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 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Introduction
 Main
 Project background
 Back Cover














Title: Sebastian Inlet State Park : "a vision of tomorrow"
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100171/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sebastian Inlet State Park : "a vision of tomorrow"
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Pollack, Ryan
Publisher: College of Design, Construction & Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Notes
Abstract: The incredible growth and development in the state of Florida and more specifically along its coasts has caused significant degradation of the extraordinary yet fragile natural environments of these areas, threatening many exotic species, natural communities and important ecological systems. It is vital that we preserve and protect these natural areas, provide for recreational and interpretational opportunities, and educate individuals of all ages about the importance of these fragile natural settings, and what can be done to maintain them. The Sebastian Inlet State Park has been a great example for this, and yet still offers even more opportunities for natural enhancements and enjoyable experiences for its users.
Acquisition: Landscape Architecture capstone project
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100171
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: Permissions granted to the University of Florida Institutional Repository and University of Florida Digital Collections to allow use by the submitter. All rights reserved by the author.

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
    Acknowledgement
        Page ii-iii
    Introduction
        Page 6-7
        Page 8-9
    Main
        Page 10-11
        Page 12-13
        Page 14-15
        Page 16-17
        Page 18-19
        Page 20-21
        Page 22-23
        Page 24-25
        Page 26-27
        Page 28-29
        Page 30-31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34-35
        Page 36-37
        Page 38-39
        Page 40-41
        Page 42-43
        Page 44-45
        Page 46-47
        Page 48-49
        Page 50-51
        Page 52-53
        Page 54-55
        Page 56-57
        Page 58-59
        Page 60-61
        Page 62-63
        Page 64-65
        Page 66-67
        Page 68-69
        Page 70-71
        Page 72-73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Project background
        Project page 1
        Project page 2
        Project page 3
        Project page 4
        Project page 5
        Project page 6
        Project page 7
        Project page 8
        Project page 9
        Project page 10
        Project page 11
        Project page 12
        Project page 13
        Project page 14
        Project page 15
        Project page 16
        Project page 17
        Project page 18
        Project page 19
        Project page 20
        Project page 21
        Project page 22
        Project page 23
        Project page 24
        Project page 25
        Project page 26
        Project page 27
        Project page 28
        Project page 29
        Project page 30
        Project page 31
        Project page 32
        Project page 33
        Project page 34
        Project page 35
    Back Cover
        Project page 36
Full Text




SEBASTIAN


INLET STATE PARK:


"A VISION OF TOMORROW"


A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBASTIAN INLET STATE PARK


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Acknowledgments


Primary Faculty Advisor:
Lester Linscott


Department Faculty and Staff


Additional Advisors
Jim Couillard w/ Marion County Parks and Recreation
Phillip Rands w/ Sebastian Inlet State Park
Terry O'toole w/ Sebastian Inlet State Park
Terry Couilliette w/ Sebastian Inlet State Park


Submitted To:
Sebastian Inlet State Park
State of Florida Department of Environmental Protection:
Division of Recreation and Parks

Submitted By:
Ryan Pollack

with

The University of Florida
College of Design, Construction and Planning
Department of Landscape Architecture


A Special Thanks To:


Senior Capstone project
Spring 2010


My Mother and family whom this book is dedicated, for filling my life with constant love and
support.

The faculty and staff of the entire Department for providing me with a rich educational
experience here at the University of Florida.

My classmates who became close friends and mentors for me during these past five years

Jim Couillard for all of your time and professional knowledge these past two years.


Sebastian Inlet State Park: A Vision of Tomorrow






INTRODUCTION



PREFACE: THE VISION:

The senior capstone project in the department of Landscape Architecture at the A fishing boat leaves the marina carrying a father and son out
University of Florida involves taking on a project where you can implement the into the glassy waters of the Indian River Lagoon in hopes ,
knowledge and experience you have received during your undergraduate education for an active day of fishing. The harbor master watches from
here at the University. It includes you choosing a project type related to the field, as a park bench under the shade of an oak as an osprey makes a
well as an actual site to be analyzed for the implementation of the project. r an eary
divefor an early meal.
Born and raised in the small rural Florida town of
Melbourne Beach located on the east coast, I developed On their way south the two fishermen pass by a group of
an interest in the flora, the wildlife and the elements of kayakers led by a park ranger on an interpretive aquatic tour
our states pristine coastal environments. I furthered -of the most biologically diverse estuary in North America.
that interest at the University of Florida and found my They pass by miles of mangrove swamps and large expanses
niche within the field after interning under a Landscape ~of grass flats. --
Architect designing for parks and recreation. This is what
formed my decision to take on a capstone project relating O t w tough the ch l t st .i
t i .pak-se sin.] On their way through the channel they spot children i
to parks design. t. a j interacting with the gentle waters of the inlet cove while
mothers relax under the shade of an umbrella.
In determining the location for the project, I knew I mothers relax under the shade of an umbrella.
wanted to work on a project in the place I grew up in, \'
giving me years of important knowledge about the region, -. Anglers from the north pier provide hints of the fishing
people, natural elements and many factors to support the forecast for the day as a number of them struggle with
production of something great for the area. I wanted to something on the line. As the boy and his father cruise past
work on a site deemed important not only for me, but for the pier and head north along the coast the new cafe' springs
the area as well. from the dunes with a couple sipping coffee from the second
selected The Sebastian Inlet State Park as my site for story gazing out over the Atlantic Ocean. Surfers are taking
I selected The Sebastian Inlet State Park as my site for
the project. I have been visiting this park since the age 'advantage of the clam morning winds and glassy conditions
of three and know it well. It is a landmark for the people :- at arguably the best surfing spots in the east coast. The two in
of both counties it occupies and has so much to offer its I the boat continue north in search of pods ofbaitfish.
users.
r On their return trip through the inlet the two can smell
burning fires from campsites to the south with the anticipation
of eating their catchfor the day back at the marina. This father
and son along with the hundreds of thousands who visit the
park annually realize they can't put a price on the unique
experience they receive from the natural setting available.


. . .-









6 7

AA VTsFON OF TOOAEROW"
A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






INTRODUCTION



PROJECT GOAL: SITE VICINITY:
The incredible growth and development in the state of Florida and more specifically along its coasts
has caused significant degradation of the extraordinary yet fragile natural environments of these areas,
threatening many exotic species, natural communities and important ecological systems. It is vital that we Sebastian Inlet State
preserve and protect these natural areas, provide for recreational and interpretational opportunities, and Park
educate individuals of all ages about the importance of these fragile natural settings, and what can be done
to maintain them. The Sebastian Inlet State Park has been a great example for this, and yet still offers even
more opportunities for natural enhancements and enjoyable experiences for its users.


GUIDING PRINCIPLES Brevard County
The balance of three interrelated guiding principles form the park masterplan, and remain just as important
in the park's vision today, as they do over a long term period of time.
1. Preservation, Protection & Enhancement: The importance of preserving the existing -
natural and cultural features of the site needs to remain a main focus through the design process.
In addition, improvements to currently altered and impacted natural communities are another ..*
goal. The addition of proposed features and facilities, as well as improvements to existing site
elements should have minimal impacts on the significant cultural and natural resources of the
site. It is important that the current character of the site be preserved and that the park continues
to be successful in preserving and protecting Florida's threatened natural coastal environments.
2. Recreation and More: Improvements to existing site features, as well as the addition of
new-use features to provide for resource-based recreation are another focus. The intent of
these additions and enhancements is to improve the overall user experience of the site and to .
attract more visitors. Recreational elements will be a huge focus as they play a huge role in the
effectiveness of environmental education, interaction and site experience.
3. Interpretation: Interpretational elements in areas where locals and visitors have a chance to
interact with the natural environment is key for understanding not only the importance of these -" |
areas but also the important roles humans can play, in protecting these natural environments .Indian River County
in the 21st century. The outdoor educational program of the site should contain educational
facilities, indoor and outdoor classrooms, and opportunities for field studies and outdoor
laboratory experiences, among other components.







SF Containing 971.01 acres, Sebastian Inlet State Park is located
in central Florida along the eastern Atlantic coast on a
barrier island. It inhabits both Brevard County to the north
and Indian River County to the south. The Park is 12 miles
north of Vero Beach and 18 miles south of Melbourne. The
park is split between the two counties by the inlet waterway.
Roughly two-thirds of the park is located in Brevard County.

