• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Case studies
 Analysis and synthesis
 Concept diagrams
 Master plan
 Conclusion
 Back Cover














Title: Community identity through sustainable urbanism
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100154/00001
 Material Information
Title: Community identity through sustainable urbanism
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Balerdi, Xavier
Publisher: College of Design, Construction, and Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100154
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Acknowledgement
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Introduction
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Case studies
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Analysis and synthesis
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Concept diagrams
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Master plan
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Conclusion
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
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        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Back Cover
        Page 81
Full Text










SID T R


A Community Development Project by XAVIER BALERDI













ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS



this project was made possible with the support of many individuals:

My Capstone Advisor, Professor Les Linscott. I thank him for his unending patience and overall guidance throughout the semester.

My mother, father, siblings, and Mona. Without them I would not be complete, myself, or alive.

My studiomates and friends. I cannot thank them enough for their friendship and the memories we now share. Go design our world!



























In tro d u c tio n ......................................................5- 1


Case Studies.................................................. 13-1 7



Analysis & Synthesis ....................................... 19-35



Concept Diagrams ........................................ 7-41



Master Plan................................................... 43-51


Conclusion..........................................................53






































Summclry



Goalls



Ocjcth-es









ABSTRACT




The focus of the project is the revitalization of the Wynwood neighborhood located
in the City of Miami, Florida. Situated between Downtown Miami and Miami's
Design District, the Wynwood neighborhood is roughly bordered by 1-395 to the
south, 1-195 to the north, 1-95 to the west, and Biscayne Boulevard to the east. The
area is historically the home of Miami's Puerto Rican community, as many Puerto
Ricans began immigrating to the neighborhood in the 1950s. As of 2000, Wynwood
had a population of 14,819 residents, with 6,221 households and 2,987 families. The
median household income was $1 1,293.93. The racial makeup of the neighborhood
was 58.51% Hispanic, 17.51% African American, 21 55% White (non Hispanic), and
2.42% Other races (non-Hispanic).


The neighborhood is home to a few art galleries, but is mostly dominated by
warehouses and other commercial buildings. The urban renewal seen to the north
and south of the neighborhood seems to have leapfrogged the area. I am
interested in exploring how sustainable urbanism can be used as an impetus for
community development and the overall improvement of community health, while
also bridging Downtown Miami and the Design District through the development of
the Wynwood neighborhood. Issues that will be explored will be community identity,
urban agriculture, sense of place, quality of life, and urban infill. The project site will
include the area bounded by NW 20th Street to the south, NW 29th Street to the
north, 1-95 to the west, and NE 2nd Avenue to the east. The neighborhood's central
location, access to public transportation infrastructure (Metrobus and Metromover),
and abundant open space allows for redevelopment that can benefit all residents
of the city.


The main goal for the project is to develop a comprehensive master plan for the
neighborhood that, at the appropriate scale, will serve as a model for future
sustainable redevelopment. Another goal of the project is to promote urban
agriculture and sustainable living by developing a master plan that will provide for
a dense, urban, walkable neighborhood that will include integrated food
production spaces. Miami, a continually evolving international city, with its
agreeable climate and year round growing season, will serve as the appropriate
site for this conceptual project. Furthermore, the project will be tied into Miami-
Dade County's Open Space System Master Plan, whose goal is to "create a
seamless, sustainable system of parks, recreation and conservation open spaces for
this and future generations" by the year 2050.



















Miami-D cde
Count


LOCATION





The project's study
area is located
between Down-
town Miami to the
south and the
Design District to
the north. The new
development of
Midtown, with new
retail stores and
residential space,
can be found
directly north of the
study area. East of
the site are the
active centers of
South Beach and
the Port of Miami.


+11


Florida


City of
Miami








PROJECT VALUE




Miami, Florida is far from being considered a sustainable city. Following the
common pattern of most U.S. cities, the city's development sprawled away from its
urban core to the region's outer fringes. There is a heavy reliance on the
automobile with little thought put into the pedestrian experience. The project holds
value in that it can serve as a model for future redevelopment efforts that will
demonstrate how a dense, walkable neighborhood can provide for a higher quality
of life and more sustainable future. Furthermore, design elements such as
community gardens, parks and open spaces, and mixed-use development will
express how design professionals can foster community. Moreover, as a landscape
architecture student considering pursuing studies in Urban Planning, I am most
interested in finding solutions that revitalize our urban cores and combat the
negative effects of suburban sprawl.


.. .. .".........'


~7LII


I- -\.., `i~.






















CURRENT ISSUES


The Wynwood neighborhood is a
low-income neighborhood.
According to the 2000 Census, the
median household income was
$1 1,293.93. The fact is further
exemplified by various public
housing projects located near the
study area. Another issue to
consider is the large number of
homeless persons that reside in the
area, as measures should be taken
to provide shelter and services
such as food distribution,
employment opportunities, and
mental health assistance.
Interconnected with the homeless
issue is the high volume of drug
abuse seen in the area and the
safety issues associated with this
aspect. Gentrification is another
concern to consider, as the area's
prime location to Downtown Miami
and the Design District attracts
buyers that are likely to drive out
current residents. Furthermore,
acting as a buffer between
downtown and the Design District,
Wynwood should be seen as a
connector to attain the maximum
benefits for the city. Next, the
neighborhood has an expansive
road infrastructure system;
however, the system can be
muddled in certain areas with
many dead-ends and fenced-off
connections. Finally, the
preservation of historically
significant buildings is a concern,
as there are many examples of
unique architecture in the
neighborhood that can lend
themselves to adaptive reuse.









GOALS





I am interested in the work that design professionals are doing in the area of
sustainable community redevelopment as our society struggles with the impacts of
global warming and unsustainable practices. Specifically, I am interested in
understanding how our cities and urban centers can be adapted to successfully
sustain future population growth while reducing the environmental impacts wrought
from our current development patterns- Furthermore, I want to explore how urban
farming can be used as an impetus for community development and the overall
improvement of community health in a low-income neighborhood. It is important to
me to develop a product that can be used as a model for future urban projects
while promoting sustainable urbanism.


wvw.e u roecoree ns. ne


n`
; r



















OBJECTIVES




Conduct thorough analyses of the Wynwood area to determine appropriate and
sensitive development measures and assess neighborhood completeness.

