<%BANNER%>
Immokalee bulletin
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100151/00128
 Material Information
Title: Immokalee bulletin
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Independent Newspapers of Florida
Place of Publication: LaBelle, FL
Publication Date: 08-09-2012
Frequency: weekly (published on thursday)
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- La Belle (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hendry County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Immokalee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Collier County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Hendry -- La Belle
United States of America -- Florida -- Collier -- Immokalee
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 16, no. 15 (Apr. 17, 1997).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 36864856
lccn - sn 97027777
System ID: UF00100151:00128

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Thursday, August 9, 2012 V ol. 45 No. 30 See Page 2 for information about how to contact the newspaper.newszap.comFree SpeechFree Ads School News ...Pages 6 7 & 8 Collier County District Bus Routes ...Pages 4 and 5 Letters to the Editor ...Page 3 Inside... Ticks! A n outdoor hazard ...Page 11 Special to the Immokalee Bulletin/ TIFCharity Classic winnersOverall and winning men’s team in the Annual Immokalee Foundation Charity Challenge Classic includes Jeff Williams, John Reiss, Pro Rob Anderson, John Costigan, W.R. and Skip Hildebrand. The annual event raised $150,000 to bene t Immokalee children. See more on this story on Page 5 District 6960’s District Governor, Steve Schlueter, along with his wife, Pam, and Area 6 Assistant Governor, Don Adams, paid our club a visit on July 25. This was the District Governor’s Of cial Club Visit. DG Steve Schlueter gave our club a brief presentation on the District’s goals for this Rotary Year, as well as the of cial message from President Sakuji Tanaka. He explained that there will be no Governor’s project this year. He encouraged our club to participate in one or more of the District’s sponsored projects. DG Schlueter’s presentation included an overview of a water and sanitation project in St. Lucia. There are about 150 people in the village, and the houses are very close together Rotary Club hosts District Governor visit Immokalee Bulletin/ Patty BrantTurbo Services, Inc., owner Tom Stout points out details on the computer screen to Commissioner Jim Coletta as testing commences. By Patty BrantImmokalee Bulletin Power is the basis for so many of the things that make modern life possible. And power the newest tenant at Immokalee Regional Airport. More precisely, Turbo Services, Inc. an industrial gas turbine company headquartered in Margate that builds the engines that make the power to supply modern life is the newest tenant at the airport. The company just opened its new turbo jet test facility at Airport Park. The Immokalee testing facility is only 1,500 square feet, but it has a big job. In a modest building consisting only of a control room and a testing area, Turbo Services rebuilds Pratt and Whitney GG-4 Turbine Engines in its Margate-area facility and is now testing these rebuilt Turbo Services tests rst engine in ImmokaleeSee TURBO — Page 2 Courtesy photo/ RotaryDistrict Gov. Steve Schlueter paid a visit to the local Immokalee Rotary July meeting. See ROTARY — Page 2

PAGE 2

2 Immokalee Bulletin August 9, 2012 To Reach UsMailing Address: P.O. Box 518 LaBelle, FL 33975 Physical Address: 22 Ft. Thompson Ave. Website: www.newszap.com/immokaleeTo Submit NewsThe Immokalee Bulletin welcomes submissions from its readers. Opinions, calendar items, story ideas and photographs are welcome. Call (239) 657-6000 to reach our newsroom. The deadline for all news items is 11 a.m. on Monday prior to the following Thursdays publication. E-Mail: ibnews@newszap.comTo Place a Display AdPhone: (239) 657-6000 day for the following Thursdays publication E-mail: cbadsales@newszap.comBilling DepartmentE-mail: billteam@newszap.comTo Place a Classi“ed AdCall 1 -877 353-2424 to place it from home or go to www.newszap.comFor SubscriptionsPhone: 1-800-282-8586 Visit circulation.newszap.com or email readerservices@newszap.com.StaffNews Editor: Patty Brant Community News Editor: Dee Hamilton Advertising Services: Dale Conyers Advertising Services: Barbara Calfee Executive Editor: Katrina Elsken Publisher: Tom ByrdOur PurposeƒThe Caloosa Belle is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida. Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspaper to pursue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community. Since no dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on pro“t margins below industrystandards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in Independents mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the communitys deliberation of public issues.We Pledgeƒ To operate this newspaper as a public trust and work, through our dedication to conscientious journalism. their own intelligent decisions about public issues. purposeful neutrality, fairness, objectivity, fearlessness and compassion. debate, not to dominate it with our own opinions. the prominence it deserves. compassion. engines in Immokalee. Workers red up its rst test engine at the Immokalee facility on August 1. With enough electronic gadgetry to rival a jet cockpit, the control room was packed with people to witness that rst test. Owner Tom Stout deferred to Collier County District 5 Commissioner Jim Coletta to push the button that cranked up the huge engine. A bullet proof window allows the controller a view of the engine as the monitoring process goes on and cameras are used to verify everything that happens. Anyone on site, even inside the control room, dons protective hearing gear while the engine roars. The engine being tested that day is capable of providing power for 7,000 homes and uses 2,500 gallons of fuel. These goliaths put out an average of 17,000 pounds of thrust and 30 megawatts of power. The computers in the control room log information of the actual test for the client to analyze to make sure it operates within the required parameters of their speci cations. The company has 20 employees in total; four or ve may be at the Immokalee facility as needed. They build and test some 24 turbo engines per year. These huge engines are used by facilities like power companies throughout the world. TURBOContinued From Page 1 w ith no roads. The existing water source for the whole village is a 1" standpipe, which only provides water two days a week. The homes the people live in are roughly 4'x8' and are located on former banana plantations. Each home is owned by a member of the same family. By law, they cannot sell the land unless they have consensus between all of the family members, which limits their ability to raise money for the necessary improvements. Steve Schlueter said that St. Lucia has three Rotary Clubs that our District can partner with. DG Schlueter's presentation also highlighted reading programs and a water safety program geared towards presentations at local schools. He also presented the Theme for this year's District Conference Having Fun Helping Others. This year's conference will focus on the activities and fellowship events that each club has held throughout the year. DG Steve Schlueter encouraged our club to take photos at each of our events and send copies to him so they can be made part of the presentation for the District Conference. ROTARYContinued From Page 1 Immokalee Bulletin/ Patty BrantThis immense engine was the subject of the rst ever turbo engine test at Turbo Services, Inc., located on Immokalee Airport. An Immokalee woman was seriously injured in a one-car crash July 28 on CR 850 just south of Whidden Loop Road. The mishap occurred at about 5:50 a.m. According to the Florida Highway Patrol report, 34-year-old Myrka Charles was southbound on CR 850 and struck an alligator on the roadway, losing control of the vehicle. Her 2006 Chevy Cobalt traveled onto the east shoulder and through a wire fence, continued east and struck a tree. It came to a nal rest on the east shoulder facing east against a tree. The driver was airlifted to Lee Memorial Hospital with serious injuries. Ms. Charles was wearing a seat belt at the time of the incident, which was not alcohol related, the report said. Alligator causes crash Immokalee woman injured Collier County Planning Commission will meet Thursday, Aug. 16, at 9 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners chambers, third oor, Collier County Government Center, 3299 Tamiami Trail East, Naples. Collier County Government Domestic Animal Services Sub-Committee for Ordinance Revisions will hold a public meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 14 at 10 a.m. at the Domestic Animal Services meeting room located at 7610 Davis Blvd., Naples. Collier County Government Productivity Committee's Purchase-to-Pay Project Purchasing Polices Review Subcommittee will hold a public meeting on Wednesday, Aug. 15 at 2 p.m. in the County Manager's Of ce conference room, second oor, Collier County Government Center, 3299 Tamiami Trail East, Naples. Collier County Planning Commission will meet Thursday, Aug. 16 at 9 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners chambers, third oor, Collier County Government Center, 3299 Tamiami Trail East, Naples. Immokalee Lighting and Beauti cation MSTU will hold a public meeting on Wednesday, Aug. 22 at 10 a.m. at the Immokalee Community Redevelopment Agency of ce located at 1320 North 15th Street, Immokalee. Public Meetings Kids Soccer registration to openInner City Soccer registration starts August 18,. Open registration will be Aug 25 in the Basketball Gym from 10 a.m.1 p.m. Practice starts Aug 28, Tuesday and Thursdays for 8 weeks. Ages 4-12 years old 6-7 p.m.; $30 per kid. We need parent volunteer coaches and are accepting sponsorships. For more information, come to Immokalee Sports Complex, 505 Escambia Street, call 239-657-1951 or go to www.collierparks.com.