8 F9

A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






LAND USE



COUNTY WIDE /


This map shows land uses for the
combined Brevard and Indian River -.
Counties. The map gives you an idea of
how rural most of these two counties are. .
Almost three quarters of both counties are
designated conservation and agricultural
areas. Notably, a large area to the north
called the Merritt Island National Wildlife
Refuge covers 140,000 acres and served as '

Most of the dense areas are located
mainland near major bridges connecting .. Parks and Recreation Commercial
to the barrier island. Sebastian Inlet State
Park can be seen to the southeast. "
$ *1
Legend


Sebastian Inlet State Park
Parks & Recreation 1 ,
State Parks '
Institutional: 4
Residential
Commercial .
Industrial Conservation Residential
Agriculture \ r
Conservation/Open Space
Bridges .
Water -
County Boundaries *- .\ ..

0 3.5 7 14 Miles
..V



SAgriculture Institutional


10N F

A MAASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






LAND USE


25 MILE RADIUS


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Legend
* Case Studies
o Schools
Cultural Centers
Parks
M Sebastian Inlet State Park
SParks & Recreation
State Parks
Institutional
Residential
SCommercial
Industrial
Agriculture
Conservation/Open Space
Bridges
County Boundaries


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Parks and Recreation


Conservation


Commercial


Residential


0 3.5 7 Miles
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The 25-mile radius map shows significant areas
as well as general character in closer proximity
to the site. Concentrated analysis took place in
areas near major connection from bridges. The
map aided in locating significant areas to reserach
for potential case studies. You can start to get an
idea of the character of the area near to Sebastian
Inlet State Park, and what areas on the mainland
might take advantage of park amenities based on
connectivity.


Agriculture


OF TOMORROW"


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Industrial


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LAND USE


5 MILE RADIUS


Legend
M Sebastian Inlet State Park
o Schools


* Cultural Centers


* Parks


Parks & Recreation


State Parks
Institutional


Residential
Commercial
Industrial


-. "


Parks and Recreation


N;
'I.


Commercial




-.-


Agricultural
Conservation/Open Space


Conservation


Residential


/ s


4 Miles


0 1 2


Y a


The five mile land use map gives a good sense of what the land is like adjacent to the Park. This map
shows the lack of connectivity to the barrier island in close proximity to the site. Almost all of the land
within five miles of the site is either conservation and parks or low density residential and offers a pris-
tine natural setting. Pelican Island is just to the south and Long Point Park is just to the north of Sebastian
Inlet State Park.


Agriculture


OF TOMORROW"


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Industrial


I






PARK HISTORY

Formation: The history of the Sebastian
Inlet area can be traced back to the end of the last -- -- Construction Timeline
ice age. Sandbars off the coast of the mainland In 1924, the small jetties were completed and Sebastian



animals began inhabiting the islands. The Ais ne during World War II For safety reasons, then permanently
Indians were more recent inhabitants of the blasted open in 1947 and has remained open since.
barrier islands. They lived off the bounty of the 1950's- Several maintenance dredging projects were
land and sea and were a tribe of hunters and complete ed to deepen and widen the inlet channel throughout
gatherers. By 1760, the As Indians disappeared -the 1950's. New construction extended both the north and
south jetties.
as they succumbed to European diseases like the. In1946 The inlet sand trap was excavated tocat esad
animals began inhabiting the islands. The Ais exca vated tc ure: sand






other natives of Florida. and prevent shoaling, and the Back Bay navigation channel was dredged.
Spanish Fleet of 1715: Eleven Spanish 1970's- Sand was dredged and placed to counter erosion on the downdrift beach. The north and
treasure galleons sank along the east central Florida coast in 1715. One of the survivors' campsites was south jetties were extended further.
located on the present day site of the McLarty Treasure Museum. While 1,500 people survived, seven 1980's- Over 200,00 cubic yards of sand was placed on the south beach after several dredging events '
barrierr islands. They lived off the bounty of the ..d c omtand hauled to the beach i.




hundred people lost their lives in this disaster. Situated on a survivors' camp of this ill-fated 1715 Spanish occurred. Sand was stockpiled on Coconut Point and hauled to the beach. 1
Sf a 1990's- A number of studies and monitoring projects were conducted at the inlet the 90s addition
Plate Fleet, the museum features artifacts, displays, and to maintenance dredging events and taking sand from the inlet trap and channel and plng on the
an observation deck that overlooks the Atlantic Ocean downdrift beach. engineering assessments of jetties, geotechnical evaluation of sand trap and shoals, and
Commercial Fishing: The lives and history of the biological studies focusing on sea turtles, seagrass and reefs were conducted. Over 800,000 cubic yards
pel v n a w i wit h of sand were placed on the downdrift beaches. State permit received in 1996 for dredging the navigation
people who lived mn Sebastian were interwoven with the
re re aleons sank along the east central Florida coast channel extension to the ICW, however, Federal permits denied
Indian River Lagoon and fishing. The lagoon provided due to presence of protected seagrass.
te o th t y t f t ty not only food and transportation but also a means of 2000 Present- Over 300,000 cubic yards of sand was
u livelihood for many of Sebastian's early residents. The placed on downdrift beaches. Major renovation of North jetty
commercial fishing industry helped make Sebastian were completed with elevated concrete cap, handrails and
what it is today. grate system. Fortunately, the jetties survived the 2004 and 2005 a a a
an o ovation d ek tat overlook te Aantic Oe an. d hurricanes without significant damage. Due to shoaling at
..Commer Excavation: In 1872, a molivemes and history of the biological studies focusing on sea turtles, seagrass and reefs were conducted. Over 800,000 cubic yards



West end of channel, the navigation channel was temporarily r e i fr r i t
- -- on a strip of barrier island near present day Sebastian reoriented to the southwest with buoy channel markers. To
Inlet was promoted by Captain David P. Gibson. At that better define channel and manatee slow speed zones, permanent
time, the barrier island at the site of the proposed cut was approximately 260 feet wide. From 1901 to 1915 piling markers were placed in the inlet throat. State and Federal
Six efforts to open the inlet took place with sand washing into the inlet as soon as it was excavated. In 1905 Permits were received to dredge the connection from the Inlet to
Roy 0. Couch arrived in Brevard County whose name is now synonymous with the Sebastian Inlet. Mr. the ICW. On July, 2007 dredging was completed and navigation
Couch raised money from private individuals and invested a great deal of his own money and formed maf 20 resent eas san as
the Sebastian Inlet Association. With Mr. Couch's persistent lobbying with the legislature and the Army
Corps of Engineers and the formation of the Sebastian Inlet Association, a permit was finally issued by
the War Department and the seventh effort to open the inlet began in April of 1918. The permit expired
in December of 1918, giving the dredgers a very short time m

which to accomplish the work led Mr. Couch and several
other prominent businessmen to Tallahassee to push
through a bill for the land that surrounded the inlet to be
encompassed into a local taxing district. In 1919 the Florida
Legislature created the Sebastian Inlet District. ian Inlet Association, a peit was finally issued by





16 17
frame to complete the work. The impossible time frame in d 'I












A VISION OF TOA-O ROW"
A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






HISTORIC PHOTOS PARK INFORMATION


In 1966 the State of Florida acquired the park with help of a donation by Robert P. McLarty. The park
was acquired to protect, develop, and maintain the property for public outdoor recreation, conservation,
historic and naturalinterpretation, andrelatedpurposes. In 2006, the Sebastian Inlet StateParkwasconsidered
the sixth most popular park in the state of Florida bringing in an estimated 800,000 visitors annually.
It now offers premier saltwater fishing, and is a favorite for anglers nationwide for catching snook,
bluefish, redfish, and Spanish mackerel from its two jetties. Surfing has also become a popular recreation
and the Park offers some of the best waves on the east coast of not only Florida, but the entire country.
Sebastian Inlet State park holds several major surf competitions each year bringing in spectators and surfers
from all over the world. Two museums provide a history of the area, one being the McLarty Treasure ,
Museum named after Robert P. McLarty, which features the history of the 1715 Spanish treasure fleet. The
second museum is the Sebastian Fishing Museum which tells the history of the area's fishing industry of
the 1800 and 1900's. Three miles of beautiful beaches provide opportunities for swimming, scuba diving,
snorkeling, shelling, and sunbathing. Visitors have the opportunity to canoe and kayak in the most
1 943 1951 biologically diverse estuary in the country, the Indian River Lagoon. The eight mile-long Hammock Trail
gives visitors a chance to relax with a stroll and an experience with an abundance of wildlife. A full facility
campground make a popular weekend retreat adjacent mangrove marshes with great views to the inlet.
Over seven plant communities are contained within the park that offer a variety of wildlife ,
including a number of threatened and endangered species. It is currently part of the Florida Greenways
and Trails System. With an abundance of recreational opportunities, history, culture and natural amenities,
the Sebastian Inlet State Park offers something for everyone and has the potential for so much more.









