accidents just like mine,"
he said. "(One young man)
was swimming and he dove
into the water, a wave left
him and he hit a sandbar
and broke his neck. You see
all kind of stuff like that, all
kinds of people."
One of the most note-
worthy of fellow patients
was the famous wrestler
turned evangelist Lex
Lugar. When Taranto's son,
Joey, told his parents how
he used to watch Lugar on
TV all the time, Toni got his
autograph.
And then Lugar made
a personal call to Joey as
a surprise. "He was there
with us every day. He's
walking with canes and
with a walker," said Taran-
to. "He's made a lot of im-
provement. He'd always
say 'I work here'"

Challenges ahead
Now that he's back
home, Taranto is visited
twice a week by a therapist
from NHC in Carrabelle
to continue his rehab. "He
mainly wants me to get up
out of the chair without
holding on to anything," he
said. "And marching, pick-
ing my legs up, laying up
and bridging up without
your chest, basically the
same stuff I was doing up
there.
"They told me up there
if I didn't do it I'd go back
like I was," said Taranto.
He would like to walk
without using hand canes,
but for now, the medical
personnel are advising him
to rely on them for support.
"They said 'I would advise
you to walk with something
you can hold on to'," Taran-
to said, who also has to deal
with a catheter, and the af-
ter effects of two previous
lower back surgeries, three
upper back surgeries, and
a hip replacement. "I've
been through the mill," he
said.
Fortunately, he hasn't
had to deal with pain, oth-
er than the residual effect
from the earlier surgeries.
The main challenge
continues to be walking,
so Toni will follow him
with the wheelchair when
he works on extending his
stamina.
"I don't know how far I
can walk without getting
tired," he said. "I get this
'mushy feeling." I'm still
sort of wobbly when I'm
balancing, I have to watch
myself to keep from falling
over."
Whenever he goes out,
Taranto makes a point
of walking out using his
canes, and if he's visiting
a store with an electric
scooter, he'll rely on it once
inside.
"We may take the wheel-
chair if I'm going some-
where but I don't use it
unless it's a case of I have
to," he said. "I'm not de-
pressed about it. I can't go
like I want to but I'm get-
ting around. I feel like I'm
making progress. I need to
keep going.
"I'm not giving up, I'm
going to keep trying. I feel
like I'm a going to walk
again without the walker,"
said Taranto. "I'll walk with


hand canes but I would like
to get where I could walk
without them.
"I got my mind made up
about that," he said.


NE ~*I


I III ( -.1 [


i rt i i i rt %t I it d i i It mi ipp, -imint in t Al ( -iii ilt k Ni irm j- ;- 11 1







S CARRABELLE -APALACH COLA





PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, January 1, 2009 w w w. apalach times. com Page 7



Seahawks lose squeaker in Barnstorm opener


PHOTOS BY ANDREW WARDLOW I The News Herald
Seahawks senior Zan Simmons grabs the rebound against Cairo at Bay High in Panama City on Saturday.


ment to that point. Frank-
lin County led after every
break, taking charge with
a 10-point run keyed by
O'Neal starting midway
through the second quar-
ter.
When O'Neal fed fresh-
man Carlos Morris for an
easy basket with 4:40 left
in the third quarter, the Se-
ahawks led 38-26, the big-
gest margin of the game.
But the Syrupmakers (2-2),
playing only their fourth
game because of a sched-
ule backloaded following a
state Class 3A champion-
ship in football, refused to
go quietly.
Sophomore guard Ter-
rell Bryant scored only 7
points but became a key
figure down the stretch for
Cairo. His 3-pointer midway
through the fourth quarter
brought the Syrupmak-
ers within 52-50, and after
Kentrail Brown tied it on
a press steal two minutes
later, Bryant gave Cairo its
first lead on a drive with
2:05 left.
Cairo's final two bas-
kets, including the game-
winner, were scored by 6-
foot-6 Kendrick Kelly, both
on feeds by Bryant.
Dywane Isom paced
the Syrupmakers with 17
points; Kelly had 14 and


Brown had 11. Senior De-
shaun Winfield supported
O'Neal with 15 points, in-
cluding eight in the third
quarter on offensive re-
bounds. Freshman Carlos
Morris added 12 points.

Dec. 27 FCHS
vs. Cairo (GA) at
Barnstorm classicc

Franklin 14 14 16 12 56
Cairo 12 8 18 20-58

FCHS STATS: Deshaun
Winfield 7/12 2s, 0/1 3s, 1/6
FTs, 15 pts; Carlos Morris
6/11 2s, 0/7 3s, 12 pts.; Jere-
my James 1/6 2s, 2 pts. Aus-
tin O'Neal 6/14 2s, 1/3 3s, 4/7
FTs, 19 pts.; Zan Simmons
0/1 2s, 2/2 FTs, 2 pts.; Ar-
ron Prince 1/3 2s, 4/6 FTs,
6 pts.
Team shooting: 12/47
(47%) 2s; 1/11 (9%) 3s; 11/21
(52%) FTs.
Rebounds: Morris 7,
Winfield 13, O'Neal 2
Assists: O'Neal 4,
James, Winfield, Simmons,
Prince
Steals: Morris, Sim-
mons 2, O'Neal, Winfield,
James
Blocks: Winfield 6, Mor-
ris, Prince


By Pat McCann
Florida Freedom Newspapers

Franklin County coach
Fred Drake could have laid
the blame on poor free-
throw shooting at inoppor-
tune moments.
He could have pointed
to only one field goal in
the final five minutes. He
could have found a num-


ber of reasons for the Se-
ahawks leading almost the
entire game before falling,
58-56, to Cairo (Ga.) on
Saturday.
They all added up to
a defeat that didn't quite
seem possible or palatable
when Franklin County led
almost 30 minutes and still
had a last possession to
force overtime.
"We had an out-of-


bounds play to get the
ball to our best shooter,"
Drake said after the Se-
ahawks had inbounded in
their half court with 8.4
seconds showing. "They
(Cairo) switched on him,
and then we wanted to
attack the basket, but we
didn't."
Junior Austin O'Neal,
who led Franklin County
(10-2) in scoring and with a


strong floor game, was left
to fire a 3-pointer from the
top of the key that never re-
ally had a chance.
"They were more physi-
cal than we were, and we
backed off," Drake lament-
ed. "They wanted it better
than we did tonight."
The finish punctuated
what easily was the most
entertaining game of the
Bay Barnstorm tourna-


This week Middle school boys hoopsters open 7-2
--*-LI A-1


wimt tne

Seahawks


Friday, Jan. 2

Seahawks varsity bas-
ketball plays at the Holiday
Tournament at Wakulla
High School. Tipoff times
and opponents to be an-
nounced.


Saturday, Jan. 3

Seahawks varsity bas-
ketball plays at the Holiday
Tournament at Wakulla
High School. Tipoff times
and opponents to be an-
nounced.


Monday, Jan. 5

Lady Seahawks varsity
basketball plays away at
Altha High School. Tipoff
time, 6 p.m.


Wednesday, Jan. 7

Lady Seahawks varsity
basketball plays at home
vs. Liberty County. Tipoff
time, 5 p.m.


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

The Seahawks middle school
boys basketball team, coached by
Mike Todd, opened the season at
7-2.
Members of the team include
Skyler Hutchinson, Roy Williams,
Zach Howze, Leonard Green, Ja-
mie Gordon, David Butler and Ty-
ler Rowell.
Stay tuned next week for the
conclusion of the Seahawks' middle
school boys electrifying season.
*Oct. 27 at home vs. Blount-
stown
The Seahawks opened the sea-
son with a 56-25 loss. The team
was led by Roy Williams, who had
three treys and a bucket for 11
points, followed by Skyler Hutchin-
son with two treys and three free
throws for 9 points and Leonard
Green with two buckets and a free
throw for 5 points.
Oct. 28 at home vs.
Hosford
The Seahawks got their first
win, 31-18, led by Williams, who
had seven buckets for 14 points.
Hutchinson added four baskets
and a trey for 11 points, followed
by Green with a bucket and a free
throw for 3 points and Zach Howze
with a trey.
*Oct. 30 at home vs. Port
St. Joe
The Seahawks got their second
win, 35-27, led by Green's six buck-
ets and free throw for 13 points.
Hutchinson added four baskets


Seahawks Skyler Hutchinson,
rebound against Tolar.


for 8 points, and Williams added
three buckets and a free throw for
7 points. Jamie Gordon had two
baskets for 4 points, and Howze a
trey.
*Nov. 10 away vs. Wewahitchka
The Seahawks got their third
win by inching out Wewa 37-26.
Green's six buckets led with
12 points. Hutchinson added
two buckets and two treys for
10 points, while Williams had four
buckets and two free throws for
10 points. Howze hit a basket and
a free throw for 3 points, and Gor-


PHOTO BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN
left, and Leonard Green wait for a


don had a bucket.
*Nov. 13 away vs. Blountstown
The Seahawks took their sec-
ond loss, again to Blountstown,
this time making a game of it 39-
33. Williams had three treys and
four free throws for 13 points.
Green's four buckets and free
throw gave him 9 points, while
Hutchinson added two buckets, a
trey and a free throw for 8. Gordon
added a bucket and a free throw
for 3 points.
*Nov. 17 at home vs. Wewahi-


The Seahawks secured their
fourth win, with a double over-
time victory 48-42 against Wewa.
The game was tied at 33-all after
regulation. Green's nine buck-
ets and free throw gave him 19
points, while Hutchinson added
four buckets, a trey, and two free
throws for 13. Williams had three
buckets, a trey and one free throw
for 10 points. Howze tallied two
buckets for 4 points and Gordon
added a basket.
*Nov. 18 away vs. Tolar
The Seahawks earned their fifth
win with a 37-34 victory. Hutchin-
son paced the team with three
buckets, two treys and a free throw
for 13 points. Green added three
buckets and three free throws for
9 points. Gordon hit three treys for
9 points, as well. Howze nailed two
treys for 6 points
*Dec. 2 away vs. Hosford
The Seahawks earned their
sixth win with a 40-18 victory.
Howze hit seven buckets for 14
points, while Hutchinson had five
baskets, a trey and a free throw
for 14 points. Williams added four
buckets, a trey and a free throw
for 11 points.
*Dec. 3 away vs. Port St. Joe
The Seahawks got their sev-
enth win, with a 46-39 conquest.
Williams hit a season-high 21
points with six baskets, two treys
and three free throws. Hutchinson
had three treys, a basket and three
throws for 14 points, while Green
had four baskets for 8 points and
Gordon hit a trey.


APALACHIC tLk
STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561
C


Seahawks
junior Austin
O'Neal tries
to move
the ball
down court
against
Cairo at
Bay High
in Panama
City on
Saturday.


Adult hoop tourney scheduled

Plans are in the works for the the former Apalachicola High School
first annual Franklin County bas- gymnasium.
ketball tournament designed ex- If you are interested in enter-
clusively for men and women older ing a team, either male or female,
than 40. call Granville at 653-7643 or 653-
The tourney will likely be held at 2010.






A8 |I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 1, 2009


Terry Fuentes, right, takes home a bike for a grandchild as Alyssa Creamer
watches at left.



Cops for Kids share



bikes for Christmas


Sheriff-elect places a bike in the trunk of Angie Arroyo, who was on hand in
Eastpoint with her infant daughter, Breauna Webb.


Date
Thu, Jan 01
Fri, Jan 02
Sat, Jan 03
Sun, Jan 04
Mon, Jan05
Tue, Jan 06
Wed, Jan 07


Temperature
High I
62 !
700
67 !
670
690
680
680


% Precip
0%
40%
10%
10%
30%
60%
0%


TIDE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
Cat Point MinusO:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03

APALACHICOLA
01/01 Thu 12:31AM 0.6 L 05:35AM 1.1 H
12:33PM -0.2 L 07:32PM 1.2 H

01/02 Fri 01:25AM 0.5 L 06:36AM 1.0 H
12:59PM 0.0 L 07:52PM 1.2 H

01/03 Sat 02:27AM 0.3 L 07:54AM 0.8 H
01:27PM 0.2 L 08:15PM 1.3 H

01/04 Sun 03:40AM 0.1 L 09:41 AM 0.7 H
01:53PM 0.5 L 08:41PM 1.3 H


01/05 Mon 04:59AM

01/06 Tue 06:13AM

01/07 Wed 07:19AM


-0.1 L 09:12PM 1.4 H

-0.3 L 09:51PM 1.4 H

-0.6 L 10:43PM 1.5 H


CARRABELLE
01/01 Thu 04:10OAM 1.8 H 10:20AM
06:07PM 1.9 H 11:12PM


01/02 Fri 05:11AM 1.6 H
06:27PM 1.9 H

01/03 Sat 12:14AM 0.5 L
11:14AM 0.3 L

01/04 Sun 01:27AM 0.2 L
11:40AM 0.8 L

01/05 Mon 02:46AM -0.2 L

01/06 Tue 04:OOAM -0.5 L

01/07 Wed 05:06AM -1.0 L


-0.3 L
0.8 L


10:46AM 0.0 L


06:29AM 1.3 H
06:50PM 2.1 H

08:16AM 1.1 H
07:16PM 2.1 H

07:47PM 2.2 H

08:26PM 2.2 H

09:18PM 2.4 H


Sponsor the Weekly

Almanac Call:

