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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100308/00030
 Material Information
Title: Web defender
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publication Date: August 27, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00100308
Volume ID: VID00030
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Vol. 1, No. 11 Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. Training Expeditionary Airpower Experts Aug. 21, 200U


In Brief

Military speakers
Community function
planners, schools and lo-
cal groups are requesting
service members to speak
about their mission and ex-
periences in the Air Force.
If you are interested in
speaking in the local com-
munity, join the speaker's
bureau by contacting the
325th Fighter Wing Public
Affairs Office at 283-4500
or 283-8597.

Beach clean-up
The 325th Civil Engineer
Squadron environmental flight
is calling for personnel and
family members with access
to Tyndall AFB to volunteer
with its annual beach clean-up
at 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Sept. 15 at
the beach house.
For any questions, please
contact ChiQuita George at
283-4498.

Courts closed
The Fitness Center bas-
ketball and racquetball
courts will be closed begin-
ning Sept. 3 to recondition
the floors.
The fitness Center will
reopen Sept. 10 looking
like new.

Triatholon
Tyndall Tri/Dualthlon
is scheduled for Oct. 20 at
7 a.m.
Individuals interested in par-
ticipating can contact 2nd Lt.
Kevin Lawracy at 523-3838.


Future NCOs receive training at ALS

STAFF SGT. VESTA ANDERSON
325TH FIGHTER WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS


While "congratulations" echo from
base to base to the Air Force's newest
staff sergeant selects, most Airmen on the
promotion list are preparing for another
right of passage earning them the honor to
proudly display the stripe on their sleeve
that distinguishes them as supervisors.
Tyndall's Airmen gather their sharpest
uniforms and begin the process of
clipping loose strings and shining
combat boots in attempt to put their best
foot forward and through the doors of
the Airmen Leadership School here.
At ALS, Airmen who are soon-to-
be supervisors learn the fundamentals
of leadership through four blocks of
instruction: leadership, human relations,
communication, and profession of arms.
The five-week course encompasses 192
hours of instruction. The school-house
graduates approximately seven classes
per year with each class consisting of 40
Airmen.
"ALS is the tuming point from Airmen
to NCO (noncommissioned officer),"
said Tech. Sgt. Jacob Peeterse, an ALS
instructor from the 325th Mission Support
Squadron.
"It's a necessary change all have to go
through for a higher level of responsibility
in a leadership position," said Staff Sgt.
Marlin Anderson, an ALS instructor from
the 325th Mission Support Squadron.
As Airmen step into supervisory
positions,ALSteachesthemthe importance
of handling each person they supervise as a
unique individual, and further teaches them
the most effective method to approach
whatever challenges they may face as
supervisors, good or bad.
"Everyone is different. They need to
be treated with the respect they deserve,"
said Sergeant Peeterse. "Being good to
the people you supervise is paramount."


The learning environment also plays
a role. The students are Airmen from
all aspects of the Air Force. In the
classrooms, an Airman from the 95th
Fighter Squadron could and, most likely,
has sat next to another Airman from the
325th Security Forces Squadron.
"One of the most beneficial elements
in ALS is meeting different airmen
from different career fields," said Senior
Airman Jenay Resto, a current ALS
student from the 325th Air Control
Squadron. "I've learned how to deal
with different people with different
personalities and how to handle their
problems by communicating effectively
without coming across as indifferent."
In the classroom students are able to
share their personal experiences with
each other regarding supervision.
"You get everyone's input from
different jobs," said Senior Airman
Wesley Sutton, a current ALS student
from the 325th FighterWing, Chaplain.
"It gives you a (broader) perspective."
Molding troops into professional
Airmanispartofbeing supervisor, said
Senior Airman Dominique Campbell,
a current student at ALS from the 83rd


Fighter Weapons Squadron.
The school accomplishes this by
teaching the students to become role
models as well as leaders.
"ALS shows you the bigger picture
of becoming an NCO and gives you the
resources you need and a standard to go
by," said Airman Sutton.
But even with all that is learned
behind the doors of school house, it is
sometimes difficult to crossover into the
NCO world.
"Maintaining discipline with friends
who are now subordinates is the hardest
issue they will have to face when
transitioning," said Sergeant Peeterse.
Sergeant Anderson agrees, "They
aren't able to consistently enforce the
line between work and play."
"They need to break the cycle by
applying what they learned here at
their work areas," explains Staff Sgt.
Frances Wittenberg, an ALS instructor
from the 325th Mission Support
Squadron.
Class 076, who are projected to
graduate Tuesday, look back on their
endeavors in the past five weeks.
SEE VOLUNTEER PAGE 2


ITrust,- Teamok Tranin





Page 2 Web Defender


Staff Sgt. Christina McKee


Airman First Class Anthony J Hyatt
Sergeant McKee, 325th Fighter Wing command post
emergency actions controller, gathers pertinent informa-
tion of the in-flight emergency to fill out a quick reaction
checklist. The information is passed to wing leaders.
Sergeant McKee orchestrated response for more than 35
in-flight emergencies. She is also involved in the commu-
nity; supports local church youth programs and is an active
member with chapel services. She constantly strives for self-
improvement attending college classes while deployed.


