Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00004
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: December 11, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

00012-11-2008 ( PDF )


Full Text




Apalachicola


Carrabelle






YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS
YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


Shop at home for
the holidays
B1


Thursday, December 11, 2008 www. a pal a ch times. com 50C


Oyster situation 'stressed'


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
A newly released state report
on the oyster harvesting situa-
tion in Apalachicola Bay shows
the drought is beginning to take
its toll on the population at the
same time a record number of
oyster licenses have been is-
sued to work the bay.
"The situation is stressed
right now, but it's not dire," said
Mark Berrigan, chief of the bu-
reau of aquaculture develop-
ment, for the state department
of agriculture and consumer
services. "It may be dire by the
end of the winter harvesting
season."
The oyster resource as-


sessment report summarizes
surveys conducted by the Divi-
sion of Aquaculture from 2006
through 2008 and finds that "the
abundance of juvenile, sub-legal
and market-size oysters sug-
gest that the overall condition
of many reefs has declined over
the past two years.
"The outlook for oyster pro-
duction for the 2008/2009 winter
harvesting season in St. George
Sound (Cat Point, East Hole,
Porters Bar and Platform) is
not promising, but may not be
as dire as previously projected,"
the report reads. "However, it is
unlikely that reefs in St. George
Sound could sustain concentrat-
ed harvesting effort for the re-
mainder of the winter harvest-


ing season."
The report uses productiv-
ity of greater than 400 bags per
acre as an indicator of healthy
oyster reefs capable of sustain-
ing commercial harvesting.
Experts find that oyster popula-
tions are capable of supporting
limited commercial harvesting
when stocks exceed 200 bags
per acre and are considered de-
pleted when marketable stocks
are below 100 bags per acre.
Though production estimates
from Cat Point, East Hole and
Dry Bars exceeded 400 bags per
acre on sampling intervals pri-
or to the opening of the winter
harvesting season over the past
See OYSTER Al 0


2.5 million -


2 million -


1.5 million


1 million -


.5 million -


0 pounds-

Pounds of meat


2000 2001 2002


ABOVE: Christopher Creek, son of Jason Lee and
Michelle Creek, of Eastpoint, is encouraged by his
mom to "give five" to Santa Claus during a visit
Friday evening to the St. George Lighthouse.

RIGHT: Ten-month-old Colby Blackburn, son of "
Brad and Shellie Blackburn, of Eastpoint, casts a
concerned look at Santa Claus during his visit. Chris
Giametta, the county's building inspector, made
special arrangements for Santa's visit.


Photos by David Adlerstein
Times City Editor




Carrabelle dedicates park to beloved matriarch


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
On Nov. 26, about 50 family mem-
bers and friends of Classie Brown
Lowery gathered in Carrabelle to ded-
icate the Franklin County children's
park named in her honor.
Lowery is an iconic figure is Car-
rabelle's history; a strong woman who
bore 20 children of her own, adopted
another and saw to it that no child in
her sphere of influence went hungry.
She worked hard and raised her chil-
dren to work and to respect God and
each other.
Lowery's daughter, Classie Wanda

See PARK A3


LOIS SWOBOMDA I StaffWriter
Ribbon cutting: From left, Jewel Lowery White, Commissioner Smokey
Parrish, Commissioner Bevin Putnal, Cherry Lowery Rankin, Henry
Lowery, James Lowery, Clarence Lowery, Anthony Lowery, George
Lowery, Classie Wanda Lowery, Savannah Lowery Tyler, Marvin White,
Commissioner Cheryl Sanders and Roosevelt Lowery attended the ribbon
cutting at the dedication of Lowery Park..


Apalachicola

library rebounds

after cutbacks

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

After cutting back midway through the year be-
cause of a cash shortfall, the Apalachicola Munici-
pal Library has rebounded and is moving forward
on a number of projects, ac-
cording to a report last week
by Susan Clementson, who
heads up the library board.
Before the Apalachicola
city commission on Dec. 2,
Clementson gave the first of
what she said would be regu-
lar monthly reports on the
status of the library.
"The cash shortfall has
been addressed. We are liv-
ing within our means," she "The cash
said. shortfall
Because of the cash
crunch, the library board has been
earlier this year was forced addressed.
to trim the hours of library We are living
staffer Anne Sizemore to a
dozen per week. She later within our
resigned her post. means."
Clementson said the li-
brary now is being staffed
by volunteer Carrie Kienzle, Susan Clementson
a retired librarian; former Apalachicola Municipal
library staffer Barbara Hol- Library board
mes; and Darrell Smith, an
employee provided by Workforce Development.
"In addition, our seasoned volunteers continue
their duties, and several others have volunteered
their service this past week," said Clementson,
who said nearly 70 volunteer hours were contrib-
uted last month.
She said the library served 633 patrons in No-
vember, including 12 children and 12 new patrons.
More than $400,000 in funds from the estate of
the late Margaret Key, who willed it to the library,
are being kept intact and preserved for future ex-
pansion.
"It's our nest egg," Clementson said.
The library board has received preliminary
drawings for expanding its current location at Av-
enue D and Sixth Street.
"Also under discussion is the possibility of our
moving to an existing building and remodeling it to
meet our needs," Clementson said.
Interior to the library, the space has been recon-
figured to delineate distinct sections, she said, and
plans are in the hopper for library automation.
"We have received the technical specifications
and costs, which will be in the neighborhood of
$12,000," Clementson said. "I am happy to say that
we have $2,000 towards that goal, and we anticipate
raising the balance through donations, grants and
fundraisers."
She said plans are being made to form an ac-
tive Friends of the Library group. Sandy Newell,
the local library's liaison with the state library, will
be in Apalachicola on Jan. 8 to meet with the local
board and a core group of citizens for the purpose
of chartering the proposed Friends group.
Clementson said the board is now in the pro-
cess of drafting job descriptions for library person-
nel and will be advertising in the near future.


Phone: (850) 653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews@starfl.com
Fax: (850) 653-8036


O pinion .............. .............. A4
Sports.............................. A ll
Church News...................... B3


Society News .. ................. B2
Tide Chart ........................... A9
Classifieds ............. ............ B4


FREEDOM
NEWSPAPERS I INTERACTIVE
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
School News & Society Friday at 11 a.m.
Real Estate Ads Thursday at 11 a.m.
Classified Display Ads Friday at 11 a.m.
Classified Line Ads Monday at 5 p.m.


*


OYSTER LANDINGS IN APALACHICOLA BAY
3 million F-


2003 2004
Year


2006 2007


0


TABLE OF CONTENTS


NE




A2 I The Times


Local


Thursday, December 11, 2008


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Performing in "The Christmas Shoes" as the Andrews
family were Dolores Roux, right, Ella Friedman, front, Performing as the Layton family were, from left,
and in back B.J. Terhune, Chad Terhune and Austin Robbie Johnson, Ginny Griner and Glory Miller and
Cammarano. in front Gillian Terhune.
Local churches shine at 'Christmas Shows'
The cooperative parish from churches throughout Produced by Rev. Patriots, Dusty Turner,
of the First United Method- the county, put on a "The Themo Patriotis, the show Smokey Parrish, Cynthia
ist Church and St. George Christmas Shows," a dra- was directed by April Pa- Rhew, Barry Hand, Robbie
Island United Methodist matic musical at the Dixie triotis and Dusty Turner. Johnson, Austin Camma-o
Church, with assistance Theater last weekend and The show featured so- rano, Ginny Griner, Robbie Temolynn Wintons, on stage, closes out The
from singers and actors it proved to be a huge hit. losby Tamara Marsh, April Johnson, Frances Camp- Christmas Shoes" after a stunning finale, complete with
bell, Temolynn Wintons, confetti, of "O Holy Night" and "The Little Drummer
Jathan Martin and Katie Boy." In front are members of the ABC School drum
IIGalloway. squad.


JIMMIE CROWDER EXCAVATING & LAND CLEARING, INC. Think Local First
COMPLETE SITE DEVELOPMENT
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL m money spent at
ASPHALT GRADING & PAVING LOT CLEARING
DEMOLITIONWORK* UTILITYCONTRACTOR home stays at home
FILL DIRT TOP SOIL GRAVEL MASON SAND DELIVERED
POND BUILDING
c & D DEBRIS ROLL OFF CONTAINERS Local businesses employ local
FULLY LICENSED & INSURED people and contribute to local
SERVING YOU SINCE 1964
L 850-697.8403 850-528-6933 850-528-5122 canaries.
OFFICE ODIE CELL JIMMIE CELL
If you would like to be involved please contact the
Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce
Thank You at (850) 653-9419 or email us at
info@apalachicolabay.org

Franklin County

For Believing / ik. t Wp,

In Me! wedlefull


tl5 A fM t&e






Not if you are one of the thousands in our
IT 9 Tarea at-risk of going to bed hungry and
empty-handed on Christmas.

INVOLVED WANT To MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
Mail in the Empty Stocking Fund envelope inserted in
today's paper to the Salvation Army with your contribution!
Lets C create A School With your help, the Empty Stocking Fund
can make a difference for so many
hSysttem That families in need during this holiday season.
y tem w i Be The Empty Stocking Fund provides food and toy baskets
to thousands of families in Bay, Gulf, Franklin,
A M odel For O others Holmes, and Washington counties.


Nina M. Marks NEWSHERALD ^ ^
THE STAR -i-. TM[S..._-_


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Nina Marks, Democrat, Superintendent


IFM alum






Thursday, December 11,2008


PARK from page A1

Benjamin, of Carrabelle, re-
cently requested the park, built
in 1999, be officially dedicated.
Carrabelle resident Dan Rosier
was instrumental in seeing that
the pretty vest pocket park be
created.
"It started off as a safe haven
for our kids walking up and down
the street in the traffic," Rosier
said. "At that time, we had a lot
of kids."
The park was named after
a survey of the neighborhood
identified Lowery as the most
admired local figure among
residents. The family and coun-
ty agreed Thanksgiving week
would be the ideal time for the
dedication because most of the
family was coming to a reunion.
Parks and Recreation applied
fresh mulch, repainted play-
ground equipment and added a
few new touches in preparation
for the event.
A plaque presented to the fam-
ily at the ceremony read, "She
was a sister, mother, grandmoth-
er and friend to all. Her steadfast
faith, loving kindness, wonderful
sense of humor and sunny dis-
position touched all who knew
her. God favored Carrabelle and
Franklin County when he sent
her to be among us."
Commissioners Cheryl Sand-
ers, Smokey Parish and Bevin
Putnal were on hand for the rib-
bon cutting. During the same
ceremony, the Carrabelle Histor-
ical Society honored Lowery for
her "tireless efforts as a mother,
advocate and friend, for her deep
concern for children and for her
many contributions to the people
and the community."
Eleven of the 20 children were
present for the dedication, and
five generations came together
in the little park to remember
the great lady.
Lowery was born Classie
Brown in 1931 and married at
the age of 13. Her oldest daugh-
ter, Savannah Tyler, said, "She
turned 13 in June, and I was
born in August."
Classie was married to Henry
Lowery, a construction worker.
After the 20th child was born,
Lowery left to start a business
but continued to send some sup-


Local


The Times I A3


Above, Classie Lowery's brother James Brown of Carrabelle was
at the ribbon cutting. At right, Shakiya Brown of Crawfordville,
Classie Lowery's great-great granddaughter, was present at the
dedication ceremony Nov. 26.


port to the family.
Classie Lowery worked hard
all of her life, cooking, working in
a nursing home and later clean-
ing the Florida State University
Marine Lab.
Son Henry said, "The oldest
took care of the younger ones,
and our grandmother was there
to help."
Tyler said, "Mama applied for
welfare one time. They sent her
a check for about $80. My grand-
ma bought her a car so she could
get from job to job. It was so rag-
gedy, you could see the street
when you were riding in it.
"Somebody complained
and told the welfare people my
mama used the check to buy the
car. When the next check came,
it was for only $40. Mama bought
it back to them and said 'No dis-
respect, my children eat more
than this in a week. You take it
and give it to somebody who re-


ally needs it.' She never asked
for welfare again."
Tyler said, "You have heard
the saying "It takes a village
to raise children"? Carrabelle
was our village. So many people
made sure my mama had food
and clothing. She was like Good-
will. People would bring her food
and clothes and she'd pass it on
to others who needed it.
"There was an ice man, La-
fayette 'Crip' Thomas. He made
deliveries to Camp Weed (located
at the current location of Sum-
merCamp), and he'd get leftover
food. He had five children of his
own but he always brought it to
our house first to see what Mama
needed or wanted."
Lowery left behind her own
children Savannah, Roosevelt,
Clarence, Johnny (deceased),
Robert, Jewel, Classie, Saul,
Anthony, Cherry, Phillip, Carol,
twins Dennis and Denise, trip-


lets Vivian, Vanessa and Valerie
(deceased of SIDS) and Peter.
She also left foster son George
Brown, who initially was adopted
by her mother Savannah Brown,
a midwife, and who passed into
Classie Lowery's care when her
mother died.
She was matriarch to 42
grandchildren, 18 great-grand-
children and five great-great-
grandchildren. She also cared
for her brother, James Brown,
for much of her life.
Tyler said her mother was
very religious and attended the
First Born Church of the Liv-
ing God, now known as the Love
Center in Carrabelle.
"It was a very happy house.
There was a lot of beatings for
being bad. Mama raised us ac-
cording to God's word, and if
Mama didn't get us, Grandma
did," she said.
It must have been a good up-


bringing. All of the children fin-
ished high school.
"We were all successful," Ty-
ler said. "She told us, if you don't
want to stay in school, you get a
full-time job."
Sixteen of the children mar-
ried, and all but two remain with
the same spouse today.
Lowery died in 1993 at age 62.
"She was tired when she
died," Tyler remembered. She
died peaceful. She laid there and
waited for everyone to come.
Almost everyone made it. One
sister was in the military and
couldn't get away.
"Mama knew where every-
body was. They were working
on her house while she was in
the hospital and she asked us
'Did you get everything for the
house? Did you get the stove
and refrigerator?'" she recalled.
"Later, she just slipped away. It
was a beautiful death."


Big Bend Hospice

and the

Franklin County

Advisory Council

invite you to attend the




2008 S Awice 4






Sunday, December 7

2:30 PM

Tillie Miller Park

Carrabelle


Come light a candle and honor

a loved one. This time of

healing and remembrance is

open to everyone.


our Hometown Hospic
Licensed Since 1983


For more info, call
Pam Allbritton: (850) 508-8749


Retail Space Available for Lease in WindMark Beach
Ground Floor Opportunity in St. Joe's newest Village Center
Join Clark & Blake Brennans School ofFish Restaurant, Joseph's Cottage Interiors
and Fit as a Fiddle Fitness Center in this exciting beachfront town coming to life
with ground floor retail space and vacation rental lofts above.

Only a few select retailers will be chosen for this opportunity.
Respond by December 17 with your business proposal.

Ideal location for..
Eco-tour / Outfitter I Ice Cream / Confections I Salon / Day Spa
Village Market I Art Gallery I Gift Shop


Six spaces available ranging from 1,000 to 3,800 square feet


Contact Mike Brandon: 850-402-5180;
mike.brandon@joe.com; or learn more online at:
www.windmarkbeach.com
101 Good Morning Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 BEACH


U
*










A4 The Times


Opinion


Thursday, December 11, 2008


Now is time for new college prep charter school



Now is time for new college prep charter school


In addition to $1 million new
federal grant dollars; add sub-
stantial long-term rental income
for the consolidated school, and a
college preparatory option for all
parents of all students in Frank-
lin County.
Now that would be a win, win,
and win situation, espe-
cially in today's economy.
In recession we espe-
cially look for new revenue
streams to support our
kids. We are always look-
ing to enhance student
success, as this is our re-
sponsibility. Rights and
privileges of others should JEFF
not be above our kids.
This column is about educa-
tion, not what is wrong with it;
rather what we can do with some
out-the-box thinking to enhance
student success, and bring in
sorely needed money!
Imagine it is 2010, the consoli-
dated school near full capacity.


One-third of the campus is gener-
ating rent revenue to offset long-
term debt; parents of students
have more choices of educational
programs, including an intense
college preparatory program.
Franklin County students who
attend Port St. Joe schools re-
turn, more students par-
ticipate in sports, and the
system has an additional
$1 million.
This picture is a very

ing is of essence, a now-
or-never opportunity. Let
me explain.
WEINER Parents and non-par-
ent taxpayers some-
times fail to realize that all public
schools are funded by taxpay-
ers to provide quality education
for all children. Public schools
include traditional, magnet,
charter, and alternative schools.
Since each type of public school
is receiving nearly the same rev-


enue per student, why not have
a charter school within the tra-
ditional school, sharing space if
you will? This would not be the
first time in Florida. I'm sure su-
perintendent Nina Marks would
be most receptive to any idea
that enhances chances for our
student's success, pays for itself,
and more!
A new college preparatory
charter program within the con-
solidated school would generate
$1 million in new grant revenue
for students over a two-year
time period. A charter "within"
would pay rent to the consolidat-
ed school (a long-term revenue
stream). The consolidated school
could be running near full capac-
ity. Port St. Joe school transfer
students would return. Sports
program participation would in-
crease.
Statistically, Franklin County
ranks 64th out of 67 Florida coun-
ties in graduation rate. A char-


ter college prep school program
within a school would directly
address this and be offered to
any student, whether currently
attending traditional, charter,
private, or home-schooled. Some
students may need extra help,
but any student can perform at
top level.
Because it would be a new
school within a school, it could be
funded with federal dollars not
accessible to the public tradition-
al system or Apalachicola Bay
Charter School any longer. With
this jump start of $1 million, the
school within a school would be
designed using research-based
best practice and crafted from
several highly successful college
preparatory schools.
This is a one-shot opportunity,
and time is running out. Right
now, federal funds are sitting in
the state bank for a project as
this on a two-year timetable. Dur-
ing this time funds cannot be re-


allocated by the state due to the
emergency state of affairs we are
in. Subsequent start-up funding
is questionable. There lies the $1
million golden egg we hold today,
if we work as a team.
If you have any interest in be-
ing a participative founding board
member, join the team. Founding
board members may have a one-
year unofficial commitment and
will be encouraged to move onto
the active board once approved,
which will be a staggered one-to-
three year commitment. Frank-
lin County School Board mem-
bers are strongly encouraged
to participate as founding board
members and beyond. Please
email your interest and contact
information to SeaHawkColleg-
ePrep@yahoo.com.

Jeff Weiner, a former prin-
cipal of the Apalachicola Bay
Charter School, now resides in
St. Augustine.


THE CLERK OF THE

CIRCUIT COURT

YOUR PUBLIC TRUSTEE


Q. Can you provide some information on
foreclosure cases being filed?
A. Currently, it appears to those reading our
newspapers and listening to the news on televi-
sion, that our nation's economy is in trouble. The
National Bureau of Economic

i A has been in a recession since De-
cember 2007. Florida is especially
in need of an economic fix. We
have a 7 percent unemployment
rate statewide which is higher
than the national average; but
reports state Franklin County's
CLERK OF THE rate is lower than that at about
CIRCUIT COURT 4.5 percent.
Marcia Johnson The number of foreclosures
filed in Franklin County tells an-
other story. In 2006, the records in this office re-
flect that only 2 foreclosures were filed in Circuit
Court. In 2007, that number increased to 46 cases.
According to a report generated on Dec. 4, 2008,
there have been 187 foreclosures filed this calen-
dar year. I hear from clerks all over the state about
the increased number of foreclosures, and it's not
just the investors who are being taken to court.
People are losing their homes.
In Franklin County, we know that the construc-
tion and seafood industries have declined, the real
estate market is slow, and jobs are not plentiful.
Not only are the workers in those industries af-
fected, but also the retail businesses, wait stafig
and minimum-pay employees. All these factors
contribute to financial burdens. As your clerk I'm
very concerned about the state of the economy,
and I am keeping a watchful eye on the county's
budget and revenue stream and expenditures.
Just as our personal budgets are being stretched
to the limit, so are the government's budgets. We
should keep in mind that as more and more fore-
closures are filed and the taxable value of real
property decreases, the county's budget will be af-
fected, which in turn, will affect services provided.
If you have any questions or comments about
this column, please forward them to: Marcia
Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market Street Ste
203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or by email to mm-
johnson@franklin.clerk.com. Visit the Clerk's
Web site at www.franklinclerk.com.



Ipalachicola Ti l
&Carrabelle


TH TIM
USPHS #027-600
Published Every Thursday at 129 Commerce St
Apalachicola, Florida 32329

VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone (850) 653-8868


PERIDICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
APALACHICOLA, FL
32329
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$23 year $15 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$33 year $20 six months

TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements the publishers do
not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for
such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


The epizootie cannot be willed away


When my grandmother, Johnny Kersey
Roux, was sick with chills, fever, and body aches,
she would say, "I've got the epizootie." I thought
it was a made-up word.
On a whim, I searched the Internet which
led me to "epizootic an epidemic outbreak of
disease in an animal population, often
with the implication that it may extend
to humans."
It was an interesting connection, es-
pecially since Nana had lived through
the 1918 flu epidemic. Maybe her word
originated from that dark time. The hor-
ror stories she told about those days are
still with me now. It was the 20th century
version of the plague. Estimates of the REDV
dead from the pandemic stand at 675,000 AND
Americans. It may have been the end of Denis
World War I, but the flu epidemic went
on to claim more lives than the Great War.
Today, we have a new flu vaccination every
year, because the virus mutates and changes it-
self about. Years ago my grandmother's elderly
neighbor got her seasonal inoculation and then
developed Guillain-Barre syndrome as a side ef-
fect. In this disease, the immune system attacks
the nervous system and paralysis results. She
died because she had gotten a flu shot.
That did it for me. Statistics notwithstanding,
I knew first-hand that the immunization might
make me deathly ill. My doctor pooh-poohed my
anecdote and warned that I was in real danger
since, as a teacher, I am around dozens of sick
children every day.
I rarely even contract a cold. I felt bold. I felt
safe. I got sick. I felt stupid.
It was quite a drag to be ill over Thanksgiving,
my favorite holiday. What's not to like about visit-
ing family and devoting a day to eating? I even
missed three days of school. I felt like Typhoid
Mary, afraid I was spreading the epizootie wher-
ever I went. I spent days horizontal on the couch
in front of the fire. I didn't eat. (10 pounds gone!)
I was able to remain vertical by last Thursday
and returned to school.
My children had really missed me, and the
substitute teacher had done a very credible job.
The classroom was not in shambles, and the sub
left extensive notes. The kids actually behaved
themselves. Of course, I am incredibly behind
in grading papers, entering grade data into the
computer, and writing lesson plans. I missed the
big faculty meeting on Monday that explained


W

Ri
e


when the folks from the Department of Educa-
tion will be back and what they expect to see.
I suspect there are many of you, like me, who
say, "I don't have time to be sick. It's just not hap-
pening." I am here to tell you that this flu cannot
be willed away.
My conundrum remains. Should I
get vaccinated now? Surely, I have the
antibodies to fight off a new onslaught.
What about next year? Will I give in, re-
membering the days lost this year, or
will my fear of side effects trump once
again? Statistically, I should probably go
for it. But then again, you know the say-
ing, "There are lies, damn lies, and sta-
HITE tistics."
OUX I rarely take the well-traveled path,
Roux relying instead on personal experience
to form my decisions. Take seat belts for
example. New autos are like nagging nannies
beeping until we strap in. I find that so offensive.
I want a choice, and I believe I am entitled to
make that decision on my own.
I was in a wretched accident when I was 15.
Three carloads of us headed out to Indian Pass
on Easter afternoon. We were stupid passing
each other and speeding the entire way down.
I was riding shotgun in a 1960s station wagon
when the driver lost control on a curve not too
far from McNeil's store. I remember the car
spinning around and that's it. I woke up in the
emergency room at the hospital in Port St. Joe,
with Dr. Joe Hendrix stitching up my forehead.
It seems I had been thrown out of the vehicle
through the window. I had a deep puncture
wound in my neck and my scalp was laid open.
After six days in hospital, I was released and
went straight to the junk yard to look at the car.
The entire roof was crushed down into the front
seat. If I had been seat-belted in, I would have
been cut in half.
Does this all seem a bit silly? Why should two
anomalies determine decisions when the statis-
tics go against personal experience?
Maybe it's hubris on my part, but I think the
universe might be sending a message.
Question everything. Just because every-
body else is doing something, doesn't make it
right.

