Group Title: Struggle (Kingston, Jamaica)
Title: Struggle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100337/00007
 Material Information
Title: Struggle official organ of the Workers Liberation League
Uniform Title: Struggle (Kingston, Jamaica)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 41 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Workers' Liberation League (Jamaica)
Workers' Liberation League (Jamaica)
Workers Party of Jamaica
Publisher: The League
Place of Publication: Kingston
Kingston
Publication Date: August 19, 1976
Frequency: bimonthly[mar.-apr. 1986-]
biweekly[ former -july 13, 1984]
monthly[ former aug. 1984-feb. 1986]
bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Labor movement -- Periodicals -- Jamaica   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Jamaica   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Jamaica
 Notes
Abstract: Struggle was published first as a mimeographed newsletter in 1974 when the Workers Liberation League was formed. It was edited by Rupert Lewis and he continued as editor when Struggle became the organ of the Workers Party of Jamaica in 1978. In the 1980s editors included Elean Thomas, Elaine Wallace and Ben Brodie. The Workers Liberation League grew out of the political initiative of academics - Trevor Munroe, Rupert Lewis as well as Don Robotham, Derek Gordon who studied in the University of Chicago in the early 1970s and were connected to activists in the Black Panther Movement and African-American radicals in the Communist Party of the United States. The latter group formed the Paul Bogle League which brought together academics, working class and community activists who read and discussed Karl Marx’s Capital and Lenin’s political writings and sought to build on Jamaica’s radical traditions in the trade union movement and in the People’s National Party from the 1930s to the 1960s. The Paul Bogle League was also involved with the formation of the University and Allied Workers Union in the early 1970s and worked with the Independent Trade Union Action Council. Politically the Workers Liberation League gave critical support to Michael Manley’s democratic socialist program in the 1970s.
Issuing Body: Vols. for -1978 issued by Workers' Liberation League; 1979- by Workers' Party of Jamaica.
General Note: Description based on surrogate of: Issue no. 28 (June 16, 1977); title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Apr.-May 1986 (surrogate).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100337
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: Florida International University: Digital Library of the Caribbean
Holding Location: Florida International University: Digital Library of the Caribbean
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 05378247
lccn - sn 91021299
oclc - 5378247

Full Text















O ffCIAl 1RGN Of TIHE WORKERS IlBERAMIO IflAUI


FIGHT LAY-
WORKERS of WEST IN- have been waging a The workers report for a soft drink
DIES GLASS CO in bitter struggle ag- that over the past bottle when only a
Industrial Estate ainst lay-offs. three weeks, more year ago, it was
IIORIA than 300 workers 2$.
f thnf IA have been laid off MILLIONS

DONALD QUARRIE by the manage t The owners ot Des-
noesTHIA an ooos r


DONALD QUARRIE, our Olympic Gold and
Silver medallist in the 200 and 100 me-
tres at the recent Olympics, received a
hero's welcome on his return home.

Now, a school in Harbour View has been
named in his honour, and a committee has
been set up to find other ways to honour
him.

We believe that Quarrie would be more
honoured, and the nation better served,
by a new and determined effort to expand
and improve our recreational and sports
programme for the hundreds of thousands
of youth at present unable to enjoy de-
cent recreation.

There are many youth clubs in this coun-
try at the present time where the youth
cannot even find a bat to play cricket,
where a bat, football boots and gear are
hard to come by. There are few properly
maintained sports fields and even fewer
coaches and trainers.

It is little use telling youth about the
fine qualities of Donald Quarrie his
discipline, perseverance and talent if
they cannot find the means to copy these
qualities and to achieve their best.
And this is where we can learn the les-
son of the Olympics.

At the Olympic Games the socialist coun-
tries such as Cuba, the GDR (East Ger-
many) and the Soviet Union were able to
demonstrate to all the peoples of the
world what can be achieved by a social
system which puts people first; which
lavishes care on young and old alike,
giving them all the necessary recreation-
al facilities to develop their fullest
potential.

The Olympics demonstrated that capital-
ism is a dying social system. When
matched against countries which put
their people first, the USA, which has
commercialized every human activity in-
cluding sports and recreation, is no
longer able to hide the fact that the
recreational needs and potential of the
majority of its people are sadly neglec-
ted and ignored.

