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Abeng
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100338/00021
 Material Information
Title: Abeng
Physical Description: 1 v. : illus. ; 46 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Abeng Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Kingston Jamaica
Publication Date: June 27, 1969
Copyright Date: 1969
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Jamaica   ( lcsh )
Social conditions -- Periodicals -- Jamaica   ( lcsh )
Race question -- Periodicals -- Jamaica   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Jamaica
 Notes
Abstract: The weekly Abeng newspaper (February 1 - September 27, 1969) was published in response to the Black Power and protest movement that emerged after the ban on Dr. Walter Rodney, the Guyanese and University of the West Indies historian, who was prohibited from landing in Kingston on October 15th, 1968 after attending a Black Writers conference in Montreal, Canada. Rodney was known in Jamaica for his lectures and talks on African history and the liberation movements in Africa. These talks were given not only on the campus but in communities of the urban and rural poor. The ban triggered protests by UWI students and the urban poor in Kingston and led to public debate about the state of Jamaican social, economic and political life. The Abeng newspaper‘s Managing Editor was Robert Hill (UWI graduate student) and other editors included George Beckford (UWI lecturer), Rupert Lewis (UWI graduate student) and Trevor Munroe (Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University). The Abeng group was a political centre for the Black Power movement, socialists, the independent trade union movement, Rastafarians, supporters of the opposition People’s National Party and people disaffected with the two main political parties. Abeng therefore became a focal point of critique and activism against the ruling Jamaica Labour Party and a harbinger of the radicalism in Jamaica in the 1970s.
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1- (no. 1- ); Feb. 1, 1969-v. 1, no. 35 (Oct. 3, 1969).
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida International University: Digital Library of the Caribbean
Holding Location: Florida International University: Digital Library of the Caribbean
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 05001780
oclc - 5001780
System ID: UF00100338:00021

Full Text











vABo EN

vol I No. 22 June 27. 1969 Price: SIXPENCE


"It'e IWnr Our People to Think for Themselves."
MARCUS GARVEV


PRINTERY FIRE


Abeng Still Sounds

Sabotage Is Suspected
On uesday afternoon last BRICE PRIN ERY, printers of tABEil G.
utted by blazing fire and its press destroyed
The fire "mysteriously" started on the ground floor in a section
tioned off and occupied by Wright Envelope Co. This Company has
out of operation for the past three weeks,
ressmen of Brice Printery, ret- among tne editors and supporter
bg from lunch at about 12 15, of ABENG. How had it happened'
tied they smelt soke and in ENG does not et kit o, th-
Sig the building through a door ought sabotage is strongly suspected
e partition they saw flames
mg from a pile of waste paper. Ns sue believes the fire vas
Saccidental. ABENG, by speaking tile
fire-extinguisher as rushed truth and being the sufferers'oice.
upstairs but it jammed. within has roused too much fear and hatred
an hour the fire was out of in the wealth few who live off the
to], devouring the wooden fl poverty of the many.
ing and ceiling bringing down
line roof. But neither fire nor anything elis
will silence the people of Jamaica
fire engines. stationed five mill- ABENG has a special reenge in
s away, took half an hour to store: it will continue to SOUND
ch the scene too late to save issue number 22. about to go to
ling in the building, press when the fire broke out, i
The chilling news spread rapidly now in your hands'


JOSWA POWER

JULY 7th


II Jamaican workers are anx-
psly waiting on the outcome of
,poll to be taken among Jamaica
pnibus workers on July 7th to
de the issue Working class
esentatises to look after work
class business
fhe pol lng dcla, ed h .ictaci al
oeuverinp heMteen Mangnemcnlt
BITU- NW'L inislry, o labh-
iconniving. was forced on tihe
pany when it finally woke to
fact thai tih power of worker
darity, as diemonstlated in the
strike, was the only force with
authority among the workers.
s has been so for a long time not
y at J.O.S. but in other areas of
5tntial services and agriculture.
icularly sugar. But it is the J.O.S
kers Association that will be
ist to put the issue to the test.
SA favourable result for the work-
swill mark the first decisive epul-
Sof the two par s two union
iout agents from tlie ranks of the


working class in Jamaica
She unions asked for a new con
tract for I year. The Company said
2 ears. The Arbitration awarded
3 ears. Nobody asked the workers
what the\ ivancId Lvci' od, ex
cepI the ear,. 'i ac aired olt tha.
There is onlt one way to change it
Jul\ 7t(h ll point the iwc J.O.S
\V.A is demanding for Ihle a,,rkers
back-senrice credit. daily overuimne
a severance pay agreement, shorlagec
and extra trip arrangement. skill p:y
for skill work. sick allo ance, strike
fund. and welfare benefits.
The worker-official of the iJ..S
Workers Association are R. Burke
(Mechanic) Presidenei C. Hall (Dri-
ver) \ e President, T Gumbns (Con-
ducto General Secretary. V Callin-
der (Duco- nan) Tieasu er.
J.O.S.W.A. POWER TO ALL WOR
KERS!
BLACK WORKER POWER TO
BLACK WORKERS'


SOUNDS
We had an experiment last week, an experimen, to
nonstrate the importance and significance of our local-
produced music in the Black Consciousness which
rough I on I youth both black, white and otherwise.
is experiment was brought about by the strong memo-
s of Don the Drum man, our beloved and studied mu-
al guide. So that first session at U.W.I. Extra-Mural
itre, Camp Road was mainly a display of Don's musi-
I travel: about 35 people present whether they knew
or not helped to shape out the design of this five part
ies "The Years of Freedom Sounds" this is an attempt
examine the history and growth of bongo music, soun-
which are with out a doubt and mistake announcing a
eat kind of Freedom. I on I gathered many ideas on
Most progressive form of putting this series together.
p main fault of the introductory programme -which
Purposely left loose, was the lack of preparation and
lack of real variety while demonstrating our points
recorded sound. This will be corrected in the next
rmme which is the real start of the Sea history. This
deal with the period from '59-'62, followed by three
(I) 62-65 (skatalites and refinement) '65- late '66
le Period) and 67-69 (rock steady, sea and rege-sca."
SFriday, 4th July, a Love.


ar m








selass

Selassie a


asl --a inaafl a a


praises Aro- STARVAIOMN


West Indians
EMPEROR HAILE SELASSIE
of Ethiopia today paid warm tri-
hute to people of African descent,
particularly those in the Caribbean
islands, for their moral and material
support during the Italian Fascists
invasion of his country in 1930s.
Selassie said small countries in
the Caribbean, including Barbados.
have important roles to play to
promote understanding and world
peace. "It is not the size of the
country, nor its population that
counts, but it's ideals of brother-
hood and peace that should mat-
ter". he said.
THE EMPEROR SAID Barbados
and other countries with peoples
of African origin must help in any
way they can to "help free Africans
still under racist and brutal colonial
rule." Addis Ababa. June 21.


I Banned


on R.J.R.


and J.B.C.


"A cry of our times..."


Bongo Neville Attacked By The Beasts


The official attempts to crush
Abeng have reached a new level.
Last week Friday afternoon two
Abeng vendors were viciously att-
acked by the police along King
Street and charged with "Failing
tolriovn on" -newspaper vendors-
on King Street- on a Friday after-
noon!!!
One of the Vendors Bongo'
Neville Howell (see inside story)
was charged in addition with ass
aulting a constable. resisting arrest
and indecent language. It is perhaps
no coincidence that the issue of
Abeng being sold contained a re-
port of police harrassment of Bongo
Neville and his brother the week
before.
At about 1. 30 pm. 'Bongo'
Neville and 'Macko' were in front
of Times Store. The sales were


going well. Suddenly a woman con-
stable accosted Bongo Neville and
told him to come off the street
Bongo Neville bent down to pick
up his bag off the ground and with-
out any warning was struck on tile
head by another woman constable
in plain clothes who immediately
proceeded to reign blows all over
his body. He was immediately su-
rrounded by a gang of policemen
and women and dragged up King
Street with 'Macko' not far behind.
The Abeng which Bongo Neville
had in his bag were thrown away by
the police who described it as "a
dirty newspaper involving dirty per-
sons with a criminal mind." He also
lost nearly 5 in cash in the course
of the roughing up.
Bongo Neville managed to call
a brother who was witnessing the


"advantage" and asked him to in
form Abeng organisation. For this
lie received greater blows.
At the City Central Station
the police locked up the vendors
of the station and proceeded to beat
up the youth, striking him over
his head and face with his own
shoes.
Bongo Neville sees the issues
very clearly. He says "We can see
clearly that the police is being used
to crush any progressive youth force
who dosen't support the two poli-
tical party...l as a black sufferer
see the need for my youth brothers
and sisters to stand up and move
out the paper to the suffering mass-
es of this country. We want this
paper to ground among the peo-
ple..."











