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Immokalee bulletin ( June 20, 2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
Immokalee bulletin
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Independent Newspapers of Florida
Place of Publication:
LaBelle, FL
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- La Belle (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hendry County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Immokalee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Collier County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Hendry -- La Belle
United States of America -- Florida -- Collier -- Immokalee

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 16, no. 15 (Apr. 17, 1997).

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36864856
lccn - sn 97027777
System ID:
UF00100151:00174

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Immokalee bulletin
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Independent Newspapers of Florida
Place of Publication:
LaBelle, FL
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- La Belle (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hendry County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Immokalee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Collier County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Hendry -- La Belle
United States of America -- Florida -- Collier -- Immokalee

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 16, no. 15 (Apr. 17, 1997).

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36864856
lccn - sn 97027777
System ID:
UF00100151:00174


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PAGE 1

Immokalee High School’s (IHS) BETA Club always does well in competitions held at state and national conventions, and this year is no exception. The 54 IHS Indians making the trip to the 33rd Annual National BETA Club Convention held in Mobile, Alabama, last weekend were joined by about 2,950 students from other schools across the nation. The Immokalee troop was the runner up the Campaign Skit category. The IHS students also pulled off a fth place nish in the Spanish category, and came in seventh in the Talent competition. While 80 BETA Club members traveled to the 71st Annual State of Florida BETA Club convention in Orlando in January, several students were unable to go to nationals for various reasons. According to Linda Ayer, longtime club sponsor, two of Immokalee’s best performers were sidelined for the Alabama trip at the last minute because they Beta students shine at national convention H onor overwhelms local group On this Independence Day, Cthe Coalition of Immokalee Workers members and Fair Food activists everywhere can celebrate with added cheer this year. The CIW has been selected to receive the Roosevelt Institute’s prestigious Freedom from Want Medal for 2013 in recognition of our two decades of work on behalf of farmworkers’ human and economic rights and the unprecedented advances of the Fair Food Program! In his January 6, 1941 State of the Union Speech (a speech delivered with the country on the brink of entering World War II), President Franklin D. Roosevelt enumerated what he called the “four essential human freedoms.” Those freedoms, or fundamental human rights, would form the vision of a more just, peaceful world that would guide the country through the terrible sacri ces of the coming war years: “In the future days, which we seek to make secure, we look forward to a world founded upon four essential human freedoms. The rst is freedom of speech and expression—everywhere in the world. The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his own way—everywhere in the world. The third is freedom from want—which, translated into world terms, means economic understandings which will secure to every nation a healthy peacetime life for its inhabitants—everywhere in the world. The fourth is freedom from fear—which, translated into world terms, means a world-wide reduction of armaments to such a point and in such a thorough fashion that no nation will be in a position to commit an act of physical aggression against any neighbor— anywhere in the world. That is no vision of a distant millennium. It is a de nite basis for a kind of world attainable in our own time and generation. That kind of world is the very antithesis of the so-called new order of tyranny which the dictators seek to create with the crash of a bomb.”—Franklin D. Roosevelt, excerpted from the State of the Union Address to the Congress, January 6, 1941 Those freedoms would also come to be manifest in the formation of the United Nations, established in the years following the war, and form the four pillars of the UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a truly visionary document championed by former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. The preamble of the UN Declaration of Human Rights ttingly cites Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms: “... Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people,...” read more And so it was with great pride (and a bit of surprise, truth be told) that we received the wonderful news that the CIW had been selected to receive is 2013 Freedom from Want Medal by the Roosevelt Institute, the New York-based organization, “devoted to carrying forward the legacy and values o f Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt by developing progressive ideas and bold leadership in the service of restoring America’s promise o f opportunity for all.” The honor was particularly remarkable for the company in which the award CIW named 2013 Four Freedoms Award Laureate! Submitted photoImmokalee High School BETA students tops again! Thursday, July 4, 2013 V ol. 46 No. 27 See Page 2 for information about how to contact the newspaper.newszap.comFree SpeechFree Ads See Beta — Page 2 See Award — Page 2