1958 1 971 CAMPING

.... ATLA .. PR- ----- .~

W PLAYGROUND 1 .:: I:
,. S .OUTHJE.. Y
AET 7 -:: v-- S















Today



18

AARVISIONROF Too EBROW"
A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INyLET STATE PARK
So ow






EXISTING FEATURES

The Park offers over three miles of wide sandy beaches both north and south of the inlet with ( -- Two different areas within the park provide boat ramps into the Indian River Lagoon and are
multiple access points and parking. a only a minutes ride through the Inlet into the Atlantic, and a few miles to the fresh water of
the Sebastian River.

SThe sport of surfing has really grown in popularity recently and Sebastian Inlet Park offers
arguably the best surfing in Florida. People come from all over the state and the southern A m p f i
east coast to take advantage of the waves the north jetty produces as well as monster hole and e ygr y the ip of coconut pint caprod
spanish house breaks, by great views to the inlet, lagoon, mangrove swamps and very close to a protected eastern
shorebird nesting area.
Beach, river, or inlet anglers will all be pleased with the fishing within the park. Fishermen
come from all over to fish from the Park's north jetty for prized fish like redfish, snook, snapper,
etc. There are few places better along the east coast of Florida. A full facility campground at coconut point overlooks the waters of the Indian River Lagoon
and Sebastian Inlet. Two rest room facilities are provided as well as a playground for children.

Swimming can be done along the miles beach or the inlet cove where waters are more gentle
and pounding waves and currents are non existent. Four waterfront pavilions are located on the south side of the inlet. They can accommodate
Ssixty people each and can rented for full day or half day events.

The reefs along the beach and structure of the jetties provide for exceptional diving inshore and
offshore the Atlantic ocean provides endless miles for diving. Concessions are provided north of the inlet within the boardwalk system which provides
i access to the beach. There is also a small gift shop within the same building.

Canoeing and kayaking the Lagoon is a popular aquatic activity. The mangrove swamps and
grassy flats of the Lagoon are great for observing an abundance of wildlife. Two ADA accessible rest room facilities can be found north of the inlet, and also at both
museums, the campground and boat ramp areas.

S A hiking trail winds for roughly a mile through a hardwood hammock community as well as
mangrove swamps with interpretive signage along the way.Outdoor showers are located within the boardwalk system north of the inlet and by the
SSebastian Fishing Museum as well.

A forty-mile long paved multi-use trail runs along A1A and along the Lagoon with access to the
beach. There are three different biking trails within the park with a combination of both paved Picnic areas are found throughout most areas of the park heavily used by visitors. A large
and unp d s e thr oh sd ad s y a Picnic areas are found throughout most areas of the park heavily used by visitors. A large
I~ l J and unpaved surfaces through sandy and swampy areas.
a picnic area between the parking lot and concessions building offers many tables.

I Over 180 different types of birds can be viewed throughout the year from the park which is
part of the Great Florida Birding Trail. The beaches of Brevard county offer the largest nesting
assemblage of sea turtles in the United States.


Boaters have access to the freshwater of the Sebastian River, the brackish waters of the Indian
IL River Lagoon, the Intercoastal Waterway, and to the salty water of the Atlantic Ocean. The Gulf
Stream is located about 25 to 30 miles east of Sebastian Inlet.






20MASTERPAN FOR SEBSTAN TATE PARK

A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






EXISTING FEATURES

Located on a barrier island between the Indian River Lagoon and the Atlantic Ocean, and on both There are thirteen recorded archeological sites within the Park with four in Brevard County and nine within /
sides of the Sebastian Inlet, the Park provides a wide variety of natural amenities and recreational, Indian River County. The McLarty Treasure Museum displays artifacts excavated mostly from the native
cultural and historical features. populations and 1715 Spanish Fleet wreck. Most of the archeological sites consist of shell middens and one .
sand mound. These elements within the park and in the museum offer more opportunities for education
and interpretation.





Natural & Recreational Features Cultural & Historical Features









]FirstPeak North Jetty Indian River Lagoon Ais Inians, 1760 Spanish Fleet of 1715 Commercidal Fish Camps 1800s










Mosquito Impoundments, 1950fs
AJarnnic leaches iletCove HaUnock Tail IletWOpering 1924 1949 S Mosqd Impam












FullFacility Campground Mangrove Swamps Dune Habias Fis Annual Surf Contes
Fishing Museum McLartyTreasure Musetni





22 23

^AMASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK







CASE STUDIES E.L.C. THE ENCHANTED FOREST SANCTUARY



The E.L.C. is a non-profit environmental learning center located in Vero Beach, Fl. The campus offers This sanctuary features an education center, trail system and amphitheatre. It was the Environmentally
an abundance of hands on educational opportunities for all ages. Endangered Lands Program's first purchase with the goal to create a network of sanctuaries throughout
Brevard County.
Mission Statement: "To provide comprehensive environmental education that will instill an understand-
ing of our natural world and will motivate participants to be active stewards of our natural resources." Ownership: Environmentally Endangered Lands Program
Proximity: 61 miles from Sebastian Inlet State Park
Ownership: Non-profit organization Scale: 470 acres
Proximity: 12 miles from Sebastian Inlet State Park
Scale: 64 acres Recreational Elements:
Wildlife observation
Strengths *. Hiking
Diversity of ecosystems :-"
Extensive interpretive trail system ( over .5 miles) Educational Elements t- "f d"_LL
Effective donation program Cultural/historical & natural trail interpretation ..
Abundance of educational opportunities Environmental Learning Center
Boardwalk with interactive signage Library
Aquatic tours Science room .
Indoor & outdoor classes Interactive exhibits "
Wet lab
Native greenhouse Strengths -
Educational Programs (mangrove plantings) Diversity of ecosystems '
Abundance of wildlife a'
Weaknesses Variety of trail and boardwalk systems
Environmental focus concentrated on the lagoon ecosystem Cultural interpretation '
Capacity of site limits recreation & expansion Modern learning center /
Classroom
Interactive exhibit
Library
Science exploration room
Outdoor amphitheatre

'"", Weaknesses
Limited recreational features
Few programs offered




















24 25


A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK







SHELDON LAKE STATE PARK




Sheldon Lake State Park & Environmental Learning Center is a 2,800 acre outdoor education and recre-
ation facility located in northeast Harris County with five different trails totaling over 1.5 miles and two
aquatic labs.

Ownership: State Parks & Recreation
Proximity: West Texas
Scale: 2,800acres

Recreational Elements:
Hiking
Wildlife observation
Boating
Fishing

Educational Elements
Environmental learning center
Two aquatic labs 1
Science room
Interactive exhibits
Programs


Strengths
Variety of hiking trails
Broad range of educational elements
Alternate energy
Green building
Compost demonstration
Native demonstration gardens
Wildlife viewing ponds
Aquatic labs

Weaknesses
Lack of variety of natural communities


Sheldon Lake Legend:
Environmental Learning Center ,o .. a l .S.










6 7








SMASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN IN T STAT






SITE ANALYSIS

Topography- As displayed by the contours within the soils map there is little grade change throughout
the site. Along the east side of the site along the dune systems there is an elevation difference of roughly
,five feet. There is however significant bathometric elevation changes moving east from the shoreline into
the Atlantic Ocean. The gentle sloping bathometric contours adjacent the west side of the site within the
,_,' 'KS Indian River Lagoon display shallow areas with a deep channel dug out for navigation through the inlet
S OI LS M A P water.


S' Geology- Consisting mainly of Hawthorn group deposits, the Park is inter bedded with limestone,
dolomite, sand and clay laid down 23 to 13 million years ago in the Miocene times. Overlaying the
Hawthorn Group is the Anastasia Formation composed of quartz sand and shell material laid 1.6 to 0.1
Million years ago during the Pleistocene era.