* = like all other newspapers, is
restricted by ReguZation 15 in the Emer-
ationas which states: '"o per-
Spublish either oaZZy or in
ia repoartor statement (whether
A4we) which is intended or is
sj*to 4elieLyt ie
Rapet tQq0pst~ja


I~^Wb^tt K~los p t


The management
claims that they
have laid off these
workers because
their sales have
fallen. The work-
ers do not believe
this argument as
WEST INDIES GLASS
makes most of the
bottles used in
Jamaica from per-
fume bottles to
soft drink bottles.

This company has
already made mil-
lions out of its
workers and Jamai-
can consumers. We
now have to pay 5


noes and eddaes are
also the main own-
ers of WEST INDIES
GLASS. D & G is
one of the most
profitable compan-
ies in Jamaica.
The workers are de-
manding that the
company hand over
its accounting
books so that they
and the public can
see for themselves
whether the manage-
ment's claim is
true.

They have made many
trips to their Uni-
on office, the


NEW LEADER


The leadership of
the Press Associa-
tion of Jamaica
have long been a
partner to reac-
tion. They have
encouraged and
praised those jour-
nalists who have
stood for the top
clique in the coun-
try and the world
and against our
people.
But the sincere and
patriotic journal-
ists have said this
sort of thing must
end. They have
| been moving to take
their association
out of this part-
nership with reac-
tion.
PSOJ
At the Annual Gen-
eral Meeting of the
Association on Aug-
ust 9, a Resolution
was passed demanding
that the Associa-
tion seperate it-
self completely
from the alliance
of US imperialists
and local big capi-
talists organised
in the Private Sec-
tor Organisation of
Jamaica (PSOJ).


Only one member,
secretary Ken Chap-
lin, of the old
Executive was re-
turned on the
slim margin of two
votes.
LEADERSHIP
President is Canute
James (Daily News),
First Vice Presid-
ent Ben Brodie,
President of the
Union of Journalists
and Allied Employ-
ees (UJAE). Second
Vice President
George Lee (API),


OFFS
BITU, but to no the fact that the
avail, government has
made over $20 mil-
lion available to
The workers should the industrial
demand that their the industrial
capitalists and
union have meetings another $21 mill-
with all of them on to the building
so that they can industry capital-
air their views ists.
and decide howtheir Workers should un-
struggle should be ite to stop this
waged, action. They can
WORKERS issue joint peti-
The struggle of tions to the Prime
WEST INDIES GLASS Minister; call for
workers against government take-
lay-offs is also ver of the compan-
the struggle of ies to stop this
many other workers sabotage against
in Jamaica today. the country and its
Workers are being people; call for
laid off daily by harsh penalties for
the capitalists on capitalists who
the excuse of less carry out actions
sales or cutbacks like lay-offs or
in production. draining money
This is despite which the working
people made for
SHIPthem by their blood
and sweat out of
the country.


pressure on the
government not to
support the demo-
cratic demands of
Third World coun-
tries for media
owned by them and
representing the
interests of the
majority of their
peoples.

The Jamaican jour-
nalists under their
new leadership have
many struggles
ahead to defeat
these plans.


Assistant Secretary
Elaine "Molly" Wal-
lace (API), Treasu-
rer Bill Haughton
(API), Executive
Members Patrick
Smikle, editor of
the sugar workers'
paper "Workers
Time", Terry Smith
(Daily News), Er-
rol Lee (JBC),
Fitzroy Nation
(UJAE) .
PLANS
As to the reac-
tionaries, they are
now trying to put


FOR PRESS ASSOCIATION


I






Page 2














IT WAS successful,
it show the talent
of Caribbean bro-
thers and sisters
and how great it
is when we get to-
gether as one. I
hope when it occur
in other country
it will even be
more enjoyable.
20 Year Old Cle-
rical Worker



CARIFESTA has made
Independence one
of the best I ever
enjoy, because one
could go to Grand
Market and see the
culture of our
neighbour country,
seeing them per-
form and then
Grand Gala which
was magnificient.
19 Year Old Stu-
dent



CARIFESTA has tru-
ly bring the heart
of the Caribbean
together, knowing
that people from
the Caribbean was
going to Asia,
Europe and forget-
ting ourself. So
with art and cul-
ture we have been
a lot within our-
self, and hoping
we will proceed
more successful
from here. 30
Year Old Worker


U.A.W.U. WORKERS SI



UNDER SOCIAIlSM.
"WE had heard that Bro. Fairclough, tric hospitals. We
communism is a hea- Nutrition Hold- saw no cripple peo-
vier form of slav- ings and Bro. ple, no dirty peo-
ery than what we Marshall, Priory. ple and no mad peo-
had experienced in ple in the streets."
Jamaica; that there
was no freedom like On education, they
we have in Jamaica, said "every child
very little to eat, has to attend
money was limit- school and they are
money was limit building more
ed... schools for when