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Help America ‘s Forests. If you join the Arbor Day Foundation in July, ten trees will be planted in high-need national forests. America’s forestland is a prized natural resource, and anyone can help plant trees in these vital areas by joining the Arbor Day Foundation this month. Through the Replanting Our National Forests campaign, the Arbor Day Foundation will honor each new member who joins in July by planting 10 trees in forests that have been devastated by wild res, insects and disease. The cost for joining the Arbor Day Foundation is a $10 donation. America’s national forests face enormous challenges, including unprecedented wild res that have left a backlog of more than one million acres in need of replanting. The Foundation has worked with the United States Forest Service for more than 20 years to plant trees in high-need forests. Our national forests provide habitat for wildlife, keep the air clean and help ensure safe drinking water for more than 180 million Americans. To join the Arbor Day Foundation and help plant trees in our national forests, send a $10 membership contribution to Replanting Our National Forests, Arbor Day Foundation, 100 Arbor Ave., Nebraska City, NE 68410, or visit arborday.org/july. Save forests, join Arbor Day Foundation 2 Immokalee Bulletin July 4, 2013 To Reach UsMailing Address: P.O. Box 518 LaBelle, FL 33975 Physical Address: 22 Ft. Thompson Ave. Website: www.newszap.com/immokaleeTo Submit NewsThe Immokalee Bulletin welcomes submissions from its readers. Opinions, calendar items, story ideas and photographs are welcome. Call (239) 657-6000 to reach our newsroom. The deadline for all news items is 11 a.m. on Monday prior to the following Thursdays publication. E-Mail: ibnews@newszap.comTo Place a Display AdPhone: (239) 657-6000 day for the following Thursdays publication E-mail: cbadsales@newszap.comBilling DepartmentE-mail: billteam@newszap.comTo Place a Classi“ed AdCall 1 -877 353-2424 to place it from home or go to www.newszap.comFor SubscriptionsPhone: 1-800-282-8586 Visit circulation.newszap.com or email readerservices@newszap.com.StaffNews Editor: Patty Brant Advertising Services: Dale Conyers Advertising Services: Barbara Calfee Executive Editor: Katrina Elsken Publisher: Tom ByrdOur PurposeƒThe Caloosa Belle is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida. Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspaper to pursue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community. Since no dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on pro“t margins below industrystandards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in Independents mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the communitys deliberation of public issues.We Pledgeƒ To operate this newspaper as a public trust and work, through our dedication to conscientious journalism. their own intelligent decisions about public issues. purposeful neutrality, fairness, objectivity, fearlessness and compassion. debate, not to dominate it with our own opinions. the prominence it deserves. compassion. hail from migrant families and they needed to be with their parents in the watermelon elds of Georgia. BETA stands for Better Education Through Achievement. The club motto is “Let us lead by serving others,” and club members do a lot of school and community service wor k throughout the year. Members must maintain a 3.0 grade point average to be eligible to take part in state and national convention activities, and they must raise the mone y needed to pay for their trip. Linda Ayer says the students wish to express their sincere appreciation to members of the Immokalee community and the Immokalee Foundation for their continued support. While in Mobile, the students, and 12 chaperones toured Battleship Memorial Par k where the USS Alabama is moored, and they got to watch the shooting of a Nicholas Cage movie, “Tokarev,” being lmed in downtown Mobile and at the hotel where they were staying. places the CIW. From the Institute’s letter: “We would be honored if the Coalition would consider accepting our Freedom from Want Medal. By accepting this award, you will join a noteworthy group of past laureates including Presidents Truman, Kennedy, Carter and Clinton, Nelson Mandela, the Dalai Lama, Aung San Suu Kyi, Carlos Fuentes, Studs Terkel, Tom Brokaw, Hillary Clinton, Elie Wiesel, and Anthony Romero.” This year’s honorees include: Wendell Berry, Freedom Medal, author and environmentalist Paul Krugman, Freedom of Speech Medal, Nobel Prize winning economist and writer Ameena Matthews, Freedom from Fear Medal, Chicago-based anti-violence organizer Sister Simone Campbell, Freedom of Religion, Executive Director of NETWORK Plans are being made for October’s award ceremony in New York City. CIW would like to thank the Roosevelt Institute for considering the CIW and the Fair Food Program for such an august award. (This article is from the CIW website) BetaContinued From Page 1 WASHINGTON –Two major challenges small business owners face after disasters are sales losses and a diminished customer base. In a recent survey of 7,500 small and medium sized businesses done by the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB), 62 percent said losing profits and clients was their biggest postdisaster challenge. Whether it’s a fire, flood or tornado, small businesses face an uphill trek when it comes to recovery. That’s why it’s important to be prepared. “South Florida businesses are faced with the threat of hurricanes every year and the quickest route to recovery is preparing before the storm hits,” said SBA South Florida District Director Francisco “Pancho” Marrero. “Helping small businesses recover from a disaster is a key mission of SBA. Our series of free webinars are just one way we help entrepreneurs and small business owners build and expand business.” Assessing your company’s risks is one of the first steps in creating an effective business continuity plan. Join Agility Recovery and the U.S. Small Business Administration on Tuesday, July 9 for an online discussion on how to protect your business before a disaster strikes. SBA has partnered with Agility to offer business continuity strategies at its “PrepareMyBusiness” website. Visit www. preparemybusiness.org to access past webinars and preparedness tips. The SBA provides disaster recovery assistance in the form of low-interest loans to homeowners, renters, private nonprofits and businesses of all sizes. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov/disaster. “The Top 5 Risks for Business Disasters in America,” a presentation followed by a question and answer session will be Tuesday, July 9, 2013 – 2-3 p.m. EDT. Space is limited. Register at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/ register/934008056 What are the top ve disaster risks to small businesses? Immokalee, Fla. – Lipman, North America’s largest open eld tomato grower, has elected Jeff Gargiulo to its board of directors. A produce industry veteran, Gargiulo currently owns and operates Gargiulo Vineyards, a Napa Valley Winery and is the chairman of Greenleaf Produce, a produce foodservice distributor in San Francisco. Jeff and his family owned Gargiulo Tomato for decades before selling the company, which still bears his name. He served as president and CEO for Sunkist Growers, and is a past chairman of the Produce Marketing Association. “Jeff grew up growing and packing tomatoes, surrounded by Florida agriculture”, said Kent Shoemaker, CEO of Lipman. “We’re thrilled to have him join our board of directors and look forward to his insight as he returns to the tomato business.” Gargiulo is on the Oakville Wine Growers board of directors and a member of the Florida Council of 100. He also supports an array of charitable organizations throughout the United States. Gargiulo graduated from Florida State University. About Lipman Based in Immokalee, Fla., Lipman is the largest eld open tomato grower in North America, providing dependable year-round fresh produce through an integrated network of research & development, farming, processing, and repacking. Farms in Florida, South Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, California and Mexico – totaling tens of thousands of acres – allow Lipman to grow and ship fresh produce 365 days a year. For more information, visit www.LipmanProduce.com. Jeff Gargiulo joins Lipman's board of directors AwardContinued From Page 1

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Possibly Pregnant? We can help florida.newszap.com Check out these new features: • Daily Local News Updates • New interactive and easy to navigate format • Plus much, much more!Come see for yourself! HERE’S MY CARDKeep the number of these locally owned businesses on hand for all of your service & shopping needs. Put your card in this space for six weeks for Only $90! Call us at 239-657-6000 or e-mail cbadsales@newszap.com for more info 3 Immokalee Bulletin July 4, 2013 Tampa, Fla. (June 24, 2013) – With the warmer summer temperatures providing the right conditions for increased thunderstorm and lightning activity, experts at the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS) offer advice to help reduce the risk of damage from power surges as part of Lightning Safety Awareness Week (June 23-29). Lighting may not seem as destructive as other natural disasters, yet a strike can cause serious damage to business equipment and electrical appliances, disrupt electrical service for long periods of time, and – most dangerously – spark wild res “People often underestimate the harm that lightning can cause, but make no mistake – it’s a force to be reckoned with,” said Julie Rochman, CEO and president of IBHS. “We encourage both home and business owners to take the necessary precautions to protect their property from the damaging effects of a lightning strike, such as power surges. IBHS recommends that home and business owners invest in a whole house or building surge protector to prevent a potential loss. Make sure the protector you select has been tested to meet the proper standards (see www.disastersafety.org/ lightning). Contact a power company or a licensed electrician to install this system. Also, install additional protection for important or expensive equipment. This should include localized surge protection for power cords to the equipment and any telephone and cable/satellite TV lines connecting to the equipment. These devices are available at most home improvement and electronics stores. Consider hiring an electrician to review the power, telephone, electrical and cable/ satellite TV connections in your home or business. Have them check that there is adequate grounding of the power line connection and the power distribution panel. All of the utilities should enter the structure within ten feet of the electrical service entrance ground wire and be bonded to that grounding point. For more IBHS guidance on lightning protection, visit www.disastersafety.org/ lightning. Summer prime time for lightning activity I-75, at Immokalee Road (Exit 111): Construction project: Work is underway to replace traf c signals at the intersection. Crews are working daytime to install adv anced warning signs and silt fence. Motorists should expect nighttime lane closures from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. weather permitting. Motorists should plan extra time traveling through this area. Estimated project completion is summer 2013. Traf c Control Devices, Inc. is the contractor. US 41 from State Road 29 to the Dade County Line (approximately thirty-two miles): Construction project: This project is w idening the roadway shoulders from two to four feet and replaces curb, guardrail and railing on 41 bridges. Work also includes paving side street connections and installing pavement markings. Weather permitting; crews will continue installing guardrail and sod at the bridges. Activities are planned for daytime, Monday through Wednesday. Drivers will encounter two lane closures. Motorists are advised to observe posted speed