• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Introduction
 Inventory
 Analysis
 Synthesis
 Concept development
 Schematic master plan
 Design development
 Bibliography
 Back Matter














Title: Sweetwater Branch corridor
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100161/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sweetwater Branch corridor
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Deffenbaugh, Allison
Publisher: College of Design, Construction & Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 2010
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Bibliographic ID: UF00100161
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
    Introduction
        Page 4-5
        Page 6-7
        Page 8-9
        Page 10-11
    Inventory
        Page 12-13
        Page 14-15
        Page 16-17
        Page 18-19
        Page 20-21
        Page 22-23
        Page 24-25
        Page 26-27
    Analysis
        Page 28-29
        Page 30-31
        Page 32-33
    Synthesis
        Page 34-35
        Page 36-37
    Concept development
        Page 38-39
        Page 40-41
        Page 42-43
        Page 44-45
    Schematic master plan
        Page 46-47
        Page 48-49
    Design development
        Page 50-51
        Page 52-53
        Page 54-55
        Page 56-57
        Page 58-59
        Page 60-61
        Page 62-63
    Bibliography
        Page 64-65
    Back Matter
        Page 66-67
        Page 68-69
        Page 70-71
        Page 72-73
        Page 74-75
        Page 76-77
        Page 78-79
Full Text


















































SWEETWATER BRANCH CORRIDOR
Allison Deffenbaugh
University of Florida
Spring 2010








The University of Florida
College of Design, Construction and Planning







SWEETWATER BRANCH CORRIDOR
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA





An Undergraduate Thesis in
Landscape Architecture
By
Allison Deffenbaugh



Faculty Advisor
Professor Terry R. Schnadelbach



2010



Submitted in partial fulfillment of the degree of the Bachelor in Landscape Architecture
and has been reviewed and accepted by the faculty as an Honors Thesis












INTRODUCTION
project location

site description

project context

goals and objectives






INTRODUCTION


FLORIDA












ALACHUA COUNTY












SITE BOUNDARY


gainesville, florida

This project is located in north-central Florida's Alachua County. The project site is centered along the length of
Sweetwater Branch and extends to include both its hydrologic context and nearby significant natural and cultural
features. Sweetwater Branch is a natural stream that originates in the City of Gainesville and flows south for
approximately four miles until it reaches the northern edges of Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park, where it ultimately
discharges into the Floridian Aquifer.


Sweetwater Branch forms the central spine of the site identified for this project. The site's boundaries expand from
the beyond Sweetwater Branch to incorporate its hydrologic context as well as other significant natural and cultural
features. NW 16th Avenue forms the site's northern boundary. The southern edge expands to incorporate Sweetwater
Branch's hydrologic end at Alachua Sink where it empties into a sinkhole connected to Floridian Aquifer. The site's
eastern and western edges are both bound by major roads; North and South Main Street to the west and NE 9th Street
and SE 15th Street to the East.


6 sweetwaterbranch corridor I INTRODUCTION


sweetwaterbranch corridor I INTRODUCTION






INTRODUCTION


, NEWNANS LAKE


I ArIAPAHA


PAYNES PRAIRIE
PRESERVE STATE PARK

0


S LAKE WAUBERG


MILES
0 11/4 21/2 5


University of Florida


LaKe wauoerg Kecreation Area


Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic State Park San Felasco Hammock Preserve State Park



8 sweetwaterbranch corridor I INTRODUCTION


alachua county, florida

Florida's Alachua County has both an immense wealth of prized natural features and a highly active outdoor recreation
community. Alachua County and the City of Gainesville maintain a well used system of park and trails throughout
the area. These parks and trails range in scale from just a few city blocks to the renowned 22,000 acre Paynes Prairie
Preserve, one of the County's seven State Parks.

Alachua County's growing population and the University of Florida continually provides hundreds of people to the
areas parks and trails as they seek outdoor recreation activities year-round. The selected site is adjacent to various
neighborhoods of differing income levels and demographics, creating an opportunity to attract diverse groups of
people to project. The County's most prominent trails also cross the selected site and present the possibility to
establish additional trailheads and connect to the regional trail network.


nawrnorne, i-oriaa


sweetwaterbranch corridor I INTRODUCTION 9






INTRODUCTION


AWARENESS | Highlight the course of Sweetwater Branch as it flows south into Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park.
Provide a pedestrian trail system along Sweetwater Branch.
Introduce site elements that allow users to interact with Sweetwater Branch.
Strengthen visual connections to Sweetwater Branch from surrounding districts.
Clearly indicate Sweetwater Branch at significant nodes and intersections.
Identify Sweetwater Branch through consistent signage.