653-8868


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APALACHICOLA 1171
BLUFF RD 2 BR/ 2 BA brick
home with detached 500 sq ft
apartment and 30 x 40 metal bldg
with 12'doors, on 0.6 acres.
MLS #209171.............$259,000


195 AVENUE F Cozy 3BR /
2BA cottage undergoing total
restoration, historic district
northside on quiet corner under
majestic oaks on TWO lots,
being sold "as is".
MLS #209281.............$189,000


HISTORIC DISTRICT 87
Ave. D 3,000 + sq ft of charm-
high ceilings, tall windows, heart
pine floors, early Apalachicola
house with major remodels over
past 150 years- on two very
private landscaped lots in the
heart of town NEW PRICE
MLS #208027.............$475,000
CAN'T BEAT PRICE! High
ground building site with natural
vegetation, 15 minutes to historic
Apalachicola, 15 minutes to
St George Island beaches. 325
Blue Heron Drive in Eastpoint's
Magnolia Ridge.
MLS #208086 ..............$35,000
APALACHICOLA 563
BROWNSVILLE ROAD- 1
1/2 acre parcel with lovely oaks,
zoned R-4 residential / home
industry
MLS #209271.............$150,000
APALACHICOLA RIVER-
1.3 acre parcel with 100'
riverfront at end of Bluff Road
south of new county Pine Log
boat ramp. Natural vegetation,
easy open gulf access.
NEW PRICE
MLS #106689.............$450,000
CARRABELLE'S
McKISSACK BEACH-
50x100' gulf front building site,
city water/sewer, spectacular
views, white sand beach stretches
for miles.
MLS #206058.............$349,000
APLACHICOLA
RESIDENTIAL
building site, city water/sewer,
orders city square near former
high school
MLS #206403...............$45,000
APALACHICOLA
NORTHSIDE High elevation
super building site with potential
river/Marina view from future
2-story. Existing structure a
restoration challenge. Block 174,
Lot 3 REDUCED AGAIN
MLS #110320 ...............$60,000


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17 1/2 Ave. E
m Apalachicola, FL 32329
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I1 1


Once again, Franklin County's finest,
together with the support of area busi-
nesses and individuals, distributed bicy-
cles on Christmas eve to the area's needi-
est children.
Mark Creamer handled the chore of
making sure the money got raised, $1,800
in just two days, and the bikes got pur-
chased and the children all got them in
time for Christmas.
After getting word from Johnny Turn-
er, investigator with the state's attorney's
office, that the Cops for Kids would once
again give out bikes for Christmas, Cream-
er sprang into action.
"I got a list (of children) from the sher-
iff's office, health department, state's at-
torney's office, and people calling me," he
said. "We made sure we reached kids who
hadn't gotten a bike from last year."
Creamer made the rounds in Tallahas-
see, buying bikes at Wal-Mart there and
in Crawfordville, where the store donated
five bikes. In addition, two families got
food from the Christmas Connection.
On the day before Christmas Eve,
Sheriff-elect Skip Shiver, and the DARE
Program's Ryan Sandoval, together with
Creamer, his son Greyson and daughter
Alyssa, went to Carrabelle, Eastpoint and
Apalachicola. In all, 45 bikes were distrib-
uted.
Creamer said the effort could not have
been done without the support of local
business and individuals. He gave a spe-
cial thanks to Scipio Creek Marina, Water


Ryan Sandoval, left, and Mark Cream-
er, help unload bikes in Eastpoint.

Street Seafood, Ace Hardware, J.V Gan-
der's, Apalachicola State Bank, Joe Tay-
lor (Avenue E), Bev Hewitt (The Grille),
Anita Grove (Apalachicola Bay Chamber
of Commerce), Marks Insurance, Har-
ry Arnold (The Tin Shed), Bill Spohrer
(Coombs House Inn) and Gulfside IGA for
their support.


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A great gift for your favorite veteran!

Proceeds help us erect in Apalachicola the famous
bronze statue by Frederick Hart, the first full-scale
replica of a major monument outside
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LIFE


TIMES


B
Section


Thursday, January 1, 2008 www. apalachtimes. com Page 1


ste oft


^J*1


PHOTOS BY MARTHA GHERARDI
ABOVE: A typical Italian family celebrating the Christmas "cenone." TOP: A photo of a Southerner's New Year's Day meal,
Italian style. Clockwise from top: bacon, Swiss chard, polenta, black-eyed peas. Cotechino in the center.


In search of the familiar in faraway lands


By Martha Gherardi
Special to the Times

Last month, I accepted an invitation to
eat Thanksgiving dinner at my neighbor's
home. This was a great treat indeed be-
cause my neighbor is a gourmet home
cook whose culinary skill is legend-
ary in the neighborhood.
She advised her guests that the
meal would be different from years
past because instead of traditional
Thanksgiving food, she was prepar-
ing an all-Greek menu. Everything
my neighbor served, from the pine
resin-scented retsina wine, cucum-
ber and yogurt tiramasalata, spin- MAI
ach-filled spanakopita, lamb-stuffed GHEI
grape leaves, olive and feta cheese
chicken to the baklava dessert, was
classical Greek cuisine.
Prepared by my neighbor's skillful
hands, the meal was delicious and satisfy-
ing. I didn't miss the turkey or the corn-
bread dressing or the green bean casse-
role or even the sweet potato, pumpkin
and pecan pies typically found on tables
across the South on that day. But I began
to wonder. What if I had eaten that same
feast on a sun-drenched Greek isle, so far
from home on such an important holiday?
How would I have felt? If past experience
is any indication, I would have reacted by
scouring vegetable stands, visiting super-
markets and butcher shops, and search-
ing in every corner of that island paradise
to try to find the ingredients to make a tra-
ditional Southern Thanksgiving dinner.
Thirty years ago, I moved to Caracas,


Venezuela, to accept a position as violinist
in the Caracas Philharmonic Orchestra.
It was there I met my husband, Luciano, a
musician in the same orchestra. Living in a
foreign country was the experience of a life-
time, but after a few months' absence from
the states, I began to develop cravings for
foods not readily available in Venezuela.
To satisfy these cravings, I be-
gan to experiment with the ingre-
dients at hand, trying to create the
tastes of home. In fact, I can say
that my interest in cooking and in
food began in earnest during my
years in Venezuela. While trying
various recipes from home, I ran
into some roadblocks. Some were
ITHA easily solved, such as converting
ARDI pounds to kilograms, but other
problems proved more difficult.
What do you use as a substitute for
brown sugar? Regular granulated sugar
just doesn't give the same flavor. I made
southern fried chicken, even if I first had
to remove the chicken's head and feet. I
learned to bake bagels, which were un-
available in Venezuela at the time. I even
tried making fig preserves using dried figs
instead of fresh.
Some of my experiments worked better
than others. The corn bread dressing for
my first Thanksgiving in Venezuela was
inedible. With a costly international phone
call home, I learned where I had gone
wrong. Part of my problem was the lack of
a proper cornmeal for the recipe; so on my
next trip home, I purchased a bag of stone-
ground cornmeal to use in my Venezuelan
corn breads and dressings.
Little by little, I gained experience in


PHOTO BY MARTHA GHERARDI
It just so happened that this holiday season, Apalachicola restaurateur Tamara Su-
arez gave us a couple of her homemade hallacas, a labor-intensive Christmas dish
popular among Venezuelans. This was a rare treat for us, and they were delicious!


PHOTO BY LUCIANO GHERARDI
A photo taken at the Salone del Gusto 2008, displaying boxes of cotechino and
other pork products.


adapting local products to my tastes, and
at the same time, I learned to appreciate
the tropical foods of Venezuela. Instead of
grits, I ate the addictive corn bread arepas.
Instead of sweet potatoes, I learned to
substitute fried plantains.
All of this experimentation was fun, but
for Thanksgiving, Christmas and the New
Year, I still sought the satisfying tastes of
home. It appears I am not the only one
who feels this way. Grocery stores have
an "ethnic" section filled with products to
satisfy the expatriate's yearning for home.
The world might be a giant global commu-
nity, but each culture has its own strong
food traditions.
A few years ago, I met an elderly gen-
tleman who grew up in the Hill section of
Apalachicola but had traveled the world.
Our conversation turned to the topic of
food. The holiday season was approach-
ing, so we began to speak of what we liked
to eat at Christmas. It was this man's opin-
ion that it just didn't seem like Christmas
if he didn't have raccoon meat.
I know Venezuelans living in the U.S.
who go to great lengths to make their la-
bor-intensive Christmas dish know as hal-
laca. Just finding enough banana leaves
to wrap 50 or more of the tamale-like corn
cakes can be a challenge. A Polish friend of
mine was unable to find sauerkraut for her
special Easter meal in the town where she
was living in Mexico, so she bought fresh
cabbage and made her own sauerkraut.
Even Luciano, who has lived in the
states for many years, enjoys celebrating
the holidays Italian style. Italians eat their
main holiday meal (known as il cenone or
"big meal") at midnight after the Christ-
mas Eve church services. Ever since we


began sharing a midnight Christmas din-
ner with other European friends who live
in this area, the holiday seems more real
for Luciano.
A year ago, Luciano and I were in Italy
for the New Year. This posed a real dilem-
ma for me. As every self-respecting South-
erner knows, what you eat on New Year's
Day is serious business! It determines the
outcome of the rest of the year. Black-eyed
peas? Check. Greens? Swiss chard would
have to take the place of turnip greens.
Hog jowl? I don't even know how to say
that in Italian. Bacon was as close as I
could get. Cornbread? I made polenta, a
type of cornmeal mush.
Luciano also wanted to eat his spe-
cial Italian New Year's good luck meal of
lentils and a type of gelatinous sausage
known as cotechino, made with ground
pork, pork rinds and spices. So, I added
some cotechino to the menu and made
lentils for him. Everyone was happy, and a
good New Year was had by all.
I am fortunate to be living in Florida
again. I can have fried chicken, grits or
even raccoon anytime I want. Because the
tastes of home are readily available, for a
change, I now enjoy re-creating some of the
fantastic meals I have eaten on my travels:
Argentine empanadas, Venezuelan pabel-
lon criollo, Portuguese seafood caldeira-
da, Spanish paella, French cassoulet and
countless recipes from my visits to Italy. I
may have to make a few substitutions here
and there, but generally I'm satisfied with
the results, and the culinary journey cer-
tainly is cheaper than an actual trip.
May your holidays be special, and may
your meals of celebration include a taste
of home. Buon appetite!


*


R
R






B2 I The Times


Society


Thursday, January 1, 2009


Sanxay to head


Gulf-Franklin arts


organization

The Gulf Alli- _.- Scotland, Sanxay
ance for Local Art lived in Paris for
(GALA) is proud four years. Her
to announce that background gives
Ally Sanxay has her a particular
joined the organi- appreciation for
zation as its new B architectural his-
executive direc- Ally Sanxay tory, and its rela-
tor. Ally Sanxay tionship to visual
Sanxay is Oxford edu- arts, dating as far back as
cated, a CPA, and enjoys the early 1200s.
the arts in all forms. In As a CPA, she carries
2003, she led a team of vol- the distinction of being an
unteers which raised over executive who possesses
$3 million to restore The in-depth experience, capa-
Capital Theatre in Green- abilities, and judgment. She
eville, Tenn. an effort which considers herself a "doer"
included obtaining $2 mil- who is highly skilled in vi-
lion in grant funding. sualizing and executing a
Sanxay has already ex- plan and doing whatever
pressed interest in build- it takes to deliver. She has
ing the team necessary already hit the ground run-
to restore the theatre in ning with a passion and ex-
downtown Port St. Joe, as citement for expanding the
well as continue restora- arts in our area.
tion and support of theatre More information is
and art programs in Frank- available by calling GALA
lin and Gulf counties. at (850) 227-4960, or by vis-
Born and raised in iting www.gulfalliance.org.






























Diamond and Spirit
Diamond and Spirit, 6-week-old
puppies, arrived at the Adoption
Center with their two siblings. They
are adorable, playful, healthy puppies
waiting for loving homes.
Call Kam for more details or visit
the Franklin County Humane Society
at 244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint.
You may log onto the website at www.
forgottenpets.org to see more of our
adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend
for life, you not only save the life of
that pet, you make room for us to save
the life of one more abandoned dog or
cat!
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! We are
always in need of volunteers. The cats
and dogs would love any spare time
you have to give.

"Holiday Plant & Pet Sitting
In your home

(850) 653-5857
for residential accounts
AlohaBugsPest Management
Franklin County's ONLY LOCAL Pest control company

GULF STATE The
Community Coolest Bank
79 Bank in the
S www.gscb.com Hottest Spots

Apalachicola Carrabelle Crawfordville
(850) 653 2126 (850) 697 3395 (850) 926 8338
Eastpoint St. George Island
(850) 670 8786 (850) 927 2511


.4 4-.4 !.'f 4:.4 :.f :.I: ::4 4 44
-*W4 -4 -4.j 4 : j -4 *-:4 :4 14 f -.


Health department


can help smokers quit


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Franklin County seventh-grader Austin Martina por-
trayed a cigarette during an anti-smoking presenta-
tion provided by the health department as part of
the Dec. 1 9 Harvest Festival at the school.