limits, look out for pedestrians and bicyclists, obey agging operations and drive with caution in the construction zone. Completion is estimated for spring 2014. The contractor is W right Construction Group. US 41 from Rattlesnake Hammock Road and St. Andrew’s Boulevard: Maintenance permit project: Crews are working on resurfacing the turn lane. The inside through lanes of both southbound and northbound US 41 will be closed until work is completed. Motorists should expect slow moving traf c and possible delays. SR 84/Davis Boulevard from west of Radio Road to Santa Barbara Boulevard: Construction project: Crews are expanding the road to six lanes, adding sidewalk, bike lanes, and street lights, and building a noise wall. During the week of June 30, motorists should expect a new traf c pattern from east of Madison Park Drive to Santa Barbara Boulevard for crews to construct the eastbound roadway. This new traf c con guration is expected to be in effect through fall 2013. Please use caution when traveling throughout the work zone as well as when entering and exiting SR84. Crews will continue placing ll dirt, installing drainage structures and pipe along the north roadway of the project. Motorists should expect intermittent lane closures during these activities. Project completion is estimated by end of 2013, weather permitting. The contractor is Guymann Construction. Road Watch MIAMI – The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) invites Florida-based, private, 501(c)certi ed non-pro t organizations to apply for a ve-year Women’s Business Center (WBC) grant. The SBA Women’s Business Center is a program or project funded, in part, by a grant from the SBA to provide technical assistance to women entrepreneurs, who are largely socially and economically disadvantaged. The successful applicant will receive an award in the form of a cooperative agreement for the base year and four additional option years may be exercised subject to the availability of funding and the WBC’s performance during the previous year. “SBA established the Women’s Business Center Program 25 years ago to better help women overcome continuing barriers to success. Today there are Women’s Business Centers in almost every state and two centers in the south Florida district,” said SBA South Florida District Director Francisco “Pancho” Marrero. “This grant will create a new resource partner in Florida to help women entrepreneurs start and grow successful businesses. Each center provides training in nance, management, marketing, as well as offering access to all of the SBA’s nancial and procurement assistance programs.” The award recipient must provide nonfederal matching funds as follows: one nonfederal dollar for each two federal dollars for the rst two years, and one non-federal dollar for each one federal dollar for years three through ve. At least 50 percent of the non-federal matching funds must be in the form of cash to include program income (e.g., fees generated from services). The remaining 50% may be made up o f in-kind contributions. Applications are due by July 31. An organization that previously operated an SBA-funded women’s business center within the past ve years of the application, and previously operated an SBA-funded women’s business center within 50 miles o f the proposed territory of the application ma y be eligible to apply, but if awarded, would be awarded as a Renewal Phase Project. For speci c information regarding the grant and how to apply, go to: http://www. sba.gov/content/womens-business-centergrant-opportunities SBA grants available for women with non-pro ts

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By Erica SkolteU.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sometimes it really does take a village to accomplish an important goal. Numerous partner agencies, non-governmental organizations and ranchers came together in LaBelle recently to celebrate the acquisition of the American Prime property one year ago, and to chart the path forward. The purchase of this “keystone tract,” now known as the Lone Ranger Forge, preserved a vital corridor for natural expansion of the endangered Florida panthers. The movement of the animals northward is considered to be one of the keys to the continued recovery of the species. Panther scientists estimate that there are only 100 to 140 Florida panthers remaining in the wild, and the last remaining breeding population of Florida panthers is in south Florida, south of the Caloosahatchee River. Though their home ranges are fairly large, female panthers tend to stay close to w here they were born. When males mature, they naturally disperse. Historically, this was a wonderful natural strategy for maintaining genetic diversity, as males could introduce fresh genetic material as they bred with small pockets of related females throughout the southeastern part of the country. With breeding populations in more than one area, there is less competition for prey, mates and territory, and intra-speci c aggression, a leading cause of death second only to vehicle collisions, is reduced. And if there are separate populations in different locations, it is easier for the species to recover from the effects of a natural disaster or a disease outbreak. Though there have been numerous stories of panthers with kittens north of the Caloosahatchee, none have been con rmed by panther scientists. However, maintaining a path for panthers to migrate to other areas is of the utmost importance. The areas east and west of Lake Okeechobee were not previously connected; today, one may cross the state from the A tlantic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico on the Okeechobee Waterway. In the late 1800s, the headwaters of the Caloosahatchee River w ere connected to the west side of Lake Okeechobee via a three-mile canal at the Moore Haven Lock and Dam. On the east side of Lake Okeechobee, the St. Lucie canal w as cut at the Port Mayaca Lock and Dam, connecting the lake to the St. Lucie