PAGE 3

3 Immokalee Bulletin A ugust 9, 2012 Master Plan fair to allIn the State of Florida communities are required to plan ahead for future growth. W here would be the best places to put new homes? Where should we put new schools, new parks, new shopping centers, new industry? Where are the special places that are best left in their natural state? For the past ten years the people of Immokalee have been making these choices in meetings, for something called the Immokalee Master Plan. Now, after everyone had agreed, a small group of property owners wants us to start all over again, to change some of the rules, in some cases, to their own advantage. I personally have voted to keep the Immokalee Master Plan is it is. I think it is fair to everybody and can be a basis for our town’s future growth. I have also voted to re-elect Jim Coletta. He has shown over the years that he is a friend of our town.Paul MidneyBeware America!The recent shooting, killing and injuring of scores of people at a movie theater in A urora, Colorado has gripped the hearts of every American and has caused a lingering sadness in our hearts-such a horrid situation for individuals and families to deal with for y ears to come. Outpourings of thoughtful expressions of comfort and grief have come from every sector of our wonderful country at the senseless murder of so many innocent lives. And yet, earlier this summer I was stricken with a similar sickening feeling of sadness, grief and anger over recent revelations that many equally innocent lives are being snuffed out because some individuals prefer to give birth to a child of a different sex. It is a slippery slope of moral decay that our country is going down when an organization can condone the killing of a life within the womb because of parental preference, also called conveniently “choice,” and then to make matters worse, many government of cials are unwilling to call this what it is, infanticide. Experts tell us that the heart of an unborn child begins beating somewhere between three to ve weeks, and yet some still insist that it is not a person. It wasn’t that long ago that our country cried out in opposition to the senseless killing of millions of pre-born babies in China when the preferred sex of the child was unwanted. My warning to our beloved country is not a false alarm, but a real one based on history. This summer I just nished a long, but powerful autobiography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxas, the keynote speaker at this year’s Presidential Prayer Breakfast, attended by President Obama and many of our national legislators. Bonhoeffer took a valiant stand against the horrors of the Holocaust that cost him his life, as he opposed the senseless slaughter of at least six million lives…because of the “choice” of Adolf Hitler and his complicit supporters, many of whom knew it was wrong, but followed orders regardless. In America we have witnessed the wholesale slaughter of over 55 million precious human beings. In his last book he wrote, “Ethics”, Bonhoeffer said, “Destruction of the embryo in the mother’s womb is a violation of the right to live which God has bestowed upon this nascent life.” The slippery slope may very well lead our country to determining that certain individuals, because of abnormalities or old age may also be expendable “for the common good.” All true, Americans must evaluate the direction our government is going before it is too late. Without going into details, my mother who passed away a few years ago, was conceived out of wedlock, born and adopted in the early 1900’s, but very likely would have been killed had Roe versus Wade been in effect in her time of being in the womb. I’ve often thought, where would I be, my six brothers and sisters, our many children and even more grandchildren if, for convenience, choice or whatever word is used, my mother had been aborted. Am I ashamed of my past? Absolutely not! I am proud that individuals made the choice to allow me and the generations of productive Americans who have been born from Audrey to live and impact our society for good. I would only plead that we look very seriously at where our country is headed. All human life must be valued. History need not repeat itself, unless we allow it to do so. Richard L. Heers Immokalee Letters to the Editor Church to host youth eventBe a “B.A.B.E!” (Beautiful, Accepted, Blessed, Eternally Signi cant!) event. This event set for Aug. 25 from 9 a.m. until 8 p.m., is for middle and high school girls. Join Andrea Stephens and special guest Chandr a Simmons. Middle school girls will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and high school girls from 4 to 8 p.m. Pizza will be served and ever y girl that attends will receive a free book. First United Methodist Church of Immokalee, 303 N 9th Street, Immokalee. For more information, please email the Church at fumc_ imm@yahoo.com, or call the Church of ce at 239-657-2841.Insurance basicsInsurance basics for small business owners will be presented by Jay Roth, branch manager of Lutgert Insurance. Learn what you need to know about insuring a small business including general insurance terms, types of property and liability insurance, insuring your one-person or at-home business and dissability insurance information. IMMBIZ will hold the the event Saturday, Aug. 11 from 10 a.m.-noon, at 1320 N. 15th Street. News in Brief