CLASS SCHEDULE


Apalachicola
Jan. 12.
Feb. 9
March 1
March 22
April 13
May 4


Eastpoint
Jan.26
Feb. 16
March 8
March 29
April 20
May 11


Carrabelle
Feb. 2
Feb. 23
March 15
April 6
April 27
May 18


Sessions
1
2
3
4 (Quit Day)
5
6 (Graduation)


If you do not smoke ciga-
rettes, you can skip this
story.
Your lungs are not black-
ened with tar deposits, your
breath is not thinned by
carbon monoxide and you
do not live with incessant
worry that sooner or later
you will come down with
heart disease, respiratory
malfunction or, God forbid,
lung cancer.
Go read about foreclo-
sures or the troubled econo-
my if you want something to
worry about.
For those who do smoke,
and who dream of a healthi-
er 2009 for their vital organs,
please continue reading
below.
Now you are no doubt
aware, since most everyone
who ever began smoking
has tried at some point to
stop, that quitting is more
often tried than comes
true.
But this year the coun-
ty health department can
help. Studies by the U.S
Surgeon General have
found that quitting strate-
gies that combined coun-
seling or support elements
boost success rates by 22 to
30 percent.
So if this the year you
wish to remember as the
year you quit smoking, there


LANARK NEWS


What a wonderful afternoon it was
the Sunday before Christmas! Barbara
and her helpers worked very hard to
prepare the delicious Prime Rib Dinner
for our Christmas Dinner. Members of
the Lanark Village Association
served the meal and brought
in dessert. There were 106 of
us seated, 10 meals on the run.
Aileen and the Scottish Fiddlers
added to the fun. Many thanks to
those who helped and to those
who enjoyed the afternoon with


Didn't get to the Cantata, but
I'm sure Donna and the choir
did a superb job.
Our Christmas Mass was


LANARK
Jim W


awesome! I just know your service was
too. Was good to see Father Cregan
again.
Hope to see you at the Hall New
Year's Day enjoying the boiled shrimp
and other goodies. Be there during cof-
fee hour 8:30 to 11 am. We always have
a good time.
Don't forget the big New Year's Eve
party at our legion post. DJ music,


SILVER UEST
Weddings N STUDIOS
Engagements
Senior Portraits
Children & Babies
Call today to reserve your photo session
850-229-9353
www.SilverQuestStudios.com


games, food, food, food, and fun, fun,
fun, from 7 p.m. 'til. Champagne at mid-
night.
Pray for the repose of the soul
of Ronald Lee, who passed away
last week. Pray also for his
family's strength during this
time.
Members and guests will
gather at the Hall, Monday,
Jan 5, for our monthly meet-
ing of the Lanark Village Asso-
ciation. We will install the new
board members. Gavel falls at
(NEWS 7 p.m.
'elsh Bingo for the Bus resumes on
Wednesday, Jan. 7, at 6:30 pm.
See you there! We always have
a good time! Homemade cookies, coffee,
and soft drinks on hand, door prizes, pot
of gold and much more.
I wish to thank you for all the cards
and gifts I received at Christmas. Have
a very happy New Year.
Be kind to one another and check in
on the sick and housebound. Until next
time, God Bless America, our troops, the
poor, homeless, and hungry.


is a way that can help.
The program is a
partnership between Big
Bend AHEC (Area Health
Education Centers),
Boys and Girls Club of the
Big Bend, and the county
health department. The
program involves a se-
ries of six classes, all free,
and each held on Monday
evenings from 6 to 7 p.m.
Some classes end earlier
depending on the size of the
class.
The Apalachicola classes
are held at the former Chap-
man Elementary School, the
Eastpoint classes are at the
former Brown Elementary
School, and the Carrabelle
classes are at the former
Carrabelle Elementary
School, now the city's mu-
nicipal complex.
The rule of the class
is that everyone must at-
tend all sessions and must
be on time. Please do not
register for a class that
will interfere with anoth-
er engagement on your
schedule.
Register by calling
Franklin County Health De-
partment at 653-2111 ext.
1234. If you cannot make it
to a class and need immedi-
ate assistance, please call
the Florida QUITLINE at
1-877-822-6669.


Sweet 16 for
Ashley Moseley
Ashley D. Moseley cel-
ebrated her 16th birthday
on Friday, Dec. 19, 2008.
She is the daughter of
Ricky and Beth Moseley, of
Eastpoint.
Maternal grandparents
are Ray and Marcia Rentz,
of Crawfordville. Paternal
grandparents are Willie
and Bobbie Braxton, of
Eastpoint.


LET US HELP YOU WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS!
CRIBS TABLES WEDDING ARCHES
HIGH CHAIRS CHAIRS CANDELABRAS
TENTS LINENS PUNCH BOWLS
DINNERWARE BEACH WHEELCHAIR CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN


23 ihwy9


NE ~*I


850-670-8686
888-670-8686


'We, bdhwv!!






Thursday, January 1, 2009


Church


The Times I B3


Obituaries


Cards of THANKS


Joseph Green Sr. was
born on August 15, 1933, to
the now late Mr. Harrison
Green and Mrs. Florence
Campbell, in Edisto Island,
South Carolina.
He left his memories
behind on Dec. 2, 2008, in
Panama City.
He is survived by his
wife, Julia Mae Green, of
Apalachicola; daughters,
Darlene E. Green, of
Jacksonville, Helen Green,
of Apalachicola, La Keisha
Cook (Perry), of Tampa;
sons, Joseph Green, Jr., of
Clearmont, Earnest Green,
of Fernandina, Gregory
Barnes (Chrystal Hall),
of Tallahassee, and Toney


Brother Lonial
Sanders, son of the
late Clara Winfield and
Louis Sanders, who both
preceded his death, was
born August 30, 1956 in
Carrabelle.
He attended school
here at Quinn High and
later became employed in
the culinary profession at
several local restaurants
here in Apalachicola.
He was born again
and turned his life over
to Christ in the year
2000. He was baptized by
Rev. James Williams at
Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church in October
2000. He later moved to
Tallahassee for seven
years.
He was employed by
Holiday Select as a Bell's
Man, and later became a
cook at Old Time Country
Buffet. While residing in
Tallahassee, he attended
Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church. After returning
home, he attended New
Life Tabernacle by the Sea,
where he later joined and
became a member under
Bishop Horace Solomon.
He moved to Fort
Pierce in May 2007 where
he and his sister Lydell
would attend Greater
Bethel Baptist Church.
He was a devoted servant
of God, who enjoyed
spreading the word about
the goodness of God, and
was full of faith. He was
well known and loved
by many throughout the
Panhandle. He touched
many hearts with
encouraging words and
scriptures on a daily basis.
He answered the
Master Call on Sunday


Mrs. Bessie Allen
Sanderson, 83, widow
of Paul Sanderson and
formerly of Mullins, S.C.,
died Friday, Dec. 5,2008.
She was born Feb. 12,
1925 in Apalachicola, a
daughter of the late John
C. and Iris Peddie Allen.
Mrs. Sanderson, along
with her husband Paul,
owned and operated the
Mullins Bakery for many
years.
She was a lifelong
member of Mullins First
Baptist Church until
moving to Florence,
SC, where she attended
Church at Sandhurst.
Mrs. Sanderson was a
loving wife, mother and
grandmother, who will be
greatly missed by all who
knew her.
Surviving Mrs.
Sanderson are children:
Ron Sanderson and wife
Joyce, of Florence, S.C.;
Don Sanderson and wife
Judi, of Nichols, S.C.;
Gail S. Grice, of Florence,
S.C., Paula L. Sanderson,


night, Dec. 7, 2008 in Fort
Pierce. His warm and
sweet personality, as well
as his love, will be greatly
missed by his family and
friends.
The loving memories
of Brother Sanders will
be forever cherished
by his son, Delonta
Lonial Sanders, one
granddaughter, Dezmonae
LaShay Sanders, five
brothers, Louis "Nikki"
Sanders, of Alaska,
and Anthony Sanders,
Donald "Nellie" Sanders,
Calvin "Dora" Harris,
Dexter Harris, all of
Apalachicola, five sisters,
Blondell "George" Julius,
Apalachicola, a devoted
sister, Lydell Robinson,
of Fort Pierce, Stella
Sanders-Bryant, O'Sheila
Harris, and Melissa
Winfield "Claude" Thomas,
all of Apalachicola, and
a devoted and longtime
friend, Nancy West, of
Apalachicola.
Also cherishing his
memories are his extended
family of Apalachicola,
the Simmons' Family
- Ms. Dorothy, Sandra,
Jessica, Frances, Bernard,
Mary(Pixie), his mother
in Christ, Maxine Kellogg,
Sister in Christ, Patricia
Tolliver, 14 nephews,
10 nieces, a host of
grandnephews and nieces,
and other relatives and
friends.
Funeral services
were held at New Life
Tabernacle by the Sea
with Bishop Horace
Solomon, officiating.
Interment was in Magnolia
Cemetery. Kelley FRneral
Home handled all
arrangements.


of Florence, S.C., and
Steven Allen Sanderson,
of North Myrtle Beach,
S.C.; grandchildren,
Paul Sanderson and wife
Melissa, Craig Sanderson,
Laura Grice, Amy Stokes
and husband Will, Jason
Grice, Allen Sanderson,
Austin Sanderson,
Matthew Sanderson,
Aaron Sanderson and
Grace Sanderson; two
great-grandchildren,
Bradley Clark and
Sydney Sanderson; two
sisters, Julia Allen, of
Apalachicola, and Connie
Allen Hicks, of Winter
Springs.
Mrs. Sanderson was
predeceased by a brother,
John Willard Allen, of
Apalachicola, and a sister,
Olis Allen Page, of Sellers,
S.C.
FRneral services were
held Dec. 10 at the Chapel
of Cox-Collins Funeral
Home in Mullins, S.C.
Burial followed in Red
Hill Memorial Gardens
Cemetery.


Roger Friedrich Weber,
53, passed away Dec. 26,
2008, in Carrabelle.
He was born in
Fayetteville, N.C., but
lived in Oviedo for the past
eight years. He enjoyed
golfing, hunting, fishing
and the outdoors, and was
a member of the Christ
Episcopal Church.
Weber provided over
18 years of honorable
and exemplary service
as a soldier in the United
States Army. Following
his commissioning in
1977 and completion of
Ranger School in 1978,
Roger served as infantry
officer with the 82nd
"All American" Airborne
Division at Ft Bragg, N.C.
In September 1980,
Weber assumed command
of a 115-man Headquarters
Company with the 1st
Brigade, 82nd Airborne
Division. In 1982, Capt.
Weber was selected to
serve as a professor of
military science with the
ROTC cadre at Georgia
Southern College where
he helped shape and
mentor future junior Army
leaders.
By the end of 1985
he transitioned to the
branch of Quartermaster
where he brought his
leadership experience
as an infantryman to
the logisticians. His first
assignment was with
the 8th Infantry Division
in Germany serving in
the Division's Support
Command providing the
food, fuel and ammunition
necessary to keep over
16,000 soldiers prepared
for combat operations in
Western Europe.
Weber was promoted to
major on June 1, 1989, and
in August 1990, deployed
to Kuwait in support of
Operation Desert Shield
as one of the first logistics
officers in theater. Later,
during Operation Desert
Storm, he took command
of the Corps Support
Command's Assault
Command Post providing
command and control to
an extremely complex
and fast moving combat


Sarah Gay


Becton, of Apalachicola;
nieces, Shilliane Green,
Veronica Green, Serena
Green, and Willie Mae
Grant, and many more;
nephews, Authur Green, P
Green, and many more; 18
grandchildren, seven great-
grandchildren; and a host
of great nieces, nephews,
loving friends and family.
He was preceded in
death by his son, Prince
Becton. A very special
thanks to Rosamae Sweet
and Jackie Houston.
Funeral services
were held at Kelley
Funeral Home, with
memorialization by
cremation.


Sarah Morris
Gay, was born
Sept. 8, 1922,
to the now
late John and
Florence Morris,
in Washington
County, Florida.
She died on
Dec.14, 2008 in
Apalachicola,
surrounded by
her family, at the age of 86.
She was a native of
Washington County before
moving to Apalachicola
in 1952. She was a faithful
member of Living Waters
Assembly of God. She was
a very good mother.
She is survived by her
children: Clara Bell Sapp
(Thomas), John Felton
Gay (Betty), Lorine Glass
(Hulon), Vergie Andrews
(Grover), Robert Gay
(Audrey), Donnie Gay
(Sue), Billy Gay (Serita),
and Tommy Gay (Lisa);
sister, Alma Davis;
24 grandchildren,


38 great-
grandchildren,
and two
great-great
grandchildren;
and a host of
nieces, nephews,
and friends. We
love her and will
miss her dearly.
Also, Aunt
Ruby and Uncle
Clifford are very special.
We can't name all of
her friends because the
number is too great. We
would like to also thank,
Jerry, for staying with
mother and taking such
good care of her. We love
you Jerry, and may God
richly bless you.
Funeral services were
held Dec. 17 at Living
Waters Assembly of God
with Sister Lois Long
and Brother Fernandez
officiating. Interment was
in Magnolia Cemetery.
Kelley Fineral Home
handled all arrangements.


operation in Iraq.
Following
redeployment, he was
reassigned to the 2nd
"Indianhead" Infantry
Division in Korea,
where he served as the
Operations Officer for
the Division's Support
Command providing
logistical and supply
support to the Division's
18,000 deployed soldiers.
Subsequently, Weber
was selected to serve as
an advisor to the leaders,
staff officers and soldiers
of the 240 Army Reserve
units stationed in Florida
with duty at Patrick Air
Force Base. For two
years he coached, taught
and mentored the Army
Reserve units of Florida
before electing to retire in
1995.
Weber completed over
18 years of dedicated
service to our nation.
Roger's awards and
decorations include
the Bronze Star Medal,
Meritorious Service
Medal with 4 Oak
Leaf Clusters, Army
Commendation Medal
with Oak Leaf Cluster,
Army Achievement Medal,
Southwest Asia Service
Medal with 2 Bronze
Service Stars, Ranger Tab,
Master Parachutist Badge,
and the Order of Saint
Maurice the Patron Saint
of Infantry.
Weber is survived by
his mother Sarah Weber, of
Tallahassee; son Brandon
Weber, of Colorado
Springs, CO.; daughter
Christy Bilberry, of Turkey,
N.C.; two brothers, Robert
Weber, of Monticello,
and Timothy Weber,
of Tallahassee; sister,
Jonnie Wheeler; long
time companion, Michelle
Franckhauser; and five
grandchildren. In was
preceded in death by his
father, Norbert E Weber.
FRneral services were
Dec. 30 at Christ Episcopal
Church in Monticello,
with interment following
at Roseland Cemetery.
Arrangements by Beggs
FRneral Home Monticello
Chapel.


