• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Cover
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Project introduction
 Site history
 Literature review
 Case studies
 Analysis & synthesis
 Concept design
 Master planning
 Capstone 2010














Title: People experiencing people : downtown Sebring redevelopment master plan
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 Material Information
Title: People experiencing people : downtown Sebring redevelopment master plan
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Caldwell, Jack
Publisher: College of Design, Construction & Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Notes
Abstract: Planning a green infrastructure can be considered the framework for understanding how city resources may be directly related to valuable natural resources to improve that human environment. Interconnected networks of green spaces provide a balance between the built and natural environments, while serving an ecological function.
Acquisition: Landscape Architecture capstone project
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Bibliographic ID: UF00100158
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: Permissions granted to the University of Florida Institutional Repository and University of Florida Digital Collections to allow use by the submitter. All rights reserved by the author.

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Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Acknowledgement
        Acknowledgement
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Project introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Site history
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Literature review
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Case studies
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Analysis & synthesis
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Concept design
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Master planning
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Capstone 2010
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
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The University of Florida
College of Design, Construction and Planning









Downtown Sebring Redevelopment Master Plan











An Undergraduate Capstone in
Landscape Architecture
j !


Ja C-I(k


Gad Ivv fI I


Faculty Advisor
Professor Les Linscott

2010


Submitted in fulfillment of the degree Bachelor in Landscape Architecture































This proposal is dedicated to the Lord for his grace and mercy for which he has bestowed
and built a foundation for my life; my mother for her consistent patience, maternal love
and compassion; my father for his unconditional support and guidance; my sister and
family for their encouragement and passions; the faculty at the University of Florida for
their wisdom, time, and patience in this journey.


Thank you.











TABLE OF CONTENTS


project introduction ......................... 1 2
site history ..................................... 3 6
literature review .............................. 7 8
case studies .................................. 9 12
analysis & synthesis ........................ 13 29
concept design ................................. 30 38
master planning ............................... 39 54







PROJECT INTRODUCTION
Description v i


A Beginning to Living


Title. "People Experiencing People"; Modernizing Idle Downtown Spaces
with Green Infrastructure Planning


Type. Downtown Redevelopment


Where. Downtown Sebring, Florida.


What. Planning a green infrastructure can be considered the framework
for understanding how city resources may be directly related to
valuable natural resources to improve that human environment.
Interconnected networks of green spaces provide a balance between
the built and natural environments, while serving an ecological
function.


To establish a viable framework for the future development in the
downtown Sebring district, which is rich in historic and cultural
character but has been degraded by strip development from Highway
27.


" The chief purpose of a park is the effect on the human
organism by an action of what it presents to view, which
action, like that of music, is of a kind that goes back of
thought, and cannot be fully given the form of words."
Frederick Law Olmsted


Why.









A Beginning to Living


Vision and program


Goals and Objectives.
Original vision: George Sebring envisioned an active community focused
gathering in order to establish Sense of Community and Sense of Place.

1) Downtown Livability
Finding the best use!
Establishing destinations such as amenities and activities that
draw the community into the area.
Motivating active use throughout the daytime and evening.


on a central





entice and


2) Relationship with the City
Creating a destination!
Limit the vehicular bypassing of downtown.
Reconnect to historical features and establish identity.

3) Sustain
Improving stormwater management for future development.
Improve walkability once alternative transit issues are addressed.
Can a district transit alternative be implemented in this scale or feasible for
the town? Could it link regionally in the future?

4) Restore the Identity of Sebring
Spatial alternatives due to such large amounts of parking.
Improving Sense of Community
Address vacancies and empty structures


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SITE HISTORY
I contextual


Discovering A New Town


Highlands County, Florida


The town of Sebring serves as the county seat of
Highlands County, centered between two prospering
towns along highway 27 in a business Mecca near
the southern-central part of Florida. In the 1920's,
Sebring began to prosper in business and industry
bringing in a variety of cattle ranch and citrus grove
developments. As the city developed, the demand
of housing exceeded the ability to construct. Major
roads were designed to expand the developing area
and stretch the city to the capacity it needed to
accommodate population change.








Discovering A New Town
Sco ntext, w t wt it tr


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Observation:
density of road network
function of transportation
importance of automobile
bypass of historic downtown culture
important connections & corridors


Experience the
infrastructure that
Sebring's downtown


developed transportation
encompasses the envelope of
district.


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Discovering A New Town
* tu I downtown site-i r









---------













"" \ / -- - - ---J -







\/ Sebring in 1911, the town's
inspiration was driven by Mr.
Sebring's desire to create a "City
on the Circle". The experience was
to be one that all roads led to and
from the center of the-community
along the I keside. It is said to
Shave been rpod led after the
--""" \ ancient Syrian city o b Heliopolis.
The original desire to establish a
collective com nit in the center
ohe ci y has failed du to the new
p radigms of strip development
0a mass m vement.

Observation:
- - des inatior
S- sense of comn unity
--- 1 sense of place
central green spaces










Discovering A New Town

c t xtuI w t w t structures


h1cj3


Architecture. Downtown Sebring
is rich in unique and intriguing
historic architecture. Styles
include Art Deco, Spanish Colonial,
Classical Revival, Japanese and
more


Lake Jackson Pier. The axis
extending through the circle is
anchored by a breath taking
waterfront public park and historic
library.


City Courthouse. A statement
of Classic Revival, the courthouse
was built as an expression of
confidence in the economic future
of the town. National Register of
Historic Places



Sebring Central Station. This
historical firehouse is an expression
of Art F)pcn Tt was the first fire
station of its kind in Florida and set
the standard for many more.


Sebring Amtrak Station. Known
as the Old Sebring Seaboard Air
Line Depot, in 1990 it was added to
the US National Register of Historic
Places. It is still in operation
today.


Observation:
celebrate identity!
historic linkages
important nodes
architectural diversity


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LITERATURE REVIEW Design with Wisdom
I publications f r


Herrera-Mishler, Thomas. The Olmsted City. The Buffalo Olmsted Park System: Plan for
the 21st Century. 2008 January.
The Olmsted City provides the planning framework needed to guide the exciting
renaissance of Buffalo's historic and picturesque system of parks and parkways
designed by America's greatest landscape architect, Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr.
Olmsted visioned a series of parks interconnected as a ribbon of greenspace
through the city. I believe the accounts in this boook are beneficial to establishing
a successful green infrastructure for downtown Sebring.



Bacon, Edmund N. Design of Cities. 1967. Viking Penguin Inc.
Quoted on the beginning page of Bacon's book, Daniel H. Burnham says "...a noble
logical diagram once recorded will never die; long after we are gone it will be a
living thing asserting itself with ever-growing insistency.." Graphically reproducing
our vision as designers is a necessity to communicate our radical thought process.
I plan to study and implement the rational and logical form of diagrams that Ed
Bacon produces.