Anti-I RasTafarI


In the campaign against the doctrine of
H.I.M. Ilyili Silassi I Jamaica now seeks
to condemn I an I RasTafarl through
international experts and international
opinion. These are the mixed multi-
tude who say I art mad to say AFRICA,
who say I art backward to praise RasTa-
farl for GOD.
The American IPsychiatric Asso-
ciation. r, ,to members strong, was
the guests of the Caribbean Phychiatric
Assc. members strong at a conven-
tion held at the Jamaica IHylton in Ocho
Rios on May I- i4., It was attended by
323 psychiatrists and their wives, many
of the wives also hbeng psychiatrists,
The subject of the convention was
Transcultural psychiatry. Psychiatrists
are men who study and treat men-
tal illness.
SOCIAL STRESS

The first paper prescntcd to the con-
vention was a paper enturld "Ihe RasTa-
farl: a stud- in social stress ndI group de-
lusion." It was prcrented by Dr. Prince,
a psychiatrir, from Canada who wa lent by
the Ale Gill Univ. to tie Jamaica Governnment
under a World Health and Par-Am Health
Organisation scheme. Dr. Prince was put
to work at the Belle uc Hospital. He is
studying the effect of gania upon smokers
using inmates of the Bellevue Hospital as
samples. (i) These are not the best people
to reveal the effects of ganja. (2i He was
not studying RasTafarl, tan! he himself


stresses that he knows nothing about Ras-
Tafarl as God.
This was plain to see from reading the
text of the paper which he prepared. It was
oberousl) a summary of the survey conduc-
ted by the Jamaican Go'ernmet in 960o.
It consisted completely of first impressions,
generalisations about the most important
and serious points and was heavily prejudi-
ced and biased, iraking fun of the heights
of Black Coniious'ness and African National-
ism in the form of Garverism and Repatri-
ation. He spoke of the fact that the white
sorlJ driad I an I locks and so therefore
the Jamaican economy suffered because I
an I cramp tourism and quaint native scenery.
It gri:ncJ about the idea that I an I achieve
supcrir li'ilical in ight and interpretation
l-tile ii h on smoking herbs. It painted
of picture of RaIlafarl being a cult speci-
ally designed to take in and satisfy runaways.
In mentioning the last stages of Gan-eyism
and Gar- 's poininno t tohe crooning of
Hyili Silasli, Prince tried to explain the de-
vclopcn.ent of the Doctrine of King RasTa-
larl as a dissapoinrment measure and a
consolation prize. Many others
still try to sketch I an I in that manner. In
other words we are disillusioned But for 38
years?. It was remarkable how Prince's
words coincided with the unofficial and
hypocritical view of the Jamaican posscsing
class. He never failed to remember that
Leopold Howell, one of the earliest RasTa-
farl teacher's, once promised people to send
them home to Itiopya and failed. He remin-
ed his colkagues tha: Howell was later regar-


ded as a madman and a rebel. He showed
that though RasTafarI brethren are familiar
with criminal elements and political ele-
ments I an I are neither criminals nor poli-
ticians but highly cultural and religious.
On the legend about Nyabingi violence he
could explain nothing, but was forced to
point our that the 1960 Henry rebellion was
neither RasTafarI works nor working
towards African redemption. He said our
view was that Adam and Eve were black.
This is completely false for Adam is not or-
iginal man, African. In finishing this paint-
ing of the picture of a cult of madman,
Prince referred and compared I an I to Bed-
ward who preached of a Black God, Black
Israe!ites and Black Redemption. Prince
humourously pointed out that after years of
'harraing Bedward Government only suc-
cc-d d iby putting him in the Bellevue. A
sqg>rio- onv. how to handle RasTafarI.
As Dr. Prince finished his paper the
.on mention Hail broke down intoBabel Tow-
err tr wo things happened. A small croup
f I an I Rasrialail bretheren entered the
cenc causing ambarassment and secondly,
beloved, representing the Black Caucus of
Amercan Psychiatrists, lumped to the floor
and condemned Prince's paper as racism
and called Prince a racist. There was much
anxiery, uith Prince admitting that he had
handled the paper lightly and had handled
RasTafarl frivolously because he
knew nothing about the subject but was
pressured into making a statement about I
an I on behalf of the profession which de-
cides who is mad and who is not. Resding


the paper I an I ind th
not necessarily racist
and under pressure I
er representing America
trists knew better, becr
cons was formed pre,
Black Doctors came to
erican Psychiatrist Ass
isarion whose main d
erican Forcign policy
countries and foreign
the black Community
find all awakening and
amongst exploited pe

people are mad or
So this Black Psvchia
ously to these racists in
pressed without apology
I RasTafarI have the sa
Western Hemisphere.
is that this conference
Jamaican Government.
an I. the defenders c
Faithfulness was set uo
Health, in order to get
by classifying us as ma(
Speaking to some
after the convention I
since the conditions ani
tal illness ii so crinin
they wre tryin, to ge
from the Am cric
to help them solve their
decided to present a see
six hundred ,dA AmcriJ


Bongo Neville's Story
SBongo Neville's Story


Bongo Nesille ha, burn 2' vears ago
He hao lined all h li fe at .30 e t Road
Declaration of War
In 1966 when police harrassment of youth
in the city intensified. Bongo Howell and his
friends were no exception. Often when they met
in an unoccupied house adjoining to play records
or cook. the police would raid the place and
beat them up.
During that year Neville was charged
along with other youths, with rioting and robb-
ery. A preliminary hearing on the first charge
was stopped, two witnesses having stated that
it was the police who told them to call the
names of accused. The second case was also
stopped when the complainant was proved to
be lying.
In September of the same year, Neville's
record player was seized and only returned
when the then M.P.. Vernon Arnett. wrote the
Commissioner of Police about it. Neville was,
at that time, a member of the Young Socialist
League.
In January 1967, the record player was
again seized and when Neville went to the
Admiral Town Station to regain it several police-
men attacked him and tried to throw him out.
Neville, quite properly, resisted and in the fracas
suffered a broken arm. One policeman suffered
a broken jaw. Three charges of assaulting the
police were brought against Neville and one for
assault occasioning bodily harm. The first three
wren eventually dropped and, in the last one,
there wee so many discrepancies in the evidence
of the l witnesses, that the judge stopped
the cas.
SIn March 1967 Nevillek as again arrested
'nd Chagrged with burglary and larceny and


nliCniiou dot'rueinon Of property, both by the
'mlc constable wito had charged Neville with
a-aut. No evidence was offered on either char-
Ig t In te same month hie was arrested and
jlaferd ,ili robber illth aggravation and in
'Mal he wa- committed to trial at Circuit. He
ias remanded in custody and remained in cust-
ndi till the end of September when he was
lrantid bail on condition that he report to the
Admiral Town Staron each Friday.
Alter reporting on the first Friday Neville
ua, arrested on tile following Monday and
clhargd hi the Admiral Town Police on two
cOuII iof robbery with aggravation. and one of
rcvill Mg stolen property and one of unlawful
possession o property. One of the arresting
constables was the one whlU-ad suffied the
broken jaw in the January fracas. Neville was
again remanded in custody where he remained
unlil February 21, 1968.
In tire meantime he was tried for unlawful
possession of property and the case was stopped
at Ith end of the prosecution'sevidence. In
January I %ts he was tried on the robbery charge
lor which he was arrested in March 1967. and
acquitted This is the only time that he has
ever been called on to answer to a charge. He
was tried at Circuit in June 198b on the other
wti robberies and the receiving charge The
udge Ithere stopped the case and directed the
jury to acquit. describing the evidence of the
police wilncsses as scandalous.
In April 1hS. before the last trial, Neville
and two uther youths were pickedup at gun-
point by the police and taken tiCelnral Station
where they were questioned and released with-
out charge. Neville's barrister then wrote a letter
lie Ihe Commissioner of Police about the police
lharrarssmen of tihe y uth,.
"Suspected Person"
On Mlas 25(h, fifteen minutes after leav-
ing his hbris\er s office, Howell -as arrested
at a bus stop and charged with being a suspected
person Thi, case. his Ioth charge. g a again
,topped hi tie Resident Magistrate before the
arresting policeman had completed his evidence
Alter Neville's acquittal at Circuit in June.
li:arn police reprisals against him, Ne'ille was
taken out of town where he remained for about
tveo weeks. On thile same day. and the two follow-
ing days, squads of policemen from Admiral
Town Station visited Neville's home four times
asking for him. His counsel had an interview
with the Commissioner of Police and informed
him it the history lof harrassment. Immediately
lilluwing his return a squad of policemen went
to Neville's home and arrested him on a robbery
charge said to have been committed in Kingston
during the time that Neville was staying in the
country. A police sergeant grabbed him by his
neck and poked him in his stomach with a revol-
ver threatening to kill him, Neville was kept in
custody for four days before an identification


parade was held. At the parade Neville changed
his shirt with another youth in the line-up and
the complainant pointed out the other man in
Neville's shirt. Although not pointed out. Neville
was kept in custody for two more days before
being taken to court to be formally dismissed.
Neville's counsel sought another interview
with the Commissioner of Police. He was not
available and the facts were repeated to Super-
intendent Stephenson. After that the harrass-
ment of Neville ceased. He obtained a permit
from the police at Admiral Town to open a beer
parlour at his premises and for a few months he
was permitted to operate it unmolested by the
criminal 'lice'.
Abeng's Brother
In February this year Neville joined the
Aheni orsganilsalitn and committed himself to
thei tak of building the Newspaper Since then
the police harra inment ls again begun On the
251h of February tIhe raided his home, as usual,
\ilhmllt am ll arranl Two of Neville friends
werie arncld and eventually released A few
iceks Ilei Neville himself was taken into
icurtid and held at the Denham Town Station
for ,seera hour before being released without
h.arge
Shortly after this incident the police again
came to Neville's home. This time they wanted
to see the papers for an old Vauxhall motor car
which his mother had lately acquired. The
papers, which were in order, were then taken
away and Neville informed that they would
only be returned if the car was taken to the
Denham Town Station to be checked. When
this was done the car was seized and some weeks
later, declared unfit to be driven and returned
without license plates.
The political nature of the attacks on
Bongo Beville became clearly revealed by the
next act which for the first time, involves a
Government Department other than the police.
We refer to the notice served on Neville's moth-
er by the Ministry of Housing to quit her home
by the end of June. It is significant that this
has been quickly followed by the visit of a pol-
ice superintendent ordering the closure of the
beer parlour.
Where will it End
Last Friday the police made a combined
a-,ltuit on Neville and Abeng. Not surprisingly,
Bongo Nevsille is the most effective vendor of
\heng, constantly creating a dialogue with the
public about the material in each issue of the
paper and rarely failing to elicit a response.
here does the criminal actions of these
line men' end' Bongo Neville is perhaps lucky
that the I-+ attempts by these men to "down"
him ha\e so far failed. Many youths have been
destroyed with much less effort. We are quite
sure however that we have not heard the last
of the "lice men"' et.


