• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Cover
 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Inventory, analysis and synthe...
 Program analysis
 Design development
 Post design guidelines
 Bibliography
 Appendix
 Conclusion














Title: Heart of Malabar
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 Material Information
Title: Heart of Malabar
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Wilbur, Aaron
Publisher: College of Design, Construction, and Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 2010
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Bibliographic ID: UF00100152
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Acknowledgement
        Page 5
    Table of Contents
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Introduction
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Inventory, analysis and synthesis
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
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        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Program analysis
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
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        Page 48
        Page 49
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        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Design development
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
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        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Post design guidelines
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Bibliography
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    Appendix
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
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        Page 136
    Conclusion
        Page 137
Full Text

The University of Florida

College of Design, Construction and Planning






THE HEART OF MALABAR





An Undergraduate Thesis in
Landscape Architecture

By
Aaron Wilbur


Faculty Advisor

Lester Linscott



2010




Submitted in partial fulfillment of the degree Bachelor in Landscape Architecture
and has been reviewed and accepted by the faculty as an Honors Thesis










UMIE Ml~lnu (O IF MIL~mi
E3jELL maL-3E;m-Lxciox jmx~ Lmj~~wx

























AARON WILBUR
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT
SPRING 20 1 0

FACULTY ADVISOR: LESTER LINSCOTT


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


~"-"





ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I



I would like to thank my family for all of the support and encouragement they have given me
over the years. Through their love, I have been able to accomplish anything. Thank you all for
being my rock these past five years.

Les Linscott, Thank you for all of the time you have given assisting me on my project. Without
your guidance and expertise, my project would not be what it is today.

Fred Halback, thank you for being so ready and willing to lend a hand and provide excellent
resources. Your contribution was very much appreciated.

To the faculty, thank you for the years you have devoted to my education. I will not forget all
that you have taught me as I leave the University of Florida. I will keep drawing those "Tina-
grams" and will never forget the art of grading.

To all my friends and classmates, it was all of you who got me through these past years. The
friendships and memories we have made in studio and outside, from the sleepless nights, to our
travels around the world, to our days in Gainesville, these will never be forgotten. I count each
of you, my friends, as one of the greatest blessings of my life.

Thank you especially to my loving God. Your blessings have been so evident.





RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING





Section Content


TABLE OF CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION
PURPOSE
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
SITE LOCATION, BACKGROUND, AND CONTEXT
HISTORY

INVENTORY, ANALYSIS, AND SYNTHESIS
SITE INVENTORY
ECOSYSTEMS PRESENT
WILDLIFE
SITE ANALYSIS
SITE SYNTHESIS


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK






7














PROGRAM ANALYSIS
EXISTING PROGRAM
DECONSTRUCTION ANALYSIS
CASE STUDIES
SCORP RESEARCH AND CONCLUSIONS
PROGRAM ANALYSIS

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT
INTRODUCTION
CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT
ORDERING PRINCIPLES
ILLUSTRATIVE MASTER PLAN
DETAILED AREA DESIGN

GUIDELINES

RESOURCES

RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING -




Section Content


SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


~---





19


RECREATION, FITNESS, LI


PURPOSE
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
SITE LOCATION
SITE BACKGROUND
SITE CONTEXT
HISTORY




EISURE, LEARNING -- -





10 Purpose


PURPOSE:

The purpose of this project is to explore the field of parks and recreation design, while
updating the existing master plan and readdressing the opportunity for expanded recreational
and educational uses of the Malabar Community Park.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


~-~c~-





Project Description 11


PROJECT TYPE: The project can be classified as a parks and recreation management project.

PROJECT LOCATION: Malabar, Brevard County, Central East Coast, Florida.

CLIENT: Town of Malabar

DESCRIPTION:
In its current condition, the Malabar Community Park is an under-used recreational com-
ponent of a larger greenway corridor. Ideally located as the terminus to 625 acres of protected
preserve lands and greenways, the proximity of the Malabar Community Park to several impor-
tant features, affords it the opportunity to truly become the "Heart of Malabar". The park will
receive a complete makeover and as the new name conveys, the Heart of Malabar Community
Park will become the center of all recreational activity, both active and passive in Malabar.
Included in the project is the expansion of the park lands, to accommodate increased rec-
reational facilities to respond to SCORP estimates of demand, expansion of passive and active
recreation on the site, the incorporation of an Environmental Learning Facility as the center of
a diverse program of learning elements, a Community Recreation and Fitness Center that will
be combined with a new Town Hall facility, and a stronger relationship and connection to the
surrounding greenways and trails systems that the Town of Malabar is known for.
Though the town is more rural than it is urban, I aim to create an open space and commu-
nity recreational facility that embodies the observations described in Stephanie Pincetl's essay
titled Using parks to make an urban metropolis: "When parks at any scale are provided in the
city, they become woven into people's regular life-patterns, and provide beauty and relaxation,
places and spaces of encounter and sociability."


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING





12 Goals and Objectives


Address potential opportunities and needs of the town through key site amenities.
+ Provide prime park lands and open space within the town to respond to the needs of a primarily residential
context.
+ Develop a community center to provide fitness and recreational opportunities year round.
Make use of new facilities as a possible secondary site for the town's administration.
+ Provide an Environmental Education Facility and interpretive trails system in order to educate the public
and provide learning opportunities for the numerous schools in the area.

Create a strong relationship between the community center, the environmental learning
center and the fire station and between the individual facilities and surrounding park
features.

Create a balanced design that integrates passive and active recreation opportunities.
+ Create a design that responds to the Clients visions of an intimate park experience, while addressing the
current and future demands of active recreational uses.
+ Increase both active and passive recreational opportunities while maintaining a harmony within the park.
+ Enhance the connection to existing and new trails systems.
+Address the user experience and provide a park that responds to and fit within the character of Malabar, Fl.

Provide a unique user experience through extensive learning and educational elements.
+ Strengthen the connection between nature and the surrounding communities.
+ Educate and inform the public of the natural communities and ecosystems around them.
+ Address the relationship between the study site and the Environmentally Endangered Lands Program.

To create a community park that truly becomes woven into people's everyday lives.
A place that they can come to and not just visit but become a part of, experience, and
interact. A park that becomes the identity of a town.


~ THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK






Site Background 13

The Town of Malabar is a unique and ideal location for eco-tourism and recreation. Though the town is considered one of the smallest in the area,
it's dedicated and passionate residents and town administrators provide excellent opportunities for the updating and expansion of ecological and
recreational uses. Currently, hundreds of acres of habitat have been bought and preserved by the Town of Malabar and converted into greenways.
Working closely with the Environmentally Endangered Lands Program (EELs), a county wide endangered lands preservation program, the town has
successfully linked several EELs preserved sanctuaries. It is important to the town that these lands are made available to the public for recreational
purposes.

The Malabar Community Park, is an existing park measuring 20 acres in size. The park, to date, has been developed mainly using FRDAP,
or Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program, money. In addition to funding being provided by FRDAP Grants, the town has existing
maintenance practices in place for caring for the park. However, areas of the park have still fallen into disrepair. The surrounding preservation lands,
managed by EELs, are under strict management practices, in order to maintain the quality of these endangered lands.

The park is situated off of S.R. 514, ---.. -. =
known locally as Malabar Rd. Malabar Rd.
has always been the main passage through the ___-_-_ E
town of Malabar, bringing residents, visitors, "ij1 -
and tourists alike to the town. Malabar Rd., Tll u .=.. 1l
which borders the park on the southern edge, \ 5
provides the sites biggest access route. -- S.. ~

Previous improvements to the park can --
be seen on the right on the conceptual master Da-rn-nold
plan. Though the plan is not one hundred .- -d
percent accurate to the existing conditions,-
the plan still provides an idea of the work and
------------------------------ -- ---------------- U
effort already invested on the park. A previous -- -- \ - -----
master plan was completed by a Landscape"" -.
Architecture firm many years ago, however
those plans were not accessible at the time.- C -
ure 1.S1 APHIC SC --


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING






141 Site Location




Location: The Malabar Community Park

City: Malabar

County: Brevard

State: Florida


,-'
\P


\

A i~iiiiiiii


S43 V


44 7


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK






Site Location 15

S'.. 1 "" The study site is broken down into three distinct
sections. These sections include the existing
community park, a collection of undeveloped
,.t single family residential lands, and an untouched
,- portion of the Malabar Scrub Sanctuary. The
P an4 residential lands are located to the far west, the
Sonser t preservation lands are located on the far east
portion of the site, while the existing park and
fire station comprise the middle third of the site.
The park and the residential lands are separated
only by a 4 foot tall fence that is in disrepair. The
park lands and the preservation lands, however,
are separated by a county owned road that is
used solely for access into the park. Though it
appears that the road, known as the Malabar
Woods Blvd., continues to the north, a trail head
exists along the northern boundary of the park,
preventing all vehicular and motorized traffic
to the north. A park wide speed limit of 15 mph
exists on all roads. The graphic to the left shows
this site division and the relationship of the park
to the Malabar Scrub Sanctuary.
It is important to note that the owners of
.1is ..- CPe 5 i the residential lands are all willing sellers.


SITE SELECTION: The site was selected primarily for its proximity to the existing Town Hall, its central location in the "heart of Malabar", and because
of its existing designation as park lands. The proposed site is ideally situated with a strong relationship to surrounding conservation and preservation
lands. The park is bordered on the north and east sides by conservation lands and private, single family residential on the south and west. This pro-
vides prime opportunities for the expansion and development of the park itself. The surrounding conservation lands provide an opportunity to create
the feeling of a much larger park, while not actually impacting the lands. The expanded Malabar Park will act as a key buffer for the south edge of the
conservation lands. This enhances the function of these sensitive lands and the quality of habitat for the species, allowing for increased wildlife view-
ing and user experience. The site was also selected based on its proximity to residential communities and a strong user base.



RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING






16 Site Context: County Wide Preserve Lands


- u


Below: An example of the Environmentally
Endangered Lands Program Recreation
Brochure for Brevard County. Right: A
county wide map showing all EEL pre-
serves and sanctuaries.
.- -_. --- /

Recreation Adventures
In BREVARD
COUNTY











.3
:.F .... ---. .


II^ ,-,.-- I i. .r_.L,


Buck Lake Conservation Area
I................................


Dnicerandra Scrub Sanctuay
.1%ncpl"aned ForestSangctuary .-. . . ....
Pine Island Conservation Area
............................ ........... .




Helen and Allan Cruickshank Sanctuay







Turkey Creek Sanctuary
Malabar Scrub Sanctuay~
.II.ii..c.... c. aljciqyl .............. ....