Soils- There are seven different soil types excluding spoil banks within the Park. In two areas of the
park, along the shoreline of the Atlantic Ocean and beach dune community south of the inlet, significant
v' '. soil erosion occurs. This is cause by seasonal storms and inlet exacerbation.
Canaveral Complex- A mixture of sand and shell fragments, Canaveral Complex is a nearly level,
gently sloping soil. It occurs along the Atlantic coast on narrow ridges.
-* Coastal Beaches- Consisting of narrow strips of nearly level or gently sloping sand and seen along
the Atlantic Ocean, Coastal Beach soils are a mixture of quartz sand and fragments of sea shells. At
times it is covered with saltwater and is bare of vegetation.
Legend Palm Beach Sand- With a 0-5 percent slope, this soil is nearly level, well-drained and occurs on dune-
like ridges parallel to the coastline. Palm Beach Sand is low in organic content and moderately alkaline
------- Bathymetric Contours throughout. It has a low water table and rapid permeability rate.
Contours Quartzipsamments- A mix of thick deposits of sand, mixed sand and shell fragments,
......o tours i s Quartzipsamments is gently sloping at 0-5 percent and moderately drained to somewhat poorly
BrackishWater drained. Available water capacity is very low and permeability is very rapid.
I I Kesson Muck Captiva Fine Sand- Poorly drained and nearly level, captive fine sand occurs in narrow, elongated
sloughs between dune-like ridges and mangrove swamps. Slopes range from 0-1 percent.
Captiva Fine Sand Kesson Muck- This soil is frequently flooded, very poorly drained and nearly level. Kesson Muck is
AQuartzipsamments ,N I formed in thick marine deposits of sand and shell fragments and occurs in tidal swamps and marshes.
___! i.t ; .o / 'The surface appears dark reddish-brown and the underlying layer is grayish-brown and dark greenish-
SCanaveral-Anclote Copl IE gray fine sand mixed.
Palm Beach Sand Bessie Tidal Muck- The areas of this soil are covered in dense, tangled growth of mangrove trees
,' "- and roots. The soil material ranges from shells to mixed sand and organic materials.
SBeaches
Bessie Muck, Tidal /
I Park Boundary \ '

S,, Summary
'- The soils map displays areas where frequent flooding occurs as well as erosion. It shows where development
\ might be difficult, or not desired because of existing sensitive areas. The bathometric contours indicate
areas for safe navigation, as well as shallow areas prime for canoeing and kayaking. The soils map aids the
S"'creation and analysis of the flood map on the following pages.




0 1,000 2,000 4,000
Feet .9
28 2 9
AA VISION OF TOAOEROW"
A MAASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






SITE ANALYSIS SITE ANALYSIS





T FLOOD MAP BURN ZONES MAP






SLegend
-,,\ C (- ,



















LegendN zone1 \
High PZone 2
Si zfone 3



Low.PLeged N_..

Zone4

Medium Zone 6
Zone 7






A burn zones map of the site shows areas for management to maintain ecology diversity within natural
Coinciding with both the soils and vegetation map, the flood map shows flood risks throughout the site..
communities. A majority of the area is coastal strand and beach dune and all zones have a fire return
Average annual rainfall is approxamately 52 inches. With low elevation levels and the fact that the park is .
Sa rn is 5 i h i r interval of five to seven years. These areas indicate sensitive habitat where constant management is
surrounded by waters and in an area with heavy rain events and an active hurricane season, a majority of
Averageneeded. There are eleven burn zones compiling 92 buelevation acres. Development should be minimal or non
the park shows a high risk for flooding. The entire site is under the flood plain. This is needs to be taken eee. There are eleven bn zones com g 92 bm Develment s be
existent in these areas so that the health of these systems is maintained.
into account when addressing existing and proposed structures as well as overall design and management
of the site. It should be noted that these bum zones areas are close to active use areas and would provide for
opportunities for interpretive signage and tours.

30 31
'A VISION OF TOOMOROW"
A MAASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK







SITE ANALYSIS


Vegetation
VE E TATION MA P Eight natural communities are contained within the Park in addition to developed and ruderal
S...-.. areas, aquatic grass flats and marine worm reef areas just off the coast. Each area contains a variety of
wildlife species interchangeably as well as some rare and endangered species. Some important plant
Legend communities include:
ee Beach Dune & Coastal Strand- This community is seen adjacent the beach with minimal erosion
SDeveloped/Beaches and vegetative cover. Dominant vegetation includes Uniola paniculata, Helianthis debilis, Ipomoea
Ruderal imperati, Panicum amarum, Canavalia rosea, Coccoloba uvifera, Sabal palmetto, Serenoa repens, Spartina
Dune/Coastal Strand patens, Croton punctatus, and Myrica cerifera among others. There are areas south of the inlet where
this community is in poor condition because of fragmentation by trails, parking, and beach re
Marine Unconsolidated Substrate nourishment projects. This has caused a high amount of erosion in some areas. The beach dune and
Maritime Hammock coastal strand community south of the inlet supports one of the last populations of a very rare and
l Woodland Pasture endangered species of southeastern beach mouse in the south. This species also lived in the dunes
SSaw Mash and coastal strand north of the inlet but because of habitat fragmentation and predation among other
factors the species disappeared.
Mangrove Tidal Swamp Maritime Hammock- Because of vulnerability to extinction and its rarity, the Maritime Hammock
Grass Flats community is considered imperiled by the Florida Natural Areas Inventory and should be protected.
Estuary/Ocean It is considered to be in good condition based on the park's unit management plan with some areas
being invaded by exotic Brazilian Pepper and Australian Pine species. Some common native plant
P^Brevard & Indian County species include Quercas geminata, Ardisia escallonoides, Eugenia axaillaris, Persea borbonia, and Bursera
........Park Boundary simaruba among others.
Mangrove Tidal Swamp- based on the unit management plan for the park the condition of this
community varies throughout the site. The mosquito impoundments surrounding the shoreline
along the lagoon side have altered these areas significantly but improvements are being made. red
mangrove, White mangrove, Black Mangrove and buttonwood dominate this community with few
/,exotics present.
Estuary & Ocean- Substrate along the edges of the aquatic estuary touching the western edge of
the site is mostly devoid of vegetation but home to rare shorebirds, crabs and mollusks. These areas
along the Indian River side as well as the Atlantic side are also home to young sea turtles and nesting
ones as well.
Grass Flats- Located along the wester side of the Park in the Lagoon waters, This aquatic
community shown in bright green stabilizes sediments and provides nurseries, shelter and food to
plenty of aquatic organisms. Some species of grass include Halodule wrightii, thalassia testudinum,
/ Halophila johnsonii and Syringodium filiforme among others.
N !* Ruderal- These areas are severely altered by human activity and often contain exotic and invasive
i. H species. There is a large area of concern just north of the inlet and cove where a large number of
gopher turtles reside and is used for overflow parking.
..\ i \ -* Developed Areas- These are areas where all natural vegetation has been removed for development
S..--. \ and structures for human use.



Summary
--- This map has been the most useful for developing analysis, synthesis, and masterplanning. It provides
/ \information for important natural communities that need to be protected as well as those that could
provide recreational and interpretive opportunities. It was also discovered some of the areas on this map
need to be addressed for rehabilitation because of threatened wildlife species like the eastern beach mouse,
gopher tortoise and eastern shorebird area at the tip of coconut point. Developed areas might show areas
0 1,000 2,000 4,000 for potential redevelopment and expansion depending on existing vegetation near these areas.
Feet


32 33
AA VRsAoN OF ToBTOROW"
A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






SITE SYTNTH ESIS



Based on prior research, site visits, inventory, and analysis of the site and surrounding areas, two synthesis CON S E RVATI ON SUITAB I ITYV A P
maps have been produced.

Conservation
The first map shows suitabilities for conservation with red representing areas to be conserved, protected
or even enhanced naturally. An example would be the coastal dune habitats in red or eastern shorebird
nesting area at the tip of coconut point located on the southwest peninsula. Moving across the legend,
yellow and then light yellows and whites represent areas that have either been disturbed or don't offer any
important natural elements that need to be conserved. You can see from this and previous maps that much
of the Park is unidsturbed and contains important natural areas for conservation.

Recreation
The map on page 36 shows areas of the park with suitability for recreation. Areas in darker reds and
oranges offer opportunity for active recreation. Yellows and light greens display areas with potential
for passive recreation and areas hatched should be protected. These areas include the dune and caostal
habitats and the eastern shorebird habitat at the tip of coconut point.

The two suitability maps communicate with one another but display some conflicting data. For example
an area on the conservation suitability signifying strong desire for conservation may also show as an
opportunity for recreation on the recreation suitability map. This is because that area might have features
that should be protected and maintained but also offer opportunity for interpretation and education, which
might be accomplished through passive recreation with little to no disturbance to the area. These maps can
be somewhat arbitrary and depend on decision making during the masterplanning process.

The suitability maps were developed to help aid in the masterplanning process and hopefully reinforce the
initial vision and guiding principles of the masterplan.







Legend N
Low


Medium



High
SPark Boundary 0 1,000 2,000 4,000
Feet





34 35
AA VRSAON OF ToEoBROW"
A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






SITE SYNTHESIS




RECREATION SUITABILITY M AP Summary of Park Suitabilities
Following suitability analysis, the next step was to begin locating areas for protection, preservation,
rehabilitation, and redevelopment and improvements in fulfilling the initial vision for the project. This
would help organize the overall masterplan as well as program development which began conceptually
early on in the process. Three areas of interest were selected within the park. These areas were either
heavily used by park visitors or natural areas disturbed by either human activity or other invasive species.
SThe three areas of interest are:

1. North marina Area
2. Central Day-Use Area
S--3. South Camping Area.

The areas are shown on the map on page 38. These three areas serve as the three most actively used areas
of the park by visitors. The plan illustrates main access points in yellow to each of these areas from A1A,
I shown as a dashed red line. Each of these three areas of the masterplan will be discussed in more detail in
the phased portion of the masterplan.