River. This presented a problem for the northward movement of panthers, in that they had to cross a wide body of water and climb steep banks caused by channelization. Still, panther biologists have tracked the movement of male panthers with radio collars across the Caloosahatchee River in one key area. Animals don’t move randomly through the wild; even creatures of different species tend to move through certain areas more frequently than others, sometimes even creating trails. The panthers coming out of south Florida seemed to be traveling along the edges of a natural waterway, and then following an agricultural ditch to a narrow spot along the Caloosahatchee River. It was this area that was identi ed as most important to preserve and protect, so that panthers could continue to move northward in the future. Just how special is this spot? During the meeting, neighboring ranchers Chris Asplundh and Dwayne House, provided some perspective on just how important this area is – though few people have been lucky enough to get a glimpse of a Florida panther in the wild, House and Asplundh say they see panthers in the area almost every week. The 1,278-acre Lone Ranger Forge property where the ditch is located, fronts a narrow section of the Caloosahatchee River that is about 92 feet wide, only a few miles west of the Ortona Lock and Dam. The complex purchase of this key property last year, with an incredible number of moving parts, extraordinarily tight deadlines, and multiple legal and funding issues, was brought to a successful conclusion at the eleventh hour, due only to dedication and combined efforts of many individuals and groups working together to achieve a common goal. Larry Williams, eld supervisor for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, South Florida Ecological Services of ce in Vero Beach, Fla., opened the celebratory meeting. “We have a lot of momentum right now, and we want to keep that momentum going,” he said. Williams also announced the formation of a new panther recovery implementation team. There were several other presentations during the meeting to highlight everything that had gone on behind the scenes to make this important acquisition a reality, and to illustrate the work that must still be done to restore and manage the property. Part of the meeting was dedicated to recognizing the many individuals at multiple organizations and agencies that played a part in the eventual success of what often seemed a nearimpossible undertaking. Tunis McElwain, Fort Myers regulatory section chief, represented the Corps team members at all levels who collectively prepared the necessary documents to facilitate the easement exchange required to set the stage for the purchase. Susan Waichulis, regulatory project manager in the Fort Myers of ce, was the Corps’ rst “boots on the ground” representative at the beginning of the project. She accepted an award for her contribution to moving the project forward. “This is very exciting,” said Waichulis. “I was privileged to represent the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and meet everyone for the site visit, and then complete the jurisdictional determination in June 2011.” “The Corps values our partnerships with other federal and state agencies,” said McElwain. “Establishment of the panther corridor shows just how important these partnerships are and underscores the fact that innovative problem solving can make a tremendous difference to the south Florid a ecosystem. The employees recognized today represent a broad cross-section of the Corps team who worked to make the corridor a reality.” Celebrations .newszap.com/celebrationsEngaged? Just married? Golden anniversary? Birthday? Holiday? New baby? Share your news in print and onlineFor a modest charge, each package includes: and family Submit your good news today at RABIES $10 € PARVO $12 € Half Price Boarding €For a limited timeFREE EXAMA $50 ValuePartners in the Way to Happiness Foundation and a Drug Free World. Free pamphlets available.SHEWMAKER ANIMAL HOSPITAL1095 N. State Rd. 29 € LaBelle € 863-675-2441IMMOKALEE MOBILE UNIT CLINICNext to the McDonalds € Immokalee € 863-675-2441CLEWISTON MOBILE UNIT CLINICat McDonalds € Clewiston € 863-675-2441Disclaimer: The Patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. LOWEST PRICE EVERYDAY! 4 Immokalee Bulletin July 4, 2013 Submitted photoPanther scientists estimate that there are only 100 to 140 Florida panthers remaining in the wild, and the last remaining breeding population of Florida panthers is in south Florida, south of the Caloosahatchee River. Corps helps make Florida panther corridor a reality

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July 4, 2013 Immokalee Bulletin 5 Gator Fred Langdale's latest adventure By Linda Peeples Martin, Melissa Sherman and Fred Langdale It has almost been a year since Kaleb "Fred" Langdale took a swim in the Caloosahatchee River where he almost lost his life to an eleven-foot gator. He survived the inci dent but did lose his right arm in the attack. He has become a local celebrity now better known as "Gator Fred" because of his quick reaction and survival skills. Gator Fred has never let his loss of limb detour him from being an outdoorsman, he still does everything he loves; fishing, hunting, wakeboarding and has become a great shot with his firearms. He continues to weld and modified his favorite equipment by making foot steering for his airboat and changed the controls on his 4-wheeler so he can drive it left handed. He has made a lot of accomplishments this year, from getting acquainted with his prosthetic arm and graduating high school. Councilman Manuel "Mondo" Tiger was moved by his unconquered sprit and invited Gator Fred to a Seminole adventure on the a Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation to celebrate his year of achievements. The Seminoles have a long history with alligator wresting, but Fred credits his quick reaction to a popular gator reality show. "When the