\ ....-.-

la Uri er Sjctu1 andS a ............... y .......... ... ...... ,


It is important to note that according to the EEL's program, it is their goal to provide "a resource
for environmental education". According to the EEL web site, the Malabar Scrub Sanctuary is
to be the next preserve to receive an environmental learning facility. This provides prime oppor-
tunity to incorporate this feature into the site design.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


I^UMJnl


~---





Site Context: Adjacent Preserve Lands 117


4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Turkey Creek Sanctuary






4 %4 4 % 4 4 Malabar Scrub Sanctuary
',i -


4% % 4 9 9 % Malabar Greenway #1

* S % % Malabar Community Park
Tn


4 4 4 4 e. Jordan Scrub Sanctuary


The study site and the surrounding context shown at a town wide scale. Notice the study site
is portrayed in red, while the county owned, EELs program sanctuaries are shown in blue,
and the Town of Malabar owned Greenwayy #1" is shown in aqua. Several prominent natural
greenways are emphasized by the solid green arrows. These greenways follow the Turkey
Creek cooridor, which winds its way from the Indian River Lagoon north of the site to just
south of S.R. 514.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING





181 Site Context


LEGEND
* Proposed Study Site
Existing Trail Head
Existing Conservation
Lands
Existing Town Hall
Residential
Neighborhoods


The site is located in a predominantly rural area situated south of EEL conservation lands and surrounded almost completely by the single
family residential land uses. The site is bordered on the south side by Malabar Road, or SR 514, which connects 1-95, US-1, and Babcock
Street, the three main north-south routes accessing Malabar. This provides critical and key access into the site from surrounding cities. The
site is located less than half a mile from the Indian River Lagoon and the existing Town Hall.
The Heart of Malabar Park will border the south side of the Malabar Scrub Sanctuary, with immediate access into the sanctuary and will
utilize the current passive recreational opportunities it provides. In addition to the Malabar Scrub Sanctuary, the park is located within hiking
distance of both the Turkey Creek Sanctuary (located to the North-West) and the Jordan Scrub Sanctuary (located to the South-East), both of
which have been previously identified. Further to the south is the Micco Scrub Sanctuary, which is one of the larger scrub sanctuaries in the
area, and is home to indigenous species that cannot be found anywhere else in Brevard County.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


~"-"





Site Context I19


Park Expansion: 15.5 ac 676,350 sq.ft.


Existing Park: 20 ac 871,200 sq.ft.


A Graphic showing the site broken down into the three distinct sections.
In blue the existing park, to the left, the block of single family residential,
and to the right, a section of the Malabar Scrub Sanctuary. The existing
park and both park expansion sections will become the new Heart of
Malabar Community Park. While the conservation area will remain
preservation lands, it will be used for an interpretive boardwalk and trails
system, associated with the learning facility and learning elements..


Acquired preservation: 14.5 ac 631,620 sq.ft.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING






20o History


ANCIENT CULTURES
12,000 B.C. 1500 A.D

12,000 b.c. The first people move into
Florida, known as the Paleolndians.
Came to hunt food such as mastodons,
giant armadillo, horses and saber tooth
tigers.

5,000 b.c. Paleolndian culture evolved
into the Archaic culture. Established
ifII 1icn1ialellnc1 tlC llc llnt Th Ailchalic
Indianil of Bri\ aird coHiint \\' %.':: kiio \ ii
a- tihK AIi alid tiK Tiintlictalln


FIRST ENCOUNTERS
1492- 1565

1492 Christopher Columbus lands in
North America. Results in widespread
European exploration.

1513 Ponce De Leon and expedition
bcolc' tih first dociiiiincntcd EIuiop:an
to land on tile Florida ic'imnsula Nanlllc
tliKc i)'inii ulna "Florida' afti tlihc' se'aon
"Pascuia Florida' Elo\\c 'i Entci)

I T 7 [ ~ HJ.--.V I J l^,~r ,-W~~a^


COLONIZATION
1565 1821
1763 Florida transferred to British con-
trol. Dived into east and west Florida.

1760 Seminoles, formerly of the Creek
tribe move to Florida. Named Seminoles
for the word Cimarron, meaning outsid-
ers or runaways.

1760 Ais Indians disappear completely
from Indian River Area.


(s, 'I


1


I "'6 Aniiican R \ oltIiOIn bc i nll

1783 End of American revolution. Spain
given Florida in return for aiding the
colonies in the war.


Historical Time Line for Learning Feature:


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK






History 121


STATE AND COUNTY
1821 1946


1821 Florida becomes US territory. Andrew Jackson made first governor
of Florida.


1823 Tallahassee retablisheld as Florida' capital


1845 Florida becomes the 27th state.


1854 Brevard County was established by an act of the Florida Legislature
in 1854. Named after Theodore W. Brevard.

1877 Captain Lund brought the steamboat Pioneer to the Indian River to
commence an era of commercial steamboat transportation.

1883 December 24 Town of Malabar gets its first official post office and
name. R.A. Ward named first postmaster by President Chester A. Arthur.


1905 Brevard amended to its present shape.


MODERN ERA
1946 PRESENT


I I1


1935 Florida Park Services Created.

1 93' Amelia Earhart takes off on around the world
lilt from Miami on June 1.

1961 May 5 The first American astronaut, Alan
Shepard, was launched into space from Cape Ca-
naveral Space Center.

1969 July 16 The Apollo 11 lift off from Cape Ken-
nedy (formerly Cape Canaveral) carrying Arm-
strong, Aldrin and Collins to the moon.


1971 Walt Disney World opens.


Florida, Brevard County and Town of Malabar History


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


Bow


1




Section Content


SECTION 2: INVENTORY, ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


221


~---






































RECREATION, FITNESS, LI


SITE PHOTOS
SITE INVENTORY
WILDLIFE
ECOSYSTEMS
SITE ANALYSIS
SITE SYNTHESIS







EISURE, LEARNING -





Inventory


U,


now -..... .*l.;- -- -


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK







Site Photos 25


LUJ -


r., .. ~..l-A
p.rt
-' .4


.
P, 2


*fJI
'7Y


UHF -.z: 1~ -


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING




261 Site Photos


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK







Site Photos


- .1 1 1


11


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


P


~j~=*: ;st,:~
ci~" ?~- "
%: ~I: ~L-_
.~;I'- .-* 'C~`-~"~" SI*,
~'~jy~'~"~;~:~c7'~5;~;
.~ ~~. /I r=~4Y~





281 Site Inventory

Site photos A G capture the character of the entry drive into the park and beyond into the Malabar Scrub Sanctuary, including several types
of signage located on the site.
SITE FEATURE QUANTITY ON SITE IMAGE

A ............. Park Entry Sign ................ 1 ....... ...... ..

B9 ......... Malabar Scrub Sanctuary Sign ............ 1 ................

S........... Community Park Sign ............... 1 ................

S.......... MalabarScrub Sanctuary .............. NA

I,.E... o..... Way-finding ............... 2 ......... ..

F .......... Malabar Woods Blvd. ............... 1 .................

G .............. Trail Head ................. ............ 1...

Site photos H L portray the existing built structures on the site. These include anything from existing buildings to pavilions and brides to
parking lots. Many of these features are located around the lake, which is one of the main features of the site.

S.... *...... Volunteer Fire Station .. ....... .... 1 *.. .. ....... -

............... Bridge ................... 1 .......... j

J ...... ....... Restrooms ................ 1 ........


--n- THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK





Site Inventory 129


SITE FEATURE QUANTITY ON SITE IMAGE
K s.........* CoveredPicnic Shelter ...... .. ..... 7 ..................
L *.....*** .... ParkingLot ........ ......... 2 ********* ..........
Site photos M S catalogues all of the recreational elements in the park. The majority of the site features are recreational elements. However,
some of the features are not being maintained as they should.

S... * * .. Exercise/Fitness Station ............... 10 ................

N ............... Tennis Court ................. 1 *****************
0 ............. Basketball Court ........ ... 1 .*.. . -i
P ............ Sand Volleyball Court.. ... ........ 1 .................
Q 1 ............Children'sPlayground . ....... 1 ................
R ............. Baseball Field ................. 1 ..... ...........
S ............. SoccerField ........ .. ..... 1 .............




RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING






301 Wildlife


Gopher Tortoise

+ The gopher tortoise is one of
the oldest species alive today,
dating back to around 60 mil-
lion years ago.

+ The gopher is one of the only
types of tortoise to dig deep
burrows, which provide shelter
for other species.

+ The gopher tortoise typically
measures under a foot in length
and is either dark tan or grey in
color.


Florida Mouse

+ The Florida Mouse (Podo-
mys floridanus) is a large spe-
cies of mouse and is listed as
a species of special concern.

+ It is best identified by the
presence of five plantar tu-
bercles on its hind feet.

+ Habitat includes that of
scrub and sandhill commu-
nities. The Florida mouse
inhabits gopher tortoise bur-
rows, or can dig its own.


River Otter

+ The river otter (Lontra
canadensis) is a member of
the weasel family.

+ The otter is built for swim-
ming and makes it's home
in nearly any inland water
body.

+ Their diet mainly consists
offish, frogs, crayfish, mol-
lusks, other invertebrates,
and small mammals.


Florida Bobcat

+ The Florida bobcat (Lynx
rufus floridanus) is one of
the two remaining species of
felines found in Florida, in
the wild.

+ The bobcat is a dark
brown color, with black
spots and a white underside.

+ The bobcats short tail is
one of it main distinctive
features.


Eastern Indigo Snake

+ The eastern indigo
snake (Drymarchon cou-
peri) averages 60 to 74
inches in length.

+ It is glossy black, with
iridescent blue highlights.
The belly is cloudy black
to blue-grey in color.

+ It often makes it's
home in tortoise burrows.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


~---






Wildlife 131


Florida Scrub Jay


Sandhill Crane


Pileated Woodpecker Great Horned Owl


Sparrow


Eastern Towhee


+ The Florida scrub jay
(Aphelocoma coerulescens)
is classified as a large song
bird.

+ It is found only in scrub
habitats, specifically the
oak scrub community in
Florida.

+It is a pale gray-brown
color with a distinct blue
head, wings and tail.


+ The sandhill crane (Grus
canadensis) is classified as a
very large migratory bird. The
crane migrates in huge num-
bers. Mated pairs stay together
for life.

+ Its body is a gray color, with
a red head and white cheeks.

+ It is a ground nesting bird
and feeds on grains, insects
and small vertebrates.


+ The pileated
woodpecker (Dryo-
copus pileatus) is
the largest wood-
pecker in North
America.

+ It has a black
body and a red crest
on its head.

+Feeds on insects,
fruits and nuts.


+ The great homed
owl (Bubo virgin-
ianus) is one of the
most common owls
in North America.

+ It can be found al-
most anywhere but
prefers woodlands.

+ Has prominent ear
tufts on the head.


+ The sparrow (Spi-
zella arborea) is a
small song bird

+ It eats seeds, ber-
ries and nuts.