"We had believed the population gets
these things about bigger. Big people
Cuba. But we know also attend school.
now that they are We saw one factory
all lies." Sis. ituriel Johnson where, in the fac-
tory itself, there
These are the views Speaking about is a classroom, a
of a group of Jam- S kinmicrophone system,
aican workers who visit itself, the blackboard and oth-
visited Cuba from workers said they er material to help
July 29 to August saw the living and the workers learn
6. working conditions to read and write
of the people. "We .. and the educa-
The workers are all went many places tion teaches about
attached to the and were allowed production as well
UAWU. In all 11 free time to go in- as politics."
2AWO.In al 11e -


agricultural ser-
vice and production
workers from 4
plants plus one
Union officer visi-
ted Cuba. The
group was led by
Sister Muriel John-
son, General Secre-
tary of the UAWU.
The other workers
ranging in age
from 22- 55 were:-
Bro. Brimmo, Main-
tenance Dept. UWI;
Sis. N. Bennett,
Zoo Dept., Minis-
try of Agriculture;
Sis. Inez Morgan,
Sis. Daley, Bro.
Burke, Sis. Nemb-
hard and Sis. Hen-
dricks, Agronomy
Dept., Hope; Bro.
Jackson and Bro.
Samuels, Bodies;


to nomes, snops and
for recreation."
EDUCATION
The workers were
greatly impressed
by what they saw.
"The most striking
thing about the
country, its people
and their work is
the manner in which
the Revolutionary
Government takes
care of its people,
particularly its
children. Educa-
tion is free, heal-
th is free. Every-
thing just nice.

"For every 300 peo-
ple in a community
there are mini-
hospitals with an
ambulance stationed
there for 24 hours.
There are also mat-
ernity and psychia-


REST
About public ti
portation, the
said "fantastic
very fantastic.
Five cents car
you anywhere fc
any period of t
The buses are c
no pushing".
also said "the
ing conditions
very good. The
house that the
ple get over th
is far better
what we workers
have out here
have to pay so
for". The work
said that they
no crime "Any
hours of night
want to walk yo
can walk and yo
don't have to f
the gunman."


rans-
y
c,

ry
or
imne.
:lean,
'hey
liv-
are

peo-
lere
than

md
much
:ers
saw

you
eu
eu
ear


CARIFESTA: Plans of reaction to sabotage the CARIFESTA cele-
brations were beaten back. And after a slow start and low
involvement of the working people, things became better.
Thousands came to the Grand Gala and took part in street dan-
ces. This was helped by the cut in the Grand Gala price to
500. Photo shows scene from Grand Gala.


I lIFE





The workers were
surprised at how
well-off Cuban wor-
kers were. About
this they said:
"Every year each
worker has one
month vacation and
one week must be
what they call fm
'complete rest'.
The worker and his
family go to work-
ers resorts where
there are hotels,
beaches, cinemas,
and night clubs,
for one week for
this complete rest.'

DIGNITY
Speaking about ra-
tioning, the work-
ers said "some
things are rationed
so that some people
don't have more
than others. The
people are happy
with it because
everybody has en-
ough". One worker
said that in Cuba
"discipline is more
than tongue can
tell" and that she
wants everybody to
know that she went
to church while she
was there.
The workers came to
the conclusion:
"Life under a soci-
alist system is
what every human
being should strive
for. It gives dig-
nity, purpose, co-
operation and dis-
cipline. We all as
workers in Jamaica
should try and
reach the goal that
the Cuban people
have reached."


mamma


OF

BAUXITE

In Guinea, Africa,
they get a fair
return for their
bauxite, because
the sekou Toure
government con-
trols the bauxite
industry and trad-
es with the socia-
list countries
which supply mac-
hinery, food and
other things at
low prices.

Manley says
he is against for-
eign control of a
our bauxite. State-
ments and a baux-
ite levy are not
enough.


PARISH

COUNCIL

CALLS FOR

NAIONALZAIIN
The Manchester Par-
ish Council has m
called on the gov-
ernment to "move
fast" in nationali-
zing the bauxite
companies operating
in Jamaica. Both
PNP and JLP Counci-
llors were united
in their demand.