Jellicoe, Geoffrey and Susan. The Landscape of Man. 1987. Thames and Hudson Inc.

The Landscape of Man portrays our most common factor as being "the mechanism
of the five senses themselves, with their peculiarities and distortions, which have
scarcely changed since pre-history and through which all perceptions still pass to
stimulate the emotions." Studying the global view of landscape design and the city
is a valuable way to find out how man adapts to philosophy and time. In order to
understand how to revitalize Sebring, it is my responsibility to discover timeless
trends that nature may reveal in the process.



Bosselman, Peter. Urban Transformations: understanding city design and form. 2008.
Island Press.
Bosselman uses aerial mapping data to view transformations of the everyday city
over time. Through his analysis of major cities and design, one begins to understand
quality of life parameters that are often considered unmeasurable, such as vitality,
livability, and belonging. These studies hold closely to my vision for downtown
Sebring in my attempt to strengthen livability and people experiences.










Design with Wisdom

St city form



Gratz, Roberta Brandes. The Living City: How America's Cities are being Revitalized by
Thinking.
This publication explains the implications involved of economic decisions relative to
urban form and preservation. She clearly points out the importance of communication
inside a healthy city. This book serves as encouragement for revitalizing a historic
framework in Sebring.



Howard, Ebenezer. Garden Cities of Tomorrow. BiblioBizaare. 2008.
Symbolizing the town development as separate magnetic forces, one being nature
and the other dense city spaces, intrigues readers to find out more on how the
two could melt together. I believe that the new design of downtown Sebring could
represent this combination of magnetic forces.


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CASE STUDIES Looking Into the Past
Solmsted c 1 c Z c


design inspire tons
Frederick Law Olmsted

In order to have a unique vision for Sebring's downtown future and explore how cultural
heritage can translate through design; I must study the foundation of cultural design in cities,
through the "father" of our profession, Frederick Law Olmsted. I would like to explore how
Olmsted's original guidelines that set precedent for many of cities, could affect a contemporary
downtown space. Can these beliefs still be carried through today?




Scenery: Designs that give a sense of movement
through a series of spaces large and small that constantly
open up to new views. This is achieved by indefinite
boundaries and the play of light and shadow.

Suitability: Respect for the local site and its natural
scenery, vegetation, and topography.

Style: Use of different styles with specific purposes:
"pastoral" for soothing, "picturesque" for a sense of richness
and bounteousness of nature and for a sense of mystery.

Subordination: The subordination of all elements,
features and objects to the overall design.

Separation: Separation of areas designed in different
styles; separation of movement to ensure safety; separation
of conflicting or incompatible uses.

Sanitation: Adequate drainage and engineering, not
just surface arrangement; designs to promote physical and
mental health of users.

Service: Design serves direct social and psychological
needs.
(Source Beveridge, Charles. (1986)









Looking Into the Past
/t case 1 2 c



"The Elmerald Necklace"
designed by: Frederick Law Olmsted
Boston, MA.





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The artist I refer to here is
Frederick Law Olmsted who, for
his vision and craft, is known
as the father of landscape
architecture. Olmsted designed
this park system in the later 19th
century to provide a common
ground to which all people
could come for healthful relief
from the pollution, noise and
overcrowding of city life. The
Emerald Necklace is considered
one of Olmsted's finest works.


Olmsted designed this park
system in the later 19th
century to provide a common
ground to which all people
could come for healthful relief
from the pollution, noise
and overcrowding of city life.
Boston's Emerald Necklace
consists of an 1,100-acre chain
of nine parks linked by parkways
and waterways.


The gesture of interconnected
inner city parks is bold and under
appreciated. I plant investigate
how Olmsted interpreted these
spaces in order to apply them
to the downtown Sebring area
and waterfront. The idea of
bettering livability in growing
cities by establishing a green
infrastructure and corridors
will increase the character and
value of downtown Sebring


How can these purposes affect Sebring?
Green infrastructure : green space connectivity and livability
Health : increase ecological functions and provide healthy environments
Safety : allowing safe pedestrian connections


TEMALL.










Looking Into the Past

/t c 1 case 2 c


"Buffalo Park System"
designed by: Frederick Law Olmsted
Buffalo, NY.


Olmsted designs for an
extensive system of parks
linked by wide, European-style
parkways and elegant traffic
circles was integrated into
Buffalo's Joseph Ellicott radial
street design. Indeed, Olmsted
was inspired by Buffalo's design,
famously declaring it to be the
"best planned city...in the United
States if not the world."3 Today,
Buffalo's Olmsted Park System
is listed as a cultural landscape
on the National Register of
Historic Places, and is one of a
very small number of Olmsted
park and parkway systems in
the U.S.


A Cultural Landscape a geographic area, including both cultural
and natural resources and the wildlife or domestic animals therein,
associated with a historic event, activity, or person or exhibiting other
cultural or aesthetic values."

So WHAT?


I BELIEVE THAT SEBRING MAY SUCCEED AND
BENEFIT IN BECOMING A CULTURAL LANDSCAPE.

So WHY?
1) INCENTIVES FOR PROJECT FUNDING.
2) CELEBRATE HISTORIC STRUCTURES EXISTING.
3) INCENTIVES FOR ALL STAKEHOLDERS
IDENTITY
MARKET/PROPERTY VALUE
CENTRAL COMMUNITY
BUSINESS
RESIDENCE
ALTERNATIVE TRANSIT OPPORTUNITIES
TOURISM

So How?
CONNECT TO HISTORIC PLACES WITH GREEN
INFRASTRUCTURE.
CELEBRATE A UNIFIED IDENTITY OF DOWNTOWN.


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Looking Into the Past
t c 1 c 2 case 3


Downtown Anaheim
designed by: RTKL Design
Anaheim, CA.


RTKL was called upon to develop
a master plan that would create
a sustainable live/work/play
environment that would foster
an around the-clock vitality.

One of the central facets of the
new master plan was
the intuitive integration of the
area's streets and open spaces,
creating pedestrian-oriented
streetscapes that complement
the existing public art in the
area


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In my attempt to interpret
Olmsted's principals of city
design for contemporary urban
downtown spaces, I feel that
it is important to investigate
contemporary ideas of downtown
restoration. RTKL looks at
innovative solutions to pedestrian
oriented streetscapes, sustainable
building, and transportation
modes for downtown spaces.


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ANALYSIS & SYNTHESIS


Downtown Growth & Development


County scale c y I it f


Agriculture lands

Water bodies


%Site boundary

SStormwater flow


1' 1


L. Jackson


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Figure 1: Highlands County Land Context



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Upland RI.Qe


Figure 2: Site Context and Hydrology


DESCRIPTION:
HIGHLANDS COUNTY CONTEXT MAP:
INCLUDING TOPOGRAPHY, HYDROLOGY,
AND AGRICULTURAL LANDS.

