Group Title: Struggle (Kingston, Jamaica)
Title: Struggle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100337/00005
 Material Information
Title: Struggle official organ of the Workers Liberation League
Uniform Title: Struggle (Kingston, Jamaica)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 41 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Workers' Liberation League (Jamaica)
Workers' Liberation League (Jamaica)
Workers Party of Jamaica
Publisher: The League
Place of Publication: Kingston
Kingston
Publication Date: July 22, 1976
Frequency: bimonthly[mar.-apr. 1986-]
biweekly[ former -july 13, 1984]
monthly[ former aug. 1984-feb. 1986]
bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Labor movement -- Periodicals -- Jamaica   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Jamaica   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Jamaica
 Notes
Abstract: Struggle was published first as a mimeographed newsletter in 1974 when the Workers Liberation League was formed. It was edited by Rupert Lewis and he continued as editor when Struggle became the organ of the Workers Party of Jamaica in 1978. In the 1980s editors included Elean Thomas, Elaine Wallace and Ben Brodie. The Workers Liberation League grew out of the political initiative of academics - Trevor Munroe, Rupert Lewis as well as Don Robotham, Derek Gordon who studied in the University of Chicago in the early 1970s and were connected to activists in the Black Panther Movement and African-American radicals in the Communist Party of the United States. The latter group formed the Paul Bogle League which brought together academics, working class and community activists who read and discussed Karl Marx’s Capital and Lenin’s political writings and sought to build on Jamaica’s radical traditions in the trade union movement and in the People’s National Party from the 1930s to the 1960s. The Paul Bogle League was also involved with the formation of the University and Allied Workers Union in the early 1970s and worked with the Independent Trade Union Action Council. Politically the Workers Liberation League gave critical support to Michael Manley’s democratic socialist program in the 1970s.
Issuing Body: Vols. for -1978 issued by Workers' Liberation League; 1979- by Workers' Party of Jamaica.
General Note: Description based on surrogate of: Issue no. 28 (June 16, 1977); title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Apr.-May 1986 (surrogate).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100337
Volume ID: VID00005
Source Institution: Florida International University: Digital Library of the Caribbean
Holding Location: Florida International University: Digital Library of the Caribbean
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 05378247
lccn - sn 91021299
oclc - 5378247

Full Text










FT HIRCE TEN CmTs

OffICIAL ORGAN Of THE WORKERS lIBERATION lEAGUE JULY22 1976,


SDITORIAI



Bankrupt Policies
THE RECENT speeches by Industry Minist-
er Patterson and Prime Minister Manley
show that once again, reliance is being
placed on the big businessmen and on
capitalist solutions to find a way out
of the crisis.

Mr Patterson called on big businessmen
to help finance a fanciful collection
of projects which he claimed would pro-
vide 40,000 new jobs. Mr Manley promi-
sed the big capitalists that the com-
mercial buildings which they rent and
much of it to the government will be
exempt from the new rent restrictions.

By continuing many of the same bankrupt
capitalist policies pursued by the JLP
government between 1962 and 1972, the
PNP government has found itself in the
position of restricting the basic
rights of the working class, such as
the right to strike against capitalist
exploitation and to win a larger share
of the profits pocketed by capitalists.

This is on the empty promise that these
measures will "stimulate production"
and improve the conditions of the mas-
ses. Instead, all these policies have
done is to put more money in the pock-
ets of the big capitalist firms such as
ICD, Grace Kennedy and Lascelles De-
Marcado while failing to prevent grow-
ing unemployment, higher prices on es-
sentials, higher bus fares, and elec-
tricity rates.

Manley should take heed from the recent
events in Peru. There, the progressive
government, pursuing capitalist poli-
cies, was forced into a 40% devaluation
and the hiking of prices on basic goods
and services.

The riots which followed caused loss of
life, and the people, alienated and
confused by the government's policies,
showed little inclination to come to
the defence of the government.

Here in Jamaica, the reactionaries are
awaiting this opportunity. Everything
must be done to prevent this. The peo-
ple must be mobilized around progres-
sive measures such as the land reform,
rent reduction and price controls, and
less reliance placed on capitalist
measures.
)********

STRUGGLE, like all other newspapers, is
restricted by Regulation 15 in the Emer-
gency Regulations which states: '"o per-
son shall publish either orally or in
writing any report or statement (whether
true or false) which is intended or is
of such a nature as to be likely to be
preJudic alto the pubZic safety, or to
incite or provoke any person to commit a

Snotoie hereider.


bildtheoJP


WASTED!


bank in 1974 by
some capitalists.
The money was to be
used for produc-
tion. But Mr Noel
Chin disclosed on
July 14th that the


capitalists "used
the money to buy
cars, pay up old
debts, buy houses,
buy foreign cur-
rency to export il-
legally". Some
even took the money
with them to Canada
and the United
States.

