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Immokalee bulletin ( June 20, 2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
Immokalee bulletin
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Independent Newspapers of Florida
Place of Publication:
LaBelle, FL
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- La Belle (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hendry County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Immokalee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Collier County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Hendry -- La Belle
United States of America -- Florida -- Collier -- Immokalee

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 16, no. 15 (Apr. 17, 1997).

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36864856
lccn - sn 97027777
System ID:
UF00100151:00180

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Immokalee bulletin
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Independent Newspapers of Florida
Place of Publication:
LaBelle, FL
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- La Belle (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hendry County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Immokalee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Collier County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Hendry -- La Belle
United States of America -- Florida -- Collier -- Immokalee

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 16, no. 15 (Apr. 17, 1997).

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36864856
lccn - sn 97027777
System ID:
UF00100151:00180


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SIGN AND DRIVE A NEW 2013 FOCUS SE FOR ONLY $229 PER MONTH*36 month lease with approved credit through Ford Credit. Only state title & license fees due at signing. Includes “rst month payment, $0 security deposit, acquisition fee, & $0 capitalized cost reduction. *Stock #13C120. 20 cent per mile over 10500 per year. Includes $2150 RCL Bonus Cash. See dealer for details. More to choose from with similar savin g s. Ima g e is for illustration purposes onl y Offer ends 08/31/13 Thursday, August 15, 2013 V ol. 46 No. 33 See Page 2 for information about how to contact the newspaper.newszap.comFree SpeechFree Ads See Principal — Page 3 by Patty BrantImmokalee Bulletin For Immokalee High School, new principal Ken Fairbanks there’s one main rule. It’s all about the kids. He has 38 years in education to back that up As both an administrator and teacher in dozens of schools, elementary through high school, he has used that mantra to the advantage of thousands of students. He earned his college degrees from the University of South Florida through the GI Bill of Rights and w orking at the Registrar’s of ce. He was born in Bangor, Maine, and grew up outside of West Point, New York. He found after returning from service in the Army that he no longer wanted any part of the cold, so he chose USF to further his education. That’s where he met the woman who would become his wife. She is now an accountant and they have one grown son. The couple stayed in Orlando till she got a job in Texas. After eight y ears she grew weary of the traf c so they returned to Orlando, ndNew I.H.S. principal‘all about kids’ by Patty BrantImmokalee Bulletin Building leaders is one of the most important endeavors anyone can undertake. Middle schoolers are at a major crossroads, just beginning to step into the larger world and nd a place for themselves. Over the summer, 11-year-old Francisco Brito took a huge step toward growing up. Thanks to the recommendation of his science mentor at Eden Park, Ms. Madeline, he attended the week long Junior National Young Leaders Conference July 21-26 in Washington, D.C. The recommendation is just beginning because the students and their families are required to come up with $3,000 for everything from air fare to accommodations and the program itself. Fundraising was hard work for Francisco and his mother, who made and sold pork and chicken dinners and desserts. They are also very grateful to many local people who freely donated to the cause. They are very appreciative of the help they received from Ben and Hayward Starling, Nicole J. Starling, One by One Leadership, Lipman’s Jaime Weinsinger, Susan Golden, from Principal Linda Salazar at Eden Park who allowed fundraisers at the school and the Immokalee Chamber of Commerce for its support along with Florida Community Bank which set up an account for donations and all those who individually donated or bought dinners. Finally, Francisco joined some 240 students from around the country from July 21-26 in a whirlwind of sightseeing, museum tours and historic sites around the Washington, West Virginia and Baltimore area. The Maryland Science Center in Baltimore was a favorite of Francisco’s, where he actually lay down on a bed of nails with no pain. He still doesn’t understand how that worked. But then he had lots of favorite places and activities. There were a lot of focus groups, Francisco said, each with a different topic like recycling and the one Francisco led on internet safety. Each student kept a journal for the week. Francisco has seen the Capitol, the Supreme Court and the White House. He visited HarpMiddle schooler back from national conference By Katrina ElskenSpecial to the Immokalee Bulletin Area health of cials are warning parents about the danger that may lurk in canals, ponds and ditches after a South Florida boy was infected by a brain-eating amoeba. A LaBelle Middle School student is ghting for his life at Miami Children’s Hospital. Zachary Reyna, 12, has been diagnosed with primary amoebic meningoencephalitis— or PAM. The infection is caused by Naegleria fowleri, a brain-eating amoeba. PAM is deadly in most cases. According to the Center for Disease Control, in the past 50 years only three victims have survived, including the recent case in Arkansas of 12-year-old Kali Hardig, who is still hospitalized. An online campaign “Pray4Number4” has Facebook and Twitter fans all over the country sending prayers that Zachary will be the fourth. According to family members who have posted updates on Facebook and Twitter, Zachary is believed to have come in contact with the amoeba while kneeboarding in a ditch near his home in Port LaBelle on Aug. 3. When Zachary started showing signs of illness, at rst the family just thought Zachary had a “24-hour bug,” according to Zachary’s older brother, Brandon Villarreal. But when the normally active boy slept all night and all day, his mother sensed something was wrong. On Aug. 7, Zachary was hospitalized in Fort Myers. The next day, he was airlifted to Miami Children’s Hospital, where he is in pediatric intensive care. According to family member’s reports on social media, a spinal tap showed positive for DNA remnants of the amoeba. The boy underwent surgery on Aug. 10 to relieve pressure on his brain. Zachary’s doctors in Miami are in contact with the doctors in Arkansas who treated Kali Harding. According to Brenda Barnes of the Hendr y County Health Department, initial symptoms of PAM usually start within one to 7 days after infection. The initial symptoms may include headache, fever, nausea, or vomiting. Other symptoms can include stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, seizures, and hallucinations. After the start of symptoms, the disease progresses rapidly. While keeping vigil at the hospital, Zachary’s family is also using social media to warn others of the dangers of swimming in warm freshwater lakes, ponds and canals where the amoeba may be found. “Keep bringing your prayers,” Danny Reyna, Zachary’s uncle, tweeted Tuesday. “The support around the country is awesome. Also spread the word on amoebas. Keep our children safe. LaBelle community unites in prayer for Zachar y Submitted photoFranciso Brito is back from a conference in Washington D.C. See Conference — Page 2 See Prayer — Page 2