OBSERVATION:
1) DEVELOP CULTURAL CHARACTER
HOW AGRICULTURE PLAYS ROLE?
WHAT RURAL RELATIONSHIPS SHOULD
REFLECT IN THE CITY REVITALIZATION?
2) ANALYZE MAN'S DECISION TO DEVELOP
ON CERTAIN LAND CONDITIONS.
UPLANDS VS. LOWLANDS
3) STORMWATER STRATEGY
FLOW DIRECTION ON SITE








Downtown Growth & Development

cu I city scale it iic


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L.~


Principal Arterial


Minor Arterial


Site boundary


I


Site Context Road Infrastructure


DESCRIPTION:
HIGHLANDS COUNTY TRANSPORTATION MAP.
INCLUDING SITE TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT.

OBSERVATION:
1) HIGH DENSITY PRINCIPAL ARTERIAL THAT
CONNECTS A RANGE OF CITIES
NORTH/SOUTH.
PROJECT SITE IS ADJACENTLY LOCATED
2) FORM A CONNECTION BETWEEN ARTERIAL
STREETS AND DOWNTOWN SITE.
CREATE NODES AND GATEWAYS
SLOW DOWN TRAFFIC MOVING AROUND
SITE
3) DISTINCT DIFFERENTIATION OF SCALE
RELATING TO MOVEMENT INSIDE VS.
OUTSIDE OF PROJECT AREA.


4.


Figure 1: Highlands County Road


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Downtown Growth & Development
c u ci I site specific








DESCRIPTION:
SITE TRANSPORTATION DIAGRAM
MAJOR CIRCULATION
MINOR CIRCULATION \

OBSERVATION: I '
1) DENSITY OF VEHICLULAR TRANSIT 0 I I
NO PEDESTRIAN ORIENTED STREETS
2) ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE LEADS TO CENTER I
WITH MAJOR STREETS HAVING DIRECT 4 -
CONNECTION 0
OPPORTUNITY TO BRING PASSING TRAFFIC t |
INTO THE DOWNTOWN CIRCLE. I
OPPORTUNITY TO OPEN GREEN STREETS S U
THAT CONNECT IMPORTANT STRUCTURES t 1 V'
AND HEALTHY CORRIDORS. 4
3) MAJOR CONNECTION WITH LAKE JACKSON .
WATERFRONT. I
-OPPORTUNITY TO BRING THE DOWNTOWN I "
CLOSER TO THE WATERFRONT AND VICE '
VERSA. w V I




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Downtown Growth & Development

c u ty C I C I site specific


DESCRIPTION:
SITE NODES & GATEWAYS DIAGRAM

OBSERVATION:
1) CRITICAL POINTS OF INTERSECTION MAY
REFLECT PRIMARY CONNECTIVITY POINTS.
2) ESTABLISH GATEWAYS INTO DESTINATION.
3) DANGEROUS & UNATTRACTIVE
INTERSECTIONS NEED TO BE ADDRESSED.
4) OPPORTUNITY TO "CREATE A LANDMARK".


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Ex. of "Dangerous & unattractive intersection"


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Downtown Growth & Development

* site specific


Connect :,r: yr, \
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vy Importa.,r

Sdangerc ri .. :ri
Q importa.,r :: :r, :
* connect ',i :,'r r- : r:
and dov ,r: r: r-,-i: -.r


DESCRIPTION:
SITE TRA rj.Pi"I PTATi:l j S. I THE'-i'.


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OPPORTUNITIES:
1) BUILD S TP:jllG Ci':'liECTill T: T THE
WATEPFPF:-llT.
2) MAKE E':LD GPEEll STREET lIIPP.:Ell.'EIIEiT
THAT / IiLL CC'IIIECT I|IA.j'P :ITE FE Ti.iPE':
AND I ITEPEECT I1.r1:.
3) EMPHA'IZE illP,'PTillT C':,IIIECTi ir, ll' i llD
INTER.EECTirl:,l THP '.I.IGH:.I.IT :iTE.
4) TAKE A"D'.vAlTGE O:IF illP:'PTillT .iE\ S:..

CONSTRAINTS:
1) MAJOP E.PA',', ADJAiCEIIT T.:' Ei:T :SIDE *:,F
DOWNTOWN SITE THAT NEEDS
ADDRESSING TO CREATE INVITING
DESTINATION.
2) IMPROVING DANGEROUS AND
UNATTRACTIVE INTERSECTIONS OF
ADJACENT PARKWAY.









Downtown Growth & Development
c I site specific







I Happy I
I Owl I

Children's
Museum

Janet King's
Studio |

Linda's I
Books |

Wild Artist I Coset I
IwAr I Carrlllo's I
Jewelry
NRH
Brenner
Gallery


Highlands C
Art League


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Highway 17


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Downtown Growth & Development
E site specific


courthouse


,.--NELU U ME 7-L0-T-

SEBRINC
HOME OF
12 HOUR GRAND PRIX
& HISTORIC DOWNTOWN DISTR


train station


."... A


waterfront pier


the palms


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12 hrs. of sebring


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Downtown Growth & Development
/ site specific


Highlands Little
Theatre


City of Sebring
Library


Waterfront &
Public Park
"Reflection of Circle"


Children Academy


public park


Police Station


Alzheimer's Association


N. Ridgewood
intersection


vacant industrial


Yogi bar


First Baptist
Church


Sebring Middle


Amtrak Rail
Station Histc


Sebring Firehouse
Historical


I City on the Circle
Bank Public park


S. Ridgewood
intersection


Gateway
intersection


City Courthouse
Historical


20









Downtown Growth & Development
C u iCi C I E site specific


landmarks
Major site landmarks


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open space landmarks
primary connection


secondary c:onnection
historic site landmarks
* historic connection

Important views


DESCRIPTION:
SITE LANDMARK SYNTHESIS

OPPORTUNITIES:


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1) MAKE A BOLD CONNECTION BETWEEN HISTORIC FEATURES.
2) CONNECT MAJOR LANDMARKS WITH IMPROVED STREETS.
3) EMPHASIZE LOCATION OF GREEN STREETS WITH LANDMARK CONNECTIONS.
4) TAKE ADVANTAGE OF IMPORTANT VIEWS.
5) CREATE A NEW LANDMARK


CONSTRAINTS:
1) PUBLIC VERSUS PRIVATE SECTOR
2) FRAGMENTATION OF SITE LANDMARKS
3) PUBLIC INTEREST










Downtown Growth & Development

E site specific


Zone 6: Density = High
single family residence
connection to public
amenities


Zone 1: Density = High
main commercial corridor
industrial sector
mixed residential and
commercial


Zone 2: Density = Medium
main commercial corridor
historic structures
public sector (schools, fire
house, church, post)


Zone 5: Density = Medium
single family residence
commercial corridor
connection to public
amenities


Structures
potential infill opportunity
high density corridor
I | area
--- stormwater improvement
opportunity


Zone 4: Density = Low
use transitions
apartment/condo residence
mixed residential and
commercial


22









Downtown Growth & Development
E site specific


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Developed by Edgar Rubin, the figure versus ground method investigates both what the mind
perceives and how the mind perceives it. In planning purposes, one may find that the ground is
quite in fact the figure for vision. This is now left to the interpretation of the designer.