Denise Roux is a regular columnist for the
Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. Tb reach
her, email her at rouxwhit@mchsi.com.


During the holiday season, many
people reflect on what they can do
to help those less fortunate. In 2007,
caring Americans gave a record
$306.4 billion in charitable do-
nations which doesn't even
include the countless hours
spent on volunteer activities.
But during this recent
economic turmoil, many
folks are being forced to cut
back on contributions as they
themselves face increasing JA
hardships. This is particu- ALDI
larly bad timing since food
banks, disaster relief organi-
zations and other charities need our
help now more than ever.
So what can you do to help oth-
ers while safeguarding your own
family's well being? Here are a few
ideas to stretch your charitable con-
tributions:
Donate your time. Charities al-
ways gladly accept cash, but many
run on shoestring budgets with mini-
mal staff, so your time and expertise
may be just as valuable.
Although you can't take a federal
income tax deduction for your time,
you can deduct mileage and certain
expenses related to your volunteer
activities at IRS-qualified, tax-ex-


SO
ERI


empt organizations. IRS Publication
526 explains how tax deductions for
charitable contributions work and
Publication 78 lists all IRS-approved
organizations (www.irs.gov).
Bang for your buck.
Make sure any non-profit
organizations to which you
donate are well-run and con-
tribute at least 75 percent of
contributions they receive
to programs that serve their
DN beneficiaries, as opposed to
MAN being spent on their own sala-
ries and expenses.
Non-cash contributions.
If you're strapped for cash, there are
many other valuable items you can
pass along to charity. For example:
Clean out your closets and do-
nate unneeded clothes, appliances,
furniture and other items to non-
profit organizations that sponsor
thrift shops.
Many organizations accept do-
nated frequent flyer miles. Check
airline websites for links to organiza-
tions that accept their miles.
Local food pantries and home-
less shelters always need food con-
tributions, especially around the
holidays.
Adopt a family. Numerous social


Letters

TO THE

EDITOR

Children need
nourishment to
study properly

Dear Editor,
I am writing in re-
sponse to the recent let-
ters from Mr. Ray Wald-
ing and Ms. April Dalton.
I would like to say anyone
needing a free breakfast
or lunch should cer-
tainly be given one. Our
children are our future;
any child needs proper
nourishment to be able
to study properly.
I think being called
"parasites" is a slander to
the hardworking people
of Franklin County. Many
of our people work on the
bay and at times have it
very hard, due to clos-
ings for red tide, weather
conditions and lack of
oysters. Also jobs are not
plentiful in our county for
those who do not work on
the bay.
We have a loving, car-
ing county and yes, we
do need the free lunches
and breakfasts. When my
children were in school, I
felt blessed for them to
have it and yes I worked,
so I guess I'm one of the
parasites.
It makes me angry
anyone would want a
child to have to do with-
out food.
Blanche Cameron
Apalachicola


and religious organizations sponsor
programs that will align you with
a family in crisis. You can provide
services as wide-ranging as helping
them to pay rent to educational tutor-
ing to playing Santa Claus for home-
less children.
Tap your employer. Many com-
panies will match a portion of their
employees' donations to IRS-ap-
proved non-profit organizations or
educational institutions.
Scam alert. Be wary of unsolic-
ited calls or emails seeking contri-
butions to organizations that sound
legitimate but may not be. Visit the
organization's website independently
(not through an email link) and look
them up on the online rating services
mentioned above. And never give out
your credit card number or personal
information unless you initiated the
contact yourself.
One last suggestion that won't
cost a dime: Donate blood. I can't
think of any better way to literally
save lives.

Jason Alderman directs Visa's
financial education programs. Tb
sign up for a free monthly personal
finance e-Newsletter, go to practical-
moneyskills.com/newsletter


-* ]


Helping others when money is tight






Thursday, December 11,2008


Local


Carrabelle hosts annual Holiday on the Harbor


Carolers, holiday displays, music
and Santa will take center stage in Car-
rabelle for the 16th annual Boat Parade
of Lights, Holiday on the Harbor and
Music Fest celebration in downtown Car-
rabelle from noon to 10pm, on Saturday,
Dec. 13.
This is a family-friendly event, with
something for everyone and is the enter-
tainment value of the season. Where else
can you watch a fabulous boat parade on
the water, eat good food, dance to good
music and visit Santa. That's the spirit of
Carrabelle.
This year's event includes a music
festival that kicks off the event at noon
in downtown Carrabelle with several
area bands. The event will benefit the
Carrabelle Food Pantry and Toys for
Carrabelle.
This year's event will have kayak
races and a kayak fishing tournament,
for information on participating contact
697-2434. The city of Carrabelle will be
serving free hamburgers and hot dogs,
presenting miniature train displays and
sharing in the joys of the holiday season.


Ilse Newell Fund presents

Christmas Concert


Photo by DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Tamara Marsh will be among the featured soloists
at this Sunday's Christmas celebration concert at
Trinity Episcopal Church, beginning at 4 p.m.


The Apalachicola Area
Historical Society's Ilse
Newell lind for the Per-
forming Arts series will
present its annual commu-
nity Christmas celebration
concert on Sunday, Dec. 14
at Trinity Episcopal Church,
beginning at 4 p.m.
The Bay Area Choral So-
ciety, under the direction of
conductor Tom Adams, will
perform. The choral society
features sopranos Shirley
Adams, Megan Lamb, Con-
nie McGinnis, Mary Vir-
ginia Robinson, Hollie Stott,
and Eugenia Watkins; altos
Susan Galloway, Barbara
Hartsfield, Susan Leach,
Judy Little, Tamara Marsh,
Ina Margaret Meyer, Au-
drey Schmidt, and Shirley
Taylor;; tenors Fred Genter,
Pat Leach, Paul Marxsen,
Liz Sisung, and Jack Zuraw-
ka; and basses DeWitt Gal-
loway, Dave McLain, Tom
Loughridge, Dusty Turner,
Merel Young
Also on the program are
The First Methodist Church
Bell Choir, under the direc-
tion of Dusty Turner, fea-
turing Rita Sawyer, Jessica
Galloway, Julie Sizemore,
Elizabeth Kirvin, Carla
Cates, Amanda Wilson,
Tamara Marsh, Lucretia


Siprell, Geanise Brown,
Francyne Wells and Carie
Cates.
Performing with the
Women's Quintet of the
Church of God at Eastpoint
will be Karen Brannan, Son-
ja Creamer, Casey Walsh,
Renee Griffin and Ginger
Coulter.
Featured soloists for
the 2007 program include
vocalists Merel Young,
Paul Marxsen and Tamara
Marsh, pianists R. Bedford
Watkins and Karl Lester,
and guitarist Hollie Stott.
Throughout much of the
concert the audience will
be invited to sing along, es-
pecially with the Hallelujah
chorus that completes the
afternoon program.
The Ilse Newell Fund is
funded primarily by the gen-
erous contributions of com-
mitted sponsors, patrons,
associates and friends. A
suggested donation of $2
is asked of concertgoers to
support the series, admin-
istered by The Apalachicola
Area Historical Society, a
not-for-profit organization
dedicated to preserving the
rich history of Apalachicola
and the surrounding area.
For more information,
call David at 653-8894.


The Decked Out Boat Parade, featur-
ing festively decorated and lighted boats
on the Carrabelle River, begins at 7 p.m.
The holiday parade is open to all boats,
and no entry fee is required. Lighting
displays will be judged in the following
seven categories: recreational power
boats through 24', recreational power
boats over 24', commercial boats through
24', commercial boats over 24', sailboats,
pontoon boats, kayaks and specialty
boats.
Boats will line up at 6:30 p.m. before
the parade begins at 7 p.m. The awards
from each category will be presented
at 9:30 p.m. at the Music Festival stage.
Fireworks will be at the end of the pa-
rade around 8 p.m.
The Holiday on the Harbor is spon-
sored by the Carrabelle Chamber of
Commerce, City of Carrabelle, Carra-
belle Cares and the Franklin County
Tourist Development Council.
For more information or to regis-
ter a boat, call the Carrabelle Cham-
ber at 697-2585 or visit www.carrabelle
chamber.org.


DnisCosmetic, Implant
FRANK D. MAY, DMD, PA Co tic
iDental care that's so gentle & so advanced & Fanily Dentistry


invisalign
start smiling more-

BY C E R I N AT E'


Try Our New Lumineer "Sapphire"
Tooth Whiting Only $1 95!
WE PRIDE OURSELVES ON BEING
CONVENIENT & AFFORDABLE
* New Patients Welcome Children & Adults
* Most Insurances Accepted! We'll Even File It For You!
* No Interest Payment Plans (Many Options Available)


I I


8 i5


Orthodontic Tooth
Alignment W/O Braces
Certified Provider
Lumineers No Shots, No Drilling,
Cosmetic Dentistry Certified Provider -


I Implants "Mini" and Traditional Implants Certified Provider
ss White Fillings
rt Fit Dentures & Partials
ural Crowns & Bridges
rtable Root Canals
utionary New Non-Surgical Gum Treatment
CREDIBLE PAINLESS ANESTHESIA TECHNIQUES

SMember
American Academy
of Implant Dentistry
MEMBER
American Academy
of Cosmetic Dentistry.


319 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe *


Certified Provider for Lumineers, Invisalign, "Mini" and Traditional Implants


Extended


NE ~*I


RIVERWALK TO DEBUT IN APALACHICOLA

STROLL ALONG THE RIVER: The first piece of a new riverwalk
will debut right after the first of the year along the river
at Veterans Park in Apalachicola. Marine Contracting
Group out of Punta Gorda is putting the finishing touches
on a $940,000 project to resurrect the old dock with a
spacious 28' wide by 480' long structure. The project,
which commenced in early September, is being paid for
out of $386,000 in grants from the Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission, two $200,000 grants from
the Florida Recreational Development Assistance Program
and $154,000 from the Federal Emergency Management
Agency.
Cindy Giametta, the city's grant administrator, said the
plan is to add picnic tables and some bollard lights along
the sidewalk and install an irrigation system. The two ends
of the riverwalk will be concrete, to enable fishers to load
or unload, but between them will be wood with a sea grate
in the middle. There'll be a little fishing platform going out
into the river to fish off of as well. Two sunken vessels have
been removed, but the "Capt. Fuzz" remains after the con-
tractor got it floated to the surface. "They're still working
with FWC to get it removed," said Giametta.
PHOTO COURTESY BASKERVILLE DONOVAN INC.


The Times I AS


-7 FC- I
*0






A6 I The Times


Local


Thursday, December 11,2008


Knapke new


manager


of state park

Franklin County is pleased to welcome Mark
Knapke, new manager of Dr. Julian G. Bruce St.
George Island State Park, Orman House State
Park and the Three Service-
men Detail in Apalachicola,
A native of Ohio, Knapke
comes here after serving with
the Florida Park Service for 12
years in the Florida Keys. He
was stationed at Fort Zachary
Taylor in Key West for seven
years and John Pennekamp
State Park in Key Largo for
KNAPKE five years.
Knapke said he arrived on
the island about three weeks
ago and began work Dec. 1. His wife, Marcia, will
be working for Century 21 Collins Realty. He re-
places Tony Tindell, who managed the park on
St. George Island for five years. Tindell has taken
a position at Topsail State Park in Destin.


Santa to dine in Apalachicola
Santa Claus himself will be in
Apalachicola very soon!
Santa will be making an appear-
ance at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 16, at
the Apalachicola Community Center.
The visit is sponsored by the Apala-
chicola Bay Charter School fifth- and
eighth-grade classes. All donations
will benefit their class field trips.
For $5, children can sit in Santa's
lap and share all their Christmas
wishes, write him a letter and enjoy a
dinner of a hot dog, chips and a drink.
For $10, children enjoy all of the
above, plus a photo with Santa and a
return letter from Santa in the mail.

Gulf State Community Bank
employees pitch in
Employees of Gulf State Commu-
nity Bank collected $7,500 in personal
donations to contribute to community
charities.
"We are so thankful to have a job
and so thankful for people sticking


News BRIEFS
with us," said Tammy Cannon, spokes-
woman. "These are such hard times;
we wanted to give back to Franklin
County. We dedicated the gift to our
customers, and they were so grateful
several of them pitched in with con-
tributions of their own. We wound up
with a total of over $8,000."
Cannon said the funds were divided
among Franklin's Promise Food Bank
and Christmas Project; Carrabelle
Food Pantry; Franklin County Senior
Center, Franklin County Humane So-
ciety and three Wakulla organizations.

Fish fry to benefit Kidney
Valerie Kidney is recovering from
her second cancer surgery and will
begin radiation treatments in Janu-
ary. She will have surgery again after
treatments and will be unable to work
for many months.
In the spirit of Christmas, the "Iron
Men," a nondenominational group
along with the women's groups from
St. George Island United Methodist
Church and First United Methodist


Church of Apalachicola, are having a
fish fry and bake sale from 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Friday, Dec. 12, at the First Unit-
ed Methodist Church in Apalachicola.
The donation will be $7.

Camp Gordon Johnston to move
Tuesday, Dec. 9 was the Camp Gor-
don Johnston World War II museum's
last day at the Marine Street location
in Carrabelle.
The city has offered a much larger
location at the new City Complex on
Gray Avenue in Carrabelle. The new
location will have double the space,
large open areas for displays, a small
video theatre, a gift shop and room for
offices and computers.
The volunteers will be busy putting
together previously unseen displays
dealing with Florida's history in World
War II. This facility will be the hub for
all of the museum's community activi-
ties and is a perfect location for the
annual Camp Gordon Johnston Days
dinner/dance.
The museum will reopen Jan. 5.


ATTENTION


THE FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS HAS THE FOLLOWING
VOLUNTEER POSITIONS THAT NEED TO BE FILLED:


FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT -

(1) DISTRICT 3, AT LARGE MEMBER

(2) ALTERNATE MEMBER

THE ADVISORY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT REVIEWS APPLICA-
TIONS WITHIN THE COUNTY FOR VARIANCES, SPECIAL EXCEP-
TIONS AND APPEALS TO ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS MADE BY
STAFF REGARDING DEVELOPMENT.



THESE ARE VOLUNTEER POSITIONS AND WILL REQUIRE ATTEN-
DANCE AT APPROXIMATELY ONE MEETING PER MONTH.

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED, PLEASE CONTACT THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY PLANNING AND BUILDING DPEARTMENT AT 653-9783 OR
SUBMIT A LETTER EXPRESSING YOUR INTEREST TO THE FRANK-
LIN COUNTY PLANNING & BUILDING DEPARTMENT, 34 FORBES
STREET, SUITE 1, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320.

RESPONSE MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN JANUARY 5TH,
2009.





O fduiv "St. George Island's
-=rr21 Real Estate Specialists"
Collins Realty, Inc.


CATHERINE'S COTTAGE
APALACHICOLA 2BR/2BA
new bungalow blends early
Florida and Caribbean flavors
with sweeping arches, French
doors, and gabled tin roof.
Offers pine floors, exquisite
master suite, antique cypress
exterior.
MLS#201207........... $390,000








PYE COTTAGE
SECLUDED BAY FRONT 3BR/
2BA home with boat dock.
Features cypress construction
with juniper interior walls and
ceilings, copper roof, wood
burning stove, wide screen
porches, fully furnished, and
extra sleeping loft.
MLS#207443........... $875,000


ISLAND RETREAT OSPREY WATCH
DUPLEX located across the INTERIOR 5BR/4BA home
street from bike path with easy in exclusive Plantation gated
beach access. Each unit is 2BR/ community features private
2BA. Close to shopping and res- swimming pool, fifth BR used
taurants. as a den with sleeper sofa.
MLS#233887.............. $395,000 Amenities include community
pool and tennis.
MLS#109127........... $850,000


MEMORY MAKER WEBER
GULF FRONT 4BR/2BA cottage CANAL FRONT 2BR/2BA
features hardwood floors, great ground-level cottage on DEEP
floor plan (2BR/1BA on each WATER CANAL with boat
side of living area), cypress exte- dock. House needs work but
rior & interior, new roof in 12/05, will make a great fishing cot-
beach front gazebo, boardwalk tage!
to beach. MLS#106066........... $449,000
MLS#208823............ $1,295,000


GULF VIEW one-acre MOL Plantation homesite with great vegetation and
possible Gulf view. Path cleared for easy viewing. MLS#202989....$249,000.

CANAL FRONT homesite with boat dock. Beautiful vegetation and located
in quiet residential area. MLS#208100................................................. $389,000.

GULF VIEW Plantation homesite with pines and palmettos close to beach
club, pool and tennis. MLS#204470..................................................... $259,000.

EASTPOINT BAY VIEW high, wooded homesite in Gramercy Plantation with
community dock on the bay. MLS#233521......................................... $195,000.

Please Call for our complete selection of Homesites and Investment
Properties on St. George Island and surrounding Franklin County.

CENTURY 21 Collins Realty, Inc.
60 E. Gulf Beah Dr. St. George Island, FL 32328

(850) 927-3100 (866) 382-4296
www.Century21CollinsRealty.com I- M -o email:Sales@CenturyCollinsRealty.com
Each Office is Independantly Owned and Operated


Travis
FICKLING Gra850.
F IC N850.653.6713
& COMPANY HoY Howz
& COMPA~NY850.653.5112


A Full Service Real Estate Company


F-aiassic lOcation for a nomirie business
Cleared one acre lot on Hwy 65 just
north of Hwy 98 Zoned single family
home industry Short walk to the bay
for great fishing
MLS # 209498..................... $129,000


CALL FOR SPECIAL DEAL! OWNER
FINANCING!! 5BR/4 5BA Southside
Historic Apalach beautyl Built In 1906
and exquisitely renovated in 2006 this
stately home will take your breath
away Cjypress and pine floors,
extensive handut crown molding
throughout the house Screen porch
overlooks private backyard Stunnigl
MLS# 208150.................... $499,000


Kim Davis
850.653.6875


s Stanley
653.6477
ard Jackie Golden
850.899.8433
Jamie Crum
850.899.8758
Ed Mitchem
850.653.5772


DAYFi-nui I iunuiU IELANDU!
3BR/2Bath home on one acre lot,
East end of SGI Lovely interior w/
vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, lots
of windows Screen porch overlooking
the long dock and excellent fishing
opportunities right from your backyard!
Plenty of enclosed storage What a
dealiU
MI Ra#Q --.-....R .-- $475flflfl


3 Bedroom/ 1 bath bayview home in First Tier Plantation 3BR/2 5BA is a 4BR/3 5BA First tier SGI Plantation
Apalachicola This cozy home has fantastic deal at this price Excellent home Immaculate home w/ awe
deeded access to the bay large lot viewsoftheGulf-youcanseedolphins inspiring views of the Gulfl Vaulted
with shady live oaks Convenient play from any of the decks Beautifully ceiling in living, fireplace, large kitchen,
location decorated interior is a perfect beach many decks Tropical landscaped
MLS # 208220..................$219,000 house Tropical landscaped pool is pool w/ waterfall newly replastered
sure to please Excellent rental income
MLS# 206497...................$895,000 MLS# 207646................$1,199,000
Please call us for a complete selection of properties for
sale in the Apalachicola Bay area! St.12 George Island FL 3232Blvd.
_rX1V St. George Island FIL 32328


www.ficklingofflorida.comr


13 850.927.2255


Now, at a $105 savings*, you can try our unlimited local and long distance,
phone with 8 calling features, along with a consistently fast Internet connec-
tion that's not shared with your neighbors, as cable can be.**

Want a triple-play bundle that includes DIRECTV' service? Ask about
special offers and every-month savings on our other bundles.



To learn more or to sign up now,
call 877.342.9394 or visit www.FairPoint P in
-------------------------------------------- communications
HIGH-SPEED INTERNET 0 PHONE 0 TELEVISION

*Savings reflects a $35/mo. FairPoint bill credit for 3 months. Starting in the 4th month, price will be $89.95/mo. ($84.95/mo. with 12 mo. term commitment). **FairPoint
delivers a dedicated connection to your home from our high speed Internetnetwork. Unfortunately, cable Internet service shares a connection with other cable modem
customers in the neighborhood. Upgrades to services in bundles available at additional cost.
FullHouse bundles are available to residential customers for a limited time and are subject to change without notification. Eligibility for FullHouse packages requires
services to be invoiced on a single bill. (DIRECTV services will be billed separately). Customers who subscribe to DIRECTV through providers other than FairPoint are
not eligible for FullHouse with DIRECTV bundles. Not all services available in all areas. The bundled price does not include other applicable charges such as: equipment,
taxes, fees, FCC Line Charge, Universal Service Fee, and other surcharges. Prices apply to bundled service only. 'Unlimited Long Distance: Minutes available on one
phone line only. Excludes 900, international, directory assistance, operator services, and dial-up Internet calls. Long distance minutes apply to residential voice service
only and apply to calls terminating in the United States, its territories and Canada. FairPoint may suspend, restrict or cancel the service if usage is inconsistent with resi-
dential voice usage. High-Speed Internet Service: Prices based on Standard High- Speed Internet service. Free modem to use as long as the customer keeps the service.
Additional terms and conditions may apply. Early Termination: Early termination will result in a fee equal to the current retail rate for High Speed Internet multiplied
by the number of months remaining in the term. If subscriber decides to upgrade to a larger bundle, that term will begin from the date of the change in service. If the
customer does not renew the term of service or upgrade to a larger bundle the customer will be automatically charged a month to month rate.
DIRECTV service provided by DIRECTV. Hardware and programming available separately. Receipt of DIRECTV programming is subject to the terms of the DIRECTV
Customer Agreement; copy provided at directv.comAegal and mailed to customers in the first month. DIRECTV and the Cyclone Design logo are trademarks of DIRECTV,
Inc. 2008 FairPoint Communicatons, Inc. All rights reserved. 674SEFH






Thursday, December 11,2008


County unemployment


rises in October


Franklin County's un-
employment rate rose by
two-tenths of 1 percent in
October, up to 4.8 percent,
but the county remained
among the best for jobless
numbers among Florida's
67 counties.
According to preliminary
labor market statistics re-
leased Friday by the Florida
Agency for Workforce Inno-
vation, 230 people out of a
county labor force of 4,833
were jobless last month.
A month earlier, in Sep-
tember, the labor force was
larger, with 5,020 people,
and the jobless rate was
lower, at 4.6 percent, as 229
people were without jobs.
Last month's numbers
were more than 1.5 per-
centage points worse than
a year ago. In October 2007,
the jobless rate in the coun-
ty was at 3.4 percent, with
163 people unemployed out
of a similar size labor force
of 4,838.
Last month, Walton
County has the state's
lowest jobless rate at 4.5
percent, followed by Ala-
chua County at 4.6 per-
cent. Franklin and Sumter
counties were both at 4.8
percent, with Leon and
Liberty counties next at 4.9
percent.
Florida's October 2008
unemployment rate is the
highest since Dec. 1993,
and is a half-percentage


point higher than the na-
tional unemployment rate
of 6.5 percent.
"The Agency for Work-
force Innovation and our
partners throughout the
workforce system are rein-
forcing our efforts to provide
a wide array of programs
and specialized assistance
to help job seekers gain
meaningful employment,"
said Monesia T. Brown, di-
rector of AWI. "One of the
many valuable resources
available is the Employ
Florida Marketplace Web
site, which provides a pow-
erful online job-matching
tool for both job seekers
and employers. It provides
job seekers with immedi-
ate access to nearly 200,000
job openings ranging from
entry-level to executive tal-
ent."
The state's 24 Regional
Workforce Boards are work-
ing to serve the employment
needs of the people of their
communities by working
closely with local economic
development, education,
and business partners to
help employ Floridians.
To learn more about local
efforts throughout the state,
contact the Regional Work-
force Boards at www.work-
forceflorida.com/boards.
For more information
other Agency for Workforce
Innovation programs, go to
www.FloridaJobs.org.


NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING


The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest
Florida Regional Housing Authority will hold
a Special Meeting, December 18, 2008 in the
Regency Room of the Ramada Inn North, 2900
North Monroe St., Tallahassee, Florida. Meeting
will begin at 1:00 p.m. E.S.T. The meeting will
be open to the public.



The City of Carrabelle is seeking a volunteer
to serve on the City of Carrabelle Planning and
Zoning Board. Anyone interested can submit a
letter of interest to the City of Carrabelle at
PO Box 569, Carrabelle, Fl 32322.

For further information please contact Courtney
Dempsey at 850-697-2727.
















ECONOMY FULL SET DENTURES*................$380
Custom Full Set Dentures.................................. $660
Custom Full Upper or Lower........................... $385
Premium Full Set Dentures............................ $950
Reline (each)................................ ............... $145
Simple Extraction (each)................................. $65
Full-mouth X-ray (required for extractions)........... $65
Fees effective December15, 2008

A r l e r P m i P I


617 W. 23rd Street
Panama City Square
Panama City, FL 32405
(850) 872-6155


General Dentist
William C. Knapke,DDS


NO APPOINTMENT SAME DAY SERVICE
NECESSARY IF IN BEFORE 9 A.M.
ON-SITE DENTURE
DENTAL LAB REPAIR
M" IbOlerIgood o nr y at I
Affordable Dentures-PanamaCity, PA

l SAVE $50 SAVE $25 I
I on Custom or Premium on Custom or Premium
Full Set Dentures Single or Partial Denture
Coupon must be presented when services are provided Expires 01/3009
FLORIDA CODE REQUIRES THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT "THESE ARE MINIMUM FEES AND CHARGES MAY
INCREASE DEPENDING ON THE TREATMENT REQUIRED THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE
FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY
OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF
RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE,
EXAM ATION OR TREATMENT"
WegladlyacceptCash, Checks, Visa, MasterCard and Discoveras paymentfor our services.

Former inorm tio, peas cal 1800DEN URE(1-00-36-873


Local


The Times | A7


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
Artist, performer Alan Garry strummed and displayed his paintings at the third annual Holiday
Fresh Market held Dec. 6 in downtown Apalachicola. Several dozen local artists and artisans dis-
played their wares from 1. to 4 p.m. on a perfect winter day.




STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT

(FL0038857-008-DW1P/NR, FL0038857-010-DW1R/RO &

Water Quality Based Effluent Limitation Study)


The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue a permit to City of Apalachicola, One Avenue E,
Apalachicola, FL 32320 to operate an existing 1.0 MGD annual average daily flow (AADF) permitted capacity activated sludge domestic
wastewater treatment facility. The treatment facility will operate in the advanced wastewater treatment mode. The Sequencing Batch
Reactor (SBR) WWTP operates in the anoxic, anaerobic, and aerobic phases. The WWTP will
have provisions for pretreatment (screening and grit removal), secondary clarification, equalization, filtration, reaeration, chlorination,
dechlorination by sulfur dioxide, digestion and sludge dewatering. The dewatered sludge will be transported to Franklin County Central
Landfill. A reject storage pond is provided.
This permitting action is the issuance of a wastewater permit to allow continued operation of the existing 1.0 MGD AADF
permitted capacity wastewater treatment facility with effluent disposal to Huckleberry Swamp (receiving wetland), designated as outfall
D-001. From Huckleberry Swamp, the effluent discharges to Huckleberry Creek (Class III fresh waters).
In addition, the applicant proposes to add a new 0.88 MGD annual average daily flow (AADF) capacity Part III public access
reclaimed water service area that provides for irrigation of two large, dedicated sites as well as irrigation of landscaped areas, medians,
residential lots, parks, playgrounds and other smaller parcels, where practical. The reuse sites are categorized into three tier groups. Tier 1
sites (181 acres with a capacity of 0.70 MGD) are significant parcels that are owned by the City for use as Land Application Sites (LAS)
for irrigation, as well as recreation opportunities,
such as nature trails or group sports. Tier 2 sites (47 acres with a capacity of 0.18 MGD) are mostly City, but also County and State,
controlled and developed properties that have some areas suitable for irrigation. Tier 3 sites are private parcels (approximately 100 prop-
erties) where most properties are designated for future extensions of the reclaimed water lines. Eleven are available now.
The wastewater treatment facility will be modified to include the installation of a new pump station, a new reuse water storage
tank, chemical feed equipment, continuous monitoring equipment and a SCADA modified system.
Various phases of the Level II Water Quality Based Effluent Limitation (WQBEL) Study were conducted from April 2004
through November 2004 pursuant to Rules 62-600.430 and 62-650, Florida Administrative Code (EA.C.), to establish the final effluent
limits for the City of Apalachicola WWTP's permit. The plan of study for the WQBEL was approved in July 2002. The WQBEL study
was conducted by Biological Research Associates through Baskerville Donovan, Inc., to the Department on September 20, 2005, for
review and approval.
The Department proposes the following effluent limits for the City's WWTP based on the results of the Level II WQBEL
Study to be equal to the current permit's AWT limits and the minimum required by Rule 62-611.420(2), EA.C. 5, 5, 3, 1 mg/L annual
averages for CBOD5, Total Suspended Solids (TSS), Total Nitrogen (TN) and Total Phosphorus (TP) for a receiving wetland with basic
disinfection. The wetland discharge limits at the Huckleberry Swamp exit point into Huckleberry Creek will remain as proposed in Rule
62-611.450(1), EA.C. at 3.0, 0.2 and 0.02 mg/L annual averages for TN, TP and unionized ammonia. The Department recommends that
the WWTP initiate a reuse program to include land application at AWT levels to reduce the nutrient loading to Huckleberry Swamp and
Huckleberry Creek and in the future to use D- 001 Huckleberry Swamp only as a back-up discharge to a reuse program pursuant to Rule
,.:-.,.lri -in F. EA.C.
The facility is located at latitude 2942'58" N, longitude 8502'13" W off US Hwy 98, adjacent to Franklin County Work
Camp, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 in Franklin County.
The Department has permitting jurisdiction under Sections 403.087 and 403.0885, Florida Statutes and Florida Administrative
Code Rules 62-4, 62-600, 62-601, 62-302, 62- 610, 62-611, 62-620, 62-640, 62-650 and 62-699. The project is not exempt from permit-
ting procedures. The Department has determined that a wastewater permit is required for the proposed activities.
The intent to issue and application file are available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at Northwest District Office, Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection, 160 Governmen-
tal Center, Suite 308, Pensacola, FL 32502-5794.
The Department will issue the permit with the attached conditions unless a timely petition for an administrative hearing is
filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, within fourteen days of receipt of notice. The procedures for petitioning for a
hearing are set forth below.
A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's proposed permitting decision may petition for an admin-
istrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes. The petition must contain the information set forth
below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard,
Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000.
Under Rule 62-110.106(4), Florida Administrative Code, a person may request enlargement of the time for filing a petition for
an administrative hearing. The request must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel before the end of the time
period for filing a petition for an administrative hearing.
Petitions filed by any persons other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3), Florida Statutes, must be filed
within fourteen days of publication of the notice or within fourteen days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. Under
Section 120.60(3), Florida Statutes, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition
within fourteen days of receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication.
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure
of any person to file a petition within fourteen days of receipt of notice shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to request an ad-
ministrative determination (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57,Florida Statutes. Any subsequent intervention (in a proceeding
initiated by another party) will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-
106.205, Florida Administrative Code.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department's action is based must contain the following information:
(a) The name, address, and telephone number of each petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner's
representative, if any; the Department permit identification number and the county in which the subject matter or activity
is located;
(b) A statement of how and when each petitioner received notice of the Department action;
(c) A statement of how each petitioner's substantial interests are affected by the Department action;
(d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate;
(e) A statement of facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the Department action;
(f) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, as well as the rules and statutes which entitle the petitioner to relief; and
(g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wants the Department to
take.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition means that
the Department's final action may be different from the position taken by it in this notice. Persons whose substantial interests will be
affected by any such final decision of the Department have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with
the requirements set forth above.
Mediation under Section 120.573, Florida Statutes, is not available for this proceeding.


NE ~*I


A SONG FOR THE SEASON






A8 I The Times


Local


Thursday, December 11, 2008


Happy ENDINGS


How I won the dog lottery


By Chester
Special to the Times
This week's Happy End-
ing story is told from the
viewpoint of Chester Bach-
er, who now resides with his
family on St. George Island.
One reason I always adopt,
rather than purchase, pets
is because I'm a sucker. The
other reason is that they
know when they have been
rescued and they never for-


get. Less than one shelter
dog in four finds a forever
home and less than one cat
in 10. Let adoption be an
option. Lois Swoboda
Three years ago I came
to the first Oyster Spat Fes-
tival on St George Island.
Kara Landiss, with the
Franklin County Humane
Society, brought a bunch
of us (dogs and cats) to the
festival. Many children and
grownups came by to pet


us and take us for short
walks. Joe and Charolette
Bacher came by to see me.
I was very excited to have
Joe take me for a walk. I
tried my best to behave but
the smells and scents in
the park were incredible, I
was so excited, I pulled big
Joe along, I knew he really
liked me, and so did Ms.
Charolette
Everyone pleaded with
Joe to take me home. He


said that at this time that
it would not be fair to have
me and not be able to give
me the proper care be-
cause they had a business
and he did not want to
leave me alone at home.
I really wanted to go with
them, however I think that
when you adopted us we
want to be safe and happy
and not alone. I was sad but
I understood. I went back
to the Humane Society and
waited. Ms. Charolette sent
money to help pay for my
shots.
In November my friend
Terry Brewer came to see
me and he adopted me. I
thought I was going home
with Terry, but instead he
had his friend Cathy put a
bow on my collar and deliv-
er me to Ms Charolette on
her birthday Nov. 13. Wow
was she surprised!
When I saw Mr. Joe, I
wagged and wagged my
tail I was so happy and
when he reached down to
pet me I knew I could stay.
Joe and I Io to the beach
elery morning, he lets me
dil and clihase sand crabls
and s\iml I also c-t to


see some of my dog pals all
from the humane society,
Baby owners Susan and
Jim, Rosie, owners Terry
and Skip. Sometimes I get
to walk Rosie home. I love
her.
The first time I went to
the bay I went with my dog
pal, Rocky, owners Sharon
and Larry. He's from South
Carolina; he taught me how
to fetch and put my head in
the water. Remember my
friend Terry who adopted
me? Well every evening, he
comes by to pick me up in
his cool van, and he takes
me to the bay. He brings
my best buddy Rocket and
we get to run and play on
the bay.
Mr. Joe and Ms Cha-
rolette have taken me on
many trips; I have traveled
to Greensboro NC, Atlanta
GA, and Denver CO. I get
to go shopping to Panama
City, and Tallahassee.
Ms. Charolette
makes sure
that


I get lots of exercise and
chicken fingers for lunch.
Ms. Charolette gave me
a birthday party at The Wa-
terStreet Hotel in Apala-
chicola. We had lots of good
food and all my friends
brought me dog toys. We
stayed overnight; am I not
the lottery dog or what?
PS. On Sept. 2, my
friends Terry Brewer and
Kara Landiss surprised
Ms Charolette with Candy.
She is my little sister and
she will have to tell you her
own story later. Thank you
for my home and new sister
Candy
Chester
Lois Swoboda is ar-
chiving success stories of
animal adoptions for her
series "Happy Endings"
for The Times. To share
a story for "Happy End-
ings," please email Lois at
lswoboda@starfl.com.


- XL7-- QdII'-



71D jJ Am Xe.j e e,11


USap p 1d


?Pe-ipe- is 44oUidaty


Season!


Pick up

your

copy

at The

News

Herald

today!


Mail-in Urder Form
Please send me copies of the 2009 Pet of the year calendar at $10.00 per copy and $1.50 for
shipping and handling. (Calendars also available for pick up at The News Herald office.)


Great

gift

for the

office or

stocking

stuffer!
Only

$2.00!


Make your holiday meals fun and festive with The Holiday's Best
Recipe Collection! This recipe book features 60 top recipes in six
categories from finalists in The News Herald's 2008 Holiday's Best
Cooking Contest plus, winning recipes from
Holiday's Best Cooking Contest 2007.

All proceeds benefit The Newspaper In Education program, which
provides classroom sets of newspapers to area schools. This real-world
learning tool builds literacy and critical thinking skills in our students.

Mail-In Order Form
Please send me copies of the 2008 Holiday's Best Recipe Collection at $2.00 per copy and
$1.50 for shipping and handling. (Books also available for pick up at The News Herald office.)
I Name
| Address
City State Zip
Phone Email
Make checks payable to The News Herald Newpaper In
Mail order form to: The News Herald NIE
P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402
L mmm mrmaM


\ 4


NE I






Thursday, December 11,2008


Local


The Times | A9


Community CALENDAR


Thursday, Dec. 11
Wandering Star Quilting
Club Luncheon. Pirate's Cove
Restaurant on Timber Island.
11:30 Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Luncheon and Information
Specials at the Franklin County
Senior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-3760.
Philaco Sr. Citizens Christmas
Program. Trinity Episcopal
Church. 4 p.m. Entertainment
and light refreshments.

Friday, Dec. 12
Apalachicola History, Culture
and Arts Board. 8:30 a.m. at City
Hall. For info, call 653-8715.


Breakfast at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30 a.m.,
meal at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call
697-3760.

Saturday, Dec. 13
Yard Sale to benefit David
and Allison Brown. 8 a.m. Taylor
Building Supply in Eastpoint.
Call 323-1300.
Eastpoint Christmas Parade.
U.S. 98. 10 a.m. Call 653-7401.

Sunday, Dec. 14
Community Christmas
Program. Ilse Newell concert
series. Trinity Episcopal Church.
4 p.m. Call 653-9419.


Monday, Dec. 15
Breakfast at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30 a.m.,
meal at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call
697-3760.
Computer classes at the
Franklin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Call Joyce
Durham 670-5951 and set up a
time.

Tuesday, Dec. 16
Franklin County Board of
County Commissioners Regular
Meeting 9 a.m. at courthouse
annex. For more info, call 653-
8861.
There will be a meeting of the


Franklin County Partnership
for Children and Youth at the
Eastpoint Church of God from
3:30-5 p.m. Call 508-8566.
Art Club at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. 2 to 4 p.m. Call 697-
3760.

Wednesday, Dec. 17
Apalachicola Traffic Safety
Committee. Noon at City Hall.
For info call 653-8715.

Thursday, Dec. 18
Carrabelle Planning and
Zoning Meeting, 4:30 p.m. at
Senior Citizens Building, 103
Ave. E For more info, call 697-


3618.
Apalachicola Community
Pride. 6 p.m. at City Hall. For
info, call 653-8715.
Wandering Star Quilting Club.
Chillas Hall Lanark Village. 1-3
p.m. Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Luncheon and Information
Specials at the Franklin County
Senior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-
3760

Friday, Dec. 19
Breakfast at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30 a.m.,
meal at 8 a.m. $2 donation. Call
697-3760.


Need a Career Change?
Train to become a Certified Florida Correctional Officer
Want to earn a great salary and have the opportunity for career growth? Become a Correctional Officer!
Beginning January 15, the Public Safety Division will offer the Correctional Officer Basic Standards program
from 5:30 to 9:30 pm, Monday through Thursday, at the Gulf/Franklin Center. This program offers certification
training to those looking to become employed as a correctional officer in Florida. Correctional Officer Basic
Standards includes training in correctional facility operations, legal issues, interpersonal skills, emergency
preparedness, first aid, CPR, defensive tactics and firearms.
Applications and registration packets must be submitted and approved before registration and are available
at the Gulf/Franklin Center in Port St. Joe. For more information, call Sharon Burdeshaw or Brenda Burkett at
the Gulf/Franklin Center, 227.9670.
Early Registration for SPRING 09 is Still Open
Don't Miss Your Chance Early Registration runs to December 18
Pick up your copy of the Spring 2009 Class Schedule from the Gulf/Franklin Center or visit www.gulfcoast.
edu to search through hundreds of available classes. Don't miss your chance to register early, now through
December 18.
The Counseling Center is available to assists students Monday Thursday, 8:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Students can
also register online at www.gulfcoast.edu 7 days a week!

00JA^T Gul CoT Mask ^^^^^^^^^^^^


Temperature
Date High Low % Precip
Thu, Dec 11 580 340 70%
Fri, Dec 12 580 390 10%
Sat, Dec 13 630 460 0%
Sun, Dec 14 670 480 10%
Mon, Dec 15 680 500 10%
Tue, Dec 17 640 510 10%
Wed, Dec 18 630 500 30%

TIDE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
Cat Point Minus0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03

APALACHICOLA


12/11 Thu 12:10AM
02:01PM
12/12 Fri 12:56AM
06:20PM
12/13 Sat 01:49AM
07:02PM
12/14 Sun 02:45AM
07:36PM
12/15 Mon 03:44AM
08:03PM
12/16 Tue 04:46AM
08:25PM
12/17 Wed 12:43AM
01:54PM


09:08AM
08:05PM
09:59AM
08:52PM
10:50AM
09:39PM
11:40AM
10:31PM
12:28PM
11:31PM
01:13PM


05:52AM 1.3 H
08:44PM 1.1 H


CARRABELLE


12/11 Thu 06:55AM
05:52PM
12/12 Fri 07:46AM
06:39PM
12/13 Sat 12:24AM
05:37PM
12/14 Sun 01:20AM
06:11PM
12/15 Mon 02:19AM
06:38PM
12/16 Tue 03:21AM
07:OOPM
12/17 Wed 04:27AM
07:19PM


04:05PM
11:31PM
04:55PM

08:37AM
07:26PM
09:27AM
08:18PM
10:15AM
09:18PM
11:00AM
10:30PM
11:41AM
11:51PM


2.2 H
2.7 H
2.2 H


Sponsor the Weekly

Almanac Call:

653-8868


Digital Mammography | Mammosite | Image Recovery | Breast Cancer Navigator Services


Tallahassee Memorial provides the most
comprehensive breast health care in the Big Bend.

For women the most important picture you'll ever take, is your yearly
screening mammogram. The Sharon Ewing Walker Breast Health Center
at Tallahassee Memorial provides digital mammography in a warm caring
environment. And if you need follow-up, TMH offers a full array of
services including the Big Bend's most experienced Mammosite provider.

Make an appointment for your next digital mammogram today at the
Sharon Ewing Walker Breast Health Center... Because your Breast Health
is Important.


JL

Tallahassee Memorial
Sharon Ewing Walker
Breast Health Center
Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare


(850) 431-5433
www.tmh.org


*I






Al 0 I The Times


Local


Thursday, December 11,2008


OYSTER from page Al


two years, the estimated
oyster population on Cat
Point Bar and East Hole
Bar during 2007 and 2008
did not indicate strong
production trends, accord-
ing to the report.
"Stable or declining
population estimates on
Cat Point and East Hole
Bars over the past two
years generally indicated
that oyster populations
were stressed, most likely
from factors associated
with higher salinity re-
gimes," the report says,
referring to the effect of
the drought on the level of
saltwater in the estuary.

Lull in fishing effort
helps Cat Point
The report said esti-
mates of production for
Cat Point Bar declined
from 514 bags per acre in
August 2007 to 478 bags
per acre in January 2008
and 381 bags per acre
in September 2008. Oys-
ter density also declined
from 264 to 123 oysters per
square meter during the
same sampling intervals.
But because of what
the report called "unusu-
ally low harvesting effort"
on Cat Point and East Hole
Bars at the beginning of
this year's winter harvest-
ing season, the numbers of
available oysters appear to
have swelled.
"Estimated production,
of 784 bags per acre, has
rebounded on Cat Point
Bar since September,
probably as a result of lim-
ited fishing effort during
the first two months of the
winter harvesting season,"
the report says.
"The fact that no one
had fished on them has al-
lowed some of the smaller
oysters there to grow to
market size," Berrigan
said. "There are oysters
there. They're not neces-
sarily plentiful there but
they can catch enough


right now to make a living.
But how long that will last
I don't know."
The experts said data
over the past three years
indicates oyster abundanc-
es and potential produc-
tion are slowing because
of declines in what it called
"recruitment, survival and
growth."
"Negative trends in
population dynamics are
likely associated with
higher salinity regimes,
which in turn contributed
to alterations in the food
web and higher natural
mortality," it said.
"What we're seeing
now is the realization of a
prediction we had made
that essentially two years
after the beginning of a
drought or so we begin to
see problems," Berrigan
said. "We're quite confi-
dent these are drought-re-
lated problems."
He said though oysters
initially "do quite well un-
der high salinity condi-
tions," their reproductive
success is affected over
the longer term.
"You don't get the num-
ber of recruits, and they
don't survive well, but typi-
cally these droughts don't
last that long and they
can be masked," Berrigan
said. "The data for eight
months is still not clear as
to exactly what we're find-
ing out there, but we're be-
ginning to tend to a stress-
ful situation.
"The lack of freshwater
is a primary contributor
to environmental qual-
ity out there, and once
the environmental qual-
ity changes, several things
happen," he said. "The en-
vironment becomes more
marine, which allows for
establishment of marine
predators such as boring
sponges, whelks, drills and
stone crabs.
"This changes the food
web so that the phyto-
plankton is changed, (and
it is a question) whether or


not there is adequate nour-
ishment for young oysters
to grow," Berrigan said.
"Also disease is a sum-
mer stress situation, and
certainly we have had that
problem of losing oysters
during the summer."
"When you combine
all these things, there is
stress on environmen-
tal quality, and it causes
stresses on these animals
and it eventually take its
toll," he said.