CONNECTIVITY | Utilize Sweetwater Branch as a primary corridor that connects to a secondary network of linkages to
nearby districts, neighborhoods, and natural and cultural features.
Create connections to the regional trail network.
Improve streetscape aesthetics along primary vehicular and pedestrian routes.
Increase the permeability of districts neighboring Sweetwater Branch
Minimize pedestrian, bike, and vehicular conflicts.

RESTORATION | Restore and enhance the natural systems of the site.
Rehabilitate the edges of Sweetwater Branch through slope stabilization and native plant material.
Maximize water filtration to enhance water quality along Sweetwater Branch.
Provide a sufficient buffer zone along Sweetwater Branch to minimize disturbance to the natural system.

RECREATION | Provide outdoor recreation for the area's diverse users groups.
Construct a trail network and provide visitor facilities along Sweetwater Branch.
Incorporate various scales of both active and passive recreation throughout the site.

EXPERIENCE | Create an interpretive landscape that integrate user experience and interaction throughout the site in
order to foster education and environmental stewardship.
Introduce site elements that allow users to interact with the natural environment
Communicate the ecological context through interpretive educational venues.
Define sense of place along Sweetwater Branch by addressing the distinct and changing character of
neighboring districts.

SENSE OF PLACE I Address the distinct and changing character of the districts neighboring Sweetwater Branch.
Incorporate sire elements and materials that highlight the surrounding character and emphasizes sense of
place along Sweetwater Branch.
Strengthen visual connections to surrounding districts from both the Sweetwater Branch corridor and
secondary linkages.


10 sweetwater branch corridor I INTRODUCTION


sweetwaterbranch corridor I INTRODUCTION I I











INVENTORY

hydrology and topography

watersheds

road hierarchy

parks & trails

public schools

historical districts

land use

natural communities

site character

creek study







INVENTORY


INVENTORY


LEGEND


Sweetwater Branch Basin


LEGEND


Five Foot Topographic Contours


Sweetwater Branch

Streams and Canals

Lakes and Ponds

Swamps and Marshes

Wetlands


Major Roads

m Site Boundary


Alachua Sink Basin


Extension Ditch Basin

Paynes Prairie Basin

Sweetwater Branch

Streams and Canals

Lakes and Ponds

Swamps and Marshes

Major Roads

Site Boundary m u


r \~


S---- I .
N> .\ 1 ; .-^ 0 I


0 1/ 1


The project site's highest elevation occurs near the northwestern corner, boundary. From here Sweetwater Branch
forms the central spine of the site and it continuously slopes downward until reaching Paynes Prairie Preserve at the
site's southern end. At this point the topography flattens and distinctive swamps and marshes form across the land-
scape. Sweetwater Branch eventually drains to the lowest elevation on the site near the southeastern boundary at
Alachua Sink.


2 MILES
0 1/2 1 2







The Sweetwater Branch Basin serves as the project site's primary watershed. This watershed is the principle recipient of
stormwater runoff from the downtown and surrounding Gainesville area. The Sweetwater Branch also receives treated
effluent from the Main Street Water Reclamarion Facility. This water is carried directly into Paynes Prairie Preserve
by Sweetwater Branch. The water then enters the Prairie's lowest lake, Alachua Sink, which empties into a sinkhole
connected to the Floridian Aquifer.


14 sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY


I-t





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/t -
14i


/
I
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--
f:\


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I-----------
---+
r.


sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY 15






INVENTORY


LEGEND

Multi-Use Trails ---


LEGEND

Arterial Roads

Collector Roads

Local Roads


Sweetwater Branch


m m Site Boundary


Activity Based Park Open Space

Nature Based Park Open Space

Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park 0 0
Sweetwater Branch
Sweetwater Branch


Major Roads

Site Boundary m u -


0 1/ 1


Two major arterial roads, University Avenue and SE 11th Street / SE Williston Road, run through the project site
and provide critical connections to the surrounding Alachua County transportation network. The site's east and west
boundaries, North / South Main Street and NE 9th Street / SE 15th Street also provide important linkages to local
routes. In the northern half of the site Sweetwater Branch is repeatedly intersected by collector roads. But following
SE 7th Avenue Sweetwater Branch is almost completely inaccessible by road.