This demand was
spurred by the lat-
est move by ALCAN.
The company demand-
ed that the council
pay 60 per 11,000
gallons of water to
be distributed to
citizens of drought-
stricken Manchester.

The Council charged
the companies with
sabotage against
the country and the
government and cal-
led their action
"wicked and dread-
ful". Mayor Charl-
ton of Mandeville
stated that the AL-
CAN "has now shown
up their true col-
ours" and JLP
Councillor Hall
stated that "the
government should
force ALCAN to give
water free to the
people of Manches-
ter".

This call by the
Parish Council is
the latest in wide-
spread demands by
growing sections of
the Jamaican people
that our most valu-
able resource, baux-
ite, be nationalis-
d. This is the
only way this re-
source can be used
for the betterment
of our people.

Up until 1973 Jam-
aica received less
than 1I% of the va-
lue of the alumini-
um produced by our
bauxite. Out of
$540 per ton we re-
ceived $7.70. Since
the bauxite levy we
are receiving only
$40.50 out of the
$540. Yet, some
companies have tak-
en the government
to court.


These companies
own 200,000 acres
of Jamaica's best
land, while people
can't get land to
grow food and
while we have to
import dearer and
dearer food.


,ir. 4:- ^ gj - Zak

IAift*i --------- . t..*a ^^


,


ii


I







Page 3





20,000 march on

wOrld affairs Johannesburg. J


yER the past weeks the struggle of the
gsth African people against racist op-
ression and for freedom has taken a de-
isive step forward.

rom Soweto, the Black township on the
mtskirts of Johannesburg, over 20,000
qfricans staged a march on Johannesburg
last week. The marchers, singing the
Black African Anthem and chanting free-
ac sounds, demanded the release of the
earlier arrested students. Not only in
Sweto were Blacks on the move, but in
te neighbouring towns of Tambisa, Alex-
mdria, East Rand, Katlehong, Germiston,
mi in Johannesburg itself large demon-
strations were held. Progressive whites
also protested against the racist re-
gine. Eight hundred white students from
tB University of Cape Town were arrest-
ed by police as they marched towards the
BEck townships in a demonstration of
.aport. All the demonstrations have
been met with the most brutal repression
by the police. Over 45 people have been
illed and a significant number arrest-
ed.

RACIST MURDERS
le earlier demonstrations of June were
spear-headed by Black students, protest-
ing the intended use of the colonialist
Africaans language in the township
schools. The South African Police mur-
dered over 176 of the protesting Africans
ad arrested a number of students during
the demonstrations, hoping that such
brutal action would quiet the AFricans.
But since the beginning of August the
Africans have again taken to the streets


- rm ul t


MILITANT blacks march on Johannesburg


in a much more organized manner.

The demonstrations are a direct result
of the oppressive policy of apartheid
and its mother, imperialism, that allows
just over three million whites to live
off the labour of over sixteen million
Africans. This policy forces Africans
to be strangers in their own land
through enforced settlement in black
homelands that account for 13% of the
total land space of South Africa. The
other 87% of the land is owned by the
white minority, and subjects Africans to
conditions like the slavery our fore-
fathers were subjected to.
HEROIC STRUGGLES
The myth of the "quiet and docile" Afri-
cans has also been destroyed by the dem-
onstrations, proving that the oppression
and torture that the Africans have been
subjected to cannot stifle their just


and heroic struggles.


United States imeprialism and its allies
along with South African racists bear a
direct responsibility for the plight of
our African brothers. Going against
world public opinion, the US imperial-
ists continue to arm the South African
Police, help with recruiting of mercena-
ries into their army, and promote com-
mercial trade. In addition to being a
long time supplier of arms to the racist
regime, the Zionist leadership of Israel
has announced that it is now building
two gunboats for South Africa.

The struggles of the South African peo-
ple, and indeed the struggles of all op-
pressed people of the world is therefore
not only against a local enemy but aga-
inst US imperialism and the forces of
world reaction.


Hermitage cultural days


ON JULY 24 and 25
the Hermitage Com-
munity held its 3rd
annual cultural day.
This third cultural
day, which was ded-
icated to CARIFESTA
'76, was definitely
the best the commun-
ity had put on so
far.

On Saturday, July
24, the sports sec-
tion of the activi-
ties was opened by
Mr Ward Mills after
the participants
paraded through the
community. On Sun-

ANGOLA
AS IS becoming
clearer to the maj-
ority of Jamaican
people, the imperi-
alists and their
friends never let
up in their efforts
to crush and stamp
out completely the
progressive move-
ment of the world's
oppressed peoples
towards socialism.