Higher salinity leads
to greater predation
The report clearly
states predation of young
oysters has increased be-
cause of the higher salinity
in the bay.
'Asuccessful spatsettle-
ment was recorded in the
spring of 2008, but the posi-
tive effect of recruitment
to the larger size classes
was absent, suggesting an
extensive mortality among
spat and juvenile oysters,"
it reads. "Observations
by divers indicate that in-
creased predation is con-
tributing substantially to
mortality among spat and
juvenile oysters.
"Stone crab burrows
(on Cat Point Bar) have
been estimated to be as
high as one burrow per
square meter in areas
where stone crabs are
concentrated," the report
says. "The presence and
abundance of stone crabs
can be associated with
higher salinity regimes
which allow predators
with marine affinities to
become established within
the estuary.
The report notes that
though Dry Bar and other
eastern bars tradition-
ally have been subject to
the most harvesting pres-
sure, reefs in the western
portion of the bay and the
"Miles" and St. Vincent
Sound areas are expected
to continue to support har-


2008-2009 FCTDC PUBLIC MEETING

SCHEDULE

The Franklin County Tourist Development Council will meet the first Tues-
day of each month beginning at 3:00 p.m. Meetings are held at Franklin County
Courthouse Annex in Apalachicola, and every third meeting is held at the Franklin
County Public Library in Carrabelle at 211 St. James Avenue. Changes to this
schedule will be published in the Apalachicola Times

The FCTDC Individual Committees will meet the third Tuesday of each month
at the St. George Island Firehouse beginning at 1:30 p.m.

December 16, 2008 SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meeting 1:30 pm

January 6, 2009 Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Full Council 3:00 pm
January 22, 2009 (Thursday) SGI Firehouse, SPECIAL MARKETING
WORKSHOP BEGINNING @ 1:30 pm.

February 3, 2009 Carrabelle Public Library, Full Council 3:00 pm
February 17, 2009 SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meeting 1:30 pm

March 3, 2009 Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Full Council 3:00 pm
March 17, 2009 SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meeting 1:30 pm

April 7, 2009 Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Full Council 3:00 pm
April 21, 2009 SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meeting 1:30 pm

May 5, 2009 Carrabelle Public Library, Full Council 3:00 pm
May 19, 2009 SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meeting 1:30 pm

June 2, 2009 Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Full Council 3:00 pm
June 16, 2009 SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meeting 1:30 pm

July 7, 2009 Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Full Council 3:00 pm
July 21, 2009 SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meeting 1:30 pm

August 4, 2009 Carrabelle Public Library, Full Council 3:00 pm
August 18, 2009 SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meeting 1:30 pm

September 1, 2009 Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Full Council 3:00 pm
September 15, 2009 SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meeting 1:30 pm

October 6, 2009 Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Full Council 3:00 pm
October 20, 2009 SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meeting 1:30 pm

November 3, 2009 Carrabelle Public Library, Full Council 3:00 pm
November 17, 2009 SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meeting 1:30 pm

December 1, 2009 Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Full Council 3:00 pm
December 15, 2009 SGI Firehouse, Individual Committee Meeting 1:30 p.m.


1,200


600 h"


400 -


200 -


0 -
AB oyster
harvesting
licenses


2000


vesting at moderate lev-
els.
"The impacts of high
salinity are less severe
on the western reefs than
on the eastern reefs. The
prevailing circulation pat-
terns move freshwater
from the Apalachicola
River westward over Dry
Bar and St. Vincent Bar,
and into the Miles, mitigat-
ing somewhat the impacts
of prolonged high salin-
ity conditions," the report
says.
With no increase in
production expected, "any
change can be expected
to be a reduction in stand-
ing stocks and production
as harvest continues. If
demand holds, there re-
mains a likelihood that
oyster resources could be
stretched by the end of the
winter harvesting season,"
the report says.
"The recent closures
of oyster harvesting areas
in Louisiana and Texas as
a result of Hurricane Ike
placed additional pressure
on the productive reefs in
Apalachicola Bay to meet
the early season demand,"
the reports says. "This
concentrated harvesting
effort could lead to re-
duced stocks at the end of
the harvesting season."


2001 2002


2003 2004


2005


Landings last year
highest since 2002
The report notes that
since 1980, reported land-
ings in Florida have ranged
from about 1 million to 6.5
million pounds of meats,
with the highest landings
reported in the early 1980s.
Annual dockside values for
oysters from Apalachicola
Bay have ranged from
about $1 million to $5 mil-
lion dollars since 1980.
Last year, reported oys-
ter landings from Apala-
chicola Bay were about
2.65 million pounds of
meat, continuing a trend of
increased landings since
2002 (see chart).
"During this period
landings appeared to be
correlated with resource
availability and fishing
pressure, and were de-
pendent upon market de-
mand," the report says.
In 2007, oystermen re-
ported 29,104 trips and the
number of Apalachicola
Bay Oyster harvesting li-
censes reached 1,142, the
highest number of licenses
sold since the license was
created (see chart).
Berrigan said oysters
typically adjust well to oscil-
lations in the natural condi-
tions, and oyster mortality


The savings you need

at a price you'll like!


2006 2007


should be seen in the con-
text of the larger cycles.
But, he said, two fac-
tors are troubling: market
demand and the persistent
drought.
"Market demand is cer-
tainly off," he said. "Shell-
fish, oysters, are really re-
flective of the economy. We
see this all the time, most
half shell oysters are eaten
at restaurants, and the
restaurant business drops
off in a hurry during tough
economic times."
The second fear is that
the ebb and flow of the
natural cycles might not be
as foreseeable as they once
were because of increased
development and water use
upriver.
"The scary reality is
that these things typically
end in a natural way be-
cause of a flood or some-
thing like that because the
bay is renewed because
of flooding in the drainage
basin," Berrigan said. "But
if they have to fill up that
entire (basin) before water
gets into Apalachicola Bay
the full cycle may not be a
possibility.
"That's the scary part,"
he said. "The natural cycle
may now be interpreted to
a point that it's not reinvig-
orated."


.Q


$29t




SAVE s90!


Save gas, save time, shop online


* Fast downloads

* FREE self-installation and 24/7 tech support


* FREE security package with anti-virus

and firewall (*50 value)

* 100MB of email storage

* Support for email files up to 25MB

(great for photos and music)


......................................................................................... communications
HIGH-SPEED INTERNET U PHONE U TELEVISION wwwFairPot com
FairPoint will automatically issue a credit of $15.00 each month for six months to customer's bill for a total savings of $90.00. Customer must keep the
service the entire six months to receive the full rebate. Offer applies to new HSD customers only (customers who have not had FairPoint High Speed Internet
for at least the preceding 180 days). Standard or above package required. After six months, Standard service will be billed at $44.95 per month, other
packages at their respective prices. Taxes and additional charges may apply. Free modem use as long as you keep the service. Pricing subject to change
without notice. High Speed Internet may not be available in all areas. Call 877.342.9396 or visit www.FairPoint.com for more details. 2008 FairPoint
Communications, Inc.All rights reserved. 674HSN


HARVESTING LICENSES IN APALACHICOLA BAY


1,000


800






S CARRABELLE -APALACH COLA




PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, December 11, 2008 w w w. apalach times. com Page 11


PHOTO BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN


S Sa i r A eI a b


Senior Zan Simmons, left, and Deshaun Winfield in Junior Austin O'Neal goes up for a bucket Monday
action Monday night against Blountstown. night against a herd of Blountstown Tigers.



Undefeated Seahawks



head to Georgia showdown


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Following the Seahawks
boys varsity basketball
team's 58-42 thrashing
of Blountstown Monday
night before an enthusi-
astic home crowd, head
coach Fred Drake was in
the mood to shower his


team with superlatives.
But they weren't the
kind you might expect.
"This is our worst re-
bounding game, period,"
said Drake. "The guards
aren't rebounding. Our of-
fensive execution was ter-
rible; we're not running
the offense all the way
through. We seemed lack-


adaisical and confused on
offense. I'm totally disap-
pointed with offense and
rebounding."
With sophomores A.J.
Williams and Dalin Modi-
can saddled with injury,
and freshman Carlos Mor-
ris benched due to less
than 100 percent commit-
ment to the team practice


regimen, Drake has been
bearing down to get his
team in shape as they head
this weekend to Columbus,
GA, for match-ups against
two top Georgia squads.
The Lady Seahawks
varsity team will be mak-
ing the trip as well, leav-
ing by school bus Dec. 11
and returning Dec. 14. The


Senior Deshaun Winfield dunks in action Monday
night against Blountstown.


trips were approved by the
school board at a special
meeting Monday, and the
entourage will include sev-
eral adult chaperones as
the teams spend the long
weekend in Columbus
with funds raised by the


school's athletic program.
Even though the games
have no bearing on the all-
important district stand-
ings, Drake knows what's
at stake on this road trip.
See GEORGIA Al12


Seahawks win 3 in a row


Winfield hits for 30
against Tigers
On Monday night, the Seahawks
played Blountstown to a 14-14 tie after
the first quarter and were knotted at 18
in the second quarter before hitting for
12 unanswered points.
Senior Deshaun Winfield stole the
ball and slammed it home to go up 30-12
in the last two minutes, and the teams
went into the locker room with Franklin
County ahead 30-21.
The third quarter was all Seahawks,
with Winfield hitting inside as the Se-
ahawks opened an 18-point cushion.
"He's doing what a senior's supposed to
do," said Drake.
Senior Jeremy James, the team's


top defensive player, was shifted to shut
down the Tigers' three-point threat.
Winnfield finished the game with 30
points and a dozen rebounds, his best
shooting performance of the year as he
went 14-for-16 from the field. Juniors
Austin O'Neal and Arron Prince tallied
11 and 8 respectively.
Drew Brazzel was top scorer for the
Tigers with 14 points, followed by PJ.
Buggs with 8.

Franklin Co. 58, Blountstown 42
Scoring: Deshaun Winfield 14/16 2s,
0/1 3s, 2/6 FT, 30 pts; Austin O'Neal 3/7
2s, 1/5 3s, 2/4 FT, 11 pts.; Arron Prince

See SEAHAWKS Al 2


On a windy April 3, Tommy Stevens took his Harris Hawk, Mylo, out
for some exercise when the bird flew to a nearby treetop and refused
to come down, perhaps distracted by the blustery weather. Later in the
evening, Mylo flew to some neighboring trees, where Stevens used a
flashlight to spot him. But when morning came, Mylo was gone. With the
help of Times readers, Stevens searched for Mylo for over a week, but
when the bird was finally found, he was terminally ill, and died less than
a week later.
That left a hole in Tommy's heart hard to fill, so he was delighted three
weeks ago when he captured a new hawk at the Apalachicola Airport
to train for hunting. He named his year-old, female, red-tailed hawk Red
Sonja. Stevens said she has a sweet temperament and has responded
well to training. He was able to hunt with her off tether only three weeks
after bringing her home.





APALACHICt(aL
STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank
Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


LOVE AT FIRST FLIGHT


This Week with the Seahawks
Friday, Dec. 12
Franklin County Middle School Girls and Boys
Basketball home vs. Apalachicola Bay Charter School Eagles.
Tipoff at 5 p.m.
Lady Seahawks Varsity Basketball vs. Carver at Carver
High School in Columbus, GA. Tipoff 6 p.m.
Seahawks Varsity Basketball vs. Carver at Carver High
School in Columbus, GA. Tipoff 7:30 p.m.

Saturday, Dec. 1 3
Lady Seahawks Varsity Basketball vs. Jordan at Jordan
High School in Columbus, GA. Tipoff 6 p.m.
Seahawks Varsity Basketball Jordan at Jordan High School
in Columbus, GA. Tipoff 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday, Dec. 16
Lady Seahawks Varsity Basketball home vs. Wakulla
County. Tipoff 5:30 p.m.
ABC School Eagles Middle School Boys Basketball away
against Wewahitchka. Tipoff 5 p.m.

Thursday. Dec. 18
Seahawks Varsity and Junior Varsity Basketball at
Jefferson County. District matchup. JV tipoff at 4:30 p.m.; varsity
7:30 p.m.
Lady Seahawks Varsity Basketball at Jefferson County.
District matchup. Tipoff at 6 p.m.
ABC School Eagles Middle School Boys Basketball away
against Franklin County. Tipoff 5 p.m.
\___________________________________






A 12 I The Times


Local


SEAHAWKS from page All


4/6 2s, 0/1 3s, 8 pts.; Zan
Simmons 1/2 2s, 2/2 FT,
4 pts.; Adam Joseph 1/1
2s, 1/2 FT, 3 pts.; Jeremy
James 1/3 2s, 0/3 3s, 0/1
FT, 2 pts.
Rebounds: Winfield 12,
Simmons 10,
O'Neal 8
Assists: James 5,
Winfield, O'Neal,
Simmons 3
Steals: O'Neal 4,
Winfield, James 2
Blocks: O'Neal,
Winfield 1

Seahawks defeat
Arnold Dec. 2
The Seahawks tri-
umphed over Class 4A
Panama City Arnold 57-43
at home Dec. 2, stepping
up against a much taller
lineup with two Div. 1 re-
cruits, Nate Hicks, a 6'10"
post player, and Mark
Troncale, a 6'3' guard
"Going into the game I
had a scouting report and I
knew those two guys were
their top players," said
Drake. "We tried to double
team the post whenever
Nate was in. We went into
the box-and-one on Mark,
knowing that's the one
we had to stop. We had to
hold their big three under
32 points. I told the kids I
knew we're going to score
more than 45 to 50 points."
Drake credited the
team with playing good de-
fense and rebounding well,
and playing the type of
fast-paced game they need


to play to win. "Because
we're pressing, that de-
fense is turned to offense,"
he said. "We want to make
our defense into offense,
make steals and run."
Troncale hit for 20
points, but after James
was assigned to guard
him, he held him to 9
points. "Somebody had to
shut down their guard,"
said Drake. "In the sec-
ond quarter we went box-
and-one and Jeremy did
an outstanding defensive
job."
James only added a
bucket to scoring, but
Drake said he likes his se-
nior's selflessness. "Some-
times we have to sacrifice
scoring," he said. "It's all
about winning, it's not
about stats sometimes."
After leading only by 5
at the half, the Seahawks
pulled away with a 17-7
third quarter, Winfield led
the team with 23 points.
Hicks added a dozen for
the Marlins.
Drake said he is con-
cerned the gym floor hasn't
been properly waxed. "The
gym floor needs some
more work," he said. "It's
still a slip and slide. That's
the only drawback to the
gym. It hasn't been waxed
yet."

Franklin County 57
Arnold 43
A 15 7 9 10 43
FC 15 12 17 13 57
Scoring: Winfield 9/13


PLANNING YOUR



Plan it with "Dolores" as your Hostess.

'You bring your guests, we do the rest"

HEA\'EN'S GATE LODGE
325 BAY CITY ROAD


2s, 5/5 FT, 23 pts; Carlos
Morris 2/5 2s, 4/7 3s, 16
pts.; O'Neal 2/4 2s, 1/1 3s,
3/5 FT, 10 pts.; Simmons
1/3 2s, 2/3 FT, 4 pts.;
James 0/2 2s, 0/3 3s, 2/6
FT, 2 pts. Prince 1/1 2s, 0/2
FT, 2 pts.
Rebounds: Winfield 8,
Morris, O'Neal 3
Assists: O'Neal 6,
Prince, Morris, James 3
Steals: Prince, O'Neal
3, Morris, Simmons,
Winfield 2
Blocks: Simmons,
Winfield 1

Seahawks slam
North Florida
Christian Dec. 4
In an away game Dec. 4,
the Seahawks demolished
district rival North Florida
Christian 83-40.
North Florida lost three
starters to transfers at the
start of the year, with one
leaving for Maclay and two
others for FAMU High.
The Seahawks made
it look easy, outscoring
their opponents in all four
quarters and leading 63-29
at the half. Winfield and
Morris led the team with
27 and 22 points, respec-
tively.
Drake said all the play-
ers got some playing time,
and the team played fero-
ciously in part to make up
for last year's loss on the
North Florida gym floor.
"I knew on paper they
weren't that good, but any-


thing can happen in a dis-
trict game. All it takes is to
better on that particular
night," said Drake. "We
wanted to make up for last
year's loss at their gym.
That's why they were so
aggressive."
Drake continues to
stress the importance of
running-and-gunning if
the team is to triumph
over bigger lineups.
"Everybody's going to
be big in there," he said.
"The only way we're go-
ing to beat these guys is
press, play good defense
and run. We're not going
to beat anybody in a half-
court post offensive game.
We're going to have to
transition, create steals
and run."
The coach also has been
letting his team shoot the
trey more, and they are
finding some modest suc-
cess. "I was never hardly
a fan of it but I was always
blessed with tall post play-
ers," said Drake. "I've kind
of adapted to letting them
shoot the three. At some
point in time we've got to
make them."
The coach said he
has been impressed with
Winfield's play. "He's play-
ing like a senior trying to
get to the next level," he
said. "He gambles a lot of
defense. He has to play
regular defense and stop
gambling. I'd just like to
see him make some more
post moves."
Drake's main concern


--5 N Clle32322


--9D5 Hwy. 98 Carrabelle, FL 32322


is for the team to gel
around success and not
around individual scor-
ing honors.
"Everybody wants to
score; everybody wants
to focus on their stats,"
he said. "That's the one
negative right now. As
a coach I want to find a
way to balance that. I'm
trying to tell them we're
winning these days.
Stats drive everybody
crazy."

Franklin County 83
North Florida
Christian 40
FC 22 19 15 27 83
NFC 11 7 10 12 40
Scoring: Winfield
11/7 2s, 1/3 3s, 2/4 FT, 27
pts; Carlos Morris 6/9
2s, 2/9 3s, 4/4 FT, 22 pts.;
O'Neal 2/5 2s, 3/6 3s, 2/4
FT, 15 pts.; Simmons
4/7 2s, 0/1 3s, 0/1 FT, 8
pts.; Prince 0/3 2s, 1/5
3s, 1/2 FT, 4 pts; Joseph
1/4 2s, 1/1 3s, 0/2 FT, 5
pts.; James 1/2 2s, 0/3
3s, 0/2 FT, 2 pts.
Rebounds: Winfield,
Morris 9, Prince 7
Assists: James 8,
O'Neal 4, Morris 3,
Winfield 2
Steals: James 5,
Winfield 4, O'Neal 3,
Morris, Simmons 2
Blocks: Winfield
2, Prince, Simmons,
O'Neal, James 1


Thursday, December 11,2008


GEORGIA

from page All
Last year the Seahawks
played Central Phenix City
and were handily defeated,
but the game marked a
turning point in the season
as the squad saw just what
they were facing in top-lev-
el talent.
Now the Seahawks have
nearly their entire squad
back from last year and
are undefeated so far and
Drake would like to keep it
that way.
On Friday, they'll face
Carver, where Drake once
coached, and a team that
was Georgia state runner-
up in 3A ball. On Saturday,
the Seahawks face Jordan,
who won the Georgia 3A
championship two years
ago.
Coach Justin Long's
Lady Seahawks will face
their female counterparts
on both nights as well. On
Thursday, the Franklin
County teams will take in a
college match-up between
Chattanooga State and
Chattanooga Valley Com-
munity College.
"This is a college expo-
sure event," said Drake.
"Georgia basketball is dif-
ferent than Florida and
this is the best competi-
tion they've seen all year
long. And a chance to play
against some good com-
petition that's going to
help us when playoff time
comes."


2 East Gulf Beach Dr., St. George Island
^ J J A 850-927-7744
Nae www.stqeorqelight.org 850-927-7744

Name: Need a Gift Card? D
Address:
Email: Phone:
4x8 BRICK: (Please use only one letter or number per block. Allow one block for a space between words.)







L- -----------------------------------------J---


Golf Cart

Sales/Services/Re tals


Christmas


S- t. Joe Rent-All
706 1 st. Street
Port St. Joe
227-2112


NE ~*I


BILL MILLER REALTY
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MASTER APPRAISERS
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER

2308 Hwy EAST CARRABELLE, FL 32322
MAIN OFFICE (850)697-3761 OR 697-3310 CALL (850) 570-0658
FISH CAMP FOR RENT LANARK OR SALE......................................... $450 MTH
M /H LOT FOR RENT UTILITIES................................................. $250 MTH
2 LOTS LANARK CLEARED UTILITIES SHADY 600' TO MARINA.....$125,000
3/2 DISHWASHER FIREPLACE, GARDEN TUB, SCREEN PORCH,
BREEZEWAY-W ORKSHOP-3 COR.LOTS............................................... $89,500
2 B/R M/H 2 LOTS BEHIND $ STORE.............. $159,500 OWNR.FIN.E OR RENT
2 B/R 1 BATH HOME GULF VIEW.................................... $79,500 OWNR.FIN.
2 B/R APT $85,000 1 B/R APT.......................... ...................... $65,000
50' GULF LOT w/WATER AND SEWER ............................................ $275,000
DBL APT LG 2BR 2BATH OPEN VIEW............................$5000 DOWN
COMM. BLDG. 1400s/F 2 COR.LOTs.......................................... $165,000












LIFE


TIMES


B
Section


Thursday, December 11, 2008 w w w. apalach times. com Page BI


Thoughtful Christmas

gifts can be found in

Franklin County

By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

With Christmas looming larger and larger, many of us
are shifting into power
shopping mode.
Usually, that means
we're off to the mall in
Tallahassee or Panama
City to brave holiday
crowds. We spend
hours coming and
going and even more
time waiting in line.
Our blood pressure
goes up and our mood
darkens. What a hassle.
Maybe there's a
better way. Why not
shop at home this
year? People come PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA I StaffWriter
from as far away as Susan McClendon displays
ABirmingham anda d wt
Atlanta to shop here. a brick from the St. George
Why not give it a try? Light affixed with a plaque
Shopping locally has commemorating the
a number of benefits. lighthouse's resurrection.
It saves time and
stress and gas.
Economically, it's the right thing to do. Money spent
in Franklin County
.. stimulates the local
economy. Local
property owners pay
local property tax
supporting schools,
roads, police, parks
and recreation and
S emergency services.
40 Local businesses
employ local people
and support local
charities.
By supporting
local businesses,
you promote local
business diversity by
making it possible for
to g io t smaller enterprises to
survive. You promote
entrepreneurs.
Finally,
shopping at home
"...... ,- is environmentally
friendly, especially
if you buy
eanine Slagle of "That's A Moray" locally produced
displays a tray of Christmas merchandise.
cookies. Slagle said she has Remember, a toy
collected family recipes from friends produced in China has
for these holiday delicacies, a carbon footprint all
the way to China. It
often takes more fuel to ship a gift item to the end point of
sale than to make it. By the time you add in the gas required
to go to the mall and back once (twice if it doesn't fit or it's
the wrong color), a whole lot of gas and money is involved.

There's a lot going on in Franklin County
In the face of the current economic downturn, this year
is an especially good time to shop at home. Many local
businesses are in the midst of sales, and there are bargains
to be had everywhere. Some merchants are getting even
more creative. J and J's of Carrabelle and the Honey Hole
are entering customers into weekly drawings for door
See HOME B6


a


60 GIFTS UNDER $20
The following is a list of gifts available in Franklin County and sold
by local merchants. Emails were sent out to members of the Apalachicola and
Carrabelle chambers of commerce, and St. George Island Business Association,
to solicit their gift ideas. Lois Swoboda then compiled the following list of gift


suggestions.