0 12 1


A diverse range of parks and trails are located throughout the project site. The southern third of the site is comprised
of large nature-based parks, including Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park, Sweetwater Preserve, Boulware Springs,
Colclough Audubon Nature Park, and Bivens Arm Nature Park. Smaller activity based parks, including the Sweetwater
Branch Park are found throughout the northern end of the sire. Two of Alachua County's most prominent trails, the
Gainesville-Hawthorne Trail and The Gainesville-Depot Avenue Trail also cross through the site boundaries.


16 sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY


I-----------


---------------------------------- :,,,


sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY 17


INVENTORY






INVENTORY


INVENTORY


I S:--

I I






I
I ,

I


LEGEND


Public Schools


S .!


LEGEND

Historic Structures

Historic Districts

Northeast I I

Pleasant Street I I

Southeast I I

University Heights- North I I

University Heights South I I


I




*


I

II

/'
Ij. I

I

*1


Major Roads

Sweetwater Branch


m m m Site Boundary


0 1/ 1


Williams Elementary School and Lincoln Middle School are located on the East side of the project site and is in close
proximity to Sweetwater Branch. The University of Florida is also located just West of the site boundarys; its close
proximity should be noted due to the large active young adult population it supplies to the area. The project site is
also surrounded by various other existing public schools. The proposed Sweetwater Branch corridor would provide
educational and recreational activities for these local school groups.


Sweetwater Branch

Major Roads


Site Boundary m * *


MILES
0 12 1 2







Gainesville's Northeast and Southeast Historic Districts are located at the northern end of the project site. Sweetwater
Branch Park runs throughout the Northeast Historic District which is primarily comprised of the Duckpond
Neighborhood. The Southeast Historic District runs along the East side of the downtown Sweetwater Branch Park.
This historical district is also known as the Historic Bed and Breakfast District. Besides the close proximity, there is
currently no visual or physical connection made between the Park and the Southeast Historic District.


18 sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY


sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY 19






INVENTORY


U-/
"r I


LEGEND


A*


/ .


I



I-~I


II




,-------.----


Herbaceous (Dry Prairie)
Shrub and Brushland

Mixed Rangeland
Upland Hardwood Forest


LEGEND


Residential High Density
Residential Medium Density
Residential Low Density


Commercial
Institutional
Industrial
Recreational


Agriculture Crop and Pastureland
Agriculture Tree Crops


Sweetwater Branch


Major Roads
m Site Boundary


Upland Coniferous Forest
Tree Plantations

Wetland Hardwood Forests


Wetland Coniferous Forests


Wetland Forest Mixed
Freshwater Marsh
Wet Prairie


Mixed Scrub-Shrub Wetland
Emergent Aquatic Vegetation


Sweetwater Branch

Major Roads
Site Boundary E


L:1..
-- -- --




!k: zi


0 1/ 1


The project site is currently comprised of mostly residential, commercial, and industrial land uses. The north-eastern
portion of the site consists of primarily low to medium density residential uses. Commercial uses are concentrated
along the site's western boundary, Main Street, and along the major arterial road, University Avenue. Industrial land
uses are found in throughout the central region of the site. For the most part, the site's industrial land uses border
and impact Sweetwater Branch.


0 12 1 2


The project site's northern half does not support the rich natural communities that encompass the southern half of the
site. Here various natural communities support a large number of native and exotic plant and animal species. The
dry prairie and wetland hardwood forest ecosystems run along the southern half of Sweetwater Branch until it reaches
Paynes Prairie Preserve. Here a wet prairie and mixed scrub-shrub wetland ecosystem cover the land as waters course
a path to Alachua Sink.