U'NU G'WAi

Fe Mi TIME

SOO'COM


"J.L.P & P.N.P
their histories",



White


Ho

It W
Middle-class Jamaica
term. "Black Power" -oa
colour but not write aboul
I have chosen to write ab
one that does not fight
are oppressed by it viz.
And since we normally
as something physical
will point to the foreign
and hotels, banks, and
the mining companies
Or you may be cone
areas of commerce and
telephone and electricity.
ship or direction seems
And I dare to say it
will demand that I be c
neTs-free speech?l that
the church it is the
the four crowned heads
the call to the political
even if you represent a
if you are white you are
the Big Four.
But the White Pot
cerned with is the grant
back of black minds wi


Bongo Jere


I ~ __


-- I
















ftice is per' whic llh 1 would hlowr up thti urgent need
gnorant for hlp and mlenital cre in Jamaica But
iBroth- whv did ther lir to paint 1 an I Rarlafarl
:tsychia- a mad W'as it the usual petty crime of
SCau- getting mInoiv off our hcais lust a, they got
r these mnonef ron forLiig countries ( pro d
he Am- Ras Fatarl with hou ing which we never got
lorgan- or was it the more dread crime, of trying to
g Am- banish I an I to a madhouse, Itrm to break
I foreign down the international uan world respect
s (Like for the rsatni and levelheadedness of Fim-
and to peror IHali SIlas l. and ihi so:.s, RasTafarl
timrents Are they tr iri to apply the medicine hiich
then to worked with HBedard who preached of a
fighting Black Christ from in tie ISoo's till when
I these they killed him in Bclicr-ue in 1,21?. Iut
glanced. we must remember that thir main rxpla
Irigour- nation for I an I mental state was fruttrtion
and ex- and ganua: l.ookin' into that point I an I
at I an arc not ftn'trate fo;r our prediction d and
i in the works manm est dad thr unity of Africa.
i: point the inertable crash In Jamaica the embrace-
i the mnent of millions of Black Brothers' i the
Son I rwest, of an I o fanciient fath, whether it i
i and clled Bll ck Rln'mption, Black P oer, or
ary of Black Hfour I he fact ir, once aamn thai
tuence Prince knows nothing of RasTafarI, but is
S domn a study on the effects of ganja So
iatrlis since their Ganja Laws are now ineffective
,d that they either have to break RaoTafarl iflu-
r men- ence by embarrcsing our sanity or tlhe haiv
bmaica to bring in a new anti-herb law ihich re-
money quires, rat six months observation and con-
latio finheent in a mental hospital whether or
to the) not the defendant is found guilty of using
Io these herb.
;of pa- iTurn to Pog 4
U


i,

/7


odly closer in concept than at any time in
h) Gleaner June 15th, 1969.


Stokely Carmichael expresses the strategy
which ought to guide the links mane. lot
instance, between the Black Struggle here in
Jamaica and that in the United States. By
the Third World' he refers to the exploited
countries of Africa. Asia and Latin America
which includes the Caribbean.
Stokely first speaks of Black Power at-
tacking those who are subverting it. He says
that Black developed Poweri as a slogan and
a movement because the African-Americans in-
side the United States recognized that prior
to 1966. the people who were leading the
struggle, were not calling for power, but were
calling for irrelevant things: they were calling
for love, non-violence, peace, etc., and that
if one were to implement change, one did not
need love. non-violence, morality, etc., one
needed Power. A clear understanding was that
power was what the Black masses of the
U.S. needed if they intended to liberate them-
selves.
Third World Hook-Up
Stokely answers this question by saying
we all have a common enemy because we
belong to communities which are colonies of
the United States.
Afro-Americans automatically hook up
with peoples of the Third World, because they
see themselves, and are in fact, colonies inside
the United States: the peoples of the Third
World are colonies outside the United States.
The same power structure that exploits and
oppresses us is the very same power structure
that oppresses and exploits them. It rapes
them of the resources inside the colonies where
they live, it rapes us of our resources outside
in the colonies where we live. The only way
all of us will be liberated is when we come
together to defeat the enemy, because we are
not fighting isolated capitalism; we are fighting
international capitalism; and since the imperia-
list powers of the world have internationalized
their system, we must also internationalize our
system so that our fight will be international,


Black


Power






Cut A Tentacle
From the stage of having a common
enemy Stokely points to two reasons for hook-
ing up the revohrtionary struggle against im-
perialism whose eye is lodged in the United
States. First he argues that Afro-Americans
have viewed the United States as an octopus
with its tentacles reaching all across the world.
The eye of the octopus is located inside
the United States Cuba has cut off one of the
tentacles. If they can get the other peoples to
tie down the other tentacles of the United
States, while those tentacles are busy they
can stab the eye of the octopus. That will
be the job of the Afro-American on the inside
so if they can make other people on the out-
side begin to fight the United States, while
they are waging their fight inside, they can
more easily defeat the octopus, and they must
do this if in fact it is going to be defeated.

The simple truth is that we can't defeat
the enemies of Black Power singlehandedly.
Our role is to cut off one of the tentacles
here in Jamaica.
The second reason why this hook-up
is necessary Stokely argues, is because the
profits from the Third World enable the white
working class in America to enjoy the money
made off the sweat of our backs. This leads
them to throw in their lot with the white
power structure. Stokely says that the white
working class will begin to develop a revo-
lutionary consciousness when the profits of
the Third World, the external profits of the
United States, are cast off and no more profits
are coming into the United States, and she
must begin to turn inside to find her resources
and her economic way of life.
Any Means Necessary
Stokely ends by saying that it's not
question any more for us of which way to go;
it is merely a question of tactics. We are ready
to destroy imperialism by any means necessary.


m


corded in tie daLs ot slaver and colo, sa-
lion The plantation owners and Ihe colonial
civil servants taught us. olten vert sub1tl
to appreciate things while and devalue Itlings
coloured or black. And although slavery and
olonialism are ended the record plays louder
than ever.
This is clear in the term "bacra", our
name lor white people and equally our lerm

tor what is finest, it is to te credit of lamai-
cans that a car that is black and runs well
may be termed a "bacra" car. II is true that
we do not apply the term to sailors or poor
whites. There is not a total colour application.
But the word is a standing tribute to the
white hierarchy of our island. And in our
efforts to reduce White Power so lhat we may
really become one people I suggest that we
bestow the term. "bacra" on our black'?
Prime Minister. He deserves it.
White Power lies in nearly every geo-
graphy or travel book we read. The authors
nearly all white usually depicted the best
of their own colour and the worst of others.
They chose pictures of Europeans or those
who are White from the young and handsome.
Peasant men. women and children are always
photographed when 'dem dress up' in their
festive national dress. It is the same as if we
printed all pictures of Jamaicans as they look
on King Street on Christmas morning. But
these same authors print the pictures of black,
and often of Chinese people when they are
ragged, old or deformed;i women wrinkled


and flathrested. tribes i areas so humid there
go almost naked and hose protein diet is
so slight thre have bulging stomach. Hence,
we generally see those with our own colour
in their worst state
White Pore ir greatest in ul treat-
men, nt onf OI.C hOt tler e o la e hard
British clergymen build points A II I
mons around 'imlle ratlenlcnl liII childel
made. Black Jamaicans iinad nio such wsdo
i Ithel l ln clldlen I i instead Iey pinch
to their Irlends ill IntI tn Ithe )ounl g IIho
main lauls 111e later hrate I' pgrlic "ic
have a negative attitude Wi oul pfe'ple In
the Spanish Town (Cathedral I('17) roe Io
our "utmost dignita ies" waned the assem-
blage ol scouts, guides and other unitolrmed
groups to make good use ol their oppoitu-
nities since many delnquenls lacked them,
Tire thightlight ol our Prui ne Ministes firs
speech sas, aCcolding talo or01 leading ioe\-
paper his insrruction ir tire people nol to
expect handouts. Tile accusations under ing
these statements ate clear. In tie meantime
white men tell stoies of little while bo\s
who put fingers in dikes to save towns and
of white people who have overcome physical
handicaps like blindness and paralysis or com-
mitted acts of heroism. Tihe are positive.
For years I watched in fury as dents at Mico harrassed incoming first-year
men into choked up anger, adult men stand-
ing humiliated and tearful, or muttering an-

(Turn to Page 4)


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GCinc to
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194A Bay Farm Road
Corner of Olympic Way
P. MUNRO Prop.


wer




ks
Sof the
t about
icquently,
e term,-
IMgh we
Power".
fpression
think I
I beaches
ctpanies,
stations.
6e vast
Djns eg.
dlowner-
deistent.
limighty-
Sdark-
itlls of
ieree of
t issued
11i, that
0gation
i one of

con-
in the
te re-















ABE&G


Vol. I No 22 June 27. 969 Price: SIXPENCE


FORMS OF VIOLENCE


THE BAN ON BLA(K LITERATURE
& RECORDS + VIOLENCE AGAINST RA
DICAL YOUTH l shos the addition will which
the Wbite Pcwer Iolders would like to minus
out tIhe strides I LA(K (ONS(CIOUSNESS is
inaking ircards IILA(K POWERC they ban
tihe writings of Sickely ( arnic hael, lijah '11u
hl;iined alcd n Xt mid N ci ict irccihic/ ed
Lieriatlrc trials Il tlicir -orl lion- Prclcc
Buelr cd hii \,it l N crsc e I c iked ii a
Prl.hihbited Literr tlllr i charg had their hIllce
raided e111\ral timnc and \were tolra cd h
Thc p li i. i
N cI cI nl i Iti fl- ci Princ t lhl t I
re.cc.. like 11 N i )\INIt1 NiD\ N IN and
"cII\ROi(i I1 ] tI R \Sl ha1 e i" hcn ba

1- iic cc fc pc, pl 'il i in I I I n lllle i
li Iic i cI ill .. licke itlhe one i ic D R d l-(l i
,l ;,c r ,;,le d Ih, l, prie -d ,ct 1 t the 1 1,
ihl l ,Ic d i partic 1 ICi, i lled n
II' coii I -i ll [ ie i icr ib, I i I ,lcl (1 I
t h lh ic c s ic Iiv A I cc i I e I r\cR\ eA
I Ei'\ h\ .i i fls for-id Ol ne grollp
'11 III W ill 1 II leh r taint N L llr i l ilc l c
Ih lll h c11 l c, c incll ll H ( ht Ill
\ lli l III d l.l. i. i 'iiicllla Ili 0llon ho Ia c ii

iii h Iniiiiclll'h c /l h'tccc ccI;i I il'c-c iii}
Icc \1i N tic Jcc/icr (o", c ul c ii oni
i n ci 1 c th ihatc apptilcc d icc tlppccd
ccIciiti ,'p' a noigcetice pul hlishI d II
Ih 11 ll ticl hIlu d I i s I I ac Irdcld nI O111 d ) r
'c1i1( oiII cIcca pap delhi d hc i l\l 'c c Pci li t