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2 Immokalee Bulletin August 15, 2013 To Reach UsMailing Address: P.O. Box 518 LaBelle, FL 33975 Physical Address: 22 Ft. Thompson Ave. Website: www.newszap.com/immokaleeTo Submit NewsThe Immokalee Bulletin welcomes submissions from its readers. Opinions, calendar items, story ideas and photographs are welcome. Call (239) 657-6000 to reach our newsroom. The deadline for all news items is 11 a.m. on Monday prior to the following Thursdays publication. E-Mail: ibnews@newszap.comTo Place a Display AdPhone: (239) 657-6000 day for the following Thursdays publication E-mail: cbadsales@newszap.comBilling DepartmentE-mail: billteam@newszap.comTo Place a Classi“ed AdCall 1 -877 353-2424 to place it from home or go to www.newszap.comFor SubscriptionsPhone: 1-800-282-8586 Visit circulation.newszap.com or email readerservices@newszap.com.StaffNews Editor: Patty Brant Advertising Services: Dale Conyers Advertising Services: Barbara Calfee Executive Editor: Katrina Elsken Publisher: Tom ByrdOur PurposeƒThe Caloosa Belle is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida. Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspaper to pursue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community. Since no dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on pro“t margins below industrystandards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in Independents mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the communitys deliberation of public issues.We Pledgeƒ To operate this newspaper as a public trust and work, through our dedication to conscientious journalism. their own intelligent decisions about public issues. purposeful neutrality, fairness, objectivity, fearlessness and compassion. debate, not to dominate it with our own opinions. the prominence it deserves. compassion. er’s Ferry, the scene of John Brown’s historic raid that he believed would begin the work of freeing the slaves. He learned about American heroes like Marybeth Tinker who, in 1965 at age 13, fought for the right to wear black arm bands in school to protest the war in Viet Nam. Her Supreme Court First Amendment case, Tinker v. Des Moines, established the right of students to freedom of speech as long as it did not disrupt school. He will never forget places like the National War Memorial and the Newseum. In the process of soaking up all this experience, he also made new friends from different places and even one he plans to keep in touch with a Texan boy he was buddied up with. His mom said it’s been a good experience that came with a lot of hard work. He will always appreciate the opportunity. Francisco’s parents are Maricela Guzman and Jesus Brito and young Francisco is one of ve siblings. He has lived in Immokalee six or seven years. This is the rst time he’s been out of the state to a big city, rst trip on his own and rst plane ride all by himself. In just a few days he’ll begin seventh grade at Immokalee Middle School, but with a new perspective on the world and himself. ConferenceContinued From Page 1 “Zac is a ghter and will kick this amoeba,” he stated. Zachary’s parents posted the following message online Tuesday morning: “Zac is still ghting. Doctors are saying things have not changed. We are still strong on our end because we know God will step in when he is ready. Keep praying.” According to Danny Reyna, Zac is an athlete who loves being outdoors. Because he loves baseball, family members are urging him to “hit a home run” and win his ght against PAM. “I told him it’s the ninth inning, ninth inning two outs, runner on third, he’s up to bat. It’s his turn to hit it out. Bring the runs home so we can go home. It’s time to win,” said Brandon Villarreal in an NBC television interview on Monday. “He’s going to be OK.” In LaBelle, hundreds of residents came together for a special prayer service at 7 a.m. on Wednesday for Zachary at the Memorial Park across from the Hendry County Courthouse. A love offering was taken at the end of the service and $3,194.16 plus $75 in gift cards was given the help Zachary’s parents. A special account has been set up at First Bank of Clewiston and donations can be made at any branch. PrayerContinued From Page 1 By Maribel De Armas Here we are just a few days before school doors swing wide open once again and we welcome our nearly 45,000 students district-wide. Monday (August 19th) is the rst day of the 20132014 school year, so w e want to share some “words of wisdom” as parents and students get ready for the big day.  This weekend: Get back into school routines if you haven’t already. Be sure your child returns to the “school year” sleeping schedule, and be sure he or she goes to bed early enough on Sunday to get a good night’s sleep. Also on Sunday evening, be sure clothes are picked out and maybe even laid out, and have book bags or backpacks ready and near the door.  Monday morning: Have your son or daughter eat a good breakfast at home, or keep in mind that a free, healthy breakfast is available for any student at his or her school.  Monday evening: Be sure to talk about the rst day. You’ll want to hear the good news and the not-so-good in case there’s a problem you can help with. As you know, probing questions are best – for example, “Tell me one thing you learned today that’s new or interesting.”  Finally, school buses haven’t been on our streets very often in weeks, except for some summer school runs. Our law enforcement friends remind us that with school buses added to the traf c mix, and more cars, we’ll want to allow a bit more time to get around. And if you have a child in Kindergarten, please don’t leave him or her at the bus stop unattended. If you have access to a computer, make sure to visit the 2013-2014 Back to School Information page at www.collierschools. com. Just click on the red school house icon in the “What’s New” area on the right side of the home page. You’ll then nd bus schedules, enrollment information, uniform policies and dress codes, school calendars, lunch menus, and so much more. For all parents or guardians of students in Immokalee area schools – make sure you are aware of the new school start and end times. You can nd these on that same 2013-2014 Back to School Information page. So, we wish you a safe, happy, and successful new school year. And, we’re looking forward to sharing some stories from the rst few days of school in next week’s column. Happy learning! Students First submitted photoFrancisco Brito at the Lincoln Monument. Immokalee Bulletin/ Dale ConyersResidents united in prayer.