PAGE 4

EVERGLADES CITY SCHOOL BUS #680 6:29 A.M. SWAN WY & PEACOCK LN 6:33 A.M. NEWPORT DR & MORNING STAR CAY 6:39 A.M. WINDWARD CAY & CAY DR 7:03 A.M. 18101 CYPRESS TOWER RD OCHOPE 7:12 A.M. TAMIAMI TRL S & TURNER RIVER RD 7:27 A.M. TAMIAMI TRL E & BIRDON RD 7:28 A.M. SATINWOOD DR NAPLES & TAMIAMI TRL E NAPLES 7:31 A.M. 32335 TAMIAMI TRL E* 7:40 A.M. SCHOOL: EVERGLADES CITY SCHOOL BUS #681 6:57 A.M. WAGON WHEEL RD & BIRDON RD 7:03 A.M. 25500 BIRDON RD @ ENTRANCE TO DRIVEWAY 7:15 A.M. 22777 SR 29* 7:15 A.M. 22855 SR 29* 7:16 A.M. 22929 SR 29* 7:23 A.M. JANES SCENI DR & LAKE GLORIA RD 7:25 A.M. 15959 JANES SCENIC DR 7:27 A.M. CHURCH ST & JANES SCENIC DR 7:28 A.M. JANES SCENIC DR & SEABOARD VILLAGE DR 7:40 A.M. SCHOOL: EVERGLADES CITY SCHOOL BUS #697 7:12 A.M. PLANTATION PKY & PLANTATION DR 7:13 A.M. PLANTATION PKY & EGRET LN 7:28 A.M. MAMIE ST & HAMILTON 7:29 A.M. MAMIE ST & CHOKOLOSKEE DR 7:31 A.M. CHOKOLOSKEE DR & SMALLWOOD DR 7:41 A.M. COPELAND AVE S & PARTNERS CIR 7:45 A.M. SCHOOL: EVERGLADES CITY SCHOOL BUS #680 2:55 P.M. SCHOOL: EVERGLADES CITY SCHOOL 3:01 P.M. SATINWOOD DR NAPLES & TAMIAMI TRL E NAPLES 3:06 P.M. TAMIAMI TRL S & TURNER RIVER RD 3:14 P.M. 18101 CYPRESS TOWER RD OCHOPE 3:26 P.M. TAMIAMI TRL E & BIRDON RD 3:29 P.M. 32335 TAMIAMI TRL E* 3:44 P.M. SWAN WY & PEACOCK LN 3:49 P.M. NEWPORT DR & MORNING STAR CAY 3:56 P.M. WINDWARD CAY & CAY DR BUS #681 2:55 P.M. SCHOOL: EVERGLADES CITY SCHOOL 3:10 P.M. JANES SCENI DR & LAKE GLORIA RD 3:11 P.M. 15959 JANES SCENIC DR 3:13 P.M. CHURCH ST & JANES SCENIC DR 3:14 P.M. JANES SCENIC DR & SEABOARD VILLAGE DR 3:23 P.M. WAGON WHEEL RD & BIRDON RD 3:26 P.M. 25500 BIRDON RD @ ENTRANCE TO DRIVEWAY 3:37 P.M. 22777 SR 29* 3:38 P.M. 22855 SR 29* 3:38 P.M. 22929 SR 29* BUS #697 2:55 P.M. SCHOOL: EVERGLADES CITY SCHOOL 3:07 P.M. MAMIE ST & HAMILTON 3:09 P.M. MAMIE ST & CHOKOLOSKEE DR 3:11 P.M. CHOKOLOSKEE DR & SMALLWOOD DR 3:21 P.M. COPELAND AVE S & PARTNERS CIR 3:25 P.M. PLANTATION PKY & PLANTATION DR 3:26 P.M. PLANTATION PKY & EGRET LN IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #516 5:30 A.M. CR 846 E & DUPREE GRADE 5:43 A.M. 14747 SR 858 6:19 A.M. 10800 OIL WELL RD 6:23 A.M. SINGLETARY CIR & HCCI 6:35 A.M. 3311 SR 29 6:39 A.M. ALEXANDER CIR & EDENFIELD WY 6:41 A.M. ALEXANDER CIR & COYOTE LN 6:50 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #518E 6:33 A.M. CARSON RD & WILTON CT 6:39 A.M. CARSON RD & ASHLEY LN 6:40 A.M. CARSON RD & WESTCLOX ST 6:50 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #538 6:22 A.M. SGT JOE JONES RD & JOHN JIMMIE BLVD 6:26 A.M. IM 5TH ST S & PALMRIDGE DR 6:36 A.M. 1507 SR 29 6:39 A.M. CHADWICK CIR & APPLEMINT LN 6:50 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #624W 6:26 A.M. 4142 SR 29 N 6:28 A.M. 2050 SR 82 6:32 A.M. SR 82 & LAMM RD 6:37 A.M. SR 29 & O QUINN RD 6:40 A.M. EXP STATION RD & STATE ST 6:50 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #714 6:32 A.M. PEPPER RD & LEMON TREE DR 6:34 A.M. BASS RD & TIPPINS TERR 6:36 A.M. BASS RD & TAYLOR TERR 6:38 A.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & MERIHAM DR 6:40 A.M. L AKE TRAFFORD RD & RAULERSON RD 6:50 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #715 6:39 A.M. BELL CIR & FLOWER LN 6:41 A.M. CHADWICK CIR & EGGPLANT LN 6:50 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #716 6:34 A.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & HARVEST DR (JUBALATION) 6:38 A.M. LITTLE LEAGUE RD & AMERICA WY 6:50 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #717 6:43 A.M. CARSON RD & CRESTVIEW APTS 6:50 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #718 6:37 A.M. CARSON LAKES CIR & CUL-DA-SAC 6:38 A.M. CARSON RD & CARSON LAKE CIR 6:50 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #721 6:40 A.M. LIBERTY WAY & JUSTICE CIR 6:50 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #724 6:38 A.M. EDEN AVE & PLUM ST 6:39 A.M. EDEN AVE & PEACH ST 6:39 A.M. EDEN AVE & ORANGE ST 6:50 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #726 6:36 A.M. LIT TLE LEAGUE RD & LITTLE LEAGUE CT 6:37 A.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & CHRISTIAN TER 6:38 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & TRAFFORD FARM RD 6:41 A.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & LINCOLN BLVD 6:50 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH BUS #624W 2:33 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH 2:51 P.M. 4142 SR 29 N 2:52 P.M. 2050 SR 82 2:56 P.M. SR 82 & LAMM RD 3:01 P.M. SR 29 & O QUINN RD 3:05 P.M. EXP STATION RD & STATE ST BUS #724 2:33 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH 2:44 P.M. EDEN AVE & PLUM ST 2:44 P.M. EDEN AVE & PEACH ST 2:44 P.M. EDEN AVE & ORANGE ST BUS #516 2:33 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH 2:44 P.M. CR 846 E & DUPREE GRADE 2:56 P.M. 10800 OIL WELL RD 2:58 P.M. 14747 SR 858 3:01 P.M. SINGLETARY CIR & HCCI 3:12 P.M. 3311 SR 29 3:16 P.M. ALEXANDER CIR & EDENFIELD WY 3:17 P.M. ALEXANDER CIR & COYOTE LN BUS #518E 2:33 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH 2:43 P.M. CARSON RD & WILTON CT 2:49 P.M. CARSON RD & ASHLEY LN 2:50 P.M. CARSON RD & WESTCLOX ST BUS #538 2:33 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH 2:42 P.M. 1507 SR 29 2:45 P.M. CHADWICK CIR & APPLEMINT LN 2:56 P.M. IM 5TH ST S & PALMRIDGE DR 3:02 P.M. SGT JOE JONES RD & JOHN JIMMIE BLVD BUS #714 2:33 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH 2:48 P.M. PEPPER RD & LEMON TREE DR 2:50 P.M. BASS RD & TIPPINS TERR 2:51 P.M. BASS RD & TAYLOR TERR 2:54 P.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & MERIHAM DR 2:55 P .M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & RAULERSON RD BUS #715 2:33 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH 2:43 P.M. CHADWICK CIR & EGGPLANT LN 2:45 P.M. BELL CIR & FLOWER LN BUS #716 2:33 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH 2:43 P.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & HARVEST DR (JUBALATION) 2:46 P.M. LITTLE LEAGUE RD & AMERICA WY BUS #718 2:33 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH 2:46 P.M. CARSON RD & CARSON LAKE CIR 2:47 P.M. CARSON LAKES CIR & CUL-DA-SAC BUS #721 2:33 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH 2:45 P.M. LIBERTY WAY & JUSTICE CIR BUS #726 2:33 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH 2:47 P.M. LIT TLE LEAGUE RD & LITTLE LEAGUE CT 2:48 P.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & CHRISTIAN TER 2:49 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & TRAFFORD FARM RD 2:52 P.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & LINCOLN BLVD BUS #764E 2:33 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE HIGH 2:41 P.M. CARSON RD & CRESTVIEW APTS IMMOKALEE MIDDLE BUS #516 8:17 A.M. SINGLETARY CIR & HCCI 8:20 A.M. OIL WELL RD & PRINGLE LN 8:40 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE BUS #714 8:25 A.M. 3311 SR 29 8:29 A.M. CHADWICK CIR & APPLEMINT LN 8:30 A.M. CHADWICK CIR & EGGPLANT LN 8:40 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE BUS #717 8:16 A.M. EDEN AVE & PLUM ST 8:17 A.M. EDEN AVE & PEACH ST 8:18 A.M. EDEN AVE & IM ORANGE ST 8:25 A.