I hl olll \Ihdal o I fhil th-re ,'ro Iit' Aboull
\ l (< o I R"It Ilud iu "1 'olld Al'x
R', (l dou iii Th in-, l t-o I c Prc

11 tll nlll atoe Itl a R ( a stij c rill 1 lltoll
iii I h\1a fit' Itidoard c, a lunctic Indccd


BLOW THE HORN TELL THE PEO


the implication iof this paper is that all these
men suffer from some kind of delusion anld
insanity. It is this violence committed against
Garvey.Henry and Bedward which is being
continued against Black Power.
Quite often this violence results in thle
per-lsleit harassment of selected individuals
Proiably olle cf Ile hbe dccmocllcted clase
is 1iI c(. Ict ygo Nevills II i III e'scnrple
.I tile Irlltlal esperielic lived cit aIlld ioftI I
times conqllcerd Ihy mlnv youths \hio have
rankedd polilrick" allogi ihcr Thios mcans ihyi
ll[ he niio pacry to ihe politicians and pr[ic
ln ii ork ii o ll iprcss black -cci i n-lll i ss ai d
rp it i h clhal he ihi ; l incciutlii. i ol tWill I

Is/h i i, Ill i -ll hinIdI i lit. i hinc e Ic
agaIr ellc c I r -i\i pl '\ i l o ion l d, llld a d

i., the lito-touno and recod, and (" 'res to
c hr I/cc ic n iir illlil e hc 1 pe Ihattl c l c i ag
IlI h-d ito ll ist tnirrlld ro- I rI d r d I O


tat It, uI(I I, I e n 1 h -Id pko r(I lc,6n,
lih l cd I II h l


FI)r Prine llC rllllltl ipprecllah" t .,i\ ( il. l l
ci a hbc r:cltd \hlii l and llthc i cailc i ic e for
b nlaltd hk Ihal li.cr..tiol. Itr'gglll (,I h.
c/ c ci c; i i r i ei blic h a hcIii i/cc
ib Irihcr ii io c cii h ; i rc oltionari A. lccciard
ci tck ci c rid hlaki i ,i t .... ra. I l, o i- i
like ;inld) t, aid cc ii ou l cri c c rIti kor


tic IIE l'r i ll~icliii i'irit'ci rughl r gaivic m c
I ii c u rie / l iii ctci rc ir l io IO ige i




,,1 ,d1 lhe grald m e<,tr hi t- a prie :-
cci \i Ih Ag-ld h,.k a t" ciciri h t hi l.



go l l d It, d ci hhn / Jiii-iic


PETER BOB ANDY & SCREE

Present

A NITE OF BLACK HARMONY
With the Mighty STEREO from Spanish Town
at the Students Union U.W.I. (No. 6 Bus)
ON SATURDAY 5th JULY 1969


F


RILEY'S FASHION CENTRE

For:-
CUSTOM BUILT GANZILS a SHIRTS
ScHURCH sT. -- KINCGTON
Vro~ o IACKsON




Blaik S.iul Socks Mlackcc
Invil's You il a Nile ll Siioulld

In n' ifieI d JulIi t.
121h Jul[
ic aani i iii


MllITAR Y REPORT

.1 am Jfreed to write this
lerttr it vouiir weekly news,. I.NG
ianil hoie when alol /th, reaers of A-
ii 'N(; se this ihec will realize whit,
the .larnair a Defence /'rce really is.
"TIhe. points which are fjets. I shall
puit to you ad hope it might he
/iiili/iii"lc d wi lthotI/ l fni'i r
(1) "/Tlie Army sililed men frocrcn
uiith !tiiadard to \i\-th lcian/lard arcc
iadci toi d the i/,r i ie dirlic wi ork
,lara /eh iping. Hle i nhuc I- h ]/ er IIfl-
and at 1c/i, wa1,, illc g ih/ II is a, e



lliii c\ i r i ii ,iiic i/ i i

i 'lll, i Nc ,c i'iat/iil
c ]i i clu i n,. c ncc 5 ccci iicc /c ,cc
i/ica /iccn t ic i/ic



t c/ ici I/ ic 1 at, Ic, anI er,
lice /i i /ii / Nccclc/c cc In ccc

liic I c a / Jmc 'ca- ic/,lir /I ,



I l c c r all naia i c / u
S / i/i/,a r h c cI/t c/ hand d, ii
[ i ..I.II. jold a cc//nr d I
ccii / /crsctIo c rcct/cr, c i /a
ii ciii' in cc cc ccci /. cc ci


'i/th the ('clc / It c 1i i
KIN( PATIRI K RE-( OR) SiA( K
I'or Local and 'oreign ReOirds
216 Old Hope Road, Kgn. 6. Ja. W. I
ALSO DISCO 1FOR HIRE
Open till 8:00 p.m.



For the BEST IN MEATS

comt to MONA MEATS

15 Hermitag Road
(near University)


Dealers in Local Prime Beef


per week Jor food. rent and other
earthliy materials
"Then the big thing is that the
Officers of the Jamaica lDeinse 'orcee
have anl annual function flr ill the
aristocrats or sav bourgeoisie, consist


irink in whisky n rld get drunk. whi
cur children in the time of our plight
in dctlention prison we-ep.
"Sir, there ,re anl kinds 1r ilorfs
going on in this Army v lli /h higher
authrity which dn s, not lake no lic
of what is haprpe ning ini air other
I i nlr.l'. //i fh elite f\ i 'f';,f lo walk
...... .I c c/ I cll c I dchc I, ce iCc Iccllic
c Icchii ic hil l Ic li' q cri i'i haiI l
c niiic i ii i lcc / c i /icn / / icn / i n/c
i/ c / l tn i k c th puN i t i / e
qin l'l.... but b"t1on I "

/N[ d/. / Nl/. R .I/ I.
Up Plurk (amp.

MARCUS GARVEY Jr.
I ii c uld nol undc-tiaid Ihc
cIii lI putl iwadi b MaciNe t"o

I, se B lack people unit, ve I he we lI
i l length a Io critci/i.i'c popi like
id clii nd Macc tli eh t cliale ,cci pIecp Is/i Did ",cI the(h, 0-
Iic'lhcii d pcuple wnik a, eciglh i
Ic icet people Why d'd nos yin
(ov- i ldk about being oiced Iby //

dit ru l WEll t i iea .I p we I

c l cci Ii gl d I/c hi Ih i iv
- 11 1' 1, -, 11 .eth...ny that I,- .llk


LET US GROUND TOGETHER
at
YARD THEATRE
at
MORTIMO PLANNO
H.I.M. Haile Selassie
Local No. 37 E.W.F. Inc.
on
SATURDAY
June 26cr 1969
5'/, Brook Street H/U
C.... '( c Icc //caci
itr /, Necec ie / ,c/c

['pci


i- r, R,,. A H r ry.r i .ding 1 a ro Av. K--, -Prn-d b HIIP Ic Ld 85 Inoui rl.' I te' K 4 2i1i June 1969


WHITE POWER CONTD.
l ch, il ni I-c c ornvcec And Ihce liclin
Scd o uisily Isli potracitl psychological
.l... hl \ lllrightl i. mn the i lacedlivc 's
pllIsiplci s II did thicn go1d. How were
Slluics ll i and Alcrican a rivals iniliaild intol
JII Icy liy ppeci'e vmilc d It
'i, ctll c IiIi ce' Ih c Whiol a d cIIu blacks,
II lami ,us Jailcic llhaic l spilaliiyi ot a in
icI h~i cchani Ic' cc inic dii l gold. Even whilc
III'\ s c o 'cc"c'g Lci cllh 'l ic ar call tel d
A\ pcIt hln II I Ilclclld cliii ccv eaiughil "Ila-
r;chll dcliio," inll da Iill11 u l 11 (1 )1
cc~iid nol b h Iacllld gullilly by ile' cIotii and
l'u'' d C CI u l t oi hi htis I .ln d S, m
blic k I icccc cin c, iiill iI ciii ihe c ivts hivc '
Icl li ed i ,Iill', .1 ,l hc im d III Il il Iiwo i
ii1a ci
ti slave maters and ite clh.oi:i for
c Inltght u toi love tihci alnd hat' .iii
vIc \nd ,, bac nv'l r foregIiclo il. Is,
c i I re l i Le pcoph i lil h- e .hla k


NOIL WillhI.


you. It black people
ol which I have n
lot to learn from pe
Mao and others of I
Garvey Jnr. wants I
perialism let him. I
ing to youths ino to

I am,
II.
SK Mounlain View
Kgn. 2




IIS (ARVILVY SIl
Irich 1 ll isl iI

lic iItIggle hi Ii
teh Atlic i hI
C,,llly a :i- .c.miI
Ihelc he is c nII II

iai/d n I I/I- dIi




I sl ed, Ih, I NMr



Sto, idnth



Ili N It c I


ANTI-RASTAFAR co NTo
P LE In trying o frame RasTafari in this"ay
they are doing the same nature of things as
when they slacsificd ganja as Drugs and
e wishes to be tree. Poisons and framed I an I precious herbs
o doubt there is a in a Dangerous Drugs Law.
ople like Che. Fidel, Why do the heathen rage, and the
ike mind If Marcus people imagine a vain thing? Why
o underestimate im- have the Kings and Princess of the earth
owever I am appeal- set them selves in array against the Lord?
follow suit. Prince explained that group delusion is diff-
erent to individual delusion, where someone
fools themselves. He showed that group
Warren. delusion was a mental illness where a group
Ave of people fooled themselves but still ignored
certain differences in order to stay together.
He said that this form of delusion allows for
various opinions of individual members and
Ilth June. 19il. also for the situation to change without af-
fecting their false beliefs so that the group
Slie article "MiAR- would not be broken up and separate.
I'l-AKS OU1'l 111 herefore we could have all different kinds
Sciii ,1 ae up of Black Ma in our faith. What is wrong
i father Iull (il, i wi w that Therefore we aould be able to
ht ena lpalin il adjust our concept if there was a vital change
ini ad iahilll, aI- in we ld events. What is wrong with that
rally, because rvciy being a characteristic of a socially concious
niicallv h lo.ippdci group. Only' that they are afraid of the
IBlack aii nlr-I'l clnpt of Revelation, Retribution nd
*s *a pliii al hIII Judgem ent. thercfore it is they w ho are
I Ihl iI ac mi fConliig themselves and ignoring realty
cic o n c iii ,,rJir to mainraion their peace of mind.
e Wn wv i i lh 'Irie it is thcv who are under the social
,I w n a. l ,,w n tres of the Jamaican Government to frame
Sparlt lcis i mlc I anr I lIrheefore it is they the 323 psy-
(;L eo oAlllld w lih chl : ritsi and their ivcs who are drop-outs
dl' V' i hl ,c pc l t. 'th e psychiatrists gathered
i/ w c hy ililonil in that hotel were suffering from
a i.ntlil ailment, an ailment none other
ll Ian l ,ii rouiipd eluion. And as the Black Doc-
II Ih' ,,,, wllel5 i1c) i,) y py irclc icir I acn I posess the soundest
i"'l LllitI lc Ihcc 1 "cu .,n l, i en ci, \ e s they are free to come
'a1 t '' 1 i i ,or .,ice therap i which would do ourscelce
leivniL, Bllack Brothers and Sisters some
cli [ccclicilh go()clod a/io.