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3 Immokalee Bulletin A ugust 15, 2013 IHS Open HouseImmokalee High School’s Open House will be on Saturday, August 17, from 9 a.m.—12 p.m. at the Immokalee High School Courtyard & Computer Lab, 701 Immokalee Drive, Immokalee. You can meet the staff, get IHS Title I Information, pick up class schedule and ll out on-line free and reduced lunch application. For more informaion call (239)-3771800.VOES meeting informationVillage Oaks Elementary School will have a Meet the Teacher afternoon for grades PK 6. On Friday, August 16 from 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. starting in the cafeteria then transition into the classrooms. Call (239) 377-8602 for more information.LTE Title 1 meetingLake Trafford Elementary will have its annual Title I Meet the Teacher meeting Friday, August 16, 1-2:30 p.m. in the classrooms. Parents and students are welcome to come meet the teacher. Translators will be present. Los padres y estudiantes son bienvenidos a venir y conocer a su maestro/a. Reunion Annual de Titulo 1 se llevara a cabo. Traductores estaran prsente. Paran ak elev you you se akeyi yo rive, yo satisfe pwofese yo. Ap Anyel Tit I Reyinyon ap fet. Ap gen entepret prezan. New school hours: 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.Pinecrest meet and greetPinecrest Elementary will be having its “Meet & Greet” on Friday, August 16, 8:3010:00 at Pinecrest Elementary. All parents/ guardians are invited to come and meet their children’s teachers for the 2013-2014 school year.Highlands meet and greetHighlands Elementary School, Open House and Annual Title One Meeting, will be on Friday, August 16th, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m.  Door open at 1:45 pm Uniforms sales from 2:00 – 4:00 pm 2:00 – 4:00 pm Registration and Free and Reduced lunch 4:00 pm Title One Parent Meeting in the Cafeteria Recepcin General y Reunin Annual de Ttilo Uno Viernes, 16 de agosto, de la 2:00 a 4:00 pm *Se abren las puertas a las 1:45 pm *Venta de uniformes de 2:00 a 4:00 pm *Matriculacin y ayuda con el formalario del almuerzo de 2:00 a 4:00 pm *Reunin de Ttulo 1 para padres a las 4:00 pmEden Elementary ElementaryTitle HouseTitle I Annual Meeting/Open House on Friday, August 16, from 1 p.m. 3 p.m. Students and parents are invited to attend and learn more about our school. Title I information will be presented Learn more about the district’s Be Fit Plan Watch a video on adolescent mental health Talk with your child’s teacher about grade level expectations. Translators will be present. Free lunch to rst 200!iGenerationComing this fall a new charter school (grades 6-12). Limited space enrolling now! iGeneration Empowerment Academy, 1411 Lake Trafford Road. Call 239-304-1221 Irm a Miller, Campus Director. Parent meetings every Monday at 3 p.m. till school begins. School Briefs ing the traf c to be every bit as big a problem. So they took a drive around the coast, avoiding the Miami area, and found their new home Naples. That was 25 years ago. Since then Mr. Fairbanks has been with the Collier County Public School district, gaining experience and excelling providing cohesion in schools. When the superintendant once again beckoned him, saying his talents were needed in Immokalee: “We need your expertise . .” words he said he’s heard often during his y ears in education. He has a totally child-centered philosophy which leads him to always do what’s best for the student, he said. He is adamant that all educators should make the life of the student better or nd another career. He adds that he’s a good listener, caring and dedicated, giving 125 percent. Students will see him in the community. In school by 5:30 every morning, don’t be surprised to see him at school events after hours, long after school let out for the day. It’s not all about academics, he says. Students are mainly there for an education, but education doesn’t stop with books or these days technology. Students need to be active in the life of the school, he feels, they need to learn to give back to the community. “These are some of the best days you’ll ever come across,” There are many things to teach students besides academics learning responsibility and patriotism as well as earning a dilploma. “Often kids are lacking in these simple but important life sessions,” he notes, “like caring for people being a friend to all and just smiling.” I.H.S. is a new challenge for Mr. Fairbanks, but he said he’s had experience at all socioeconomic levels. His approach is always the same, “Just look into their hearts.” Across the country districts are ramping up for the more rigorous Common Core Curriculum. Mr. Fairbanks said they are “great standards” but will take time to implement. They are less factual, but incorporate more critical thinking, He noted. Actually, he feels Collier schools are showing growth but there are a lot of challenges ahead. He believes that parents and students must buy into the new standards in order to succeed. “It will take the whole community,” he commented. Ken Fairbanks is not a complete stranger to Immokalee. He said he knows some of Immokalee’s leading educators including Manny Touron and Linda Salazar and he’s a proli c reader who has done some “homework” on Immokalee. As the new principal. he said he steps back and observes never making wholesale changes. He will take a good look at the school grade data before setting up goals and targets. He gives credit to former principal Dr. Murray for growth at the school. He looks at successful strategies and gets expert ideas before moving forward. He believes in accentuating the positive. He wants motivated kids who want to be in school so he tries to make it a place where students want to come and learn. He said he realizes that I.H.S. may be a bit more challenging, but he said the school can rely on the district, which is “all about equity.” He believes that successful teachers are involved in students’ lives. He believes that teachers ought to be tired at the end of the day, because teaching is hard work. Teachers and staff are working toward the August 17 open house. He feels the Bring Your Own Device incentive allowing students to bring their own iPhone, iPad, etc., to do research in school and providing devices for freshmen and sophomores is a great way to integrate technology into the school and bump up student involvement. Regardless of what programs are in place, Mr. Fairbanks is making it a point to get the community involved in the high school’s activities. That, he feels, in an integral part of the entire support system for education. PrincipalContinued From Page 1 Immokalee Bulletin/ Patty BrantImmokalee High School, new principal Ken Fairbanks there’s one main rule. It’s all about the kids. As Collier County Public Schools (CCPS) prepare to open their doors for the 2013-2014 school year on Monday (August 19th), the district’s Nutrition Services Department would like to share some of its latest information. Lunch prices remain the same. Elementary school students continue to pay $2; secondary students $2.25, and adults $3. Students whose families qualify to receive meals at a free or reduced price will be served meals at no charge. Menus follow the USDA nutrition guidelines of the new Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. The lunch