20 sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY


le,


U


L~.S
i I


I


sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY 21


INVENTORY






INVENTORY


1 Duckpond Neighborhood


2 Downtown Gainesville


I I


3 Utility Services


4 Light Industrial


5 Low Density Residential


6 Sweetwater Preserve


8 Alachua Sink


The distinct gradient of character and experiences along Sweetwater Branch is predominantly defined by its surrounding
context. The northern end of the sire is anchored by Gainesville's historic Duckpond neighborhood, where Sweetwater
Branch originates. (1) University Avenue marks the transition from the suburban residential district to downtown
Gainesville. (3) Following the downtown district, utility and industrial facilities dominate the central site. (3) These
uses quickly fade into light industrial and low density residential land uses. (5 & 6) South-east of Williston Avenue
natural communities comprise most of the site. The Sweetwater Preserve is protects and provides outdoor trails on
125 acres on the north of Paynes Prairie Preserve. (6) Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park is a low lying wet prairie
that provides a rich habitat for a multitudes of diverse wildlife species. Throughout history the natural hydrology has
been significantly altered by channelization, draining, and pollution, which have notable impacted the health of the
Paynes Prairie Ecosystem. In order to mitigate these affects, a treatment wetland and restored sheetflow area is being
constructed where Sweetwater Branch enters Paynes Prairie. (7) This incoming water will naturally course a path of
flow to the Prairie's lowest lake, Alachua Sink (8)


22 sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY


sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY 23


~L ~--~ ~u3







INVENTORY


h< .


'f^I ~


- .


SECTION A- A'


Within Gainesville's historic Duckpond neighborhood Sweetwater Branch has been successfully integrated into the
upper class suburban residential community. Here the ecological integrity of Sweetwater Branch as been preserved and
an open park space for passive recreation and visual enhancement has been incorporated along the water's edge.


'p

uA-"


SECTION B- B'


Throughout the Duckpond neighborhood historic homes and a wide one lane road run unobtrusively along either
side of this prized neighborhood amenity. The neighborhood acquired its name when ducks began gathering at this
retention pond along Sweetwater Branch.


o 12


SECTION C- C'


At the southern edge of the Duckpond neighborhood the treatment of Sweetwater Branch is altered. Sweetwater
Branch is channeled into a steep ditch that borders thick vegetated buffer and a small grass strip that runs alongside
a narrow two land road. The deep ditch hinders visual connections and recreational opportunities with Sweetwater
Branch.


In order to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the changing character and conditions of Sweetwater
Branch, a creek study was conducted. The study examines Sweetwater Branch in section as it travels from its origin
in Duckpond Neighborhood to Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park where it ultimately discharges into Alachua Sink, a
sinkhole connected to the Floridian Aquifer.


24 sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY


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--
J,
,
,
...,


ch
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sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY 25







,s4Y
<7~r
At


SECTION D- D'


INVENTORY


Y


1'= '-"


The downtown section of Sweetwater Branch park is currently much less successful than the treatment to the North.
Here park edges are relatively buffered with vegetation and limit interaction with adjacent districts. A single linear pe-
destrian path runs parallel to Sweetwater Branch. Thus path system quickly moves users through the park and limits
interaction with and appreciation for Sweetwater Branch. Prominent streets intersect the park with little acknowl-
edgement to the existence of Sweetwater Branch. This lack of awareness and deign for user experience has created an
under used park.


liN


I -


SECTION E E' i= '
Following the area of industrial utility services, Sweetwater Branch reemerges from an underground culvert and is
channeled by a concrete basin. Utility power lines and transformers run along either side of Sweetwater Branch
preventing public access to the Branch.

,2 "2


SECTION F F' 1= '" SECTION G- G' 1'=
As Sweetwater Branch progresses South from the industrial district to Paynes Prairie Preserve its character varies
from a gentle slope to a small ravine.


26 sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY


0 V1 1


sweetwater branch corridor I INVENTORY 27











ANALYSIS
key features
hydrology





ANALYSIS


LEGEND

ZI LAKES AND PONDS
D SWAMPS AND MARSHES
J PRIMARY PARK OPEN SPACE

-1 SWEETWATER PARK
SSWEETWATER PRESERVE
PAYNES PRAIRIE PRESERVE STATE PARK

L J NORTHEAST HISTORICAL DISTRICT
L, J DOWNTOWN GAINESVILLE
SWEETWATER BRANCH
r STREAMS AND CANALS
SECONDARY PARK OPEN SPACE
O CULTURAL POINTS OF INTEREST
i NATURAL POINTS OF INTEREST
PRIMARY CIRCULATION
SECONDARY CIRCULATION
TRAIL CIRCULATION