According to Mr
Chin, some of these
people "cannot be
found", and he will
have to "write off
these debts".

Mr Chin owes it to
the nation and es-
pecially the work-
ing people who suf-
fer most under the


STRUGGLE


THE HEAD of the
Jamaica Development
Bank, Mr Noel Chin,
has revealed the
misuse of $10m of
government funds
borrowed from the


crisis to immedia-
tely reveal the
names of those cap-
italists responsi-
ble.

Government should
take immediate
steps to have them
pay for these acts.
This would include
requesting foreign
governments to send
back to Jamaica
those who have tak-
en the money so
they can account
for it.

Government must al-
so pas laws to
deal with those
committing economic
crimes.


REGRETS..
sincere sympathies
to the family of
worker Fearon Bhoo-
rasingh who died
from injuries re-
ceived from a mys-
terious explosion
at Alcoa. Workers
want to know what
is Alcoa doing to
provide for his
family and depend-
ents.


THE GENERAL SECRE-
TARY of the Workers
Liberation League,
Dr. Trevor Munroe,
has written to the
Secretary of the
Jamaica Labour
Party.

In his letter dated
July 8, Dr. Munroe
noted that "since
Mr. Seaga has so
far failed to sus-
pend Mr. Better
Whittingham and
other JLP candidat-
es detained by the
security forces,
pending a disci-
plinary enquiry -
the Executive of
the JLP should im-
mediately insist
that these steps be
taken".
The letter continu-
ed: "Mr. Seaga's
initial statement
on behalf of the
Party claimed 'no
knowledge of...the
contents of the do-
cuments alleged to
have been found in
Mr. Peter Whitting-
ham's briefcase'.
However, a later
statement, publish-
ed today (July 8)
in the Daily Glean-
er, in a clear re-
ference to the
Whittingham case,
speaks of 'the mis-
guided thoughts of
any individual
which were never


printed nor even
intended to be
printed' and also
refers to a 'brief-
case where they
existed for the
eyes of the writer
only".

Dr. Munroe further
states: "We would


remind the JLP Exe-
cutive that the
'misguided thoughts'
found in the brief-
case include refer-
ence to such items
of violence as 200
rifles, 100 sub-
machine guns, 22
trained men, 2 bar-
rels of gunpowder"
*$$* e t STRUGGLE extends


WLL WRITES


THE JLP




















I THINK it makes
good sense to take
the bad elements
out of the society
and ease the vio-
lence. But I think
the bad thing about
it is that it is
not dealing enough
with the economic
problems. Trade
Unionist

* *

I LIKE the way it
is operating be-
cause it is cutting.
a lot of the crime.
The small people
like me can go ab-
out our business
freely without any
fear. I was frigh-
tened about the
violence the kil-
ling and the burn-
ing. But the State
of Emergency ease
that tension and I
now feel free to go
wherever I want to
go and I know other
people are glad
about it too.
- Fifty year old
Female Worker



I PERSONALLY think
in some cases the
Emergency is good.
One of the main
thing it can do is
to bring -in the
wrongdoers who are
trying to mash up
the country and put
more hardships on
the working people.
- Thirty two year
old Female Worker


Page 2




CIA LINK-UP IN AIRPORT BOMBING


TRAILEF and luggage blown up in the explosion
at Norman Manley Airport on July 9.


IT HAS been estab-
lished that there
are strong and de-
finite links bet-
ween the United
States Government's
CENTRAL INTELLIG-
ENCE AGENCY (CIA)
and the terrorists
who tried to blow
up a Cuban airplane
at the Norman Man-
ley airport on Fri-
day, July 9.

The Cubana Airlines
flight was to leave
at 6.30 p.m. with
38 passengers from
various countires,
going to Havana,
Cuba, but was de-
layed for 40 min-


ON THURSDAY, July
8th, fire of un-
known origin des-
troyed the home of
four workers at 6
Cedar Valley Road,
Kingston 6. The


utes. The delay
saved many lives -
those of the pas-
sengers, the crew
of the plane and
probably others.
The life of the
driver of the lug-
gage trolley was
saved only because
he had left the
trolley to deliver
a package before
the bomb went off.