Duty title: Emergency actions controller
Hometown: Fort Walton Beach, Fla.
Time on station: Four years and two and half
months
Time in service: Four and a half years
Hobbies: Scrapbooking, photography and
decorating
Goals: To complete my degree
Favorite thing about Tyndall AFB: Being
close to home
Favorite movie: Grease
Favorite book: Dr. Suess "Oh The Places
You'll Go"
Pet peeves: People smacking their mouths
while eating
Proudest moment in the military: Being
chosen by my peers and instructors for the
Leadership Award at Airmen Leadership
School
The Checkertail Salute is a 325th Fighter Wing
commander program designed to recognize
Tyndall's Warrior of the Week. Supervisors can
nominate individuals via their squadron and
group commanders. Award recipients receive
a certificate, letter from the commander and a
one-day pass.


* 1 :e eX~X~


* FROM VOLUNTEER PAGE
"This experience will open your eyes to things you
may not realize and will better you as a supervisor,"
said Airman Resto to future students ofALS.
"Come with an open mind, not a preconceived notion
of what the experience will be; doing this will allow
you to absorb all the information given," Airman Resto
advises.
"Take it seriously and be ready," said Airman Sutton.
"It's not the easiest of curriculums; you have to be
ready for it."
The students' motivated words echo their instructors'
advice.
"The experience is what you make it," explains
Sergeant Peeterse. "It's an experience that will stay
with you for a long time."
"Have a positive attitude and get the information
to become an effective supervisor," said Sergeant
Wittenberg.
"ALS is a wonderful place to learn and grow. The
concepts and training you receive will enhance your
ability to lead, follow and understand those above,
parallel, and beneath you," said Sergeant Anderson.
"Some things will go against the workings of your
work center, but it's up to you to break the cycle and
make the change. Just remember, before you change the
mind, you (must) change the heart," Sergeant Anderson
explains. "Here atALS, we will initiate that change and
it's up to (the students) to follow through."


I AFI 10-248

AFI 10-248 IC was officially re-
leased as of Aug. 17.

An individual score that is
equal to or greater than 75. is
meeting standards: An individ-
ual score that is less than 75 is
not meeting standards.

Please brief your people that
this change will affect there
performance report (automatic
Referral OPR/EPR)if their score
is less than 75(not meeting
standards)on their PFT.

When a performance report is
due the supervisor will look at
the last PFT. if that person has
a score less than 75 then it will
be an automatic referral report.
because they are not meeting
AF standards. The marking is
based on the current PFT as of
the closeout of the report, even
if the test is outside the report-
ing period.

L ------


FPID: 413429-1-52-01

Construction is scheduled to begin the week of August 27, on SR 30 (US 98 / Tyndall
Parkway) from SR 30A (Business 98) to the Dupont Bridge. Anderson Columbia Com-
pany, Inc., of Lake City, Florida is the Prime Contractor. This $2.3 M construction con-
tract includes: resurfacing, installing new sidewalks, drainage improvements, signing,
signalization and pavement markings.

This project also includes realigning old US 98 with Cooper Drive and the removal of
some drive way openings. The current median opening at old US 98 will be modified
and a new southbound left turn lane added in the median. Curb cut ramps along the
project will be reconstructed to meet current ADA standards. Motorists are encour-
aged to use caution while traveling through the construction zone. Expect delays
while traveling through the area, one lane of traffic will be maintained in each direc-
tion. The project is expected to take approximately 5 1/2 months to complete.
Safety Tips
Safety is our greatest concern, so use caution while traveling along the corridor.
Equipment and construction employees will be entering and exiting the roadway,
watch for quick stops and expect minimal delays. Keep a safe distance between you
and the vehicle traveling ahead. Watch for posted speed limits, remember speeding
violations double in construction zones (when workers are present) and in school
zones. Access to businesses and residences will be maintained during construction.


Aug. 27, 2007




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