L~ I--


' a t I t ,











Anti-I RasTafarI


In the campaign against the doctrine of
H.I.M. Ilyili Silassi I Jamaica now seeks
to condemn I an I RasTafarl through
international experts and international
opinion. These are the mixed multi-
tude who say I art mad to say AFRICA,
who say I art backward to praise RasTa-
farl for GOD.
The American IPsychiatric Asso-
ciation. r, ,to members strong, was
the guests of the Caribbean Phychiatric
Assc. members strong at a conven-
tion held at the Jamaica IHylton in Ocho
Rios on May I- i4., It was attended by
323 psychiatrists and their wives, many
of the wives also hbeng psychiatrists,
The subject of the convention was
Transcultural psychiatry. Psychiatrists
are men who study and treat men-
tal illness.
SOCIAL STRESS

The first paper prescntcd to the con-
vention was a paper enturld "Ihe RasTa-
farl: a stud- in social stress ndI group de-
lusion." It was prcrented by Dr. Prince,
a psychiatrir, from Canada who wa lent by
the Ale Gill Univ. to tie Jamaica Governnment
under a World Health and Par-Am Health
Organisation scheme. Dr. Prince was put
to work at the Belle uc Hospital. He is
studying the effect of gania upon smokers
using inmates of the Bellevue Hospital as
samples. (i) These are not the best people
to reveal the effects of ganja. (2i He was
not studying RasTafarl, tan! he himself


stresses that he knows nothing about Ras-
Tafarl as God.
This was plain to see from reading the
text of the paper which he prepared. It was
oberousl) a summary of the survey conduc-
ted by the Jamaican Go'ernmet in 960o.
It consisted completely of first impressions,
generalisations about the most important
and serious points and was heavily prejudi-
ced and biased, iraking fun of the heights
of Black Coniious'ness and African National-
ism in the form of Garverism and Repatri-
ation. He spoke of the fact that the white
sorlJ driad I an I locks and so therefore
the Jamaican economy suffered because I
an I cramp tourism and quaint native scenery.
It gri:ncJ about the idea that I an I achieve
supcrir li'ilical in ight and interpretation
l-tile ii h on smoking herbs. It painted
of picture of RaIlafarl being a cult speci-
ally designed to take in and satisfy runaways.
In mentioning the last stages of Gan-eyism
and Gar- 's poininno t tohe crooning of
Hyili Silasli, Prince tried to explain the de-
vclopcn.ent of the Doctrine of King RasTa-
larl as a dissapoinrment measure and a
consolation prize. Many others
still try to sketch I an I in that manner. In
other words we are disillusioned But for 38
years?. It was remarkable how Prince's
words coincided with the unofficial and
hypocritical view of the Jamaican posscsing
class. He never failed to remember that
Leopold Howell, one of the earliest RasTa-
farl teacher's, once promised people to send
them home to Itiopya and failed. He remin-
ed his colkagues tha: Howell was later regar-


ded as a madman and a rebel. He showed
that though RasTafarI brethren are familiar
with criminal elements and political ele-
ments I an I are neither criminals nor poli-
ticians but highly cultural and religious.
On the legend about Nyabingi violence he
could explain nothing, but was forced to
point our that the 1960 Henry rebellion was
neither RasTafarI works nor working
towards African redemption. He said our
view was that Adam and Eve were black.
This is completely false for Adam is not or-
iginal man, African. In finishing this paint-
ing of the picture of a cult of madman,
Prince referred and compared I an I to Bed-
ward who preached of a Black God, Black
Israe!ites and Black Redemption. Prince
humourously pointed out that after years of
'harraing Bedward Government only suc-
cc-d d iby putting him in the Bellevue. A
sqg>rio- onv. how to handle RasTafarI.
As Dr. Prince finished his paper the
.on mention Hail broke down intoBabel Tow-
err tr wo things happened. A small croup
f I an I Rasrialail bretheren entered the
cenc causing ambarassment and secondly,
beloved, representing the Black Caucus of
Amercan Psychiatrists, lumped to the floor
and condemned Prince's paper as racism
and called Prince a racist. There was much
anxiery, uith Prince admitting that he had
handled the paper lightly and had handled
RasTafarl frivolously because he
knew nothing about the subject but was
pressured into making a statement about I
an I on behalf of the profession which de-
cides who is mad and who is not. Resding


the paper I an I ind th
not necessarily racist
and under pressure I
er representing America
trists knew better, becr
cons was formed pre,
Black Doctors came to
erican Psychiatrist Ass
isarion whose main d
erican Forcign policy
countries and foreign
the black Community
find all awakening and
amongst exploited pe

people are mad or
So this Black Psvchia
ously to these racists in
pressed without apology
I RasTafarI have the sa
Western Hemisphere.
is that this conference
Jamaican Government.
an I. the defenders c
Faithfulness was set uo
Health, in order to get
by classifying us as ma(
Speaking to some
after the convention I
since the conditions ani
tal illness ii so crinin
they wre tryin, to ge
from the Am cric
to help them solve their
decided to present a see
six hundred ,dA AmcriJ


Bongo Neville's Story
SBongo Neville's Story


Bongo Nesille ha, burn 2' vears ago
He hao lined all h li fe at .30 e t Road
Declaration of War
In 1966 when police harrassment of youth
in the city intensified. Bongo Howell and his
friends were no exception. Often when they met
in an unoccupied house adjoining to play records
or cook. the police would raid the place and
beat them up.
During that year Neville was charged
along with other youths, with rioting and robb-
ery. A preliminary hearing on the first charge
was stopped, two witnesses having stated that
it was the police who told them to call the
names of accused. The second case was also
stopped when the complainant was proved to
be lying.
In September of the same year, Neville's
record player was seized and only returned
when the then M.P.. Vernon Arnett. wrote the
Commissioner of Police about it. Neville was,
at that time, a member of the Young Socialist
League.
In January 1967, the record player was
again seized and when Neville went to the
Admiral Town Station to regain it several police-
men attacked him and tried to throw him out.
Neville, quite properly, resisted and in the fracas
suffered a broken arm. One policeman suffered
a broken jaw. Three charges of assaulting the
police were brought against Neville and one for
assault occasioning bodily harm. The first three
wren eventually dropped and, in the last one,
there wee so many discrepancies in the evidence
of the l witnesses, that the judge stopped
the cas.
SIn March 1967 Nevillek as again arrested
'nd Chagrged with burglary and larceny and


nliCniiou dot'rueinon Of property, both by the
'mlc constable wito had charged Neville with
a-aut. No evidence was offered on either char-
Ig t In te same month hie was arrested and
jlaferd ,ili robber illth aggravation and in
'Mal he wa- committed to trial at Circuit. He
ias remanded in custody and remained in cust-
ndi till the end of September when he was
lrantid bail on condition that he report to the
Admiral Town Staron each Friday.
Alter reporting on the first Friday Neville
ua, arrested on tile following Monday and
clhargd hi the Admiral Town Police on two
cOuII iof robbery with aggravation. and one of
rcvill Mg stolen property and one of unlawful
possession o property. One of the arresting
constables was the one whlU-ad suffied the
broken jaw in the January fracas. Neville was
again remanded in custody where he remained
unlil February 21, 1968.
In tire meantime he was tried for unlawful
possession of property and the case was stopped
at Ith end of the prosecution'sevidence. In
January I %ts he was tried on the robbery charge
lor which he was arrested in March 1967. and
acquitted This is the only time that he has
ever been called on to answer to a charge. He
was tried at Circuit in June 198b on the other
wti robberies and the receiving charge The
udge Ithere stopped the case and directed the
jury to acquit. describing the evidence of the
police wilncsses as scandalous.
In April 1hS. before the last trial, Neville
and two uther youths were pickedup at gun-
point by the police and taken tiCelnral Station
where they were questioned and released with-
out charge. Neville's barrister then wrote a letter
lie Ihe Commissioner of Police about the police
lharrarssmen of tihe y uth,.
"Suspected Person"
On Mlas 25(h, fifteen minutes after leav-
ing his hbris\er s office, Howell -as arrested
at a bus stop and charged with being a suspected
person Thi, case. his Ioth charge. g a again
,topped hi tie Resident Magistrate before the
arresting policeman had completed his evidence
Alter Neville's acquittal at Circuit in June.
li:arn police reprisals against him, Ne'ille was
taken out of town where he remained for about
tveo weeks. On thile same day. and the two follow-
ing days, squads of policemen from Admiral
Town Station visited Neville's home four times
asking for him. His counsel had an interview
with the Commissioner of Police and informed
him it the history lof harrassment. Immediately
lilluwing his return a squad of policemen went
to Neville's home and arrested him on a robbery
charge said to have been committed in Kingston
during the time that Neville was staying in the
country. A police sergeant grabbed him by his
neck and poked him in his stomach with a revol-
ver threatening to kill him, Neville was kept in
custody for four days before an identification