The bomb had been
planted by the ter-
rorists in a suit-
case to go on the
plane and was timed
to go off while the
plane was in the
air. Only quick


action by the air-
port fire-fighters
prevented the des-
truction of lives
within the airport
building.

A terrorist group
calling itself the
UNITED REVOLUTIONARY
ORGANISATION boast-
ed "we did it" as
if cold-blooded
mass murder is any-
thing to boast ab-
out. WHO ARE THESE
CRIMINALS?

The UNITED REVOLU-
TIONARY ORGANISA-
TION (not at all to
be mixed up with
the true revolution-


ary organisation of
I the same name in
STrinidad) is headed
by ORLANDO BOSCH
AVILA. This man
has been identified
as one of the main
CIA agents involved
with terrorists
acts against the
Cuban Government
and people as well
as against other
anti-imperialist
forces in Latin
America and the
Caribbean. A for-
mer CIA agent,
MANUEL DE ARMAS,
tore the veil from
his face.

As STRUGGLE 3:9
(May 27) reported,
DE ARMAS left the
CIA and revealed
many of its secret
activities in Latin
America, the Carib-
bean and in fact,
in our own country,
in a news confer-
ence in Cuba, in
May of this year.


Apart from AVILA
himself being re-
vealed as a CIA
agent, all the
counter-revolution-
ary organisations
with which he has
been associated
have links with the
CIA. The United
Revolutionary Orga-
nisation is no ex-


ception.

This is a new ter-
rorist grouping
made up of members
from other counter-
revolutionary orga-
nisations. Most of
its members are
from the NATIONAL
FRONT FOR THE LIB-
ERATION OF CUBA
which admitted res-
ponsibility for the
bombing of the
Cuban Consulate at
Dillsbury Avenue in
1974.

The bombing at Nor-
man Manley airport
- the total uncon-
cern for human life
- is the very same
type of violence
which we were fac-
ing in Jamaica from
late last year up
to the point when
the State of Emer-
gency put a brake
on the reactionary
gunmen and arson-
ists.

Up to press time,
none of the forces
who speak against
the locking up of
those connected
with terrorism un-
der the STATE OF
EMERGENCY have rai-
sed their voices
against the bombing
at the airport.

***


FIRE IN CEDAR VALLEY


workers lost all
their possessions
valued at thousands
of dollars, in the
fire. The fire
started around 11
a.m. and was


brought under con-
trol at about 2 p.m.
by the Trench Town
Fire Brigade. Hun-
dreds of citizens
rallied to try and
save the belongings


of the workers but
this failed as
there was no water
in the area; all
pipes had been
turned off due to
the water crisis.


Other workers liv-
ing close to the
fire lost belong-
ings and damage was
done to their house
while trying to
save their belong-
ings in case the
fire had spread.

The people of Cedar
Valley have started
a fund to assist
their fellow citi-
zens, while the
members of Liguanea
Socialist Movement
in the area have
offered to help re-
build the houses on
a voluntary basis.

On the morning of
the 9th after the
fire, the politi-
cians visited the
area. But the peo-
ple are now asking


what have they done
to ensure that the
working people in
Cedar Valley as
well as in other
areas are provided
with proper houses
and protection?

In order to prevent
the re-occurrence
of fire like that
in Cedar Valley in
poor communities,
the Government must
stop depending on
capitalists to
build houses for
workers. The capi-
talists are inter-
ested in creating
profits, not houses.
Only by taking over
cement, steel and
block peaking will
the Government be
able to really tac-
kle the housing
problem and make
houses for the wor-
kers which are
safer than board
houses, in which
most of our working
people live. Board
houses burn easily.
S**** *


I










wOrld affairs


aster to apartheid

E ISRAELI commnando raid at Uganda's-
Itebbe Airport is being seen by some as
Oroic and praiseworthy. This view has
teen expressed by some GLEANER column-
Ssts and by the right-wing JLP Senator
Ramsay.

le use of innocent citizens as pawns,
s was the case with the plane hijacked
to Uganda, must be condemned. It does
damage to the Arab cause and allows the
lionist leadership of Israel to keep in
te background the fact that it occupies
lab lands and has conducted a brutal
plicy of extermination of the Palestin-
lia people. Many Jews and Arabs in
Israel are against this policy.'