ITEM


MERCHANT


Keychain float
Tiny wooden shrimp boats
Etched glass paper weights
Coconut head banks and birdhouses
Leather belts
Rainforest Alliance stuffed frogs
St. George Light brick with a memorial
plaque
Old fashioned stick horses for tots
Lightly used vintage Hawaiian shirts
Backpacks

Brass nautical key rings
Bungee card case
Dozen handcrafted Christmas cookies
Dog collars and tags
Extendable backscratchers
Mermaids
Field guides

Hurricane oil lamps
Old St. Nick egg nog
Black and Decker detail finish sander
Coin counting money jar
Deck prisms
Fine wines
Giftables gift-wrapped high tech
gadgets
Hand-painted sand dollar turtle
Kayak paddle clip kits
Premium cigars
St. George Peach Salsa
Ugly dolls so ugly they're cute
How to Play Music books
Carol Mahoom fused glass and shell
ornaments
Crosses decorated with blue limpet
shells
Evening bags and wallets
Nautical playing cards with semaphore
flags
Puff pastry wrapped baked brie
Personal CD player
Seafood the Apalachicola Way
Cookbook
2 Ibs. Watkins locally produced Tupelo
honey
Ferry ride to St. Vincent Island and bike
rental
Ancient Secrets rock salt lamp
Apalachicola note cards
Hot Heads silicon oven mitts
Bedder Breader fish breading bowl
Carnival Glass butter dish
Daiwa reels
Fish ID coloring book
Music lesson: guitar, fiddle banjo and
bass
Tai Chi and Chi Kung classes
Living tree ready to plant
Gift tickets 2009 professional season
Apalachicola: It is what it is and it ain't
what it ain't! T-Shirt
Kid Kits with activity book and supplies
Triple strand charm bracelet
Stained glass turtle lamps
Riverlily signature scent candle
Doors of Apalachicola poster
European manicure
Holding cross
Manicure
Notecard set of the Heritage at sail
Pedipaws pet nail trimmer
Scallop Shell cheese plate set
Special gift Riverkeeper membership
Apalachicola River American Treasure
DVD
Culinary herb basket


Dockside Marine Inc.
Pesky Pelican
Pesky Pelican
Old Soda Fountain
J & Js in Carrabelle
ExpressLane
Visitor Center St. George island

Dollar General
Robinson Brothers Guide Service
The Treasure Cove in the Sugar
Shack
Tin Shed
Blue
That's a Moray
Fisherman's Choice
Riverlily
Riverlily
Apalachicola National Estuarine
Research Reserve
IGA
Honey Hole
Ace Hardware
Ace Hardware
Tin Shed
Piggly Wiggly
Buy Rite Drugs

The Blue Door
Expeditions in Hell
Honey Hole
Some Like it Hotter
Blue
Wombat Music
Sea Oats Gallery

The Green Door

Oystercatcher
Avenue E

Cafe Floridita
Family Dollar
Sea Oats Gallery

Piggly Wiggly

St. Vincent Island Shuttle Service

Natural Medicine Shoppe
Richard Bickel Gallery
Stuffed Owl
Fisherman's Choice
J & Js in Carrabelle
Scipio Creek Marina
Fisherman's Choice
Wombat Music

Holly Stott
Gardens Inc.
Dixie Theatre
Market Street Antiques

Avenue E
Oystercatcher
Tin Shed
Riverlily
Artemis Gallery
Palace Day Spa
Artemis Gallery
Unique Nails
Apalachicola Maritime Museum
CVS Drugs
River City
Apalachicola Riverkeeper
Apalachicola Riverkeeper

Gardens Inc.


*


PRICE


and up
and up


$6
$6
$6
$7 and up
$7
$7 and up
$8

$9
$9
$10
$10
$10
$10 and up
$10

$10
$10
$10 and up
$10
$10
$11
$12

$12

$12 and up
$12

$12
$13
$13

$13

$15

$15
$15
$15
$15
$15
$15
$15
$15

$15
$15
$15 and up
$16

$16
$18
$18
$19
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20

$20


Carol Harris of Wombat Music offers lessons in fiddle, banjo
and guitar. A number of art, music and other lessons are
available locally and make wonderful gifts.


NE





B2 I The Times


Local


Thursday, December 11,2008


EXTRA EXTRA!!!

HELPFUL HARDWARE LADY TURNS


THE BIG 4-0


Genee' Heinke celebrated her
40th birthday on December 8,2008.
Also on her birthday she reached 4 years
of service at your local ACE Hardware.

Congratulations from your
co-workers & friends!






























Rusty
Meet this Week's Pet, Rusty! If Rusty
looks familiar, it's because he's graced our
"Pet of the week" profile before. Rusty is a
beautiful Sheppard mix who desperately needs
to find his "forever family"! Rusty is so often
overlooked as families come & go because he
is very shy & needs more time to warm up to
new people. Rusty is a special boy & needs to
find a special family to call his own! Rusty
needs a quite household with no young children.
Rusty absolutely loves other dogs & would do
wonderfully with a= brother and/or sister as a
mentor. Rusty is leash trained, house trained
& knows many basic obedience commands.
If you would like to give Rusty a chance at a
"forever family", please contact the St. Joseph
Bay Humane Society at 227-1103. Or stop by the
Humane Society at 1007 Tenth St., Tues.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! We are always
in need of volunteers to spend time with the
animals. The cats and dogs would love any spare
time you have to give.

Holiday Plant & Pet Sitting
In your home

(850) 653-5857
for residential accounts
Aloha Bugs Pest Management
Franklin County's ONLY LOCALPest control company

GULF STATE The
Community Coolest Bank
9 Bank in the
www.gscb.com Hottest Spots

Apalachicola Carrabelle Crawfordville
(850) 653 2126 (850) 697 3395 (850) 926-8338
Eastpoint St. George Island
(850) 670 8786 (850) 927 2511







".4" 4" -'4" :4" ":4" :" -:4" ::4 -.'"4 44 :" :


Chance Martina

born


Tyler and Terress Martina, of Apalachicola, are proud
to announce the birth of their son, Chance Martina.
He was born Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2008 at Gulf Coast
Community Hospital, and weighed 6 lbs. 15.9 ounces
and was 19 inches.
Maternal grandparents are Tammie Cline, of Apala-
chicola, and Terry Faircloth, of Eastpoint.
Paternal grandparents are Kevin and Patty Martina,
of Apalachicola.


Jerrad Hunnings

turns 10


Jerrad Hun-
nings celebrated
his 10th birthday
on Monday, Dec.
1.2008.
He is the son
of Jessica Butler
and Joseph Hun-
nings, of East-
point.


Dylan Griffin

turns 5


Dylan Griffin
celebrated his fifth
birthday on Sun-
day, Nov. 30, 2008.
He is the son of
Brittney Herndon
and Joseph Hun-
nings, of Eastpoint.
Maternal grand-
parents are Dale
and Donna Jo
Herndon, of St.
George Island.


SILVERtsUEST
Weddings I 'TDIS
Engagements
Senior Portraits
Children & Babies
Call today and ask about our Senior Portrait specials
850-229-9353
www.SilverQuestStudios.com


Kylah Cox turns 4


Hi, this is me, Kylah Alexis, and my mommy, Stacy
Cox.
We celebrated my fourth birthday on Tuesday, Nov.
25, 2008 with Nana and Papa Cox, Meme, Aunt Kim, my
cousins and my friends.
We played at the park and had ice cream and a "High
School Musical" cake. What a great day!


Daylon Hunnings

turns 4


Daylon
Hunnings cel-
ebrated his
fourth birth-
day Sunday,
Nov. 30, 2008.
Daylon's twin
brother Dylan
(deceased)
would have
also been 4.
He is the
son of Jessica
Butler and
Joseph Hun-
nings, of East-
point.


Tommy Gragg

turns 7

Tommy Gragg cele-
brated his 7th birthday on
Friday, Dec. 5.
He is the son of Chris
and Stephanie Gragg, and
big brother to Emma and
Ava, of Carrabelle.
Maternal grandpar-
ents are Beth and John
Hoats, of Atlanta, and
Brent and Donna Bar-
ber, of Carrabelle. Great-
grandparents are Jack
and Cynthia Taylor, of St.
George Island, and Dallas
Barber and the late Ava
Jean Barber, of Eastpoint.
Paternal grandparents
are the late Gene and
Thelma Gragg, of Apala-
chicola.
Happy Birthday Tom-
my. We love you Bubba!



LET US HELP YOU WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS!
CRIBS TABLES WEDDING ARCHES
HIGH CHAIRS CHAIRS CANDELABRAS
TENTS LINENS PUNCH BOWLS
DINNERWARE BEACH WHEELCHAIR CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN


W e4 e~ivpm I


23 ihwy9


NE ~*I


850-670-8686
888-670-8686






Thursday, December 11,2008


Local


The Times I B3


Hospice services remember loved ones


Sponsored by Big Bend
Hospice, Franklin County
held two remembrance ser-
vices in past weeks to help
those grieving during this
holiday season.
With the theme "Hope
is grief's best music," the
services featured music and
readings, and culminated in
the lighting of candles for a
Tree of Remembrance.
About 30 people gathered
in Veterans Park in Apala-
chicola on Sunday after-
noon, Nov 30. Last Sunday
afternoon, a similar number
took part in a service at Til-
lie Miller Park in Carrabelle.
Jing Jing Chang, a music
therapist for Big Bend Hos-
pice, played gathering music
as the service got underway
in Carrabelle.
Regina Compton, team
manager for hospice, of-
fered opening words of wel-
come, followed by an open-
ing prayer by Pastor Mark
Collins of Fellowship Baptist
Church.
Rita Millender, chair of
hospice's advisory coun-


cil in Carrabelle, offered
readings about the need
for hope. Prayers were led
by Pastor Ron Barks, of
the Carrabelle Assembly
of God, and the Rev John
Sink, a retired United Meth-
odist pastor.
Cheryl Glass and Shirley
Massey led the lighting of
the tree, graced with the fol-
lowing words:
"The many twinkling
lights are symbolic of the
hosts of people we have
loved who have gone be-
fore us into the mystery of
death," those assembled
said in unison. "And while
we grieve their loss, we are
forever grateful that they
once were with us."
Ed Lyon, chaplain for
hospice, sang "You'll Never
Walk Alone," followed by
Millender and Dianne Fly-
nn, a registered nurse with
hospice, leading the lighting
of candles.
A reception of coffee,
hot chocolate and sweets
followed the service on the
sunny afternoon.


PHOTO BY LOIS SWOBODA
Beverly Hewitt, left, and Sandra Smith take part
in the Service of Remembrance in Apalachicola's
Veteran's Park Nov. 30.


Rita Millender (standing), chair of Big Bend Hospice's
advisory council in Carrabelle, lights candles of grief
and hope during the Service of Remembrance at
Tillie Miller Park Sunday afternoon.


Obituaries


Katherine Robinson


Katherine Ben-
nett Robinson, 78, died
Tuesday, Dec. 2,2008, in
Panama City.
During her faithful
ministry, she served as
Sunday School teacher,
youth leader, district mis-
sionary, district mother,
national missionary and
director of the Women's
Department.
Katherine leaves to
cherish her memory her
daughters, Patricia (Wil-
liam) Lane, of
Apalachicola, and
Kathi (Thomas) Wynn,
of Orlando; sisters Ber-
nice Weaver and Eula
Rochelle, both of Apala-
chicola; a host of grand-
children; one daughter-
in-law, Linda Brown; and
one sister-in-law, Floretta
Cobb of Whistler, AL.
She also leaves behind


godchildren, Anderson
Williams, Randy Williams
and Latonya Wallace;
very dear friends, Mrs.
Dorothy Simmons, Mis-
sionary Mary Horlback,
Missionary Alice Wil-
liams, Missionary Evelyn
Williams, Missionary
Patricia Tolliver, Mother
Cinderella Becton and
Ingrid Jordan; many
nieces, nephews, friends,
her pastors and the New
Life family, and the whole
Franklin County com-
munity. She will be sorely
missed.
Services were held
Saturday, Dec.6, at New
Life Tabernacle by
the Sea, Apalachicola,
with burial at Magnolia
Cemetery. Strong &
Jones Funeral Home
is handling arrange-
ments.


Leah Kinsey Brown,
born Sept. 14, 1931, in
White County, GA, went
to be with our Lord on
Dec. 5, 2008.
Leah grew up in the
North Georgia moun-
tains with four brothers,
Ralph, Sam, June and
Bob, and a loving moth-
er, Ida Kinsey. Leah at-
tended school at Rabun
Gap and Young Harris
College.
After school she joined
the Air Force during the
Korean War. During and
after her service, Leah's
desire to travel took her
on many adventures in
numerous places. Leah
never met a stranger and
always had encouraging
words for everyone she
came in contact with.
Never afraid of hard
work, Leah held various
jobs during her youth.
In her early 30's, Leah
opened the first employ-
ment agency in Gaines-
ville, GA. After building
the business, she sold and
moved to Florida, with her
four children, Billy, Tony
(AJ), Lisa and Lee.
After arriving in
beautiful North Florida
in 1970, Leah met and
married William C. (Bill)
Brown. They moved to
Apalachicola and opened
the Anchor Motel. This
venture was a family af-
fair and almost everyone
who passed through the
motel left feeling like it
was their home.


Bill, who was a master
bass fisherman, shared
his passion for fishing
with Leah. He and Leah
spent many hours on the
Apalachicola River fish-
ing, appreciating nature
and enjoying each other.
During her nearly 40
years in Apalachicola,
Leah and Bill owned and
operated many success-
ful businesses. The An-
chor Motel, Lisa's Fac-
tory Outlet and Sport's
Place restaurant were
places local folks loved
to frequent and talk with
Leah and Bill. Even with
her busy life Leah al-
ways put her children
and family above her
own needs and desires.
There was never a time
Leah was not accessible
to her children.
As Leah grew older
her desire to travel never
diminished. She and Bill
spent time in New Mex-
ico, the East Coast of
Florida and many other
places.
In addition to four chil-
dren, Leah is survived by
four grandchildren and
three great-grandchil-
dren. Her Southern kind-
ness mixed with a com-
forting smile will truly be
missed.
Funeral services were
Dec. 9, at Blue Creek
Baptist Church Cem-
etery in Cleveland, GA.
Wards Funeral Home of
Gainesville, GA was in
charge of arrangements.


Had a good meet-
ing last Monday. We
had our election of
new board members
for the coming for
the Lanark Village
Association. The new
members are Paul
Updyke, Jack Stew- JIM
art, David Kyte, Car-
ol Piadonna, Kathy
Swaggerty, and Dot Bless,
who remained treasurer.
Congrats to all the above.
Margaret Stitt, who won
a cruise at the Thanksgiv-
ing dinner, donated it back to
the association. She'd been
there, done that.
We will have a prime rib
dinner at the hall Sunday,
Dec. 21. Social hour at 4
p.m., dinner at 5 p.m. Mem-
bers are free, guest dona-
tion $10. There is a sign-up
sheet in the hall and the off
on the count will be the Dec.
15. We will have two more
cruises plus the one from
Margaret. Get your reser-
vation in early! No doubt we
will have a great time.
Had a very good crowd
at the bingo last week. Ev-
eryone was pleased with
the new paint and the new
floor in the hall. There are
now new windows. When
you come to bingo every


Wednesday or to
coffee in the morn-
ings, check out the
remodeling.
Get ready for
Saturday, Dec. 13.
After you enjoy din-
ner at the Legion,
WELSH sashay on over to
Chillas Hall for the
Second Saturday
Dance. Fun starts at 7 p.m.
You can also enjoy
a good breakfast at the
Senior Center, Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Friday. from 8 to 10 a.m.
Tuesday is Lanark Day for
breakfast, lunch Thursday
at the Senior Center start-
ing at noon. Monday night
is bingo at the Center, doors
open at 5 p.m., snacks and
soft drinks are available.
And if you play your
cards right, you won't have
to cook on Friday. Break-
fast at the Senior Center,
lunch at the Franklin Coun-
ty School in Eastpoint, and
supper at the Legion. How
about that!
Be kind to one another
and check in on the sick and
housebound.
Until next time, God
Bless America, our troops
the poor, the homeless and
hungry


Card of Thanks Lockley Family

The family of Georgiann Lockley, wife of County
Commissioner Noah Lockley, Jr., wishes to thank the
Franklin County community. The support that you all
showed for the benefit that was held on Monday,
Dec. 8, was deeply appreciated. God Bless you.


' St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave. "C" & 6th St. Apalachicola, FL 32329
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@gtcom.net

PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
MASS SCHEDULE

SATURDAY ............. ........... ................ 5PM
SUN D AY ............................ ................. 10 AM
SUNDAY SPANISH MASS ................................ 5 PM
TUESDAY FRIDAY ................................... 8:30 AM
\____._________________


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


WELCOMES YOU

Church

of the

Ascension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


Trinity
EST. 1836
Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


*I


DO YOU KNOW THESE WOMEN?


PHILACO CLUB LADIES: Author
Beverly Mount-Douds has been
busy collecting photographs
for her new pictorial history of
Apalachicola, to be printed by
Arcadia Publishing. She is seek-
ing the community's help in iden-
tifying the Philaco Club members
in this photograph, given to her
by the Marks family.
Of the six women listed,
Mount-Douds has tentatively
identified four. From left to right
are Fannie Ruge, Lillian Wefing,
(unknown), (unknown), Annie
R. Marks and (believed to be
Rebecca Hickey). If anyone can
positively identify any of these
women, please contact Mount
Douds at 229-1094 or email csb-
lighthouselady2008@gmail.com.


Leah Kinsey Brown


Lanark NEWS


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


SThe United Methodist Churches

of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5' St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Friday of each month
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672
Pastor: Julie Stephens
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis







4B The Times Thursday, December 11, 2008


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1130 Adoptions
1140- Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160 Lost
1170 Found


S 1100
9344T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

GULF STATE COMMU-
NITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JAN WAGENAAR,
Defendant.

CASE NO: 08-000122-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE is hereby given
that, pursuant to the Order
of Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure in this cause,
in the Circuit Court of
Franklin County, Florida, I
will sell the property situ-
ated in Franklin County,
Florida described as:

All of Block 4 of Kelley's
Addition to the City of
Carrabelle (a subdivision
as per- map or plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book 2,
Page 20, of the Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida) lying West
of Ridge Street, (also
known as Block "32" of. the
Official Map of the City of
Carrabelle.

ALSO; A parcel lying East
of Ridge Street being more
particularly described as
follows:

Begin at the Intersection of
the Easterly right-of-way
boundary of Ridge Street
with the Northerly
right-of-way boundary of
Avenue "D" (Osbourn Ave-
nue) and thence run North
along the Easterly
right-of-way boundary of
Ridge Street 100.00 feet,
thence run East 35.00 feet,
thence run South 100.00
feet to the Northerly
right-of-way boundary of
Osbourn Avenue, thence
run West along said North-
erly right-of-way boundary
35.00 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING.

The undersigned surveyor
has not been provided a
current title opinion or ab-
stract of matters affecting
title or boundary to the
subject property. It is pos-
sible there are deeds of
records, unrecorded
deeds, easements or other
instruments which could
affect the boundaries.

at Public Sale, to the high-
est bidder, for cash, at the
front steps of the Franklin
County Courthouse, 33
Market Street, Apalachi-
cola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m.
on December 18, 2008.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
24th day of November,
2008.

CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Steve M. Watkins, III
41 Commerce Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
(850)653-1949
December 4, 11, 2008
9421 T
In The Circuit Court Of The
Second Judicial Circuit In
And For Franklin County,
Florida

Superior Bank, a Federal
savings bank,
Plaintiff

vs,

MARY SMITH (Deceased),
ANNIE BROWN, BRENDA
CUMMINGS, BRENDA
BENJAMIN, JAMES
DONNELL AUSTIN,
DARRON SMITH, WILLIE
SMITH and unknown par-
ties of the above named
Defendants, including any
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees,
and all other parties claim-
ing by, through, under or
against that defendant,
and TENANT #1 and TEN-
ANT #2 representing any
unknown tenants who may
be in possession
Defendants.

CASE NO.: 08-000020CC

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
MARY SMITH (Deceased),
ANNIE BROWN, BRENDA
CUMMINGS, BRENDA
BENJAMIN, JAMES
DONNELL AUSTIN,
DARRON SMITH, WILLIE
SMITH and unknown par-
ties of the above named
Defendants, including any


1100
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees,
and all other parties claim-
ing by, through, under or
against that defendant,
and TENANT #1 and TEN-
ANT #2 representing any
unknown tenants who may
be in possession, and To
All Others Whom It May
Concern:

You are hereby notified
that an action to foreclose
a mortgage on the follow-
ing parcel of real property
located in Franklin County,
Florida, described as fol-
lows:

THE NORTHEAST HALF
(1/2) OF LOT NUMBER
TEN (10), BLOCK NUM-
BER ONE HUNDRED
SIXTY-FIVE (165), OF THE
CITY OF APPALACHI-
COLA, FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT
OF SAID CITY IN COM-
MON USE, THE SAID
PARCEL FRONTING FIFTY
(50) FEET ALONG AVE-
NUE "L' BY SIXTY (60)
FEET ALONG THE ALLEY
IS SAID BLOCK.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it
on Steven L. Applebaum,
attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is Post Office Box
9454, Panama City Beach,
Florida 32417, on or be-
fore 30 days from the first
date of publication, and file
the original with the Clerk
of this Court before service
on Plaintiff or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do
so, a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint.

Witness my hand and seal
of the Court on this 24th
day of October, 2008.

Clerk of the Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
December 11,18, 25, 2008
January 1,2009
9428T
NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR WATER USE
PERMIT

Notice is hereby given that
pursuant to Chapter 373,
Florida Statutes, the fol-
lowing applications) for
water use permits) has
(have) been received by
the Northwest Florida
Water Management Dis-
trict:

Application number
I 07000 filed 12/02/2008
City of Apalachicola, 1 Bay
Avenue, Apalachicola, FL
32320
Requesting a maximum
withdrawal of 1,570,000
gallons per day from the
Flondan Aquifer System
for Public Supply use by
an existing facility.
General withdrawal
locations) in Franklin
County: T08S, R08W, Sec.
34, 35; T09S, R08W, Sec.
1A, 1B, 3

Interested persons may
object to or comment
upon the applications or
submit a written request
for a copy of the staff
reports) containing pro-
posed agency action re-
garding the applications)
by writing to the Division of
Resource Regulation of
the Northwest Florida
Water Management Dis-
trict, attention Tern Peter-
son, 152 Water Manage-
ment Drive, Havana, Flor-
ida 32333-9700, but such
comments or requests
must be received by 5
o'clock p.m. on December
24,2008.

No further public notice
will be provided regarding
this (these) applicationss.
Publication of this notice
constitutes constructive
notice of this permit appli-
cation to all substantially
affected persons. A copy
of the staff reports) must
be requested in order to
remain advised of further
proceedings and any pub-
lic hearing date. Substan-
tially affected persons are
entitled to request an ad-
ministrative hearing re-
garding the proposed
agency action by submitt-
ing a written request ac-
cording to the provisions
of 28-601.201, Florida Ad-
ministrative Code. Notices
of Proposed Agency Ac-
tion will be mailed only to
persons who have filed
such requests.
December 11, 2008
9436T-1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

CHAMBERS BANK OF
NORTH ARKANSAS, a
State community bank or-
ganized under the laws
of Arkansas,

Plaintiff,

vs.