DESCRIPTION:
SITE FIGURE VERSUS GROUND


OPPORTUNITIES:
1) POTENTIAL INFILL IN PRIMARY SITE ZONES.
(PARKING GARAGES, PARKS, STRUCTURES)
2) DETERMINING GREEN STREET IMPROVEMENT HIERARCHY.
3) PARK SPACES MAY BE INTEGRATED IN HIGH DENSITY AREAS.
(OLMSTED PRINCIPALS)
4) DETERMINE MAJOR CORRIDORS AND CONNECTIONS.
5) POTENTIAL STORMWATER IMPROVEMENTS FOR MAIN
COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL CORRIDORS
6) POTENTIAL FOR INNER CITY STORMWATER COLLECTION PARK.

CONSTRAINTS:
1) HIGH DENSITY ZONES REFLECT NEED FOR HIGH DENSITY PARKING.
2) SPATIAL DENSITY









Downtown Growth & Development
E site specific


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DESCRIPTION:
PARKING SYNTHESIS


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OPPORTUNITIES:
1) ADAPTIVELY REVITALIZE
2) EXTEND STREET WIDTH TO ACCOMMODATE GREEN PROPOSALS
3) CONCENTRATE PARKING WITH USE OF GARAGES

CONSTRAINTS:
1) LARGE AREAS OF DIMINISHED ECOLOGY
2) DENSITIES OF USER PARKING
3) COST OF GARAGES
4) COST OF RESTORING DIMINISHED ENVIRONMENTS


park ng
1 parking zones
highest density=high need
moderate density=mod. neec
low density=minimum need
address street parking
potential siting of parking
J garage addition


24


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Downtown Growth & Development
/ site specific


Zoning.
Designating permitted uses
of land according to mapping
zones and distinguishing
their use is a crucial element iQ
towards preserving the b r
character of the community.

This proposal was submitted -..
recently to Sebring by 13JA
Consulting as a future land
use plan for the downtown -
district. I believe this proposal .
endorses the automobile and .
lacks bringing residential '
opportunities directly to the
center of the town.





i 'g -1




K-- I -f \'\IW
I pi

F-igu 1_:- Exi-t oni pa






Figure 1: Existing zoning plan MJA


Consulting










Downtown Growth & Development
/ site specific


mixed use commercial use
"Community center" "Market value"


These areas
may offer unique
opportunities to
introduce residences
into a prolifically
commercial sector,
in order to bridge
the gap between
the two, that was
lost in the 1950's.


Mixing up the
zoning of commercial
uses will break
the status quo of
traditional growth
habits of American
cities since the 1950s


residential use
"Livability"

This space offers
opportunity to
phase in residential
communities and
neighborhoods into
areas of unique
infrastructure, which
will promote safe
inner city living.


public use
"integration"


Distinguishing
areas of potential
public corridors
to activate an
integration between
the city offices,
downtown users
and residences.


Art District
"sense of place"

-An opportunity
to establish a
thriving arts district
connected by
pedestrian oriented
streetscapes and
provide an invaluable
community amenity.


Zoning Goals
"Mix it up"

- livability
- walkability
- integration
- community
- clean up
status quo

"A place where
residents can feel
safe with their
families while
sharing a walk in
the city, to have
an ice cream or
experience the
public art."


26


..........n









Downtown Growth & Development
Su c' y Ic I / site specific


Tissue* isa cellularorganizationa I level intermediate
between cells and a complete organism; an ensemble
of cells, not necessarily identical, but from the same
origin, that together carry out a specific function.
Organs are then formed by the functional grouping
together of multiple tissues.
*definition of tissue. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tissue_(t


Section: study of density and scale; proposed streetscape opportunity.


Individual Entity.
shows relationships between site elements.
develop a "sense of place"; character
section offers sense of scale and density.


I4









Downtown Growth & Development
C I city Ic I site specific




II

/ \



\' ,



/ //


1-E-N- A l -/
--/
L ~ ---- -


t f
\ /\












MIXED USE OPEN CURB STORMWATER PE VIOUS
FiLTRAnON PARKING
Figure 1: proposed stormwater improvements
Section A: alternative green street improvements


Figure 2(below): urban stormwater treatment
II 0


U i i _





1V-eP l UfAIP-Ie 85AN A
___ 6 I


28


Ir--- .~--- 11~-







Downtown Growth & Development
C u I c' C I E site specific


Street~r Trni -ot AtraieA


Fig. 1: Movement synthesis







\V'
r*
F4


Fig. 2: Landmark synthesis


U


A street car transit proposal would celebrate a sustainable move
into the future of how people experience downtown spaces. As the
increased number of automobiles diminish the safety, protection, and
livability for the pedestrian, downtown areas need more improved
modes of transportation, and most importantly modes that emphasize
the development of community. This study focuses on connecting
the most utilized landmarks, while contributing to the overall flow of
movement and connectiveness of the community as a whole.


Fig. 3: Zoning synthesis









C ONCEPT D ESIGN Creating Livable Spaces
Vision It tv c



The approach for conceptual development for the downtown area is focused as Issue by Issue, pertaining
directly to the synthesized tissue and character of downtown Sebring, as opposed to the common Spatial
Development strategy.

and Objectives.
Original vision: George Sebring envisioned an active community focused on a central gathering in order to
establish Sense of Community and Sense of Place.

1) Downtown Livability
Finding the best use!
Establishing destinations such as amenities and activities that entice and
draw the community into the area.
Motivating active use throughout the daytime and evening.

2) Relationship with the City
Creating a destination!
Limit the vehicular bypassing of downtown.
Reconnect to historical features and establish identity.

3) Sustain
Improving stormwater management for future development.
Improve walkability once alternative transit issues are addressed.
Can a district transit alternative be implemented in this scale or feasible for
the town? Could it link regionally in the future?

4) Restore the Identity of Sebring
Spatial alternatives due to such large amounts of parking.
Improving Sense of Community
Address vacancies and empty structures

5) Conceptual design
Bring innovative and passionate ideas pertaining to what I have learned in
Landscape Architecture and Planning.
Solve critical issues that affect downtown spaces and the outdated paradigm of the status
quo.
Step 'outside the box' of the traditional design and break the walls of the status quo.
Cohesiveness in character and language.