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & CHRISTIAN TER 8:26 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & TRAFFORD FARM RD 8:29 A.M. PEPPER RD & LEMON TREE DR 8:40 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE BUS #718 8:25 A.M. CARSON RD & WILTON CT 8:26 A.M. CARSON RD & WESTCLOX ST 8:29 A.M. CARSON LAKES CIR & CUL-DE-SAC 8:30 A.M. CARSON RD & CARSON LAKE CIR 8:31 A.M. CARSON RD & ASHLEY LN 8:40 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE BUS #719 8:25 A.M. VOE BUS LOOP 8:27 A.M. ALEXANDER CIR & EDENFIELD WY 8:29 A.M. BELL CIR & FLOWER LN 8:30 A.M. BELL CIR & CUCUMBER LN 8:40 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE BUS #721 8:28 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & LIBERTY WAY 8:32 A.M. LIT TLE LEAGUE RD & LITTLE LEAGUE CT 8:33 A.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & LINCOLN BLVD 8:40 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE BUS #724 8:30 A.M. LITTLE LEAGUE RD & AMERICA WY 8:40 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE BUS #773 8:05 A.M. SGT JOE JONES RD & JOHN JIMMIE BLVD 8:09 A.M. IM 5TH ST S & PALMRIDGE DR 8:28 A.M. BASS RD & TAYLOR TERR 8:31 A.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & MERIHAM DR 8:40 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE BUS #777 8:22 A.M. 6061 SR 82 8:25 A.M. SR 82 & LAMM RD 8:27 A.M. SR 82 & EDWARDS GROVE RD 8:32 A.M. EXP STATION RD & STATE ST 8:40 A.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE BUS #516 3:53 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE 4:19 P.M. SINGLETARY CIR & HCCI 4:23 P.M. OIL WELL RD & PRINGLE LN BUS #714 3:53 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE 4:03 P.M. CHADWICK CIR & EGGPLANT LN 4:04 P.M. CHADWICK CIR & APPLEMINT LN 4:08 P.M. 3311 SR 29 BUS #716 3:53 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE 4:01 P.M. EDEN AVE & PLUM ST 4:03 P.M. EDEN AVE & PEACH ST 4:03 P.M. EDEN AVE & IM ORANGE ST 4:08 P.M. CARSON RD & WESTCLOX ST 4:39 P.M. SR 82 & LAMM RD 4:41 P.M. SR 82 & EDWARDS GROVE RD 4:46 P.M. EXP STATION RD & STATE ST BUS #718 3:53 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE 4:00 P.M. CARSON RD & WILTON CT 4:04 P.M. CARSON LAKES CIR & CUL-DE-SAC 4:05 P.M. CARSON RD & CARSON LAKE CIR 4:06 P.M. CARSON RD & ASHLEY LN BUS #719 3:53 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE 4:03 P.M. VOE BUS LOOP 4:05 P.M. ALEXANDER CIR & EDENFIELD WY 4:07 P.M. BELL CIR & FLOWER LN 4:08 P.M. BELL CIR & CUCUMBER LN BUS #721 3:53 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE 4:01 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & LIBERTY WAY 4:04 P.M. LIT TLE LEAGUE RD & LITTLE LEAGUE CT 4:05 P.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & LINCOLN BLVD BUS #724 3:53 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE 4:02 P.M. LITTLE LEAGUE RD & AMERICA WY BUS #773 3:53 P.M. SCHOOL: IMMOKALEE MIDDLE 4:02 P.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & CHRISTIAN TER 4:03 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & TRAFFORD FARM RD 4:06 P.M. PEPPER RD & LEMON TREE DR 4:08 P.M. BASS RD & TAYLOR TERR 4:10 P.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & MERIHAM DR 4:27 P.M. IM 5TH ST S & PALMRIDGE DR 4:33 P.M. SGT JOE JONES RD & JOHN JIMMIE BLVD EDEN PARK ELEMENTARY BUS #777 6:51 A.M. 4142 SR 29 N 7:05 A.M. SR 82 & CHURCH RD 7:09 A.M. 4646 CORKSCREW RD 7:23 A.M. 6061 SR 82 7:29 A.M. SR 82 & LAMM RD 7:34 A.M. SR 29 & O QUINN RD 7:36 A.M. EXP STATION RD & STATE ST 7:50 A.M. SCHOOL: EDEN PARK ELEMENTARY BUS #717 7:23 A.M. 602 W MAIN ST (FRIENDSHIP HOUSE) 7:35 A.M. 19TH ST N & LEED AVE 7:50 A.M. SCHOOL: EDEN PARK ELEMENTARY BUS #717 3:20 P.M. SCHOOL: EDEN PARK ELEMENTARY 3:27 P.M. 19TH ST N & LEED AVE 3:45 P.M. 321 N 1ST ST IMMOKALEE COMMUNITY PARK 3:49 P.M. 602 W MAIN ST (FRIENDSHIP HOUSE) BUS #777 3:20 P.M. SCHOOL: EDEN PARK ELEMENTARY 3:35 P.M. 4142 SR 29 N 3:48 P.M. SR 82 & CHURCH RD 3:51 P.M. 4646 CORKSCREW RD 4:22 P.M. 6061 SR 82 4:24 P.M. SR 82 & LAMM RD 4:29 P.M. SR 29 & O QUINN RD 4:31 P.M. EXP STATION RD & STATE ST VILLAGE OAKS ELEMENTARY BUS #550 7:12 A.M. 16263 OIL WELL RD 7:19 A.M. ST RT 846 & THORP RD 7:52 A.M. SINGLETARY CIR & HCCI 7:58 A.M. OIL WELL RD & PRINGLE LN 8:06 A.M. 3311 SR 29 8:10 A.M. SCHOOL: VILLAGE OAKS ELEMENTARY BUS #718 8:02 A.M. N 11TH ST & ANHINGA CIR 8:04 A.M. W MAIN ST & S 4TH ST 8:10 A.M. SCHOOL: VILLAGE OAKS ELEMENTARY BUS #719 8:03 A.M. HORIZON VILLAGE 8:03 A.M. SCHOOL DR & PRICE AVE 8:03 A.M. IM SCHOOL DR & DELAWARE AVE E 8:10 A.M. SCHOOL: VILLAGE OAKS ELEMENTARY BUS #721 7:58 A.M. ROBERTS AVE & N 5TH ST 7:58 A.M. ROBERTS AVE & N 2ND ST 8:01 A.M. 119 N 9TH ST 8:02 A.M. 2ND AVE & N 7TH ST 8:10 A.M. SCHOOL: VILLAGE OAKS ELEMENTARY BUS #773 7:39 A.M. 602 W MAIN ST W(FRIENDSHIP HOUSE) 7:46 A.M. SGT JOE JONES RD & JOHN JIMMIE BLVD 7:47 A.M. STOCKADE RD & MARY W BILLIE DR 7:51 A.M. DELAWARE AVE E & FAHRNEY ST 7:52 A.M. 222 S 1ST ST 7:55 A.M. ADAMS AVE & BROWARD ST 7:59 A.M. 418 NEW MARKET RD E 8:01 A.M. ALACHUA ST & JEFFERSON AVE E 8:02 A.M. 511 NEWMARKET RD E 8:07 A.M. SR 29 & WILLIAMS LN 8:10 A.M. SCHOOL: VILLAGE OAKS ELEMENTARY BUS #550 3:08 P.M. SCHOOL: VILLAGE OAKS ELEMENTARY 3:13 P.M. 3311 SR 29 3:34 P.M. OIL WELL RD & PRINGLE LN 4:03 P.M. SINGLETARY CIR & HCCI 4:07 P.M. 16263 OIL WELL RD 4:14 P.M. ST RT 846 & THORP RD BUS #718 3:08 P.M. SCHOOL: VILLAGE OAKS ELEMENTARY 3:17 P.M. N 11TH ST & ANHINGA CIR 3:21 P.M. W MAIN ST & S 4TH ST BUS #719 3:08 P.M. SCHOOL: VILLAGE OAKS ELEMENTARY 3:15 P.M. 402 W MAIN ST (RCMA) 3:19 P.M. IM SCHOOL DR & DELAWARE AVE E 3:20 P.M. SCHOOL DR & PRICE AVE 3:21 P.M. HORIZON VILLAGE BUS #721 3:08 P.M. SCHOOL: VILLAGE OAKS ELEMENTARY 3:18 P.M. ROBERTS AVE & N 5TH ST 3:19 P.M. ROBERTS AVE & N 2ND ST 3:22 P.M. 119 N 9TH ST 3:23 P.M. 2ND AVE & N 7TH ST BUS #773 3:08 P.M. SCHOOL: VILLAGE OAKS ELEMENTARY 3:14 P.M. SR 29 & WILLIAMS LN 3:18 P.M. 418 NEW MARKET RD E 3:19 P.M. ALACHUA ST & JEFFERSON AVE E 3:20 P.M. ADAMS AVE & BROWARD ST 3:24 P.M. 511 NEWMARKET RD E 3:28 P.M. DELAWARE AVE E & FAHRNEY ST 3:33 P.M. SGT JOE JONES RD & JOHN JIMMIE BLVD 3:35 P.M. STOCKADE RD & MARY W BILLIE DR 3:38 P.M. 222 S 1ST ST 3:41 P.M. 602 W MAIN ST W(FRIENDSHIP HOUSE) HIGHLANDS ELEMENTARY BUS #714 8:06 A.M. PALM AVE & PINE ST 8:08 A.M. N 19TH ST & ASH LN 8:10 A.M. SCHOOL: HIGHLANDS ELEMENTARY 3:03 P.M. CARSON RD & WILTON CT COLLIER COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS BUS SCHEDULE 2012 -2013The 2012 … 2013 School Session begins Monday, August 20th, 2012. The bell times are provided below. Students should arrive at their assigned bus stop at least 5 minutes prior to scheduled pickup time. Most students will be home within one hour after school dismissal time. Pleas e check the Collier County Public Schools web site (www.collierschools.com) for scheduled changes as they occur.IMMOKALEE SCHOOLS NEW START/END TIMES Immokalee High School 7:05 AM … 2:23 PM Immokalee Middle School 8:58 AM … 3:43 PM Immokalee Alternative Schools 7:30 AM … 1:30 PM Pace 8:00 AM … 2:20 PM Pinecrest, Village Oaks & Highlands Elementary 8:33 AM … 2:58 PM Lake Trafford Elementary 8:00 AM … 3:30 PM Eden Park Elementary 8:15 AM … 3:10 PM EVERGLADES 8:05 AM … 2:50 PM Note: Bus riders are limited to only those students living more than 2 miles from school 4 Immokalee Bulletin August 9, 2012