EASTPOINT REDEVELOP-
MENT LLC., a Florida lim-
ited liability company;
JAMES MITCHELL MAS-
SEY, individually; JOHN
MORGAN HOOKER and
wife CARLEN G. HOOKER,
individually and as hus-
band and wife; RICK L.
HANCOCK and wife
CHRISTINE HANCOCK, in-
dividually and as husband
and wife; all unknown par-


1100
ties having or claiming to
have any right, title, or in-
terest in and to the prop-
erty herein described; and
all unknown parties claim-
ing under any of the
above-named or described
defendants or parties or
claiming to have any right,
title, or interest in and to
the property herein de-
scribed,
Defendants.

CASE NO.:
2008-CA-000346

AMENDED NOTICE OF
SALE

NOTICE is hereby given
pursuant to the Final Sum-
mary Judgment of Fore-
closure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Franklin
County, Florida, that I will
sell the following property
situated in Franklin
County, Florida, described
as:

PARCEL 1:

A PARCEL OF LAND IN
THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF
FRACTIONAL SECTION
31, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST BEING
THAT SAME PARCEL
CONVEYED BY DEED AS
RECORDED IN VOLUME
98, AT PAGES 109 AND
110, OF THE "OFFICIAL
RECORDS" OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA, AND
FURTHER DESCRIBED BY
METES AND BOUNDS AS
FOLLOWS: FROM A
POINT (CONCRETE MON-
UMENT) ON THE NORTH-
ERLY BOUNDARY OF THE
100 FOOT HIGHWAY,
"U.S. 319-98" 730 FEET
SOUTH (TRUE MERIDIAN)
OF THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF SAID
NORTHEAST 1/4, RUN
SOUTH 54 DEGREES
WEST ALONG SAID HIGH-
WAY BOUNDARY 137
FEET TO A POINT FOR
BEGINNING; RUN
THENCE NORTH 37 DE-
GREES WEST, 175 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST 54 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 37 DE-
GREES EAST, 175 FEET
TO SAID HIGHWAY,
THENCE CONTINUE ON
SAME BEARING FROM
THE SOUTHERLY
BOUNDARY OF SAID
HIGHWAY TO ST.
GEORGE SOUND;
THENCE NORTHEAST-
ERLY ALONG SAID
SOUND TO A POINT
SOUTH 37 DEGREES
EAST OF THE BEGINN-
ING POINT; THENCE
NORTH 37 DEGREES
WEST TO SAID HIGHWAY,
ACROSS WHICH IS THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
SAME BEING IN TWO
PARTS BY THE CROSS-
ING OF SAID HIGHWAY

PARCEL 2:

FROM A POINT ON THE
NORTHERLY BOUNDARY
OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO.
319, 730 FEET DUE
SOUTH OF THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF SEC-
TION 31, TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST,
RUN SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST ALONG
SAID BOUNDARY 291.4
FEET TO A POINT OF BE-
GINNING; RUN THENCE
NORTH 36 DEGREES
WEST, 200 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST 50 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 36 DE-
GREES EAST, 200 FEET
TO SAID HIGHWAY;
THENCE NORTH 54 DE-
GREES EAST 50 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. SAME BEING A PAR-
CEL 50' X 200' LYING
NORTH OF THE 100
FOOT HIGHWAY BY DIVI-
SION OF A TRACT OF
RECORD, "OFFICIAL REC-
ORDS", FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA, VOL-
UME "81" ON PAGES
556-557.

PARCEL 3:

FROM A POINT ON THE
NORTHERN BOUNDARY
OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO.
319, 730 FEET DUE
SOUTH FROM THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP
8 SOUTH RANGE 6 WEST,
RUN SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST ALONG
ROAD FOR 341.4 FEET
FOR A POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. FROM THIS POINT
OF BEGINNING RUN
THENCE NORTH 36 DE-
GREES WEST, 200 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST 100 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 36 DE-
GREES EAST 200 FEET
TO HIGHWAY; THENCE
NORTH 54 DEGREES
EAST ALONG THE ROAD
RIGHT OF WAY 100 FEET
TOTHE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. BEING A PARCEL
OF LAND 100 FEET BY
200 FEET AND FRONT-
ING 100 FEET ON THE
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE
ROAD 30 (U.S. 319 AND
U.S. 98)

PARCEL 4:

BEGIN AT A POINT 494
FEET WEST AND 767-5
FEET SOUTH FROM THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP
8 SOUTH, RANGE 6
WEST, RUN THENCE
EAST 100 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 54 DEGREES
WEST, 100 FEET;
THENCE RUN IN A
NORTHWESTERLY DI-
RECTION TO POINT OF
BEGINNING. THUS
FORMING ATRIANGULAR


PARCEL 5:

FROM A POINT
(CONCRETE MONU-
MENT) ON THE NORTH-
ERLY BOUNDARY OF THE
100 FOOT HIGHWAY (U.S.
HIGHWAY NO. 319) 730
FEET SOUTH (TRUE ME-
RIDIAN) OF THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF SEC-
TION 31, TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST,
RUN SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST ALONG
SAID HIGHWAY BOUND-
ARY 541.4 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 36 DEGREES
WEST, 200 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM THIS POINT OF BE-
GINNING, RUN SOUTH 54
DEGREES WEST, 50
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 36
DEGREES EAST ALONG
THE EASTERLY BOUND-
ARY OF THE 50 FOOT
FIRST STREET, 50 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 54 DE-
GREES EAST, 50 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 36 DE-
GREES WEST, 50 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. SAME BEING THAT
PARCEL OF LAND CON-
VEYED BY DEED DATED 7
FEBRUARY 1966 AND RE-
CORDED IN VOL. 77" AT
PAGES 373-374 OF THE
"OFFICIAL RECORDS" OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.

PARCEL 6:

COMMENCE AT AN OLD
CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF SEC-
TION 32, TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST,
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA AND THENCE
RUN SOUTH 730.00 FEET
TO AN OLD CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S.
HIGHWAY NO. 98,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 54
DEGREES WEST ALONG
SAID NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 2.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 37
DEGREES 00 MINUTES
EAST 100.02 FEET TO
THE SOUTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF SAID U.S. HIGH-
WAY NO. 98; THENCE
CONTINUE SOUTH 37
D E
GREES 00 MINUTES
EAST, 59.18 FEET TO THE
APPROXIMATE MEAN
HIGH WATER LINE OF ST.
GEORGE SOUND;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 58
DEGREES 00 MINUTES
1 0
SECONDS WEST ALONG
SAID APPROXIMATE
MEAN HIGH WATER LINE,
81.11 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 36 DEGREES 30
MINUTES 32 SECONDS
WEST 53.52 FEET TO THE
SOUTHER LY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF SAID U.S. HIGH-
WAY NO. 98; THENCE
CONTINUE NORTH 36
DEGREES 30 MINUTES
3 2
SECONDS WEST, 100.03
FEET TO THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF SAID
HIGHWAY; THENCE CON-
TINUE NORTH 36 DE-
GREES 30 MINUTES 32
SECONDS WEST, 174.98
FEET TO AN OLD IRON
PIPE; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 54 DEGREES 00
MINUTES WEST 108.00
FEET TO AN IRON PIPE;
THENCE NORTH 40 DE-
GREES 24 MINUTES 57
SECONDS WEST, 120.63
FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 16 DEGREES 35
MINUTES 30 SECONDS
WEST, 403.34 FEET;
THENCE RUN EAST 67.59
FEET; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 37 DEGREES 00
MINUTES EAST 636.11
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. LESS AND
EXCEPT THE RIGHT OF
WAY OF U.S. HIGHWAY
NO. 98.

PARCEL 7:

THAT CERTAIN PARCEL
OF LAND, 54 FT X 175 FT,
NORTH OF THE 100
FOOT HIGHWAY (U.S.
319-98 STATE #30) AND
INCLUDING ALL LAND LY-
ING BETWEEN THE HIGH-
WAY AND ST. GEORGE
SOUND, IN THE NORTH-
EAST 1/4 OF FRAC-
TIONAL SECTION 31,
TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST, COM-
PRISING THE DIVISION
OF TWO TRACTS AS FOL-
LOWS; THE MOST WEST-
ERLY 36 FOOT PORTION
FROM A TRACT IN DEED
FROM APALACHICOLA
STATE BANK AND RE-
CORDED IN VOL. 35" AT
PAGE 141-142 OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA; AND THE MOST
EASTERLY 18 FOOT POR-
TION FROM A TRACT IN
DEED FROM DAVID H.
BROWN ESTATE AS RE-
CORDED IN DEED BOOK
GG AT PAGE 340-352
O F
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF SAID COUNTY AND
STATE; AND FURTHER
DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: FROM A POINT
(CONCRETE MONU-
MENT) ON THE NORTH-
ERLY BOUNDARY OF THE


100 FOOT HIGHWAY
(STATE #30) 730 FEET
DUE SOUTH OF THE
NORTHEAST CORNER
(CONCRETE MONU-
MENT) OF SAID SECTION
31, RUN SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST ALONG
SAID HIGHWAY 83 FEET
TO A POINT OF BEGINN-
ING; RUN THENCE
NORTH 37 DEGREES
WEST, 175 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST 54 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 37 DE-
GREES EAST 175 FEET
TO SAID HIGHWAY AND
ON SAME LINE TO ST
GEORGE SOUND;
THENCE NORTH 54 DE-
GREES EAST ALONG
SAID SOUND 54 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 37 DE-
GREES WEST TO, AND
ACROSS, HIGHWAY TO
THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.

PARCEL 8:

FROM A POINT ON THE
NORTHERN BOUNDARY
OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO.
319, 730 FEET DUE
SOUTH FROM THE
NORTHEAST CORNER
O F
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP
8 SOUTH, RANGE 6
WEST, RUN SOUTH 54
DEGREES WEST ALONG
ROAD 541.1 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM THIS POINT OF BE-
GINNING RUN THENCE
NORTH 36 DEGREES
WEST, 200 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST 50 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 36 DE-
GREES EAST, 200 FEET
TO THE ROAD; THEN ON
TO THE SHORE OF ST
GEORGE SOUND,
THENCE NORTHEAST-
ERLY ALONG SHORE 50
FEET; THENCE NORTH 36
DEGREES WEST
A C R O S S
THE HIGHWAY TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
THUS FORMING A LOT
50' X 200' ON THE
NORTHERN SIDE OF THE
100 FOOT ROAD, AND IN-
CLUDING THAT PORTION
BETWEEN THE ROAD
AND SOUND. LESS AND
EXCEPT: FROM THE DE-
SCRIBED LAND THAT
CERTAIN PARCEL AS DE-
SCRIBED IN THAT CER-
TAIN DEED DATED FEB-
RUARY 3, 1956, FROM
CLYDE TUCKER AND
LLOYD R. TUCKER HER
HUSBAND TO GEORGE
BRASWELL AND SELMA
BRASWELL HIS WIFE, DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
FROM A POINT ON THE
NORTHERN BOUNDARY
OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO.
319, 730 FEET DUE
SOUTH FROM THE
NORTHEAST CORNER
O F
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP
8 SOUTH, RANGE 6
WEST, RUN SOUTH 54
DEGREES WEST ALONG
ROAD 541.4 FEET;
THENCE RUN NORTH 36
DEGREES WEST 200
FEET FOR THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; FROM THIS
POINT OF BEGINNING
RUN SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST 50 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 36
DEGREES EAST 50 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 54
DEGREES EAST 50 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 36
DEGREES WEST 50 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. BEING THE
NORTHERLY 50 FEET OF
THE LAST DESCRIPTION
ABOVE.

PARCEL 9:

BEGIN AT A POINT ON
THE NORTHERN BOUND-
ARY OF THE 100 FOOT
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF U.S.
HIGHWAY NO. 319, ONE
HUNDRED NINETY-ONE
(191) FEET SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST FROM A
POINT SEVEN HUNDRED
THIRTY (730) FEET DUE
SOUTH FROM THE
NORTHEAST CORNER
O F
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP
8 SOUTH, RANGE 6
WEST, RUN THENCE
NORTH 37 DEGREES
WEST ALONG D.W.
BROWN'S LINE TWO
HUNDRED (200) FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST NINETY
SEVEN (97) FEET TO
NORTHEAST CORNER
O F
MELTON CREAMER'S
TRACT; THENCE SOUTH
36 DEGREES EAST TWO
HUNDRED (200) FEET TO
HIGHWAY AND STRAIGHT
ON TO SHORE OF ST.
GEORGE SOUND;
THENCE NORTH 54 DE-
GREES EAST ALONG
SHORE ONE HUNDRED
TWO (102) FEET;
THENCE NORTH 37 DE-
GREES WEST ACROSS
HIGHWAY TO POINT OF
BEGINNING; THUS
FORMING A TRACT IN
THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 31,
WHICH INCLUDES ALL
OF THE TRACT AS RE-
CORDED IN DEED BOOK
'JJ ON PAGES 330-331
OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA AND
BEING THE SAME AS RE-
CORDED ON PAGES
30-31 OF DEED BOOK
NN", NICHOLS TO
DOERRE.

PARCEL 10:

FROM A POINT 635 FEET
WEST AND 860.5 FEET
SOUTH FROM THE N.E.
CORNER OF SECTION 31,
T 8-S; R.6-W, RUN S. 36
DEGREES E, 15 FEET TO


A POINT FOR BEGINN-
ING; CONTINUE THENCE
36 DEGREES E 50 FEET,
THENCE N. 54 DEGREES
E, 150 FEET, THENCE IN
A NORTHWESTERLY DI-
RECTION AND ALONG
THE WEST LINE OF A
TRACT DEEDED TO
HOUSTON MILLER 50 OR
MORE FEET, THENCE S.
54 DEGREES W. 160
FEET MORE OR LESS TO
POINT OF BEGINNING.
THUS FORMING ATTRACT
50 FEET WIDE IN SOUTH
CORNER OF THE TRACT
AS RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK RR, PAGES 384
AND 385 AND LATER IN
DEED BOOK UU, PAGES
377 AND 378. AND BEGIN
AT A POINT 635 FEET
WEST AND 767.5 FEET
SOUTH FROM THE N.E.
CORNER OF SECTION 31,
T 8-S.: R. 6-W. RUN
THENCE SOUTH 93 FEET.
THENCE S. 36 DEGREES
E, 65 FEET. THENCE N.
54 DEGREES E. ALONG
THE BACK ENDS OF FIVE
LOTS, 250 FEET. THENCE
WEST 241 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
LESS, HOWEVER A TRI-
ANGULAR TRACT AT THE
EAST AND FORMERLY
DEEDED TO MR. & MRS.
HOUSTON MILLER, AND
ALSO A STRIP ALONG
THE S. E. PREVIOUSLY
DEEDED TO J T BOAT-
WRIGHT AND WIFE
VELMA BOATWRIGHT

LESS AND EXCEPT:
BEGIN AT A POINT 494
FEET WEST AND 767.5
FEET SOUTH FROM THE
N.E CORNER OF SEC-
TION 31, T 8-S. R.6-W.
RUN THENCE EAST 100
FEET THENCE S. 54 DE-
GREES W. 100 FEET.
THENCE RUN IN A
NORTHWESTERLY DI-
RECTION TO POINT OF
BEGINNING. THUS
FORMING A TRIANGULAR
TRACT MADE BY THE DI-
VISION OF AND BEING
THE EAST END OF THE
TRACT AS RECORDED
ON PAGES 227-8 IN DEED
BOOK "UU." FLOY
GRIMES HIGGINS TO
MRS. DORIS GREENE
DOEREE.

PARCEL 11:

BEGIN AT A POINT 363
FEET EAST AND 218
FEET SOUTH FROM THE
NW CORNER OF SEC-
TION 32, TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST,
RUN THENCE SOUTH 36
DEGREES EAST, 200
FEET TO THE 100 FOOT
U.S. HIGHWAY #319 AND
ON TO THE SHORE OF
ST. GEORGE SOUND;
THENCE NORTHEAST-
ERLY ALONG SAID
SOUND 50 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 36 DE-
GREES WEST ACROSS
SAID HIGHWAY; THENCE
CONTINUE ON 200 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES WEST 50 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. THUS FORMING A
LOT IN THE NW 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 32, FRON-
TING 50 FEET ON THE
HIGHWAY AND RUNNING
BACK 200 FEET. SAME
BEING THE LOT IN DEED
FROM LEE VROOMAN
AND WIFE AND RE-
CORDED IN DEED BOOK
HH ON PAGE 327-328, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND HEREBY
TRANSFERRED SUBJECT
TO THE PRESENT TUR-
PENTINE LEASE HELD BY
C. C. LAND FROM LEE
VROOMAN. EXCEPT ALL
OR THAT PART OF THE
ABOVE DESCRIBED REAL
PROPERTY LYING BE-
TWEEN THE
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF U.S.
HIGHWAY NO. 319 AND
ST. GEORGE SOUND; IT
BEING THE INTENTION
OF THIS DEED TO
TRANSFER AND SELL
ONLY THAT PART OF THE
ABOVE DESCRIBED REAL
PROPERTY WHICH IS
NORTH OF U.S. HIGH-
WAY 319, CONSISTING
OF A TRACT 200 FEET
DEEP AND 50 FEET WIDE
ON THE HIGHWAY

PARCEL 12:

A PORTION OF THAT
PART OF THE NORTH-
EAST 1/4 OF FRAC-
TIONAL SECTION 31,
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST AS DE-
SCRIBED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 22,
PAGE 244, OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 83,
PAGE 419 AND OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 83,
PAGE 421, ALL BEING IN
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCING AT A
POINT ON THE EAST
BOUNDARY OF FIRST
STREET (50 FEET WIDE)
SAID POINT BEING WEST
635 FT. AND SOUTH
517.5 FEET OF THE
NORTHEAST CORNER
O F
FRACTIONAL SECTION
31, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST; THENCE
CONTINUE SOUTH ON
SAID EAST BOUNDARY
150 FEET; THENCE DE-
FLECT 89 DEGREES 53
MINUTES 20 SECONDS
LEFT AND RUN A DIS-
TANCE OF 173.11 FEET;
THENCE DEFLECT 64 DE-
GREES 01 MINUTES 40
SECONDS RIGHT AND
RUN A DISTANCE OF
19.04 FEET FOR THE
POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE DEFLECT 11 DE-


1100
GREES 17 MINUTES 00
SECONDS LEFT AND
RUN A DISTANCE OF
100.63 FEET; THENCE
DEFLECT 90 DEGREES
0 0
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
LEFT AND RUN A DIS-
TANCE OF 150 FEET;
THENCE DEFLECT 91 DE-
GREES 07 MINUTES 10
SECONDS LEFT AND
RUN A DISTANCE OF
92.33 FEET; THENCE DE-
FLECT 19 DEGREES 47
MINUTES 30 SECONDS
RIGHT AND RUN A DIS-
TANCE OF 74.25 FEET;
THENCE DEFLECT 96 DE-
GREES 01 MINUTES 10
SECONDS LEFT AND
RUN A DISTANCE OF
156.55 FEET; THENCE
DEFLECT 91 DEGREES
2 2
MINUTES 10 SECONDS
LEFT AND RUN A DIS-
TANCE OF 98.21 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.

PARCEL 13:

THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF
LAND, 100'X 141' IN THE
NE 1/4 OF FRACTIONAL
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP
8 SOUTH, RANGE 6
WEST, FORMED BY THE
JOINING OF TWO PAR-
CELS CONVEYED BY 1
DEED DATED 23 APRIL,
1962 AND RECORDED IN
VOL. "58" AT PAGES 6 & 7
OF THE "OFFICIAL REC-
ORDS" OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA; AND
2, DEED DATED 2 MAY,
1962 AND RECORDED IN
VOL. "58" AT PAGES 8 & 9
OF SAID "OFFICIAL REC-
ORDS", SAID TRACT IS
HEREBY FURTHER DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT A POINT ON
THE EAST BOUNDARY
O F
THE 50 FOOT "FIRST
STREET", 635 FEET WEST
(TRUE BEARING) AND
667.5 FEET SOUTH OF
THE NE CORNER OF
SAID SECTION 31, RUN
THENCE CONTINUING
SOUTH 100 FEET;
THENCE EAST 141 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 100
FEET; THENCE WEST 141
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. TOGETHER
WITH ALL IMPROVE-
MENTS THEREON. SUB-
JECT HOWEVER, TO ANY
EXISTING VALID EASE-
MENTS OR RIGHT OF
WAYS.

A PORTION OF THAT
PART OF THE NE 1/4 OF
FRACTIONAL SECTION
31, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST AS DE-
SCRIBED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 102,
PAGE 99, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA, AND
BEING MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS; COMMENC-
ING AT A POINT ON THE
EAST BOUNDARY OF
FIRST STREET (50' WIDE),
SAID POINT BEING WEST
635 FEET AND SOUTH
517.5 FEET OF THE NE
CORNER OF FRAC-
TIONAL SECTION 31,
TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST; THENCE
CONTINUE SOUTH ON
SAID EAST BOUNDARY
150 FEET FOR THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE
DEFLECT 89 DEGREES
5 3
MINUTES 20 SECONDS
LEFT AND RUN A DIS-
TANCE OF 173.11 FEET;
THENCE DEFLECT 115
DEGREES 58 MINUTES
2 0
SECONDS LEFT AND
RUN DISTANCE OF
79.17 FEET; THENCE DE-
FLECT 91 DEGREES 14
MINUTES 10 SECONDS
LEFT AND RUN A DIS-
TANCE OF 135.66 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.

PARCEL 14:

COMMENCE AT AN OLD
CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF SEC-
TION 32, TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST;
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA AND THENCE
RUN SOUTH 730.00 FEET
TO AN OLD CONCRETE
MONUMENT OF THE
NORTHERN LY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY
NO. 98, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 54 DEGREES
WEST ALONG SAID
NORTHERN LY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 2.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING THENCE
RUN NORTH 37 DE-
GREES 00 MINUTES
WEST 636.11 FEET,
THENCE RUN EAST
101.41 FEET; THENCE
RUN SOUTH 37 DE-
GREES 00 MINUTES
EAST 576.50 FEET TO
THE NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF SAID U.S. HIGH-
WAY 98; THENCE CON-
TINUE SOUTH 37 DE-
GREES 00 MINUTES
EAST 100.02 FEET TO
THE SOUTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF SAID HIGHWAY
THENCE CONTINUE
SOUTH 37 DEGREES 00
MINUTES EAST 73.96
FEET TO THE APPROXI-
MATE MEAN HIGH
WATER LINE OF ST.
GEORGE SOUND,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 64
DEGREES 59 MINUTES
0 7
SECONDS WEST ALONG
SAID APPROXIMATE
MEAN HIGH WATER LINE


82.59 FEET THENCE RUN
NORTH 37 DEGREES 00
MINUTES WEST 59.18
FEET TO THE SOUTH-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S.
HIGHWAY NO. 98,
THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 37 DEGREES 00
MINUTES WEST 100.02
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. LESS AND
EXCEPT THE
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF U.S.
HIGHWAY NO.98 AND
POWER LINE EASEMENT
OVER AND ACROSS A
NORTHERLY PORTION
THEREOF.
(Continued as 9436T-2)
9436T-2
PARCEL 15:

BEGINNING AT A POINT
220 FEET SOUTH AND
173 FEET WEST FROM
THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OF SECTION 31 OF
TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST; RUN
THENCE SOUTH 37 DE-
GREES EAST ALONG R.
E. BROWN'S LINE 624
FEET TO ST GEORGE
SOUND; THENCE SOUTH
54 DEGREES WEST
ALONG ST. GEORGE
SOUND 90 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 37 DE-
GREES WEST ALONG F
D. TUCKER'S LINE 691
FEET; THENCE EAST
ALONG SEVILLA
CARRIN'S LINE 112.7
FEET TO POINT OF BE-
GINNING. BEING PARTLY
IN SECTION 31 AND
PARTLY IN SECTION 32
OF TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST.