30 sweetwater branch corridor | ANALYSIS


sweetwater branch corridor I ANALYSIS 31





ANALYSIS


LEGEND

Z LAKES AND PONDS

D SWAMPS AND MARSHES

U WETLANDS

SWEETWATER BRANCH

r STREAMS AND CANALS

L I SWEETWATER BRANCH BASIN
r== -.=
L_ ALACHUA SINK BASIN

L I EXTENSION DITCH BASIN
.. PRIMARY WATERSHED DIRECTION OF Ft

SECONDARYWATERSHED DIRECTION OF

CREEK DIRECTION OF FLOW

DIRECTION OF FLOW

HIGH POINT

u RETENTION POND

WATER RECLAMATION FACILITY

PROPOSED HYDROLOGY


32 sweetwater branch corridor | ANALYSIS


sweetwater branch corridor I ANALYSIS 33








SYNTHESIS










A NORTHEAST PUBLIC PARK
consideration for possible anchor point of
Sweetwater Branch corridor

B HISTORIC DUCKPOND NEIGHBORHOOD
opportunity to display the distinct historical
character of Gainesville

C ALACHUA COUNTY LIBRARYAND MATHESTON MUSEUM
civic and cultural nodes along Sweetwater
Branch

D EXISTING MAJOR ARTERIAL ROADS
primary vehicular circulation and access points

E DOWNTOWN GAINESVILLE
opportunity for highly public pedestrian
linkages and park spaces

F GAINESVILLE REGIONAL UTILITY SERVICES
lost visual and physical connection of
Sweetwater Branch

G SWEETWATER BRANCH CULVERT
lost visual hydrologic connection of
Sweetwarer Branch

H WILLIAMS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AND LINCOLN MIDDLE SCHOOL
consideration for possible connection to
Sweetwater Branch education centers


GAINESVILLE-HAWTHORNE TRAIL
potential bike trail connection

SWEETWATER BRANCH
potential park corridor

K GAINESVILLE REGIONAL MAIN STREET WATER RECLAMATION
FACILITY
visual and audible disturbance

S COLCLOUGH AUDUBON NATURE PARK
potential connection to Sweetwater Branch
corridor

M BOULWARE SPRINGS
potential connection to Sweetwater Branch
corridor

N PROPOSED PAYNES PRAIRIE CONSTRUCTED WETLAND
consideration for possible anchor point of
Sweetwater Branch corridor.

0 BIVENS ARM NATURE PARK
potential Connection to Sweetwater Branch
corridor

S ALACHUA SINK
potential connection to Sweetwater Branch
corridor


The information obtained in the analysis phase was synthesized to determine suitable locations for the site's program
elements. The synthesis revealed opportunities to create a consistent corridor along the length of Sweetwater Branch
while also highlighting key points of individual interest. Sweetwater Branch is an example of how a large scale corridor
park can be utilized to create a valuable amenity by identifying strategic areas of interest and utilizing them to define
user interaction.


36 sweetwater branch corridor I SYNTHESIS


SYNTHESIS


sweetwater branch corridor I SYNTHESIS 37











CONCEPT

DEVELOPMENT
concept one
concept two
concept three






CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT


This concept focuses on creating a series of nodes along the entire length of Sweetwater Branch. The nodes occur at
the primary transition zones that define the distinct gradient of character and experience along Sweetwater Branch.
The nodes serve as the primary points of entry to the Sweetwater Branch corridor. Each node is given equal weight
and importance, but posses a unique sense of arrival is defined by markedly different educational and interactive
displays. Design interventions between the nodes allow for interpretation that reinforces the surrounding areas unique
character.


40 sweetwater branch corridor I CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT


sweetwater branch corridor I CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT 41






CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT


I
i






\ MILES
0 14 12 1


This concept focuses on creating a series of nodes along the entire length of Sweetwater Branch. The nodes occur at
the primary transition zones that define the distinct gradient of character and experience along Sweetwater Branch.
The nodes serve as the primary points of entry to the Sweetwater Branch Corridor. Each node is given equal weight
and importance, but is defined by its unique educational and interactive displays. Minimal design interventions occur
throughout the transition zones between the nodes, allowing users to experience Sweetwater Branch's surrounding
local character.