PAGE 5

BUS #715 8:04 A.M. 7TH AVE & 16TH ST N 8:06 A.M. 18TH ST N & 8TH AVE 8:10 A.M. SCHOOL: HIGHLANDS ELEMENTARY BUS #724 7:50 A.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & RINGO LN 7:52 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & TITUS LN 7:56 A.M. MADISON AVE W & NASSAU ST 7:59 A.M. KISSIMMEE ST & MADISON AVE 8:00 A.M. JACKSON ST & MADISON AVE 8:02 A.M. 505 MADISON AVE W 8:04 A.M. 314 MADISON AVE W 8:10 A.M. SCHOOL: HIGHLANDS ELEMENTARY BUS #714 3:08 P.M. SCHOOL: HIGHLANDS ELEMENTARY 3:11 P.M. PALM AVE & PINE ST 3:12 P.M. N 19TH ST & ASH LN BUS #715 3:08 P.M. SCHOOL: HIGHLANDS ELEMENTARY 3:11 P.M. 18TH ST N & 8TH AVE 3:14 P.M. 7TH AVE & 16TH ST N 3:16 P.M. N 17TH ST & 5TH AVE 3:21 P.M. 321 N 1ST ST IMMOKALEE COMMUNITY PARK BUS #724 3:08 P.M. SCHOOL: HIGHLANDS ELEMENTARY 3:12 P.M. 314 MADISON AVE W 3:12 P.M. 505 MADISON AVE W 3:13 P.M. JACKSON ST & MADISON AVE 3:14 P.M. KISSIMMEE ST & MADISON AVE 3:15 P.M. MADISON AVE W & NASSAU ST 3:19 P.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & RINGO LN 3:19 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & TITUS LN PINECREST ELEMENTARY BUS #518E 7:51 A.M. N 18TH ST & 6TH AVE 7:55 A.M. 550 N 19TH ST 8:00 A.M. N 15TH ST & INDIAN CAMP RD 8:02 A.M. W MAIN ST & WHITE WAY 8:10 A.M. SCHOOL: PINECREST ELEMENTARY BUS #613E 8:00 A.M. IMMOKALEE DR & DILSA LN 8:03 A.M. IMMOKALEE DR & MARIANNA WAY 8:06 A.M. 15TH ST N & CHANEYS MHP 8:10 A.M. SCHOOL: PINECREST ELEMENTARY BUS #716 7:55 A.M. ROBERTS AVE & 18TH ST N 7:57 A.M. 18TH ST N & SEACREST AVE 8:00 A.M. IMMOKALEE DR & WELLS ST 8:03 A.M. IMMOKALEE DR & MCCBLACK ST 8:10 A.M. SCHOOL: PINECREST ELEMENTARY BUS #726 8:00 A.M. IMMOKALEE DR & 19TH ST N 8:10 A.M. SCHOOL: PINECREST ELEMENTARY BUS #726 3:08 P.M. SCHOOL: PINECREST ELEMENTARY 3:15 P.M. IMMOKALEE DR & 19TH ST N BUS #518E 3:08 P.M. SCHOOL: PINECREST ELEMENTARY 3:20 P.M. N 18TH ST & 6TH AVE 3:24 P.M. 550 N 19TH ST 3:30 P.M. N 15TH ST & INDIAN CAMP RD 3:31 P.M. W MAIN ST & WHITE WAY BUS #538 3:08 P.M. SCHOOL: PINECREST ELEMENTARY 3:16 P.M. IMMOKALEE DR & DILSA LN 3:18 P.M. IMMOKALEE DR & MARIANNA WAY 3:21 P.M. 15TH ST N & CHANEYS MHP BUS #716 3:08 P.M. SCHOOL: PINECREST ELEMENTARY 3:13 P.M. ROBERTS AVE & 18TH ST N 3:14 P.M. 18TH ST N & SEACREST AVE 3:18 P.M. IMMOKALEE DR & WELLS ST 3:20 P.M. IMMOKALEE DR & MCCBLACK ST ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS PACE BUS #615 6:28 A.M. CHADWICK CIR & EGGPLANT LN 6:31 A.M. BELL CIR & CUCUMBER LN 6:49 A.M. N 19TH ST & HICKOCK LN 6:52 A.M. CARSON RD & REFLECTIONS AVE 6:53 A.M. CARSON RD & WILTON CT 6:55 A.M. EDEN AVE & PEACH ST 6:56 A.M. EDEN AVE & ORANGE ST 7:03 A.M. CARSON RD & CARSON LAKE CIR 7:06 A.M. CARSON RD & MAX DR 7:10 A.M. LITTLE LEAGUE RD & AMERICA WY 7:15 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & TIPPINS TERRACE 7:20 A.M. CARSON RD & CRESTVIEW APTS 7:22 A.M. EL PASO TRL & EL PASO TRL 7:25 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & SUMMER GLEN BLVD 7:27 A.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & RINGO LN 7:30 A.M. IMMOKALEE DR & 19TH ST N 7:40 A.M. SCHOOL: PACE BUS #615 2:30 P.M. SCHOOL: PACE 2:39 P.M. BELL CIR & CUCUMBER LN 2:41 P.M. CHADWICK CIR & EGGPLANT LN 2:58 P.M. N 19TH ST & HICKOCK LN 3:02 P.M. CARSON RD & REFLECTIONS AVE 3:04 P.M. EDEN AVE & PEACH ST 3:05 P.M. EDEN AVE & ORANGE ST 3:12 P.M. CARSON RD & CARSON LAKE CIR 3:15 P.M. CARSON RD & MAX DR 3:17 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD ELEM (PM ONLY) 3:19 P.M. LITTLE LEAGUE RD & AMERICA WY 3:25 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & TIPPINS TERRACE 3:32 P.M. CARSON RD & CRESTVIEW APTS 3:37 P.M. EL PASO TRL & EL PASO TRL 3:41 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & SUMMER GLEN BLVD 3:42 P.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & RINGO LN 3:48 P.M. IMMOKALEE DR & 19TH ST N NEW BEGINNINGS, PHOENIX & BEACON BUS #533 6:16 A.M. 18TH ST N & 8TH AVE 6:18 A.M. N 19TH ST & HICKOCK LN 6:23 A.M. CARSON RD & WILTON CT 6:24 A.M. EDEN AVE & PLUM ST 6:25 A.M. EDEN AVE & PEAR ST 6:25 A.M. EDEN AVE & PEACH ST 6:27 A.M. EDEN AVE & IM ORANGE ST 6:33 A.M. CARSON RD & CARSON LAKE CIR 6:36 A.M. CARSON RD & WESTCLOX ST 6:39 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & LIBERTY WAY 6:41 A.M. LITTLE LEAGUE RD & AMERICA WY 6:46 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & TRAFFORD FARM RD 6:49 A.M. PEPPER RD & LEMON TREE DR 6:52 A.M. BASS RD & TAYLOR TERR 6:53 A.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & MERIHAM DR 6:54 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & RAULERSON RD 6:57 A.M. CARSON RD & LINCOLN BLVD 7:00 A.M. IMMOKALEE DR & MCCBLACK ST 7:03 A.M. SCHOOL: BEACON 7:15 A.M. SCHOOL: PHOENIX IMMOKALEE 7:15 A.M. SCHOOL: NEW BEGINNINGS IMMOKALEE BUS #719 5:59 A.M. CR 846 E & DUPREE GRADE 6:30 A.M. FARM WORKER WAY & AGRICULTURE WAY 6:38 A.M. ALACHUA ST & JEFFERSON AVE E 6:40 A.M. MADISON AVE W & DADE ST 6:42 A.M. INDIAN RIVER ST & NEW MARKET RD W 6:44 A.M. MANATEE ST & JEFFERSON AVE W 6:49 A.M. IMMOKALEE DR & 19TH ST N 6:52 A.M. EL PASO TRL & EL PASO TRL 6:54 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & N 29TH ST 6:55 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & PALM DR 6:56 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & GARDEN LAKE CIR 6:56 A.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & WARDEN LN 6:57 A.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & RINGO LN 6:58 A.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & TITUS LN 7:03 A.M. SCHOOL: BEACON 7:15 A.M. SCHOOL: PHOENIX IMMOKALEE 7:15 A.M. SCHOOL: NEW BEGINNINGS IMMOKALEE BUS #533 1:35 P.M. SCHOOL: PHOENIX IMMOKALEE 1:35 P.M. SCHOOL: NEW BEGINNINGS IMMOKALEE 1:47 P.M. SCHOOL: BEACON 1:52 P.M. 18TH ST N & 8TH AVE 1:53 P.M. N 19TH ST & HICKOCK LN 1:58 P.M. CARSON RD & WILTON CT 1:59 P.M. EDEN AVE & PLUM ST 2:00 P.M. EDEN AVE & PEAR ST 2:00 P.M. EDEN AVE & PEACH ST 2:02 P.M. EDEN AVE & IM ORANGE ST 2:08 P.M. CARSON RD & CARSON LAKE CIR 2:11 P.M. CARSON RD & WESTCLOX ST 2:15 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & LIBERTY WAY 2:17 P.M. LITTLE LEAGUE RD & AMERICA WY 2:21 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & TRAFFORD FARM RD 2:24 P.M. PEPPER RD & LEMON TREE DR 2:27 P.M. BASS RD & TAYLOR TERR 2:28 P.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & MERIHAM DR 2:29 P.M. L AKE TRAFFORD RD & RAULERSON RD 2:32 P.M. CARSON RD & LINCOLN BLVD 2:35 P.M. IMMOKALEE DR & MCCBLACK ST BUS #719 1:35 P.M. SCHOOL: PHOENIX IMMOKALEE 1:35 P.M. SCHOOL: NEW BEGINNINGS IMMOKALEE 1:47 P.M. SCHOOL: BEACON 1:52 P.M. IMMOKALEE DR & 19TH ST N 1:54 P.M. EL PASO TRL & EL PASO TRL 1:57 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & N 29TH ST 1:58 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & PALM DR 1:58 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & GARDEN LAKE CIR 1:59 P.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & WARDEN LN 1:59 P.M. LAKE TRAFFO RD & RINGO LN 2:00 P.M. LAKE TRAFFORD RD & TITUS LN 2:04 P.M. MANATEE ST & JEFFERSON AVE W 2:06 P.M. INDIAN RIVER ST & NEW MARKET RD W 2:08 P.M. MADISON AVE W & DADE ST 2:10 P.M. ALACHUA ST & JEFFERSON AVE E 2:17 P.M. F ARM WORKER WAY & AGRICULTURE WAY 2:49 P.M. CR 846 E & DUPREE GRADE COLLIER COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS BUS SCHEDULE 2012 -2013 Continued from previous page 5 Immokalee Bulletin A ugust 9, 2012 Despite rainy weather on April 30, 19 foursomes from 11 local communities and their clubs’ golf pros gathered to participate in the 2012 Inter-Club Challenge at The Old Collier Golf Club in Naples. The sixth annual tournament raised $150,000, bene ting the children of Immokalee through The Immokalee Foundation. The winning teams w ere from Mediterra (men’s) and The Old Collier Golf Club (women’s). TIF board member Joe Zednik, said the rain didn’t dampen the spirits of the players, “It just showed the dedication of our great donors to play in inclement weather. We must also thank our presenting sponsor Kevin Johnson and Wayne Meland with Morgan Stanley Private Wealth Management, our host The Old Collier Golf Club and other corporate sponsors and underwriters for helping to make a day like this possible.” The Immokalee Foundation middle and high school students assisted with the day’s activities and had the opportunity to play with the teams. TIF student Elijah Arreaga said, “It’s great playing in this golf tournament because I’m around successful people. Golf helps me learn about goals and responsibility, perseverance and respect.” The winning men’s team included W.R. “Skip” Hildebrand, John Costigan, John Riess and Jeff Williams, with golf pro Rob Anderson. The women’s winning team were Carrie Scannell, Rene Zona, Eileen Golden and Jane Dennis with golf pro Chris Rockwell. The Inter-Club Challenge is the rst in a series of annual fundraising events aimed to build pathways to success for the children of Immokalee. TIF’s largest fundraiser of the year, the 2012 Charity Classic Celebration, is slated for Nov. 16, at The Ritz-Carlton, Naples. The Immokalee Foundation has a range of programs that focus on building pathways to success through college and career development, direct scholarships, mentoring and tutoring, and opportunities for broadening experiences and life skills development. To learn more about volunteering as a mentor or for additional information, call 239-4309122 or visit www.immokaleefoundation. org. A nnual Charity Classic raises 150K for local kids Special to the Immokalee Bulletin/ TIFWinning Women’s Team includes, from left to right: Rene Zona, Pro Chris Rockwell, Carrie Scannell, Eileen Golden and Jane Dennis. The annual charity classic challenge is an inter-club event that raises funding to bene t the children of Immokalee through the Immokalee Foundation. Special to the Immokalee BulletinLiz Allbritten, TIF executive director, and John Henry participated in this year’s annual “Classic Challenge” event which raised $150,000 to bene t local Immokalee children in education.