Conduct informal interviews with current residents, workers in the area, city officials,
and other users to gather information that will be used in my approach in addressing
the needs of current residents.

Develop parameters for an integrated community development approach that can
be applied specifically to this project and to future projects. One endeavor will be the
integration of affordable housing into the design that provides for diversity, not
division.

Understand the designed and non-designed elements of successful community
gardens, community garden programs, and open space systems that are currently in
place in the United States by researching relevant case studies.

Build on Wynwood's assets and strengths, such as its proximity to downtown Miami
and its emerging art scene to promote character and economic growth.

Develop multiple concept options for the Wynwood neighborhood that demonstrate
the use of different design approaches to foster community identity, a sense of place,
and promote sustainability in urban areas. Furthermore, there will be a focus on
mixed-use development and adaptive reuse as a scheme for urban infill.

Develop a comprehensive master plan package that will incorporate the lessons
learned in this exploration for the City of Miami and current residents of the area while
reducing the city's carbon footprint.
































High Point, Seatlle, Washington



Making the Edible Campus Project, McGill University, Montreal, Canada



South Central Farm, Los Angeles, California



Christie Walk, Adelaide, Australia









HIGH POINT SEATTLE, WASHINTON



High Points is an innovative/
community redevelopment effort _
near downtown Seattle in a :
formerly isolated low-income 6 I
housing area. The site is a ten
minute drive from downtown
Seattle, therefore the neighborhood .
is in close proximity to a large
number of job opportunities which
are easily accessible via transit or
car. Sustainable construction
techniques, such as landscaped
sales that are interspersed with
common turf planting strips to
provide stormwater management
without sacrificing the aesthetic
appeal of a traditional streetscape,
can be found throughout the
design- In addition, porous concrete
sidewalks direct water down into
the soil. Pocket parks provide
neighborhood play spaces for
children while inviting community
interaction. A neighborhood
garden provides fresh produce that
is sold at a local market. Pea
patches serve as informal food
production spaces for residents
interested in small-scale gardening.
One of the design's strengths is the
priority given to integrating
low-income housing into a mixture
of housing types, incomes, and
designs. Another design strength is
the site's inclusion of features [1
designed to promote interaction _-
among neighbors and a close-knit WO
community.


SustcincilbI Urbarnism: Urbari D-sign with Nature by D. Farr


~IR 1
www.s~attl~housing .org



















MAKING THE EDIBLE CAMPUS PROJECT

MONTREAL, CANADA








The Edible Campus Project was a
collaboration between two
NGO's and the Minimum Cost
Housing Group of McGill
University's School of
Architecture. The team was able
to incorporate productive
growing in a concrete covered
urban corner of the university's
downtown campus. The project
has demonstrated how urban
farming can be woven into the
urban fabric without disrupting
functionality in underutilized and
neglected spaces. The endeavor
merges food production and a
public space, creating an
environment that fosters social
interaction, continually changing
aesthetic beauty, and /
environmental awareness. http://s.raic. org









SOUTH CENTRAL FARM

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA


Also known as the South Central
Community Garden, the garden
was an urban farm and community
garden located at East 41st Street
-, ......- -" - and South Alameda Streets in an
-- -- industrial area of South Los
.. Angeles, California which was in
-operation between 1994 and 2006.
At 14 acres, it was considered one
of the largest urban farms in the
United States. The farm was sold in
2004 and the farmers were evicted
in 2006. The space provided
farming plots for 350 low-income
families and held an estimated 100
to 150 species of plants. The former
garden demonstrated the need for
urban food production spaces as
many families depended on the
farm. Furthermore, the community
interaction and the consequent
social unity, were clearly shown
*L arieBarden when problems arose when the
-: farm became threatened.


commcr-s.wikim cdiici.crg/wiki/Scouth Gr-trciI Fcirm


















SCHRISTIE WALK

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA




The project packs numerous sustainable features into a modest one-half acre urban
parcel. Christie Walk's creators imagined it as a small-scale template for larger urban
projects, and so were careful to include all the important elements of good
sustainable design. It features the first intensive vegetative roof in South Australia as
well as a fully functional community garden. The lush vegetation on the site is supplied
with collected rainwater stored in underground tanks. The entire site features walkable
paths and open access to the development. The development is just a five-minute
walk from a robust central market featuring fresh produce from the Australian
countryside, bus routes, tram service, and open parkland.
Sustainable Urbanism: Urban Design with Nature by D. Farr


5A
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LI


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ywww. urbariecalagy.arg .au eC LJ/c.~rir~UsTI'5. riTrml


C~6CLlr.~l
































Regional Context



Urtban Context



Site Context



Site Synthesis









REGIONAL CONTEXT

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY


Legend
SMasor Roads = OPEN LAND
Roads RECREATIONAL
Land U ss RESERVOIRS
BODIES OF WATER RE SDENTIAL.HIOH DENSITY
COMMERCIAL AND SERVICES RESIDENTIAL.LOWDENSITY
COMMUNICATIONS RE SIDENTIAL. MEDIUM DENSITY
CROPLAND AND PASTURELA *) SHRUB AND BRUSHLAND
DISTURBED LAND STREAMS AND WATERVWYS
HERBACEOUS DRYPRAIRIE) TRANSPORTATION
INDUSTRIAL UPLAND FORESTS
INSTITUTIONAL UTIUTIES
MIXED RAWELAND WETLANDS


Miami-Dade County is located in the
southeastern corner of the state of
Florida. The United States Census
Bureau estimates that the county
population was 2,478,745 in 2008,
making it the most populous county
in Florida and the eighth-most
populous county in the United States.
The county has a very diverse
population, with over half its residents
being foreign-born. It is also Florida's
second largest county in terms of
land area, with 1,946 square miles.
The county seat is the city of Miami.
Most of the county's development is
focused on its eastern portion. The
agricultural areas of Homestead and
the Redlands can be found in the
south. The western portion of the
county extends into the Everglades
National Park and is uninhabitated.
miamiherald.com, U.S. Census Bureau


.