+ It breeds in open,
scrubby areas, nest-
ing on or near the
ground. It winters in
fields, open forests,
marshes and gardens.


+ The Eastern Towhee
(Pipilo erythroph-
thalmus) spends the
majority of its time on
the ground.

+ It prefers dense
shrub cover to hide in.

+ It is dark black (or
brown for females)
with a white under-
side and red sides.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


~"-"






32 Ecosystems and Habitats


Sand Pine Scrub


Scrubby Flatwoods


Pine Flatwoods


Characteristic Vegetation: Characteristic Vegetation:
Quercus chapmanii, Q. myrtifolia, Q. Pinus clausa, Quercus myrtifolia,
geminata, Serenoa repens, Lyonia ferru- Ceratiola ericoides
ginea, Ceratiola ericoides, Pinus clausa


Characteristic Vegetation: Characteristic Vegetation:
Lyonia lucida, Myrica cerifera, Ilex Pinus palustris, Pinus elliottii, Aristida
glabra, Quercus geminata, Q. chap- stricta, Ilex glabra, Serenoa repens
manii, Q. myrtifolia, Pinus clausa, P.
palustris, P. elliottii


Important Species:


Important Species:


Important Species:


Important Soecies:


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


Scrub


~"-"





Ecosystems and Habitats 33


Xeric Hammock


Depression Marsh


Characteristic Vegetation: Characteristic Vegetation:
Quercus geminata, Q. chapmanii, Q. laevis, Several species of lilies, several
Q. incana, Q. margaretta, Q. hemisphaerica, varieties of green-stemmed,
Q. virginiana, Pinus clausa, P. elliottii, P. broad-leaved, herbaceous plants,
palustris, Serenoa repens, Lyonia ferrugin- reeds, sedges, rushes, and float-
ea, L. lucida, Vaccinium arboreum, Cal- ing aquatic plants
licarpa americana, Osmanthus americanus,
Ilex vomitoria, Aristida stricta


Important Species: Important Species:


Characteristic Vegetation: Characteristic Vegetation:
Many diverse species of wetland vegeta- Grasses, algae, sedges, reeds, rushes,
tion. and floating aquatic plants.






Important Species: Important Species:


I E~


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


Slough


Pond


~"-"





Site Analysis


Contextual Analysis


Contextual Analysis: To begin the analysis phase, a contextual analysis was conducted as a transition from the context maps to the actual site specific
analysis. Displayed on the map are public schools, parks and major roads. The roads displayed are a combination of freeways, major and minor arterials,
and collectors. These will provide the main access to the site. The map also portrays half mile, mile and 3 mile rings, visually displaying the amount of
users that fall within each of the 3 distances.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


~"-"





Site Analysis 35


Existing Conditions


Existing Structures:

1 Fire Station (Main of-
fices and truck bays)

2 Fire Station (mainte-
nance shed and garage)

3 Children's playground
and shade structure

4 Covered picnic struc-
ture (6 typ.)

5 Covered gazebo

6 Public Rest rooms

7 Bridge


Existing Conditions: The existing conditions map analyzed the relationship and the presence of different elements on the site. Depicted in the map was the
existing canopy versus the open space on the site. Existing structures are shown in black showing the the lack of relationship between any of the built features.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


~"-"





36


Land Use Areas:

Undeveloped
Residential: 15.5 acres

Preservation: 14.5 acres

Open Space: 11 acres

Parking and
Roads: 3.5 acres

Buildings and
Structures: .25 acres

Recreation: 2.5 acres

Open Water: 2.75 acres

Total: 50 acres


LEGEND Preservation lands Open space L Site boundary
Undeveloped residential Recreation uses Existina site structure-


Land Use Analysis: The land use analysis shows the several different existing uses on the site. Main land uses of the site include undeveloped single fam-
ily residential, preservation lands, open space, and recreation. Secondary uses include buildings and structures, roads and parking, and open water.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


Site Analysis


Land Use Analysis


~"-"






Site Analysis 37


Soils and Watershed Analysis























LEGEND Soil suitable for moderate use f Site boundary
ExistingSoils suitable for improvements Soil unsuitable or improvement Ste dranage-

Ba -Soils and Watershed Analysis:
Mp Myakka Sand 'ii






















High suitability is shown in green. Theses areas are composed of soils that are well-drained and adequate for supporting buildings and other de-
velopment.
Medium Suitability is shown in orange. This area is composed of poorly drained soils or low lands that have been filled to support light existing
development.
Mk Myakka Sand













allphar RPl a"
"' LEGEND !I'',: Soil suitable for moderate use i Site boundary
Soils suitable for improvements- Soil unsuitable for improvement N Site drainagce- -

Soils and Watershed Analysis:
High suitability is shown in green. Theses areas are composed of soils that are well-drained and adequate for supporting buildings and other de-
velopment.
Medium Suitability is shown in orange. This area is composed of poorly drained soils or low lands that have been filled to support light existing
development.
Low Suitability is shown in red. These areas are composed of poorly drained soils that are either annually flooded or hold water year round and
are very poor for any development except the lightest passive uses. Any improvements must be extremely sensitive.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING





38 Site Analysis

Circulation Analysis


4&^ : -
ff-f4^n ^*^^^^^^__^J


Circulation Analysis: The circulation analysis shows existing circulation through out the site. The primary vehicular circulation shows adequate access
to the site, however pedestrian circulation, shown in blue, is poor. It lacks any sort of opportunity for exploration and discovery within the site. There are
no physical pedestrian sidewalks or pathways, only worn areas in the grass showing routes pedestrians have taken between site feature. There is a lack of
hierarchy to the circulation on the site. The east preservation lands have the constraint of no vehicular and medium to light pedestrian circulation. The pos-
sibility of potential vehicular access is shown along undeveloped road corridors to the west.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


~"-"





Site Analysis I39


View Shed Analysis


View Shed Analysis: In order to determine the most appropriate locations for different active areas versus passive areas, it is important to analyze the
views on the site. This was accomplished through site visits and categorizing the views present based on a simple hierarchy of important vehicular views,
good pedestrian views, and unfavorable site views. On the site, several view sheds and points of visual interest were determined based on the important
vehicular views. Secondly, at a smaller scaler, good pedestrian views helped to locate views that should be preserved or enhanced in their current state. The
unfavorable views helped to info the areas that needed remediation, through either screening or buffering in addition to major site enhancements to create
pleasing vistas for visitors.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


~"-"














I1. -
.4.

,1 ,

- '


II
4


7'


I


!2-
U


r-4
7-o`-*-


Ii


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


40 Site Synthesis


~"-"








High opportunity for development
and intense site improvements
Moderate opportunity for develop-
ment and site improvements
Low opportunity for site improve-
ments and no development
Very low opportunity for site im-
provements
Opportunity to reuse existing site
improvements and development
Opportunity to re-use major site
entry point
Opportunity for secondary site entry
point
Opportunity for major site feature

Opportunity to maintain and reuse
pleasing site views
Constraint due to poor view sheds

Potential vehicular site access

Opportunity to incorporate existing
structures


Site Synthesis 41

Site Synthesis:
There are both many opportunities and constraint on the site. Each of these has been
determined through careful study of each of the site analysis maps.
There is a high opportunity for development and site improvements on the existing
park lands because the land is already disturbed and cleared. These areas will be the most
suitable for further developments and the possibility of any heavy site improvements. In
addition to these lands there is an excellent opportunity to reuse existing site development
already on the site.
The western portion of the site is mostly classified as having a moderate opportunity
for development. Due to the fact that this portion of the site is zoned as single family residen-
tial, the lands will eventually be developed, in addition the lands are already disturbed and
thus not of as high of an importance to protect as the preservation lands. However it is still of
a great importance to preserve as much natural vegetation and as many of the natural process
on the site as possible in order to create a park character that is harmonious to the nature pre-
serves that surround it.
The next category is the areas of low suitability for site improvements and no devel-
opment. This category is made up of the preservation lands in which no site development
and only environmentally sensitive site improvements shall be permitted. In addition to the
preservation lands the category is composed of the wetlands soils with a low suitability for
development. Theses areas should be reserved for the lightest of uses such as board walk
systems.
The final category shows a very low suitability for site improvements. This category
is made up of open water bodies and the adjacent flood zones. All site development should be
avoided in this area.
There were several opportunities and constraints pertaining to the view shed that have
been addressed in the synthesis. First, there is prime opportunity to preserve and enhance the
good pedestrian views of the site. These views are concentrated mainly around the lake and
provide opportunities for wildlife viewings and beautiful natural vistas.
Two potential vehicular access points were selected from the analysis phase. The first
runs from the south to the north. This access point benefits from the visibility of potential
visitors and users from S.R. 514. The second access point runs east west from the western
most point of the park. This access point draws its opportunity from the fact that it does not
cross or interfere with any of the sensitive wetland areas.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


El
aic


~---




Section Content


SECTION 3: PROGRAM ANALYSIS


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


~--























EXISTING PROGRAM
DECONSTRUCTION ANALYSIS
CASE STUDIES
SCORP RESEARCH
PROGRAM ANALYSIS


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


-~-~-






44 Existing Program



The existing program of the site is mainly focused on the active recreation uses. Sports field and play equipment are the
main features of the site, with minimal focus on any passive recreation. Below is listed all of the existing program. Identifying
these existing features is an important first step in the program development phase.


Existing Program:


Active Uses

Baseball Field
Soccer Field
Tennis Court
Basketball Court
Volleyball Court
Playground Equipment
Fitness/Exercise Structures


Existing Program:


Passive Uses

Covered Picnic Structures
Observation Bridge and Fishing
Malabar Scrub Trail Head
Lake Viewing


Existing Program:


Other Uses

Fire Station
Rest rooms and Maintenance


As can be concluded from the site inventory, site analysis, and now the study of the existing program, the character of
the site can best be described as sterile. Though the park does host several key uses and has a variety of recreational compo-
nents, it lacks character or the possibility of interpretation or exploration. Younger children are confined to a stereotypical set of
pre-fabricated playground equipment while the only uses for children and young adults between 15 and 30 years of age are the
different sports, watching younger kids play, or leaving the park via the trail head and hiking on the trails. There are no inviting
transitional spaces between the elements, only barren expanses of grass. The only inviting space in the park is the areas around
the lake, where there are some shade trees and some seating or picnic options and nice views of the lake and surrounding pre-
serve lands. These observations will become a focus when developing the program and in the initial phases of design.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


~---







FRDAP and Demolition Analysis 45




The park, to date, has been developed through funding provided by FRDAP, or the Federal Recreation Development As-
sistance Program. Through this grant money the main recreational elements have been installed. Below is a cost breakdown for
several of the major site features. From this information a deconstruction analysis was created to graphically and visually rank
the importance of each feature and possibility or plausibility of the demolition of some of those features.