Legend
Active



Passive



MPreservation
Aquatic Rec.
Protection
SPark Boundary 0 1,000 2,000 4,000
Feet ZZr \




S36 37

A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK









AREAS OF INTEREST


U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U


O Access Points i


-m--... Major Circulation-
A1A A


North Marina


Central Day Use


South Campgrounds


OF TOMORROW"


0







PARK MASTERPLAN


The overall masterplan map for the park on the following page displays active areas for redevelopment
and proposed areas for natural rehabilitation. One of the main goals for the park vision is to bring more
people into the site while improving visitor experience.

Redevelopment
For redevelopment in red areas, the goal is to attract more visitors while minimizing disturbance to the
natural areas close by. Most of the areas selected in red for re-development are either already developed or
already disturbed areas with little to no expansion into existing healthy natural areas. Places identified for'
rehabilitation are important naturally disturbed areas in need of improvements. Along with rehabilitating -
these areas, the goal is also to provide information to visitors, why there is a need for improvements, how i
it is being done, and why it should be happening. .

Archealogical Preservation
Preservation of known existing archaeological sites has been taken into account during the design process
and those sites will stay protected, however it is highly likely there are more of these sites within the park
that have not been recorded. Professional surveying has not been done and there is no set time frame for this
to take place in the near future. Therefore preserving potential archaeological sites has not been ignored,
but was not a high priority. It is assumed that surveying and sampling will be done prior to alteration of
existing areas where plans illustrate. If these areas contain archeological sites base on surveying, revisions
will be made to protect these areas.

Architecture
All proposed structures and buildings including the making, rest room facilities, new cafe', baitshop,
etc. will have a vernacular style of architecture. All proposed structures will be designed to withstand
occasional flooding and raised in areas with frequent flooding.

Landscaping & Irrigation
All landscaping done within the masterplan will be 100 percent native taking into account the natural
plant communities close by. This will provide more nectar, seed, cover, and sustenance for wildlife and
help reinforce the natural areas of the Park as well. The native plants will require less fertilizer, fungicide
and pesticide. Using natives will also help maintain a healthy natural soil. Temporary irriragtion may be
used until native plants are established but this will decrease water polltuion and conserve water as no
permanent form of irrigation will be needed. The native plantings will also provide more opportunity for
signage and public education through demonstration.

Rehabilitation
Areas for rehabilitation include the eastern shorebird habitat at the southwest tip of coconut point and
along the east side of the site within the dune and caostal communies. Rehabilitation will consist of limiting
or preventing access to selected or all areas with fencing, signage, and enfroecement if necessary. Native
landscaping to improve the health of the vegetation community will also be done with native plants of
the existing specific plant community of that area. These rehabilitation sites will provide yet another area
within the park for public education and interpretation through demonstartion. Rehabilitation



Redevelopment






4041 j

A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK












The emphasis for the rehabilitation map is within the dune and coastal community. These areas have seen REH A B I ITATION A P
the most disturbance by humans. Beach re nourishment projects south of the inlet along the east coast
brought sand across the dunes in trucks which cut wide trails through the natural habitat causing major
damage. Since the re nourishment projects, park visitors seeking access to the beach continue to use these
trails while parking along A1A for quicker and closer access to the beach. This has created an ongoing
disturbance to the areas. In some cases erosion is severe and the dunes have fallen away completely.

Not only are the communities themselves very important, but one of the last populations of a very
endangered species of southeastern beach mouse mentioned earlier in analysis makes the dune and coastal -:
habitat its home, along with gopher tortoises, scrub jays and other threatened species. A first step for
the masterplan would be to replant these identified areas with native vegetation, and enforce regulations
of no parking or access to. This would have to be done with signage, fencing and communication and
enforcement by park rangers.






Plant List for Rehabilitation of the Dune Communities
Sea Oats(Uniola paniculata)
Railroad Vine (Ipomoea pes-caprae)
Beach Morning Glory (Ipomoea imperati)
Coastal Dune Sunflower (Helianthus debilis var. debilis)
Baybean (Canavalia rosea)
Bitter panicgrass (Panicum amarum)
Sea grape (Coccoloba uvifera) .






li>a.


















42 43
AA VPsRON OF TOMTOROW"
A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






PHASED MASTERPLAN

The phased masterplan organizes the program elements into phases of the three areas of interest and is
based on the unit management plan for the Park and these three main factors.

1) Park and user needs
2) Cost of implementation
3) Time needed for implementation.


Below is an outline of the overall program for the park organized within the three areas of interest and
North Marina Area
broken down into phases within those areas. ....t Ma ia Area
Al Phase 1: Marina Life
P a O n Phase 2: Spanish House Parking
Program Outline ,Phase 3: Environmental Learning
The program includes revitalization of existing natural areas, improvements to existing features, and fCenter- Option A
design of new use elements. .-

North Marina Area
Phase 1: "Marina Life'- Redevelopment

Phase 2: "Spanish House Parking"- Redevelopment

Phase 3: "Environmental Learning Center"- Option A Central Day Use
New Use Area Phasel: Atlantic Lounge
Phase 2: Cove Experience
Central Day-Use Area Phase 3: Environmental
Phase 1: "Atlantic Lounge"- Redevelopment - S Learning Center- Option B

Phase 2: "Cove Experience"- Redevelopment

Phase 3: "Environmental Learning Center"- Option B
New Use Area

South Camping Area
Phase 1: "Wildlife Protection"- Revitalization

Phase 2: "Cooler Camping"- Redevelopment


Phase 1

S Phase 2


Phase 3 South Camping
Phasel: Wildlife protection
Phase2: Greeener Camping







44 45 .
NoFN EOF TOOTAIN IROW"
A AMASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN IN LET$ EPR






NORTH MARINA



EXI STI NG CONDITIONS Eastern Parking Lot and Administration Office
The quietest of the three areas of the masterplan, the north marina area is rarely filled with cars or people
unless there is a special event happening. It is located to the far north of the park and is an under utilized .
area for what it offers. Just to the west of A1A is an informal parking lot with the capacity to hold roughly
forty cars. Across from the parking lot an administration building with offices for park managers and
rangers as well as a utilities area to the west of the building can be seen. There is access to the beach
across from A1A which is the main reason for visitors parking here. To the west of the parking lot a large
kiosk informs visitors of the Hammock trail head nearby. This area is addressed during phase two of the
masterplan for the north marina area.


Marina
Passing the parking lot and administration building visitors can take a dirt road to the marina. Parking is
informal and unpaved. The marina is old and in need of repairs but nestled in a nice lagoon cove offering
great views over the water. The existing dock system is newly renovated and the existing boat ramp is in
good shape. There are very few areas to sit and enjoy the area though it could be a nice space. Inside the
marina you can find information on boating or decide to rent a canoe or kayak for one half day or a full
day. Rest rooms are located on the outside of the building. A large kiosk offers information on the history
of mosquito impoundments in the area that became very popular in the 1950's but are slowly being altered
to improve the health of the mangrove ecosystems. The kiosk also serves as a trail head to a multi-use trail
6 system used heavily as a bike path through the mangrove swamps.












Below are pictures of the parking lot for the beach (left) and the existing marina (right).
















46 47
A VON MASTERPLANOF T OFOR OBTAIN ROW"
A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK







PHASE 1- MARINA LIFE





Right now the marina area is under utilized. The building offers very little to visitors. Users are only i
spending the necessary time here to either launch their boat or rent a canoe and kayak to take off on into
the River. The space offers much more potential for a variety of uses because of its great location, excellent
views, and peaceful environment.

Design Goal: to create a space for visitors to spend time in and enjoy the natural and recreational r
features the marina and its surrounding has to offer.

A redesigned marina resembling the architecture of early fish camps offers concessions and a covered and
screened seating area as well as outdoor shaded seating on an expanded deck. This would draw visitors i*
into the space for a bite to eat and a cold drink after or before a day of boating or to just to pass the time
looking out over the water. A proposed fish cleaning station also creates the potential to clean your fish
and have a cook from inside prepare your catch for a meal while you rest in the shade. With a canoe and -" i.
kayak rental station within the marina for users, there is opportunity for guided tours across the gentle
waters of the lagoon. .

A park area shown to the west of the building offers even more opportunity for seating as well as picnicking r
and grilling. A trail down to a community pavilion and dock system could be rented out for birthday
parties or to simply allow families an area for get together in a private setting.

Shaded formalized parking is separated from the main circulation route. Two storm water ponds collect i
run off and filter it before moving into the Lagoon.