LESS AND EXCEPT,
HOWEVER, ALL THAT
PART LYING SOUTH OR
SOUTHERLY OF U.S. 98
(SR 30), DESCRIBED AC-
CORDING TO FRANKLIN
COUNTY "OFFICIAL REC-
ORDS" VOLUME 134,
PAGES 78-79, AND LESS
AND EXCEPT THAT PART
CONVEYED TO
EASTPOINT WATER AND
SEWER DISTRICT DE-
SCRIBED ACCORDING
TO FRANKLIN COUNTY
"OFFICIAL RECORDS"
VOLUME 124, PAGES
576-577, FURTHER DE-
SCRIBED BY METES AND
BOUNDS AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NE
CORNER OF FRAC-
TIONAL SECTION 31,
TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST AND EX-
TEND A LINE SOUTH FOR
220.0 FEET THENCE
WEST FOR 172.7 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. THENCE SOUTH 37
DEGREES 00 MINUTES
EAST FOR 513.12 FEET
TO A POINT ON THE
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF STATE ROAD
30-U.S. HIGHWAY 98;
THENCE SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES 00 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY FOR 25.0
FEET; THENCE NORTH 37
DEGREES 00 MINUTES
WEST FOR 441.06 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 56 DE-
GREES 21 MINUTES 05
SECONDS WEST FOR
65.10 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 37 DEGREES 00
SECONDS WEST FOR
135.63 FEET; THENCE
DUE EAST FOR 112.7
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, BEING IN
FRACTIONAL SECTIONS
31 AND 32, TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST,
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.

PARCEL 16:

A PARCEL OF LAND IN
FRACTIONAL SECTION
32, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST, DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
FROM THE NW CORNER
OF SAID FRACTIONAL
SECTION 32, RUN 220
FEET SOUTH TO A
POINT; THENCE RUN
WEST 172.7 FEET TO A
POINT; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 37 DEGREES
EAST A DISTANCE OF
556 FEET, MORE OR
LESS, ACROSS THE 100
FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
STATE ROAD NO. 30 (U.S.
HIGHWAY 98), TO THE
WATERS OF ST. GEORGE
SOUND AND THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINN-
ING, RUN NORTH 37 DE-
GREES WEST TO THE
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE
ROAD NO. 30 (U.S. HIGH-
WAY 98) THENCE RUN IN
AN, EASTERLY DIREC-
TION ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR A
DISTANCE OF 135 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 37 DE-
GREES EAST TOTHE WA-
TERS OF ST. GEORGE
SOUND; THENCE RUN
WESTERLY ALONG THE
MEANDERING WATERS
OF ST. GEORGE SOUND
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.

PARCEL 17:

BEGIN AT A POINT 267.5
FEET SOUTH (TRUE ME-
RIDIAN) AND 635 FEET
WEST OF THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF SEC-
TION 31, TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST;
RUN THENCE EAST 195.5
FEET; THENCE S17 DE-
GREES 30 MINUTES E
105 FEET; THENCE WEST
227.5 FEET TO FIRST
STREET; THENCE NORTH
ALONG SAID STREET TO
POINT OF BEGINNING
100 FEET. THUS FORM-
ING A LOT IN THE
NORTHEAST QUARTER
OF SAID SECTION 31,
FRONTING 100 FEET ON
FIRST STREET,


EASTPOINT AND RUNN-
ING BACK TO PROPERTY
LINE OF R.B. BROWN
AND BORDERING A
TRACT DEEDED AUGUST,
1947 TO 0. J. DOERRE
ON THE NORTH AND A
TRACT DEEDED OCTO-
BER 1945 TO LAVERE
WALKER ON THE SOUTH.
AND, BEGIN AT A POINT
635 FEET WEST AND
217.5 FEET SOUTH FROM
THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OF SECTION 31,
TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST; RUN
THENCE SOUTH(TRUE
MERIDIAN) 50 FEET;
THENCE EAST 195.5
FEET; THENCE N17 DE-
GREES 30 MINUTES W
52.5 FEET; THENCE
WEST 179.5 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

PARCEL 18:

BEGIN AT A POINT 635
FEET WEST AND 367.5
FEET SOUTH FROM THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP
8 SOUTH, RANGE 6
WEST, FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA, RUN
THENCE SOUTH 50 FEET;
THENCE EAST 244 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 17 DE-
GREES 30 MINUTES
WEST 53 FEET; THENCE
WEST 227.5 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
THUS FORMING A TRACT
IN THE NORTHEAST 1/4
OF SAID SECTION 31.
AND, A 25 FOOT STRIP
OF LAND ALONG THE
SOUTH BOUNDARY OF A
TRACT IN DEED FROM
LEE VROOMAN DATED
JULY 20, 1953 AND RE-
CORDED IN VOL. 8 ON
PAGES 157-58 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AND FURTHER
DESCRIBED BY METES
AND BOUNDS AS FOL-
LOWS: BEGIN AT A
POINT 342.5 FEET SOUTH
(TRUE MERIDIAN) AND
635 FEET WEST OF THE
NORTHEAST CORNER
O F
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP
8 SOUTH, RANGE 6
WEST; RUN THENCE
EAST 219.5 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 17 DE-
GREES 30 MINUTES
EAST 26.25 FEET;
THENCE WEST 227.5
FEET TO THE EAST
BOUNDARY OF THE 50
FOOT FIRST STREET;
THENCE NORTH ALONG
SAID STREET 25 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.

PARCEL 19:

THAT CERTAIN IRREGU-
LAR PARCEL OF LAND IN
THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF
FRACTIONAL SECTION
31, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST, BY DIVI-
SION OF A TRACT CON-
VEYED BY DEED FROM
REVA LAMAR FINCHER
DATED 11 APRIL, 1969,
AND FURTHER DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
FROM A POINT 290 FEET
DUE WEST OF THE
NORTHEAST CORNER
(CONCRETE MONU-
MENT) OF SAID SECTION
31, RUN FIRST SOUTH 36
DEGREES EAST 125
F E E T
(EASTERLY CORNER OF
ARLEN T CHAMBERS
LAND) THENCE SOUTH
77 DEGREES 30 MIN-
U T E S
WEST, 60 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING;
FROM THIS POINT OF BE-
GINNING RUN SOUTH 77
DEGREES 30 MINUTES
WEST 200 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 17 DEGREES 30
MINUTES EAST 66.75
FEET (CONCRETE
M 0 N U
MENT); THENCE DUE
EAST 200 FEET; THENCE
NORTHERLY TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

PARCEL 20:

A PARCEL IN LOT 27, OF
BLOCK 120 ACCORDING
TO AN UNRECORDED
1956 PLAT (REVISED) OF
THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF
FRACTIONAL SECTION
31, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 6 WEST AND DE-
SCRIBED BY METES AND
BOUNDS AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A POINT
(CONCRETE MONU-
MENT) WHICH MARKS
THE INTERSECTION OF
THE EAST BOUNDARY
O F
THE 50 FOOT FIRST
STREET AND THE
SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY
OF THE 60 FOOT
AVENUE A (FORMER
S-65), AND WHICH SAID
POINT IS 76.25 FEET DUE
SOUTH AND 635 FEET
WEST OF THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER
(CONCRETE MONU-
MENT) OF SAID NORTH-
EAST 1/4; RUN THENCE
SOUTH ALONG THE
STREET BOUNDARY
91.25 FEET TO A POINT
WHICH IS THE POINT OF
BEGINNING OF THE PAR-
CEL HEREIN CONVEYED;
THENCE EAST 179.5
FEET; THENCE NORTH
17.5 DEGREES WEST 60
FEET, MORE OR LESS,
TO A POINT; THENCE
TURN LEFT 90 DEGREES
AND RUN 180 FEET,
MORE OR LESS, TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
BEING A TRIANGULAR
PARCEL SOUTH OF THE
UNIMPROVED ROAD
WHICH TRAVERSES SAID
LOT 27.

PARCEL 21:

BEING LOT 14, BLOCK


+1+ +1+ +






Franklin County's source of news for more than a century The Times Thursday, December 11, 2008 5B