PAGE 6

ESC gets BSN program accreditation The National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, Inc. (NLNAC) has granted Edison State College’s baccalaureate nursing program initial accreditation for the Bachelor of Science Nursing (BSN) program. The letter from NLNAC was received by Edison State College today. “We are very pleased NLNAC concluded that our nursing program meets the high academic standards and level of rigor needed to earn this accreditation,” said Dr. Jeff A llbritten, District President. “Thanks to the many academic leaders, faculty and staff w ho worked together to make this accreditation possible. The ultimate benefactors are the students we serve.” According to the NLNAC, Edison State College’s initial accreditation is valid until Spring 2017, when the next evaluation is scheduled. Students who graduated from the BSN program this past Spring have the NLNAC accreditation with their degree. The NLNAC is an accrediting organization for post-secondary and higher degree education nursing programs, ranging from practical and diploma to baccalaureate and clinical doctorates. Celebrations .newszap.com/celebrationsEngaged? Just married? Golden anniversary? Birthday? Holiday? New baby? Share your news in print and onlineFor a modest charge, each package includes: and family Submit your good news today at It all began in 1962. Fast forward 50 years and more than 35,000 graduates later, Edison State College continues to be a Southwest Florida leader in higher education. Our instructors are passionate about bringing real-world expertise to the classroom so our global market. See for yourself. Visit us on campus or online today. 863-674-6000www.edison.eduA Higher Degree of You 6 Immokalee Bulletin August 9, 2012 The Immokalee Foundation, a nonpro t organization devoted to enhancing the lives of Immokalee’s youth by emphasizing education, career development, mentoring and life skills, is welcoming new partnerships for its Career Development program. Formerly known as Vocational and Career Success, the program focuses on career empowerment and post-secondary readiness for students through experiences that stress leadership, skills development and community service. TIF board member Dick Stonesifer has been a staunch supporter of the program since its inception. “In Immokalee, 70 percent of high school graduates do not go on to college,” he said. “We recognize that college is not for everyone, so we want to provide alternative career options and help prepare students for the workforce.” Through Career Development, students participate in career panels, job shadowing/ internships, resume writing, interview training, networking, summer camps and more. The career panels feature informative speakers in the elds of technology, law, media, human services, health care, manufacturing and others. The speakers often share personal stories about their educational backgrounds and the struggles they encounter in achieving their goals. Summer internships with area businesses provide students with real-world experience in particular career elds and help them develop professional skills and knowledge. Local companies, such as Naples Community Hospital and Arthrex, have hosted tours, giving students a rsthand look at the workplace in action. These partnerships with area rms are essential to the success of the Career Development program; therefore, TIF is actively seeking local companies interested in becoming partners. Companies must be willing to provide speakers and consider TIF students for internships and employment. “We want our students to know what these companies do, what careers are available and even what kind of income can be expected,” said Skip Hildebrand, TIF board member and chairman of the Career Development Committee. “We want to prepare these students so that when they graduate from high school, they aren’t lost.” To partner with TIF, learn about sponsorship opportunities or volunteer as a career panel speaker, call 239-430-9122. The Immokalee Foundation has a range of programs that focus on building pathways to success through college and career development, direct scholarships, mentoring and tutoring, and opportunities for broadening experiences and life skills development. For more information, visit www.immokaleefoundation.org. TIF seeks new Career Development partnerships Special to the Immokalee Bulletin/ TIFSummer internship students provide good results on both sides of the fence including emerging talents for the business community and also helpful experience and future job training for up and coming graduates. The Immokalee Foundation helps the two come together in a new program pairing businesses and organizations with grads from high schools and post-secondary schools to prepare them for leadership experiences in the business community. Edison State College ranked in the Top 100 across several categories for Community College Week’s annual Top 100 Associate Degree and Certi cate Producers. The results cover the 2010-2011 academic year. “We are pleased that a national publication recognizes us for our dedication to prov iding excellent educational opportunities w ith our associate degree offerings,” said Dr. J eff Allbritten, District President, Edison State College. “Such success is a great credit to the students themselves, most who juggle other responsibilities in addition to their studies, and our faculty, who work hard to help them reach their educational goals.” The annual report divides its results into two-year and four-year institutions. Edison State College’s rankings are included with four-year institutions as follows: 49th for Associate Degrees, All Disciplines 27th for Associate Degrees, Arts & Sciences/General Studies 41st for Associate Degrees, All Disciplines, Total Non-Minority 72nd for Associate Degrees, All Disciplines, Total Minority 95th for Associate Degrees, All Disciplines, African-Americans 58th for Associate Degrees, All Disciplines, Hispanics Edison State College is nationally ranked