Concept C 1. Community Pavilion & Dock .
Co-nc ept C2. Stormwater Ponds
3. Boat Trailer Parking (6)A
7 ... D I p 4. Dove Tail .
S5. Boat RampL

..8. Marina
Concept B 9. One Way Angled Parking
ConepB10. Covered Deck
S11. Picnic Area "
12. Deck Seating
( ''13. Indian River Lagoon
Existing
IExisting 50 100 200
Feet

/-'I


48 49


A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






PHASE 2- SPANISH HOUSE PARKING





The parking lot just to the west of A1A does not accommodate for the numbers of visitors it attracts on
A vernacular designed marina resembling the character of early fish camps with a a good day of surf because of a very popular break called "Spanish House" just north of the area. The
screened in front porch would add character, culture and history to the area. parking lot at this location can hold roughly 40 cars which causes parking overflow parking along A1A
making matters unsafe which also damages the natural vegetation.


Design Goal: To expand the parking lot while doing minimal clearing to existing vegetation nearby.
...... Increasing shade within the new parking area with native trees of Sabal palmetto, Coccoloba uvifera and
native oaks.

To accommodate for more users, a proposed rest room facility along with showers just west of the parking
- 10' Irh lot near the existing trail head would attract more people to the Hammock trail and marina area as well.
-,-r r.-. -. -,n a a f By providing enough parking spaces for users and especially surfers when the waves are up, this would
hopefully prevent parking along A1A and prevent people from making new trails to the beach through the
SMarina & Shade Park Area Angled Par.ng *,, Pnted sland dune habitat. Signage and enforcement might be needed however which could educate individuals about
Ind4n RmI Ugoon the sensitive habitats and wildlife within these natural areas.
Dock SrystemR































50 1
AA VRSAON OF ToEoBROW"-
A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






I

/
"i


The proposed parking lot contains planted islands every eight
car spaces to provide shade and collect rainwater from the
parking lot. One way roads and angled parking limit the size
of the parking and therefore decreasing the amount of natural
vegetation that would have to be cleared.


-4-


I: A Zgj po
~ b._I I TI_- T


\
'i


* Existing


50 100
Feet


OF TOMORROW"


. 1 .. -







PHASE 3- ENVIRONMENTAL LEARNING CENTER

OPTION A

The introduction of an environmental learning center to the park is a conceptual idea that could be
implemented down the road. Because the park offers such a rich array of cultural, natural and historical
features, the ELC would provide a wide variety of effective interpretive programs both indoors and out.
This is the first conceptual design for an ELC in the park using a more conservative approach of proposed
program elements although if was implemented in this area of the Park, it should be noted that there would
a lot of clearing of hardwood hammock vegetation.

This proposed location would create a more private space for the ELC with connections to the marina.
This could reinforce the idea of the guided tours on the Lagoon and make hands on aqautic education
available.



N












Rest/Outlook Ropes
Areas Tral Course
System





1. Entrance
Classroom 2. Pervious Parking
3. Historic Model Home & Native garden
Concession Gift 4. Educational Facility
.Shop a. Visitor Center
Visitor b. Gift Shop
Center c. Concessions
d. Classroom
e. Aquatic Lab
Native Plant Walk f. Greenhouse
5. Trail System
Parking 6. No-Motor Vessel Station
ROAD 7.Ropes Course

54 55
AA VESNON OF ToMoROW"E A
A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






CENTRAL DAY-USE


To the Northeast of the Inlet
This is the busiest area of the park offering the most recreational elements and parking for users. The newly
reconstructed north jetty is always crowded and when there are waves, surfers come from all over to surf
"first peak." Two annual surf contests take place here attracting thousands of visitors from all over the
world for each week long event. A boardwalk system leads down to miles of Atlantic Beaches, the north
jetty, and also concessions area and gift shop. Rest room facilities and outdoor showers are located just
north of the concessions building. Between the parking lot and boardwalk a shaded park has picnic tables
and just south of that there is a bait shop for anglers. For a more private beach experience visitors can park
to the north in another large parking lot with its own outdoor showers and rest room facilities.

(!To The Northwest of the Inlet
7 7To the northwest of the inlet a man made swimming cove offers gentle waters for people of all ages to
swim without worrying about powerful waves and rip currents. It is also a good place for snorkeling and

for fishermen who don't want the crowds of the jetty or catwalk running under the AlA bridge. To the
Northwest of the swimming cove an overflow parking area is used during holidays, surf contests and busy
summer days when the Central Day-Use Area fills up.















Below are pictures of the existing concessions building (left) and the existing parking lot and park leading
to the boardwalk system and concessions (right).
















56 57

AA VTSAON OF ToEoBROW"-
A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






PHASE 1- ATLANTIC LOUNGE CONCEPT DESIGN




Similar to the Marina Area, the concessions building located along the boardwalk system is under utilized. Concept A
There is very limited space inside and outside of the building for seating and not a lot of variety for food
and beverage is provided. The building also does not take advantage of great views to the Atlantic Ocean,
beaches or the active inlet waters. There is limited recreation aside from the beach and the pier, and also a
need to entertain younger children when they are away from the beach.
Concept B

Design Goal: to create a space for visitors to spend time in and enjoy the natural and recreational features
of the beaches and waterways while providing improved dining services to create a better experience for
visitors and an increase in revenue for the park.

A design for a vernacular new-use cafe' building with an extended deck from the boardwalk, oriented for
users to enjoy views to the inlet and Atlantic would create a great seating and dining area. Expanding up
and not out would make room for indoor dining upstairs and a break from the sun and pesky mosquitos.
On the ground floor, indoors is a proposed beach rental station and retail/gift shop as well as an extended
deck and seating just outside overlooking the beach and inlet. Expanding up and making the building two
stories would not only improve views for visitors downstairs, but owuld eliminate the need to clear away
dune habitat.

A proposed playground is much needed as there is not one anywhere north of the inlet. Sand volleyball
courts would add yet even more variety of recreation to the place.

Additional planting of native trees within the park system would provide more shade for seating and Concept C
recreation along with a pavilion for private get-togethers.

The existing parking lot is in need of additional shade from native trees which is also proposed on the
masterplan for the Atlantic Lounge.
n fr te A c Taking the concept diagrams to the next step
Concept A if involved orienting them to take advantage of good
views and analyzing relationships. Circulation
Conceptual diagrams were created among each program element was also examined.
to define architectural structure of These diagrams helped identify the use of elements
both the first and second floor of from each concept for a final program diagram
the cafe'. for the cafe' and Atlantic lounge Masterplan.
Additional proposed elements include a wildlife
S^ outlook, bait shop, boardwalk system, rest room
l. facilities, showers, pedestrian circulation, storage
area, and parking.

1st Floor 2nd Floor
Concept B Concept C









lst Floor 2nd Floor 1st Floor 2nd Floor
58 59

A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK














'4


1. "Park area
2. Playground
3. Pavilion
4. Sand Volleybal
5. Bail Shop
6. Service Parking
7. Storage Area
8. Cafe'/Retail Building
9. Deck Seating
10. Restroom Facilities
11. Lookout Station
12. "Boardwalk System
13. "Beach & Atlantic Ocean
14. "Inlet
* Existing

-~ Ciii


The second story cafe' surrounded by large windows and an open interior
would provide visitors with views to the beaches, ocean and inlet waters.
The first floor would contain a station for beach rentals, a gift shop, and
outside and expanded deck with shaded seating.


....


rwrr


./
r;


E l'*


50 100
Feet


I


"i
1
/


J~4,


\,


Tr~






PHASE 2- COVE EXPERIENCE



For the amount of visitors that use the cove area, there is a lack of shade during the day, no rest room fa-
cilities or outdoor showers, and informal parking along the road causing disturbance to vegetated areas.

Design Goal: to provide users with additional elements to enhance the experience and bring more people
to the area while decreasing disturbance to the natural environment.

The overflow parking area is already disturbed. Creating a formal overflow parking lot would prevent
cove users from parking along the road among vegetation. Creating distinguished paths would also
control circulation.

The addition of showers, pavilions along the edge of the beach, and rest room facilities would further
enhance user experience and bring more people into the site.

Native trees in planted islands would provide shade in and along edges of the parking lot and parking
along the roadside. Proposed bioswales between parking spaces and a storm water pond would treat aA ..
runoff before it is released into the lagoon and inlet.




Two photos of existing conditions. f 4








N14 2 Way Road


... 5. Restroom Facilities
6. Showers
7. Showers & Trails
'1 8. Pavilions
9. Cul-de-Sac Viewing Area
10. Cove Waters
11. The Inlet

i Existing



50 100 200 Fee





62 63.
ASTERPLAN FOR OF T ROW"






P____ HASE 3- ENVIRONMENTAL LEARNING CENTER
OPTION B


The introduction of an environmental learning center to the park and its users is a conceptual idea that
could develop down the road. Because the park offers such a rich array of cultural, natural and historical
-t features, the ELC could provide a wide variety of effective interpretive programs both indoors and out.
"?,< q, This is the second conceptual design for an ELC in the park using a more aggressive approach of proposed
program elements to support more visitors and provide more features.