Joseph Green Sr.


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


WELCOMES YOU

Church

of the

Ascension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


Trinity
EST. 1836
Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM -1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


*I


Special Acknowledgement
My brother, Joseph McIntosh, touched the lives
of so many during the years he was blessed to be
amongst us and in turn, during his final days and those
days that followed, so many of you reached out and
demonstrated your love for him, to me, comforting me
with you many acts of kindness. For all that you did for
me and for my brother during his life and his passing, I
am grateful and I thank you from the bottom of my
heart.
Alice Walker


Nowling Family
The family of Clifford Nowling would like to express
our appreciation and thanks to everyone for their
kindness, gifts, and prayers during his long illness
and his passing. Words are not enough to express our
gratitude and love to each and everyone. We are truly
blessed to live in a community filled with such love and
true friendship.
We would never be able to list each person as the list
is endless, but please know that you are in our hearts
and will never be forgotten.
A special thank you to Merle Odom, Larry Hatfield,
and the Deliverance Tabernacle Church.
Thank you,
Aritha, Terry, Walt and Sharon


McClain Family
The family of Timmy McClain would like to thank
everyone for their donations since Timmy as been
unable to work for some time.
A special thank you to Sister Jean of the St. Patrick's
Church and to the Love Center.
May God Bless you all
Timmy McClain and Family



Janice Hicks
A family member was taken to Weems Memorial
Hospital on Dec. 23 and I would like to thank the
following staff of Weems Hospital.
Dr. Miniat, Nurses Nicole Cook and Gail Haddock,
Admissions Clerk Patrice Williar, and X-ray Technician
Charlotte Williams.
The courteous and professional services provided
to us were excellent. Our small hospital provided all
needed services including intake, lab work, x-rays, etc.
The staff was just wonderful and our experience could
not have been any better than if we had went to one of
the major out-of-town hospitals.
Thanks to all the staff at Weems Hospital for keeping
our little hospital open and for providing the quality of
care that all of us in Franklin County can be proud of.
Sincerely,
Janice M. Hicks


Lonial Sanders


Roger Friedrich Weber


Bessie Allen Sanderson


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave. "C" & 6th St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@gtcom.net

PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
MASS SCHEDULE

SA TU RD AY ................................... . . ...... 5 PM
SUNDAY ......................... ................. 10 AM
SUNDAY SPANISH MASS .......................... ...5 PM
TUESDAY FRIDAY ................................... 8:30 AM
L


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


I The United Methodist Churches

of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5' St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Friday of each month
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672
Pastor: Julie Stephens
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis


Advertise Here







Call 3-8868






B4 I The Times


Local


Sweet Squabaga

Recipe provided courtesy of
Chef Eddie Cass

1 large rutabaga peeled and
boiled till soft
1 large winter squash roasted
and skinned
4 large sweet potatoes roasted
and skinned
Half stick butter
Half cup cream
Salt and pepper to taste

Roughly mash the squash, pota-
toes and rutabaga. Combine with
butter and cream and mash until
smooth. Add salt and pepper to
taste.
Chef Eddie said any kind of win-
ter squash will work in this dish, but
this year he used kabocha squash,
also known as Japanese pumpkin,
that is new to western markets.
"Kabocha is known for its strong,
sweet chestnut flavor; dark orange
meat and fluffy texture," said Cass.
"It wakes up the potatoes and ruta-
baga and the Japanese say it's an
aphrodisiac, which can't be bad."


Chef Eddie serves up Christmas


By Lois Swoboda

In keeping with tradition,
Chef Ed Cass and wife Bettye
provided a Christmas feast for
Franklin County's forgotten
citizens.
Aided by a score of volun-
teers Chef Eddie's Magnolia
Gill served up and delivered
180 meals on Christmas this
year. Many of the recipients
were regular clients of the
Meals on Wheels program but
in celebration of Jesus' birth-
day, Eddie feeds anyone who
is alone at work or at home as
well, regardless of need.
"It's not about need," said
Bettye. "This is our ministry."
In addition to local work-
ers, this year four visitors, two
from Canada, volunteered to
deliver Christmas dinner.
On the menu was turkey
with stuffing, mashed pota-
toes and gravy; green peas,
fresh baked rolls and "Sweet
Squabaga," a combination of
pureed sweet potato, kabocha


TED RUFFNER
Chef Eddie displays the makings of Christmas dinner
2009 in the kitchen of the Magnolia Grill.


winter squash and rutabaga.
Cass sends his thanks to
everyone who helped with the
meal but also reminds visitors
that many more volunteers
work day in and day out to de-
liver food to Franklin County's
shut-ins through the Meals on
Wheels program.


The program serves over
100 clients daily, with funding
for 70. ElderCare Services,
administrator of the program,
seeks both donations and vol-
unteer help in all phases of the
operation. To help call Elder-
Care Services at 697-3756.


Journey Toward Freedom to open at Gadsden Arts


Experience America's Jour-
ney Toward Freedom through
an exhibition of large format
photographs by photographer
Benny F Cochran and A.E. Jen-
kins Studio of Albany, Ga.
The exhibition honors the
contributions and sacrifices that
people young and old, black and
white, made in the struggle for
equality during the civil rights
era.
"It would be difficult to imag-
ine America without this jour-
ney", said late exhibition Curator
James Ray Miller. This exhibit
displays the victory and defeats
and the ultimate triumph of civil
rights in America that have left
an indelible imprint on the na-
tion and entire world.
"Given the rich history of the
state of Florida, and the rich po-
litical and human history of Gads-
den County in particular, this ex-


hibition is a natural", said exhi-
bition organizer Willie Dawkins
Miller. She will give a gallery talk
about the exhibition at the open-
ing reception on Friday, Jan. 16,
at 6:30 p.m. at the Gadsden Arts
Center.
"Journey Toward Freedom
is an important exhibition for
our community, our state, and
our country", said Executive
Director Grace Maloy. "We are
particularly fortunate to have
the exhibition at this time. With
President-Elect Obama's in-
auguration and Martin Luther
King Day in January, and in Feb-
ruary, Black History Month, the
exhibition helps us to honor past
history while celebrating history
as it is being made.
Journey Toward Freedom
will be on exhibition in the Gads-
den Arts Center's Bates Com-
munity Room Gallery from Jan.


16 to March 1, 2009. The opening
reception is Friday, Jan. 16, from
6 to 9 p.m, with the Gallery Talk
at 6:30 p.m.
The Center will also feature
Phil Gleason Sculpture in the
Sara May Love Gallery, works by
22 members of the GAC Artists
Guild in the Zoe Golloway Exhibit
Hall, and works of art by students
from Stewart Street Elementary
and St. John Elementary in the
Bates Children's Gallery.
The Gadsden Arts Center is
at 13 N. Madison St., 20 miles
from downtown Tallahassee,
and 10 miles from the Tallahas-
see city limits. Admission is $1
(members and children admit-
ted free). Hours are Tuesday
through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5
p.m., and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m.
Group tours are available free
of charge; call (850) 875-4866 to
make your reservation.


This 1 8" x 25" black and
white photograph called "If
you desire to be free" is part
of the Journey Toward Free-
dom exhibition.


Thursday, January 1, 2009


NEED SUPPORT?

Thursday, Jan. 1
Apalachicola Narcotics
Anonymous. 6 to 7 p.m. Trin-
ity Episcopal Church. Call
323-0974.
Alcoholics Anonymous.
St. George Island Methodist
Church. 7:30 p.m. Call 653-2000.
Friday, Jan. 2
Alcoholics Anonymous.
Apalachicola. Trinity Episcopal
Church. 5:30 p.m. Call 653-2000.
Carrabelle AA Group Meet-
ing at the Elder Care Services
Building at 7:30 p.m. For infor-
mation call 697 2837.
Saturday, Jan. 3
Alcoholics Anonymous.
Eastpoint Methodist Church.
7:30 p.m. Call 653-2000.
Sunday, Jan. 4
Alcoholics Anonymous.
Eastpoint Methodist Church.
7:30 p.m. Call 653-2000.
Monday, Jan. 5
Alcoholics Anonymous.
Apalachicola. Trinity Episcopal
Church. 7:30 p.m. Call 653-2000.
Al-Anon Apalachicola 5:30
to 6:30 p.m. Trinity Episcopal
Church. Call 653-3153.
Tuesday, Jan. 6
Apalachicola Narcotics
Anonymous at Trinity Episcopal
Church at 7 p.m. Call 323-0974
Alcoholics Anonymous.
Apalachicola. Trinity Episcopal
Church. 5:30 p.m. Call 653-2000.
Carrabelle AA Group Meet-
ing at the Elder Care Servic-
es Building at 7:30 p.m. Call
697-2837
Wednesday, Jan. 7
Alcoholics Anonymous.
Apalachicola's Trinity Episcopal
Church. Women's Group at 6 p.m.
Men's Group at 7:30 p.m. Call
653-2000.

Thursday, Jan. 8
Apalachicola Narcotics
Anonymous. 6 to 7 p.m. Trin-
ity Episcopal Church. Call
323-0974.
Alcoholics Anonymous.
St. George Island Methodist
Church. 7:30 p.m. Call 653-2000.


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Alicia Pouncey and Gail Mathes helped serve up roast beef and butter beans at
the ElderCare Services Christmas luncheon.


ElderCare provides holiday cheer


By Lois Swoboda
On Dec. 22, Franklin County ElderCare
director Bert Ivey hosted a Christmas cel-
ebration for clients, staff and volunteers.
About three dozen people attended a hol-
iday celebration at the offices of ElderCare
in Carrabelle. Award winning musician and
ElderCare employee Aisha Ivey joined old-
time fiddler Jean Etheridge of Port St. Joe
to create lively traditional background mu-
sic for the party.
"Jean has been coming over to play
at the party for at least three years," said
Aisha. "She has that old-timey sound that
they really seem to relate to."
The meal, butter beans, roast beef;
macaroni and cheese and mashed potatoes
with gravy was prepared and served by Ali-
cia Pouncey, Gail Mathes, Frances Brinkley
and Pearlie Mae Clark. Bert Ivey prepared
the banana pudding for dessert.
"Our workers and even our volunteers
work together but because they are in the
field, they never see each other for very
long. It was fun to see them get together. We
are so glad we can do this," said Aisha.
Director Ivey said he greatly appreci-
ates the help ElderCare receives from the
community over the holidays and all year
round. A recent fundraiser concert featur-
ing James McMurtry and his band raised
about $2,000 for Meals on Wheels, he said.
"We are so thankful for all of the help
we receive but we are concerned about
what lays ahead this year. We hope that


Laura O'Sullivan, of Blountstown, at-
tending the ElderCare party with sister
Joyce Dyer, of Carrabelle, sang along
with carols as Ivey and Etheridge
fiddled.

our neighbors will continue to support us
in any way they can. We always need volun-
teers for all sorts of work. We can use help
in the office and with the Meals on Wheels
program.
"Even if you don't have time to volun-
teer for ElderCare, remember to look out
for your own elderly or shut in family and
neighbors," said Ivey. "Over the holidays or
any time, a visit, a phone call or a little care
package means everything to someone who
is housebound."