alligator was a few inches from my face I grabbed the gator under the jaw and pushed up." The gator did get a hold of his arm and went into a death roll; Fred held on tight and eventually put his feet on top of the gators mouth and was able to break free from the gators grasp unfortunately without his arm. He quickly made it to the bank and used spider webs to stop the bleeding before the paramedics arrived and was airlifted to the hospital where he stayed for six days. When Fred and his Mother Felinda Langdale arrived on the Big Cypress Indian Reservation they thought they were going to just go for a buggy and airboat ride at Billie Swamp Safari. However, they had another adventure waiting for them, but this time it was a fun and safe one. After meeting Coun cilman Manuel "Mondo" Tiger he revealed his VIP plans to Gator Fred. The first stop was at the Big Cypress Hunting Adventure, an area rarely visited by the general public, for a tour where they spotted several buffalo and hogs. Next, they made their way to the Aviation Department where they were given a tour of the hanger, then briefed on helicopter safety for their aerial tour of the reservation and experience zero gravity. The only other time Fred was in a helicopter was for the trip to the hospital. "I didn't get to see much the last time" Fred joked. Once they landed ev eryone went to the Swamp Water Cafe at Billie Swamp Safari for lunch and fun. After lunch they met Billie Swamp Safari employee Hans who gave them a guided tour on an airboat. After returning to the dock they were greeted by Tribal Member Billy Walker who shared many interesting facts about the Seminole culture and also joined them on the swamp buggy ride. "This has been one of the best days I have had since my accident; I want to thank the Seminole Tribe, Councilman 'Mondo' Tiger, the staff at Billie Swamp Safari and Hunting Adventure. My Mom and I had a wonderful time." Fred has plans on attending Edison State College to get his Associates Degree and then attend St. Petersburg College to pursue his dream of becoming a doctor of prosthet ics and orthotics so he can help others who have lost limbs. "It makes me feel great to help others who are in similar situations." Fred added, "I am not bitter, if anything it has made me a stronger person." For more information about visiting the Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation please visit www.floridaseminoletourism or call (863) 902-3200 and get the latest deals and events the Seminoles have to offer. v / / .-V: "-.V" &T\ .INC. MINING OPERATIONS 11515 CtICK DRIVE LAKEPORT, Ft "3471 (OFF SR 78) iniLog^= o g^} o H^ rafoBA
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Important Information: Please read your ad carefully the first day it appears. In case of an inadvertent error, please notify us prior to the deadline listed. We will not be responsible for more than 1 incorrect insertion, or for more than the extent of the ad rendered valueless by such errors. Advertiser assumes responsibility for all statements, names and content of an ad, and assumes responsibility for any claims against the INI USA. All advertising is subject to publisher’s approval. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any or all copy, and to insert above the copy the word “advertisement”. All ads accepted are subject to credit approval. All ads must conform to INI USA style and are restricted to their proper classifications. Some classified categories require advance payment. These classifications are denoted with an asterisk *. Garage/ Yard SalesLabelle 7/6, 7am -?, 404 Belmont St., huge moving sale, something for everyone. Employment Full TimeHOUSE CLEANING Experienced full time house cleaners, attention to detail, highly motivated, energetic self starter for a fast pace job. Serious inquires only. No drama! Naples area. Work you way to “Team Leader” Leave message at 239-353-0557. One mans trash is another mans treasure. Turn your trash to treasure with an ad in the classifieds. Employment Full Time Railroad Locomotive MechanicsRepair of locomotive mechanical, electrical, and associated equipment to FRA standards Have knowledge of and ability to repair rail cars and their associated equipment. Be prepared to help when called out for derailments and train breakdowns. Carry out inspections on Locomotives, railcars and equipment to FRA standards Email: Jdooley@ussugar.com Apply online at www.ussugar.com Accounts Payable Specialist needed for Immokalee Agricultural based business. Essential job duties include but are not limited to; proof checking all documents related to produce purchases, maintaining PO les, communicating with vendors, preparing analysis of vendor accounts etc. A high school diploma or GED needed and a minimum of two(2) yrs. bookkeeping exp. in the areas of accounts payables. Must be able to maintain a high level of con dentially. Email resume to: hiring@ lipmanproduce.com Drivers: $1,000 Sign-On Bonus! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on this Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-888-567-4854 Reading a newspaper helps you understand the world around you. No wonder newspaper readers are more successful people! Employment Full Time RECEPTIONIST Needed in busy Ave Maria Of ce. Pay commensurate with experience. Applications can be picked up at 5072 Annunciation Cir. #314 Ave Maria, FL 34142 Need a few more bucks to purchase something deer? Pick up some extra bucks when you sell your used items in the classifeids. Time to clean out the attic, basement and/or garage? Advertise your yard sale in the classifieds and make your clean up a breeze! How do you find a job in todays competitive market? In the employment section of the classifieds Love the earth Recycle your used items by selling them in the classifieds. Buying a car? Look in the classifieds. Selling a car? Look in the classifieds. Business Opportunities NOTICEIndependent Newspapers will never accept any advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises of guaranteed income from work-athome programs if it sounds too good to be true, chances are that it is. If you have questions or doubts about any ad on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the Better Business Bureau at 772-878-2010 for previous complaints. Some 800 and 900 telephone numbers may require an extra charge, as well as long distance toll costs. We will do our best to alert our reader of these charges in the ads, but occasionally we may not be aware of the charges. Therefore, if you call a number out of your area, use caution. Collectibles I buy pre-1920 Florida origin handwritten material letters, documents, business records, etc. Will make offers. Joe Rubin ne, P. O. Box 1000, Cocoa, FL 32923. (321)455-1666 Joerubin ne@ mindspring.com Looking for a place to hang your hat? Look no further than the classifieds. Shop here first! The classified ads ApartmentsNOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Apts Willowbrook Place, Garden Lake, Summer Glen, Heritage Villas & Southern Villas. Please call 239-657-3204 For more information. Handicapped Accessible. Hearing Impaired: Call TDD711Equal Housing Opportunity This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer Condos/Townhouses Rent TRAFFORD PINE ESTATES INC. 3 BR & 2 BR CBS Construction All include Stove, Refrig., Air, Ceiling Fans, Util. Rm. w/W&D Hookup, Sound Barrier Between Apt./Twnhs. Free Trash Pickup, Free Lawn Service. Pets Allowed w/ Deposit. Walk to Store. NEW Management Privately Owned Call (239)777-2788 How fast can your car go? It can go even faster when you sell it in the classifieds. When doing those chores is doing you in, its time to look for a helper in the classifieds. Find it faster. Sell it sooner in the classifieds Houses RentFarm Worker Village invites you to come home. Available now 1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom rental homes, starting as low as $425 per month. You may qualify for Rental assistance. Please Call us at: 239-657-3649 or stop by at 1800 Farm Worker Way. Mobile Home LotsMobile home lot in Immokalee. No impact fees due. Very easy nancing. Just pick out your mobile home. Call Kenny at 863-673-4325 or 863-675-8888 Mobile HomeSaleLand & Home packages. 3 and 4 bedroom new mobile homes. All marked down for summer sale. 1 lot in Immokalee, many 1/2 acre lots available between LaBelle and Immokalee. Very short drive. Average credit accepted. Call Kenny 863-673-4325 or 863-675-8888 Located on Lake front 1/2 acre lot. 3br, 2bath mobile home. Easy nancing with your average credit. Call Kenny at 863-673-4325 or 863-675-8888 Grab a bargain from your neighbors garage, attic, basement or closet in todays classifieds. Earn some extra cash. Sell your used items in the classifieds The classifieds are the most successful salesperson in town. Campers/RVsWanted all Travel Trailers, Motor Homes and Fifth Wheels. Any Condition, Cash paid on the spot. Call 941-347-7171 Business & Service Directory AUCTION1991 Toyota JT2EL43B1M0040975 Time for a new car? Check out this auction onJuly 15, 2013 at 9amKeiths Towing925 E. Delaware Ave. € Immokalee, FL (239) 657-5741 ROOFING Metal Roofs Re-Roofs Roof Repairs Seamless Gutters Soffit & Fascia Free Estimates Lic# CCC037019 981 Cowboy Circle Office (863)675-7045 Fax (863)612-1158 Lic#CCC1325950 Of“ce: (863) 675-704 5 1050 Commerce Dr. Suite B. Fax (863) 612-1158 6 Immokalee Bulletin July 4, 2013 Reading a newspaper helps you understand the world around you. No wonder newspaper readers are more successful people! Need a few more bucks to purchase something deer? Pick up some extra bucks when you sell your used items in the classifeids. Earn some extra cash. Sell your used items in the classifieds The classifieds are the most successful salesperson in town. Earn some extra cash. Sell your used items in the classifieds The classifieds are the most successful salesperson in town. Time to clean out the attic, basement and/or garage? Advertise your yard sale in the classifieds and make your clean up a breeze!

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Parks and Rec launches web siteCollier County Parks and Recreation recently launched its mobile web site. Access www.collierparks.com on your smart phone or tablet to view the mobile device-friendly site. Add the Collier County Parks and Recreation icon to your home screen to access quickly the information you need to enjoy all the recreational amenities offered by Collier County Parks and Recreation. For more information, contact Parks and Recreation Administration at (239) 2524000.Childcare available at Step Up ImmokaleeA Step Up Immokalee, operated by Collier Child Care Resources, Inc., provides childcare for teen parents, school district teachers and staff, county workers. They care for infants to four years of age Monday through Friday 6:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. with extended hours till 3 p.m. There is a warm and inviting atmosphere with nurturing childcare providers, free childcare tuition to members of the Teenage parenting Progrm. Located at 701 Immokalee Drive. Phone 239-377-1172; cell 239-980-9021 or go to www.collierchildcare.org.Get your athletic physicalThe Immokalee Seminole League will be offering league participants sports physicals on Friday, June 28, at the Immokalee Chamber of Commerce of ce located at 1390 North 15th Street Suite 200 from 5-8 p.m. Physical fee is $20. For more information call 239-867-1859.iGenerationComing this fall a new charter school (grades 6-12). Limited space enrolling now! iGeneration Empowerment Academy, 1411 Lake Trafford Road. Call 239-304-1221 Irma Miller, Campus Director.Learn to land government contractsThe US Small Business Administration is holding a brown bag workshop to help small businesses in the area learn how to land government contracts. This is your opportunity to learn how to win some of these government dollars. Friday, July 19, noon till 1:30 p.m. at the Southwest Florida Works Building (One