1 l






Lagoon
Aquatic
Excursion
Rest/Outlook Station
Areas Trail Ropes
System



S____ LAB
Greenhouse F Theatre
|.Classroom
ACTIVE
CaRf Gift REC
Shop PLAYGRND AREA
............................... V is ito r

Center PINIC/PAV.


Parking


ROAD



64 (65
AA VISION OF ToMoROW"
A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






SOUTH CAMPING AREA





1. Picnic/Pavilion Area
2. Active Recreational Area
3. Paved Parking & Retention
4. Educational
a. Visitor Center
b. Gift Shop
c. Cafe'
d. Classroom
e. Aquatic Lab
f. Greenhouse
5. Trail System & Ropes Course
6. No- Motor Vessel Station
7. Existing Road


OF TOMORROW"






SOUTH CAMPING AREA




The south camping area contains the Florida Fishing Museum near A1A and miles of more private
Atlantic beaches. The campground along coconut point has full facility sites for both RV's and tents and
there is a parking lot alongside A1A with free access to the beach farther south. .

Phase 1: Wildlife Protection
Phase 1 for this area addresses the eastern shorebird nesting area at the tip of coconut point as well
as the highly disturbed dune and coastal habitats along the east side of A1A south of the inlet noted .
earlier from the Vegetation Map. Replacing the existing chain link fence which keeps visitors out of the
shorebird area with a nicer wooden dune fence along with interpretive signage would enhance visual
quality. The signage would also educate users about the protected area making them less likely to enter.

Along the eastern side of A1A beach re nourishment programs in the past that had trucks bring sand
across the dune habitat damaged large areas. Beachgoers continue to use these areas as access points to
the beach, blocking the wildlife corridors and not giving the vegetation a chance to grow back. There are
also a number of areas where people are parking alongside A1A for easy access to the beach throughout
these damaged areas which is unsafe for users and detrimental to vegetation.

This plan for phase 1 identifies those areas that need to be protected through enforcement of signage and
dune fencing to prevent access. This would also be a good opportunity to educate people on why they
shouldn't be disrupting the natural habitat, where the southeastern beach mouse, a highly threatened
species is trying to survive.









i i
















68 69

A VON ASTERPLANOF TFOR OBTAIN ROW"
A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK






PHASE 2- COOLER CAMPING


The campgrounds at coconut point contain great views to the inlet waters and mangrove swamps along
the Indian River Lagoon. However some the campsites are spaced too closely together and shading is
minimal in many areas.

Design Goal: to provide users with additional elements to enhance the experience and bring more people
to the area by shading with native trees and buffering sites from each other with vegetation.

There is also no current existing tent campsites. The proposed locations on the plan to the right show
designated tent campgrounds made private with additional vegetation. Two fire rings would create areas
for both types of campers.

The plan shows an addition of RV sites to bring in more revenue for the park while spacing out the existing
sites for a nicer experience for campers.

The additional vegetation and shade trees would be planted in a way that would still allow for nice views
to the inlet. All road systems were left as is in the plan and the offices shown at the bottom of the plan are
existing.


kf


s,
L Q


>


To the right is a picture of the existing
campsite area of coconut point to give
you an idea of how close the sites are
spaced together and barren the area


1. Small RV Site
2. Large RV Site
3. 'One Way Roads
4. Fire Ring
5. Tent Campsites
6. "Restrom Facilities
7. "Ofices
8. "The Inlet
9. "Mangrove Swamp &
Laggon Waters


* Existing


50 100
Feet


TOMORROW"


~cF'
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CONCLUSION

"A Vision for Tomorrow" was a very rewarding for me. I have
taken a liking to park's design and think planning and designing
( for outdoor experiences among nature is gratifying. One of the
biggest lesson I learned about this project was how different the
design process is when dealing with real clients and a real site.
: Ideas change so much after research, during analysis, and after
.*../ / t.... meetings with clients that you can't always stick to the same
deign ideas throughout. I've learned flexibility and willingness
to change ideas for the better of the client and site is very
important in producing effective and efficient work.















i







ai::..








7273

^A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLET STATE PARK







BIBLIOGRAPHY


Absolutely Florida. "Florida State Parks SEBASTIAN INLET STATE RECREATION AREA." Absolutely
Florida Guide to Travel in the Sunshine State. Web. 26 Apr. 2010. SebastianInlet/sebastianinlet.html>.

Ferrero Hixon Assoc. Sears Park Masterplan. Rep. May 15, 2009. Print.

Florida Tech. Geomorphic Investigations of Tidal Inlets: Applications in Coastal Engineering. Rep. Ma-
rine & Environmental Systems. Web. Mar.-Apr. 2010. .

Forsyth, Ann, Laura Musacchio, and Frank Fitzgerald. Designing Small Parks: a Manual Addressing
Social and Ecological Concerns. Hoboken, N.J.: J. Wiley, 2005. Print.

McHarg, Ian L. Design with Nature. Garden City, N.Y.: Published for the American Museum of Natural
History [by] the Natural History, 1969. Print.

Portland Parks and Recreation. Waterfront Park Masterplan. Rep. Portland. Print.

Rhodeside and Harwell. Monroe Park Masterplan. Rep. Print.

RJM Design Group Inc. Ambrose Park- Masterplan Report. Ambrose Park- Masterplan Report. 30 Apr.
2009. Web.

Roberts, Wallace, and Todd Roberts. Boyce Mayview Park Masterplan. Ecological Restorations, 1999.
Print.
The Sebastian Inlet District. "Sebastian Inlet District The History of Sebastian Inlet, Florida."

Sebastian Inlet District Managing the Connection Between the Atlantic Ocean & Indian River. Web.
Mar.-Apr. 2010. .
"Sebastian Inlet History I SURFLINE.COM." SURFLINE.COM I Global Surf Reports and Forecasts, Live
Surf Cams and Coastal Weather. Web. 26 Apr. 2010. tian-inlet-history_904/>.

Sebastian Inlet State Park Unit Management Plan. Rep. Vol. December 12th. Environmental Protection
Agency: State of Florida, 2008. Print.

Sole, Michael W., and Bob Ballard, comps. "Outdoor Recreation in Florida- 2008." Environmental Protec-
tion Agency. Web. Dec. 2009. reationinFlorida2000.pdf>.

Website Creations. "Sebastian Inlet State Park." Welcome To Floridian Nature. Web. Jan.-Feb. 2010.
.

Welcome to Florida State Parks. Web. 26 Apr. 2010. let/>.



74

A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBSTAIN INLETTATEPARK
















7;


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ii-


- -i-


A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBASTIAN INLET STATE PARK


SEBASTIAN INLET STATE PARK:

"A VISION OF TOMORROW"


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CONTENTS


Site & Project Introduction
Vision
Location
Description


Analysis & Suitability
Land Use
Soils
Hydrology
Burn Zones
Vegetation
Conservation/Recreation

Masterplan Summary
Three areas of Interest
Conservation
Recreation


Phased


Masterplan
North & Marina
Central Day Use
South & Campgrounds


Conclusion


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PROJECT VISION i


The significant growth and development in the state of Florida and more
specifically along its coasts has caused degradation of the extraordinary yet
fragile natural environments of these areas, threatening many exotic species,
natural communities and important ecological systems. It is vital that we
preserve and protect these natural areas, provide opportunities for recreation
and interpretation, and allow individuals of all ages to experience the
importance of these fragile natural settings, and learn what can be done to
maintain them. The Sebastian Inlet State Park holds numerous natural
amenities and has played a leading role in protecting these natural systems
while offering park users a variety of recreational opportunities. My intent is to
provide a masterplan for the park that would further enhance these natural
features while creating enjoyable experiences to increase the parks number of
visitors.






PROJECT VISION U



Guiding Principles
The balance of three interrelated guiding principles form the park masterplan, and remain just as
important in the park's vision today, as they do over a long term period of time.

1. Preservation, Protection & Enhancement: The
S importance of preserving the existing natural and cultural features of
the site needs to remain a main focus through the design process.
--- In addition, improvements to currently altered and impacted natural
communities are another goal. The addition of proposed features
and facilities, as well as improvements to existing site elements
should have minimal impacts on the significant cultural and natural
resources of the site. It is important that the current character of the
S W site be preserved and that the park continues to be successful in
preserving and protecting Florida's threatened natural coastal
environments.



1 Recreation and More: Improvements to existing site
**i-aba features, as well as the addition of new-use features to provide for
S resource-based recreation are another focus. The intent of these
additions and enhancements is to improve the overall user
experience of the site and to attract more visitors. Recreational
elements will be a huge focus as they play a huge role in the
effectiveness of environmental education, interaction and site
experience.