Baktbl outMdeae($500)Lw odLo 4


Volybl outLw $,00 ig oert ig 2


PRIMARY RECREATION AREAS AND FACIUTIES: Including, but not limited to, beach access, picnic
facilities, fishing piers, ballields, tennis courts, bicycle trails, etc. Costs of planning and site preparation
should be included within the cost of each element.
Quantity Description Estimated Cost
1 Baseball Field $ 38,734.00
1 Softball Field 30,000.00
1 Tennis Court 20,000.00
1 Soccer Field 25,000.00
1 Volleyball Court, sand 1,500.00
1 Basketball Court 15,000.00
1 Playground 2,000.00







Prim : 132,23400

Total Primary: S$ 132,234.o00


SUPPORT FACILITIES AND IMPROVEMENTS: Parking, restrooms, landscaping andothersuch costs
should be included under support costs. Costs ofplanning and site preparation should be included within the
cost ofeach element.
Quantity Description Estimated Cost
n/a Landscape buffering 1,000.00
n/a Sand for beach area 100.00







Total Support $ 1,100.00
TOTAL COST OF PROPOSED PROJECT S 133,334.00
DEP Form #42-010
Revised 02/97 3
Note: In the estimate there are 2 main categories of site features; Primary and Sup-
port. When developing the grant proposal you must have Primary features in order
to apply for support improvements.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


~"-"





461 Case Studies

Cedar River Watershed Education Center; Seattle; Washington State.

Overview:
An intuitive and creative design, by Jones and Jones, for an innovative Environmental Education Center, in Seattle,
Washington. Situated adjacent to the pristine Cedar River watershed, the water source of Seattle, Washington, the Education
Center is located on 5 acres of land built along a ridge line. The Complex is located near a 90,000 acre ecological reserve,
which is prime habitat to many species. However, it is not the wildlife that takes center stage, but the water itself. Celebrat-
ing the water that has sustained Seattle for more than a century, the Education Center captures, and literally puts into play
falling rain, while teaching, educating and captivating visitors of all ages. The entire campus is a narrative of water. The
site is the image of sustainability, with green roofs visible on many of the buildings and all water on the site being cleansed
through the use of bio-swales, a stream planted with native wetland vegetation. Jones and Jones successfully created an
intriguing and fun complex that encourages and stimulates interest in learning about the watershed. Design elements include
a moss garden, rain drums that play world tunes through rain drops falling from tubes artistically wound through the trees, a
stream that flows from a spring under the covered entry walkway to a native-boulder-lined pool, runoff filtering bio-swales,
a five building complex which is linked through a series of covered walkways and courtyards. The interior of the buildings
open to specialized exterior rooms, which function as spaces for teaching, meeting, and discovery. The education complex
itself is made up of a welcoming room, an interpretive hall, an auditorium, classrooms, a library, offices, and an archive stor-
age area.


Significance to the Project:
The Cedar River Watershed Education Center is one of the primary examples of the creative and environmentally
responsible design of a teaching facility that respects the sensitive context of a site, while celebrating an important resource.
The study helped develop several aspects that will be implemented in the Heart of Malabar Park. These Include:

+ The Environmental Learning Facility Program + Methods to incorporate site sensitivity

+ Creative learning features for the facility itself + The use of interactive elements



STHE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK






Case Studies 147





- : ,.' k,
*l "'-


Above Right: Site photos of the character of Cedar River. Above: An analysis of the site plan show-
ing the main program elements of the site. The layout of the learning center is unique in that each
program element has been separated into distinct buildings connect by covered walkways. Below: An
overall site map of the Cedar River Watershed Park.


Il-


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING



;r


~"-"





481 Case Studies

Commons Park; Denver; Colorado.

Overview:
Commons Park is the green heart of Denver. Designed as the hub of Denver's park system, the 26 acre park is the fo-
cal piece of a 10.5 mile greenway that runs along the South Platte River. The goals of Jones and Jones are always two fold,
and a single design decision never serves one purpose. For example, the design of the park serves as a public open space,
while dually functioning as river habitat restoration. While maintaining an ecological sensitivity, the open space provides
recreation, public rest rooms, accessible river frontage and river crossing. Both Denver and the park lands itself boast a rich
history of Native American Culture, of early American history, and of wagon trails leading west, of trading grounds and of
railroads. The park is located at the historical intersection of two major wagon trails; historically know as the Arapaho trad-
ing ground, which gets its name from the Native American Tribe that made its home there. Despite this rich historical con-
text, the inspiration for the parks design comes from the natural heritage of the park lands. Not only does the park focus on
the restoration of the river, but it also reintroduces the function and hydrology of the prairie, which the park was created to
embody. It is the nature and feel of this ecosystem and the spirit of the first inhabitants that the park aims to reintroduce.


Significance to the Project:
The park is a brilliant community park design, capitalizing on the simplicity of the natural history of the area while
acknowledging and celebrating the rich history of the city of Denver. It is a perfect example of the creative and subtle way
in which both natural and cultural history can become a didactic element that not only teaches users but can informs the de-
sign itself. This case study provides an in depth look at a successful community park. Several traditions of 19th century park
design can be gathered from Commons Park, such as:
+ Broad grassy expanses + Dramatic vantage points

+ Soft green boarders + Substantial architectural features





STHE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK






Case Studies


P gr
~.,.te nsi-



'a1


I


-5r


- ta. "-lay -


~ra

t~U4


aff-Jt


Above: Several site photos dis-
playing the character of the Park
It is important to not the use of
open space within n the park Uis-
ers can begin to info the uses of
these spaces
Left The site master plan of
Commons Park
S Belo\ .A conte\tual \ ie\\ of the
park IIandi s \\ th the St rrlOtindinul
cit\ of Den\ e


-- mmi



Ss a ' tT C r i a t a P S r
-&::. ZMI Sn P_ A Z.M!R


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


.;''


~"-"





501 Case Studies

West Augustine District Park; St. John's County; Florida.

Overview:
West Augustine District Park is an excellent example of a park project of similar character and a roughly similar scale.
Graciously provided by Fred Halback and Halback Design Group, the project itself was beneficial in examining an actual
park project that addressed a similar program. In addition to the design itself, Halback Design Group provided the full pre-
sentation package which detailed out their process of analysis and programming, including many of the dimensions and
square footage of major and minor site elements. Though the park addresses more recreational uses than will be included
in the Heart of Malabar, it was helpful to study the process and follow a similar route in park planning. The greatest benefit
of the West Augustine District Park was the opportunity to study the design of the community center. As a successful com-
munity center that has been built and is functioning, Halback Design Group used the project to develop a kit of parts and a
detailed set of guidelines for community center design. Utilizing these guidelines, the program for the community center was
developed and finalized. The program and design was adjusted to better relate to the site and fit with the context, but the de-
sign principles and guidelines set forth by Mr. Halback were followed in order to ensure a successful project. West Augustine
was the most beneficial case studies analyzed during the program development process.

Significance to the Project:
West Augustine is a successful and well designed park incorporating active recreation uses with that of the commu-
nity center. It was beneficial to analyze a park project of similar nature. The West Augustine Park provided much insight and
contributed to:
+ The program development of the community center + Details regarding park design and different technical data

+ The analysis of similar program features and active recreation + A clear view of a successful design package, detailing the steps for
components presenting in a clear fashion the data gathered and the design created







STHE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK









Case Studies 51


Illustrative

Master Plan


Buildings Parking
F Spaa 450 s0

Cm-d b no y I50 Paking Spaces
C(are. s Mon 1 space x 450sq ft
(18000 ) (67.50 M ft)
Pavilion with
4 p-lt c tables

100 table per 000000

SOperatons
scorerstpress
(2,400 soft


Facilities Figure 3.4 etenton


I
SLighted
210'x 360 laying Aare
275x 410 -Oeral
Mulprpose FieM
(75.600 q ft.)


iIorraaeat aoarI
1-1 PoaygrOr
75'x75'
(5,525sq ) 131x131
Cormpel Snimmnn Pool
8 plans. 25 yards
w chidrern's poo, play equipre0n rnn8S
"' V...' PV"" .. (17.235 "f)
sdedec space, a pav a17235
shade slructrbes (17.000 0q 0t)


Mal nteFna e

2 igeL eaLeague (s5,a000 a el oeeAesm
0S00F0le BF1ba, Fr'ea -(102,0720 ft)
sease 200 y 3Lgea y 200',
e 200 2 Lghled Conpet0 Py 2250
. 22! Sq r League (422.500 sq ft
l7ay 225
0. 2 330
(217,800 s qR.)


.120 ,-.*. 2.le 0 M i, -Purpose F
h H 4 Leagua Play
1200' Te Ba Fes
(151,200 sqft.)


*0. fl,


145 x145


S(22272 sqfl)


Rear Elevation


Decorative Security Gate
j_ -MtalBrac


- Metal Roof


I I I j ~


SImpact Glass


7QI I I. I 1 II I I _


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


:: 4 Palions
16 picic tables
(1600 sq )
F. S.r
Coneosson
(2,400 sq ft)
MalednS.ce
(2.400 Q ft)


- PavIon
(400000)
SRe250 sq ftroo
(250 sq0)


Rear Elevation


U


i'.-*
v.....


~YO I.......-;,.;
~r ;r.~ .


&J







52 SCORP Program Development


Table 5.1
Statewide Resident and Tourist Participation, 2007


Residents


Resource-Based
Saltwater Beach Activities
visiting Archaeological and Historic
Sites
Picnicking
Bicycle Riding Paved Trails
Nature Study
Freshwater Beach Activities
Saltwater Boat Fishing
Hiking
Bicycle Riding Unpaved Trails
Freshwater Boat Fishing
Saltwater Non-Boat Fishing
Freshwater Boat Ramp Use
Freshwater Non-Boat Fishing
Saltwater Boat Ramp Use
Tent Camping
Off Highway Vehicles
Canoeing and Kayaking
Hunting
RVITrailer Camping
Horseback Riding

User-Oriented
Outdoor Swimming Pool Use
Baseball or Softball
Golf
Outdoor Basketball
Football
Outdoor Tennis
Soccer or Rugby
Outdoor Handball/Racquetball
Outdoor Shuffleboard


Percent
of Residents
Participating '
57.2
48.7

44.3
43.5
37.1
26.8
25.7
22.6
21.4
21.4
20.6
20.1
20.0
18.1
15.9
15.9
14.2
11.5
9.6
9.1


50.7
20.1
19.3
16.9
13.4
11.0
7.7
4.8
3.3


Tourists


Number of
Participants 2
11,277,724
9,101,667

8,248.470
8,927.743
7,286,902
4,316,737
5,193,711
3,968,756
3.965.018
2.983,859
4,249,090
2,787,543
3.048,681
3,492,812
2,877,159
2,531,871
2,647,260
1,534,565
1,587,936
1,476,428


10,151,384
3,677,399
3.850.919
3,422,509
2,527,850
2,424,225
1,519,705
989,628
640,297


Percent
of Tourists
Participating
54.4
21.6

13.0
8.0
21.6
7.1
7.3
5.0
1.0
1.0
3.8
1.0
0.7
1.2
1.2
1.0
1.2
0.4
2.5
0.4


56.8
3.5
9.6
2.6
1.6
2.3
0.3
0.3
2.9


Number of
Participants 2
46,285,304
20.433,540

11,920,746
6,612,431
20,173 810
5.823 381
4,545.695
4,654,262
1,072,568
866,580
2,981,088
999,842
915,182
1,419,774
653,236
762,192
973,511
114,565
2,687,683
547,535


47,257,791
3,119,266
8,804,329
999 532
879,240
2.559 688
272 905
264,000
2,650,806


1 Percentage rates are based on the statewide resident and tourist samples.
2 Statewide totals are calculated by adding regional resident and tourist participants.


SCORP ANALYSIS:
SCORP functions primarily as an outdoor rec-
reation planning guide. With recreation being one of
the main attractions that the state of Florida has to offer
both visitors and residents alike, it is important to plan
for the expansion of these programs. SCORP serves as
one of the most important sources of recreation in-
formation, and is an invaluable guide and resource to
recreation planning.
The main functions of SCORP is to identify na-
tional trends in recreation and to meet the demand and
recreational needs of Florida.
In relation to the project, SCORP was used ex-
tensively to develop the possible program and as one of
the initial steps in the programmatic phase of the proj-
ect. To the left is a table displaying Statewide Resident
and Tourist Participation in 2007. This table, taken from
the "Outdoor Recreation in Florida" guide, graphically
displays the percentages of both residents and visitors
that participate in a wide range of recreational activi-
ties. These activities were then organized based on their
popularity.
The highest ranked activities are first analyzed
based on their relevance to the Malabar park site. If the
activity supports a certain level of relevance and feasi-
bility, it becomes a part of the initial program develop-
ment for the Heart of Malabar Community Park. These
recreational activities that are selected as possible
program elements are shown highlighted in yellow.

*All information and graphics gathered from the Outdoor Recre-
ation in Florida 2000 Guide, specifically chapter 1 and 5.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK







SCORP Program Development 53


Table 5.2
Frequency of Participation Among Residents and Tourists


Percentage of Respondents


Activities
Saltwater Beach Activities
Outdoor Swimming Pool Use
Saltwater Boat Fishing
Bicycle Riding Paved Trails
Golf
Nature Study
Freshwater Boat Fishing
Visiting Archaeological and
Historical Sites
Hunting
Baseball or Softball
Hiking
Picnicking
Outdoor Basketball
Freshwater Non-Boat Fishing
Saltwater Non-Boat Fishing
Off-Highway Vehicle Riding
RV/Trailer Camping
Horseback Riding
Outdoor Tennis
Tent Camping
Freshwater Beach Activities
Football
Soccer or Rugby
Bicycle Riding Unpaved
Trails
Canoeing and Kayaking
Freshwater Boat Ramp Use
Saltwater Boat Ramp Use
Outdoor Handball/
Racquetball
Outdoor Shuffleboard


Most
Frequent Activity
Residents Tourists
14.3 27.2
10.1 26.5
9.0 1.9
8.3 0.5
7.7 3.5
6.5 4.7
5.1 0.3


0.1 0.0


Second Most
Frequent Activity
Residents Tourists
7.4 15.4
7.5 15.4
7.7 1.4
8.3 1.7
2.9 2.3
5.5 5.5
7.5 0.2


0.2 0.5


Third Most
Frequent Activity
Residents Tourists
11.2 5.9
5.6 5.6
5.1 2.0
7.8 2.0
1.3 2.1
5.6 6.7
6.9 0.1


0.4 0.7


Table 5.2 displays the Frequency of Partici-
pation Among Residents and Tourists. This
table again shows the highest ranked rec-
reational activities in Florida and will help
to develop a successful program. Only the
highest ranked uses that are relevant to the
site are selected.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING








54 SCORP Program Development




Additional Historical Resources Needed


Table 5.14

Demand and Need Summary By Region

Visiting Archeological and Historic Sites

2007-2020


West Apalachee Noth
Central


Northeast Withlacoochee


Regions


East
Central


Central Tampa Bay


Southwest Treasur
Coast


sfate


Sou th
Total


Percent of Participation
Residents 49.9


Tourists
Total Paricipants"
2007
2010
2015
2020
Levels of Service
(SitesJl.1, Paticipants)
2007
2010
2015
2020
ResourceFacilty Reuiremrents""
(Sites)


24.0

2,853,353
2,953,315
3,232,514
3,527,654




0.02

0.02


50.8 44.2


58.3


27.1 19.0 46.6


680,440
704,818
764,132
825,841



0.20
0.25
0.23
0.21


371,100
383.748
413,884
442,937



0.10
0.18
0.17
0.16


3,714.638
3,859.440
4,239.105
4.39,678



D.09
0.00
0.08
I.N7


47.7
32.4


943,603
983.293
1,088.019
1,194,994


52.9 34-2
17.7 19.6


5.612,308
5,833,682
6.414,875
7.021,554


676,862
701,482
787.044
834,279



0.04
OJM
003
0.03
0.03


50A
23.0

3,779.036
3,908,505
4,249,566
4,005,266



<0.01

<0.01
<0-.01
4aOfl


4.11~i


43.7
25.D

2,462.928
2,566,014
2,838.181
3,117,619



0.04
0.04
0.04
0-03


47.3


50-2


18.8 27.B


2.200,181
2.345.424
2,570,856
2B03,360



0.02
0.01
0.01
0.01


8,343,801
8,549,936
7,092,279
7,685,779



0.02
0.02
0.02
0.01


2010 2 6 2 13 4 12 1 1 4 1 4 49
2015 9 22 B 48 14 42 3 2 16 5 13 177
2020 16 38 14 85 24 74 B 4 27 B 23 311

SPercent of participation represents the percentage of residents and tourists who participated in activity at least one tine during the year.
Total participants represents the combined number of residents and tourists ho participated in activity at least one time during the year.
Resourcefacility requirements represents the amount of additional resources and facilities that are needed to maintain 2007 levels of service through the projected years.
BOLD type represents regions with levels of service below the statewide median.


A table displaying the additional historical sites needed in the East Central region of Florida.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


48.7
21.6

27.224,551
28,227.132
30.855,188
33,598,431



0.O5
0.05
O.05
0.04
0.04








SCORP Program Development 55


Additional Nature Study Resources Needed


Table 5.15

Demand and Need Summary By Region

Nature Study

2007-2020


Rpfdnrm


West Apalachee


Percent of Participation
Residents
Tourists
Total Partc pans"
2007
2010
2015
2020
Levels of Service
(Mies of Traiil,.000 Particants)
2007
2010
2015
2020
ResourceFality Requirements'"
(Miles of Trail)
2010
2015
2020


39.3
21.9

2.538,299
2,832,159
2,877,419
3.142,013



0.04
0.04
0.04
0.03


North
Central


Northeast Withlacoochee


East
Central


30.8 29.8 30.0
21.9 21.9 21.9


819,41
849,864
925,719
1.006,492



0.36
0.35
0.32
0.30


209,752
310,185
335,356
380,550



0.69
0.67
0.62
0.57


2,305,370
2,395.349
2,631.304
2,879.342



0.08
0.08
0.07
0.06


Central Tampa Bay Southwest


42.1 30.2
21.9 21.9


707.328
736,954
815.094
895.181


5.101,423
5,302,022
5,828,492
6.381,435


686,632
711,792
778.640
847.834



0.28
0.27
0.25
0.23


40.3
21.9

3.941,873
4,080,780
4.448,125
4.832,151


0.05
0.05
0.04
0.04


32.7
21.9

2,924.054
3,042.772
3,353.788
3,883.791



0.00
0.08
0.08
D07


Treasure
Coast


38.5
21.9

2.887,554
2.897,242
3.286.243
3.591,238



0.04
0.04
0.04
0.03


ifate


taSouth
Total


44.8
21.9

5,375,525
5,548,502
6,003.747
9,484.015



0.05
0.05
0.04
0.04


37.1
21.9

25.056,387
259886,179
28.422,876
30.989,465



0.10
0.10
0.09
0.08


SPercent of participation represents the percentage of residents and tounsts who participated in activity at least one tmne dunng the year
" Total partlopants represents the combined number of resmkenrs and lounsis who particpated m activity at least one time during the year.
", Resourcefacility requirements represents the amount of additional resources and facilities that are needed to maintain 2007 levels of sernce through the priected years.
BOLD type represents regions with levels of service below the statewide median.


A table displaying the additional miles of nature study trails needed in the East Central region of Florida.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


---a---


~"-"






56 SCORP Program Development



Additional Baseball Resources Needed


Table 5.25
Demand and Need Summary By Region
Baseball'Softball
2007-2020

Regions State
West Apalachee North Northeast Withlacoochee East Cenral Tampa Bay Southwest Treasure South TOW
Central Cental Coast
Percent of Particiatn"
Residents 22.0 21.1 23.0 22.2 10O 21.8 181 24.5 16.1 15.5 18.7 20.2
Tourists 2.7 <0.1 4.8 3.0 15 1.4 7.8 7.6 5.4 4.0 4.3 35
Total Participants"
2007 473,98 98,512 156.479 575,373 147,714 1,003,767 295.715 1.443.448 633,743 584,275 1,449,265 6,70B,796
2010 490,029 101,558 161,618 598,237 154,538 1,044,645 308.391 1.491253 861,191 606,193 1,400.902 6.948.379
2015 531,977 107,663 173.357 658,318 172,670 1,152,342 334888 1.617.432 733 I.7 684,320 1.600,911 7,576,987
2020 575,505 112,968 184.295 718,174 189,909 1,257,771 363,837 1.746 895 806,614 723,227 1,713,603 B.20B.678
Levels of Service
(Fields 11,000 Participants)
2007 1.0 2.6 1.3 1.0 2.1 0. 1.3 0.5 .5 10 0 5 0.
2D10 1.0 2.5 1.3 1.0 2.0 a. 1.2 85 0.5 10 0.5 0.8
2015 0.C 2.4 1-2 0.9 1-8 0.7 1.1 05 0.4 09 0.5 07
2020 0.8 2.3 1.1 0.8 1. 0.7 1.0 A0 0 0.8 0.4 0.7
ResourceFacilitv Requirements"
Fields)
2010 17 8 7 23 14 33 14 25 14 22 22 195
2015 60 24 23 85 52 121 50 92 49 81 79 708
2020 104 38 37 14a 88 20B B7 161 i8 140 138 1.223
* Pement of parcipatorn rprsen.ts the prentLage of residents and tourist who parti-qated in actbity at least one time dunng the year.
" Total particpants represents the combined number of residents and tounsts who participated in activity at least one time dunng the year
" Resource/acdty requirements represents the amount of additional resources and faciies that ae needed to maintain 2007 levels of sence through the projected years.
BOLD type represents regions with levels of serace belaw me sa~ewdle median