menu provides healthy choices including lean protein, whole grains, a variety of fruits and vegetables, and low fat or fat free milk. Breakfast will be served at no charge to all enrolled students. Adult breakfast is $1.50. Research shows, and teachers agree, that students who eat breakfast are more attentive, learn better and have fewer behavior issues. Free and reduced-priced meal applications can be obtained at your child’s school on the rst day of classes. An online version of the application is also available by visiting the district website at www.collierschools.com/foodservice, then clicking on Free & Reduced Meals under the Quick Links menu on the left of the screen, and clicking the red “Apply Online” button. Applications submitted electronically will be processed within 48 hours. Parents may also visit www.Paypams. com and make secure online prepayments to meal accounts, view student balances, and transaction history. Once an account is established, parents will receive e-mail noti cations when a student’s meal account balance runs low. To learn more or for assistance with meal applications, please contact the Nutrition Services Department at 377-0297 or via email at CCPSNutritionServices@collierschools.com. Updated information from Nutrition Services for the school year

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HERE’S MY CARDKeep the number of these locally owned businesses on hand for all of your service & shopping needs. Put your card in this space for six weeks for Only $90! Call us at 239-657-6000 or e-mail cbadsales@newszap.com for more info 4 Immokalee Bulletin August 15, 2013 I-75 at Immokalee Road (Exit 111): Construction project: Work is underway to replace traf c signals at the intersection. Crews are working daytime to install adv anced warning signs and silt fence. Motorists should expect nighttime lane closures from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. weather permitting. Motorists should plan extra time traveling through this area. Estimated project completion is summer 2013. Traf c Control Devices, Inc. is the contractor. I-75/Alligator Alley Rest Area at mile marker 63: Construction project: Work begins to build two recreational access areas adjacent to the Big Cypress National Preserve backcountry trails, replace the existing rest area, build a new public safety center and water treatment plant, and upgrade the existing wastewater treatment plant. Crews are surveying, and placing erosion control and embankment. The contractor is clearing and installing fence for the north and south recreational access areas, weather permitting. Estimated project completion is fall 2014. The design/build contractor is Stantec/Wright Construction Group. US 41 from State Road 29 to the Dade County Line (approximately thirty-two miles): Construction project: This project is w idening the roadway shoulders from two to four feet and replaces curb, guardrail and railing on 41 bridges. Work also includes paving side street connections and installing pavement markings. Weather permitting, crews will complete guardrail installation, continue placing permanent signs along the project and start nal paving operations. A ctivities are planned for daytime, Monday through Saturday. Drivers will encounter three lane closures. Motorists are advised to observe posted speed limits, look out for pedestrians and bicyclists, obey agging operations and drive with caution in the construction zone. Completion is estimated for spring 2014. The contractor is Wright Construction Group. US 41 from Rattlesnake Hammock Road and St. Andrew's Boulevard: Maintenance permit project: Crews are installing turn lanes. The inside through lanes of both southbound and northbound US 41 will be closed until work is completed. Motorists should expect slow moving traf c and possible delays. SR 84/Davis Boulevard from west of Radio Road to Santa Barbara Boulevard: Construction project: Crews are expanding the road to six lanes, adding sidewalk, bike lanes, and street lights, and building a noise wall. Crews have constructed the permanent westbound traf c lanes allowing for the eastbound roadway to be built. This traf c con guration is expected to be in effect through fall 2013. Crews will continue placing ll dirt, installing drainage structures and pipe along the south roadway of the project. Motorists should expect intermittent lane closures during these activities. Please use caution when traveling throughout the work zone as well as when entering and exiting SR 84. Project completion is estimated by end of 2013, weather permitting. The contractor is Guymann Construction. SR 84 from County Barn Road/Glen Eagle Boulevard to Whittenburg Drive: Maintenance permit project: Motorists should expect the westbound outside lane to be closed during the nighttime/overnight hours of 7 p.m., Wednesday, August 14 to 6 a.m., Thursday, August 15 for underground utility work. SR 29 from 7th Street South to 6th Street South: Maintenance permit project: Motorists should expect daytime lane closures Monday through Friday for crews to remove and replace the concrete median. Please drive with care. SR 29 from south of South Industrial Loop Road to North Industrial Loop Road: Construction project: Work is scheduled to begin Monday, August 5 to resurface the road, add a turn lane and widen the shoulders on SR 29. The project includes adding drainage improvements, signing and pavement markings. Motorists are advised to use caution and watch for construction workers and equipment in the construction zone. Project completion is expected at the end of 2013. The Contractor is Lawrence-Lynch Corporation. Road Watch There are currently improvements being made to the Monroe Station, Skillet Strand North and Pace's Dike recreational access points within Big Cypress National Preserve. The nal facilities will allow for parking off main roadways and right-of ways. The work was described in an environmental analysis that can be found at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?projectID=32734. It is anticipated that the work will continue through mid-October of this year. Beginning Friday, August 30 the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission w ildlife check station and the parking to access the Monroe North Trail, which is typically located at Monroe Station, will be moved to the Monument Lake Campground. During the work nominal parking will be available at Pace's Dike, Skillet Strand, and Monroe Station for those accessing the Monroe South Trail. For further questions related to the work contact Bob DeGross at bob_degross@nps.gov or 239-695-1107. Back country access point work The Naples Zoo at Caribbean Gardens and Big Cypress National Preserve are working together to protect South Florida wildlife with a new exhibit that encourages people to treat alligators, wading birds and other animals with respect, for the safety of the wildlife and the public. The new exhibit, to be installed at several popular wildlife viewing spots along the Tamiami Trail (U.S. 41) within the Preserve, is being funded by the Naples Zoo Conservation Fund with a $15,000 donation to the South Florida National Parks Trust, the nonpro t partner of Big Cypress National Preserve. The exhibit represents the rst project of a new partnership between the Naples Zoo and Big Cypress National