30







Creating Livable Spaces
v/ alternatives c cl

This conceptual diagram representing new zoning designations is an essential component for achieving
the overall vision in downtown Sebring. The commercial core will increase market values while providing
business stakeholders long-term incentives. The core is also strengthened by adding residential opportunities
to promote affordable living and smart growth. This incentive will promote an increase in building more
residential units in the center of the city, while also increasing potential in funding for affordable housing.



MK'x iIk


x COMMEKZilAl.


r. INPUVrTAL-
i'-- i-
I~ I I~rMnG1h









Creating Livable Spaces


* alternatives


fir

a'mm,
*r~


g0-


The Parking2Parks project is a
concept developed prior to analyzing
the overwhelming calculated area of
parking areas in downtown. This began
as a constraint for the development of
a green infrastructure, but if carefully
executed may become a unique
opportunity.


-\9
*'.




ent al Green Spaces /
e al
posed Parking Garages r-


.r ..- -- \
Il / 4 ." ,' -'
.-..... _* .- r .. ,


4 0
Fig re 2:-,r .s.. -r i g P '. c o e -.
^- -"r,-- "" -
-. --.e. -* w .. . - ," .


S - ;. '- -. .i. - *' ,. .t-
\ \. *-. ... T /,.. .* "- .... *.

t"_?- ,,--, I- '- ,-., L -A ; .. -L

-- -- --- A .' -- .. -; .. .- .
,. -'t --.- r -- ,*' -1
.. ,. ..- .. .,4 .
". .
.r -r,= .,. ., ,, .


*t.* '. /
-- **"
*., '* ~ .'.t- A /




._, 7 ',.; -.
*r101 \ / r .
ca-I Fiur- -. o P in c e


mI Pot
- Pro


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4.
n.
-9











32
In '"








Creating Livable Spaces


I alternatives


-r m

. I.
k i :


Figure 1: green streets and park connections


2


This proposal focuses mostly on a
concern for the pedestrian. Asphalt
gardens have occupied this space
for years, limiting pedestrians,
bicyclists, and festivals from intimately
experiencing the space. Limiting on
street parking, introducing new parking
garages, and integrating connective
green spaces will establish a scale
relative to the pedestrian.


Figure 2: proposed "gateway" and parking garage


i/-


P$
t., 1~L









Creating Livable Spaces


I alternatives

design 4 interaction


/i4 t'~~*


Closed to vehicular movement


Who & What is being facilitated?

The primary focus of this
concept is to celebrate the life
and community of the downtown
space. There are currently no
pedestrian friendly streets,
which make it nearly impossible
to experience an intimate walk
through downtown Sebring. By
connecting to the waterfront
and emphasizing the character
of the circle, this would serve
as a prime corridor for weekend
markets, street vendors, and
safe daily strolls.


Figure 1: sketch of pedestrian green street


/

-j









Creating Livable Spaces


I conclusion





Pedestrian Corridor and
anchor to the waterfront.













Interconnected green park
system and corridors.


Proposed green street
improvements, important
nodes, and emphasizing
the entry.


~. -t-


0









Creating Livable Spaces
SIt r tiv conclusion


CO~~~~~( (p~~C eQoCC~L
Caw'

(PI.
N.C. C.- t


36
















I V Vi7
1~\ ri\JI











IA
-S S


fr vi j iw 7
fl V A-- SI SS%
N._-..













1'I







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- *

/: i

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New commercial corridor
(past industrial brownfield)



Community stormwater park
Gateway defining sense of entry



Interconnected city parks (442,000 sq. ft. added)


Green street improvements
Waterfront park addition
Pedestrian only streets

Proposed parking garage site
Commercial corridor

Surface brick paving begins
Streetcar transit route


38









MASTER PLANNING
/ identity




A/ .


the framework


*. .4 A
I


t


I~~WhZ


During my time spent collecting on-site data, the realization that
downtown Sebring exhibited a lack of pedestrian friendly experiences
was evident. Wall Street is currently a one way vehicular corridor
and serves an invaluable purpose for the accommodations of deserted
parking and asphalt gardens.

My goal is to shine a light on this degraded, but truly delightful
downtown corridor by transforming it into a full pedestrian connection
that emphasizes the original character of "City on the Circle." This is
a place for safe daily strolling, weekend markets, and unique street
vendors bringing community into the downtown.


.... ,. .

























.. ..... .- ._.



S ...... .. :.: ..

Perspective 1: Wall Street pedestrian connection and safe corridor crossing
















I_., ,,, '"--Z 4












Perspective 1: Wall Street pedestrian connection and safe corridor crossing
40
4O










the framework

* identity i f


Pic 1(top): Proposed Bike Network
Approx. 2.5 miles added in Phase 1


'F^




* -
h'I-


Section: Bike to street connection









Section: Bike to street connection


By introducing the new
bike connections, the
downtown may become a
destination to exercise or
simply experience nature
in community. It will also
raise pedestrian awareness
to the hazardous existing
automobile network. Over
2.5 miles of bike lane will
be added to this master
plan, serving as a catalyst
to a smart and healthy
downtown community
lifestyle.


Pic 2: Perspective of removed parking to bike lane
Pic 2: Perspective of removed parking to bike lane















the framework


* identity ity I


.*


Vitex agnus-castus
Chaste Tree


Lagerstroemia indica
Crape/Crepe Myrtle


Optimal Light: O

Light Range: O *

Soil Moisture:

Wildlife: W

Native: No
Drought Tolerance: High
Perennial: N/A
Invasive Status: Not Assessed
Comments:
purple flowers in summer; attracts
wildlife


Optimal Light: (

Light Range: Q

Soil Moisture: 6 6A

Wildlife:

Native: No
DroughtTolerance: High
Perennial: N/A
Invasive Status: No
Comments:
flowers vary, summer; use mildew
resistant cvs, good air circulation;
watch for aphids/sooty mold/root rot;
high wind resistance; invasive
assessment: not considered a
problem, incomplete conclusions


Optimal Light:

Light Range:

Soil Moisture:

Wildlife:

Native:
Drought Tolerance:
Perennial:
Invasive Status:
Comments:


Quercus virginiana
Live Oak


Ulmus parviflora and cvs.
Chinese Elm


O
0

0 (9

6 66


Yes
High
N/A
N/A


wildlife food; not for small lots;
caterpillars, root rot and insect galls
sometimes a problem; tolerates
occasionally wet soil; high wind
resistance


Optimal Light: Q

Light Range: 0 (3

Soil Moisture: 6 66

Wildlife:
Native: No
Drought Tolerance: High
Perennial: N/A
Invasive Status: Not Assessed
Comments:
low wind resistance; may experience
freeze problems and pest problems in
north FL; tolerates occasionally wet
soil


Growth Rate: Medium
Mature Height: 40 80 ft.