*I





Thursday, January 1, 2009


Law enforcement


The Times I BS


Florida establishes



animal fighting



tip line


Attorney General Bill Mc-
Collum has announced that
Floridians now can report
animal fighting and be eligible
for a reward of up to $5,000 by
calling The Humane Society
of the United States' animal
fighting tip line at 877-TIP-
HSUS (847-4787).
The toll-free tip line first
was established in Georgia
by The Humane Society and
Atlanta-based corporate se-
curity firm Norred & Associ-
ates Inc. Because of its suc-
cess, the tip line has been
expanded to help combat
dogfighting and cockfighting
in Florida.
"Animal fighting is a cruel
and criminal behavior often
associated with gang activity
and other violence," McCol-
lum said. "Now Floridians will
have an easy, anonymous way
to help make their neighbor-
hoods safer and perhaps re-
ceive a substantial reward for
their efforts."
Florida animal fighting tip
line is managed by investiga-
tors with Norred & Associates
and The Humane Society.
Once tips are authenticated,
investigators work with law
enforcement agencies to in-
spect, arrest and prosecute
animal fighters. Callers' iden-
tities are protected, and if a
caller's tip leads to the arrest
and prosecution of an animal
fighter, the caller becomes
eligible for a reward of up to
$5,000 from The Humane So-
ciety.
"Animal fighting is a hor-
ribly cruel activity, and I am
proud to help bring the crimi-
nals who engage in these
blood sports to justice," said
Greg D. Norred, founder and


CEO of Norred & Associates.
"The animal fighting tip line
has been immensely suc-
cessful in Georgia, and we're
hopeful that we will have simi-
lar results in Florida."
The tip line first was es-
tablished in the wake of the
Michael Vick case so Georgia
residents could easily report
illegal animal fighting to au-
thorities. Since its inception in
January 2008, the Georgia tip
line has received more than
1,000 calls, leading to seven
raids and 11 arrests.
"The mix of a dedicated
tip line for animal fighting
investigations and a reward
program is a winning combi-
nation," said Laura Bevan, di-
rector of The Humane Society
of the United States' South-
east regional office.
The Humane Society es-
timates that Florida is one of
the top three states in which
major dogfighting operations
exist.
The expansion of the ani-
mal fighting tip line has been
made possible thanks to a
grant from the Companions'
FRind of The DuPage Commu-
nity Foundation. The animal
fighting reward program was
established through a grant
from the Holland M. Ware
Foundation.
The Humane Society of the
United States is the nation's
largest animal protection
organization, backed by 10.5
million Americans, or one
of every 30. For more than a
half-century, it has been fight-
ing for the protection of all
animals through advocacy,
education and hands-on pro-
grams. Find out more at www.
humanesociety.org.


Shiver to take oath of office Tuesday
*. County Judge Van Russell will swear in
Sheriff-elect Skip Shiver as the sheriff of
Franklin County at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 6,
A at the conclusion of the county commissioners'
Meeting.
Ls m The public is invited. Refreshments will be
served immediately following the ceremony.
SHIVER


'Keystone


species'


professor


to speak


From 7-9 p.m. Jan. 9, the
Florida State University Coastal
and Marine Laboratory invites
the public to the next lecture in
its Conservation Lecture Series.
Robert Paine, professor
emeritus of biology at the
University of Washington,
will give the upcoming talk,
titled "Food Webs: from bay-
mouth bar to keystone species,
interaction strengths and
beyond."
Paine, who earned a
doctorate from the University
of Michigan in 1961, is credited
with introducing the keystone
species concept, a mainstay of
the ecological and conservation
biology literature, in 1969.
His seminal work, which
extended the conclusions of
a field experiment published
three years earlier, established
that if a single predator is
removed, dramatic changes
result in the varieties and
population densities of all the
other species in the community.
Keystone species usually
are noticed when they are
removed or they disappear
from an ecosystem, resulting
in dramatic changes to the rest
of the community. Put another
way, a keystone species is one


Robert Paine, professor emeritus of biology at the University
of Washington, is credited with introducing the concept of a
keystone species, a mainstay of the ecological and conservation
biology literature, in 1969.


whose effects on its community
or ecosystem are large and
greater than would be expected
from its relative abundance or
total biomass.
Paine's work has been cited
by hundreds of researchers
over the years and has been
proposed as a foundation for
management efforts to protect
the biological diversity of
the world's ecosystems. The
concept has provided a powerful
model for understanding the
forces that organize ecological
communities, and it has
influenced the thinking of
managers and policy makers
as they set priorities in their
efforts to conserve species and
habitats.
Paine's research focuses
on experimental ecology of
organisms on rocky shores,
interrelationships between


species in an ecosystem and
the organization and structure
of marine communities. He has
examined the roles of predation
and disturbance in promoting
coexistence and biodiversity.
He is a member of the
National Academy of Sciences
and was a member of the Ocean
Studies Board. He has served
on numerous National Research
Council committees, including
the Committee on Ecosystem
Effects of Fishing.
The Jan. 9 talk will be
held at the FSU Coastal and
Marine Laboratory, located in
St. Teresa, at the intersection
of US. 98 and 319 in Franklin
County, halfway between
Carrabelle and Panacea.
For more information, visit
www.marinelab.fsu.edu or
contact Sharon Thoman at 697-
4120 or sthoman@fsu.edu.


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Carrabelle 697-3333 Anywhere


irsiiF*







6B The Times Thursday, January 1, 2009


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


0.


lFLORIDA

S 1100 CAPITAL CITY BANK,
9421 T Plaintiff,
In The Circuit Court Of The
Second Judicial Circuit In vs.
And For Franklin County,
Florida RONALD W. MILLER,
BRENDA G. MILLER and
Superior Bank, a Federal UNKNOWN TENANT(S),
savings bank, Defendants,
Plaintiff
CASE NO. 08-000282-CA

vs, NOTICE OF SALE PUR-

MARY SMITH (Deceased), SUANT TO CHAPTER 45
ANNIE BROWN, BRENDA
CUMMINGS, BRENDA NOTICE is given pursuant
BENJAMIN, JAMES to a Final Judgment of
DONNELL AUSTIN, Foreclosure dated Novem-
DARRON SMITH, WILLIE ber 24,2008, and an Order
SMITH and unknown par- Rescheduling Foreclosure
ties of the above named Sale entered in Case No.
Defendants, including any 08-000282-CA, of the Cir-
unknown heirs, devisees, cult Court of the Second
grantees, assignees, Judicial Circuit, in and for
lienors, creditors, trustees, Franklin County, Florida, in
and all other parties claim- which CAPITAL CITY
ing by, through, under or BANK is the Plaintiff and
against that defendant, RONALD W. MILLER,
and TENANT #1 and TEN- BRENDA G. MILLER and
ANT #2 representing any UNKNOWN TENANT(S)
unknown tenants who may are the Defendants, I will
be in possession sell to the highest and best
Defendants. bidder for cash at the
Front door of the Franklin
CASE NO.: 08-000020CC County Courthouse in Ap-
alachicola, Franklin
NOTICE OF ACTION County, Florida at 11:00
a.m. on January 15, 2009,
TO: the property set forth in the
MARY SMITH (Deceased), Final Judgment of Foreclo-
ANNIE BROWN, BRENDA sure and more particularly
CUMMINGS, BRENDA described as follows:
BENJAMIN, JAMES
DONNELL AUSTIN, LOT 43, LAKES ON THE
DARRON SMITH, WILLIE BLUFF, ACCORDING TO
SMITH and unknown par- THE PLAT THEREOF RE-
ties of the above named CORDED IN THE PUBLIC
Defendants, including any RECORDS OF FRANKLIN
unknown heirs, devisees, COUNTY FLORIDA, IN
grantees, assignees, PLAT BOOK8, PAGES 33,
grantees, assignees, & 35 .
lienors, creditors, trustees 34, & 35.
and all other parties claim-
ing by, through, under or Any person claiming an in-
against that defendant, terest in the surplus from
and TENANT #1 and TEN- the sale, if any, other than
ANT #2 representing any the property owner as of
unknown tenants who may the date of the is pend-
be in possession, and To ens, must file a claim
All Others Whom It May within sixty (60) days after
Concern: the sale.

You are hereby notified DATED: December 11,
that an action to foreclose 2008.
a mortgage on the follow-
ing parcel of real property MARCIA JOHNSON
located in Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court
Florida, described as fol- By: Michele Maxwell
lows: Deputy Clerk

THE NORTHEAST HALF Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
(1/2) OF LOT NUMBER Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
TEN (10), BLOCK NUM- Wadsworth & Bowden PA.
BER ONE HUNDRED 1300 Thomaswood Drive
SIXTY-FIVE (165), OF THE Tallahassee, Florida 32308
CITY OF APPALACHI- December 25, 2008
COLA, FRANKLIN January 1, 2009
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AC- 9427T
CORDING TO THE PLAT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF SAID CITY IN COM- OF THE SECOND JUDI-
MON USE, THE SAID CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
PARCEL FRONTING FIFTY FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
(50) FEET ALONG AVE- FLORIDA
NUE "L' BY SIXTY (60)
FEET ALONG THE ALLEY CAPITAL CITY BANK,
IS SAID BLOCK. Plaintiff,

has been filed against you VS.
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ- ANNE ANDERSON, REX
ten defenses, if any, to it ANDERSON and UN-
on Steven L. Applebaum, KNOWN TENANT(S)
attorney for Plaintiff, whose Defendants.
address is Post Office Box
9454, Panama City Beach, CASE NO.: 08-000152-CA
Florida 32417, on or be-
fore 30 days from the first NOTICE OF SALE PUR-
date of publication, and file SUANT TO CHAPTER 45
the original with the Clerk
of this Court before service NOTICE is given pursuant
on Plaintiff or immediately to a Final Judgment of
thereafter. If you fail to do Foreclosure dated Novem-
so, a default will be en- ber 24,2008, and an Order
tered against you for the Rescheduling Foreclosure
relief demanded in the Sale entered in Case No.
Complaint. 08-000152-CA, of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Second


S 1100
Judicial Circuit, in and for
Franklin County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff and
ANNE ANDERSON, REX
ANDERSON and UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) are
the Defendants, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the
Front door of the Franklin
County courthouse in Apa-
lachicola, Franklin County,
Florida at 11:00 a.m. on
January 15, 2009, the
property set forth in the Fi-
nal Judgment of Foreclo-
sure and more particularly
described as follows:

LOT 3, LAKES ON THE
BLUFF, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA IN
PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 33,
34 & 35.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.

DATED December 11,
2008

MARCIA JOHNSON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
Wadsworth & Bowden PA.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
December 25, 2008
January 1, 2009
9556T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

HSBC BANK USA, N.A.,
AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE
FOR THE REGISTERED
NOTEHOLDERS OF REN-
AISSANCE HOME EQUITY
LOAN TRUST 2006-2,
Plaintiff,

vs.

THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, CRED-
ITORS AND ALL OTHER
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST CLYDIE MAE
RUSS A/K/A CLYDIA MAE
RUSS DECEASED; ALVIN
K. BAKER:. UNKNOWN
TENANT 41; UNKNOWN
TENANT #.; ALL OTHER
UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTERESTS
BY THROUGH, UNDER.,
AND AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAME UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 08-000459-CA
DIVISION:

NOTICE OF ACTION

THE (UNKNOWN
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, CRED-
ITORS AND ALL OTHER
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST CLYDIE MAE
RUSS A/K/A CLYDIA MAE
RUSS DECEASED

Last Known Address:
Unknown

Current Address:
Unknown

ALL OTHER UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING IN-
TERESTS BY THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST A


Current Address:
Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
property in Franklin
County, Florida:

All of Lot Number Five (5)
of Block Number One
Hundred Fifty-Four (154)
of the City of Apalachicola,
according to the map or
plat thereof in general use.

Being the same property
conveyed to Clydie Mae
Russ from Hilda F Marlar,
widow, by Warranty Deed
dated September 16, 2003
and recorded on Septem-
ber 17, 2003, in O.R. Book
756, page 143 and re-
corded among the Land
records of Franklin
County, Florida.

This property is located at
the Street address of. 250
10th Street, Apalachicola,
Florida 32320

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses 30 days after
the first publication, if any,
on Elizabeth R. Wellborn,
PA., Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is 1701
West Hillsboro Blvd., Suite
307, Deerfield Beach, Flor-
ida 33442, and file the
original with this Court ei-
ther before service on
Plaintiff's attorney, or im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint or petition.

This Notice shall be pub-
lished once a week for two
consecutive weeks in the
Apalachicola Times.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of the court on De-
cember 12, 2008.

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
CLERK OF THE COURT
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Attorney for Plaintiff:
Elizabeth R. Wellborn, PA.
1701 West Hillsboro Blvd,
Suite 307
Deerfield Beach, FL.
33442
Telephone: (954) 354-3544
Facsimile: (954) 354-3545

**IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, If you
are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accom-
modation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding.
you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administra-
tion at 425 N. Orange Ave-
nue, Orlando. Florida
32801, Telephone (407)
836-2303 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing
or voice impaired. call
1-800-955-8771.
December 25, 2008
January 1,2009
9558T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR FRANKLIN
COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE
COMPANY
Plaintiff,


1100
KNOWN SPOUSE OF NI-
COLE PARKER; IF LIVING,
INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPEC-
TIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUS-
TEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; COX
COASTAL DEVELOP-
MENT, LLC; WHETHER
DISSOLVED OR PRES-
ENTLY EXISTING, TO-
GETHER WITH ANY
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS,
OR TRUSTEES OF SAID
DEFENDANTS) AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIM-
ING BY THROUGH, UN-
DER, OR AGAINST
DEFENDANTSS;
Defendants)

CASE NO. 08 406 CA

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given
that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Franklin
County, I will sell the
property situate in Franklin
County, Florida, described
as:

LOT 11, BLOCK 93/274,
KEOUGHS SECOND AD-
DITION, TO THE CITY OF
CARRABELLE, OF THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA.

A/K/A
Third Street West
Carrabelle, FI 32322

at public sale, to the high-
est and best bidder, for
cash, Front steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, 33 Market Street,
Apalachicola, FL 32320 at
11:00 AM, on January 15,
2009.

DATED THIS 12th day of
December, 2008.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Witness, my hand and seal
of this court on the 12th
day of December, 2008.

Law Offices of Daniel C.
Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the
American with Disabilities
Act of 1990, persons need-
ing a special accommoda-
tion to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ASA Coordinator no
later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceedings. If
hearing impaired, please
call (800) 955-9771 (TDD)
or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.
December 25, 2008
January 1, 2009
9559T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF
PATRICK W. O'NEILL
Deceased.