1. Interpretation: Interpretational elements in areas where
locals and visitors have a chance to interact with the natural
Environment is key for understanding not only the importance
of these areas but also the important roles humans can play, in
S protecting these natural environments in the 21st century. The
S outdoor educational program of the site should contain
S. educational facilities, indoor and outdoor classrooms, and
f ,-.-,, .,I opportunities for field studies and outdoor laboratory
i, ..;. experiences, among other components.





SITE LOCATION


Sebastian Inlet State
Park


Brevard County


.-Indian River County


. ... ' '


~ '


4v^





SITE DESCRIPTION


Located on a barrier island between the Indian River Lagoon and the Atlantic
Ocean, and on both side of the Sebastian Inlet, the Park provides a wide variety of
natural amenities and recreational features.
Natural & Recreational Features


4,


First Peak


North Jetty


Atlantic beaches


Inlet Cove


Indian River Lagoon


Hammock Trail


Full Facility Campground


Dune Habitats


Mang rove Swam ps


4






SITE DESCRIPTION


Cultural & Historical Features


Ais Indians, 1760


Spanish Fleet of 1715


Commercial Fish Camps,
1800's


Estuan'
f <
^S ao^^^


Inlet Opening, 1924


1949


Mosquito Impoundments,
1950's


Fishing Museum


McLarty Treasure
Museum


Annual Surf Contests


4




SITE DESCRIPTION U I







~1'


LAND USE


* .5.




2P


Legend
SCase Studes
SSebastian Inlet State -: *
Parks & Recreatmn
StSae Parks
I Instutional
Residential
SCommermal
Industrial
Agnculture
Conservarsn/Open Si..
- Bndges
Water
County Boundares
0 35 7 14 Ms



















,o \
c -


a.


j.'
ft1
"-9

- V


i eA













'V
0 1 2 4Miles a.(


Legend
SSebastian Inlet State Park
o Schools
Cultural Centers
o Park
I Par & Rereation
State Parks
S I Institunal


Residenal
I Comnnercal
Industrial
Aericltural
ConservaetronOpen Space


L


Legend
Case Studies
Schools
Cultural Centers
Parks
Sebastian Inlet State Park
SParks & Recreation
C. State Parks
Institutional
Residential
Commercial
Industrial
Agriculture
Conservation/Open Space
aI Bridges
SCounty Boundaries


Is
.
-. A,;




- ,.'-l .


0 3.5 7 Miles
-n1


4
v^ .'








ANALYSIS


MAPS


Legend
aMym Calu
C-an













Soils Mar












If







Legnd
Iz-I
Zone 2


Zol ne8E
Z-4

z- 100057
Zo- 9E


-
II
ua


Hydrology Map


Legend
- Deveop c
D ou oasta Str
Manne Un-n aMd Subam
Mam-ae Hamm o k
I WomaMid Pature
I SaHwatmMarh
Manro Tla Swamp
GraS Flas
BrePard & I.d Caro
Park 8da.,y


0 1,000 2.00 4000
F4,0


Burn Zones Map


Vegetation Map


o o 1000 roe on


o -n 111 11%


0 i, 200 4I0


"







SUITABILITY MAPS


F


Legend
Low

Medium

High
Park Boundary


A ..


0 1,000 2,000 4.000
Feet


Conservation Suitability


Legend
I Acve

Passive

SPreservation
Aquate Rec
Protection
Park Boundary


Recreational Suitability


~1'


0 1.000 2 --. ,.


4v





AREAS OF


INTEREST


U
[. \
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
*>*


O Access Points r

ns..-,- Major Circulation-
A1A

O North Marina

Central Day Use


South Campgrounds


4
'
v^"C[







MASTERPLAN SUMMARY


xia


SRehabilitation


Redevelopment





REHABILITATION r L


Ammophila breviligulata

Solidago sempervirens

Leymus mollis

i Lathyrus japonicus
Hudsonia tomentosa

Prunus maritima


F





Phase 3


MASTERPLAN- PHASED








n. ,









I












Phase 1

Phase 2


South Camping
Phasel: Wildlife protection
Phase2: Greeener Camping


North Marina Area
Phase 1: Marina Life
Phase 2: Spanish House Parking
Phase 3: Environmental Learning
Center- Option A





Central Day Use
v. Phasel: Atlantic Lounge
S Phase 2: Cove Experience
S Phase 3: Environmental
& \'\ Learning Center- Option B






NORTH MARINA L i i


0


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[* ^,
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irid


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PHASE 1 1 J WI

MARINA LIFE

Objective- Bring in more users
and create a usable space
throughout the day.




Program-
* New marina
Bait Shop /
Concessions
* Dining/Seating
Screened ,
Outdoor
* Cleaning Station
* Community Area
Pavilion ,
Dock
* Shaded Formal Parking
* Shaded Picnic Area




PHASE 1


U


MARINA LIFE


rI


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PHASE 1 WA IU2


MARINA LIFE


Marina & Shaded Park Area


Analed Parkina bne-Wayl Planted Island kne-Wa


Indian River Lagoon &
Dock System


Hardwood Hammock Triler Parking


n

Native Planted island -Native Plnte n lnd Iv One 0-Way |Angled Parkingl NatinvPItd Angled Prking One-Way Angled Parking Hardwood H.mm k
Slormwaer Pond .load I|| lnld | | o.d |


Tf .





PHASE 2 FJ WI

SPANISH HOUSE PARKING


Objective- Improve safety by
adding formal parking to
prevent street-side parking
along AlA as well as control
visitor access points to the
beach.





Program-
*Formal Parking
*Planted Islands for Shade
*Buffer from Al A
*Restroom Facilities
*Sh owners
Trailhead ....
T railhead" ~ ~..... .. .. '".... ;





PHASE 2 I.?
SPANISH HOUSE PARKING
_^ /(







PHASE J I5EI


SPANISH HOUSE PARKING


One-Way Forty-Five Degree Angled Parking


Hardwood Hammock &
Restrooms


. ps..I .. val st..lo


I,




CENTRAL DAY-USE r


0





PHASE 1 WA IV,


ATLANTIC LOUNGE


Objectives- Limit habitat
disturbance while accommodating
more visitors as well as improved
dining services that take
advantage of good views.




Program
*Two story cafe'/retail building
2nd Floor Dining
1st Floor Retail/Beach
Rental
*Shaded Picnic Areas
*Playground & Sand volleyball
*Shaded Parking
*Interpretive signage along
boardwalk system.


Concept A


Concept B


Concept C


1 st Floor


2nd Floor





PHA


ATLANTIC LOUNGE


\72---






PHASE 1 WA IV,


ATLANTIC LOUNGE













- ''* "i
..r llnir Beach Boardaalk S r[em
Atlantic Ocean


IPI*m~





PHASE 2 L J Wi

COVE EXPERIENCE
q


Goal- Formalize parking and
access to the cove to limit
disturbance on natural areas
and provide for shaded areas.


--I




Program -
*Formal Parking along road
*Designated pathways to the
cove
*Pavilions along the beach
*64 Parking Lot for overflow
*Restroom Facilities & Showers
Interpretive signage along
pedestrian paths to the cove






PHASE


COVE


EXPERIE


*1


IF,


-7
AA


rA. *CI; I;


Ii


c
ill!!!!llllllll!A'







PHASE 2 fW\ L ,i


COVE EXPERIENCE


AN

I s- k -r 4C :4 1 91~-~ Ia
i - I -lr I I -'-* 0~ do l 'l l. I a.*


1 1
I,...,-. -~r


Formal Parking Coastal Dune Habitat


Formal Parking Shower


Formal Parking Coastal Dune Habitat Formal Parking




SOUTH


CAMPING


0


0





PHASE 1 WAJ &I


WILDLIFE PROTECTION

Goal- Protect the eastern
shorebird habitat as well as the
eastern dune habitats along A1A
with an improved visual barrier.






Program-

*Visually Appealing dune fencing
along identified areas.

*Signage to enforce fencing.

*Signage providing interpretation.





PHASE 1 W A IV,
WILDLIFE PROTECTION


III,,,,l],


ii.-. - .. -. =- ...


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PHASE 2 W\ IV


GREENER CAMPING
Goal- Increase number of
campsites while improving
experience.






Program-

* More spacing between
sites

*Native landscaping to
shade

*Addition of designated tent
campsites

*Preserve views to the inlet





PHASE 2 L L LJ


GREENER CAMPING







Inlet Waters


Indian River Lagoon






PHASE)E 2 f iI


GREENER CAMPING


I~ I **"" I -.*.- p ~ ~^
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A MASTERPLAN FOR SEBASTIAN INLET STATE PARK


SEBASTIAN INLET STATE PARK:

"A VISION OF TOMORROW"


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