1 1100 1100 1100 1100 2100 3280 6100 6140
"120A", FRONTING 48.5 GREES 58 MINUTES 37 POINT OF BEGINNING BEING THE SAME PROP- Beautiful AKC King Kutter Post hole Carrabelle, commercial Beachview house for rent,
FEET ON THE SOUTH- SECONDS EAST ALONG RUN NORTH 36 DE- ERTY AS DESCRIBED IN Bea digger for 3pt-PTO, 40 in office space downtown on short walk to beach, furn. 3
ERN BOUNDARY OF THE SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE AGREES 01 MINUTES 14 OFFICIAL RECORDS drilling depth, includes 9 & Hwy 98. $500 month, br, 2 ba, screened in
100 FOOT HIGHWAY U.S. FOR 90.01 FEET; THENCE SECONDS WEST 147.35 BOOK 35, PAGE 143, OF- 12 in. bits, $450 Please call 850-510-2888 swimming pool, lots of pn- "s s
319-98, ACCORDING TOA LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; FICIAL RECORDS BOOK UW}V l 850-653-2897 vacy, $950 mo. call I .
1956 MAP OF THE NW 1/4 WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 36 THENCE RUN SOUTH 77 60, PAGE 462, OFFICIAL I rF 5 20 i 509-2460 EL
OF FRACTIONAL SEC- DEGREES 58 MINUTES DEGREES 46 MINUTES RECORDS BOOK 92, F for mall business or of va 7100 -Homes
TION 32, TOWNSHIP 8 3 3 2 3 PAGE 2, OFFICIAL REC- ce Utilities includedll 7110 Beach Home/
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST; SECONDS EAST FOR SECONDS WEST 60.39 ORDS BOOK 93, PAGE Standard poodle pup- ic. Utilities included. CarrabelleAa p ey
ALSO BEING THAT POR- 97.38 FEET TO THE AP- FEET TO A RE-ROD; 161, AND IS EXCLUDING pies home raised vet lacDcola.w 29 Ave. E Beach 7120 Commercial
TION, LYING BETWEEN PROXIMATE MEAN HIGH THENCE RUN SOUTH 09 THAT PROPERTY AS DE- docks, dews, shots, (upstairs) For 29 fo calv 3 br, 2 ba large lot w/d 7130 Comndofonhoise
SAID HIGHWAY AND ST. WATER LINE OF ST. DEGREES 00 MINUTES SCRIBED IN OFFICIAL health certicate. Ready Carol 850-653-3871 deck, appliances, ref. 7140- Farm s & Ranches
GEORGE SOUND, OF A GEORGE SOUND; THEN 0 0 RECORDS BOOK 204, on Dec 14. Accepting 7150- Lot60-233-0676 nd Arege
TRACT IN DEED DATED TURN LEFT AND MEAN- SECONDS EAST 108.37 PAGE 322, DESCRIBED deposits now to hold up $750/m or ema860233l0676 7170 Walerfront
23 DECEMBER, 1960 AS DER ALONG SAID AP- FEET TO A RE-ROD AS AN "OUT" PARCEL. to Dec24. View at EMPLOYMENT cla arten(sbclob- 7180 Investment
RECORDED IN VOL. "50" PROXIMATE MEAN HIGH (MARKED #7160); SUBJECTTOA 100'WIDE www.palmpups.com or ..al.net Property
AT PAGES 445-446 OF WATER LINE IN A SOUTH- THENCE RUN NORTH 89 FLORIDA POWER COR- phone 850-508-6865 or 4100 Help Wanted 611I0 9 710 Out-of-Town
THE "OFFICIAL REC- WESTERLY DIRECTION DEGREES 37 MINUTES PORTION POWERLINE 850-508-3315 4130- Employment Real Estate
WORDS" OF FRANKLIN FOR 95 FEET, MORE OR 1 4 EASEMENT LYING OVER Ioa o 7200 Tmeshare
COUNTY FLORIDA, AND LESS, TO A POINT SECONDS EAST 86.84 AND ACROSS THE WEST-
WHICH IS HERE DE- WHICH BEARS SOUTH 36 FEET TO A CONCRETE ERLY PORTION OF THE.1 br, 1 ba & 2 br, apart- Carrabelle/Lanark Beach
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: DEGREES 58 MINUTES MONUMENT (MARKED ABOVE DESCRIBED 4100 ment. unfurn electric/water unfurnished, 3 br, 1 ba, 7100
BEGIN AT A POINT 363 3 3 #1787); THENCE RUN PREMISES. Administrative/Clerical inc. Tile floors, part cy- Good Locaon $775 mo Port St. Joe, St. George
FEET EAST, AND 218 SECONDS EAST, FROM NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 press panelling, private + utilities. 850-528-3850 Island and St. James Bay
FEET SOUTH OF THE THE POINT OF BEGINN- MINUTES 15 SECONDS at public sale, to the high- Island and St. James Bay
NORTHWEST CORNER ING; THENCE LEAVING EAST 41.88 FEET TO THE est and best bidder for Computer deck 1 block from beach Previously Bank Owned
4 0 4 4 0 2 5 7 3 Property. Priced way below
(CONCRETE MONU- SAID APPROXIMATE POINT OF BEGINNING. cash, at the Franklin Nerd: 850-653-6459 Pmarket value Prices start
MENT) OF SAID SECTION MEAN HIGH WATER LINE County Courthouse, 33 MERCHANDISE market $35,value000 Prlease callrt-
32; RUN THENCE SOUTH RUN NORTH 36 DE- PARCEL 29: Market Street, Apalachi- Computer 1 br, 1 ba, all utes Century21 Gulf Coast Re- Counts Real Estate Group
54 DEGREES WEST, 54 GREES 58 MINUTES 33 cola, Florida 32320, at 3100- Antiques 1 br 1 ba all utltesCountsRealEstateGroup
FEET TO PROPERTY LINE SECONDS WEST FOR COMMENCE AT A CON- 11:00A.M. on January 8, 3110-Appliances administrative in-cluded,Apalachicola, no alty long term rentals avail at 850-249-3615.
3120- Arts & Crafts assistant: FT/PT. Must smoking, walk to groc able Carr's Townhomes
OF T.M. BROWN; 75.36 FEET TO THE CRETE MONUMENT 2009. 3130-Auctions spend 90% of waking store, furn. 1 yr lease #6, #8, #10 2 br, 1.5 ba Why
THENCE SOUTH 37 DE- POINT OF BEGINNING. MARKING THE NORTH- 3140- Baby Items hours on the internet required, 1st monthand 210 Watermark Way $950 Why Rent
GREES EAST, 200 FEET EAST CORNER OF FRAC- Any person claiming an n- 31- Building Supplies anin31o required, 1st month and 2ermonth, Coronado #3 2 When You Can
TO SAID HIGHWAY AND PARCEL 25: TIONAL SECTION 31, terest in the surplus from 3160- Business put that time to goodsigning. br, 1.5 ba 731 Hwy 98
ON TO ST. GEORGE TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, the sale, if any, other than Equipment use Must understand 6536375$850 per month Destiny Own A Brand
SOUND; THENCE BEGIN AT A POINT RANGE 6 WEST, FRANK- the property owner as of 3180- Computers terms likeRSS feed, im- 2#1ed s2 b r ba15- 40thSt New Home?
NORTHEASTERLYALONG THREE HUNDRED LIN COUNTY FLORIDA the date of the lis pendens 3190- Electronics bedded, SEO, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths #1 2 br, 1 ba 115 40 th St. N
SOUND APPROXIMATELY SIXTY-THREE (363) FEET AND RUN SOUTH 220.92 must file a claim within 60 3200 Firewood download, upload, Modern Apt with washer #4 2 br, 2.5 ba 7172 Hwy THE AVENUES at
47 FEET; THENCE NORTH EAST AND TWO HUN- FEET TO THE POINT OF days after the sale. 3210 Free Pass it On backdoor, key words. and dryer, central AC Ave 98 $1000 per month, In- KEOUGH'sANDING
36 DEGREES WEST DRED EIGHTEEN (218) BEGINNING; FROM SAID 3220 Furniture Eherdmns ve E Apalachicola $700 98 $1000 per month, In KEOUGH's LANDING
ACROSS HIGHWAY AND FEET SOUTH FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING, MARCIA JOHNSON 32- ge/Yard Sal tes as needed. Dvers mo.,+ dep. Call 653-1240 dan Lagoon Cottages te t
ON FOR 200 FEET TO NORTHWEST CORNER RUN EAST 185.24 FEET Clerk of Court 3250- Good Things to Eat License EEO. Salary or 670-1211. br, 2 ba SR-30 Indtan Pass Forgotten Coast
THE POINT OF BEGINN- OF SECTION TO A RE-ROD (MARKED By: Michelle Maxwell 3260 Health & Fitness Negotiable, Send re- Plantation 3 br, 3 ba 1120 ranging from 1250-2000
ING. THUS FORMING A THIRTY-TWO (32), TOWN- #4261), THENCE RUN As Deputy Clerk 3270 Jewelry/Clothing sume or letter with ex- 15th St. $900 per month, sqft in Carrabelle's Newest
LOT, MEASURING 50 SHIP EIGHT (8) SOUTH, SOUTH 36 DEGREES 53 December 11, 18, 2008 3280 Machinery/ peence, Paradise Porch 2br, 2 ba Subdivision only V mile
FEET ON THE NORTH- RANGE SIX (6) WEST, MINUTES 14 SECONDS Equipment interest last web ste Paradise Porch 2br, 2 ba Subdivision only Rivle
ERLY BOUNDARY OF RUN THENCE SOUTH 54 EAST 302.19 FEET TO A 9444T 3290- Medical Equipment interests, last web ste 9135 Cockles Ave. $650 from the Carrabelle River
SAID HIGHWAY RUNN- DEGREES WEST, RE-ROD (MARKED #0340) REQUEST FOR PRO- 3300- Miscellaneous hacked on 2 br, 1 ba, two er month, Surf & Sands from $159
3310-Musicallnslmmenls kikimon28@yahoo.com unit 30-1 2br, 2 ba 109- Prices from $159,900 to
ING BACK 200 FEET, AND FIFTY-FOUR (54) FEET TO LYING ON THE NORTH POSAL 3320- Plants & Shrubs/ u_____ nits available 30th St. $580 per month, $189,900 $
MEASURING 54 FEET THE PROPERTY LINE OF W E S T E R L Y Supplies $650 and $850 per month Surf & Sands unit 42-A &
ACROSS THE BACK; IN- T.M. BROWN; THENCE RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND- The Gulf Coast Workforce 3330 Restaurant/Hotel 850-653-9087 42-b 2 br, 2ba 121- 42ncd IPickyour Lot
CLUDING THAT PORTION SOUTH 37 DEGREES ARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY Board announces the 3340 Sporting Goods
LYING BETWEEN SAID EAST TWO HUNDRED 98, THENCE SOUTH 54 availability of the following 3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell) St. $650 per month, Surf & Choose
HIGHWAY AND SAID ST. (200) FEET TO U.S. DEGREES 00 MINUTES Request for Proposal Hospital700 mo deposit no ty/Tourism 3 br 1 ba Lanark Vi 121-age Sands unt 42C 4 br,2 ba Your Model
GEORGE SOUND. HIGHWAY #319, AND ON 0 0 (RFP) titled "Delivery of $700 mo + deposit. no 121-42ncd St. $850. per
TO THE SHORE OF ST SECONDS WEST ALONG Specialized Program Ser- Room Attendant Mainstay smoking no pets Susan month, Ponderosa #18 3 JillArcher, REALTOR
PARCEL 22: GEORGE SOUND SAID RIGHTOFWAY vices for Mandatory FSET 3200 Suites in Port St. Joe is Jones Bluewater Realty br, 2 ba #18 Ponderosa 1st Choice Real Estate
THENCE NORTHEAST- BOUNDARY 285.00 FEET Participants". This RFP re- asoned now accepting applica- Group (850) 566-7584 Pines Dr. $850 per month, Services, Inc.
ALL OF THAT PART OF ERLY ALONG THE SHORE TO A RE-ROD (MARKED places the previously ad- Seasoned tons for an Room Call 850-648-5449 or (850) 528-5804
THE FOLLOWING DE- A P P R OX I MATE LY #4161), THENCE LEAV- vertised Request for Quall- Firewood Attendant. Candidate must 1BR/1BA furnished apart- 850-229-1200 for more in-
SCRIBED TRACT OF FORTY-SEVEN (47) FEET; ING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY fications (RFQ). The RFP By the load or by the stick, maintain flexible schedule, ment, downtown Apalachi- formation
LAND WHICH LIES ON THENCE NORTH 36 DE- BOUNDARY RUN NORTH is to establish a contract 670-8808 or 670-8851 dependability is a must. If cola. satellite, WiFi, newly
THE SOUTHERLY SIDE GREES WEST ACROSS 36 DEGREES 53 MIN- between a professional you have an eye for detail renovated, balcony, laun- For rent 710
OF THE 100 FOOT THE HIGHWAY THENCE U T E S firm to assist with the delyv- and a passion for service, dry on site. Short or long Downtown
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE CONTINUE ON TWO 14 SECONDS WEST, eryand case management We Want youl Please term rental. Call Apalach
ROAD #30 (U.S. 319) AND HUNDRED (200) FEET TO 511.64 FEET TO CON- of the Food Stamps Em- 320 apply in person Mainstay 850-653-8801Apaach
BETWEEN SAID ROAD- THE POINT OF BEGINN- CREATE MONUMENT ployment and Training 1Sutes 3951 Hwy 98 Port
WAY AND THE WATERS ING. THUS FORMING A (MARKED #1787), (FSET) program in Bay, St. Joe, FLEOE Lanark Village Large histocal home 57 acres off Hwy 65 on
OF ST GEORGE SOUND; LOT MEASURING 50 FEET THENCE RUN EAST, Gulf, and Franklin Coun- DFWPLanarkVilla great location. 4 bed, 2 Ga diners andng Road
BEGIN AT A POINT 363 ON THE NORTHERN SIDE 171.05 FEET TO THE ties. It is intended that tthOther bath withfireplace. 1124th Make offer.850653-1596
FEET EAST AND 218 OF HIGHWAY 200 FEET POINT OF BEGINNING. contract will be negotiated 2 br, 1 ba, furn. with w/d St. $850/mo 850-323-0259 leave message
FEET SOUTH FROM THE DEEP AND 54 FEET for a period to be deter- 5 Piece 100% MicroFber $700 mo. incld. util. All - - -
NORTHWEST CORNER ACROSS THE BACK. PARCEL 30: mined upon vendor selec- Living Rm set complete Attention rk, new 2 br, 1 ba, furn, with House for Rent
OF SECTION 32, TOWN- LESS, HOWEVER, THAT tlion. w/tables:$599,ALLNEW in Home Computer work!!!, w/d incld. until. $925 mo. 3 Br 2 Ba w/carport and
SHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 PORTION BETWEEN THE COMMENCE AT A CON- boxes. Delivery available Flexible hours, great pay, Furn. 2 br, 1 ba, incld util. I storage. Whispering I
WEST; THENCE RUN 100 FOOT HIGHWAY AND CRETE MONUMENT The Board is seeking 545-7112 will train, apply online $775 mo. Rental's weekly Pines, East points For Sale By
SOUTH 36 DEGREES SOUND. MARKING THE NORTH- RFP's from organizations twww.lIwor or monthly. 850-697-2220 $895/mo first, last, and
EAST, 200 FEET TO THE EAST CORNER OF FRAC- capable of providing this fromhome.com or 850-509-3535 Isecurity deposit year I Owner
N 0 R T H E R L Y PARCEL 26: TIONAL SECTION 31 service as expeditiously as lease Call 850-653-9341 1 acre lot high and dry,
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF (ALSO BEING THE possible and with the ad- 3220 Other Lease to own $1000 down or 813-293-2311 cleared with trees. Re-
THE 100 FOOT COMMENCE AT A CON- NORTHWEST CORNER ministrative capabilities to 2 br W sunroom in Lanark - - - duced Price $48K. Call
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE CRETE MONUMENT OF FRACTIONAL SEC- manage a comprehensive Caregivers Needed Village Or rent for $425 Captain JR for more de-
ROAD #30; THENCE MARKING THE NORTH- TION 32), TOWNSHIP 8 project, the ability to work or CNA's mo + $250 dep 509-2460 St. George Island Home tails at 850-670-8858
CONTINUE ON THE EAST CORNER OF SEC- SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, closely with required com- Seeking caring and re- home or cell 653-5030
S A M E TION 31, TOWNSHIP 8 FRANKLIN COUNTY, munity partners, and oper- $160 Brand Name Queen sponsible persons to Furnished 2 br, 1.5 ba
BEARING ACROSS SAID SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST FLORIDA AND RUN ate on a Mattress Set Unused with assist elderly. Will train ground level 3rd from WANTED
ROADWAY AND EXTEND FRANKLIN COUNTY SOUTH 220.92 FEET, performance-based basis, warranty (850) 222-7783 right person. Harbor beach o/s shower
SAID LINE TO THE WA- FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE RUN EAST Proposal is due December Breeze Assisted Livingl 6120 screened porch roof deck Apalachicola Area: 1/2 1
TERS OF ST. GEORGE SOUTH ALONG THE EAST 185.24 FEET TO A 22,2008. 312 N.W. Avenue D large living, and dinning acre wooded, vac
SOUND; THENCE RUN BOUNDARY OF SAID RE-ROD (MARKED Carrabelle, 697-2886. St. Georqe room, laundry $800 month cel suitable for S/F Modu-
NORTHEASTERLY MEAN- SECTION 31 (AS MONU- #4261), THENCE RUN To obtain further informa- Contact Tammi Hardy Island plus utilities Please Call lar Home, non-waterfront,
DERING THE WATERS OF MENTED) A DISTANCE SOUTH 36 DEGREES 53 tion or a copy this RFR A New Queen Orthopedic $160 wk, elec, Satellite, Joe at 215-570-9977 avail. access road and electric
ST GEORGE SOUND TO OF 220.00 FEET TO A MINUTES 14 SECONDS please contact: Pllowtop mattress set in a Garbage included, pool Jan4 available. 727-515-8537
A POINT FROM WHICH A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) EAST 302.19 FEET TO A sealed plastic $279. Full_ table. 12'X65' deck with
LINE RUN NORTH 36 DE- MARKING THE POINT OF RE-ROD (MARKED #0340) Gulf Coast Workforce warranty. Sacrifice Can | 4130 Beautiful view, Call
AGREES WEST WILL BE 50 BEGINNING. FROM SAID LYING ON THE NORTH- Board Deliver. 850-222-7783 Other 850-653-5114
FEET FROM AND PARAL- POINT OF BEGINNING W E S T E R L Y 5230 West US Highway 98 _______Dehve. Tnt er 8 50-65 -f -
LEL TO SAID FIRST DE- RUN NORTH 36 DE- RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND- Panama City, FL 32401 Townhomes for rent 7160
SCRIBED LINE; THENCE GREES 00 MINUTES 28 ARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY 850-913-3285 Mystery Shoppers. Earn Jones Homestead 3 br 2 ba Single Wide
RUN NORTH 36 DE- SECONDS WEST 223.72 NO. 98, THENCE LEAV- 1-800-311-3685 ext. 3285up to $100 a day. Undones Homestead- 3 br, 2 b, Sngle Wde
GREES WEST ACROSS FEET TO A RE-ROD ING SAID NORTHWEST- 850-913-3269 Fax cover shoppers needed to Ponderosa pines. End Fully furn$250 mo, 450 24th Ave
SAID ROADWAY TO THE (MARKED #0340), ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY dwilliams@gcwb.org Cherry- NEW QUEEN, judge retail/dining estab- of year special. First Apalachcola$250 mo, 4 50 24th Ave.
N R T H E R LY THENCE RUN SOUTH 53 BOUNDARY CONTINUE sleigh 7pc bedroom set. lishments. Exp not re- Carrabelle month rent free with 8506539 ,50 0 Call6
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF DEGREES 55 MINUTES SOUTH 36 DEGREES 53 Minority businesses are $2400 value, must sell quired. Please Call deposit and 12 month
STATE ROAD #30; 3 7 MINUTES 14 SECONDS encouraged to apply. The $1,000. 425-8374. Delivery 1-800-308-4616.
THENCE CONTINUE ON SECONDS WEST 52.66 EAST 100.01 FEET TO A Workforce Investment Act available. POSTAL & GOVT JOB W/Dbr, 2 ba Unfurnshec, lease 2 br and 3br MH For Sale or Rent
THE SAME BEARING A FEET; THENCE RUN RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) is an Equal Opportunity INFOFORSALEGOV Pool side. Covered park, units8502278404 or 850 BR 2 BA,16x60Champion
DISTANCE OF 200 FEET; SOUTH 36 DEGREES 00 LYING ON THE SOUTH- Employer. Program and INFO Fng. LnOR SALE? Pool sde.g tCoverm. 995/mo. 850-227-8404 or MH zoned 3 850-370-2 BA, 1 6x6Champ118
THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 MINUTES 46 SECONDS E A S T E R L Y auxiliary aids and services For appointment, Call
DEGREES WEST 50 FEET EAST 185.54 FEET; RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND- are available upon request caution 850-877-7696. formation.
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN- THENCE RUN NORTH 89 ARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98 to individuals with disabili- Complete Solid Wood caution
NING. DEGREES 54 MINUTES FOR THE POINT OF BE- ties. Bedroom Set. Brand New! Snow Birds! k
1 5 GINNING; FROM SAID December 11, 2008 Top quality. Dovetail Draw- You NEVER have to pay Snow Birds/ge
PARCEL23: SECONDS EAST, 65.00 POINT OF BEGINNING ers. Beautiful. Must See. for informatin about Lanark Villagea
FEET TO THE POINT OF AND LEAVING SAID $499 Can deliver 545-7112 federal or postal jobs. If 1 br, 1 ba, Renovated/ fur- Yearround rental on canal
COMMENCE AT A CON- BEGINNING. THE ABOVE RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND- 9462T ou see a ob nshed end unt, new ktch n SGI, 2 br, 2 ba, nRenovated/ Year round iceana
CRETE MONUMENT DESCRIBED PARCEL BE- ARY CONTINUE SOUTH Public Notice yoguarant see contact te and unbath, mn. 4 month yard. Boats welcome b No e
guarantee", contact the and bath, mini. 4 month yard. Boats welcomell No
MARKING THE NORTH- ING THAT SAME PARCEL 36 DEGREES 53 MIN -Pi% FTC. lease $595/mo + dep no pets. $795 mo. Call AUTOMOTIVE, MARINE
WEST CORNER OF SEC- AS DESCRIBED IN OFFI- U T E S The next meeting of The 3230 The Federal Trade smoking, pet considered 4134544253 RECREATIONAL
TION 32, TOWNSHIP 8 CIAL RECORDS BOOK 14 SECONDS EAST, 74.75 Northwest Florida Trans- Commission (850) 653-3838 8100 Antique & Collectibles
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, 139, PAGE 226, OF THE FEET TO A RE-ROD portation Corridor Author- Carrabelle, 212 Avenue C Amernca's consumer 8110 Cars
FRANKLIN COUNTY PUBLIC RECORDS OF (MARKED #4261) LYING ity will be held on Thurs- and 2nd street, Fri & Sat protection agency. 8120-SportsUtilitVehicles
FLORIDA AND THENCE FRANKLIN COUNTY, ON THE APPROXIMATE day, December 18th, 2008 8-? Collectible dolls, proteion agencyV a 6170 n Trucks
RUN SOUTH (BEARING FLORIDA. MEAN HIGH WATER LINE at 10:00 a.m. CST in the comforters, glassware, etc www.ftc.gov/jobscams 140 2 br, 1 ba 8150-Commercial
BASE) ALONG THE WEST OF ST GEORGE SOUND, Gulf Breeze City Hall, 1-877-FTC-HELP6140 8160 Motorcycles
BOUNDARYLINE OF SAID PARCEL 27: THENCE RUN SOUTH 53 Council Chambers, 1070 1877FTCHELhuge lot, 3 Rivers Area 8170 Auto Parts
SECTION 32 FOR 220.00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES Shoreline Drive, Gulf Garage Sale Aublic service Carrabelle. remodeled Carrabelle, $495 mo+util-653-3270 & Accessories
FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 COMMENCE AT A CON- 2 2 Breeze, FL. Any person re- 188 Woodll Rd, message from the FTC w/d hookup, fenced yard,es & dep850-8220 Personal aircraft
DEGREES 58 MINUTES CRETE MONUMENT SECONDS WEST ALONG quiring special accom- Fri & Sat, 12th & 13th and The News Herald Low util. $500 per month 2 br, 2 ba MH, Woodill 8230 Sailboats
3 1 MARKING THE NORTH- SAID MEAN HIGH WATER modations to participate in 8a- 4p Classified Advertising plus dep. Call 850- Rd., Carrabelle, W/D w/ 8240- Boal & Marine
SECONDS EAST FOR EAST CORNER OF SEC- LINE, 138.37 FEET; this meeting is asked to Many Collectibles & Christ- Department 6974080 or 850-591-5899 shed, trash pck up 831- Supplies
183.80 FEET FOR THE TION 31, TOWNSHIP 8 THENCE RUN SOUTH 43 advise the Corridor Author- masDecor l $500 3 Aircr a/Aviation
POINT OF BEGINNING. SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST DEGREES 31 MINUTES ity at least 48 hours prior mas cr included. $500 mo. +dep. 8320 ATV/OffRoad Vehicles
FROM SAID POINT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY 3 5 to the meeting by contact- 1, & 2, br 850-685-6787. 8330 Campers & Trailers
BEGINNING RUN SOUTH FLORIDA AND RUN SECONDS WEST ALONG ing Amber Perryman at / Apalachicola, FL.nt t 8340 MolorhDmes
36 DEGREES 58 MIN- SOUTH ALONG THE EAST SAID MEAN HIGH WATER 850-215-4081 or by email at Dec 13 Call 850-643-7740. Rent to Own
U T E S BOUNDARY OF SAID LINE, 11.78 FEET TO A a t Eastpoint 8-12 ---
33 SECONDS EAST FOR SECTION 31 (AS MONU- RE-ROD (MARKED Amber.Perryman@hdrinc. Own your pelce of para- 8
303.70 FEET TO THE MENTED) A DISTANCE #4261), THENCE LEAV- com. 241 Patton dise now. $0 down, $500
N O R T H E R LY OF 220.00 FEET TO A ING SAID MEAN HIGH December 11, 2008 Gull Coast StoPrage wt* * t mo. 2 or 3 br MH, each F-150 Ford 91 Fiberglass
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF RE-ROD (MARKED WATER LINE RUN NORTH Ceowmplex. t.hETtTE 2 br 2 ba, House off T wth s own dock on camper, runs good, In fair
U.S. HIGHWAY 98 #7160), THENCE RUN 36 DEGREES 53 MIN- mpX RS TN 2 br, 2 ba, House ofs Twin Crooked River in condition $1,500 Call
(HAVING A 100 FOOT SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 U T E S Furnit Old 8100 Business/ aesA wd C anddw arabelle, call 509-2460 8503706118
WIDE RIGHT OF WAY); MINUTES 15 SECONDS 14 SECONDS WEST, Iwood/glasswindoWS Commercial Screened in front porch
THENCE NORTH 53 DE- WEST 65.00 FEET TO THE 77.72 FEET TO A \ 6110-Aparmentis
GREES 58 MINUTES 37 POINT OF BEGINNING. RE-ROD(MARKED #4261) perfect eor artisan, 6120 Beach Rentals very prvate w/s included"
SECONDS EAST ALONG FROM SAID POINT OF LYING ON THE SOUTH- f lamps, exercise equip, 6130-Condo/Townhouse $800 mo first and last -
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE BEGINNING RUN NORTH E A S T E R L Y I 1 J lots and lots 0 H Romaeatea monthren 850-370 6863 -
FOR 90.01 FEET;THENCE 36 DEGREES 00 MIN- RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND- J 6160 Rooms for Rent 3i
LEAVING SAID U T E S ARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY Our trash is your 6170- Mobile Home/Lot 3br, 2 ba House, w/W/D
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN 46 SECONDS WEST, 98, THENCE RUN NORTH **' ** treasure 6180- Out-of-Town Rentals for rent in Apalachicola.
NORTH 36 DEGREES 58 185.54 FEET; THENCE 54 DEGREES 00 MIN- PETS ANIMALS 6190-Timeshare Rentals Avail Jan 1st Yard w/ cov-
MINUTES 33 SECONDS RUN SOUTH 53 DE- U T E S 6200-Vacation Rentals ered deck, plus storage
WEST FOR 237.50 FEET; GREES 55 MINUTES 37 00 SECONDS EAST 2100- Petls shed, pets ok, call
THENCE SOUTH 89 DE- SECONDS WEST, 52.66 ALONG SAID 2110- Pels: Free to Apalachee Center, Inc. is currently seeking: 850-653-5950 I ,, I ,
AGREES 58 MINUTES 31 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND- 2120- Pe Supplies STAFF ASSISTANT #1874
SECONDS WEST FOR THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 ARY 150.00 FEET TO THE 2130 Farm Animals/ USTPOSSESSA HGHSCHOOL r iR E
112.62 FEET TO THE DEGREES 01 MINUTES POINT OF BEGINNING. Supplies MUS O A H H SH L
POINT OF BEGINNING. 1 4 2140- Pels/Liveslock DIPLOMA OR ITS EQUIVALENT,
SECONDS EAST 147.35 Wanted 3 YEARS OF SECRETARIAL/ 3 br, 2 ba, house on River
PARCEL 24: FEET TO A RE-ROD Rd, FP, fncd in backyard.
(MARKED #0340); Buy it! OFFCEEXPERIENCEANDA REDUCED $800 mo. Call E-
COMMENCE AT A CON- THENCE RUN NORTH 89 TYPING SCORE OF AT LEAST Mara 850-766-0357.
CRETE MONUMENT DEGREES 54 MINUTES Classified. 55CWPM 206 3rd St, Carrabelle, 3
MARKING THE NORTH- 5 2 3rd St, Carrabelle 3 ..
TION 32, TOWNSHIP 8 FEET TO THE IN Make your move to We offer an outstanding benefits br, 1 ba, with downstairs
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, BEGINNING. package to eligible regular status gra, $5 mo. Please
FRANKLIN COUNTY the medium that'S employees. Apalachee Center
FLORIDA, AND THENCE PARCEL 28: mpa
RUN SOUTH (BEARING yOur number one Employees are making a Apalachicola. .- i -..
BASE) ALONG THEWEST COMMENCE AT A CON yo-r n b di fference! .w. ..-,, ,
BOUNDARYLINEOFSAID CREATE MONUMENT "
SECTION 32 FOR 220.00 MARKING THE NORTH- source of For more information and a w/d included, central air,
ECET' TEEF N, NOfRTH 89 EAST CORNER OF EC-, . screened porch, fenced


DGREES 58 MINUTES TION 31, TOWNSHIP 8 information about complete listing of available yard, pets OK w/ dep.,bishi
3 1 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST positions: $680 mo. 4046958367. =Chrysler eep Mitsuishi
SECONDS EAST FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY homes for sale! www.apalacheecenter.org NowAcceptingHUD = & Used Car Supercenter =
183.30 FEET; THENCE FLORIDA AND RUN
SOUTH 36DEGREES58 SOUTH ALONG THEEAST F r all ur h sin(850) 523-3333 x2218 Carrabelle Service Center~ Parts & Accessories =
MINUTES 33 SECONDS BOUNDARY OF SAID F a your hu uman Resorc Fablous r Acsrie
EAST FOR 403.71 FEET SECTION 31 (AS MONU- man sources A A
TO A POINT ON THE MENTED) A DISTANCE needs consult 2634-J Capital Circle N.E., Private! H-a 'nvS L.u- B .
S O U T H E R L Y OF 220.00 FEET TO A Tallahassee, FL 32308 =
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF RE-ROD (MARKED Classified when it's Tallahassee, FL32308 4 Bed, 2 Bath w/Fall
U.S. HIGHWAY 98 #7160), THENCE RUN Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE 4 Bedd2Bath w/FR al w
(HAVING RIGA 100 FOOT SOUTH89DEGREESND4 time to buy, background check appl ,n otdishwashaud 850 785-4372
FOR THE POINT OF BE- WEST 130.00 FEET TO A An Equal Opportunity/ pool house w/full bath
GINNING. FROM SAID RE-ROD(MARKED#0340) it's the resource on Affirmative Action Employer curmoty depo aset, cr chse
POINT OF BEGINNING MARKING THE POINT OF i tAfrmatoive ctonrmployer cuty deposit cr check -40 -
RUN NORTH 53 DE- BEGINNING. FROM SAID which torely. Drug-FreeWorkplace Cad r e N s 229-403-7701





B6 | The Times


Local


Thursday, December 11,2008


These
colorful
night
lights are
available
for less
than $20 at
Riverlily.













--4


Place yur ChristmasGreetings Ad* in our annual
Letters to Santa Pull out Section, December 25th Issue,
deadline is Wednesday, December 17th at noon.
Ad Size Color Ad Cost B&W Ad Cost
Full Page $670 $480
Half Page $350 $25480
Quarter Page $200 $250
Eighth Page $150 $150
Sixteenth Page $89 $99
Business Card $50 $49
Call Joel Reed (850) 370-6090 or $29
Kathleen Smith (819) 819-5078
to get your greeting in this special section and
then sit back anid en/jor' reading the Letters to
San tafrom, area chli dren.
These /e/ters are publishedfre) of charge in
the Sfar and tihe iOes each .ear.
JEC er


All( ck: lic liii_,ilctl
.-;C"C I iL ( lit
Ith cl
-lit 'Ic 1'. 'I'tj
1L: 11 IIC C IL


HOME from page B1


prizes. The Apalachicola
Riverkeeper is offering a
special $20 membership,
$5 off the regular price.
Badcock Furniture is
giving a gift ornament to
holiday shoppers.
Think outside the box
when shopping for gifts
locally. Hardware stores,
marinas, drug stores
and not for profits like
museums often carry
great gift items.
Remember that not all
gifts fit inside a shoebox.
A dance or music lesson,
a massage, a haircut or a
manicure are all special
treats.
Gift certificates
are great! Many local
businesses offer them, and
even if you can't afford to
give a $60 spa treatment,
a $10 gift certificate helps
to foot the bill. Local
restaurants offering
certificates include The
Apalachicola Seafood Grill
and Steakhouse Grill,


Chef Eddie's, Caf6 Con
Leche, AJ's, the Owl Cafe,
Verandas, Hog Wild BBQ,
the Sugar Shack and Boss
Oyster to name just a few.
Holly Stott Massage,
the Natural Medicine
Shoppe, Scipio Creek
Marina, The Moorings,
Balanced Energies,
Riverlily, Apalachicola
Candy Company, the Dixie
Theatre, Dockside Marine
Inc., Gardens Inc., The
Mane Salon and That's a
Moray have them as well.
Take a look around
and discover what out-
of-towners already know.
Shopping in Franklin
County is more pleasant
and relaxed than braving
the mall or WalMart and,
with a little creativity; it
doesn't have to be more
expensive, especially
when you consider your
gas, your time and your
emotional well-being.
Think local first this
year for Christmas.


A holding cross from Artemis Gallery is designed to fit
gently into arthritic hands.


[ Franklin County Humane


Society Annual Meeting
Tuesday December 16, 2008
Harry A's Restaurant on St. George Island
Time: 6:30 p.m.


FRANKLIN
COUNTY
HUMANE
SOCIETY


o m- d o (CARRABELLE BEACH RV RESORT


Our local real estate experts have

identified what they feel are the best

values around and are offering them to

you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section),

Discover the best real estate values in

Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola,

Cape San Bias, St. George Island,

Carrabelle and surrounding areas.


Own your RV site in paradise located on Florida's "For-
gotten Coast". Relax and enjoy the sun, pool, beach and
great fishing from your home away from home. We will
rent and maintain your site when you are on the road, mail
you a check for 80% of revenues generated from your
site. Prices from $89,900. For purchasing your RV Con-
dominium Lot today, please call Patty Lee, 850-545-2872.
Don't miss out on this opportunity of a lifetime of fun.
MLS#207792
Carrabelle Coastal Properties, LLC
Patti Lee
Phone: 850-697-5444
Cell: 850-545-2872


St. George Island


NEW
LISTING!


One acre Plantation lot located in Bay Cove Village,
this outstanding, dry lot has easy access to theBeach,
Bob Sykes Cut and the Apalachicola Bay. Vegetation is
dense in some areas, but few if any trees need to be cut
for your building site. This bay view lot measures 174
x 256. Plantation amenities include tennis, pool, 24 hr
security and air strip. Osprey nest is near on Turpentine
Lane.
-' John Shelby, Broker
'St. George Isand 800-344-7570
Ray wge i 850-927-4777
Realty www.sgirealty.com


401 St. James Ave.


Excellent 2/BR/3Bath condo on the Carrabelle River. Fan-
tastic view of the river, sunrises from your private deck.
Tiled kitchen in the family room and baths, Berber car-
pet in the bedrooms. Full kitchen built- ins plus Fridge/
washer/dryer. Dedicated under-unit parking plus boat slip.
Make this your vacation get-away for the best relaxation
and fishing that Florida offers. Priced at only $224,900.
MLS# 207628
Carrabelle Coastal Properties, LLC
Robert Barfield
Phone: 850-697-5444
Cell: 850-528-3850


8 0 7 -1278


NE ~*I


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA I StaffWriter


t


850-227-1278




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs