Group Title: Struggle (Kingston, Jamaica)
Title: Struggle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100337/00034
 Material Information
Title: Struggle official organ of the Workers Liberation League
Uniform Title: Struggle (Kingston, Jamaica)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 41 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Workers' Liberation League (Jamaica)
Workers' Liberation League (Jamaica)
Workers Party of Jamaica
Publisher: The League
Place of Publication: Kingston
Kingston
Publication Date: September 8, 1977
Frequency: bimonthly[mar.-apr. 1986-]
biweekly[ former -july 13, 1984]
monthly[ former aug. 1984-feb. 1986]
bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Labor movement -- Periodicals -- Jamaica   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Jamaica   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Jamaica
 Notes
Abstract: Struggle was published first as a mimeographed newsletter in 1974 when the Workers Liberation League was formed. It was edited by Rupert Lewis and he continued as editor when Struggle became the organ of the Workers Party of Jamaica in 1978. In the 1980s editors included Elean Thomas, Elaine Wallace and Ben Brodie. The Workers Liberation League grew out of the political initiative of academics - Trevor Munroe, Rupert Lewis as well as Don Robotham, Derek Gordon who studied in the University of Chicago in the early 1970s and were connected to activists in the Black Panther Movement and African-American radicals in the Communist Party of the United States. The latter group formed the Paul Bogle League which brought together academics, working class and community activists who read and discussed Karl Marx’s Capital and Lenin’s political writings and sought to build on Jamaica’s radical traditions in the trade union movement and in the People’s National Party from the 1930s to the 1960s. The Paul Bogle League was also involved with the formation of the University and Allied Workers Union in the early 1970s and worked with the Independent Trade Union Action Council. Politically the Workers Liberation League gave critical support to Michael Manley’s democratic socialist program in the 1970s.
Issuing Body: Vols. for -1978 issued by Workers' Liberation League; 1979- by Workers' Party of Jamaica.
General Note: Description based on surrogate of: Issue no. 28 (June 16, 1977); title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Apr.-May 1986 (surrogate).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100337
Volume ID: VID00034
Source Institution: Florida International University: Digital Library of the Caribbean
Holding Location: Florida International University: Digital Library of the Caribbean
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 05378247
lccn - sn 91021299
oclc - 5378247

Full Text






II Oc
S 109
Sept. 8,

1977


OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE WORKERS LIBERATION LEAGUE


Issue No 34


NO TO IMPERIALISM


Demonstration on August 29 organised by WLL started at Marcus Garvey shrine
and stopped first at the offices of Gleaner Co.


Editorial


CARTER AND

SEAGA
WHEN Carter came to power, many people
in the national movement believed that
US imperialism had changed its spots.
Following this advice, the government
adopted a policy of concessions to Cart-
er hoping that this would bring conces-
sions from America in turn, especially
on the economy.
Well, now the fruits of this policy
of concessions to the American imperial-
ists are being reaped. The new plan of
the Carter reg: se to take advantage of
the concession; to swing the country
back onto a rightwing path and to put
Seaga back in power, is out in the open
for all to see.
Unlike the old CIA plan of 1976, this
new plan of Carter's is not based mainly
on violence, though it does not rule out
the CIA as the flour poisoning case in


Rocky Point, Clarendon, makes clear. The
new plan is to take advantage of the wa-
ge freeze, shortages, layoffs, slowdown
in the land reform programme which have
been imposed by the IMF, to push Seaga
and his Women's Freedom Movement forward
to turn the working people against soci-
alism and the government.
Total control of the Gleaner, Star,
Daily News and RJR is a key element in
this plan by the reactionaries. Their
plan is to give maximum publicity to
Seaga and his agitation and demoralize
and confuse the working people.
This plan moved into high gear a few
weeks ago when Andrew Young came to Jam-
aica and held long talks with Seaga whi-
le pretending as if it was Manley he re-
ally came to see.
If this plan works, Manley would go
to Washington on his knees in November,
with Seaga and the Gleaner calling the
tune in Jamaica. Then the imperialists
would really put Manley and the entire
progressive movement under manners. They
would then be able to force the govern-
ment to pressure working people even fu-
rther and to bring back Seaga and compl-
ete big man rule.


This is the plan of Carter, the lover
of "human rights", aided and abetted by
his black face-card.
In this plan, they have been unconsc-
iously helped by Ministers in the gover-
nment who praise the IMF, World Bank and
American imperialism; Ministers who def-
end the big companies when they hoard;
Ministers who attack wage increases for
workers in the same breath as they def-
end price increases for the big man;
Ministers who attack higglers and land
capturing but defend the landgods; Mini-
sters who put the selfish interests of
capitalism before the survival of their
own government and the economic and pol-
itical interests of the working people.
Manley must deal firmly with these
Ministers.
See Page 6

SPECIAL 8-PAGE ISSUE
Imperialist plan
Media workers demonstrate
Seaga uses poor women
Fascism in Chile


































% I -a mW- vm v

IA WORF~RS demonstrate last Monday (August 29).


Workers against



capitalist control


WORKERS in the news
media radio stat-
ions and newspapers
- last week launch-
ed a campaign of
militant struggles
against the efforts
of foreign and loc-
al big men to gain
total control of
the media.
The demonstrati-
or and protest sta-
tements carried out
a resolution passed
at the Annual Gene-
ral Meeting of the
Press Association
of Jamaica on Sund-
ay, August 28. Fol-
lowing is the text
of the resolution:
"Whereas the Ja-
maica Daily News,
the Gleaner and Ra-
dio Jamaica are ow-
ned and controlled
by either multi-na-
tionals or foreign
and local capitali-
sts whose interests
are opposed to tho-
se of the majority
of Jamaican people;
And whereas the
conflict is now be-
ing demonstrated at
the Daily News by
the dismissal of
editor Canute James
who defended the
right of all secti-
ons of the society
to express their
views through that
medium;
And whereas this
conflict is also
[eing demonstrated
*at the G14~her with
an attempt t wrest
it orial C .irlc

trn for t itcr

.ccern for th hrob-


lems of the working columns of that ne- Gleaner has carrleu
people and gave th- wspaper; out a concerted po-
em a voice in the And whereas the CONT'D ON P. 7


C'.N'U J-"S addressing working journalists gathered at the
Da l- Keows on Monda,.


Gleaner says no to


working journalists


LAST week the capi-
talist management
of the Gleaner Co -
Ashenheim, Oliver
Clarke and Hector
Wynter refused to
print articles from
working journalists
Harris Dias and De-
smond Allen.
These journalis-
ts who write in the
column "As I See
It" had done artic-
les speaking out
agaLnst the disiis-
a5 cf Caonute JlasE
and calling for
people's control of
the media.


But the Gleaner ma-
nagement turned do-
wn these articles
while at the same
time printing rig-
ht-wing articles by
Hearne, Perkins,
Dacosta and Stone.

These reactiona-
ry columnists fil-
led the editorial
page of the leaner
during _last wpeet,
attacking J C, API
and all ltho'se who

st rmnority control
of the media.
Yet the Gleaner.


management absolut-
ely refused to let
through even one
article with an op-
posite point of
view.
The working jou-
rnalists have pro-
tested this action
by refusing to wri-
te in the Gleaner's
columns


Out with


IMF $10


law
-^ by Liabert Bsrotn
rHE government has indicated to the tra-
de unions that they will be changing the
rIM $10 law. This care after the 14
trade unions served an eight-day ultima-
tun on the government.
This victory of the trade unions shows
tIat we the working people must organise
and don't uive up and get demoralized
too easily. When the IMF had forced the
$10 law on us many of us workers were
saying "we don't need trade unions any-
more if is only $10 we can get". Others
were saying that if the government had
passed this $10 law we could not do any-
thing but accept it even though we know
it was unfair. Many did not believe
that the unions could change this.

We workers will now be able to get
more than $10 per week pay increase if
we are prepared to struggle against the
capitalist for it. We can get more than
$10 by way of what is called "comparabi-
lity" that is, comparing our wages wi-
th similar categories of workers. We
can also get more than $10 if the Indus-
trial Disputes Tribunal thinks that it
is reasonable for us to receive it.
It therefore boils down to the fact
that so long as the capitalist can pay,
ard the workers and their union are wil-
ling to fight they can get more than $10
increase.
This is what most workers wanted;
however, the big capitalist of the Jama-
ica Manufacturers Association, PSOJ,
Chamber of Commerce, Jamaica Employers
Federation and their other high-up frie-
nds don't want this. These big men will
be stepping up their campaign to prevent
the workers getting more than $10 per
week increase, while pushing up their
price and cost of living. These big men
are the class enemy of the working class
and all poor people.

It is not the capitalist who do the
work in the factory but we the workers.
Production can take place without the
capitalists. However, many workers don-
't believe that we can do without the
capitalist, just as they did not believe
that the government would have to change
the $10 paper. Now they have seen that
the government had to change the $10 as
a result of the unity of the trade unio-
ns.
We the working-class people, if we
want progress, must learn that unity and.
organisation is the way to help us def-
eat the oppressors from IMF, PSOJ. JMA,
etc., who are fighting against us.
We must work for the unity of all tb
people at our workplace against the 4.b
man who is using Seaga to try and fRpi
us into believing that if we don't 4trO-
ggle the capitalist will help us. V t
Seaga, his IMF and PSOJ bosses I"t 4
we will not be fooled
ACTION NOW AGAINST THE IMW. SEGr AND
THE BIG MAN!


Sign up now

WLL petition on media


"-







PLAN


OF IMPERIALISM


WLL Rally, YWCA, Aug. 27, 1977
"We are here tonight as progressive and revolutionary people
who want to see Jamaica go forward against imperialism and
against the big people who have ruled over this country from
the days of slavery up until the present time." (Applause)


"LET US NOT LEAVE HERE TONIGHT WITHOUT
UNDERSTANDING THAT WE ARE UP AGAINST A
PLA.' WE ARE UP AGAINST A PLAN OF IMPE-
RIALISM AND THE BIG PEOPLE."






























































"SINCE DECEMBER, MANY OF US HAVE BECOME
CONFUSED, HAVE BECOME WORRIED AND HAVE
BECOME UPSET BECAUSE THE SAME IMPERIAL-
ISM THAT ;. ORGANISED TO FIGHT AGAINST,
THE SAME CLASS OF BIG PEOPLE WHO WE ORG-
ANISED TO FIGHT AGAINST, THE SAME FORCES
.HICH WE DEFEATED IN DECEMBER OF 1976 -
THESE ARE THE SAME FORCES WHO AT THIS
MOMENT IN OUR COUNTRY ARE NOW COMING
BACK, GETTING STRONGER AND STRONGER,
PRESSURING THE POOR PEOPLE, PRESSURING
THE WORKING PEOPLE." (APPLAUSE)


Workers, students, youth

women demonstrate against

imperialism, Aug. 29, 1977

i "~~. .AND THE INTENTION OF THIS PLAN, THE I5 ?
BEING THE KEY FOUNDATION OF THE PLAN, IS
THAT THE WORKING PEOPLE WILL BECOME DEF-
EATED AND CONFUSED, WILL BECOME DEPRESS-
ED AND WILL BECOME DOWNilARTED, AND TiE
PEOPLE WILL SAY IF TISS IS SOCIALISM WE
iDOl'T CWP'TI IT THAT IS THE INTNTICON."


"SO .e hAVE TO GO IlTO THE SOURCE OF
THIS PRESSURE. WE HAVE TO UNDERSTAND
WHERE IT IS COMING FROM. AND IN LOOKING
AT THAT WE SEE THAT IT IS THE AGREEMENT
WIfHf THE INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND,
SUPPORTED BY THE BIG PEOPLE IN THIS COU-
NTRY, WHICH IS CAUSING GREATER OPPRESSI-
ON ON TEE MASSES AND IT IS JUST A FEW
MONTHS SINCE THE AGREEMENT HAS BEEN SIG-
NED. JUST A FEW MONTHS SINCE TEE AGREE-
MENT HAS BEEN SIGNED AND THE PRESSURE IS
ALIIADY BUILDING UP THE HIGH PRICES
AND TEas Cu ? NBBiBSSfS T4 A4. Of US
*MBB~aB~g~2B-siFE~ierho'-aieBm NIE~fi2 M'i, 11


"IF WE aBS TO .T
ALISM' ANiL' TIE
NA cCts FCT: r;
It'AE ANDT D
OR BEHALF OF Tl
TO TAKE river,
THE HANDS CF 11
PSPiE.. .ITHE DA
NEWS, AND ,RAi
THARE ARE AT RN
AND REPRESENIA2.
ARE ABLE TO RUN










TJ CRUSE *

PR/CC #


~ER AM


1E*l m'S~k mm





IRADII JAMAICA"
%n P- W-_

SPLA'l OF fVPERI-
STEN THE IME
FIVE FORCES TO
THE GOVERINEfNT
9EDIATELY MOVE
OVER AND OUT OF
AND THE BIG
I?, THE DAILY
(APPLAUSE)
T JOURNALISTS
t PEOPLE WHO


"OUR TASK AS PROGRESSIVE PEOPLE WHO WANT
TO SEE OUR COUNTRY GO FORWARD, OUR TASK
TONIGHT AND FROM THIS NIGHT ONWARDS -
ONCE WE UNDERSTAND THEIR PLAN IS TO DO
EVERYTHING IN OUR POWER TO BREAK DOWl
THE PLAN AND TO MASH IT DOVl SO THAT IT
CAN 'T WORK IN OUR COUNTRY BECAUSE IF IT
WORK IN OUR COUNTRY IT GOING TURN THE
WHOLE COUNTRY INTO A BIG PRISON JUST
LIKE IN URUGUAY AT THE PRESENT TIME." '


"YOU CAN'T GO BY WORDS ALONE BECAUSE
WORDS NEVER BRING DOWN ANY SYSTEM YET.
YOU HAVE TO TEST THE CONSCIOUSNESS AND
THE WILLINGNESS OF THE PEOPLE TO TAKE
ACTION IN DEFENCE OF RIGHTS, IN DEFENCE
.O JUSTICE AND AGAINST THE OPPRESSORS
:..iAElArNSSSIG.DOWN ONUS .RIGBT2RNQ W.!'










6




Bauxite and land

by Horace Levy


V I. LENIN


THE FIRST


SOCIALIST STATE

THE 60TH anniversary of the Great Octob-
er Socialist Revolution in Russia will
be coming up shortly.
Comrades should have already studied
the Political Bureau resolution which
was published in the last issue of
struggle, and already begun to implement
it.
In 1895 the Russian revolutionaries
took a most important and historic step.
Led by a great and outstanding fighter
against all forms of oppression and inj-
ustice and for socialism V.I. Lenin -
they formed the League for the Liberati-
on of the Working Class. This organisa-
tion was to lay the foundation for the
Communist Party of the Soviet Union.
Twenty two years later, after a long
and bitter struggle, after many setbacks,
after a defeated revolution in 1905, the
Soviet working class finally triumphed.
The Soviet working class had learnt a
lesson from the French workers who in
1871 made the first serious attempt to
overthrow capitalism. The workers held
power for 72 days before they were turn-
ed back. Their defeat was made easier
because they did not have their own ind-
ependent political party.
This mistake was not made in Russia.
The age-long dream of the oppressed and
exploited people for a better life with-
out fat necked exploiters became a real-
ity in their country.
The October revolution has shown that
corkers do not need capitalists to prov-
ide employment or aSnything or the work-
ing class. It has shown that capitalist
exploitation is the cause of our suffer-
ing and that the working class can only
achieve true liberation and begin to
build a better life after it has swept
uie capitalist class out of government
and established a workers' state.
With the October revolution the hist-
ory of mankind took a turn away from ca-
pitalism and imperialism and towards so-
cialism.
Workers in other countries, inspired
by the Soviet revolution and t~a noble
ideas of Lenin, stepped up the struggle
within the capitalist countries'for soc-
ialism. In Hungary and Germany in 1919
the workers seized power but were soon
bloodily turned back from socialism by
,.the imperialists.
I m nly other eautries, cimunist
parties, the political pilot of the wor
king clas, were formed. In Uruguay al
ile i,1Q,,and Cuba in 19250


SMALL people whose holdings are being
mined for bauxite are not being treated
right by the Jamaica Bauxite Institute
and the bauxite companies.
You can see it down in Mocho, Claren-
don, where two sisters stubbornly held
out, while on every side, feet away from
the trembling walls of- their shack and
privy, Alcoa tractors and tractivators
push away the red earth.


You can hear ab-
fout it from Muriel
Eccles, who has had


o move twice. She
ras given a tempor-
ary place because
the lot offered her
at Rhlmesbury was
not ready. The Pa-
rish Council had
not yet approved it
for subdivision.
The Rhymesbury
land had little to
commend it. Cane
land in earlier
days, it was too
water-logged to ta-
ke soakaway latrin-
es. It rotted Mrs
Eccles' cassava and
ruined other crops.
This was on top of
her loss of oranges
and other produce
at Dawkins where
she was temporarily
sited by Alcoa.
All rights
The Burrell sis-
ters and Muriel Ec-
cles are not isola-
ted cases. Their
experiences are be-
ing told here, not
to challenge the
right of the gover-
nment and the comp-
any to acquire the-
ir land for mining,
but to criticize
the MANNER in which
this is being done.
The Mining Act
gives to the state
all rights to mine-
rals in the ground.
It gives to a baux-
ite company, to wh-
ich government lea-
ses an area like
Mocho, exclusive
"right to enter up-
on the land...to


prospect or mine
...". The landown-
er in that area has
only surface (or
non-mineral) rights
and the right to
compensation for
the surface land.
This is standard
legal practice, de-
signed for the ben-
efit of the nation
as a whole. It
says that no citiz-
en or minority gro-
uping should be ab-
le to stand in the
way of the general
good by refusing to
sell to government
or to its leasee
(the bauxite compa-
ny).

The trouble is
that many small
people in the baux-
ite sectors do NOT
UNDERSTAND this. It
has never been ex-
plained to them in
a way they can gra-
sp. And many of
those who do under-
stand (like Muriel
Eccles), feel still
that injustice is
being done, either
in the negotiation
process, or in the
compensation paid.
Instead of a
.programme of syste-
matic public educa-
tion and subsequent
firm action, many
of the officials
involved in land
acquisition resort
to all kinds of
roundabout devices
for removing "hold-
outs" .
Land is "pushed"


EDITORIAL
From P.1
But Carter's scheme is not working
out as simply as he Flanned. Wide sect-
iors of progressive people, democrats,
socialists, workers, journalists, women,
trade unions and communists have counte-
r-attacked in the press, radio and TV,
by successfully challenging the $10 law
and by an energetic series of meetings
and demonstrations.
Already these actions have hurt the
imperialists and the big man and streng-
thened socialism and the govei'rTsnt. But
imperialism and the big man have not yet
been defeated and are counter-attacking


for example, bull-
dozed that is, whi-
le the owner is aw-
ay in another pari-
sh attending a fun-
eral or consulting
her lawyer. Spies
are used. Petty
local feuds are ex-
ploited. Small
wonder that bauxite
company officials
are so roundly hat-


many cases one is
dealing with an el
derly woman or mal
or couple, accuse
med to hillside 11.
ving, counting on
established fruit
trees to buttress
last years. How de
you deal with such
and similar prob-
lems?
It is not enough


ed. simply to come acr
It is part of oss with the money
the problem that value of the land
bauxite company men and crops 5,000,
are still in prac- 10,000 or 20,000
tice doing the land dollars or whatev-
acquisition, but er, without regard
doing now on behalf to how it may be
of and in the name used or squander
of the Jamaica Bau- ed. It is not eno
xite Institute, ugh to offer anoth
which is now techn- er piece of ground
ically and legally anywhere.
responsible. Human beings de
Not Enough serve better treat
Or again, inste- ment than that.
ad of the governme- The Government
nt providing legal of Jamaica has ent
assistance in the ered into partner-
negotiations to se- ship with nearly
ttle the level and all the bauxite an
kind of compensati- alumina companies
on, the Bauxite In- in the island. II
stitute and company has obtained cons:
make generous use derable revenue b
of the legal advan- imposing an addit
tage they naturally onal levy in 1974
have over a peasant That these steps
with little acquai- are really for the
ntance with the law people of the cou
and little money to try must be demon
pay a lawyer. strated in the to
Providing compe- atment accorded
nsation is perhaps pecially to those
the thorniest task. citizens forced
For what is called vacate their lan
for is not so much so that it can
compensation as re- minede
habilitation. In


"SC WHEN WE SAY THAT THE TIME HAS C
FOR THE GOVERNMENT TO TAKE THE LAND
THE LANDGODS AND GIVE IT TO THE PEOP
5RC-HERS :;D SISTERS, IS NC IF, AN'
N' -':T, :' 7S NC iAYbEE... WE CEMAND
THEY -UIT T H -' THE LAND FR T LAND
G-D AND GIVE IT TO THE PEOPLEg'


-:e eaener, Star and iRJR.
:otir. could be more harmful to th
rcvgressive forces now than complacent
An even greater effort is required.
ever bigger campaign of meetings, mf
es, TV and radio programmes, ideologil
and political activities, marches and
meetings again, on and on and on unti
reaction and imperialism is defeated
must be undertaken.
This is no easy, short, swift bat
comrades. This is a long, drawn-out.
struggle between progressive forces
want to see the country go forward e
the imperialists and the local big
who ';;nt to drag us backways into sl
rye


j


'1
!










1

t
i

i


I
I-


t
w












leaga use


poor women

Rupert Walters

GA and defeated politician Princess
es have been organising a clique of
er-class women who stir up the people
the supermarkets to blame the shorta-
on socialism. They have drawn into
clique some poor women from Rema and
voli.
The Women's Freedom Movement which
as formed by these reactionary women

city and the other in Montego Bay.
y also had a meeting at State theatre.
At this meeting Seaga said that the
ernment is going to ration food items.
t every working man and woman knows
t food has always been rationed to
r people, because workers do not have
Money to buy basic food items which
Family needs to keep healthy.
Some families can only buy meat and
rish once every two months while Seaga
id the upper-class section of these wo-
I who protest against food shortage
n stock up their cupboards with many
veks supplies of groceries that the wo-
OIing people produce.
They are able to feed their dogs with
tilk, fish and meat every single day,
wlile our kids and elders search the
rubbish to find food to eat and suffer
from malnutrition.
Rema Galloway who is president of
this clique is calling on Jamaican women
to free themselves "from exploitation by
imperialists who sought to recolonize us
in the name of socialism".
How long now have capitalists been
sing words like exploitation and imper-
ialism? It is only because they realize
that the masses are understanding and

Chile and Uruguay


ALL progressive people in Jamaica conde-
in the crimes of American imperialism in
.Chile and Uruguay. Four years ago on
ISeptember ii, 1973, and June 27, 1973,
American imperialism backed local react-
ionaries to overthrow the governments of
these two Latin American countries.
In Chile 15,000 As late as 1976
patriots from all US agencies paid
valks of life were $357 million to
lled and thousa- Pinochet.
s imprisoned by In an interview
inochet. The US with Struggle ear-
acked inochet, lier this year,
giving him the mo- Comrade Luis Corva-
y they withheld, lan, General Secre-
om Allende'. tary of the Commun-
in


really feeling imperialism and exploita-
tion. So they try to use words like ex-
ploitation and imperialists to confuse
the people while defending the capitali-
sts.
Seaga and his reactionaries have not
demonstrated against capitalist hoarding
like at Seprod. Far from this their re-
al intentions slipped out when Adassa
Rowe demanded that the JPSCo be given
back to the capitalists.


not want what had
happened in Chile
to be repeated in
Uruguay.
American imperi-
alism was afraid of
the growing streng-
th of the progres-
sive movement.
He said that to-
day in Uruguay whi-
ch has a population
the size of Jamaica
there are 6000 pol-
itical prisoners
and 50,000 people
have served prison
sentences. 600,000
people have had to
leave the country
to live in exile or
seek jobs.
The Jamaica Uni-
on of Tertiary Stu-
dents has condemned
fascism in uruguay
and called on Prime
Minister Manley to
break all diplomat-
ic and trading rel-
ations with Uruguay
and seek the relea-
se of student lead-
ers who are no in
prison.


ist Party of Chile
who was imprisoned
for three years by
Pinochet, appealed
to the Jamaican
people to protest
against the Pinoch-
et regime.
Dr Manuel Gonza-
lez, a member of
the Uruguayan Comm-
unist Party who
spoke to StruggZl
recently said that
the US backed the
coup in June 1973
because they did


Media workers


From P.2

licy to ensure the
dominance of comme-
ntators reflecting
the views of minor-
ity interests and
who are hostile to
the advancement of
poor people in the
country;