Preserve. Additional exhibits are planned for the Naples Zoo and at entrances to popular backcountry trails at Big Cypress. The exhibits will emphasize wildlife conservation and safety. "We are grateful for the strong partnership with the Naples Zoo and to be working with them for the bene t of South Florida's wildlife and the safety of the public," said Pedro Ramos, superintendent for Big Cypress National Preserve. "These exhibits will encourage people to enjoy the rewards of being in nature while also appreciating the responsibilities we have to protect wildlife," said Tim Tetzlaff, Director of Conservation and Communications for the Naples Zoo at Caribbean Gardens. The Tamiami Trail exhibits will urge visitors to keep a safe distance from wildlife and to refrain from disturbing or feeding alligators and other animals. Alligators that are fed pose a danger to the public and may be removed and killed. "The overall message of the exhibits is wildlife conservation and safety," said South Florida National Parks Trust Chairman Neal McAliley. The rst Living with Florida Wildlife exhibits jointly produced by the Naples Zoo and the Big Cypress are scheduled to be installed later this year along the Tamiami Trail. About Naples Zoo at Caribbean Gardens Founded in 1919, Naples Zoo at Caribbean Gardens is a nationally accredited zoo nestled within a 44-acre historic tropical garden. The nonpro t Naples Zoo cares for rare and endangered species locally and around the world. Cruises, shows, and keeper talks are offered daily in the Zoo promoting its conservation and education mission. For more information, visit www.napleszoo.org or call (239) 262-5409. About Big Cypress National Preserve Established as one of America's rst national preserves in 1974, the site protects over 729,000 acres of a vast freshwater swamp ecosystem, which supports the rich marine estuaries along Florida's southwest coast. Big Cypress National Preserve contains a mixture of tropical and temperate plant communities that are home to a broad diversity of wildlife, including the elusive Florida panther. For more information on the Preserve, please visit www.nps.gov/bicy. About the South Florida National Parks Trust The South Florida National Parks Trust was established in 2002 to support South Florida's four national parks Everglades, Biscayne and Dry Tortugas National Parks and Big Cypress National Preserve through fund-raising and community outreach. Since its inception, the Trust has provided more than $4 million in funding to these four parks to support projects and programs in ve critical areas: environmental education, resource protection, visitor services, volunteer activities and community outreach. For more information about the Trust, visit www.south oridaparks.org on the Web. Follow us on Facebook www.facebook.com/SouthFloridaNationalParksTrust www.facebook.com/napleszoo www.facebook.com/pages/Big-CypressNational-Preserve On October 11, 1974 Congress established Big Cypress as America's rst National Preserve. The Preserve was created through a grassroots effort by many to ensure that the Big Cypress Swamp would be protected and enjoyed for generations. The National Park Service cares for special places saved by the American people so that all may experience our heritage. The Naples Zoo and Big Cypress National Preserve Team Up

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(August 6, 2013) – With 10 states reporting record high temperatures this summer, the National Weather Service warns hot temps and high humidity will continue to create danger that causes heat illnesses – especially for the elderly. Even if temps drop a bit in our area, experts warn the elderly often do not take proper precautions to stay cool and hydrated.  40% of heat related deaths are among people over the age of 65.  A study out of Kent State University shows most respondents over age 65 thought the heat warnings for seniors did not apply to them and were targeted to “older Americans.” That’s why Visiting Angels, one of the nation’s largest in-home senior care companies, with an of ce in our area, advises families to protect their aging relatives by assembling Senior Summer Safety Kits. These kits include vital, yet, inexpensive tools to make sure elderly loved ones have the protection they need to stay safe during hot summer days – especially when family members are not around. “Seniors often don’t realize their bodies can’t handle heat like they used to so they fail to take extra precautions. That’s why it’s so important to have resources available right w ithin reach,” says Visiting Angels CEO, Larry Meigs. “Seniors can get dry because their body water content decreases and medications can dehydrate them. Take the time to prepare a Senior Summer Safety Kit. If you can’t be with your elderly loved one, hire a caregiver to make sure your senior hydrates, applies sunscreen and stays active and engaged indoors.” What’s in the ‘Senior Summer Safety Kit?’ – (contents optional)  Reusable water bottle to maintain hydration  Copies of all prescriptions and health insurance cards  Phone numbers of health care providers and information concerning chronic health problems  Broad spectrum sunscreen, at least SPF 30, to prevent serious burns  Snap Towels that activate with water and have a cooling effect when applied to the skin  Misting fans that require no electricity in case of a power outage  An ID bracelet with personal information and emergency contact numbers  A pre-paid cell phone for seniors to use in an emergency The Senior Summer Safety Kit can be easily purchased and assembled for $25 $50 in less than 15 minutes. How Visiting Angels “Summer Safety Caregivers” Help Seniors Visiting Angels caregivers come to the home to help with chores like cooking or y ard work which can be strenuous in the heat. They also make sure seniors take proper precautions to beat the heat.  Wear Lightweight, Loose Fitting Clothes – Caregivers help with laundry and can make sure seniors have enough clean, lightweight loose clothes to stay cool.  Drink up! – Caregivers remind seniors to drink water throughout the course of the day, even if they’re not particularly thirsty (eight, 8oz. glasses at least). As adults continue to age, the amount of water retained by the body decreases substantially. Caregivers ll water bottles and keep coolers well stocked. They can even make “mock tails” drinks the senior enjoys like lemonade or fruit juice mixtures – which do not include caffeine or alcohol.  Stay cool – Caregivers close blinds and curtains keeping the house cool, even in triple digit temperatures. Caregivers also have battery operated/hand-held fans readily available to keep their seniors comfortable. Most seniors are budget-conscious, so it’s important for caregivers to be sure the AC is set to a proper, cool level and it’s working. Caregivers can also be responsible to check lters once a month.  Stay in air conditioning in the afternoon – The hottest part of the day is from 3-5 p.m. Caregivers provide inside activities like playing cards, going to movies, the mall or the library to keep seniors active inside to avoid spending time outside during the most dangerous hours of the day.  Eat plenty, but eat light – Caregivers prepare light food because heavy foods, like meat and cheese, tend to make the body work harder to digest, using more water and generating more body heat.  