Matre Spread: 60 120 ft.
Soil Texture: Any
Acidic, Slightly
Soil pH: acidic, Slightly
alkaline

Salt Tolerance: High
HardinessZone: 8b-10b






i-.. ..


Growth Rate:
Mature Height:
Mature Spread:
Soil Texture:
Soil pH:
Salt Tolerance:
Hardiness Zone:


Medium
40 50 ft.
35 50 t.
Any
Any
Medium
8-10a


4. 1 .

,. f B ;


42


Ornamentals


Growth Rate:

Mature Height:
Mature Spread:
Soil Texture:

Soil pH:

Sat Tolerance:
Hardiness Zone:














Growth Rate:

Mature Height:
Mature Spread:
Soil Texture:

Soil pH:
Salt Tolerance:
Hardiness Zone:

.


Fast
10-20 ft.
10-20 ft

Any
Slightly acidic,
Slightly alkaline
Medium
8-10






mA
, i





Fast
10- 30 t.
15 30 ft.

Any
Any
Low to None
8-10b


Street Shade


".Z'- 7 *"; *




,.'. h ,_ '


._.,.:















the framework


I identity


Optimal Light:

Liht Range:

Soil Moisture:

Wildlife:


Phoenix spp. except P. reclinata
Date Palms


Wodyetia bifurcata
Foxtail Palm


Sabal palmetto
Cabbage Palm


.5

itt.. ~


Taxodium ascendens
Pond Cypress


O Growth
0 (L Mature

S Mature
Soil Tex


Native: No

Drought Tolerance: High

Perennial: N/A
Invasive Status: Not Assessed
Comments:
yellow flowers in summer; Phoenix
canariensis, Phoenix dactylifera and
Phoenix roebelinii have high wind
resistance







Optimal Light: Q

Light Range: 0 3

Soil Moisture:

Wildlife:

Native: No

Drought Tolerance: Medium

Perennial: N/A
Invasive Status: Not Assessed
Comments:
white flowers in spring, no pest
problems









Optimal Light: Q

Light Range: 0 3

Soil Moisture: 4 444

Wildlife:

Native: Yes
Drought Tolerance: High
Perennial: N/A

Invasive Status: N/A
Comments:
FL's state tree; adapted to most
landscapes; white flowers, summer,
watch for giant palm weevil/scale
/ganoderma butt rot; high wind
resistance; older palms transplant
easily; fruit imp to wildlife


Optimal Light: O

Light Range: O 3

Soil Moistue: 4 44

Wildlife:

Native: Yes

Drought Tolerance: High

Perennial: N/A
Invasive Status: N/A

Comments:
also known as Taxodium distichum
var. nutans; flammable in
wildfird-prono area, plant a min. 30'
from bldgs; wetland plant but adapts
to dry sites; usually has yellow-brown
fall color; high wind res


soil pH:

Salt Tole

Hardine


Growth

Mature

Mature

Soil Tex

Soil pH:

Salt Tol

Hardine















Growth
Mature

Mature
Soil Tex

Soil pH:
Salt Tol
Hardine

aA


Growth
Mature
Mature

Soil Tex
Soil pH:

Salt Tol
Hardine
'.


Rate: Slow

Height: variable

Spread: variable

ture: Sandy, Loam
Slightly acidic,
Slightly alkaline
rance: Medium

ssZone: 8-11















Rate: Fast

Height: 30 ft.

Spread: 8 20 ft.
tare: Any
Slightlyacidic,
Slightly alalkne
erane: Medium

ssZone: 10-11















Rate: Slow

Height: 25 60 ft.

Spread: 10 15ft.
ture: Any
Any

erance: High
ssZone: 8b-ll






9









Rate: Fast

Height: 50 60 ft.
Spread: 10 15ft.
ture: Any
Any
erance: Medium
ssZone: 8b-9





A
r- sr


Character









the framework


I identity


U ,AN : R WIQr0+' FA IFAlf


I
1f-~~


* 1v~fl& IA.1 att ___
w rab rnw.I

.1411PF S


r.Ma


,: 1. 1 ." ,
'- .. . I .


a;


I


vehicular lane


stormwater filtration
planter


sidewalk


mixed use


The site of downtown Sebring is located adjacent to a
fresh water lake that covers over 9,000 acres of area.
Lake Jackson is also home to many of the towns valuable
wildlife and became the driving inspiration to the
design of the city in 1911. Today, there is very minimal
mitigation done to alleviate untreated stormwater from
flowing directly into the lake. The street stormwater
improvements will decrease sediment and toxins caught
by the filtration process directly on the street edge.


rfKAN M


AN








the framework


I identity


N. Ridgewood and Parkway intersection


IQ


S. Commerce and Parkway intersection


The downtown site has two existing bypasses connecting
to North and South highways. My goal is to slow down
the vehicular traffic adjacent to the site and create an
identifiable entry which currently does not exist. To do
this, I have proposed round a bout options on both the
north and south entry points. The construction guidelines
should be suitable for the density. Defined gateways will
not only benefit in drawing users into the space, but
also satisfy aesthetic appeal with new signage and lush
plantings.









the framework


I identity


Reference Map:
N. Ridgewood/Parkway intersection


Perspective A (top):
Street view of parkway entrance
looking toward downtown Sebring.
Perspective B (left):
Bird's eye view of round a bout
approach and downtown entry
character.


46









the framework


To further emphasize the need to celebrate character and
sense of place in downtown Sebring, I have conceptually
proposed defined intersections at major nodes. These
nodes will offer a continuity in character of the site, as
well as define major corridors for both the vehicle and
pedestrian. Here the node does not conflict with traffic
movement due to it's scale. The sculptural elements
involved at each node offer an opportunity to celebrate
historic characteristics of the town.


sculptural stormwater
node filtration planter


kr


, 1 11 .. I-


sidewalk bike lane


sidewalk








the framework
tity I amenity fi




Probably the most diminished identity of Downtown Sebring is
the lost connection that the circle once made to the waterfront.
Currently, the connection is broken along Lakeview Rd. by large
scale horizontal parking lots and poorly placed structures. My goal \
is to reconnect these two elements and bring back the vision that
once existed. I also am emphasizing this corridor by closing off one
half of the connecting street to vehicles, while opening up the other
half to accommodate a pedestrian mall. This will bring a new amenity
into downtown and give people a place to shop, stroll, bike, and
much more.











tI P




A I'








the framework
i' ti l amenity N\ fi I


,vc.tL
zi"C1L^


C
S
"



F


... ...* '"// '*""7-:b, \ ,
/ / f

/

r // "/
/

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. . .,, ,'.....' A..." .,
. i , t ",

,r / ,:
L't ,,l
d ", ....' "


:5:


50


P''I~"' ~~ 7 I~~i-l









the framework

t / U amenity f


Section 1: Lake Jackson waterfront park with stormwater park improvements


Section 2: Pedestrian connection between waterfront and Center Dr.