I-- 'h




r



'.L

Hi I

j.
1ik;-. ,-
E-f 1iIT
-t 02.5 10e i


t


I I Miles
15 20
























600F


400F



200F



O0F
Jan


Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
I Highs I Lows


AAA


Jan Feb Mar Apr May


Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec


Drecipitarton
w'eather.corn/outlook/travel


CLIMATE





Miami-Dade has a true tropical climate, with
hot and humid summers and warm winters.
Most of the year is warm and humid, and the
summers are almost identical to the climate of
the Caribbean tropics. The wet season lasts
from May to October, when it gives way to the
dry season, which features mild temperatures
with some invasions of cool air. The hurricane
season largely coincides with the wet season.




The county receives abundant rainfall, mostly
occurring from mid-May through early
October. It receives annual rainfall of 58.6
inches.


The county's largest city, Miami, has been
identified as one of three cities in the United
States most vulnerable to hurricanes, mainly
due to its location and it being surrounded by
ocean and low-lying coastal plains.
http://vww .srh.noaa.gov/mflI/? n=florida historypage


1000F










URBAN CONTEXT

CITY OF MIAMI


Legend
Major Roads
Roads
Land Uses
BODIES OF WATER
M COMMERCIAL AND SERVICES
COMMUNICATIONS
CROPLAND AND PASTURELAND
S DISTURBED LAND
HERBACEOUS(DRYPRAIRIE)
INDUSTRIAL
INSTITUTIONAL
MIXED RANGELAND


11 OPENLAND
RECREATIONAL
RESERVOIRS
RESIDENTIAL. HIGH DENSITY
RESIDENTIAL, LOWDENSITY
RE SIDENTIAL. MEDIUM DENSITY
SHRUB AND BRUSHLAND
STREAMS AND WATERVWYS
TRANSPORTATION
UPLAND FORESTS
UTIUTIES
, WETLANDS


Miami is the principal city and the
center of the South Florida
metropolitan area. Known as The
Gateway to the Americas, Miami is
an international center for
entertainment, education, media,
music, fashion, film, culture, print
media, and the performing arts.

As can be seen in the land use
map to the right, Miami has a
dense urban core located off of
Biscayne Bay composed of
Downtown Miami and Brickell.
Moving north and west of the city
center, different land uses are
separated, which creates
sprawling suburban environments
that are highly dependent on the
automobile.
http://www.Iboro.ac.uk/gawc/citylist.html


0 5 10 20iles
0 5 1 0 20








PUBLIC TRANSIT


The city is serviced by MetroBus,
MetroMvover, and MetroRail. The
MetroRail is an elevated rail that
connects many important Miami
neighborhoods. The MetroMover
circulates users in and around the
Downtown and Brickell areas. The
MetroBus extends into the suburbs
and largely follows the Miami grid.
International trade and travel is
serviced in Miami by the Port of
Miami (east of Downtown) and the
Miami international Airport (west of
Downtown).


F rni F -- I- n 1*IMilSes
0 1 2 4


Legend
,3J City of Miami Limits
* Metro Rail Stations
Metro Mover Stations
-- Metro Mover
- Metro Rail
- Bus Routes
-- Roads


t







SITE CONTEXT


ElI


MIAMI NEIGHBORHOODS


The Study Area is bounded by NW 29th Street to the north, 1-395 to the south, 1-95 to
the west, and N Biscayne Boulevard to the east. The Wynwood neighborhood,
shown as red in the neighborhoods graphic, is bordered by Allapattah, Overtown,
Downtown, Edgewater, Model City, and Little Haiti.










ROAD CLASSIFICATION

AND CIRCULATION


I II -Miles
0 0.125 0.25 0.5


Legend
SMtroMoverStatiors
m MetroMover
Bus Stops
Bus Routes
SHighway
cMjo R oads
Roads
SI Wynwood Boundary

SI IMdles
0 0125 025 05


The area is bounded by three highways: 1-395 to the south, 1-195 to the north, and i-95 to
the west. There are two primary distributor roads: Biscayne Boulevard moves traffic north
and south, while NE 15th Street moves traffic east to west and connects the City of Miami
to the City of Miami Beach.

The neighborhood is well serviced by public transportation, as there are various MetroBus
stops along NW 29th Street, NW 20th Street, NW 2nd Avenue, N Miami Avenue, NE 2nd
Avenue, and Biscayne Boulevard. Furthermore, there are two MetroMover stops in the near
vicinity, that connect the site to Downtown Miami.









LAND USE


A diverse mix of land uses can be
found in the study area. A large
portion of the neighborhood is
zoned as industrial land, and being
in such close proximity to
Downtown Miami, these spaces
would be better suited for
commercial, residential, or mixed-
use development to activate their
true potential- A commercial
corridor is seen predominantly
along Biscayne Boulevard and N
Miami Avenue that extends north
and south to North Miami and
Downtown, respectively.


FI J I Miles
0 0.125 0.25 0.5


Legend
BODIES OF WATER
COMMERCIALAND SERVICES
INDUSTRIAL
INSTITUTIONAL
] OPEN LAND
RECREATIONAL
RESERVOIRS
RESIDENTIAL, HIGH DENSITY
RESIDENTIAL, LOW DENSITY
RESIDENTIAL, MEDIUM DENSITY
TRANSPORTATION
UTIUTIES











TOPOGRAPHY AND


FEMA FLOODZONE DESIGNATION


Legend
SContour
I Highway
-- Roads
w |ynwood Boundary


0I Miles
0 0125 025 05


Legend
Seter

- oil
02PCTMNNUALCHMPCE FLOOD UAZMoi
YEE
L -- - -- -J ie

I I 01505 0
0 0125 025 05


The site is predominantly flat and gradually slopes into Biscayne Bay. The highest point
is located in the NW corner, where the land slopes down westward.