Help With ‘Late Sundown Syndrome’ (periods of agitation in the evening for seniors with dementia) Caregivers help by keeping seniors active in the day so they’re tired-out at night and can go to sleep with no problem. Caregivers also keep seniors on steady nap and bedtime schedules so their bodies get used to the routine.  Follow new sunscreen guidelines – Caregivers are well versed on the FDA’s newly released guidelines about sun protection. Seniors are more prone to sunburn because their bodies have less water. Caregivers educate seniors about these new regulations such as there’s no such thing as “sweat proof” or “water proof” sunscreen. Or, that you must re-apply sunscreen every two hours for it to work effectively.  Copies of health care information – In case of emergency, caregivers have copies of seniors’ prescriptions, health insurance card, and phone numbers of health care providers. We can provide photos of a Senior Summer Safety Kit (available upon request) and/ or interviews with caregivers making the kits and working with seniors to keep them happy, healthy and safe this summer. Sources: University of Chicago Medical Center, National Weather Service. The Department of Health, The Hydration for Health Initiative, The Adult & Geriatric Institute, European Review of Aging and Physical Activity, and the Department on Aging Celebrations .newszap.com/celebrationsEngaged? Just married? Golden anniversary? Birthday? Holiday? New baby? Share your news in print and onlineFor a modest charge, each package includes: and family Submit your good news today at 5 Immokalee Bulletin A ugust 15, 2013 Families ght heat with Summer Safety Kits' for seniors Due to the heavy rainfall and isolated ooding throughout the state this summer, the Florida Department of Health (DOH) emphasizes the importance of residents and visitors protecting themselves against mosquito-borne diseases. To prevent mosquitoes from living and multiplying around your home or business, individuals should remember to drain and cover. Drain standing water:  Drain water from garbage cans, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, owerpots or any other containers where sprinkler or rainwater has collected.  Discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that aren’t being used.  Empty and clean birdbaths and pets’ water bowls at least once or twice a week.  Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that don’t accumulate water.  Maintain swimming pools in good condition and appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. Cover your skin with:  Clothing If you must be outside when mosquitoes are active, cover up. Wear shoes, socks, long pants and long sleeves.  Repellent Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing. Always use repellents according to the label. Repellents with 10-30 percent DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus and IR3535 are effective.  Use mosquito netting to protect children younger than 2 months old. Cover doors and windows with screens:  Keep mosquitoes out of your house. Repair broken screening on windows, doors, porches and patios. Symptoms of West Nile virus and other mosquito-borne illnesses may include headache, fever, fatigue, dizziness, and confusion. For information on mosquitoborne illnesses, visit our Environmental Health website http://www.doh.state. .us/ Environment/medicine/arboviral/info_ links_general.htm or call your local county health department. Read Healthy Florida Summer Series: Winning the Battle Against Mosquitoes This SummerFive Simple Tips. DOH protects, promotes and improves the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts. Follow us on Twitter at @HealthyFla and on Facebook. For news story ideas, interviews, videos and more from DOH Communications visit the DOH Online Newsroomhttp://newsroom.doh.state. .us/. Take precautions against mosquito-borne illness

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Employment Full Time Railroad Locomotive MechanicsRepair of locomotive mechanical, electrical, and associated equipment to FRA standards Have knowledge of and ability to repair rail cars and their associated equipment. Be prepared to help when called out for derailments and train breakdowns. Carry out inspections on Locomotives, railcars and equipment to FRA standards Email: Jdooley@ussugar.com Apply online at www.ussugar.com Drivers: $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on this Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-888-567-4854 RAILROAD CONDUCTORS $20.73 per Hour US SUGAR Clewiston, Florida These are Seasonal Positions lasting Seven Months. Must have previous RR Experience. EMAIL RESUME OR APPLY ONLINEJdooley@ussugar.comwww.ussugar.com Grab a bargain from your neighbors garage, attic, basement or closet in todays classifieds. Employment Full Time Machinist Full Time Perm $22.88 Per Hour Job Responsibilities: Sets up, calibrates and operates machining equipment including manual engine lathes, shapers, jig boxes, brakes, grinders, drill presses, milling machines, and heavy duty presses to assemble and or fabricate parts and complex assemblies. Email: Jdooley@ussugar.com Apply online at www.ussugar.com Need a few more bucks to purchase something deer? Pick up some extra bucks when you sell your used items in the classifeids. Employment Full Time Network Administrator IIResponsible for the maintenance, monitoring and troubleshooting the network along with supporting rewalls and other network devices Requirements: Experience in all areas of local and wide area network management and administration including system con guration, setup, troubleshooting, planning, design, implementation, and end user support; experience installing and supporting Microsoft server technologies; experience supporting telecommunications equipment. OSI model, STP, VLAN, DTP, Wireless 802.11 a,b,g,n OSPF, EIGRP, PIM. LACP, VMware, VRRP, HSRP. GLBP, MPLS, VPLS and BGP. Certi cations preferred: CCNA, CCNA Voice, and NET+. EMAIL Jdooley@ussugar .com Reading a newspaper helps you understand the world around you. No wonder newspaper readers are more successful people! Time to clean out the attic, basement and/or garage? Advertise your yard sale in the classifieds and make your clean up a breeze! Earn some extra cash. Sell your used items in the classifieds Employment Full Time THREE MECHANICS/ HEAVY FARM EQUIPMENT $22.88 PER HOUR, EXTENSIVE OT Majority of work EAST of Clewiston Experience with trucks, farm machinery and other diesel equipment. Perform engine, transmission, drive train, brakes, chassis, diagnosis and repairs on cane harvesting and industrial equipment. Email your resume or Apply OnlineJdooley@ussugar.com www.ussugar.com One mans trash is another mans treasure. Turn your trash to treasure with an ad in the classifieds. How do you find a job in todays competitive market? In the employment section of the classifieds How fast can your car go? It can go even faster when you sell it in the classifieds. Love the earth Recycle your used items by selling them in the classifieds. Looking for a place to hang your hat? Look no further than the classifieds. Buying a car? Look in the classifieds. Selling a car? Look in the classifieds. Business Opportunities NOTICEIndependent Newspapers will never accept any advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises of guaranteed income from work-athome programs if it sounds too good to be true, chances are that it is. If you have questions or doubts about any ad on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the Better Business Bureau at 772-878-2010 for previous complaints. Some 800 and 900 telephone numbers may require an extra charge, as well as long distance toll costs. We will do our best to alert our reader of these charges in the ads, but occasionally we may not be aware of the charges. Therefore, if you call a number out of your area, use caution. When doing those chores is doing you in, its time to look for a helper in the classifieds. The classifieds are the most successful salesperson in town. Join all the people who say, I sold it in the classifieds.