Israel refuses to give up the lands she
captured in the 1967 war and now occu-
pes. Whole Arab towns and villages in
Fza, in Golan, and on Jordan's West
Bank have been bulldozed, homes and
aops destroyed. On March 30 Israeli
police opened fire on a peaceful demon-
stration in Galilee, killing 6 and
ounding many more Arabs. More than 300
tabs were arrested. Their crime was to
demand that the Israeli occupation of
their country should end. How can Jam-
ica condemn apartheid in South Africa


CULTURE -


and praise a state that exterminates
Palestinians?

Those who support the Israeli commando
raid forget that it is such conditions
which force the Arabs to unfortunate and
desperate acts such as hijacking. They
also ignore the fact that the Israeli
raid violated Uganda's territorial sov-
ereignty and killed over 20 Ugandan sol-
diers.

This act is a product of Israeli-South
African alliance. South Africa has al-
ready invaded Angola and recently attack-
ed guerrilla camps in Zambia. Zionism
is the twin sister of apartheid. Jam-
aica must defend the sovereignty of in-
dependent African countries and the
national liberation struggle.



iRevolutionary .

ustice in Angola

FOUR MERCENARIES were executed by firing
squad in Angola on July 10. The four
men are Costas Georgiou (known as Colo-
nel Callan), Andrew McKenzie and John
Derek Barker of Britain, and Daniel
Gearheart of the United States. Appeals
to save the lives of these men came from
Queen Elizabeth and US Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger.


'Barry- REVOLUTIONARY SINGER
In "Black So It is in "Come Wor- Maybe even two traditions are
Beautiful", for ex- kers Stand and But we cannot lose weak. Comrades
ample, Barry, re- Fight", the battle this war. will dance to B
cognizing the exis- hymn of the Workers Socialism our fin- Marley, but are
tence of racial and Liberation League at aim ral
colour prejudice and of all fighters Liberation we pro- around revoluti
under imperialism, against imperialism, claim aryon .
marvelled that: "A that Barry has We goin' end slave to rate son. I
nevah know, a nevah reached his high- labour which, like "Th
know, Black so point so far. The For the poor of international"
beautiful", words of the chorus Jamaica Internatione


ob
not


ry
e
dS


AlRRY CHEVANNES


BARRY CHEVANNES is
one of a growing
number of revolu-
tionary musicians.
Born in rural St.
Catherine in poor
peasant surround-
ings, Barry was
sharply aware from
Very early in life
of the exploitation
to which the vast
majority of our
-orking people are
daily subjected.

As a youth, he
vould spend his
sparetime compos-
ing, in his words
'nonsense tunes",
improvising and
shouting words to
his friends across
the hills and val-
leys of the dis-
trict.

later on, this so-
nial consciousness,
lorn out of an
an


awareness of what
it meant to be a
poor black person
in Jamaica, led him
to the church. It
was during this
period that his mu-
sic began to devel-
op. Songs like
"Black Up" and his
Christmas carol
"Holy Holy Holy"
were made. His mu-
sic in this period
had a strong recog-
nition of social
oppression, how-
ever. Barry points
out that "In the
church I was very
strongly influenced
by the rising tide
of national libera-
tion struggles and
I always attempted
to connect my reli-
gious music to the
fact that the majo-
rity of Jamaicans
were poor, black
and oppressed".


This social con-
sciousness led him
to Marxism-Leninism.
It was because of
his communist world
outlook that Barry
began to see the
real possibility of
freedom from ex-
ploitation.

The world socialist
system and social-
ist Cuba became for
him, like many oth-
er youth in Jamaica,
a beacon of hope.

Naturally the music
began to develop in
the.direction of
his outlook. Early
compositions like
"Three Blind Mice",
"The Working Class
Must Rule", and
"Fire! Revolution!"
were well received
by democratic and
revolutionary peo-
ple wherever he
sang.


help to indicate
the militancy of
this anthem:


And establish a
workers' state."


progressive people
can sing, to ex-
press their true


"Come workers Asked what was his emotions about the
stand and fight reason for writing struggle".
We have victory on songs like this,
our side Barry replied: "In
We may lose one Jamaica our revolu- -
battle ionary cultural *****