PAGE 7

Back to School Shoe Program taking applicationsGuadalupe Center of Immokalee will be hosting its annual Back-to-School Shoe Program during the week of Aug. 13-17. Parents with children in Kindergarten-8th grade are encouraged to apply to see if they qualify. Applications will be taken from July 23Aug. 1 from 8:30-10 a.m.and from 1:30-4 p.m.Guadalupe Soup Kitchen at 211 S 9th Street.Parents or legal guardian must bring a form of ID, 2 months proof of income of both parents and their children’s birth certi cate or legal custody form. Contact Merline Dieujuste at 239-657-3202 for more information.St. Matthews House collects backpacks for childrenSt. Matthew’s House of Naples, is collecting backpacks and school supplies through the middle of August to be donated to children in need. The supplies will support the hundreds of low-income and homeless families participating in SMH programs. Recipients are among SMH residents as well as those receiving SMH direct assistance. Donations can be dropped at St. Matthew’s House, 2001 Airport Rd, South in Naples. For more information, please contact Kerri Sparks, Director of Development & Communications at 239-774-0500.Student Immunization timeImmunization documentation on a DOH Form 680, Certi cation of Immunization, is required for all students in grades pre-Kindergarten (K) through 12. Free immunizations for children through 18 years of age are available at the following Collier County Health Department locations: 419 1st Street North, Immokalee, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Appointments are not necessary. For questions, please call 239252-7300 (Immokalee). W inn Dixie hosts back to school celebrationLocal teachers from Highlands Elementary School will be on-hand distributing school supply lists for the upcoming year. Kids will be able to enjoy an in-store movie, scavenger hunt, hot dog wagon, food samplings, free giveaways as well as meet the Bimbo mascot. In addition, local re and rescue and sheriff’s departments will be on site providing safety tips.It’s all free Saturday, August 11 from 3-7 p.m.at your Winn-Dixie Store #751, 1602 Lake Trafford Road.Fall sports practice times announcedFall practices will starts this month at Immokalee High school. Football starts August 6 on the eld at 7:30 a.m. for Freshmen, JV and Varsity. Volleyball starts Aug. 6 in the gym at 9 a.m. for Freshmen, JV and Varsity. Cross Country starts on Aug. 13 at the track at 6 p.m. for both girls and boys cross country.IHS plans Open HouseImmokalee High School: Cross Country Practice start on Aug. 13, at 6 p.m. Open House Aug. 18 9 a.m.-noon.School hours have changedImmokalee district schools are changing student hours. If you are the parent or guardian of an Immokalee student, this information is for you. All Collier County Public Schools in Immokalee will be changing student arrival and dismissal times beginning on the rst day of school, Monday, Aug. 20. The new hours for each school are listed below. Parents – please make note of the new times and share them with your child. All after-school program times at Immokalee schools will also be adjusted based on the new school dismissal times. Questions? Please contact the Communications and Community Engagement Department at 239-377-0180. Education News in Brief florida.newszap.com Check out these new features: • Daily Local News Updates • New interactive and easy to navigate format • Plus much, much more!Come see for yourself! Nationwide Insurance comes to ImmokaleeNationwide Insurance has partnered with Bruce Hendry Insurance in Immokalee offering Auto, Business Insurance, Life Insurance, Workers Comp, Boat, Motorcycle, RV and more... Call or stop by for an One Your SideŽ review. 7 Immokalee Bulletin A ugust 9, 2012 Fifth Third Bank (South Florida) collected enough school supplies to ll 1,000 backpacks during its fourth annual “Back to School” Supply Drive. Donations were collected this summer at 64 nancial centers in Collier, Lee, Charlotte, Manatee, Broward and Palm Beach counties and will be distributed to students through the Education Foundation in each area. The Education Foundation of Collier County will receive a portion of the school supplies to provide to local children. According to Collier County Public School’s website, 62 percent of students – or 26,586 children – are “economically needy.” “We want to thank our customers and employees who generously donated school supplies,” said David Call, president and CEO of Fifth Third Bank (South Florida). “Because of those contributions, hundreds of local children will have the necessar y tools to properly start the school year.” “We are grateful for the commitment and dedication that Fifth Third Bank has demonstrated for the past four years – bringing our community and schools together through this drive to bene t the students of Collier County,” said Susan McManus, president o f The Education Foundation. “Together, we can provide an environment where all children can maximize their learning opportunities.” Fifth Third Bank donates 1,000 school supply- lled backpacks to children in need Special to the Immokalee Bulletin/ Fifth Third BankFifth Third Bank (South Florida) collected enough school supplies to ll 1,000 backpacks during its fourth annual "Back to School" Supply Drive. The Education Foundation of Collier County will receive a portion of the school supplies to provide to local children. According to Collier County Public School's website, 62 percent of students or 26,586 children are "economically needy." Fifth Third Bank employees (from L to R) are: Kathy Leavesley, Lily Casanova, Trish, Hamilton, Derrick Ayers, Cara Zasoba and Malika Gibbs. Steps to the Future Christian Childcare is located in Immokalee at Lake Trafford Independent Baptist Church. Our operating hours are Monday-Friday from 6 a.m.-6 p.m. The center is licensed through the Department of Children and Families amd currently accepting enrollments for children ages 6 w eeks thru 18 years. This facility is a provider of 4C’s or School Readiness. If you are looking for a child care center that you can trust, Steps to the Future Christian Childcare is YOUR place. The center will provide breakfast, lunch and snack daily for every child. The best care for your child is always in mind, please call for an appointment today 239-658-0426. Steps to the Future Christian Childcare will be hosting a free event on August 11. You are encouraged to come join the fun, free event. There will be a bounce house, potato sack races, free food, etc. Please come by to join them in the event from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sign your child up while positions are available. Grand opening set for Steps to Future Christian Child Care

PAGE 8

Florida Dept. of Education offers these statewide School Bus Safety Tips for students and motorists to follow: Motorists: Please exercise patience and caution, especially around children and school buses. Follow these safety practices: When approaching a school bus that is stopped with its red lights ashing and its stop arms extended, motorists are required to STOP in nearly every instance. For more information on Florida's school bus stop law and penalties, go to www.FloridaSchoolBusSafety.gov. Be alert and watch for children at all times, but especially near schools, bus stops, school buses, and in school parking lots. Obey all traf c laws and speed limits, paying extra attention to the lower speed limits in school zones. Do not pass other vehicles in school zones or at crosswalks. Do not change lanes or make U-turns in school zones. Watch for and obey signals from school crossing guards. Do not text or use a cell phone while driving. Only drive or park in authorized areas to drop off or pick up children at school. Parents and Students: Please discuss these safety tips together and be sure to follow them: Discuss and practice the safest way to get to and from school or the assigned school bus stop. Never run out into the street or cross between parked cars. At the School Bus Stop: Arrive at the bus stop about ve minutes before the bus is scheduled to arrive. Follow instructions from your bus driver or the school district about where to wait at your assigned bus stop. Wait in a safe place away from the road. Do not run and play while waiting for the bus to arrive. Never sit on the roadway while waiting for your bus. Never speak to strangers at the bus stop and never get into the car with a stranger. Always tell your parents, the bus driver, or another responsible adult as soon as possible if a stranger tries to talk to you or pick you up. Loading or Unloading from the Bus: As the bus is approaching, watch for the red ashing lights and the stop arms to extend. When the bus stops, wait for the driver's signal that it is safe to cross the road or board the bus. If crossing the street, look left, right, and left again. When the driver signals that it is safe, walk at least 12 feet in front of the bus where the driver can see you. Never walk behind the school bus. Never run after the bus. Hold the handrail while going up and down the stairs. Go directly to your bus seat and remain seated during the entire ride. Exit the bus only at your assigned bus stop. If you drop something near the bus, tell the bus driver. Never try to pick it up rst, because the driver may not be able to see you. Parents or guardians of small children should wait with them in the morning and meet them at the bus stop in the afternoon. Riding in the School Bus: Keep hands, arms, and head inside bus. Always buckle up properly if your school bus has safety belts. Stay in your seat and obey the driver. Remain seated at all times and keep the aisle clear. Stop talking and remain silent when the bus comes to a railroad crossing so the driver can hear if a train is approaching. Avoid any loud or disruptive behavior that could distract the bus driver from safely operating the bus. Be courteous and respectful to your driver. Safely getting you to and from school is a tremendous responsibility that the driver takes very seriously. As Collier County Public Schools (CCPS) prepare to open their doors for the 20122013 school year, the district's Nutrition Services Department would like to share some of its latest information. Lunch prices remain the same. Elementary school students continue to pay $2; secondary students $2.25, and adults $3. Students whose families qualify to receive meals at a free or reduced price will be served meals at no charge. Menus follow the USDA nutrition guidelines of the new Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. The lunch menu provides healthy choices including lean protein, whole grains, a variety of fruits and vegetables, and low fat or fat free milk. Breakfast will be served at no charge to all enrolled students. Adult breakfast is $1.50. Research shows, and teachers agree, that students who eat breakfast are more attentive, learn better and have fewer behavior issues. Free and reduced-priced meal applications can be obtained at your child's school on the rst day of classes. An online version of the application is also available by visiting the district website at www.collierschools. com/foodservice, then clicking on Free & Reduced Meals under the Quick Links menu on the left of the screen, and clicking the red "Apply Online" button. Applications submitted electronically can be processed withi n 48 hours. Parents may also visit www.Paypams. com and make secure online prepayment s to meal accounts, view student balances, and transaction history. Once an account i s established, parents will receive e-mail no ti cations when a student's meal accoun t balance runs low. To learn more or for assistance with mea l applications, please contact the Nutritio n Services Department at 239-377-0297 or vi a email at CCPSNutritionServices@collier schools.com. Nutrition services department announces latest updates Looking for Back-to-School information? You're only a few clicks away. Links to this important information is now located in a convenient, one-stop location on Collier County Public Schools' (CCPS) website. Just visit CCPS online at www.collierschools.com and click on the Back-to-School red schoolhouse icon located in the "What's New" section on the right side of the page. There you'll nd links to the most commonly requested back-to-school information. From bus schedules to enrollment, open house and curriculum nights to school supplies, you'll nd answers to your questions, plus so much more. Parents are encouraged to check back regularly as information may be updated daily. Take advantage of this informative website to ensure your child will be fully prepared for the rst day of school Monday, Aug. 20. Back-to-school information is now available online School bus safety tips offered to help keep little riders safe Cheaper than the non-pro“ts and the traveling vets! Disclaimer: The Patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. 8 Immokalee Bulletin August 9, 2012