Section 3: Intersection of Center Dr. (pedestrian mall) and Lakeview Dr.


.lllllll1Ti..









the framework

ti U amenity f


Section 4: Pedestiran mall streetscape and market corridor


Section 5: Intersection at Wall St. and Center Dr.
Section 5: Intersection at Wall St. and Center Dr.


C.~


Section 6: Transition between pedestrian mall and circle park


52


--W-










the framework

t final


The downtown Sebring redevelopment master plan focuses on downtown livability, restoration of identity,
sustainability, and establishing a stronger connection to the city. It incorporates a new land use proposal
designed to bring residents to the center, forming a more cohesive community, and increasing social
awareness throughout the site. There are a series of interconnected parks adjacent to each residential
sector, which will establish an identity through the site and offer amenities to increase property and social
value. Due to the emmense parking, this plan proposes parking garages in a phasing program, allowing the
streets to be revitalized with bike lanes and stormwater filtration planting. The green streets will become the
connection between the parks. The most bold provision in this plan is the large pedestrian corridor stretching
from the circle park west to the waterfront. Incorporating a pedestrian mall, and extending the path will offer
a destination for weekend markets, street vendors, community, or a daily stroll to soak in the true character
of downtown Sebring. This is a framework. Many downtown's do not have the rich character that downtown
Sebring holds, so it is extremely important to revitalize and revamp this wonderful community.


,rJ
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CAPSTONEZ0 1 I f
\\ \, '
Downtown Sebring Redevelopment Master Plan /' \\ / /- xit x
Jack Caldwell I Advisor: Professor Lester Linscott I IUhiersity of FIorida 1 -














Downtown Reder, lopment
site ainventory a f.-.
Downtown Redevelopment t;. ; F.

site analysis w

Downtown Sebring, Florida.
concept
why
To establish a viable framework for the future development in the downtown Sebring district,
Master plan which is rich in historic and cultural character but has been degraded by strip development from Highway 27.



Project Introduction






Abl


Master plan


4) Restore the Identity of Sebring
Spatial alternatives due to such large amounts of parking.
Improving fese of Comm s uty
-Address vacancies and empty structures


-S


Goals and Objectives


intro


1) Downtown Livability
Finding the best use!
Establishing destinations such as amenities and activities that entice and drew the community into the area.
-Motivating active use throughout the daytime and evening.



2) Relationship with the City
relating a destination!
-Limitthe vehicular bypassing of downtown.
Reconnect to historical features end establish identity.


3) Sustain 1
Improving stormwater management for future development.
-Improve walkability once alternative transit issues are addressed.
-Can a district transit alternative be implemented in this scale or feasible for the town?


vision11








Sb


_\ 2


1 ite 2 Ur r


it


. Site


Observation:
density of road network
function of transportation
importance of automobile
bypass of historic downtown culture
Important connections & corridors


Site Context


intro




vision


Originally developed by George
Sebrirg in 1911, the town's
inspiration was driven by Mr.
Sebring's desire to create a "City
on the Crcle". The experience was
to be one that all roads led to and
from the center of the riomm-iunlty
along the lakeside it is said to
have been modeled after the
ancient Syrian city of Heliopolis.
The original desire to establish a
collective community in the center
f Ihl) City rI- iailedc due to the new
" paradigms of strip development
x and mass movement.










Sb,


Agriclturt lands
Water bodies

~Site bOundary

stormwater flow


vision


( I i.,


1 s" inve


Master plan


Figure 1 : ghlands County Land Context










. V
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lt
.
4 '





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Figure 2: Site Context and Hydrology


ar.. ulturPe lands
.adltc bodies
U I.a.-id Ridge


DusaurPTn:
HCIGHANo COUmTi COTEXT MAP:
1NCLUIND TOb PiRAPHY, HYDROLOGY,
AND AGRICULTURAL LANDS.

OabERVAnrON:
1) fVELOP CULTURAL CHARACTER
H HOW AGRICULTURE KPAYS RO?
WHAT RURAL RELATIONSItPS SHOULD
REFLECT IN THE CITY REVITALIZATON?
2) ANALYLe MAN'S DECISION TO oDEVLLO
ON CERTAIN LAND CONDITIONS.
UPANDS VS, I OWL ANDS
3) STokoiWArTR sraATcGY
FLOW DIRECTION ON SITE


-S


Context: Topo, Stormwater, Ag. Lands


intro


S
'4
(Iu
V,







Principal Arteal


S-it'


%F


intro


bl"


II

SI


F* jj,r- I: t! ilarlns County Road Infrastruture
S* #.


f ZW Sitre Contest Rwd InfrastruCture


- w" W W
.


- -t


* -.


S w '
S-F rrr
-r


Drscamrnom:
HIGnuLahoi CoQruf TRMSPonTAiN MA,.
INCLUDING SITE TRA1MSPOTATION CONTEXT.
OBSEVATIMON:
I) Hrisn ltrt sa tl Co t MPtIUM. *thA
CONNECTS A aANGE OF CFl1ES
mOnkY/SOWTIM.
PROJECT SITE IS ADACENTLY LOCATED
2) FO(M A CONNECTloI iITjttN ARIRItAL
STREETS AND DOVWNTKi* lITE
CREATE WIODS AND GATEWArt
SI0 DOWN TRAFFIC MDVIRC AROUND
SlitE
3) DISTINI DEFFEIETIATION OF SCALE
EtLAtING TO MOVEMENT LWIIM VS.
oUTSoID Of PROPER AREA.


Master plan


-S


Context: Transportation


Minor Artenal

Site boundary


vision


1 s"nveto


r-

,:








bl"


concept





Master plan


DESCRIPTION:
SITE TRANspNogTolN DIAGen
MAJOR CIRCULATION
MINOR CIRCULATION

OBSERVATION:
1) DENSrIT OF VEHICULAR TRANSIT
NO PEDESTRIAN ORIENTED STREETS
2) ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE LEADS TO CENTER
WITH MAJOR STREETS HAVING DIRECT
CONNECTION
OPPORTUNITY TO BRING PASSING TRAFI
INTO THE DOWNTOWN CIRCLE.
OPPORTUNITY TO OPEN GREEN STREETS
THAT CONNECT IMPORTANT STRUCTURES
AND HEALTHY CORRIDORS,
3) MAJOR CONNECTION WITH LAKE JACKSOf
WATERFRONT.
OPPORTUNITY TO BRING THE OOWNTOW
CLOSER TO THE WATERFRONT AND VICE
VERSA.