A table displaying the additional baseball fields needed in the East Central region of Florida.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


~"-"








SCORP Program Development 5


Additional Basketball Resources Needed


Table 5.26

Demand and Need Summary By Region

Outdoor Basketball

2007-2020


Regions


West palachee


Norfmast Wthlacachee


Cenab TawpaeBaB Sothwest


Percent of Particpali
Residents
Tourists
Total Partcipants"

2010
2015
2020
Levels of Seice
(Goast 1.000 Partiaipans)
2007
2010
2015
2020
ResourcelFacih tyRequirements"'
V'3oals i


145
1.0

296,210
380,148
332,239
39, 148


14.9 18LD 208
2.1 <.1

103.04
122.311
114.803
122.311


89,185
102,985
97,010
102,985



5.0
5.4
5.1
4.9



15

78


316,779
395,083
383,557
395,083



2.1
2.1
1.9
1.7
2I



28
100
187


19.7 1.0
1.6

103.923
134.427
122,157
134.427


987.53
1,237230
1,133,070
1,237.230


124,851
150.624
140.352
150.624



3.8
3.5
32
3.0



15
56
03


17.3
1.7

668.659
795.438
742.735
795.438



1-6
15
1.
1.3



32
116
198


135
0.4

237,35B
308,973
27.,844
308,973



1.6
1.5
13
12



18
67
113


13.8
1.3

353,870
438,095
401,997
438.095



2.6
2.5
2-3
2.1



35
127
216


24.6
0.9

1,18B,626
1,380,648
1,289,601
1,306,648


1.31
1.3
1.2
1-2
1.1



35
130
220


" Percert do partiapaton represents the perentage of residents and Iansls who patcipaled in activity lest one time dunrg the year.
" Total partiiqrts represents the combied number of residents and Iunrsts who partipated in activity at least one time dung the ye.
" Resuce/faality requirnens represents the anarunt f addiicnal resmuces and facilities that ae needed to mintaintn 207 vels a service through Ihe proDected years
BOLD type reprPsents regiis wih level sf seince belok the statewide median.


A table displaying the additional basketball courts needed in the East Central region of Florida.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


Coam
Camsf


elsat


16.9
2.0

5,343,091
6,530,300
6,031,821
6.53300



1.5
1.4
1.3
1.2



283
1,024
1.765


Tttal
SOL a Ta


~"-"







581 SCORP Program Development




Additional Soccer Resources Needed


Table 5.32

Demand and Need Summary By Region

Soccer/Rugby

2007-2020


Regions


West Apaachee North
Central


Percent of Partidpalion"
Residents
Taouists
Total Participants"
2007
201 D
2015
2020
Levels of Service
(Fields .000 Participants)
2007
2010
2015
2020
ResourceFacility Requiremrens""
(Fields)
201 D
2015
202D


10.3
<0.1

94,922
97,581
104.424
11D.760



15
1.5
1A
13


5.9
2.1

61,581
63,752
68,888
74,133



1.1
1.1
1.0
OL9



2
8
14


5.7

28,030
28,900
30,772
32.387



6.1
5.9

5.3
55



17
26


ortheast Withlacoochee


12.1
<0.1

184.453
191,9650
211.867
230.04B



0.7
0.7
0.6
0.6



5
20
33


39.590
41.485
46.536
51,21D


East Cernal
Central


334.500
348.231
384.436
419,311


4.4
40.1

34.681
35,831
38,087
41,840



2.2
22
2.0
1.9



3
10
16


Tampa Bay Southwest


83
<].1

238.B84
245,463
263,036
279.2885



1.0
0.9
0.9
0.8



6
23
30


5.9
QA

11B2S93
125.014
140.030
154.480


Treasure South
Coast


8.8 8.&0
<8.1 O.B


163.471
189,443
1B5.5D4
200,382


519.93
533,D00
568.315
863,272


I Percent of participation represents Ite percentage of residents and tourists who participated in activity at least one time during the year.
Totl parlicipanws resents Ithe cornbned number of residents and turnsts who parncipaed in activity at least one time during the year.
"' Resourcelacirty requirements represents the amount of addiar l resources and facilities that ame needed to maintain 2007 eve of service thrug~ the projected years.
BOLD type represents regions uMth levels of service below the statewide mean.

A table displaying the additional soccer fields needed in the East Central region of Florida.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


State
Total


1,700,5W3
1,758,915
1,912,136
2,067,986








SCORP Program Development 59




Additional Freshwater Outdoor Tennis Resources Needed


Table 5.33

Demand and Need Summary By Region

Outdoor Tennis

2007-2020


West Apalaee North
Central


northeast ithlaochee


Regions


East Centra


TaunpaBay Soutwest


Treasure Sout
oast Totl
Coast


Percent df Participation
Residents
Tourists
Total Participants"
2007
201D
2015
202D
Levels of Service
(Cortsi t,00D Participnts)
2007
2010
2015
2020
ResourelFacility Requirements'"
(Courts)


10.9
22

317,427
32B,595
357,706
388,410


9.3 7.2
<0.1 <0.1


43.461
44,805
47,498
49.839


35.674
38,781
39,164
41.194



5.5
5.3
5.0
4.8


12.1
0.6
as

218,531
227,338
250,517
272,632



2.8
2.7
2.5
2.3


12.4 8.4
2.1 2.0


B0.,06
B4,530
g4,140
103,442


857.402
891.677
981.75
1,073,389


108.B76
11D,737
120.759
13D,707



3.5
3.4
3.1
2.9


12.2
2.9

638.664
657.295
711.821
767.157



2.1
2.0
1.9
1.7


531.841
564,557
813.841
675.022


69,864
726291
796.136
868.450


18.7
4.6

1,495.185
1 5 ~..610
1.853,233
1,770,08.



1A
1.4
1.3
1-2


11.0
23

3.98.198
4.132,557
4.508.823
4.B80,580



2.3
2.2
2.1
1.9


201D 17 7 S 25 10 52 13 43 30 58 62 334
2015 62 21 19 80 37 188 49 157 141 205 225 1.208
202D 1O9 32 30 153 3 326 85 273 246 359 392 2D095

SPercentof participain represents the percentage of residents and ounsis who paricpated in activity at least one time during the year.
STotal participants represents the combined number of restienis and tourists wlo paticipa ed in activity at least one lire dunng 1he year.
"" Resca~cefaaciliy requirements represents the amount of additional resources and facilities that ar needed to maintain 2007 levels of service tough the projected years.
BOLD type represents reons ith levels of service belowthe statewide median


A table displaying the additional outdoor tennis courts needed in the East Central region of Florida.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING







601 SCORP Program Development



Additional Horseback riding Resources Needed



Table 5.23
Demand and Need Summary By Region
Horseback Riding
2007-2020

Regions
West Apaladhee North Northeast Witacoochee East Central Tampa Bay Soutwest Treasure South
Total
Central Cenral Coast
Percent ofat Participation
Residents 9. 8.7 12-9 13.5 10.1 B~ 8.4 7.2 6.2 9.5 0.4 9.1
Tourists 1.1 2.1 <0.1 1.7 <0.1 0.9 <0.1 0.0 <.1 0.7 <0.1 0.4
Total Partiipants"
2007 196,682 74.629 63.703 306.736 76,705 404.855 85.894 284,431 96.202 225.,76 275,817 2,043,224
2010 220,622 83.138 ,L9.93 351.187 90,163 464,17 74.075 293,324 113.923 258.549 297,085 2.287,912
2015 220.622 83.138 69.936 351.167 90,163 484.D17 74.075 293,324 113,923 256.849 297,005 2,297,962
2020 238,500 891,05 73.560 382.805 9B,220 507.D88 7M.406 313,716 125.8B3 27B.156 311,340 2.474,160
Levels of Service
(Mies of Tral.000 Participants)
2007 0.37 1.7 3.88 0.68 4.02 1.31 3.3 0M.5 O.G 0.72 0-50 1.1
2010 .3S 1.70 3.75 0.65 3.83 1.20 3.18 0.2 0.4 0.70 OAS 1.12
2015 0.33 1.68 3.52 0.59 3.42 1.14 2.94 0.88 014 0.64 .47 1.03
2020 0.31 1.47 3.34 0.54 3.11 1.04 2.74 0.80 0.76 0.5 045 0.95
Resource/Facility Requirements'"
(Miles of Trail)
2D10 2 5 8 8 10 21 7 8 5 6 3 78
2015 9 15 24 30 38 77 27 27 18 22 11 282
2D20 16 25 38 51 65 134 45 47 29 38 18 477

SPecent of partapabon represents the percentage of residents and lunrts who participated in activity at leas one time dunng the year.
Total parlapants represents the mribned number of residents and tourists Who participated in activity at least one time during the year.
Resorcerfacility requirernentl represents the amrot of additional resources and facilities that are needed to maintain 2007 levels of service throuh the projected years.
BOLD type represents regions wth levels of service below the statewide median
A table displaying the additional miles of horseback riding trails needed in the East Central region of Florida.





-THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK







SCORP Program Development 61


Additional Freshwater Hiking Resources Needed


Table 5-18

Demand and Need Summary By Region

Hiking

2007-2020

RaninnM


West -tpalachee


North
Crl I


Mdheast Wii aNe oede


East
Cesdral


Centra TampaBay Southwest


Treasue SouB h
Coast


Percent of Partiiaian'
Residents
Tourists
Total Participats"
2007
2010
2015
2020
Les of Service
(Miles of Trai1,00 Particpens)
2007
2010
2015
2020
Resource/Facilty Requirerents"
(Files of Trail!
2010
2015
2020


24.0
5.5

765.092
792214
862.37
937.,79


25.7 2B.2
4.2 4.8


188,374
194,712
20B.024
223,024



26g
285
265
2.4


167.945
173.441
185,945
187,536



201
280
2_2
246


25.1
8.4

892,104
927,246
1,019,497
1,113,855



0.51
0.49
0.44
81*


24.3 14.7
4.7 5.9


280,039
271,740
302,781
332,879


1,817.874
1,800323
2,080.748
2,275,475


237,393
245,917
268,710
291,705



1.81
1.74
1.60
1.47


24.1
7.0

1,433,081
1.480,580
1,605,0986
1.734,752



0.27
0.27
0.2
0923


d16
6.5

729,252
760,536
842,548
026,735



0.70
0.67
0.55
0.55


1808 1.7
4.0 4.9


662.741
687,526
753.382
819.401



0.59
0.57
0.52
0.48


1,541,126
1,586,297
1.7 5,555
1.828,394



0.27
026
0.25
0.23


" Percern of partiipalin repesets the percentage of residents arm Iaunss hli participated in activity at least ce time during the year.
" Total participants represens the combined number of residents and tourists who partipated in activity at least me ine duin the year.
"" Resourcelaality reqursrnents represents the anount of additional resources and facilities tha are needed Io maintain 2007 levels of service hou the proiecled years.
BOLD type represents reics with lels of service below the sakemide median.