FEMA Flood Designations:
VE- Coastal areas with a 1% or greater chance of flooding and an additional hazard associated with storm
waves. These areas have a 26% chance of flooding over the life of a 30-year mortgage.
AE- Areas with a 1% annual chance of flooding and a 26% chance of flooding over the life of a 30-year
mortgage
AH- Areas with a 1% annual chance of shallow flooding, usually in the form of a pond, with an average
depth ranging from 1 to 3 feet. These areas have a 26% chance of flooding over the life of a 30-year
mortgage.
X- Area of moderate flood hazard, usually the area between the limits of the 1 00-year and 500-year floods.


The Study Area is predominantly designated as AH and X, having moderate chances
of flooding.
msc.fema.gov











DENSITY, VACANCY, AND HOUSEHOLD


ANALYSES




Using Census Block data, density, vacancy, and household analyses were conducted
to determine which areas were more suitable for redevelopment than others. As can
be seen in the maps below, the study area has a great number of vacant parcels with
low densities and a small number of households.


T Miles
0 015 03 06

Legend
Population Density per Acre

1 -10. Low
[] 10 20, Low Medium
20 40. Medium
40 60. Medium High
60 100, High
100 1299, Very High


Mles
0 015 03 06

Legend
Vacant Units per Block

1-5
S6-10
11 15
16 25
26 932


S-Miles
0 015 03 06

Legend
Households per Block

1 10, Low
11- 15, Low Medium
16 29 Medium
30 44, Medium High
45 73, High
74 2587, Very High


Household Numbers


Pcopulciticn Dt--nsity


Vca--cnt Units
































FIGURE/GROUND



When examining the Figure/Ground
map, it becomes apparent the
multitude of vacant parcels in the
area. These empty lots, in such an
urbanized area, are very suitable for
redevelopment and infill. It should be
noted that a small number of these
empty lots are in reality parking lots,
most of them being underutilized and
ultimately unnecessary. Also, the
Midtown development can be seen
to the north, which houses many big
box retail stores.


1 -- 0 06Miles
0 0.15 0.3 0.6









SITE INVENTORY





1. Martell Park/Steams Park
2. Roberto Clemente Park
3. Midtown Development
4. School for Applied Technology
5. Robert E. Lee Park/ Jose Diego
Middle
6. Rainbow Home Care
7. Eneida Massas Hariner Elementary
8. Young Men's Prepatory Academy
9. Our Family ALF
10. Utility
11. Dunbar Elementary
12. Rainbow Village Mini Park
13. Cement Facility
14. Wynwood Conventon Center
15. Center of Life Academy
16. Utility
1 7. Aspira School
18. Margaret Place Park
19. Williams Park
20. Gibson Charter School/St. Francis
Xavier School
21. Town Park
22. Phyllis Wheatley Elementary
23. City Cemetery
24. Central Miami Mini Park
25. MetroMover Rail
26. School Administration Building
27. International Fine Arts College
28. Miami Skill Center

Public Housing
a. In Cities
b. Wynwood Elderly
c. Rainbow Village
d. Town Park
e. Gwen Cherry
f. Phyllis Wheatley


0 Art Gallery









SITE CHARACTER

WAREHOUSES


The site has a very
distinct, industrial
character. Many old
warehouses have
been converted into
artist studios, lofts,
and even
restaurants. These
examples exemplify
how adaptive reuse
can successfully
maintain a building's
(and neighbor-
hood's) character
while retrofitting
them for contempo-
rary needs.


I.., *. ;~









SITE CHARACTER

URBAN ART


.. .. .. .


It is no surprise
that the
neighbor-
hood's
emerging art
scene is also
spreading to
the urban
fabric. Great
examples of
urban artwork
can be seen
throughout the
area. Murals,
rich graphics,
and collages
rethink graffiti
into character-
building tools.








SITE CHARACTER

VACANT LOTS


apparent
characteristics of
the area is the
quantity of
vacant lots. It is
flabbergasting to
see so many
unused parcels
when Downtown
Miami, the city's
core, is a few
minutes away. The
above graphic
highlights the
vacant parcels in
brown.








SUITABILITY ANALYSIS FOR REDEVELOPMENT




By overlaying the Population Density, -- -
Vacancy, and Household Analyses, I .
was able to formulate a suitability
analysis for redevelopment purposes. -
Census Blocks with a high number of" '
households and high density wereJ
marked under special consideration:-
consequently, most of these were -
public housing. Newly redeveloped '' .
or constructed areas were "
designated as having a very low .
suitability for redevelopment, and
areas with a low number of -- '
households, low density, and a high -
number of vacant parcels were r .
designated as having a very high r
potential for redevelopment. -

j-'
Very Low



Somewhat Good ..

Good

High -' "
'*' ," ". 4 -7.


Special Consideration , ,.
High .. ', -- *^ ,


I I IMiles
0 0125 0.25 05








SITE SYNTHESIS














the previous data, Need for Buffer
Combining iffe-Rail:MajorConstraint



rand limitations of M Large OpenStopArea
the site.vius After care- Strong CommBufferial
thful sitanal synthsi sis C88- Majorr idors




unique character and sPentse f places
southme of1-95 t the ptwest, and NE 2nd. 1
tiale aepp bortun ditiedsJ Rail: Major Constraint B








Avenue to the east is mostly industrial
in character and in most need of
revitand limitations Majf Large Open Area
the site. After care- Strong Commrridor
fu, one olysis, ... f.cus




identified, as well as the need fr a




buffer adjacent to the highway. NW -
tht hAvenue, NW its Avenue, Nwn





uniami Avenue, and NE 2nd Avenue 'm pBana
are rdesi united as the site's majStrt
taco thivity north. NW 20th Stret t the
south., 1-95 to the west, and NE 2nid rJ-L 2 BH i
Avenue to the east is mostly industrial -




larest tracts f vacan mt land were
revitalizatiaon Major neodens were '- ii
identified, as t hey have needhigh fr a
ufftenr tiadjacels fnt tredevel thpment higher ay NW

Miparkmi Avnu and NE 2nsd Avenue
are designated as the site's major !
corridors, and will be planned as high
activity zones. Furthermore. the. .
largest tracts of vacant land were
identified, as they have high -" .... i t
potentials for redevelopment or open
park space.-...





