WORKERSUNEMPLOYED WOMEN

YOUTH*STUDENTS*PROFESSIONALS
COME TO THIS HISTORIC


carifesta mass rally

AN ANTI-IMPERIALIST SALUTE TO THE HEROES
OF OUR REGION
NATIONAL STADIUM SATURDAY, JULY 24 3.00 P.M.
ADMISSION FREE GATES OPEN AT 1.00 P.M.
SSpeakers. PRIME MINISTER MICHAEL MANLEY
FORBES BURNHAM JUAN ALMEIDA
i : CEDRIC BROOKS UNITED AFRICA BAND
ia HFBARRY CHEVANNES ROBERTO RETA MAR
fORWARD fOIfR UIM L __


1


L m F


Page 3
Kissinger appealed on behalf of Gear-
heart. Who was Gearheart? Gearheart
was a Vietnam veteran who had served as
bodyguard for the Chief of the US army,
General Westmoreland, and for Defense
Secretary Robert McNamara. Asked why he
came to Angola, Gearheart replied: "I
came here for the same reason everybody
else did to make some money..." "Col.
Callan", head of the mercenaries, was
asked what he would have done if the
MPLA had offered him 300 pounds sterling
a week. He replied instinctively: "Go
over to the MPLA". These are the crimi-
nals imperialist politicians like Kis-
singer defend.
Behind the mercenaries are the CIA, the
monopolists and the imperialist govern-
ments. President Neto in explaining his
refusal to commute the death sentences
said: "Every Angolan remembers the vile
and cruel behaviour of the mercenaries
who have sown death and despair in Afric-
an countries in return for pay; trying
in this way to put a brake on the higher
interests of a people for a few coins.,.
We are applying justice in Angola not
only in the name of our martyred people
but also to the benefit of the brother
peoples of Namibia, Zimbabwe and all the
peoples of the world against whom imper-
ialism is already preparing new mercen-
arv aggressions..."




3 ulturul


daysHenrtitage
July24 &25


I _










CARIFESTA MUST INVOLVE


THE PEOPLE
THE SECOND Carib- FESTA is an event
bean Festival of of major signifi-
Arts (CARIFESTA) cance.
takes place in our
country between There are 36 parti-
July 23 and August cipants, speaking
2. Apart from the French, English,
fact that another Spanish and Dutch.
one is unlikely in All, however, have
Jamaica for a long one thing in common
time to come, CARI- our cultures were


shaped out of the
struggles against
colonialism. We
are the poor and
oppressed national-
ities of the Carib-
bean region, who
with the exception
of Cuba are still
under the heel of
imperialism.

As a cultural ex-
pression, CARIFESTA
can have a great
impact on the anti-
imperialist strug-
gle. Hence the po-
litical signifi-
cance of the heroes
being honoured by
CARIFESTA '76,
namely Benito Juar-
ez of Mexico, Simon
Bolivar of Venezue-
la, Toussaint
L'Ouverture of Hai-
ti, Marcus Garvey
of Jamaica and Jose
Marti of Cuba -
every one of them
were patriots who
fought against the
colonial regimes
for national liber-
ation.

CARIFESTA will show
that the traditions
passed on by our
enslaved African
and Amerindian
forebears are going


to stand out and
dominate the cultu-
ral displays. We
shall see that sla-
very failed to
crush their human
spirit and we shall
draw the lesson
that imperialism
today cannot crush
ours despite the
billions that it
steals from us to
keep us underdevel-
oped, poor and il-
literate.

Art must serve the
masses. CARIFESTA
should attempt to
do this, but it
cannot unless the
working people are
involved in the
wide range of CARI-
FESTA activities.


Once we realise how
much we have in
common with the
people of Cuba,
Guyana, Mexico,
Surinam, Venezuela,
St Lucia, Trinidad
and the many other
participating coun-
tries all of whom
were colonised -
the anti-imperial-
ist struggle will
be that much more
advanced.


A B S


THE WORKERS of Nu-
trition Products
Ltd., who recently
sent a petition to
the Prime Minister
calling on him to
visit their factory,
were visited on
Wednesday, July 14,
by Vivian Blake,
Minister of Market-
ing and Commerce,
under whose Minis-
try the factory
falls.

The workers who
wrote Manley in or-
der to get him to
prevent the manage-
ment of Nutrition
Products Ltd. from
pursuing actions
which might bring
an end to the
School Feeding Pro-
gramme, are repre-
sented by the Uni-
versity and Allied
Workers Union. The'
told Minister Blake
of the incompetence
of the management
and called on him
to "dismiss them
lock, stock and
barrel from top to
bottom by September
when school re-
opens".

The workers pledged
their support for
the School Feeding


Programme and in-
formed him that as
workers they were
able and willing to
run the factory in
the interest of the
nation.