A table displaying the additional miles of hiking trails needed in the East Central region of Florida.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


TSma
TOMt


226
5.0

8,422,662
8725,938
0,521,450
10,329,245



0.00
am
0.5B
0.53
0.49


181
658
1.138


---~p----


~"-"







621 SCORP Program Development




Additional Paved Bicycle Resources Needed


Table 5.17

Demand and Need Summary By Region

Bicycle Riding Paved Trails

2007-2020


R1oninne


West palae North
Central


Percent of Participation"
Residents
Twoists
Ttal Participants"
2007
201D
2015
202D
Leuvel oF Seruice
(Miles ofTrail.O)1 Paricipants)
2007U
2010
2015
2020
ResourcelFaciity Requirements'"
(Miles of Trail)
201D
2015
2020


35.7
6.0

926,319
958,527
1.042,429
1.130,431



0-03
0.03
0.03
0.03


34.1 35.5
42 4.8


227,489
235,036
251,772
267,880



0.21

0.18
0.18


213.812
220.731
236299
250.499



D32
a031

D28
0-28


Nomtheast Wihlacoochee


47.2
8.4

1.228,g32
1,277,783
1.406,D74
1.533,.44



0.G6
0.M
0.5
0.05


38.9
7.4

420,801
445.986
486,878
546.264



0.23
0.22
0.20
0.18


East
Central


Cenr Tampa Bay Southest


52.5 35.1
5.3 15.7


2,827,629
2,41,858
3,242,540
3,541,752



0-08
.OB
0.07
0.07


601.834
623.532
681.472
740.225



0.09
0.00
0.08
0.08
a08


47.8
9.3

2,288.72
2,361.614
2,554.585
2,748.758



0.06
0D6
0.05
0.5


48.5
16.5

1,933,084
2,016,88
2,235,368
2,450,882



OL10

0.06
0.08
ai0 a


Treasure South
Coast


47.0 57.0
121 5.2


1,759,304
1,825,35
2,000,380
2.177,696



0.04
004
0.04
0.-0


3.263,175
3.345,259
3.563,241
3.777,780



0.12
0.12
0.11
0.11


SPerent of paricipalia represents the percentage of residents ad ists who partiapated in activity at least one tirne during the year.
Tclai participats represent Ihe combined number of residents and tourists who pariated in activity at least r me ime during the year
Resoureacility requirements represents the amountof addition resources and faciities that are needed to maintain 2007 leaves of service through the proected years.
BOLD type represents regions ith levels of serce belowthe statewide median.

A table displaying the additional miles of paved bicycle trails needed in the East Central region of Florda.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


Stale
Total


435
s8.

14.841.323
15.372,389
10.765,691
18.169.382



0.10
0.09
008
0.08


---a---


~"-"








SCORP Program Development 63


Additional Unpaved Bicycle Resources Needed


Table 5.19

Demand and Need Summary By Region

Bicycle Riding Unpaved Trails

2007-2020


West -palashee North
Central


Northeast Wihlaoachee


Regions


East
ON"i


Central Tmpa Bay Sou&hwest


Treasure


SoulTh
Toal1


Percent of Particdpa n
Residents
Tourists
Toal Participants"
2007
2010
2015
2B20
Levels of Service
(Miles afTrailf'.DOO Parcipants)
20077
2010
2015
2020
ResourcegFafiy Requirement.""
(Miles of Trail)
201 D
2015
2020


Permnt of participi represents the percentage of residents and tourists wh participated in actity at least ne ineduring e year.
Total participants represents the combined number of residents and tourists who particated in actvty at least one bre dunng the year.
m Resourceacilty requirements represents the aniounil od additional resources and facilities that are needed maintain 207 levels of service tihigh the prrected years.
BOLD type represents regions wrtl levels of service below Ine slalewae medaen


A table displaying the additional miles of unpaved bicycles trails needed in the East Central region of Florida.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


229 23.9
2.1 <.


23.4 18.4
0.9 2.0


216,248
226,102
252,26~
277,398


20.4
1.6

350,780
382,324
392,2B3
42..835.



0.24
0.23
0.22
0-20



3
10
17


933,311
971,653
1.072,761
1,169,l84


28.5
2.2

598.376
5892219
652.307
710.449



OAD
0.0
0.3
0-32



9
33
56


141,270
145,895
155,969
165,504



1.13
1.10
1.03
0.97



5
17
27


118,48B
122.167
138,D80
136,22



1.95
1.89
1.77
1.8



7
23
36


19.8
1.7

741,362
763,863
822,789
880,435




0.41
0.38





34
50


168,301
175,133
190,936
206,019



1.04
1.01
0.93





23
38


14.8
1.9

384,705
381.536
425.,98
468.136




0-44
OAS

0-39
0-36



8
28
48


16.3
0.7

35D0214
363.1D5
397,632
430.431



0.40
0.48
0.43
0.40



e
23
40


24.6
0.6

1,152.69
1,178.473
1,247.279
1.312.253






.016
OAS6





2
6
10


21.4
1.0

4.838,979
5.005,534
5,443,043
5.881,614





0.44
0.41



82
298
504


Beh





64 Program Analysis


PROGRAMMATIC ANALYSIS:
COMMUNITY PARK


Picnic Area
Op
Preserved^^


I











- c~- THE HEART OF MALABAR:


COMMUNITY PARK





Program Analysis 65


Programmatic Analysis:
The final analysis of the program elements, which were determined through
the site inventory, through SCORP and through personal contacts at the town, is
shown to the left. It is shown in a diagrammatic language which not only lists the
possible program elements but shows relationships, connections and weight or im-
portance for each element.
There is a clear delineation of the elements into two distinct categories within
the park; Nature Study and Recreation. Within these two distinct groups elements
are arranged taking into account potential connections and ties that would be desir-
able on the site. Despite the clear separation between groups there are still elements
that are able to bridge the separation and create unity and ties amongst all elements.
It is important to understand that even though all of the elements were select-
ed because of the relevance to the site and appropriateness within the context, they
are all still just potential elements. The actual selection of the park elements will be
discussed after the concept phase in the following section.
Also shown in the programmatic analysis are the potential connections to the
surrounding context. Below are pictured some possible program elements.














RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING





661 Program Analysis


Programmatic Analysis of the Environmental Learning Facility


An analysis of potential program for the environmental learning facility. This was developed mainly through the analysis of the
Cedar River Watershed Education Center case study. This program analysis will essentially help to shape the layout and design of
the learning facility on the Heart of Malabar site.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


~"-"




Program Analysis 67


Programmatic Analysis of the Environmental Learnine Facility


Area


An analysis of potential program for the community center. This was developed mainly through the analysis of the West Augustine
District Park case study. This program analysis will essentially help to shape the layout and design of the learning facility on the
Heart of Malabar site.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


~-~c~-


d$r




Section Content


SECTION 4: DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


681


~---























INTRODUCTION
CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT
ORDERING PRINCIPLES
ILLUSTRATIVE MASTER PLAN
DETAILED AREA DESIGN


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


-~-~-





701 Introduction


What is park design? Is it possible to discuss what is proper design for a park or
what makes a good park? In the opinion of Bernard Heut in Modem Park Design, "The
circumstances and traditions in the various countries, the programs and concepts differ so
widely, that confusion seems inevitable" (Arriola and Heut, 31). However, two interesting
and extreme theories can be considered. These differing opinions come from Heut's com-
mentary on La Villette park in Paris, France, a Bernard Tschumi design.

The first controversial theory in park design can be seen in the design of La Vil-
lette. According to Heut, "the most horrible park made recently in Paris is La Villette
by Tschumi, because it is made with the idea of filling it up with many things for every-
body." Heut describes this type of mentality as a "plug-in park" approach. Heut goes on
to say that "we are obligated to think that people have to do something. They have to
drink coffee, they have to walk, they have to play, they have to play they have to be cul-
tivated. We are afraid of emptiness. Afraid of void, of an empty, beautiful space" (Arriola
and Heut, 30)

Considering the views expressed which path does a designer take. Does the design
become a plug-in park, providing something for everyone, and filling the park with pre-
defined uses that tells the visitorswhat should be done and where. Or does the approach
Bernard Heut claims we "fear", become the path to a successful park, one in which the
space is left to be explored, discovered and designed as each user determines. Do you al-
low the beauty of the individual spaces within the park captivate the user?

These were questions asked in the design process of the Heart of Malabar. The final
solution, as you will see, will be a middle ground approach. One that does plug-in uses
and program elements, but also one that respects and celebrates spaces for what they can
offer. For the limitless possibilities of what they can become.



THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK





71



















/
i








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RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING






721 Concept Development


Concept Development: The design development phase began with a large amount of concept sketches, aimed at capturing and experimenting with
different design ideas. The main focus of these sketches were to explore the different extents to which the site could be developed.

The first set of concepts were devoted to a high development/high impact model. In these versions a majority of the site was devoted to devel-
opment and little of the existing uses were preserved. Preserving the natural residential portion of the site was less of a concern in these concepts.




High Development Concept Sketches


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THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


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Concept Development 73


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RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING





74 Concept Development



The second set of concepts explored the possibility of a low impact model, which focused on preservation of site features and on the natural,
undeveloped environments. The undeveloped residential portion of the site is conserved to a high degree, with only minimal passive recreation be-
ing grouped on those lands. In each of the four options the existing recreation uses are preserved. These models incorporated a minimal amount new
program elements.