Program Mapping




Commercical-riented Concept




Mixed-Use-Oriiented Concept




Business/Mixed-Use Hybrid Concept







PROGRAM MAPPING


The main elements of the
project program are open
space, density, walkability,
and affordable housing. With
open space, the redevelop-
ment plan for the Wynwood
neighborhood will have an
interconnected system of
parks, food production
spaces (community gardens),
and recreational areas- As of
now, the density is relatively
low, so an aim of the design is
to higher that density to a
sustainable level. Walkability
wil be taken into account by
creating pedestrian friendly
environments that minimize
conflicts. This will be done by
the incorporation of
boulevards. Affordable
housing will be integrated
into the design, allowing for a
vibrant mixture of income
levels by encouraging smaller
building footprints and higher
densities to reduce housing
costs. Other elements of the
program are civic spaces,
mixed-use development, and
preservation.


/


/
* 0*


0pp-

dest


*;s^ 0 *0
* 6,
I.- -..a\4 N


2


E economics


useE mixed-









COMMERCIAL-ORIENTED CONCEPT










Centered around commercial .. 1.'-. i '
activity, this concept is primarily -
geared towards users outside the 1'' ll
neighborhood. By zoning mostly ..
commercial land and creating new _-'" -
opportunities for businesses, the le ".-.
neighborhood could potentially bring .
in a lot of activity from the i
surrounding neighborhoods, I
reinventing the area into a new 4
business district for urban Miami-. -


I I IMiles
0 0.125 0.25 0.5


Legend
*ComnwcIOI AMO

*MbreO-4J1A! e

ReSkdnlal AMe

*Pam

INUMC Sch"o









MIXED-USE-ORIENTED CONCEPT


This concept improves on
industrial areas by mostly
converting the zoning to
mixed use, with commercial
activity used as a buffer
along the highway.
Furthermore, there are
distinct residential "villages"
that create community
interaction on a much more
intimate scale. There is also
the idea of green boulevards
to facilitate movement, as
well as potential boulevard
access to Biscayne Bay. By
primarily zoning mixed-use,
the area has the potential to
create an autonomous
revitalized community,
missing many oppor-
tunities gained from
outside users. Legend



E Mbe-UsW Ame

Rti)dernfal Aeo


Nm

Srubnlc school


VC



"-~



.J4






L1I


I I I Miles
0 0.125 0.25 0.5









COMMERCIAL/MIXED-USE HYBRID CONCEPT


The third and final concept combines
the previous two to form a hybridized
concept. In this idea, there are three
levels of movement: commercial
boulevards (north and south), mixed
use boulevards (east and west), and
green/blue boulevards for interior
movement and outside movement.
This plan calls for a very integrated
community with the possibility for
niche groups, creating intimate
scales from the much larger scale.
This concept was used to develop
the neighborhood's master plan, as it
is the most cohesive and well-
balanced the three ideas.


I I IMiles
0 0.125 0.25 0.5


'I-

1,l

III -
*'-l
.

.
S.,.I


~ r---

ji ~,:;r1
*1-**--
.rE ,a.L.J
Ii.f Id
-+
j -'


f


Legend
*ComfIWMIOl AMO

*MbreO-4J1A! e

ReSknlagl AMe

*Pam

INUMC Sch"o








































Final Master Plan




Section & Perspectives






MASTER PLAN


I T














.ee eeeene ueeeeeeeeeeeee eu

i .
I I I Miles
0 0.125 0.25 0.5
a-a





IMIR








0 0.125 0.25 0.5
















The master plan attempts to achieve all the project
goals by allowing multiple opportunities to fulfill the
program elements.

Most existing structures were preserved, however,
some were removed if they were in a very poor state
of condition. Infill worked around the existing
structures, not against them, to blend seamlessly into
the existing urban fabric while substantially
DESCRIPTION increasing the density of the neighborhood.

Tree-lined boulevards along the major corridors
provide comfortable pedestrian environments that
encourage people to get out of their automobile.
The relationship between the street, building, and
pedestrian, was an aspect that was always
considered-
Legend Commercial corridors facilitate movement along the
major north-south corridors while mixed-used
Development encourages movement throughout the
Existing Structures neighborhood. Distinct pockets of residential areas
d will allow small-scale interactions among neighbors.
Proposed Structures Furthermore, the new land use changes correlate
S. with the neighborhood's adjacent zones, tying in the
Commercial area much more cohesively than the previous plan-

SMixed-Use All industrial land was removed from the site, as there
are greater industrial sites in and around the city
Residential where these businesses could potentially relocate.

E Industrial Two new major parks will act as community centers
k on the neighborhood and city level, while smaller
Park/Open Space community gardens will invite community interaction
on a much more personal level. Every park is located
Boulevard Tree on or in close proximity to a boulevard for immediate
access to users.









BOULEVARD REVITALIZATION


The boulevard section below is cut through the
southern section of NW 5th Avenue, a commercial
corridor. With a generous 100' right-of-way,
expanded sidewalks, on-street parking, bicycle lanes,
comfortable roads, and a planted median come
together to create a vibrant shopping environment.
Furthermore, the section cut shows potential infill
opportunities and their relationship to the street and
pedestrians-


KEY






*k Jlin: P
II 'l'll



ME'l1;
... ........r ~ 1 .r r ln


NW 5th Avenue


i. -


I


Er


A 13' Sidewalk 10' 6' 15' Road
Parking Bike
Lane


Lane


i i


'


1I

1
















The perspective below is showing the street improvements for N Miami Avenue.
Expanded sidewalks, on-street parking, and bicycle lanes encourage alternative
modes of transportation. Tree canopy creates shade for pedestrians while beautifying
and adding a cohesive structure to the neighborhood. The Cafe building on the right
hand side is an example of how an existing industrial building can be adapted for
commercial uses. The building on the left hand side is an example of potential infill
where the industrial character of the site was kept in mind in its design.