' ~ ma a
~bt~llI~llI


-Sr


Movement Analysis


4 0



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S" I I














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a'~r


DescmRIPON:
SITE NODES & GATEWAYS DlAGRA
OBSERVATION:
1) CRITICAL POINTS OF INTERSECTON MAY
REFLECT PRIMARY CONNECTIVITY POINTS.
2) ESTABLISH! GATEWAYS INTO DESTINATION.
3) DANoCGOUS & UNATTRACTVE
INTERSECTIONS NFEO TO BE ADDRESSED.
4) OPPORTUNITY TO "CREATE A LANDMARK".


Ex. of LD 'L-r," i & unaltracive intersection"






/ '* "I


Master plan


-S


Node Analysis


Sb,


concept


eP~






Sb


site inventory


don.ilonr b&pa's
ir ptise qiten qrreer%
a- rriponydftt ievs
Sda erCjtrL inrrrsr
rnrpofrtInA teronltllrn
rcanrect wateifraonl IT dowrit',n
and diMnnaor. to n.irnfrorai


concept




Master plan


intro



vision


r


i
Ir


I

II


Movement Synthesis


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I I ttle


concept





Master plan


waterfront &
Public Park
"Refletion of Circle"


Sb


City of Sebring
Library

Children Arcadmy






public park




0


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C .,k .


Sebrlg Midd~ae


Amtrak R,-'ILra
*-,t Tr- i' ca ir 0 n f-.


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tflsrt~rrca


City on the Circle
la k Public park


ntersLti rL o


un'y Jail


G7tewy
rnterscetian


City Courthouse
Historical


-S


Landmark Analysis


Police Sa Lionl

Alzhermer's Association

intersection
Vacant industrial

Sr a ri1bar
Ch .c bar

U-E


eP~~


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Master plan


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Landmark Synthesis


landmarks
maior i't:- landmark
Cipen Space ladrari.mdr
pnrrary conri-.ti.:r,
secondary ;,.nr.: 5,:.n
histone site IbOn.Jrrrarl .
histonc cornr-tli.n
important vi -


Arc


concept


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I r Tra i Ru ri A


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concept


Master plan


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Transit Study


0 =- dr Nut
O] Ntf it:ar sto


intro


vision


site inventory


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Zone 1: Density High
main commercial corridor
Smndustrial sector
Smixed residential and
Zone 6: Densty = High commercial
Single 'amiiv residence
connection to public
amenities

/


Zone 2: Density = Medium
main commercial corridor
historic structures
public sector (schools, fire
house, church, post)


structures
piteitl infill oppolltnity
high density corridor
I I area
stormnwalrel Ilnprovemrrot
oppoituflity


Zone 4: Densrty Low
Suse transrtions
apartment/condo residence
mixed residential and
commercial


-S


Figure Ground Synthesis


concept


Master plan


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a.


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DESCRIPTION:


concept


Master plan


APr-Jl.-Ij SYNTHESIS t
OPPORTUNITIES:
1) ADAPTVELY REVITALIZE
2) EXTEND STREET WIDTH TO ACCOMMODATE GREEN PROPOSALS
3) CONCENTRATE PARKING WITH USE OF GARAGES
CONSTRAINTS:
1) LARGE AREAS OF DIMINISHED ECOLOGY
2) DENSITIES OF USER PARKING
3) COST OF GARAGES
4) COST OF RESTORING DiMINISHED ENVIRONMENTS


St

pQ


parking
B parking zor
highest denslty=hlgh need
moderate density-mod. neec
low density-minimum need
address street parking
potential eating of parking
garage addition


-S


Parking Synthesis


Sb,


4%r~r


9


N.,


OA


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mixed use crmmerlal use residential use publicJ use Art iaLtrict
"Community center" "Market value" *Livability" 'integration" "sense of place'


Sb^


These areas
may offer unique
opportunities to
Introduce residences
into a prolifically
commercial sector,
in order to bridge
the gap between
the two, that was
lost in the 1950's.



Zoning Goals
"Mix it up"
- livability
- walkability
- integration
- community
- clean up
Status quo
"A place where
residents can feel
safe with their
families while
sharing a walk in
the city, to have
an ice cream Or
experience the
public art."


An opportunity
to establish a
thriving arts district
connected by
pedestrian oriented
streetscapes and
provide an Invaluable
community amenity.


Master plan


-SI


Zoning Synthesis


Mixing up the This space offers Distinguishing
zoning orcommercial opportunity to areas of potential
uses will break phase in residential public corridors
the status quo of 'omlinuniL]Le and to activate an
traditional growth neighborhoods into integration between
habits of American areas of unique the city offices,
citlessince the 1950s infrastructure, which downtown users
will promote safe and residences.
Inner city giving


concept


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-. ill r --
B.a'm-...
;'3 "* rlr ""
E.' IBvnrt-*'


niUp!
"Downtown as a geits. k"




-- M.
"Trasfming e a~ Spr......


. "Trananfowming tbe asphak ga rdene
'^ SiK,-.,, ..,"


1 r


Master plan


"Ceebrate comm wnty


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Conceptual brainstorming
















a Utow
06'


1 -* r


Master plan


-S


Connections














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Downtown Sebring Redevelopment Master Plan


I Masterpln





*'* ..L*,


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,


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Walkin' on Wall Street


I Masterpln


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ma
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Walkin' on Wall Street


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Walkin' on Wall Street


I Masterpln






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'ttit


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New Bike Lanes


intro


vision


site inventory



site analysis


concept


I Masterpln


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kb Uart


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e ~ , sy g hose

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F.."H rhb


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11 9 I*IIIIC.
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Ist
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rmur r~

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h~ttpc o~lrcridck .rylPInts~ndex .pbp


Ur4C
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Irri.

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Site Trees


1. Masterpln


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site inventory --______ -

^ I - .
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site analysis




concept




S ""aB"(1" ', ___i_'_._iT,.____

vehicular lane stormwater filtration sidewalk mixed use
planter


Storm Water Treatment





























Identity: Gateways


-S


I Master plan





I


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Se?:tio:n A: street view of downtown gateway


Se?:ti)n B: aenal view of downtown gateway


Identity:


teways


A .


I. *


I Masterpln


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-S


Identity: Nodes


I Masterpln












7$1
Eu
u'rn


ti




VP


Pedestrian Mall


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0A Ah "% *! *4 4tW Vt


Pedestrian Mall


1






bl"


Independent design process....
be organized
be passionate
enjoyit
expand horizons
identify with stakeholders
balance quantity and quality


Thank you.


-S


Identity: Nodes


conclusionl~ll


Most Important Aspects.....
thorough site analysis
digital data can be misleading
listen to what the site tells you
communication with users
communication between multiple departments of planning
read local news
money is an obstacle


I


I


i




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