Stop), 750 S. Fifth Street, Immokalee.South Park closed for constructionImmokalee South Park, located at 418 School Drive, is closed. A new community park building will be under construction throughout this summer and fall. Construction is expected to be complete by January 2014. The new building will house programs such as voluntary pre-kindergarten, after school programs, summer camp, senior programs, arts and crafts, and special events. The building will have classrooms and a community room for residents to enjoy. For more information, contact Annie Alvarez at (239) 867-4121 ext 206, or (239) 252-4449. Conference at Ave MariaAll high school age youth from rising freshman to graduating seniors are invited to the 6th Annual Ave Maria University Youth Conference "BELIEVE" July 12-14, 2013. Join youth from all over the country for this dynamic, fun and faith lled weekend! The cost is only $150 and includes conference fee, lodging and meals, PLUS a t-shirt! Speakers include; Catholic Answers, Matt Fradd, Founder of All4Him Ministries, Mary Bielski, FOCUS and nationally known abstinence speaker and author, Pam Stenzel. The weekend will be hosted by Mike "Gomer" Gormely with music provided by Martin Doman and the Band. Register today by visiting www.avemariayouthconference.com, email conferences@avemaria.edu or call (239) 348-4725 for more information.Breastfeeding mothers group to meetLearn about the many bene ts of breastfeeding, get advice and tips, speak with breast-feeding peer counselors Myda and Noemi, meet and share experiences with other breastfeeding mothers. Pregnant women welcome. Come to the Collier County Department of Health Room 133 every Tuesday from 1011:30 a.m. For additional information call 239-252-7347 or 239-252-7312.Commissioner Nance of ce openCollier Commissioner Tim Nance opened his new of ce in the Immokalee Government Center, 106 South First Street. Regular of ce hours for Nance at the government center will be established soon. Community Briefs 7 Immokalee Bulletin July 4, 2013 Edison State College ranked in the Top 100 across several categories for Community College Week's annual Top 100 Associate Degree and Certi cate Producers. The results cover the 2011-2012 academic year. "It's always nice to be included in a national ranking by a well-regarded publication like Community College Week, but we are more focused on the quality of the education our students receive," said Dr. Jeff Allbritten, president, Edison State College. "We attribute our success rst and foremost to our students. They work hard to achieve their academic goals. Just as important is the dedication of our faculty, who guide them along the way." In all the categories, Edison State moved up in the rankings, with the exception of the 72nd ranking for Associate Degrees, All Disciplines, Total Minority. New this year is Edison State's 26th ranking nationally for its nursing program. The annual report divides its results into two-year and four-year institutions. Edison State College's rankings are included with four-year institutions as follows: 26th for Associate Degrees, Nursing, Registered, Administration, Research & Clinical 45th for Associate Degrees, All Disciplines 38th for Associate Degrees, All Disciplines, Total Non-Minority 72nd for Associate Degrees, All Disciplines, Total Minority 93rd for Associate Degrees, All Disciplines, African-Americans 46th for Associate Degrees, All Disciplines, Hispanics Celebrating over 50 years of excellence, Edison State College is Southwest Florida's largest, most accessible and affordable institution of higher education. Proud to be tobacco-free, Edison State serves more than 24,000 students across ve counties and through Edison Online. For more information please visit www.edison.edu. Edison State College moves up in national ranking

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8 Immokalee Bulletin July 4, 2013 Submitted photoAppreciation for a friendRepresentative Hudson met with PACE girls from Immokalee and PACE Board Member Andrew Reiss in Naples where he accepted an award. The award represents PACE’s appreciation of Rep. Hudson’s kind and generous gift of his time as he provided a tour of the Capitol in Tallahassee last year for PACE Legislation Day. PACE Executive Director Marianne Kearn said Rep. Hudson is a great advocate for their program and that, during the Tallahassee tour, he went out of his way to acquaint the girls with the work of the Legislature and also with Florida history. On presentation day in Naples, the girls had lunch with Collier County Commissioner Donna Fiala and met several other commissioners who stopped in, and even got a tour of the county of ces. Ms. Kearn added that PACE has about 50 girls in summer classes. She said PACE provides a summer program for students because it is important for them to “keep on track.” She said they have several eld trips in line including tours of the Naples Zoo, the Museum of Art, the Holocaust Museum and even a trip to Orlando. Pictured from left: Tiffany P., Elizabeth M., Development Director Cheryl McDonell, Brianda B., Jane Miller social studies teacher Alyssa A., Rep. Hudson, Board member Andrew Reiss and Adriana M. Submitted photo/ Gayle NanceRotary installs of cersThe Rotary Club of Immokalee held the Installation of Of cers Ceremony on June 12, 2013 at Ave Maria University in the Executive Dining Room. The new Rotary International Theme for the 2013-2014 year is Engage Rotary Change Lives. The banner was of cially changed during the Installation of Of cers Ceremony. President Roy Terry is holding the new banner in the picture. Join us for the weekly meeting at i-Tech, 508 North 9th Street, Immokalee Every Wednesday at 12:15 p.m. For more information about the Rotary Club of Immokalee please visit our website at: www.immokaleerotary.org/. Pictured from left: 2013-2014 Rotary Club of Immokalee Of cers Edward “Ski” Olesky Sergeant at Arms, Richard Rice Past President, Roy Terry President, Richard Hailer Secretary.