North Miami Avenue


perspective B










COMMUNITY SPACE


KEY


perspective C


Community space in the
neighborhood will be
multi-functional. With
areas for food production,
social interaction, and
recreational space, these
smaller-scale parks will
become the centers of
community niches.
Bordering fruit trees and a
linear pergola create
shade and a comfortable
environment where
neighbors can get to know
neighbors. Furthermore, as
there are garden plots,
daily activity and use
would be expected.


x- 3 r..,,


^ .- ^ r.



















These pespectives
show the relation-
ship of a commu-
nity space with a
newly developed
housing area. The
new homes have
very small building
lots and footprints,
so a park space
nearby would be
an ideal compro-
mise instead of
more private
space. This commu-
nity space demon-
strates how the
idea of a park and
civic square can be
merged to create a
unique centering
amenity for the
neighborhood.
Also, the proposed
buildings are
designed to tie into
the industrial cha-
racter of the rest of
the site, while
creating their own
identity in the
bigger scheme of
the redevelopment
plan.


perspective D









CENTRAL COMMUNITY PARK
















A large community park,
near the center of
revitalized Wynwood,
would serve as the
grounding space for the
community. Large-scale-
functions, such as a c
farmer's market, art and
music festivals, and other
social events, could be
held in the park. These
events would strengthen
social ties in the
neighborhood while
bringing in users from the
rest of Miami. A community
center would serve as the .
liaison between the .. .
community and indivual.
Youth meetings, adult
classes, and other
informational sessions
would be held in the
center, further establishing
the center's importance to
Wynwood residents.


perspective D
. J .k i l








ADAPTIVE REUSE



perspective E
KEY




thro. gh a few : e s~' u II"s"B
........... .,.. .. .... ........ :.... .. ....








su hs esa r s offle s s
i :B ,- ". : ,-. --











through a fw mi asu res- By









galleries, or some other high
activity business, the area can be
transformed into a vibrant and -H',
lively community. Still, the charac-'.B
ter of Wynwood is maintained,
enhanced, and now revitalizetidn of
the neighborhood could happen





thrSidghwalk im fprovew ments, vegeta- By
tion, and street lighting all work
warehouses to commercial uses.
such as restaurants, coffee shops.
bakeries, clothing stores, art
galleries, or some other high



togtivity busintrss,ngthen the ar a's
tappnsfrmd intao vibrant and
lively community. Still, the charac-
ter of Wynwood is maintained,
enhanced, and now revitalized.
Sidewalkl improvements, vegeta- Lu
tion, and street lighting all work
together to strengthen the area's LL
appeal. 4




































The project's intent was to conceptually show how the Wynwood
neighborhood could be revitalized using sustainable urbanism techniques.
Some of these techniques were improved wallkability, higher densities, urban
infill, and park and open space planning.

In doing this project, I was able to work at very different scales of concern. From
the large land use master planning scale to the smaller site design scale. Using
the knowledge gained in my five years at the University of Florida, I hope this
product is successful in that it demonstrates how we can improve our urban
areas and adapt our current environments for a brighter future.





Appendix: Final Presentation Copy



































- '- ... : / '' .- t3-, "; '* ,..., '. -0 .
--..- -^ -.- J

-. "1 r - 7 w



A .ommunit De n oe by XI
A i v l p e P e by -
'V I~ -- C


A~~~~ Comuit Deeopet Prjc by XAiRBAED







+


Florida \


Miami-Dade
County


LOCATION




The project's study
area is located
between Down-
town Miami to the
south and the
Design District to
the north. The new
development of
Midtown, with new
retail stores and
residential space,
can be found
directly north of the
study area. East of
the site are the
active centers of
South Beach and
the Port of Miami.


IWynwood


City of
Miami









REGIONAL CONTEXT

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY



Legend
--MorRoadf !:= OPENLAND
Roads RECREATIONAL. i
Land Uses RESERVOIRS v
BODIES OF WATER RE SDENTIAL.HIGH DENSITY
COMMERCIAL AND SERVICES RESIDENTIAL. LOWDENSITY
COMMUNICATIONS RE SDENTIAL, MEDIUM DENSITY
CROPLAND AND PASTURELANDL SHRUB AND BRUSHLAND
DISTURBED LAND STREAMS AND WATERVAYS
HERBACEOUS (DRYPRAIRIE) TRANSPORTATION
INDUSTRIAL PLAND FORESTS
INSTITUTIONAL UTIUTIES
MIXED RAWOELAND WEITLANDS



Miami-Dade County is located in the
southeastern corner of the state of -
Florida. The United States Census
Bureau estimates that the county
population was 2,478,745 in 2008,
making it the most populous county
in Florida and the eighth-most
populous county in the United States. -
The county has a very diverse
population, with over half its residents
being foreign-born. It is also Florida's
second largest county in terms of
land area, with 1,946 square miles.
The county seat is the city of Miami.
Most of the county's development is
focused on its eastern portion. The
agricultural areas of Homestead and
the Redlands can be found in the
south. The western portion of the
county extends into the Everglades
National Park and is uninhabitated.
miomihercld.corm, U.S. Census Bureau


n 2.l I5 I I Miles
0 2.5 5 10 15 20










URBAN CONTEXT

CITY OF MIAMI


Legend
SMaoQ Roads
Roads
Land Uses
BODIES OF WATER
SCOMMERCI.AND SERVICES
COMMUNICATIONS
CROPLAND AND PASTURELAN
I DISTURBED LAND
HERBACEOUS (DRY PRAIRIE)
I INDUSTRIAL
INSTITUTIONAL
MIXED RANOELAND


SOPENLAND
RECREATIONAL
RE SERVOIRS
RE SIDENTIAL. HIGH DENSITY
RESIDENTIAL. LOW DENSITY
RE SIDENTIAL. MEDIUM DENSITY
SHRUB AND BRUSHLAND
STREAMS AND WAJERW YS
TRANSPORTATION
UPLAND FORESTS
UTILITIES
W WETLANDS


Miami is the principal city and the
center of the South Florida
metropolitan area. Known as The
Gateway to the Americas, Miami is
an international center for
entertainment, education, media.
music, fashion, film, culture, print
media, and the performing arts.