File No. 08-000062PR
Division PROBATE

NOTICE TO CREDITORS


NICOLE PARKER; UN- I The administration of the


All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's
estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publica-
tion of this notice is De-
cember 25, 2008.

Personal Representative:
Mary O'Neill
N11262 Clear Lake Road
Tomahawk, WI 54487
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Kristy Branch Banks
Attorney for Mary O'Neill
Florida Bar No. 517143
PO Box 176
Apalachicola, Florida
32329
Telephone: (850) 653-1255
Fax: (850) 653-1256
December 25, 2008
January 1, 2009
9567T
IN THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

COASTAL COMMUNITY
BANK, d/b/a APALACHI-
COLA STATE BANK, a Di-
vision of Coastal Commu-
nity Bank,
Plaintiff,

vs.

LEWIS S. JAMES, III, and
GAIL B. JAMES,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 08-00063-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a De-
fault Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated De-
cember 11, 2008, and en-
tered in Civil Action No.
08-00063-CA of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judi-
cial Circuit in and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein the parties were
the Plaintiff, COASTAL
COMMUNITY BANK, and
the Defendants, LEWIS S.
JAMES, III, and GAIL B.
JAMES, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder,
for cash, at 11:00 a.m.
(Eastern Time) on the
22nd day of January,


Commence at the most
Easterly corner of St.
George Island Gulf
Beaches, Unit No. 2, a
subdivision as per map or
plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 2, at Page 15, of
the Public Records of
Franklin County, Florida,
and thence run North 18
degrees 37 minutes 19
seconds West 150.00 feet,
thence run South 71 de-
grees 22 minutes 41 sec-
onds West 20.00 feet,
thence run North 18 de-
grees 37 minutes 19 sec-
onds West 410.00 feet to
the centerline of State
Road No. 300, thence run
along said centerline as
follows: North 71 degrees
22 minutes 41 seconds
East 416.89 feet to a point
of curve to the right,
thence Northeasterly along
said curve with a radius of
5729.58 feet, thru a central
angle of 05 degrees 59
minutes 35 seconds for an
arc distance of 599.31 feet,
the chord of said arc being
North 74 degrees 22
minutes 28 seconds East
599.03 feet, thence North
77 degrees 22 minutes 16
seconds East 1848.92 feet,
thence leaving said center-
line run North 12 degrees
37 minutes 44 seconds
West 732.18 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING;
from said POINT OF BE-
GINNING continue North
12 degrees 37 minutes 44
seconds West 421.86 feet
more or less to the approx-
imate mean high water line
of Apalachicola Bay,
thence run along said ap-
proximate mean high
water line as follows: North
73 degrees 51 minutes 44
seconds East 19.64 feet,
thence North 85 degrees
39 minutes 30 seconds
East 85.83 feet, thence
leaving said approximate
mean high water line run
South 12 degrees 37 min-
utes 44 seconds East
410.69 feet more or less,
thence run South 77 de-
grees 22 minutes 16 sec-
onds West 104.56 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINNING

The successful bidder at
the sale will be required to
place the requisite state
documentary stamps on
the Certificate of Title.

DATED this 11th day of
December, 2008.

Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON
Clerk of the Court
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michelle Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
December 25, 2008, Janu-
ary 1, 2009
9589T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

CITIMORTGAGE, INC.
PLAINTIFF

VS.

KAREN BETH MIL-
LENDER; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF KAREN BETH
MILLENDER, IF ANY; ANY
AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN


NAMED INDIVIDUAL CHEST
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOWN TO BE whose
DEAD OR ALIVE, known
WHETHER SAID UN- living;
KNOWN PARTIES MAY be dead
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS fendani
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI- spouse
SEES, GRANTEES OR grantee
OTHER CLAIMANTS; lienors,
JOHN DOE AND JANE and all
DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN- interest
ANTS IN POSSESSION or agaii
DEFENDANTS) who are
dead o
CASE NO: 07-000468-CA ties hav
have ai
NOTICE OF terest i
FORECLOSURE SALE scribed
being f(
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum- YOU AI
mary Final Judgment of FIED th
Foreclosure dated Decem- close a
ber 12, 2008 entered in following
Civil Case No.
07-000468-CA of the Cir- LOT 5,
cult Court of the 2ND Judi- 4, PIC
cial Circuit in and for TO
FRANKLIN County, Apa- CARRA
lachicola, Florida, I will sell MAP O
to the highest and best AS RE
bidder for cash at ON THE BOOK
FRONT STEPS at the THE P
FRANKLIN County Court- OF FR
house located at 33 MAR- FLORID
KET STREET in Apalachi- 6, BLO(
cola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. ETTS /
on the 22nd day of Janu- CITY (
ary 2009 the following de- AS PE
scribed property as set THERE
forth in said Summary Fi- IN PLA
nal Judgment, to-wit: 20 OF
ORDS
LOT 3 BLOCK 4, LANARK COUNT
VILLAGE SUBDIVISION
PER PLAT RECORDED IN has bee
PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES and yc
14-14A OF THE PUBLIC serve a
RECORDS OF FRANKLIN ten def
COUNTY FLORIDA. on DAV
Plaintiff
Any person claiming an in- address
terest in the surplus from Island F
the sale, if any, other than tion, F
the property owner as of later th
the date of the lis pend- date of
ens, must file a claim of this
within 60 days after the file the
sale. clerk o
before
Dated this 17th day of De- attorney
cember, 2008. thereaft
fault
MARCIA JOHNSON against
Clerk of the Circuit Court demand
By: Michele Maxwell plaint
Deputy Clerk herein.

IN ACCORDANCE WITH WITNE&
THE AMERICANS WITH the sea
DISABILITIES ACT, per- FRANK
sons with disabilities need- ida, this
ing a special accommoda- cember
tion should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA- CLERK
TION, at the FRANKLIN COURT
County Courthouse at BY. Mic
9 0 4- 6 53 88 6 1 Deputy
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida IN AC(
Relay Service. THE A
DISABI
THE LAW OFFICES OF sonswi
DAVID J. STERN, P A, ing a s[
ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN- tion
TIFF COURT
400 South Pine Island TION,
Road, Suite 400 County
Plantation, FL 33324-3920 (850)
(954)233-8000 1-800-9
December 25, 2008 1-800-9
January 1, 2008 Relay S
9603T LAW 0
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT J. STE
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL ATTOR
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR TIFF
FRANKLIN COUNTY 900 SC
FLORIDA9O
GENERAL JURISDICTION ROADN
DIVISION PLANT333
33324-3"
DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST 08-797e
COMPANY AMERICAS AS Decem
TRUSTEE, January
PLAINTIFF, 9636T
IN THE
VS. OF TH
CIAL (
CHESTER N. KRAWCZUK, FOR FF
ET AL., FLORID
DEFENDANTSS.
GULF
CASE NO: NITY BI
19-2008-CA-000372 Plaintiff,

NOTICE OF ACTION vs.
CONSTRUCTIVE SER-
VICE UNKNO
SEES,
TO: CHESTER N. SIGNED
KRAWCZUK AND UN- LIENOF


ER N. KRAWCZUK

residence is un-
if he/she/they be
and if he/she/they
d, the unknown de-
ts who may be
s, heirs. devisees,
es, assignees,
creditors, trustees,
parties claiming an
by, through, under
nst the Defendants,
e not known to be
r alive, and all par-
ving or claiming to
ny right, title or in-
n the property de-
in the mortgage
foreclosed herein.

RE HEREBY NOTI-
at an action to fore-
a mortgage on the
g property:

BLOCK "B", RANGE
KETTS ADDITION
THE CITY OF
,BELLE, AS PER
OR PLAT THEREOF
CORDED IN PLAT
2, PAGE 20, OF
PUBLIC RECORDS
ANKLIN COUNTY,
DA. AND ALSO LOT
CK "74", (B4), PICK-
ADDITION TO THE
OF CARRABELLE,
R MAP OR PLAT
OF AS RECORDED
T BOOK Z, PAGE
THE PUBLIC REC-
OF FRANKLIN
TY FLORIDA

en filed against you
*u are required to
copy of your writ-
enses, if any, to it
'ID J. STERN, ESQ.
s attorney, whose
s is 900 South Pine
Road 11400, Planta-
L 33324-3920 no
an 30 days from the
the first publication
notice of action and
original with the
of this court either
service on Plaintiffs
y or immediately
er; otherwise a de-
will be entered
you for the relief
ded in the com-
or petition filed


SS my hand and
al of this Court at
(LIN County, Flor-
s 11th day of De-
r, 2008.

OF THE CIRCUIT
IT
hele Maxwell
Clerk

CORDANCE WITH
AMERICANS WITH
LITIES ACT, per-
ith disabilities need-
)ecial accommoda-
should contact
- ADMINISTRA-
at the FRANKLIN
Courthouse at
653-8861,
955-8771 (TDD) or
55-8770, via Florida
Service.