parade was held. At the parade Neville changed
his shirt with another youth in the line-up and
the complainant pointed out the other man in
Neville's shirt. Although not pointed out. Neville
was kept in custody for two more days before
being taken to court to be formally dismissed.
Neville's counsel sought another interview
with the Commissioner of Police. He was not
available and the facts were repeated to Super-
intendent Stephenson. After that the harrass-
ment of Neville ceased. He obtained a permit
from the police at Admiral Town to open a beer
parlour at his premises and for a few months he
was permitted to operate it unmolested by the
criminal 'lice'.
Abeng's Brother
In February this year Neville joined the
Aheni orsganilsalitn and committed himself to
thei tak of building the Newspaper Since then
the police harra inment ls again begun On the
251h of February tIhe raided his home, as usual,
\ilhmllt am ll arranl Two of Neville friends
werie arncld and eventually released A few
iceks Ilei Neville himself was taken into
icurtid and held at the Denham Town Station
for ,seera hour before being released without
h.arge
Shortly after this incident the police again
came to Neville's home. This time they wanted
to see the papers for an old Vauxhall motor car
which his mother had lately acquired. The
papers, which were in order, were then taken
away and Neville informed that they would
only be returned if the car was taken to the
Denham Town Station to be checked. When
this was done the car was seized and some weeks
later, declared unfit to be driven and returned
without license plates.
The political nature of the attacks on
Bongo Beville became clearly revealed by the
next act which for the first time, involves a
Government Department other than the police.
We refer to the notice served on Neville's moth-
er by the Ministry of Housing to quit her home
by the end of June. It is significant that this
has been quickly followed by the visit of a pol-
ice superintendent ordering the closure of the
beer parlour.
Where will it End
Last Friday the police made a combined
a-,ltuit on Neville and Abeng. Not surprisingly,
Bongo Nevsille is the most effective vendor of
\heng, constantly creating a dialogue with the
public about the material in each issue of the
paper and rarely failing to elicit a response.
here does the criminal actions of these
line men' end' Bongo Neville is perhaps lucky
that the I-+ attempts by these men to "down"
him ha\e so far failed. Many youths have been
destroyed with much less effort. We are quite
sure however that we have not heard the last
of the "lice men"' et.


U'NU G'WAi

Fe Mi TIME

SOO'COM


"J.L.P & P.N.P
their histories",



White


Ho

It W
Middle-class Jamaica
term. "Black Power" -oa
colour but not write aboul
I have chosen to write ab
one that does not fight
are oppressed by it viz.
And since we normally
as something physical
will point to the foreign
and hotels, banks, and
the mining companies
Or you may be cone
areas of commerce and
telephone and electricity.
ship or direction seems
And I dare to say it
will demand that I be c
neTs-free speech?l that
the church it is the
the four crowned heads
the call to the political
even if you represent a
if you are white you are
the Big Four.
But the White Pot
cerned with is the grant
back of black minds wi


Bongo Jere


I ~ __


-- I















ABE&G


Vol. I No 22 June 27. 969 Price: SIXPENCE


FORMS OF VIOLENCE


THE BAN ON BLA(K LITERATURE
& RECORDS + VIOLENCE AGAINST RA
DICAL YOUTH l shos the addition will which
the Wbite Pcwer Iolders would like to minus
out tIhe strides I LA(K (ONS(CIOUSNESS is
inaking ircards IILA(K POWERC they ban
tihe writings of Sickely ( arnic hael, lijah '11u
hl;iined alcd n Xt mid N ci ict irccihic/ ed
Lieriatlrc trials Il tlicir -orl lion- Prclcc
Buelr cd hii \,it l N crsc e I c iked ii a
Prl.hihbited Literr tlllr i charg had their hIllce
raided e111\ral timnc and \were tolra cd h
Thc p li i. i
N cI cI nl i Iti fl- ci Princ t lhl t I
re.cc.. like 11 N i )\INIt1 NiD\ N IN and
"cII\ROi(i I1 ] tI R \Sl ha1 e i" hcn ba

1- iic cc fc pc, pl 'il i in I I I n lllle i
li Iic i cI ill .. licke itlhe one i ic D R d l-(l i
,l ;,c r ,;,le d Ih, l, prie -d ,ct 1 t the 1 1,
ihl l ,Ic d i partic 1 ICi, i lled n
II' coii I -i ll [ ie i icr ib, I i I ,lcl (1 I
t h lh ic c s ic Iiv A I cc i I e I r\cR\ eA
I Ei'\ h\ .i i fls for-id Ol ne grollp
'11 III W ill 1 II leh r taint N L llr i l ilc l c
Ih lll h c11 l c, c incll ll H ( ht Ill
\ lli l III d l.l. i. i 'iiicllla Ili 0llon ho Ia c ii

iii h Iniiiiclll'h c /l h'tccc ccI;i I il'c-c iii}
Icc \1i N tic Jcc/icr (o", c ul c ii oni
i n ci 1 c th ihatc apptilcc d icc tlppccd
ccIciiti ,'p' a noigcetice pul hlishI d II
Ih 11 ll ticl hIlu d I i s I I ac Irdcld nI O111 d ) r
'c1i1( oiII cIcca pap delhi d hc i l\l 'c c Pci li t


I hl olll \Ihdal o I fhil th-re ,'ro Iit' Aboull
\ l (< o I R"It Ilud iu "1 'olld Al'x
R', (l dou iii Th in-, l t-o I c Prc

11 tll nlll atoe Itl a R ( a stij c rill 1 lltoll
iii I h\1a fit' Itidoard c, a lunctic Indccd


BLOW THE HORN TELL THE PEO


the implication iof this paper is that all these
men suffer from some kind of delusion anld
insanity. It is this violence committed against
Garvey.Henry and Bedward which is being
continued against Black Power.
Quite often this violence results in thle
per-lsleit harassment of selected individuals
Proiably olle cf Ile hbe dccmocllcted clase
is 1iI c(. Ict ygo Nevills II i III e'scnrple
.I tile Irlltlal esperielic lived cit aIlld ioftI I
times conqllcerd Ihy mlnv youths \hio have
rankedd polilrick" allogi ihcr Thios mcans ihyi
ll[ he niio pacry to ihe politicians and pr[ic
ln ii ork ii o ll iprcss black -cci i n-lll i ss ai d
rp it i h clhal he ihi ; l incciutlii. i ol tWill I

Is/h i i, Ill i -ll hinIdI i lit. i hinc e Ic
agaIr ellc c I r -i\i pl '\ i l o ion l d, llld a d

i., the lito-touno and recod, and (" 'res to
c hr I/cc ic n iir illlil e hc 1 pe Ihattl c l c i ag
IlI h-d ito ll ist tnirrlld ro- I rI d r d I O


tat It, uI(I I, I e n 1 h -Id pko r(I lc,6n,
lih l cd I II h l


FI)r Prine llC rllllltl ipprecllah" t .,i\ ( il. l l
ci a hbc r:cltd \hlii l and llthc i cailc i ic e for
b nlaltd hk Ihal li.cr..tiol. Itr'gglll (,I h.
c/ c ci c; i i r i ei blic h a hcIii i/cc
ib Irihcr ii io c cii h ; i rc oltionari A. lccciard
ci tck ci c rid hlaki i ,i t .... ra. I l, o i- i
like ;inld) t, aid cc ii ou l cri c c rIti kor


tic IIE l'r i ll~icliii i'irit'ci rughl r gaivic m c
I ii c u rie / l iii ctci rc ir l io IO ige i




,,1 ,d1 lhe grald m e<,tr hi t- a prie :-
cci \i Ih Ag-ld h,.k a t" ciciri h t hi l.



go l l d It, d ci hhn / Jiii-iic


PETER BOB ANDY & SCREE

Present

A NITE OF BLACK HARMONY
With the Mighty STEREO from Spanish Town
at the Students Union U.W.I. (No. 6 Bus)
ON SATURDAY 5th JULY 1969


F


RILEY'S FASHION CENTRE

For:-
CUSTOM BUILT GANZILS a SHIRTS
ScHURCH sT. -- KINCGTON
Vro~ o IACKsON




Blaik S.iul Socks Mlackcc
Invil's You il a Nile ll Siioulld

In n' ifieI d JulIi t.
121h Jul[
ic aani i iii


MllITAR Y REPORT

.1 am Jfreed to write this
lerttr it vouiir weekly news,. I.NG
ianil hoie when alol /th, reaers of A-
ii 'N(; se this ihec will realize whit,
the .larnair a Defence /'rce really is.
"TIhe. points which are fjets. I shall
puit to you ad hope it might he
/iiili/iii"lc d wi lthotI/ l fni'i r
(1) "/Tlie Army sililed men frocrcn
uiith !tiiadard to \i\-th lcian/lard arcc
iadci toi d the i/,r i ie dirlic wi ork
,lara /eh iping. Hle i nhuc I- h ]/ er IIfl-
and at 1c/i, wa1,, illc g ih/ II is a, e



lliii c\ i r i ii ,iiic i/ i i

i 'lll, i Nc ,c i'iat/iil
c ]i i clu i n,. c ncc 5 ccci iicc /c ,cc
i/ica /iccn t ic i/ic



t c/ ici I/ ic 1 at, Ic, anI er,
lice /i i /ii / Nccclc/c cc In ccc

liic I c a / Jmc 'ca- ic/,lir /I ,



I l c c r all naia i c / u
S / i/i/,a r h c cI/t c/ hand d, ii
[ i ..I.II. jold a cc//nr d I
ccii / /crsctIo c rcct/cr, c i /a
ii ciii' in cc cc ccci /. cc ci


'i/th the ('clc / It c 1i i
KIN( PATIRI K RE-( OR) SiA( K
I'or Local and 'oreign ReOirds
216 Old Hope Road, Kgn. 6. Ja. W. I
ALSO DISCO 1FOR HIRE
Open till 8:00 p.m.



For the BEST IN MEATS

comt to MONA MEATS

15 Hermitag Road
(near University)


Dealers in Local Prime Beef


per week Jor food. rent and other
earthliy materials
"Then the big thing is that the
Officers of the Jamaica lDeinse 'orcee
have anl annual function flr ill the
aristocrats or sav bourgeoisie, consist


irink in whisky n rld get drunk. whi
cur children in the time of our plight
in dctlention prison we-ep.
"Sir, there ,re anl kinds 1r ilorfs
going on in this Army v lli /h higher
authrity which dn s, not lake no lic
of what is haprpe ning ini air other
I i nlr.l'. //i fh elite f\ i 'f';,f lo walk
...... .I c c/ I cll c I dchc I, ce iCc Iccllic
c Icchii ic hil l Ic li' q cri i'i haiI l
c niiic i ii i lcc / c i /icn / / icn / i n/c
i/ c / l tn i k c th puN i t i / e
qin l'l.... but b"t1on I "

/N[ d/. / Nl/. R .I/ I.
Up Plurk (amp.