Minister Blake saw
for himself the op-
pressive conditions
under which the
workers have to
work for very low
wages. He also
gave instructions
that the management
immediately make
moves to improve
the condition in
the factory, as
well as to give the
workers greater say
in operating the
factory. The Min-
ister has promised
to look into the
function of the
management as a re-
y sult of the work-
ers' complaints.


In the meantime, a
Watchdog Committee
of workers has been
set up by the Union
and the Minister is
to supervise the
operation of the
management to en-
sure that there is
no sabotage at the
factory.


A visit to the fac-
tory on Thursday,
15th July, showed
that the management
who had neglected
the factory for
months had now
started to fix the
old machines, take
measures to prevent
the dumping of food-
stuffs and to rect-
ify the problems of
the workers.

It was only when
the worKers showed
that they were pre-


pare
ains
that
came
ers
acti
Prod
the
duct
must
cept
bett
will
for
pare
fact


d to unite ag-
t management
any better


Port workers


petition


Prime Ministel


SEVENTY EIGHT work-
ers at Western Ter-
minals Ltd. have
sent the following
letter to the Prime
Minister.

Honourable Michael
Manley
Prime Minister of
Jamaica

The crisis at Wes-
tern Terminals Ltd.
is getting out of
hand. After seven
(7) months of nego-
tiation for recog-
nition of our con-
stitutional rights
to have representa-
tion by the union
of our choice, we
are forced to re-
quest your personal
intervention to
solve the crisis.

Since January, we
the workers at Wes-
tern Terminals re-
voked our member-
ship with BITU-NWU
and joined the Port
Supervisors' Union
(PSU) on our own
free will. This is
not a case of union
rivalry as was pub-
lished in the DAILY
GLEANER on Saturday
10th July, 1976.


. Other work- This is a general
must follow the case of us the wor-
on of Nutrition kers being convinc-
ucts. But like ed that the best in-
Nutrition Pro- terest of workers
s workers, they at Westerm Termin-
not only ac- als and the nation-
promises of al interest are
er but must be best served by hav.
ing to struggle ing one union, the
these and pre- PSU, representing
Sto run the all categories of
ory themselves, workers. We have
no quarrel with the
%**** $ BITU-NWU as a


whole. But they
have proven them-
selves incapable ol
representing us at
Western Terminals.'
Neither is it a
matter of tug-of-
war between sec-
tions of workers.
The majority of
workers is in fav-
our of PSU and will
continue to be re-
solute for our
rights.

We experienced the
rigid application
of the LRIDA when
it comes to work-
ers' action, while
the one provision
which speak of wor
kers joining the
union of their
choice is being
trampled on pre-
sently.

In this regard we
are totally dissa-
tisfied- with the
action of the Min-
istry of Labour on
the matter. There
have been extensive
delays in dealing
with this matter
the Ministry of
Labour and Employ-
ment, such delays
could only serve t
continue the denia
of our rights.

This is a definite
dragging out of
this case which ci
only do more dreal
ful damage to the
already bad state
of the economy.

We therefore urge
you to intervene
urgently and deci-
sively in this mat
ter.


WHAT IS DESTABILIZATION


DESTABILIZATION is the tactic to which
the US imperialists have resorted in an
effort to carry out their counterrevolu-
tionary strategy wherever a progressive
government begins to transform the sta-
tus quo.

Destabilization bears the stamp "Made in
USA" and is turned out by that US indus-
try of subversion and espionage, the
CIA. As .a result of the complicity bet-
ween the CIA and the US Government, an
effort is now being made to use destabi-
lization tactics against the .Governments
of Guyana and Jamaica.

All the destabilization programs hatched
in Washington over the last few years
have evidently been aimed at leftist
parties and progressive movements. The
coup prepared to topple the people's
government in Chile, headed by Salvador


Allende, is the most recent and scanda-
lous example of this type of imperialism
action.

Destabilization, as the word itself in-
dicates, is an attempt to upset the bal
ance of stability in a given nation by
various means. The methods include cut
ting off credits, using the reactionary
press for distorting the facts, impose
an economic blockade, promoting internal
strife, making attempts on the lives
revolutionary leaders and engaging in
sabotage in key branches of the economy
Huge sums of money and weapons are also
supplied to reactionary elements link
to the oligarchy, and turmoil and out-
right defiance of legitimately establ
ed authorities are instigated. This
happened in Chile, and it is happening
in Jamaica now.




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