Having been soundly
thrashed on the mi-
litary front by the
Angolan people with


day Mr Rex Nettle-
ford declared open
an exhibition of
paintings and draw-
ings which showed a
great deal of prom-
ise.

Later on Sunday Mrs
Beverley Manley in
declaring open the
variety concert em-
phasized the role
of unity and orga-
nisation in the
community in the
struggle against
imperialist domina-
tion
The entire commun-


ity was united in
this cultural day.
The age of partici-
pants ranged from 5
to 70 years. Cul-
tural day once
again demonstrated
the abundance of
talent which exists
among the poor.
This is being stif-
led by imperialist
domination which
results in a lack
of adequate facili-
ties for our people
to develop their
creative abilities.


VANKS IMPERIALISM

the leadership of action.
the MPIA and with
fraternal assistan- A report from


ce from the Cuban
comrades and the
rest of the world
communist movement
- the imperialists
have now steped up
their sabotage of
that African coun-
try.


And once more, the
Maoists have joined
ranks with the im-
perialists in this


Prensa Latina sets
out the details.

Comrade LUCIO IARA,
Secretary of the
MPLA Political Bur-
eau has disclosed
that the imperial-
ists anditheir fri-
ends are trying to
carry out sabotage
in Angola. They
have been trying to

CONTD ON P4

















do the


workers



need the







capitalist



(F IAL A E-F.ZEI EIES)

MANY workers still do not have the time
or the interest to think about whether
we need the capitalist or not. The only
interest of these workers is in getting
more pay. They believe that if they can
get more money from the capitalist or
from management then most of their prob-
lems will be solved.

One reason why so many workers have this
belief is that the workers' pay is very
small so small that sometimes the pay
is finished before the worker even gets
it. Rent has to come out of it, bus
fare, food, and furniture bill. Most
workers don't even see what they are
working for. And so it is understand-
able that so many workers believe that
if they could get more money then things
would be all right.

But this is still a wrong idea. Even
though it is a must in the capitalist
system for the workers to fight to im-
prove their conditions it is never
enough to fight only for more wages.

Why is this so? Because no matter how
high the wages the worker gets, he re-


office all the tine while the workers do
Sdirty work.

BY PRGHT THE CAPITALIST SHOULD GET NO-
THING BECAUSE HE IS DOING NOTHING. BUT
UNDER THE CAPITALIST SYSTEM, THE CAPITA-
LIST NOT ONLY GETS SOMETHING BUT HE POC-
KETS THE LION'S SHARE OF THE MONEY WHICH
COMES FROM" THIE WORKERS' PRODUCTION. SO
THAT FRGARDLESS OF HOW HIGH PHE WORKERS'
WAGES THE CAPITALIST IS ALWAYS GETTING
SOMETHING FOR NOTHING. WHETHER HIS PRO-
FIT IS HIGH OR LOW THE CAPITALIST IS
GETTING SOMETHING FOR WHICH HE DID NOT
WORK. IT IS THE CAPITALIST'S OWNERSHIP
OF THE FACTORIES WHICH ALLOWS HIM TO
STEAL THE WORKERS' PRODUCTION. SO LONG
AS THE CAPITALISTS OWN THE FACTORIES IT
IS REALLY THE WORKERS WHO ARE IN FACT
PAYING THE CAPITALIST AND NOT THE CAPI-
TALIST WHO IS PAYING THE WORKER.

This is what is meant by exploitation.
This condition cannot chance so long as
the capitalists own and control the fac-
tories. This is why workers can never
cet rid of exploitation so long as the
capitalist class, the class of people
who do not -rk, are the t ones who are in
charge of production. The worker who is
only interested in getting more money is
helping the capitalist to keep the han-
dle while the workers hold the blade.
The worker who is not interested in whe-
ther the capitalists continue to own the
factories or not still does not know
himself and is really a back-up for the
ca italists. This worker needs to learn
tiat regardless of the wage, the capita-
list is still stealing some of his pro-
duction from him. And it is these ill-
gctten gains which the capitalist uses
every day to keep down the worker.