OFFICES OF DAVID
IN
NEY FOR PLAIN-

'UTH PINE ISLAND
SUITE 400
NATION, FL
3920
67 HCNW
ber 25, 2008
y 1, 2009

- CIRCUIT COURT
E SECOND JUDI-
CIRCUIT, IN AND
FRANKLIN COUNTY
DA

STATE COMMU-
ANK,




)WN HEIRS, DEVI-
GRANTEES, AS-
ES CREDITORS,
RS, TRUSTEES OF


KNOWN SPOUSE OF DIANE L. FISCHER, DE-


+1+ +1+ +






Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


The Times Thursday, January 1, 2009 7B


1 1100 1100 1100 1100 10100 1 1100 1 | 6140
CEASED; MICHAEL FREE- 279) Ida offer for sale, and sell MOORE; ANY AND ALL 19-2008-CA-000305 SPOUSE OF FRANCES C. 1, & 2, br
MAN a/k/a MICHAEL LEE at public outcry to the UNKNOWN PARTIES DIVISION CANNON; UNKNOWN Apalachicola, FL.
FREEMAN, INDIVIDUALLY Tract 4, Jeppson Estates, highest and best bidder, CLAIMING BY THROUGH, SPOUSE OF KAY W. Call 850-643-7740.
AND AS HEIR; THE UN- more particularly de- the following described UNDER, AND AGAINST NOTICE OF EUBANKS; JOHN DOE; _ _ _WffSS W
KNOWN SPOUSE OF MI- scribed as follows: real property situated in THE HEREIN NAMED IN- FORECLOSURE SALE JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN 3 br, 2 ba, house on River
CHAEL FREEMAN, HEIR; Franklin County, Florida: DIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) TENANT (S) IN POSSES- EMPLOYMENT REALESTATEFE Rd, FP fncd in backyard.
BOBBY CARTER, HEIR; Commence at the North- WHO ARE NOT KNOWN NOTICE IS HEREBY SION OF THE SUBJECT 4100- Help Wanted 6100- Business/ REDUCED! $800 mo. Call
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE east corner of the South- Lot 15, Sunset Isle &Yacht TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, GIVEN pursuant to a Final PROPERTY are defend- 4130 Employment Commercial Maria 850-766-0357.
OF BOBBY CARTER; IF west Quarter of the South- Club, according to that WHETHER SAID UN- Judgment of Mortgage ants. I will sell to the high- Information 6110- Apartments
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY east Quarter of Section 4, certain plat recorded in KNOWN PARTIES MAY Foreclosure dated De- est and best bidder for 6120- Beach Rentals 3 br, 2 ba, On The
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF Township 8 South, Range Plat Book 9, page 14, offi- CLAIM AN INTEREST AS cember 12, 2008 and en- cash at the ON FRONT 6130- Condo/fownhouse Carrabelle River. Garage,
SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF 5 West, Franklin County, cial records, Franklin SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVI- tered in Case No. STEPS OF COURTHOUSE 6150- Roommatuse ReWant ed als $1,000 month $500 de45-8813
REMARRIED, AND IF DE- Florida, and thence run N County, Florida, being a SEES, GRANTEES, OR 19-2008-CA-000305 of the at the Franklin County | 4100 6160- Rooms for Rent
CEASED, THE RESPEC- 00 degrees 33 minutes 40 subdivision, lying in Sec- OTHER CLAIMANTS; Circuit Court of the SEC- Courthouse, in Apalachi- 6170- Mobile Home/Lot Apalach Newer, 2 br, 2
TIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, seconds East 651.26 feet; tion 20, Township 7 South, INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A OND Judicial Circuit in and cola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. Other 6180- Out-of-Town Rentals ba, ch/a, dw, w/d, hkup,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, thence run South 89 de- Range 4 West, city of FEDERALLY CHARTERED for FRANKLIN County, on the 22nd day of Janu- 6190 Timeshare Rentals sm. pet ok w/dep $725 mo
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, grees 23 minutes 20 sec- Carabelle, Franklin SAVINGS BANK; are the Florida wherein BANK OF ary, 2009, the following de- Attention!!! 6200- Vacation Rentals + dep. Call 850-670-8266
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEE, onds East 1176.076 feet to County, Florida. Defendants, I will sell to AMERICA NA is the Plain- scribed property as set At ten n -_
AND ALL OTHER PER- the Point of Beginning. the highest and best bid- tiff and RYAN MCDOWELL forth in said Final Judg- Home Computer work!l, -
SONS CLAIMING BY From said Point of Beginn- pursuant to the Final Judg- der for cash at FRONT A/K/A RYAN C. ment, to-wit: Flexible hours, great pay | 6100
THROUGH, UNDER OR ing continue South 89 de- ment of Foreclosure en- DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN MCDOWELL; THE UN will train, Callr h
AGAINST THE NAMED grees 23 minutes 20 sec- tered in a case pending in COUNTY COURTHOUSE, KNOWN SPOUSE OF LOT 12, BLOCK C, THREE 727-865-6795 1 br house Carrabelle
DEFENDANT(S), onds East 112.80 feet; said Court, the style of, 33 MARKET STREET, AP- RYAN MCDOWELL A/K/A RIVERS SUBDIVISION, A c/h/a, w/d incl. Beach
Defendantss. thence run South 01 de- which is ALACHICOLA, FLORIDA RYAN C. MCDOWELL SUBDIVISION AS PER No pets. 850-653-9788 Beach
grees 35 minutes West at 11:00AM, on the 22nd N/K/A JANE DOE; are the MAP OR PLAT THEREOF 850-370-5113 3 br, 2 ba, large lot, w/d,
CASE NO.: 08-000039-CA 386.16 feet; thence run REGIONS BANK, day of January 2009, the Defendants, I will sell to RECORDED IN PLAT deck, appliances, ref.
North 89 degrees 23 mmn- Plaintiff following described prop- the highest and best bid- BOOK 3, AT PAGE 1, OF Commercial $750/mo. 860-233-0676
NOTICE OF SALE utes 20 seconds West erty as set forth in said Fl- der for cash at FRONT THE PUBLIC RECORDS Other Building or email
112.80 feet; thence run vs. nal Judgment: DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, 190 12th Street clapparten(acsbcolob-
NOTICE Is hereby given North 01 degrees 35 mmn- COUNTY COURTHOUSE, FLORIDA. Several 85065397th Street ant
that, pursuant to the Order utes East 386.16 feet to STUART WHITE, JR. a/k/a LOTS SIX, SEVEN, AND 33 MARKET STREET AP85037
of Amended Final Sum- the Point of Beginning. FREDERICK S. WHITE, EIGHT IN BLOCK ONE ALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at ANY PERSON CLAIMING POsitions 850-370-5113 For rent
mary Judgment of Fore- (Mortgage ORB 909, Page JR. and KRISTIE R. HUNDRED TWELVE OF 11:00AM, onthe 22nd day AN INTEREST IN THE Resort Vacation Downtown
closure in this cause, In 511) WHITE. husband and wife: THE CITY OF APALACHI- of January, 2009, the fol SURPLUS FROM THE Propertis of SGI,
the Circuit Court of Frank- UNITED STATES OF COLA, FLORIDA. TO- wi January, 2009, the ol- SALE, IF ANY OTHERes o Apalach
lin County, Florida, I will Lot 44, Block 4, Lanark Vil- AMERICA, DEPARTMENT GETHERWITHA10FOOT as set forth in said FinalO THAN THE PROPERTY Inc For Rent Sace available
sell the property situated in large, Unit No. 1, as per OF TREASURY INTERNAL FENCE EASEMENT OVER Judgmas set forth in said Final OWNER AS OF THE DATE Agreat opportunity For Rent Space avalale Large historical home,
Franklin County, Florida map or plat thereof re- REVENUE SERVICE; and AND ACROSS THE Judgment OF THE LIS PENDENS awatsyouatthelargest for sma usinesncld great location. 4 bed, 2
described as: corded in Plat Book 2, SUNSET ISLE OWNERS NORTHWESTERLY 10 LOT BLOCK ONE HUN MUST FILE A CLAIM vacation rental wntown Histor Aa bath with fireplace. 112 4th
Page 14-14A of the Public ASSOCIATION, INC., FEET THEREOF, MORE LOT 3 BLOCK ONE HUN- WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER company Downtown Histo Ap St. $850/mo 850-323-0259
Lot 28, Block "B", St. Records of Franklin Defendants. PARTICULARLY DE- DRED SIXTY-TWO (162) IN THE SALE. on St George Island. lachicola. 29 Ave. E.
James Island Park, Unit County, Florida. (Mortgage SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: THE CITY OF APALACHI- We are now accepting (upstairs) For info call
No. 3, a subdivision as per ORB 909, Page 516) and the docket number of BEGIN AT THE NORTH- COLA, FRANKLIN In accordance with the applications for the Carol 850-653-3871 St. George Island Home
map or plat thereof, re- which is 2007 CA 000483. EASTERLY CORNER COUNTY, FLORIDA, AC- Americans with Disabilities following positions
corded in Plat Book 2, Lot 8, Block N, Lanark (ALSO THE MOST CORDING TO THE MAP Act (ADA), disabled per- *Maintenance Furnished 2 br, 1.5 ba
Page 6, of the Public Rec- Beach No. 1 according to Any person claiming an in- NORTHERLY CORNER) OR PLATOFSAID CITYIN sonswho, because of their Technician ground level 3rd from
Oisonslitwhonbeausefeira Tebeach o/s shower
ords of Franklin County, the plat thereof recorded in terest in the surplus from OF LOT 9, BLOCK 112, COMMON USE disabilities, need special *Independent Retail/Office space for seacn o/s shower
Florida. Plat Book 2, Page 13 of the sale. if any, other than CITY OF APALACHICOLA, accommodation to partici- contractors: rent3 units 600 sf each screened porc roo deck
the Public Records of the property owner as of AS PER MAP OR PLAT A/K/A 226 9TH STREET pate in this proceeding *Housekeeping allcan be connected to large living, and dinning
APLAYroom, laundry $800 month
at Public Sale, to the high- Franklin County, Florida. the date of the lis pendens THEREOF RECORDED IN APALACHICOLA, FL should contact the ADA *Front Desk Clerk make 1 unit. Located on rooms utilities Please Call
est and best bidder, for (Mortgage ORB 913, Page must file a claim with the THE PUBLIC RECORDS 32320 Coordinator at 33 Market *QualityAssurance Island Dr. Main road to e at 2155709977 avail.
cash, at the steps of the 63) clerk of the court within 60 OF FRANKLIN COUNTY Street, Suite 203, Apalachi- Coordinators St.George Island. Call J0- ava
Franklin County Court- days after the sale. FLORIDA, AND THENCE Any person claiming an in- cola, FL 32320 or Tele- We offer a great benefits 653-5950an4
house, Apalachicola, Flor- at Public Sale, to the high- RUN SOUTH 48 DE- terest in the surplus from phone Voice/TDD (904) package to full time em- Townhomes for rent,
ida, at 11:00 a.m. on Janu- est bidder, for cash, at the In accordance with the GREES 47 MINUTES 11 the sale, if any, other than 653-8861 prior to such ployess or you may join Jones Homestead-
ary 22, 2009. front steps of the Franklin AMERICANS WITH DISA- SECONDS EAST ALONG the property owner as of proceeding. us on a part time basis
County Courthouse, Apa- BILITIES ACT, persons THE NORTHEASTERLY the date of the Lis Pend- to supplement your cur- 6110 Ponderosa pines. End
Any person claiming an in- lachicola, Florida, at 11:00 needing a special accom- BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT ens must file a claim within Dated this 17th day of De- rent income. of year special. First
terest in the surplus from a.m. on January 22, 2009. modation to participate in 9, A DISTANCE OF 10.00 sixty (60) days after the cember, 2008. Apply in person today a month rent free with
the sale, if any, other than this proceeding should FEET THENCE RUN sale. at deposit and 12 month
the property owner as of Any person claiming an in- contact the undersigned SOUTH 41 DEGREES 05 Marcia M. Johnson 125 Gulf Beach Drive lease 2 br and 3br
the date of the lis pend- terest in the surplus from not later than seven days MINUTES 20 SECONDS WITNESS MY HAND and Clerk of the Circuit Court West St George Island 3 br, 1 ba Lanark Village lease. 2 br and br
ens, must file a claim the sale, if any, other than prior to the proceeding to WEST 99.69 FEET, the seal of this Court on By: Michele Maxwell FL 32328 $700 mo +deposit. no units available. Call
within 60 days after the the property owners as of ensure that reasonable ac- THENCE RUN NORTH 48 December 17, 2008. Deputy Clerk smoking no pets Susan 850-227-8404 or 850
sale. the date of the lis pend- commodations are availa- DEGREES 42 MINUTES 35 Jones Bluewater Realty 227 9732 for more in-
ens, must file a claim ble. SECONDS WEST ALONG Florida Default Law Group, Law Office of Marshall C. ,. Group (850) 566-7584 formation.
WITNESS my hand and within 60 days after the THE SOUTHWESTERLY PL. Watson Year round rental on canal
the seal of this Court this sale. WITNESS my hand and BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT PO. Box 25018 1800 NW 49th Street, 4130 in SGI, 2 br, 2 ba, nice
22nd day of December, the official seal of this Hon- 9, A DISTANCE OF 10.00 Tampa, Florida Suite 120 yard. Boats welcomell No
2008. WITNESS my hand and orable Court this 17th day FEET, THENCE RUN 33622-5018 Fort Lauderdale, Florida
the seal of this Court this of December, 2008. NORTH 41 DEGREES 05 F08044622 33309 POSTAL & GOVT JOB 1/2 Off First Month pets. $795 mo. Call
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT 22nd day of December, MINUTES 20 SECONDS January 1, 8, 2009 Telephone: (954) 453-0365 INFO FOR SALE? Rent!!! 413-454-4253
COURT 2008. MARCIA M. JOHNSON EAST ALONG THE 9669T Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 2 br, 2 ba, Modern Apt
BY: TERRY E. CREAMER Clerk of the Circuit Court NORTHWESTERLY IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 with washer and dryer, as -1
Deputy Clerk CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT By: Michele Maxwell BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL 08-03442 caution central AC, Ave E, Apa- 6| 170
COURT Deputy Clerk 9, A DISTANCE OF 99.69 CIRCUIT IN AND FOR January 1, 8, 2009 lachicola $700 mo.,+ dep.
Steve M. Watkins, III By: Michele Maxwell FEET TO THE POINT OF FRANKIN COUNTY Call 653-1240 or 670-1211. 2 br, 1 ba
FBN: 0794996 DEPUTY CLERK MELISSA HOLLEY BEGINNING. FLORIDA You NEVER have to pay huge lot, 3 Rivers Area
41 Commerce Street PAINTER FLORIDA for information about Carrabelle, $495 mo+ utili-
Apalachicola, FL 32320 Steve M. Watkins, III Florida Bar No. 0144177 A/K/A 212 AVENUE C, AP- CIVIL DIVISION federal or postal jobs. If ties &dep. 850-653-3270
(850)653-1949 41 Commerce St. Clark, Partington, Hart, ALACHICOLA, FL 32320 HSBC BANK USA N.A you see a ob
January 1, 8, 2009 Apalachicola, Florida Larry, Bond & Stackhouse ff guarantee contact the Small Studio Apt. for ma-
9641T -- 32320 Suite 800, 125 West Any person claiming an in- Plaintiff, FTC. ture, single person, $500
IN64TE CIRCUIT COURT (850) 653-1949 Romana Street terest in the surplus from TheFederal Trade everything furnished, Call
OF THE SECOND JUDI- January 1,8, 2009 PR 0. Box 13010 any sale, if any, other than vs. A Commission 850-697-8623
~~isOF THE SECOND JUDI F h _I America's consumer ----
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND 9643T Pensacola, Florida the property owner as of KAY W. EUBANKS; HSBC MERCHANDISE protection agency.
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTYIN THE CIRCUIT COof the Lis Pend-MORTGAGE CORPORA- 3100 -Antiques
FLORIDA OF THE SECOND JUDI- (850)4349200 ens must file a claim within TION (USA); BARBARA JO 3110-Appliances www.ftc.gov/jobscams6140
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND fo a sixty (60) PALMER; FRANCES C. 3120 -Arts & Crafts 1-877-FTC-HELP 2 br, 2 ba, House off Twin REALESTATE ORSALE
GULF STATE COMMU- FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY Attorneys for Plaintiff CANNON; UNKNOWN 3130-Auctions Lakes Roadin astpolnt
NITY BANK FLORIDA January 1,8,2009 WITNESS MY HAND and SPOUSE OF BARBARA JO 3140 Baby Items A public service C/H&akesA wd a d/w 7100 Homes
Plaintiff 9667T the seal of this Court on PALMER; UNKNOWN 3150 Building Supplies message from the FTC cHA wd and d/w 7110 Beach Home/
ALBANYBANK&TRUST, N E CIRCUIT COURT December 17, 2008. SPOUSE OF FRANCES C. 3160 -Business ceened inont poh Properly
ALBANY BANK & TRUST IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SPOUSE OF FRANCES C. Equipment and The News Herald very private w/s included 7120 Commercial
vs. Plaintiff, OF THE SECOND JUDI- Marcia M. Johnson CANNON; UNKNOWN 3170 Collectibles Classified Advertising $800 mo first and last 7130 CondoTownhouse
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND Clerk of the Circuit Court SPOUSE OF KAY W. 3180 Computers Department month rent. 850-370-6863 7140- Farms & Ranches
KAREN BETH MIL-vs. FORFRANKLIN COUNTY heEUBANKS; JOHN DOE; 3190 Electronics 7150 Lots and Acreage
LENDER, a single person; FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN 3200 Firewood 7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
LENDER,a single person; FLORIDA Deputy Clerk 7170- Waterfront
WILLSON'S SEPTICTANK; JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY CIVIL ACTION TENANT (S) IN POSSES- 3210- Free Pass It On 710- terront
TENANT # 1, TENANT # a/k/a JEFFREY STUART SION OF THE SUBJECT 3220 -aFurniturerd al Iprnt
2, UNKNOWN TENANTS, GALLOWAY; SHELLY INDYMAC BANK F.S.B., Florda Default Law Group, PRSOP O T 3 3240 Garage/Yard Sales 7190- Out-of-Town
Defendants) GALLOWAY; FRANKLIN Plaintiff, PL B 25018 Defendants. 3250 Good Things to Eat ll Real Estate
COUNTY FLORIDA; ST PO. Box 25018 3260 Health & Fitness 7200 Timeshare
CASE NO: 08-000414-CA GEORGE ISLAND OWN- VS. Tampa, Florida CASE NO.: 08-000075-CA 3270 Jewelry/Clothing tartThe Ne ar Right
ES'ASSOCIATION, INC.; 3622-5018 3280- Machinery/ Start The New Year Right!
NOTICE OF SALE and UNKNOWN PAT G. MOORE, et al, F08000505 NOTICE OF 3290 Meiq uipment HERE'SYOUR CHANCETO BECOME A PART OF
TENANTSS, Defendantss. January 1, FORECLOSURE SALE 3300 Miscellaneous AN EXTRAORDINARY HEALTHCARE FACILITY.
NOTICE is hereby given Defendants. 9668T 3310 Musical Instmruments Let's Trade
that, pursuant to the Order CASE NO. 08-0036-CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT NOTICE IS HEREBY 3320 Plants & Shrubs/ WE'RE GROWING! Houses
of Summary Judgment of CASE NO.: 08-000135-CA DIVISION OF THE SECOND JUDI- GIVEN pursuant to a Final Supplies
Foreclosure in this cause, CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND Judgment of Foreclosure 3330- Restaurant/Hotel SEEKING GREAT C.N.A.'S My beautiful $275,000
in the Circuit Court of NOTICE OF NOTICE OF FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY dated the 12th day of De- 3350 Tickets (Buy& ell) FT,PT & PRNhome in Tenn wth low
Franklin County, Florida, I SALE PURSUANT FORECLOSURE SALE FLORIDA cember, 2008, and entered taxes and ins., or my
will sell the property situ- TO CHAPTER 45 CIVIL ACTION in Case No. Are You Caring,Reliable and Dedicated beautiful $170,000 home in
ated in Franklin County, NOTICE IS HEREBY 08-000075-CA, of the Cir- To OutstandingQualityCare? beautiful rolina fthe Pan-our
Florida described as: NOTICE is given pursuant GIVEN pursuant to a Final BANK OF AMERICA, NA, cult Court of the 2ND Judl- be-u-ti. Do You BelieveThat QualityoffifeisEssential? handle, Ca252 9269525
to a Final Judgment of Judgment of Mortgage Plaintiff, cial Circuit in and for En3200t andle, Call 2529269525
Block 47 (210), Lots 12, Foreclosure dated Decem- Foreclosure dated Decem- Franklin County, Florida, Ifso,pleasefaxyourresumeorcompleteanapplicationtoday! or tomandritac@
13,14, Keough's2nd Addi- ber 12, 2008, in Case No. ber 12, 2008 and entered vs. wherein HSBC BANK USA, aearthank.net
tion ORB 170, Page 400, 08-000135-CA, of the Cir- in Case No. 08-0036-CA of N.A. is the Plaintiff and earth l ntl
ORB 354, Page 275, ORB cult Court of the Second the Circuit Court of the RYAN MCDOWELL A/K/A KAY W. EUBANKS; HSBC
361, Page 2266, ORB 388, Judicial Circuit, in and for SECOND Judicial Circuit RYAN C. MCDOWELL, et MORTGAGE CORPORA- SeasonedJO a t .
Page 252, ORB 654, Page Franklin County, Florida, in in and for FRANKLIN al, TION (USA); BARBARA JO 5 r Hw
687, according to the plat which ALBANY BANK & County, Florida wherein Defendant(s). PALMER; FRANCES C. Firewood 220NINTHST.,PORTST.JOE G 57 acres off Hwy 65 on
thereof recorded in the TRUST is the Plaintiff and INDYMAC BANK F.S.B., is CANNON; UNKNOWN By the load or by the stick. 850-229-7129 FAX Gardner's Landing Road.
public records of Franklin JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY the Plaintiff and PAT G. CASE NO. SPOUSE OF BARBARAJO 670-8808 or 670-8851 Make offer. 850-653-1596
County, at Plat Book 2, a/k/a JEFFREY STUART PALMER; UNKNOWN leave message
Page 20. (Mortgage ORB GALLOWAY; SHELLY
775, Page 448) GALLOWAY; FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA; ST
Lot 5, Block 211 (48), GEORGE ISLAND OWN-