Low Impact Concept Sketches


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RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


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761 Concept Development


From the previous series of concept sketches, a best concept was developed. The
final concept was a combination of the high impact and low impact options and included
all of the best features of each of the different concept sketches. In this concept option,
development extended into the undeveloped residential lands, but was confined to areas
where there was less canopy cover. The majority of the recreational elements are pre-
served, however the baseball field was relocated above the community center. This option
aims to creates an active recreation zone that is located closer to the surrounding resi-
dential lands, allowing the rest of the site be devoted to passive recreation, interpretation
and open space. An environmental learning facility is located adjacent to the existing trail
head and is closely associated to the Malabar Scrub Sanctuary, creating a strong tie be-
tween the preserve and the main learning feature of the site.
The concept aims to create a balance between the active recreation elements and
the rest of the site. Where the existing park was dominated by the recreational compo-
nents, the new park will maintain a more intimate feel, despite the expanded recreational
uses.
The concept's main focus is on the possibility of introducing strong learning com-
ponents into the site. It will be these learning features that truly create the opportunities
for exploration, interpretation and discovery. The learning elements will begin to create
an overall organization and ordering, inform spaces and act as an enhancement to the
sanctuary lands.
The park's design will be based on several organizing principles, which are graphi-
cally portrayed on page 78 and 79. The first of these design principles is the use of axes
is the layout and planning of the main site features. The main buildings on the site, the
environmental learning facility, the community center and the fire station all create very
strong relationships between each other. Other axes are set up along important view sheds
or based on strong intersections. All of the axes help to inform the site features. The sec-
ond principle is that of a grid system, which sets up the location for one of the series of
learning elements. All of these principles will be portrayed on the following pages.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK





Concept Development


3


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RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


PAPrd


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78


The primary axes set up the relationships amongst the main site
buildings creating a unity of three. Secondary and tertiary axes pro-
vide for the relationship and location of other important site features.

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THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


Ordering Principles


Axis System







Ordering Principles 79


The Grid System


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The Grid system begins to organize one of the series of learning features on the site. Each intersection on the grid be-
comes a potential location of a feature. The black circles show the actual locations that learning features will be located.
The angled line becomes a second learning feature overlaid onto of the grid system.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


* **6*





801 The Heart of Malabar: Master Plan

Illustrative Park Master Plan -77 Th-1 1-L



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THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK






The Heart of Malabar: Master Plan 81

Final Program:

1 Environmental Learning ,'
Facility
2 Community Center .. 1 r __ _I I/ ,I 1
3 Fire Station
4 Baseball Field -
5 Softball Field "
6 Soccer Field i ) t j -, 1
7 Basketball Court '
8 Tennis Court
Playground l
10 Lake and fountain ..
11 Observation Tower I. .
12 Boardwalk and Covered :-L-LTL-L 1' .. -
Pavilion
13 Foot Bridge -19 15
14 Picnic Area -
15 Central Lawn
16 Environmental trails 1m 1
17 Interpretive trails
18 Learning Feature
19 History Walk
20 Park Trail Head -'' -..
21 Malabar Scrub Trail Head :
22 Parking 28 spaces
23 Parking 34 spaces
24 Parking 64 spaces
25 Entry Feature Sign "__' : 'i 1:
26 Exercise/Fitness Loop .

Buildings: 2 acres Recreation: 4 acres Lake: 2.75 acres Roads/Parking: 4.25 acres Woods: 9.5 acres Preservation: 14.5 acres Open Space: 13 acres



RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING





821 Detailed Design: Park Entry


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A redesigned entry sign. New sign is meant to create visual interest, while at-
tracting visitors to the park from S.R. 514.


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THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK







Detailed Design: Central Lawn 83


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RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


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841 Detailed Design: R.A. Ward Discovery Center


The R.A. Ward Discovery center, named after Malabar's first postmaster and acknowl-
edging the rich history of the town, is the center piece and the hub of all of the interpre-
tive learning features on the site. With direct access to observation areas, the interpretive
boardwalk and trails system that runs through out the preservation lands and connections
to the history walk and community center, the discovery center will be the main feature
of the site. The center will host a broad program of features such as:


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Section sketch of the R.A. Ward Discovery Center and the surrounding area.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


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+ Welcome Lobby
+ Meeting Rooms
+ Auditorium
+ Rest rooms


+ Interpretive Area/Exhibit Hall
+ Multipurpose Rooms
+ Offices
+ Observation deck.


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Detailed Design: R.A. Ward Discovery Center 185


Section of the Discovery Center Parking.


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RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


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861 Detailed Design: Interpretive Learning Features


The Grid System


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Detailed Design: Interpretive Learning features I87


Area 1: The gird overlay system in area 1
introduces interpretive and learning fea-
tures into the wooded nature walk area.
The features in this area teach visitors of
the natural surroundings; of the wildlife
and the habitats we interact with.


Area 2: The grid overlay system in area 2
brings learning elements into the more open
section of the park. The features here are ded-
icated to teaching site specific and town facts.
Some of the elements located around the lake
address the lakes history as a borrow pit and
the ecological functions it now is used for.


Area 3: Located in the preservation lands,
the grid system teach of the importance of
preserving lands and of restoration practices.
It also teaches of the different endangered
and protected species and the species pres-
ent on the site. The features here encourage
the visitors to try and discover these different
inhabitants as they explore the park.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


~"~p-





88ssl Detailed Design: Interpretive Learning Features

The History Walk



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-- 7 THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK
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Detailed Design: Interpretive Learning features 89










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sketch of the nature of the stone monoliths that make up the history walk. Information will be

etched into the stone so that the texture can be felts and touched by children. The content of each

monolith will be selected from the time line below of the town, counties and states history.


ANCIENT CULTURES
12.000B.C. 1500 A.D

12,000 b.c. The first people move mto
Flonda, known as the Paleolndians
Came to hunt food such as mastodons
giant armadillo, hoses and sabertooth
tigers

5,000 b.c. Paleondian culture evolved
mto the Archaic culture Established
_- H ..T- .1.
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FIRST ENCOUNTERS
1492- 1565

1492 Christopher Columbus lands m
North America Results m widespread
European exploration

1513 Ponce De Leon and expehton
becnmr th fip t d 'ltmilpted FlplaliT

l. ...a ,.
Ii. II- r


COLONIZATION
1565- 1821
1763 Flonda transferred to Bntish con-
trol Dived mto east and west Florida

1760's Semmnoles, formerly of the Creek
tibe move to fonda Named Semnotles
for the word Cimarron, meaning outsid-
ers ornmasways

1760 Ats Indians disappear completely
from Indian River Area.
wer


I "1 I '


1821 Florida bee -
of Flonda
,,:i l n J I I .. ,,l ,, ,, , .


,i ,, ,ate
Ct 1." I', I shed by an act of the Flonda Legislature
S -- i.- I VBrevard
i-" -1 iI teamboat Pioneer to the Indan River to
1 steamboat transportation

ii. - i -- i i I i lbar gets itsfirst ofcal post oficeand
S .i .. lr.- tasterby President ChesterA Arthu

1905 Brevard amended to its present shape


I1 MODERN ERA
1946 PRESENT


*. I I


1961 May 5 The first American astronaut, Alan
Shepard was launched into space from Cape Ca-
naveral Space Center


strong, Aldnr and Colhns to the moon

1971 Walt Disney World opens


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


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90 Detailed Design: The Heart Community Center


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The Heart Community Center is located was developed as the focal piece of the active
recreation zone. The Community Center is designed to be multifunctional and incorpo-
rates a new Town Hall facility into the structure. The community center cantilevers over
the town hall as the distinct parts of the building play off of the different geometries
creative by the axes. The center will host a broad program of features such as:

+ Town Hall with offices, conference rooms and meeting hall.
+ Community Center + Reception and lobby
+ Multipurpose Gymnasium + Weight room
+ Rest rooms + Fitness Studios
+ Stage + Cardio room


Section sketch of the=Heart Community Center and the surrounding area.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK





Detailed Design: The Heart Community Center 91


The Heart community Center and the children's playground.


Section of the Discovery Center Parking.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


~"~p-






92 Detailed Design: Active Recreation


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16


Even though the main focus has shifted from recreation to the learning components,
recreation is still one of the major program elements of the park. In order to remain sensi-
tive to the site, and to the previous improvements made by the town, several recreation
elements were preserved. Preserved elements include:


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+ Outdoor Tennis Court


The existing baseball field was relocated and a second field added, one for competition
play and one for rec play. The sand volleyball court was removed entirely due to the dis-
repair and the lack of maintenance.


Recreational Elements.


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THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


+ Soccer Fields
+ Outdoor Basketball court


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Detailed Design: Active Recreation 193


The Heart community Center and the children's playground.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


~"~P-







Woodland Nature Trail: On the Southern half of the undeveloped residential lands, are
nature walk paths. These paths wind through the undisturbed pine flatwoods and depres-
sion marshes that exist there. These trails transition between nature paths and light board-
walk systems as the trail works it's way back and forth across the wetland areas. The trail
runs from the community center parking lot and, after looping through the woods, returns
to the community center and picnicking area.


Woodland Nature Trail.


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


94 Detailed Design: Trails


IL,






Detailed Design: Trails 95


Malabar Scrub Sanctuary Interpretive Trails: Located on the east side of the site,
the interpretive trails run through the southern portion of the Malabar Scrub Sanctuary.
These trails are designed to be as sensitive as possible to the site around them. Half of the
trails are natural pathways while the other half become a boardwalk system to protect the
wetland ecosystems from intrusion, yet still provide view access and passive recreation
opportunities for visitors. The trails enjoy direct access to the rest of the Malabar Scrub
Sanctuary and a strong relationship with the discovery center enhancing the environmen-
tal and educational significance of the trails.


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A perspective displaying the character through one of
the wetland areas.


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING






96 Detailed Design: Damon-Arnold Lake


The Lake: One of the main features of the site is the Damon-Arnold Lake. As an existing
feature of the site, the lake is to be reshaped in order to remove the very straight embank-
ments and create an organic shaped shore line. There are several focal features grouped
around the lake:


+ The R.A. Ward Discovery center
+ The Board walk and covered pavilion
+ And the observation tower


+ The footbridge
+ The exercise and fitness loop


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


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Detailed Design: Damon-Arnold Lake


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING




Section Content


SECTION 5: POST DESIGN GUIDELINES


THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK


981


~---























PHASING
MANAGEMENT
CONNECTIONS
CONCLUSION


RECREATION, FITNESS, LEISURE, LEARNING


-~-~-






101 Guidelines: Phasing

Due to the fact that the Town of Malabar relies on, and to date has used, FRDAP grants to develop the park, it must be understood that the project
will not be completed at one time. Therefore, it is essential to the success of the project that the project be spaced out over several phases. It is recom-
mended that the Heart of Malabar Community park should be completed in three phases.

Phase one makes any and all improvements that are within the existing park lands. This ensures the success of the park in the event that ad-
ditional lands may not be acquired. During this phase the baseball fields will remain in the current location so that access to all of the recreation ele-
ments is preserved throughout the construction process.

Phase two will include all site improvements on the preservation land. These include the trail head, the natural trails and the board walk sys-
tem, which will be the most extensive part of this phase. Phase two serves as a recovery phase for the town and the park after the completion of phase
one. The baseball field and all other recreation fields will remain through the completion of phase 2.

Phase three will complete any projects that had not been finished to date. This should mainly be the baseball fields, the community center, the
woodland nature trails and the picnicking area. Phasing the improvements will allow the park to be successfully completed.


Phase 1


Phase 2


Phase 3


L


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THE HEART OF MALABAR: COMMUNITY PARK




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