42 sweetwater branch corridor i CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT


m

I
U


sweetwater branch corridor I CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT 43

























































I
mm ~ m~mm mw wm U


CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT














































This concept focuses on creating a series of nodes along the entire length of Sweetwater Branch. The nodes occur at
the primary transition zones that define the distinct gradient of character and experience along Sweetwater Branch.
The nodes serve as the primary points of entry to the Sweetwater Branch Corridor. Each node is given equal weight
and importance, but is defined by its unique educational and interactive displays. Minimal design interventions occur
throughout the transition zones between the nodes, allowing users to experience Sweetwater Branch's surrounding
local character.


sweetwater branch corridor I CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT 45


44 sweetwater branch corridor I CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT







SCHEMATIC
MASTER PLAN










I!


SCHEMATIC MASTER PLAN


















LEGEND

S SWEETWATER BRANCH CORRIDOR

fl STREET ENHANCEMENTS


TRAILS

PRIMARY PARK OPEN SPACE


I ii El


II


PAYNES PRAIRIE PRESERVE STATE PARK











The schematic master plan highlights the actual routs employed to create the Sweetwater Branch corridor as well
as the secondary network of linkages to nearby natural and cultural features. The primary focus was on enhancing
the connectivity of the corridor along Sweetwater Branch. This was achieved by designing a trail along Sweetwater
Branch and selecting alternative streets routes in areas where Sweetwater Branch was inaccessible. A secondary focus
was placed on creating a network of linkages to nearby natural and cultural features. This was achieved through street
enhancements to maintain the park-like atmosphere on key routes identified.

In order to most effectively address this large corriror and system of linkages key points of user interaction were idenfied
and design efforts were focused in these areas. The three areas studied in greater detail include the Sweetwater Branch
corridor and corresponding linkages, revitalization of the downtown Sweetwater Branch Park, and the newly designed
4th Street Sweetwater Branch Park.


48 sweetwater branch corridor I SCHEMATIC MASTER PLAN


a, -


sweetwater branch corridor I SCHEMATIC MASTER PLAN 49










DESIGN

DEVELOPMENT
corridor and linkages
downtown sweetwater branch park
4th street sweetwater branch park





DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


S:.
"'z*. ;~i C~Ih. 44f.7


ti T"n
BR-a-
-^ A__I ___


Typical Major Arterail Road Street Enhancement Section


I I


a


typical Majorrterail Road Street Enhanement Plan
Typical Major Arterail Road Street Enhancement Plan


II


The primary Sweetwater Branch corridor, identified in light green above, is created defined by a trail system along
the length of Sweetwater Branch and small-scale local streets where Sweetwater Branch runs unaccessbile to pedestrian
access. The secondary linkages, identified in dark green, connect to narby natural and cultural features. Along the
selected routes street enhancements have been identified to maintain the park atmosphere and increase bike- and
walk-ability.


52 sweetwater branch corridor I DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


", "


sweetwater branch corridor I DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 53
















Typical Local Road Street Enhancement Section


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


II


Typical Trail Section Along Sweetwater Branch


j-


Typical Local Road Street Enhancement Plan


54 sweetwater branch corridor I DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


--


"


sweetwater branch corridor I DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 55






DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


UNIVERSITY AVE


GRASS VEGETATION \
SWEETWATER BRANCH
BRANCH NATURAL
VEGETATION ,




GENTLY SLO'Pl.
LAiNII
SECONDARY PAIH.


SPAlM li F_ PKIIFER


SII ii liF I IIl iI I
MAI HEIl l AllIiiESUM

MAIAHF Hll. I IIESUM


P'iMAi: i SIDEWALK
AllVfE PASSESS
P .iA AA


2ND AVE STREET .
IMPROVEMENTS




GEN1i i I
l A. I l MN


SEND


FL
\_ := <_ -- ^


2NDAVE

/ NATIVE GRASSES
/ PRIMARY SIDEWALK
. SECONDARY PATH WITH
RETAINING SEAT WALLS


SECONDARY PATH
SWEETWATER BRANCH
f-,


SRASSVEGEATATION
PRIMARY SIDEWALK
PALM TREE BUFFER
4TH AVE STREET
iE' IMPROVEMENTS
4TH AVE .
T --. ---


The design of this park was inspired by the ecology of Sweetwater Branch. The secondary path progresses in manner
that is similar to a creek's successional form of change. The secondary path begins with a straight and narrow route
before slowly developing a meandering form and then exspantion throughout the flood plain. The revitalization of
this park focused on creating awareness of Sweetwater Branch throughout the neighboring districts and increasing user
interaction with Sweetwater Branch.