Without these ill-gotten gains, without
this money stolen from the workers, how
could the capitalist have any power to
make government serve them, to bribe the
high officials and to buy out the poli-
ticians? Could the capitalists have the
power to print so much propaganda ag-
ainst workers and to write so many books
which try to pretty up the system of
capialist oppression and tool the youths?
Could the capitalists have the power to
bring down "the law" against the workers
whenever the struggle really begins to
get serious?


mains exploited so long as the capital-
ist or his agent is the one who owns the without this power which comes from own-
factory, the farm or the business. The ing the factories and controlling produc-
reason for this is that everything that tion, the high and mighty capitalist
the factory produces comes from the wor- would just be like any other man he
kers' labour. The tools or the machines would have to work in order to eat; he
could do nothing without the labour of would have to follow the majority in-
the workers. No capitalist, however big stead of going against the majority
and powerful, can bring about production whenever it suits him.
or keep it going without workers. The
workers every day do the work, produce Eut this can never come about so long as
the goods and the services, workers fail to realise that looking out
for more pay alone, regardless of how
What does the capitalist do? Nothing at much we achieve, leaves the capitalist
all! Most of the biggest capitalists with the ownership of the factories,
the bauxite capitalists and the bank with the power to steal the workers'
capitalists don't even live in Jam- production and to run the country for
aica; others may pass through the busi- the benefit of the capitalists.
ness for one or two hours, two or three
days a week. The smaller capitalists TREVOSR AMJROE
may actually come to the business every GEL'ERAL SECRTA4RY
day but stay in their air-conditioned W.L.L.



ANGOLA... (CON FROM PAGE)


destroy bridges and
use all sorts of
means to frighten
the workers, so
they can turn the
working people from
their task of re-
building their
country along soci-
alist lines.


Comrade Jara also
disclosed that some
materials made in
China and used to
carry out sabotage
were captured in a
number of coffee
zones in Angola.

But the people of
Angola and their


government, the
MPLA, are moving
forward firmly.
Their country is
advancing with the
help of highly ski-
lled technicians
from the socialist
countries, particu-
larly Cuba and the
Soviet Union.


As comrade Lara
said:

"We are continuing
along the correct
path, the path of
internationalist
solidarity, streng-
thening our revolu-
tion and angering
our enemies."


STS'iGLE welcomes the fraternal visit
e3raiia of Comrades A)'TAVCo HART, RAPEt
Fe ALIXDA and MIGUEL CAnO1 from the Pe.
'ae's Republic of Cuba. Comrade Hart,
vwo is the leader of the delegation, ii,
a "ebeBr of the Politbureau of the Cor;
-="ist Party of Cuba. He is also the
Party 's First Secretary for Oriente PFi
:)`,'e. Comrade Almeida is Chancellor'
the University of Oriente and comrade
a-;o "-*js a member of the Central Comnil.
tee -f the Party. All the comrades lhe
over many years been involved in the
sti-.tgle against imperialism and the
iuYlring of socialism in Cuba. Here
corrade Hart (right) is met at Norman'
ar:1ly airport or. Thursday, August 12,
i the Cuboan Ambassador, Comrade Ramo.
]Z eqo.


TDJTA SAYS:


don't divide


the teachers


THE Teachers for a
Democratic J'PA
(TDJTA) has called
on the Secretary-
General of the Jam-
aica Teachers' As-
sociation, Mrs Fay
Saunders, to stop
dividing the teach-
ing profession at
this time of nation-
al crisis by lift-
ing the suspension
orders on eight
teachers who are
members of the
TDJTA and active
members of the JTA.

The teachers, who
have so far gotten
suspension letters
are: John Haughton,
Secretary TDJTA,
Joan French, presi-
dent West St Andrew
District Associa-
tion (DA), Paulette
Chevannes, Execu-
tive member, West
Kingston DA, Antho-
ny Perry Vice-Pre-
sident, West St
Andrew DA, Rudyard
Brown, President
South West St An-
drew DA, Herman
McFarlane, Presi-
dent North Central
Kingston DA, Wesley
Van Riel Executiye
member, East St.
Andrew BA. and


Harry Jackson,
Vice-President West
Kingston DA.

These teachers, as
well as being ac-
tive members of the
JTA, are also some
of the hardest
fighters for teach-
ers' rights and thi
improvement of the
education system
for the benefit of
all our people.

The TDJTA said tha;
at this time, all
Jamaicans who real-
ly love their coun-
try need to come
together to defend
the nation from
foreign interfer-
ence and local con-
spiracy. This was
certainly not the
time to be moving
in such a way to
divide the teachers

"We therefore urge
Mrs Fay Saunders ic
her capacity as
Secretary-General
to lift the suspen-
sions against the
teachers and place
on record her comm-
mittment to a unit-
ed teaching profes-
sion", the 'LJTA
says.


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