As can be seen in the land use
map to the right, Miami has a
dense urban core located off of
Biscayne Bay composed of
Downtown Miami and Brickell.
Moving north and west of the city
center, different land uses are
separated, which creates
sprawling suburban environments
that are highly dependent on the
automobile.
http://www.Iboro.ac.uk/gawc/citylist.html


0 5 10 es
0 5 10 20









PUBLIC TRANSIT


The city is serviced by MetroBus,
MetroMover, and MetroRail. The
MetroRail is an elevated rail that
connects many important Miami
neighborhoods. The MetroMover
circulates users in and around the
Downtown and Brickell areas. The
MetroBus extends into the suburbs
and largely follows the Miami grid.

International trade and travel is
serviced in Miami by the Port of
Miami (east of Downtown) and the
Miami international Airport (west of
Downtown).


LJ I Iv iles
0 1 2 4


Legend

L.J City of Miami Limits
* Metro Rail Stations
Metro Mover Stations
-- Metro Mover
- Metro Rail
- Bus Routes
-- Roads








SITE CONTEXT


MIAMIL NEIGHBORHOOD~ DS
M4IAMI NEIGHBORHOODS


The Study Area is bounded by NW 29th Street to the north, 1-395 to the south, 1-95 to
the west, and N Biscayne Boulevard to the east. The Wynwood neighborhood,
shown as red in the neighborhoods graphic, is bordered by Allapattah, Overtown,
Downtown, Edgewater, Model City, and Little Haiti.











ROAD CLASSIFICATION

AND CIRCULATION






195 PRAM Legend 5 19RA
Class Type
1, Trunk Roads
2 Pmery Dstnbutors
3. 'strct Dstbuters
1 4 LocI Estrsbutors
5. Residenmoa Acces Roads

NE 29TH I Mles
NW 297 ST 2 THST 0 0125 025 05 H.




m

Sic Legend
NW 20TH ST In 2n Aven i ST
"" zI n MatroMoverStations

SIIIIIIIIIIIII MetroM over
vBus Stops
Bus Routes
SHighway
NE STjo Roads
NE THST Road
4 ~E 11TH ST Wynwood Boundary

_L'T -- o------ ---oj Ws -- ---_
0 0125 025 05




The area is bounded by three highways: 1-395 to the south, 1-195 to the north, and i-95 to
the west. There are two primary distributor roads: Biscayne Boulevard moves traffic north
and south, while NE 15th Street moves traffic east to west and connects the City of Miami
to the City of Miami Beach.

The neighborhood is well serviced by public transportation, as there are various MetroBus
stops along NW 29th Street, NW 20th Street, NW 2nd Avenue, N Miami Avenue, NE 2nd
Avenue, and Biscayne Boulevard. Furthermore, there are two MetroMover stops in the near
vicinity, that connect the site to Downtown Miami.









LAND USE










Legend
BODIES OF WATER
COMMERCIALAND SERVICES
INDUSTRIAL
INSTITUTIONAL
OPEN LAND
RECREATIONAL
RESERVOIRS
RESIDENTIAL, HIGH DENSITY
RESIDENTIAL, LOW DENSITY
RESIDENTIAL, MEDIUM DENSITY
TRANSPORTATION
UTILITIES



A diverse mix of land uses can be
found in the study area. A large
portion of the neighborhood is
zoned as industrial land, and being
in such close proximity to
Downtown Miami, these spaces
would be better suited for
commercial, residential, or mixed-
use development to activate their
true potential. A commercial
corridor is seen predominantly
along Biscayne Boulevard and N
Miami Avenue that extends north
and south to North Miami and
Downtown, respectively.


I I Miles
0 0.125 0.25 0.5
































FIGURE/GROUND



When examining the Figure/Ground
map, it becomes apparent the
multitude of vacant parcels in the
area. These empty lots, in such an
urbanized area, are very suitable for
redevelopment and infill. It should be
noted that a small number of these
empty lots are in reality parking lots,
most of them being underutilized and
ultimately unnecessary. Also, the
Midtown development can be seen
to the north, which houses many big
box retail stores.


S1I I IMiles
0 0.15 0.3 0.6











DENSITY, VACANCY, AND HOUSEHOLD


ANALYSES




Using Census Block data. density, vacancy, and household analyses were conducted
to determine which areas were more suitable for redevelopment than others. As can
be seen in the maps below, the study area has a great number of vacant parcels with
low densities and a small number of households.


0 015 03 06

Legend
Population Density per Acre

I 10.Low
10 20. Low Medium
20 -40. Medium
40 60. Medium Mgh
60 100. High
100 1299., Very High


-- Mles
0 015 03 06

Legend
Vacant Units per Block
L__0J
1-5
6 6- 10
11 15
16 25
26 932


Legend
Households per Block
0
I 10 Low
11 15. Low Medium
16 29. Medium
S30 44, Medium High
45- 73. High
S74 2587. Very High


Household Numbers


Pc:)puic~tii:n Deens~lity


Vcu_,cnt Units









SUITABILITY ANALYSIS FOR REDEVELOPMENT





By overlaying the Population Density, -
Vacancy, and Household Analyses, I
was able to formulate a suitability
analysis for redevelopment purposes. '
Census Blocks with a high number of .
households and high density were '^ ..
marked under special consideration: .
consequently, most of these were i t
public housing. Newly redeveloped -
or constructed areas were
designated as having a very low 'J
suitability for redevelopment, and
areas with a low number of '
households, low density, and a high '".
number of vacant parcels were -
designated as having a very high ,. .
potential for redevelopment. ... A N-

.i- -. .- t.-
Very Low :i .

Low 4 0

Somewhat Good -. "
.... "", "- ". ..
Good,


_a,, *' .. .:.,. :, ;'i^ {-,^
Very High

SSpecial Consideration .
A .ll .