And whereas gov-
ernment has not yet
given effect to its
declared intention
to take RJR out of
the hands of forei-
gn capitalists and
place it into the
hands of local
people-based orga-
nisations;
Be it resolved
that this annual
general meeting of
the Press Associat-
ion of Jamaica de-
clares its firm co-
mmitment to active-
ly struggle to bri-
ng an end to capit-
alist control of t
the media; to intr-
oduce true democra-
cy to the function-
ing of the media
and enhance the pr-
ofessional respect
of journalists.
Be it further
resolved that the
PAJ condemns the
action of the Chief
Executive and Board


of the Jamaica Dai-
ly News in dismis-
sing editor Canute
James and demands
his immediate rein-
statement.
The PAJ calls on
its members and all
media workers to
demonstrate public-
ly from tomorrow,
August 29, our sta-
nd against minority
and undemocratic
control of the med-
ia as shown by Mr
James' dismissal,
the attempts to
wrest editorial
control of the Star
from Mrs Barbara
Gloudon and the ap-
parent foot-draggi-
ng over the people-
's ownership of
RJR, the net effect
of which is to con-
tinue to deprive
the public of the
widest spectrum of
views.
Finally, the PAJ
calls on government
to ensure at once
that through chang-
es in the ownership
structure of the
Gleaner Co. Ltd.,
the Jamaica Daily
News and RJR, that
working journalists
and represenctcives
of peoples Orgi-
sations be plac
in control."


S-BACKED FASCISM


FalsuJNERt at Fesagua concenrrarton camp in Lnz&e.


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PNIP Mass RaIly Support for, Ponam

* New Coconut Board *People control of RJR *People cheer criticism of Gleaner


PRID :.'IISTER JLIEY amounced government takeover of Radio Jamaia, at a mFssd t f
ra!Z& on Soundy (September 4), Nationa Heroes Park. The Prime Minister ao F ard to full socialist
Said that government would seek majority representation on the Coconut I st


Board which controls Seprod. .
_


ST- WILLIAM GRANT


A fighi
1 a


tor tne


people
ST WILLIAM GrANT, one of the outstanding
leaders of the 1938 vqrking-class strug-
gles, died on August 27.
St William Grant was one of those who
came out of the Garvey movement and laid
the foundation for the trade union move-
ment in the 1930s. He is especially re-
membered for the role he played in arou-
sing the people in marches, demonstrati-
ons, rallies and political meetings. St
William Grant was imprisoned, beaten up
and harassed because of this political
work.
The striking workers first came to St
William Grant for leadership because he
was the man who spoke for them in the
streets of Kingston. When the people
came to Grant in 1938 he told them to
support Bustamante because he felt that
with Busta's help an islandwide labour
movement could be built up.
Grant had no money and no car to do
organising work. Busta had money and a


Look out for WLL

political education

course

WHAT IS COMMUNISM?
Starting soon


Solidarity rally with
the Chilean people against
fascism YWCA Auditorium,
Arnold Rd. & Camp Rd.
Friday, Sept. 9 -- 6.30 p.m.
Special guest: Beotriz Allende


car and used this to help in organisao
the workers. Grant therefore carried
Bustamante to the masses and Bustamant:
inherited Grant's popularity.
However, instead of Bustar.ante beea
ing Granw's Cnief Lieutenant, Grant be
ame Busta .ante's Chief Lieutenant.
After Pustamante made a deal with
Governor Richards and the bia man that
he would fight only for a little bread
and not fcr the whole bread he turned
against Grant and many other "grassrOi
leaders. This deal with the big man I
Bustamante to actively oppose the stru
gle against imperialism and use the po
ular support he had to divide the work
ng people in the face of a united en
Grant could have gone along with
tamante. But Grant said "Nc ". This
was not what he had worked and fought
for. Many times he was beaten up.
now only by the colonial police but
Busta's own supporters. But Grant
sed to mobilize the people behind
mante after he made the deal With
big man.
For the rest of his life Grant lil
in poverty. From 1950 until his dea
he worked as a watchman at the Minis
of Housing. At the time of his death
was earning a small $36.80 per week. '
We salute the memory of St William
Grant because he put the interest of,
people before himself. .From his lih
know that no trade union or political
party can be based on one-man rule a
this will always lead to sell-out tot0
big man and imperialism.


Visit WLL office

2B Marescaux Rd

opp. Wolmer's Giru

School, Kingston.i
Tel. 92-21350


printd by CoammWnittiiCWC.rWatom o9 J-ni L-t, Half Way Tre Ro.d, Kingstoa W.


- --


" rl i Co mnctos"'l't~ IJmi4L4. I llfW yT ~41 illl I




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