Keough s Second Additiugh's Secon ERShouASSOCIATION, INC.;
Franklin County, Florida. TENANT(S) are the De-
(Mortgage ORB 775, Page pendants, I will sell to the
448 & ORB 882, Page 32) highest and best bidder for
cash at Front door of the
Lots 9,10, and 11, Block Franklin County Court-
86 (249), Keough's Second house in Apalachicola,
Addition to the City of Franklin County, Florida at


the Public Records of Foreclosure and more par- A
Franklin County, Florida. ticularly described as fol-
(Mortgage ORB 882, Page lows:

All of Lot 37 in Block A' of GEORGE ISLAND GULF
division joining Three Riv- cording to the map or plat
ers Subdivision as de- thereof as recorded in Plat
scribed by metes and Book 2, Page(s) 15, Public T D l Y las fi a
at the NW Corner of Lot County, Florida. T o PersI

ers Subdivision, a subdivi- Any person claiming an in-
sion as per map or plat terest in the surplus from
t treof, recorded in Plat the sale, if any, other than
Book 3, Page 1, of the the property owner as of M
Public Records of Franklin the date of the ils pend-
County, Florida and run ens, must file a claim r nh r I ne "HENl m m a
thence South 89 degrees within sixty (60) days after fl T A RII APA L I MEIlS.l
28 minutes 40 seconds the sale.
East along the North H E(/ STA R 0ARRACHIC *anmo
boundary of said lot a dis- DATED: December 15, &CARRABE
tance of 60.00 feet to the 2008. _
NE corner of said lot;
thence North 00 degrees MARCIA M. JOHNSON l
25 minutes 05 seconds Clerk of the Circuit Court
East 100.00 feet to the By: Michele Maxwell
boundary of a proposed
60.00 foot roadway; Garvpn B. Bowden, Esq, Call Our Ne w Num bers No w!
thence North 89 degrees Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
28 minutes 40 seconds Wadsworth & Bowden PA.
West, along said Southerly 1300 Thomaswood Drive


Right-of-Way boundary Tallahassee, Florida 32308
60.00 feet; thence South January 1, 8, 2009 C: 8 -
00 degrees 25 minutes 05 9666T Call: 850-747-5020
seconds West 110.00 feet NOTICE OF FORECLO- (
tothe Point of Beginning. SURE SALE BY CLERK To Free: 800-345-8688
(Mortgage ORB 889, Page OF CIRCUIT COURT
535)
Lots 1, 2, 3, and4, Block Notice is herebygivenha F 850-747-5044
48(211), Keough's Second M Johnson, Clerk of the
Addition to the City of Circuit Court of Frankln
Carrabelle, according to County Florida, wi on,kl
he i plt threof d C ttyCFida nnEm ail: thestar@ pcn h.com
nthe plat Book2, Page20, of January 22, 2009. at 11:00 f
the Public Records of a.m. at the front ofthemail: thetimes@p
(Mortgage ORB 901, Page city of Apalachicola, Flor th t m s p n o






B8 I The Times


Local


Thursday, January 1, 2009


Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce demographics

In the January 2009 issue of the Bay home to 26 members of the chamber.
Business Report, Apalachicola Bay Cham- Businesses are now listed in 95 cat-
ber of Commerce Director Anita Grove re- egories. Members can be listed under [, ,
leased a breakdown of chamber member- multiple categories. The largest category,


ship by location and category of business.
The chamber now boasts 366 members.
Not surprisingly, the majority of business-
es, 169, are based in Apalachicola, followed
by 58 on St. George Island and 51 in East-
point. Twenty members are located on the
east end of the county and 64 are based
outside of Franklin County in locations
from Tallahassee (11 members) to Pana-
ma City (Nine members). Gulf County is


Associations and Organizations, contains
33 members. Accommodations list 21
members, Real Estate 23 and the Build-
ing Trades and Suppliers 28. The chamber
also lists 23 Restaurants, 17 Beach Home
Rental Agencies and 22 Tour Providers or
Fishing Guides.
Over 30 business categories list only a
single provider. Business listings can be
viewed at www.apalachicolabay.org.


C niur/2 "St. George Island's
--r21. Real Estate Specialists"
Collins Realty, Inc.


Eva Strickland holds her hat high in "Frosty the Snowman."


ornnIrui o rL-..C.
GULF VIEW 5BR/3BA fur-
nished home located by
easement to beach across
from bike path. Enclosed
garage with parking for 2
vehicles.
MLS#208989......$369,000


VILLA a-4
GULF FRONT CONDO 2BR/2BA
two-story furnished unit offers
remodeled kitchen cabinets and
appliances, balcony, community
pool, beach walkover. Located in
the "Light House District" of St.
George Island, close to shopping,
dining, and bike path.
M LS#105967.................$445,000


LAGNIAPPE ISLAND CLUB #2
BAY FRONT 4BR/3BA home GULF FRONT ground level
located in gated Plantation Com- cndo in 4 unit building.
munity. Excellent rental. Offers condo in 4 unit building.
2 master bedrooms, an extra Nicely furnished, features
den, ceramic tile floors in foyer & tile floors and Plantation
kitchen/dining. Many extra fea- shutters. Enjoy beautiful
tures include large pantry, elevator views of the gulf from the
shaft, private heated pool, outdoor community gazebo.
shower, & fish cleaning area. community g
MLS#233551..............$799,000 MLS#209240......$395,000


POPE RITZ
EASTPOINT 3BR/2BA very nice APALACHICOLA 3BR/2BA
home. New flooring throughout, home offers dramatic great
new stove and microwave built room with vaulted ceilings and
in, and new water heater. Dining floor-to-ceiling brick fireplace,
room & dine-in kitchen. Large lot heart pine floors, eat-in chef's
with extensive landscaping, ir- kitchen, master suite with dou-
rigation system. Even has a put- ble Jacuzzi overlooking large
ting green! wooded back yard.
MLS#206698............... $294,900 MLS#201440...........$265,000


EASTPOINT high and dry homesite with sewer and water taps in place,
close to county boat ramp. MLS#205840............................................ $79,000.
EASTPOINT BAY VIEW high, wooded homesite in Gramercy Plantation with
community dock on the bay. MLS#233521......................................... $195,000.
FIRST TIER homesite that offers easy beach access and Gulf views.
M LS#209479 ............................................................................................. $365,000.
GULF FRONT homesite located in St. George Plantation. Close to a board-
walk to the beach, steps away from the proposed new Club House, tennis
court and swimming pool. MLS#233621............................................ $999,000.

Please Call for our complete selection of Homesites and Investment
Properties on St. George Island and surrounding Franklin County.
CENTURY 21 Collins Realty, Inc.
60 E. Gulf Beah Dr. St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 927-3100 M (866) 382-4296
www.Century21CollinsRealty.com I email:Sales@CenturyCollinsRealty.com
Each Office is Independantly Owned and Operated


Dancing thronmh the holidays


On Dec. 19, the Pam Nobles Studio once again presented its annual Christmas recital, this
year at the Chapman Auditorium. From the "Parade of the Wooden Soldier" to "Jingle
Bells" to "Frosty the Snowman," the recital was once again a big hit with kids of all ages.

LEFT: Katie Max-
well, left, and An-
nalyse Wharrie con-
clude the song "Last
Christmas." BELOW
LEFT: Pam Nobles,
left, kicks up her
heels with her mom,
June Gray, in "Win-
ter Wonderland."
BELOW RIGHT:
Josalyn Ward, the
studio's youngest
dancer, takes part in
"A Christmas Tree in
Heaven."


II


Our local real estate experts have identified what they feel are

the best values around and are offering them to you in Real Estate

Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in

Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Bias, St.

George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas.


MAKE OFFERI...


High traffic / visibility vacant 6,750 sq ft commercial
comer property in downtown Port St Joe at intersection
of US HWY 98 (Monument Avenue) & 4TH STREET.
Location, Location, Location! MLS # 201675. Call now
for details.
Shaun S. Donahoe
licensed real estate broker
(850) 653- 8330
www.shaundonahoe.com


MAKE OFFER!!!


flVILS#10'7'738


$399,900 St. George Island)


1 GREAT BAY
FRONT
HOME
Located in East
Bay Estates on
the East End of
the island, this
3 bedroom, 2
bath home includes an upstairs master suite
overlooking the St George Sound. Unbelievable
view! Living room has wooden vaulted ceiling
& freestanding fireplace. Large deck leads to
POOL & DOCK that's shared by 3 other homes.
Legal beach access just across the street.
BEST BUY ON THE BAY!


't. George Island'
Realty


John Shelby, Broker
800-344-7570
850-927-4777
www.sgirealty.com


850-227-1278


NE ~*I


I




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