To increase visual awareness of Sweetwater Branch Park a permeable palm tree buffer opens the park up to the adjacent
South Each Historical Bed and Breakfast District. A plaza on 2nd Avenue and corresponding street improvements also
create awareness throughout the downtown district.

In order to enhace interaction with Sweetwater Branch a secondary patheway was created throughout the park. The
primary pathway still exists to facilitate quick linear movement, but an alternative experience is now created to along
1'= '- Sweetwater Branch.


56 sweetwater branch corridor I DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


sweetwater branch corridor I DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 57


j

C--%







BRANCH IIAIiAl
VECEIiAIil,",li

GENTL' l' IIlmi
I AW\I

SWEETWATER PRAII: H







2NDAVF IR.lIFF
IMPROVEMEJllSN


Iliifi RA' (IIV
WAlER fP AIRIIREE


IJAIHIE GRASSES

PRIMARY SIDEWALK

5Ejl iNDARY PATH

RE GAINING SEAT WALLS


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


'*1j

4%


K




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'4.




-a
9


K4


-4c.


S


- _




,=,
_^ .( .-


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SWEETWATER BRANCH
& VEGETATION

SECTION A A'


I I I I I
PATHWAY PRIMARY
SLOPED LAWN PLAZA &WATER FEATURE SIDEWALK


PALM TREE BUFFER
& PATHWAY


Street improvements and a plaza were created along 2nd Avenue to increase awareness of the Sweetwater Branch
Park to the surrounding districts. The plaza includes an interactive water feature and can be utilized for various
scales of activites--from community events to individual personal use. On either side of 2nd Avenue retaining seat-
walls are used to create a lawn that slopes more gently down to Sweetwater Branch. This allows users to walk down
to the waters edge and create memorable interaction with Sweetwater Branch.


58 sweetwater branch corridor I DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


a_


sweetwater branch corridor I DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 59







DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


I /i
I


5.\W fI WATER
P AIJI H TRAIL


SECONDARY lifl RAIIl f

OVERFliiW PARh.IIJi

EDUCATION, I:ifE l i




['A HI jiL I i I f
RAIIl l,A Iff ll
WATER :fAi iiRf


PRIMARY FIl.iFhAIUi L-


This site was selected for development into a park along Sweetwater Branch because its acts as an ideal central node
and transition zone along the Sweetwater Branch corridor. It is located along 4th Avenue where Sweetwater Branch
intersects with the Gainesville-Hawthorne Trail. This location also serves as a point of transition along the Sweetwater
Branch corridor and marks the beginning of the natural realm.


The interpretive landscape designed for this site demonstrates the interaction between the natural world and human
needs. Site elements used to accomplish this task include an educational center, rain garden display, bioswale education
area, and watershed education area.


60 sweetwater branch corridor I DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


FL
\_ := <_ -- ^


sweetwater branch corridor I DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 61











it I .


Fr Ii~ -;1 '


EDUCATION CENTER'

PARKING LOT'
BICYCLE PARKING.
RAIN GARDEN
WATER FEATURE








PRIMARY ENTRANCE.

VEGETATED BUFFER'

CONNECTION TO'
GAINESVILLE-
HAWTHORNETRAIL

RESTORED VEGETATION


I r


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


EXISTING
VEGETATION
*BOARDWALK

*PATHWAY


I


WATERSHED
EDUCATION AREA


-. .


/'t


*'


EXISTING VEGETATION

SECTION A A'


BOARDWALK CYPRESS DOME BOARDWALK
WATERSHED EDUCATION AREA


RESTORED VEGETATION


The design intent of the 4th Street Sweetwater Branch Park is to help users develop and understanding of the integration
between the natural world and human needs. Users are immediately exposed to a rain garden when evertig the
educational center from the parking lot. A series of paths and trails extend from the center and provide for a range of
expereicees throughout the site. The watershed education area recreates Sweetwater Branch in mineature and a series
of paths and boardwalks allow users to traverse the education area and participate in interactive educational displays.


62 sweetwater branch corridor I DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


S~


I


i .
I


r


sweetwater branch corridor I DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 63






WORKS CITED


Andersen, Lars. Paynes Prairie the Great Savanna: A History and Guide. Sarasota, Florida: Pineapple, 2004. Print.