MARCUS GARVEY Jr.
I ii c uld nol undc-tiaid Ihc
cIii lI putl iwadi b MaciNe t"o

I, se B lack people unit, ve I he we lI
i l length a Io critci/i.i'c popi like
id clii nd Macc tli eh t cliale ,cci pIecp Is/i Did ",cI the(h, 0-
Iic'lhcii d pcuple wnik a, eciglh i
Ic icet people Why d'd nos yin
(ov- i ldk about being oiced Iby //

dit ru l WEll t i iea .I p we I

c l cci Ii gl d I/c hi Ih i iv
- 11 1' 1, -, 11 .eth...ny that I,- .llk


LET US GROUND TOGETHER
at
YARD THEATRE
at
MORTIMO PLANNO
H.I.M. Haile Selassie
Local No. 37 E.W.F. Inc.
on
SATURDAY
June 26cr 1969
5'/, Brook Street H/U
C.... '( c Icc //caci
itr /, Necec ie / ,c/c

['pci


i- r, R,,. A H r ry.r i .ding 1 a ro Av. K--, -Prn-d b HIIP Ic Ld 85 Inoui rl.' I te' K 4 2i1i June 1969


WHITE POWER CONTD.
l ch, il ni I-c c ornvcec And Ihce liclin
Scd o uisily Isli potracitl psychological
.l... hl \ lllrightl i. mn the i lacedlivc 's
pllIsiplci s II did thicn go1d. How were
Slluics ll i and Alcrican a rivals iniliaild intol
JII Icy liy ppeci'e vmilc d It
'i, ctll c IiIi ce' Ih c Whiol a d cIIu blacks,
II lami ,us Jailcic llhaic l spilaliiyi ot a in
icI h~i cchani Ic' cc inic dii l gold. Even whilc
III'\ s c o 'cc"c'g Lci cllh 'l ic ar call tel d
A\ pcIt hln II I Ilclclld cliii ccv eaiughil "Ila-
r;chll dcliio," inll da Iill11 u l 11 (1 )1
cc~iid nol b h Iacllld gullilly by ile' cIotii and
l'u'' d C CI u l t oi hi htis I .ln d S, m
blic k I icccc cin c, iiill iI ciii ihe c ivts hivc '
Icl li ed i ,Iill', .1 ,l hc im d III Il il Iiwo i
ii1a ci
ti slave maters and ite clh.oi:i for
c Inltght u toi love tihci alnd hat' .iii
vIc \nd ,, bac nv'l r foregIiclo il. Is,
c i I re l i Le pcoph i lil h- e .hla k


NOIL WillhI.


you. It black people
ol which I have n
lot to learn from pe
Mao and others of I
Garvey Jnr. wants I
perialism let him. I
ing to youths ino to

I am,
II.
SK Mounlain View
Kgn. 2




IIS (ARVILVY SIl
Irich 1 ll isl iI

lic iItIggle hi Ii
teh Atlic i hI
C,,llly a :i- .c.miI
Ihelc he is c nII II

iai/d n I I/I- dIi




I sl ed, Ih, I NMr



Sto, idnth



Ili N It c I


ANTI-RASTAFAR co NTo
P LE In trying o frame RasTafari in this"ay
they are doing the same nature of things as
when they slacsificd ganja as Drugs and
e wishes to be tree. Poisons and framed I an I precious herbs
o doubt there is a in a Dangerous Drugs Law.
ople like Che. Fidel, Why do the heathen rage, and the
ike mind If Marcus people imagine a vain thing? Why
o underestimate im- have the Kings and Princess of the earth
owever I am appeal- set them selves in array against the Lord?
follow suit. Prince explained that group delusion is diff-
erent to individual delusion, where someone
fools themselves. He showed that group
Warren. delusion was a mental illness where a group
Ave of people fooled themselves but still ignored
certain differences in order to stay together.
He said that this form of delusion allows for
various opinions of individual members and
Ilth June. 19il. also for the situation to change without af-
fecting their false beliefs so that the group
Slie article "MiAR- would not be broken up and separate.
I'l-AKS OU1'l 111 herefore we could have all different kinds
Sciii ,1 ae up of Black Ma in our faith. What is wrong
i father Iull (il, i wi w that Therefore we aould be able to
ht ena lpalin il adjust our concept if there was a vital change
ini ad iahilll, aI- in we ld events. What is wrong with that
rally, because rvciy being a characteristic of a socially concious
niicallv h lo.ippdci group. Only' that they are afraid of the
IBlack aii nlr-I'l clnpt of Revelation, Retribution nd
*s *a pliii al hIII Judgem ent. thercfore it is they w ho are
I Ihl iI ac mi fConliig themselves and ignoring realty
cic o n c iii ,,rJir to mainraion their peace of mind.
e Wn wv i i lh 'Irie it is thcv who are under the social
,I w n a. l ,,w n tres of the Jamaican Government to frame
Sparlt lcis i mlc I anr I lIrheefore it is they the 323 psy-
(;L eo oAlllld w lih chl : ritsi and their ivcs who are drop-outs
dl' V' i hl ,c pc l t. 'th e psychiatrists gathered
i/ w c hy ililonil in that hotel were suffering from
a i.ntlil ailment, an ailment none other
ll Ian l ,ii rouiipd eluion. And as the Black Doc-
II Ih' ,,,, wllel5 i1c) i,) y py irclc icir I acn I posess the soundest
i"'l LllitI lc Ihcc 1 "cu .,n l, i en ci, \ e s they are free to come
'a1 t '' 1 i i ,or .,ice therap i which would do ourscelce
leivniL, Bllack Brothers and Sisters some
cli [ccclicilh go()clod a/io.


L~ I--


' a t I t ,















vABo EN

vol I No. 22 June 27. 1969 Price: SIXPENCE


"It'e IWnr Our People to Think for Themselves."
MARCUS GARVEV


PRINTERY FIRE


Abeng Still Sounds

Sabotage Is Suspected
On uesday afternoon last BRICE PRIN ERY, printers of tABEil G.
utted by blazing fire and its press destroyed
The fire "mysteriously" started on the ground floor in a section
tioned off and occupied by Wright Envelope Co. This Company has
out of operation for the past three weeks,
ressmen of Brice Printery, ret- among tne editors and supporter
bg from lunch at about 12 15, of ABENG. How had it happened'
tied they smelt soke and in ENG does not et kit o, th-
Sig the building through a door ought sabotage is strongly suspected
e partition they saw flames
mg from a pile of waste paper. Ns sue believes the fire vas
Saccidental. ABENG, by speaking tile
fire-extinguisher as rushed truth and being the sufferers'oice.
upstairs but it jammed. within has roused too much fear and hatred
an hour the fire was out of in the wealth few who live off the
to], devouring the wooden fl poverty of the many.
ing and ceiling bringing down
line roof. But neither fire nor anything elis
will silence the people of Jamaica
fire engines. stationed five mill- ABENG has a special reenge in
s away, took half an hour to store: it will continue to SOUND
ch the scene too late to save issue number 22. about to go to
ling in the building, press when the fire broke out, i
The chilling news spread rapidly now in your hands'


JOSWA POWER

JULY 7th


II Jamaican workers are anx-
psly waiting on the outcome of
,poll to be taken among Jamaica
pnibus workers on July 7th to
de the issue Working class
esentatises to look after work
class business
fhe pol lng dcla, ed h .ictaci al
oeuverinp heMteen Mangnemcnlt
BITU- NW'L inislry, o labh-
iconniving. was forced on tihe
pany when it finally woke to
fact thai tih power of worker
darity, as diemonstlated in the
strike, was the only force with
authority among the workers.
s has been so for a long time not
y at J.O.S. but in other areas of
5tntial services and agriculture.
icularly sugar. But it is the J.O.S
kers Association that will be
ist to put the issue to the test.
SA favourable result for the work-
swill mark the first decisive epul-
Sof the two par s two union
iout agents from tlie ranks of the


working class in Jamaica
She unions asked for a new con
tract for I year. The Company said
2 ears. The Arbitration awarded
3 ears. Nobody asked the workers
what the\ ivancId Lvci' od, ex
cepI the ear,. 'i ac aired olt tha.
There is onlt one way to change it
Jul\ 7t(h ll point the iwc J.O.S
\V.A is demanding for Ihle a,,rkers
back-senrice credit. daily overuimne
a severance pay agreement, shorlagec
and extra trip arrangement. skill p:y
for skill work. sick allo ance, strike
fund. and welfare benefits.
The worker-official of the iJ..S
Workers Association are R. Burke
(Mechanic) Presidenei C. Hall (Dri-
ver) \ e President, T Gumbns (Con-
ducto General Secretary. V Callin-
der (Duco- nan) Tieasu er.
J.O.S.W.A. POWER TO ALL WOR
KERS!
BLACK WORKER POWER TO
BLACK WORKERS'


SOUNDS
We had an experiment last week, an experimen, to
nonstrate the importance and significance of our local-
produced music in the Black Consciousness which
rough I on I youth both black, white and otherwise.
is experiment was brought about by the strong memo-
s of Don the Drum man, our beloved and studied mu-
al guide. So that first session at U.W.I. Extra-Mural
itre, Camp Road was mainly a display of Don's musi-
I travel: about 35 people present whether they knew
or not helped to shape out the design of this five part
ies "The Years of Freedom Sounds" this is an attempt
examine the history and growth of bongo music, soun-
which are with out a doubt and mistake announcing a
eat kind of Freedom. I on I gathered many ideas on
Most progressive form of putting this series together.
p main fault of the introductory programme -which
Purposely left loose, was the lack of preparation and
lack of real variety while demonstrating our points
recorded sound. This will be corrected in the next
rmme which is the real start of the Sea history. This
deal with the period from '59-'62, followed by three
(I) 62-65 (skatalites and refinement) '65- late '66
le Period) and 67-69 (rock steady, sea and rege-sca."
SFriday, 4th July, a Love.


ar m








selass

Selassie a


asl --a inaafl a a


praises Aro- STARVAIOMN


West Indians
EMPEROR HAILE SELASSIE
of Ethiopia today paid warm tri-
hute to people of African descent,
particularly those in the Caribbean
islands, for their moral and material
support during the Italian Fascists
invasion of his country in 1930s.
Selassie said small countries in
the Caribbean, including Barbados.
have important roles to play to
promote understanding and world
peace. "It is not the size of the
country, nor its population that
counts, but it's ideals of brother-
hood and peace that should mat-
ter". he said.
THE EMPEROR SAID Barbados
and other countries with peoples
of African origin must help in any
way they can to "help free Africans
still under racist and brutal colonial
rule." Addis Ababa. June 21.