Ž Its never too late to find the perfect gift. Look for it in the classifieds. Your new home could be in todays paper. Have you looked for it? Get a quick response to any item you may be selling with a classified ad. Shop here first! The classified ads ApartmentsESPERANZA PLACE Affordable 2BR and 3BR Apartments, Energy ef cient appliances, washer/ dryer hook ups, spacious oor plans, community center on site with computer lab for resident use and classes. From access to Carl Kuehner Community Center educational and social programs. Must be farm or grove labor employed. Pay no more than 30% of your households adjusted monthly income for rent and utilities. Call Rental Of ce at 657-2009 Mon-Fri, 8:00AM-5:00PM 2693 Marianna Way, #308 (TDD 1-800-955-8771) Equal Housing Opportunity Provider & Employer Condos/Townhouses Rent TRAFFORD PINE ESTATES INC. 3 BR & 2 BR CBS Construction All include Stove, Refrig., Air, Ceiling Fans, Util. Rm. w/W&D Hookup, Sound Barrier Between Apt./Twnhs. Free Trash Pickup, Free Lawn Service. Pets Allowed w/ Deposit. Walk to Store. NEW Management Privately Owned Call (239)777-2788 Houses RentFarm Worker Village invites you to come home. Available now 1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom rental homes, starting as low as $425 per month. You may qualify for Rental assistance. Please Call us at: 239-657-3649 or stop by at 1800 Farm Worker Way. Mobile HomeSaleDoublewide 3br, 2 bath located in subdivision on E Road between LaBelle and Immokalee. Owner nancing even with bad credit. Call Kenny at 863-673-4325 FELDA 4br, 2ba, 2500 sq. ft. on nice lot, like new cond., CA, Owner nancing with 20% down. (863)675-8010 or (863)673-6467 Large 3br, 2 bath doublewide. Lake front 1/2 acre lot on A Road between LaBelle and Immokalee. Only $57,900 with your average credit. Call Brittany or Sue at 863-675-1580 Campers/RVsWanted all Travel Trailers, Motor Homes and Fifth Wheels. Any Condition, Cash paid on the spot. Call 941-347-7171 When you want something sold, advertise in the classifieds. Your next job could be in todays classifieds. Did you look for it? 6 Immokalee Bulletin August 15, 2013 ADVERTISEand Get Results www.newszap.com click on classifieds READING A NEWSPAPER MAKES YOU A MORE INFORMED AND INTERESTING PERSON. No wonder newspaper readers are more popular!

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LTE Title 1 meetingLake Trafford Elementary will have its annual Title I Meet the Teacher meeting Friday, A ugust 16, 1-2:30 p.m. in the classrooms. Parents and students are welcome to come meet the teacher. Translators will be present. Los padres y estudiantes son bienvenidos a venir y conocer a su maestro/a. Reunion A nnual de Titulo 1 se llevara a cabo. Traductores estaran prsente. Paran ak elev you you se akeyi yo rive, yo satisfe pwofese yo. Ap Anyel Tit I Reyinyon ap fet. Ap gen entepret prezan. New school hours: 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.Prayer for our educatorsWith all of the professional, physical, emotional and spiritual challenges that educators face each school year, Allen Chapel A .M.E Church, located at 208 S. 3rd Street Immokalee with the Rev. Lori Snell as the pastor, would like to invite all of the educators in the Immokalee area to a special prayer service on Friday, August 16, 2013 at 3:15 p.m. This will be a simple prayer service, that w ill last no more than 30 minutes. All are invitedLearn English fastLearn English fast at iTECH, the Immokalee Technical Center. Take advantage of morning, afternoon, and evening classes. Study using the newest technology. Classes are being taught by certi ed teachers. Classes begin on Monday, August 19. Enroll now. For more information about this great opportunity, visit Immokalee Technical Center at 508 N. 9th Street, call 658-7080 in Immokalee, or visit www.itech.edu.Parks and Rec launches web siteCollier County Parks and Recreation recently launched its mobile web site. Access www.collierparks.com on your smart phone or tablet to view the mobile device-friendly site. Add the Collier County Parks and Recreation icon to your home screen to access quickly the information you need to enjoy all the recreational amenities offered by Collier County Parks and Recreation. For more information, contact Parks and Recreation Administration at (239) 2524000.Childcare availableA Step Up Immokalee, operated by Collier Child Care Resources, Inc., provides childcare for teen parents, school district teachers and staff, county workers. They care for infants to four years of age Monday through Friday 6:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. with extended hours till 3 p.m. There is a warm and inviting atmosphere with nurturing childcare providers, free childcare tuition to members of the Teenage parenting Progrm. Located at 701 Immokalee Drive. Phone 239-377-1172; cell 239-980-9021 or go to www.collierchildcare.org.South Park closed for constructionImmokalee South Park, located at 418 School Drive, is closed. A new community park building will be under construction throughout this summer and fall. Construction is expected to be complete by January 2014. The new building will house programs such as voluntary pre-kindergarten, after school programs, summer camp, senior programs, arts and crafts, and special events. The building will have classrooms and a community room for residents to enjoy. For more information, contact Annie Alvarez at (239) 867-4121 ext 206, or (239) 252-4449. Breastfeeding mothers groupLearn about the many bene ts of breastfeeding, get advice and tips, speak with breast-feeding peer counselors Myda and Noemi, meet and share experiences with other breastfeeding mothers. Pregnant women welcome. Come to the Collier County Department of Health Room 133 every Tuesday from 1011:30 a.m. For additional information call 239-252-7347 or 239-252-7312.Commissioner Nance of ce openCollier Commissioner Tim Nance opened his new of ce in the Immokalee Government Center, 106 South First Street. Regular of ce hours for Nance at the government center will be established soon.TAC meeting plannedThe Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the Collier Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) will meet on Monday, Aug. 26 at 9 a.m. at the Collier County Growth Management Division Planning & Regulation, Room 609/610, 2800 North Horseshoe Drive, Naples, Fla. One week prior to the meeting, the TAC agenda will be posted on the MPO's website at colliermpo.net. To access the agenda, go to the