Florida State Parks. Florida Department of Environmental Protection Division of Recreation and Parks. Web. 04 Nov.
2009. .

Friends of Paynes Prairie. Friends of Paynes Prairie, 2009. Web. Sept. 2009. html>.

GRU- More than Energy. Gainesville Regional Utilities. Web. 04 Nov. 2009. .

Jones and Jones. Sweetwater Branch / Paynnes Prairie Sheetflow Restoration Project: Public Use Concept Plan. Rep.
Seattle, 2007. Print.

Sweetwater Branch/Paynes Prairie Sheetflow Restoration Team. A Conceptual Plan for Sweetwater Branch/Paynes
Prairie Sheetflow Restoration. Rep. Gainesville, 2007. Print.

Tilden, Freeman. Interpreting Our Heritage. New York: The University of North Carolina, 2008. Print.

Veverka, John A. Interpretive Master Planning: The Essential Planning Guide for Interpretive Centers, Parks, Self-
Guided Trails, Historic Sites, Zoos, Exhibits & Programs. Tustin: Acorn Naturalists, 1998. Print.


sweetwater branch corridor I WORKS CITED 65































Allison Deffenbaugh
,! , I I,, J ,; ,,


04.23.2010


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Light industrial


SECTION B- B'


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SECTION C C'


441
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SECTION D D'




*d S, a -' "

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.SECTION E .
SECTION E -E'


... ... .. ... .
. .a,, ...^.. "..- ., -1, ..:: -S. S C O G


V
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4'% l


LEGEND

T LAKES AND PONDS

SSWAMPS AND MARSHES

PRIMARY PARK OPEN SPACE

_3 SWEETWATER PARK

rJ SWEETWATER PRESERVE

S ] PAYNES PRAIRIE PRESERVE STATE PARK

L J NORTHEAST HISTORICAL DISTRICT

L J DOWNTOWN GAINESVILLE

SWEETWATER BRANCH

ro STREAMS AND CANALS

*W SECONDARY PARK OPEN SPACE

CULTURAL POINTS OF INTEREST

NATURAL POINTS OF INTEREST

li PRIMARY CIRCULATION

u SECONDARY CIRCULATION

........ TRAIL CIRCULATION


SECTION F F'


I i I I I IiHii %
I 1IIII1I I I I 1I I I I 1 IIr1 1
I I I I 11111311 A


In I


I m i II


SECTION G G'






11ii 111 11 111111111


LEGEND

SWEETWATER BRANCH CORRIDOR

i STREET ENHANCEMENTS

), TRAILS
PRIMARY PARK OPEN SPACE

PAYNES PRAIRIE PRESERVE STATE PARK


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Typical Arterial Road


c. -,



Typical Trail Aong Sweetwater Branch
TypicalI Tra il A long Sweetwater Bra nch


Typical Connector Street


IU


III I I


A. i


UNIVERSITY AVE


2ND AVE


\

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c /
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11111111111


4TH AVE


Ai F1


i.
Y









PATH TO MATHESON MUSEUM-

NATURAL BUFFER-

SWEETWATER BRANCH

PLAZA'

INTERACTIVE.
WATER FEATURE

2ND AVE
STREET ENHANCEMENTS


PATHIWA ,

RETAINIINGSEATWALL

SE 2ND PLACE


SWEETWATER BRANCH

SWEETWATER BRANCH TRAIL

RESTORED VEGETATION

PATHWAY


OVERFLOW PARKING

PARKING LOT

EDUCATIONAL CENTER

RAIN GARDEN
WATER FEATURE


EXISTING VEGETATION

WATERSHED ECOSYSTEM
EDUCATION AREA


SWEETWATER
BRANCH PATHWAY


SECTION A- A'


PLAZA


PALM TREE BUFFER
SIDEWALK WITH PATHWAY


aSl


=- 7 5


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RAIN GARDEN
WATER FEATURE
EDUCATIONAL CENTER

MAIN ENTRANCE


WATERSHED ECOSYSTEM
EDUCATION AREA
PATHWAY
BOARDWALK
WATER FEATURE


EXISTING VEGETATION

SECTION A- A'


I I I
WATER FEATURE AND BOARDWALK CYPRESS DOME AND BOARDWALK
WATERSHED ECOSYSTEM EDUCATIONAL AREA


RESTORED VEGETATION




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