I Banned


on R.J.R.


and J.B.C.


"A cry of our times..."


Bongo Neville Attacked By The Beasts


The official attempts to crush
Abeng have reached a new level.
Last week Friday afternoon two
Abeng vendors were viciously att-
acked by the police along King
Street and charged with "Failing
tolriovn on" -newspaper vendors-
on King Street- on a Friday after-
noon!!!
One of the Vendors Bongo'
Neville Howell (see inside story)
was charged in addition with ass
aulting a constable. resisting arrest
and indecent language. It is perhaps
no coincidence that the issue of
Abeng being sold contained a re-
port of police harrassment of Bongo
Neville and his brother the week
before.
At about 1. 30 pm. 'Bongo'
Neville and 'Macko' were in front
of Times Store. The sales were


going well. Suddenly a woman con-
stable accosted Bongo Neville and
told him to come off the street
Bongo Neville bent down to pick
up his bag off the ground and with-
out any warning was struck on tile
head by another woman constable
in plain clothes who immediately
proceeded to reign blows all over
his body. He was immediately su-
rrounded by a gang of policemen
and women and dragged up King
Street with 'Macko' not far behind.
The Abeng which Bongo Neville
had in his bag were thrown away by
the police who described it as "a
dirty newspaper involving dirty per-
sons with a criminal mind." He also
lost nearly 5 in cash in the course
of the roughing up.
Bongo Neville managed to call
a brother who was witnessing the


"advantage" and asked him to in
form Abeng organisation. For this
lie received greater blows.
At the City Central Station
the police locked up the vendors
of the station and proceeded to beat
up the youth, striking him over
his head and face with his own
shoes.
Bongo Neville sees the issues
very clearly. He says "We can see
clearly that the police is being used
to crush any progressive youth force
who dosen't support the two poli-
tical party...l as a black sufferer
see the need for my youth brothers
and sisters to stand up and move
out the paper to the suffering mass-
es of this country. We want this
paper to ground among the peo-
ple..."
















ftice is per' whic llh 1 would hlowr up thti urgent need
gnorant for hlp and mlenital cre in Jamaica But
iBroth- whv did ther lir to paint 1 an I Rarlafarl
:tsychia- a mad W'as it the usual petty crime of
SCau- getting mInoiv off our hcais lust a, they got
r these mnonef ron forLiig countries ( pro d
he Am- Ras Fatarl with hou ing which we never got
lorgan- or was it the more dread crime, of trying to
g Am- banish I an I to a madhouse, Itrm to break
I foreign down the international uan world respect
s (Like for the rsatni and levelheadedness of Fim-
and to peror IHali SIlas l. and ihi so:.s, RasTafarl
timrents Are they tr iri to apply the medicine hiich
then to worked with HBedard who preached of a
fighting Black Christ from in tie ISoo's till when
I these they killed him in Bclicr-ue in 1,21?. Iut
glanced. we must remember that thir main rxpla
Irigour- nation for I an I mental state was fruttrtion
and ex- and ganua: l.ookin' into that point I an I
at I an arc not ftn'trate fo;r our prediction d and
i in the works manm est dad thr unity of Africa.
i: point the inertable crash In Jamaica the embrace-
i the mnent of millions of Black Brothers' i the
Son I rwest, of an I o fanciient fath, whether it i
i and clled Bll ck Rln'mption, Black P oer, or
ary of Black Hfour I he fact ir, once aamn thai
tuence Prince knows nothing of RasTafarI, but is
S domn a study on the effects of ganja So
iatrlis since their Ganja Laws are now ineffective
,d that they either have to break RaoTafarl iflu-
r men- ence by embarrcsing our sanity or tlhe haiv
bmaica to bring in a new anti-herb law ihich re-
money quires, rat six months observation and con-
latio finheent in a mental hospital whether or
to the) not the defendant is found guilty of using
Io these herb.
;of pa- iTurn to Pog 4
U


i,

/7


odly closer in concept than at any time in
h) Gleaner June 15th, 1969.


Stokely Carmichael expresses the strategy
which ought to guide the links mane. lot
instance, between the Black Struggle here in
Jamaica and that in the United States. By
the Third World' he refers to the exploited
countries of Africa. Asia and Latin America
which includes the Caribbean.
Stokely first speaks of Black Power at-
tacking those who are subverting it. He says
that Black developed Poweri as a slogan and
a movement because the African-Americans in-
side the United States recognized that prior
to 1966. the people who were leading the
struggle, were not calling for power, but were
calling for irrelevant things: they were calling
for love, non-violence, peace, etc., and that
if one were to implement change, one did not
need love. non-violence, morality, etc., one
needed Power. A clear understanding was that
power was what the Black masses of the
U.S. needed if they intended to liberate them-
selves.
Third World Hook-Up
Stokely answers this question by saying
we all have a common enemy because we
belong to communities which are colonies of
the United States.
Afro-Americans automatically hook up
with peoples of the Third World, because they
see themselves, and are in fact, colonies inside
the United States: the peoples of the Third
World are colonies outside the United States.
The same power structure that exploits and
oppresses us is the very same power structure
that oppresses and exploits them. It rapes
them of the resources inside the colonies where
they live, it rapes us of our resources outside
in the colonies where we live. The only way
all of us will be liberated is when we come
together to defeat the enemy, because we are
not fighting isolated capitalism; we are fighting
international capitalism; and since the imperia-
list powers of the world have internationalized
their system, we must also internationalize our
system so that our fight will be international,


Black


Power






Cut A Tentacle
From the stage of having a common
enemy Stokely points to two reasons for hook-
ing up the revohrtionary struggle against im-
perialism whose eye is lodged in the United
States. First he argues that Afro-Americans
have viewed the United States as an octopus
with its tentacles reaching all across the world.
The eye of the octopus is located inside
the United States Cuba has cut off one of the
tentacles. If they can get the other peoples to
tie down the other tentacles of the United
States, while those tentacles are busy they
can stab the eye of the octopus. That will
be the job of the Afro-American on the inside
so if they can make other people on the out-
side begin to fight the United States, while
they are waging their fight inside, they can
more easily defeat the octopus, and they must
do this if in fact it is going to be defeated.

The simple truth is that we can't defeat
the enemies of Black Power singlehandedly.
Our role is to cut off one of the tentacles
here in Jamaica.
The second reason why this hook-up
is necessary Stokely argues, is because the
profits from the Third World enable the white
working class in America to enjoy the money
made off the sweat of our backs. This leads
them to throw in their lot with the white
power structure. Stokely says that the white
working class will begin to develop a revo-
lutionary consciousness when the profits of
the Third World, the external profits of the
United States, are cast off and no more profits
are coming into the United States, and she
must begin to turn inside to find her resources
and her economic way of life.
Any Means Necessary
Stokely ends by saying that it's not
question any more for us of which way to go;
it is merely a question of tactics. We are ready
to destroy imperialism by any means necessary.


m


corded in tie daLs ot slaver and colo, sa-
lion The plantation owners and Ihe colonial
civil servants taught us. olten vert sub1tl
to appreciate things while and devalue Itlings
coloured or black. And although slavery and
olonialism are ended the record plays louder
than ever.
This is clear in the term "bacra", our
name lor white people and equally our lerm

tor what is finest, it is to te credit of lamai-
cans that a car that is black and runs well
may be termed a "bacra" car. II is true that
we do not apply the term to sailors or poor
whites. There is not a total colour application.
But the word is a standing tribute to the
white hierarchy of our island. And in our
efforts to reduce White Power so lhat we may
really become one people I suggest that we
bestow the term. "bacra" on our black'?
Prime Minister. He deserves it.
White Power lies in nearly every geo-
graphy or travel book we read. The authors
nearly all white usually depicted the best
of their own colour and the worst of others.
They chose pictures of Europeans or those
who are White from the young and handsome.
Peasant men. women and children are always
photographed when 'dem dress up' in their
festive national dress. It is the same as if we
printed all pictures of Jamaicans as they look
on King Street on Christmas morning. But
these same authors print the pictures of black,
and often of Chinese people when they are
ragged, old or deformed;i women wrinkled


and flathrested. tribes i areas so humid there
go almost naked and hose protein diet is
so slight thre have bulging stomach. Hence,
we generally see those with our own colour
in their worst state
White Pore ir greatest in ul treat-
men, nt onf OI.C hOt tler e o la e hard
British clergymen build points A II I
mons around 'imlle ratlenlcnl liII childel
made. Black Jamaicans iinad nio such wsdo
i Ithel l ln clldlen I i instead Iey pinch
to their Irlends ill IntI tn Ithe )ounl g IIho
main lauls 111e later hrate I' pgrlic "ic
have a negative attitude Wi oul pfe'ple In
the Spanish Town (Cathedral I('17) roe Io
our "utmost dignita ies" waned the assem-
blage ol scouts, guides and other unitolrmed
groups to make good use ol their oppoitu-
nities since many delnquenls lacked them,
Tire thightlight ol our Prui ne Ministes firs
speech sas, aCcolding talo or01 leading ioe\-
paper his insrruction ir tire people nol to
expect handouts. Tile accusations under ing
these statements ate clear. In tie meantime
white men tell stoies of little while bo\s
who put fingers in dikes to save towns and
of white people who have overcome physical
handicaps like blindness and paralysis or com-
mitted acts of heroism. Tihe are positive.
For years I watched in fury as dents at Mico harrassed incoming first-year
men into choked up anger, adult men stand-
ing humiliated and tearful, or muttering an-

(Turn to Page 4)


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