calendar and select the meeting date. For more information call MPO Executive Director Ms. Lucilla Ayer, AICP, at 239-2528192. Business & Service Directory AUCTION Mobile Homes for Rent (239) 633-1864 ROOFING Metal Roofs Re-Roofs Roof Repairs Seamless Gutters Soffit & Fascia Free Estimates Lic# CCC037019 981 Cowboy Circle Office (863)675-7045 Fax (863)612-1158 Lic#CCC1325950 Of“ce: (863) 675-704 5 1050 Commerce Dr. Suite B. Fax (863) 612-1158 7 Immokalee Bulletin A ugust 15, 2013 Public Notice SECTION 00100 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Sealed Bids for the Upgrade Lift Stations I, T, & V and New Lift Station I2 & Forcemain and New Sanitary Sewer & Manholes project will be received by the Immokalee Water and Sewer District at the District of ce located at 1020 Sanitation Road, Immokalee, FL 34142 until 10:00AM (Local Time), September 16, 2013 and then at said of ce publicly opened and read aloud. The upgrade of Lift Station T generally includes the removal of the existing pump station pumps, piping, and accessories from the existing wetwell, recoating the existing wetwell, reinstalling the existing three phase pumps, installing new discharge piping, removal of the existing valves and valve vault, installation of new above ground valves and piping and connection to the existing forcemain, removal of the existing single phase control panel (with add-a-phase) and single phase electrical service, installation of a new three phase control panel and three phase electrical service, plus related miscellaneous items of work. The upgrade of Lift Station I generally includes the removal of the existing pump station pumps, piping, and accessories from the existing wetwell, recoating the existing wetwell, installing new three phase pumps, installing new discharge piping, removal of the existing valves and valve vault, installation of new above ground valves and piping and connection to the existing forcemain, removal of the existing three phase control panel, installation of a new three phase control panel, plus related miscellaneous items of work. The upgrade of Lift Station V generally includes the removal of the existing pump station pumps, piping, and accessories from the existing wetwell, recoating the existing wetwell, installing new three phase pumps, installing new discharge piping, removal of the existing valves and valve vault, installation of new above ground valves and piping and connection to the existing forcemain, removal of the existing single phase control panel and single phase electrical service, installation of a new three phase control panel and three phase electrical service, plus related miscellaneous items of work. The New Lift Station I2 and Forcemain generally includes installation of a new precast concrete wetwell, coating the new wetwell, installing new pumps and discharge piping inside the wetwell, installation of new above ground discharge piping and valves, installation of a new three phase control panel and three phase electric service, and construction of approximately 650 LF of 6 inch HDPE force main, and connecting the new forcemain to an existing manhole, plus related miscellaneous items of work. The new Sanitary Sewer and Manholes generally include installation of approximately 250 LF of 8” PVC gravity sewer, approximately 2400 LF of 10” PVC gravity sewer, approximately 30 LF of 12” PVC gravity sewer, seven (7) new sanitary sewer manholes, one (1) new master manhole, master manhole coating, three (3) new sanitary sewer services, plus related miscellaneous items of work. The work is located in Immokalee, FL. Contract Documents may be obtained at the following location at a cost of $15 each: Greeley and Hansen, 5260 Summerlin Commons Way, Suite 302, Fort Myers, FL 33907 A MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE will be held at 10:00 AM on Monday, August 19, 2013, at the Immokalee Water and Sewer District Of ces, 1020 Sanitation Road, Immokalee, FL 34142, Immokalee, Florida. August 9, 2013 Eva J. Deyo, Executive Director 450099 IB 8/15/2013 Public Notice Community Briefs

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8 Immokalee Bulletin August 15, 2013 To advance its mission of quality healthcare accessible to everyone in the community, the Healthcare Network of Southwest Florida raised nearly $1,750 for the Susan G. Komen Foundation during its inaugural Ultimate Yard Sale, Aug. 3, at the Marion E. Fether Building in Immokalee. Yard sale chair Lizzy Perez said she was pleased with the funds raised, but even more rewarding was the signi cant support of Healthcare Network employees from all 13 locations and the overwhelming response from the Immokalee community. "Words cannot explain how I felt the moment I saw the crowd!" she said of the long lines on Saturday morning. "Success is simple if you work hard for it and our team was able to achieve that success this weekend." Sale items were provided by employees, w ho cleaned out closets, garages and storage sheds to donate items no longer needed and still in usable condition. Over 20 volunteers assisted with the collection, set up and operation of the sale, which drew nearly 500 shoppers. "We de nitely hope to make this an annual event a time for all of us to come together to celebrate the Immokalee community," Perez said. Annually, the Healthcare Network of Southwest Florida provides primary care for 45,000 people in Southwest Florida (32,000 are children) at 13 medical and dental service locations in East Naples, Golden Gate, North Naples, Marco Island and Immokalee. The Healthcare Network also provides pediatric, medical and dental services, including screenings for autism, through the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile¨. For more information on the Healthcare Network, contact Kaydee Tuff at 239-6583116 or ktuff@healthcaresw .org. Healthcare Network of Southwest Florida Yard Sale is Ultimate Success! Submitted photoThe Healthcare Network of Southwest Florida raised nearly $1,750 for the Susan G. Komen Foundation during its inaugural Ultimate Yard Sale on August 3. Dwight Brock, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Collier County, would like to let the citizens of Collier County know that homeowners in Florida counties are receiving letters from a private company offering to provide a copy of their property deed for $83.00. The company, Property Transfer Services is located in Wilmington, Delaware. Brock stated he "does not want the public to be taken advantage of, so unless someone has an 80 page deed, it does not make good economic sense, as most deeds are just one or two pages in length." He also wants to take this opportunity to remind Collier citizens that they can obtain a copy of their property deed on http://www.collierclerk.com/ free of charge, or by visiting the Clerk's Recording Department on the second oor of the Courthouse Annex at the Government Center Complex or at any full service satellite of ce (provided it was recorded in the of cial records after 1981). The Clerk's charge for copies is $1.00/ page, plus an additional $2.00 charge for a certi ed copy, plus any mailing costs. Citizens who wish to learn more may call the Clerk's Recording Department at (239) 252-7242 or (239) 252-8261 or email questions to recordinghelp@collierclerk.com Beware of Property Deed Service via Mail