I I WMiles
0 0125 0.25 05










SITE INVENTORY


1. Martell Park/Steams Park
2. Roberto Clemente Park
3. Midtown Development
4. School for Applied Technology
5. Robert E. Lee Park/ Jose Diego
Middle
6. Rainbow Home Care
7. Eneida Massas Hariner Elementary
8. Young Men's Prepatory Academy
9. Our Family ALF
10. Utility
11. Dunbar Elementary
12. Rainbow Village Mini Park
13. Cement Facility
14. Wynwood Conventon Center
15. Center of Life Academy
16. Utility
17. Aspira School
18. Margaret Place Park
19. Williams Park
20. Gibson Charter School/St. Francis
Xavier School
21. Town Park
22. Phyllis Wheatley Elementary
23. City Cemetery
24. Central Miami Mini Park
25. MetroMover Rail
26. School Administration Building
27. International Fine Arts College
28. Miami Skill Center

Public Housing
a. In Cities
b. Wynwood Elderly
c. Rainbow Village
d. Town Park
e. Gwen Cherry
f. Phyllis Wheatley


IIV
-16LIE'



(~Cf
"bus






Ira


0 Art Gallery








SITE SYNTHESIS







Legend

Site Focus Area
ParkIdow.
Combining differ Major Node
rent aspects of O Metromover Stop -4
the previous data, fr Need for Buffer
the site synthesis 3.04 Major Corridors
demonstrates
dme mos thra ptens ) Potential Water Access
some of the poten-
tial opportunities ',~' Rail: Major Constraint
and limitations of M Large Open Area -
the site. After care- Strong Commercial *"*
Corridor ..
ful analysis, a focus Corridor
area was chosen
that had its own
unique character and sense of place. c BiscayneBay
The area bounded by NW 29th Street --: cayn Bay
to the north, NW 20th Street to the I
south, 1-95 to the west, and NE 2nd .
Avenue to the east is mostly industrial ~
in character and in most need of
revitalization. Major nodes were _I
identified, as well as the need for a
buffer adjacent to the highway. NW
5th Avenue, NW 2nd Avenue. N
Miami Avenue, and NE 2nd Avenue !
are designated as the site's major
corridors, and will be planned as high
activity zones. Furthermore, the
largest tracts of vacant land were
identified, as they have high
potentials for redevelopment or open t
park space.-- -









SITE CHARACTER

WAREHOUSES


The site has a very
distinct, industrial
character. Many old
warehouses have
been converted into
artist studios, lofts,
and even
restaurants. These
examples exemplify
how adaptive reuse
can successfully
maintain a building's
(and neighbor-
hood's) character
while retrofitting
them for contempo-
rary needs.


IML









SITE CHARACTER

URBAN ART


It is no surprise
that the
neighbor-
hood's
emerging art
scene is also
spreading to
the urban
fabric. Great
examples of
urban artwork
can be seen
throughout the
area. Murals,
rich graphics,
and collages
rethink graffiti
into character-
building tools.









SITE CHARACTER

VACANT LOTS


One of the most
apparent
characteristics of
the area is the
quantity of
vacant lots. It is
flabbergasting to
see so many
unused parcels
when Downtown
Miami, the city's
core, is a few
minutes away. The
above graphic
highlights the
vacant parcels in
brown.


!i_




i r,
.ii








opportunities



* Access to public transportation

* Central location
Proximity to Downtown Miami, the Design District, Midtown development, and Biscayne Bay

* Unique character
Urban art
Studios
Industrial character
Architecture

* Abundant open space and vacant lots

* Agreeable climate








constraints



* Very low-income population

* Railway that intersects site

* Dead-end roads

* Industrially saturated

* Weak sense of identity

* Homelessness

* Urban deterioration

* Gentrification







PROGRAM MAPPING


The main elements of the
project program are open
space, density, walkability,
and affordable housing. With
open space, the redevelop-
ment plan for the\ Wynwood
neighborhood will have an
interconnected system of
parks, food production
spaces (community gardens).
and recreational areas. As of
now, the density is relatively
low, so an aim of the design is
to higher that density to a
sustainable level. Walkability
wil be taken into account by
creating pedestrian friendly
environments that minimize
conflicts. This will be done by
the incorporation of
boulevards. Affordable
housing will be integrated
into the design, allowing for a
vibrant mixture of income
levels. Other elements of the
program are civic spaces,
mixed-use development, and
preservation.


S


-*, P F 00 -,9


p0, -q
P,


affordable
houin


~g ~


7


f


E economics





l *- "




i .....





i, _
-* .























1.) Commercial-Oriented Concept



2.) Mixed-Use-Oriented Concept



G 3.) Hybrid Concept..



Legend I --'

Commercial Area Public School


A 2Mixed-Use Area Green Boulevard

Residential Area Blue Boulevard
.,-._-:iml















0 0125 025 0o l lis





Legend


LAND USE MASTER PLAN


IVSLfJIr1W'VqSS H trikaI af


011 -i a
tm" A. ""
-'U^ E, r l, .. m


* i











I.


Existing Structures
I Proposed Structures
SConmmercial
E Mixed-Use
Residential
E Industrial
i Park/Open Space
* Boulevard Tree


























t


I I I
0 0.125 0.25


I Miles
0.5









BOULEVARD REVITALIZATION























.A 1 'od

A 13 Sidewalk 10, 1 1 5 Road 12 11 edianT 15 Rood 6 10 13 Sidewalk A'
Parking Bike Bike Parking
Lane Lane


KEY


perspective B








COMMUNITY SPACE


perspective C


KEY


: L r T
.Illll ." , .I ?i.l
:-_ i.0 i. -~~r i |- i n11
-111'J .: "ii ''
illl'. 1i,
.K'I 'rl~ri ;I :'I '
.*I[ ,"' .3 IJ -


Cxv- r,


r .
a -


J^', ^'







COMMUNITY SPACE


pcrspiczfive L)


KEY


Min


v r .6,
ll1 1F7i


Mom Y7~
L3~
I ,I: I '







ADAPTIVE REUSE


oterspica-tivea D


KEY

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... ... ... ... .. . . .. .

II I : I Ir II Iiln




.-le...::z::::~ lit:1 ;l~i
Lii2iii


.... .. ..























In conclusion...




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