PAGE 9

The Leadership Collier Foundation Alumni Association, a program of the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce, is pleased to announce that Collier County Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Kamela Patton will be the keynote speaker at the Aug. 23, Boxed Lunch Speaker Series. Registration and networking will begin at 11:30 a.m. with the program starting promptly at noon at the Professional Dev elopment Center, 615 3rd Avenue South in Naples. The cost to attend is $15 and includes a box lunch with dessert. Proceeds from this event bene t the Leadership Collier Foundation Scholarship Fund, which provides tuition assistance to the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce leadership programs. Online reservations are required and can be purchased in advance online at www.napleschamber.org. The Boxed Lunch Speaker Series is open to graduates of the Chamber's leadership programs including Leadership Collier, GAIN (Growing Associates in Naples), Youth Leadership, Campaign for Leadership and the Leadership Institute. The new "Boxed Lunch Speaker Series" was launched earlier this year to continue and expand the leadership experience by providing education, stewardship and networking opportunities to keep alumni abreast of the current challenges and opportunities facing the community. At the August 23 lunch, Dr. Patton will educate alumni about how she plans to maintain the high caliber of education in Collier County, a priority in the wake of decreased state funding, how community outreach and engagement has improved since she took of ce and if she thinks Collier Schools are making the grade. Dr. Patton received a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education in 1985 from Messiah College in Grantham, Pennsylvania; a Master of Science, Reading Education in 1992 from Nova Southeastern University in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida and a Doctorate o f Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Educational Leadership in 2003 from the University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida. Twitter Rebroadcast: LCF Alumni Association hosts CCPS Superintendent Dr. Kamela Patton 8/23 Boxed Lunch Speaker Series http://onfa.st/RpwQmV @GNCoC. Leadership Collier Alumni hosts Dr. Kamela Patton HERE’S MY CARDKeep the number of these locally owned businesses on hand for all of your service & shopping needs. Put your card in this space for six weeks for Only $90! Call us at 239-657-6000 or e-mail cbadsales@newszap.com for more info NEED FLOOD INSURANCE??? Did you know... Flood insurance is now required in Immokalee if your home has a mortgage. Just an inch of water can cause costly damage to your property. Homeowners insurance does not cover ”ood damage, rising water. Its important to buy insurance before ”oodwaters start to rise, there is a 30 day waiting period if not required by lender. Last year, one-third of all claims paid by the NFIP were for policies in low-risk communities. Contact us at Bruce Hendry Insurance for a FREE FLOOD QUOTE at 239-657-3614 9 Immokalee Bulletin A ugust 9, 2012 Five-month-old female alligators exposed during development to toxins found in a polluted Florida lake show changes in ovarian gene function and decreased body weight at hatching, but paradoxically showed accelerated growth rates in the months after hatching, according to a study at the University of Florida. Alligators are a species whose relative w ell-being in a given environment is indicative of the health of its ecosystem, and scientists say the study may have broader implications for ovarian function and obesity in other animals. The ndings appeared in May in the journal Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology. Previous research demonstrated that repeated contact with chemical runoff from spills in Lake Apopka, near Orlando, caused male alligators to develop shorter than normal sexual organs and the loss of normal patterns of sex differences in hormone levels and gonad function. Now, scientists show that environmental exposure to hormonally active toxins such as PCBs and DDT and its breakdown products are also affecting normal genetic functioning in female alligator ovaries. The results: contaminant-exposed female hatchlings are born smaller and shorter, but gain w eight at a faster rate during post-hatching development than alligators exposed to fewer toxins. In this study, the researchers found an association between altered ovary function and changes in body growth rates. Many human reproductive illness syndromes that affect female fertility, such as polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS, have symptoms that include altered ovarian gene functioning, a lack of normal ovulation and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. "The ovaries of the hatchling alligators at rst seem to function normally, but when you hormonally stimulate them, that's when gene expression abnormalities start to appear," said Louisiana Tech University professor Brandon C. Moore, who led the study, which was based on his graduate research at UF in the laboratory of reproductive biologist Louis Guillette. To investigate dysfunction in reproduction, Moore and his colleagues collected alligator eggs from Lake Apopka which has been examined for three decades by scientists surveying the effects of industrial pesticides and sewage pollution. Eggs were incubated and hatched under laboratory conditions. They injected the young alligators with Follicle Stimulating Hormone, or FSH, which regulates reproductive processes in many species, including alligators and humans. "When you give an animal FSH, it's like revving the gas pedal," Moore said. However, there was no "revving" for pivotal ovarian genes of pollution-exposed alligators when injected with FSH in Moore's experiments. In addition, the researchers explored the parallels between the lack of FSH responsiveness and potentially environment-induced human reproductive diseases, such as polycystic ovary syndrome, a disorder where levels of the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone become imbalanced. "Even though we're studying alligators, what makes endocrinology so powerful is that the chemical structure of most of the steroid and thyroid hormones are identical among vertebrates, from sh to people," said Ashley Boggs, a postdoctoral researcher at the Medical University of South Carolin a who also studies alligators near Cape Canaveral. "It's not just about your genes but also about what you've been exposed to throughout your whole life, from embryonic development to puberty to pregnancy." Boggs suggested long-term epidemiological studies would need to be conducted to determine whether human reproduction and development may also be in uenced b y the same contaminants affecting Florida alligators. Such a study would require taking blood samples from expectant mothers and screen for similar chemicals. However, because thousands of chemicals such as BPA and phthalates are used and easily found in the environment, Boggs said it is an enormous task to separate which toxins are in uencing speci c biological functions. This study at Lake Apopka is an important step to answering that challenge, she said. Lake contaminants affect alligator weight, study shows Immokalee Bulletin/ D. HamiltonContaminants commonly found in area lakes including chemical runoff can be detrimental to the health of Florida’s alligator population.

PAGE 10

Maintenance Technician Part Time Maintenance Technician, Ave Maria, FL. Able to repair and maintain buildings/facilities. Position provides 24 hour maintenance emergency coverage. Immediate opening for serviceoriented, exible, motivated candidate with experience in maintenance, groundskeeping and general trades. Application may be picked up at our of ce: 5076 Annunciation Circle, Unit #104 Ave Maria, FL 34142 EOE For more listings, go to www.newszap.com NOTICEIndependent Newspapers will never accept any advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises of guaranteed income from work-athome programs if it sounds too good to be true, chances are that it is. If you have questions or doubts about any ad on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the Better Business Bureau at 772-878-2010 for previous complaints. Some 800 and 900 telephone numbers may require an extra charge, as well as long distance toll costs. We will do our best to alert our reader of these charges in the ads, but occasionally we may not be aware of the charges. Therefore, if you call a number out of your area, use caution. For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Apartments MIRA VERDEMOVE IN SPECIAL, 1st MONTH FREE! $20.00 Application Fee• 2 BEDROOMS AT $364.00 PER MONTH• 3 BEDROOMS AT $411.00 PER MONTH• 4 BEDROOMS AT $464.00 PER MONTH LOCATED AT: CALL US AT: 6760 Santa Fe North (863)675-3339 LaBelle, FL FREE GIFT FOR EVERY NEW RESIDENT! Here’s the keys to your new home! Aqui estan las llaves de su nueva casa! REGALO PARA CADA RESIDENTE NUEVOMIRA VERDEESPECIAL DE ENTRADA PIMER MES GRATIS!! $20.00 cargo de aplicacion• 2 RECAMARRAS A $364.00 POR MES• 3 RECAMARRAS A $411.00 POR MES• 4 RECAMARRAS A $464.00 POR MES LOCALIZADOS EN: LLAMENOS AL: 6760 Santa FeNorth (863)675-3339 LaBelle, FL For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Important Information: Please read your ad carefully the first day it appears. In case of an inadvertent error, please notify us prior to the deadline listed. We will not be responsible for more than 1 incorrect insertion, or for more than the extent of the ad rendered valueless by such errors. Advertiser assumes responsibility for all statements, names and content of an ad, and assumes responsibility for any claims against Independent Newsmedia Inc. USA. All advertising is subject to publisher’s approval. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any or all copy, and to insert above the copy the word “advertisement”. All ads accepted are subject to credit approval. All ads must conform to Independent Newsmedia Inc. USA style and are restricted to their proper classifications. Some classified categories require advance payment. These classifications are denoted with an asterisk *. Child CareIMMOKALEE CHILD CARE CENTEROpenings for VPK enrollment. Child must be 4 years of age by Sept. 1st. We provide wrap around care. Call Diana at 239-657-4130 or stop by 415 Colorado Ave. Immokalee FL. Need a few more bucks to purchase something deer? Pick up some extra bucks when you sell your used items in the classifeids. For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Employment Full Time Seminole Tribe of Florida Big Cypress ReservationRV PARK ASSISTANT MANAGERAssist Manager with day to day operations of RV Park. Must have computer skills. Must have Maintenance background. HS diploma/GED reqd. Able to work varied hours & on-call. Valid FL DL. Contact: joshualohn@semtribe.com Seminole Tribe of Florida Big Cypress ReservationCAFETERIA MANAGERResponsible for managing the food service operations at the Ahfachkee School. HS/GED. 3yrs. caf exp. Food Handler Cert. Florida Driver’s License. Contact: joshualohn@semtribe.com DRIVERS: $1,000.00 Sign-On Bonus! Top Pay, Bene ts, Miles, Great Home Time & More! Werner Enterprises: 1-888-567-4854. Employment Part Time Pets/Supplies All New Happy Jack Kennel Dip II controls eas, ticks, mosquitos, stable ies & MANGE without steroids. BiodegradableJACK & ANNS FEED & SUPPLY www.happyjackinc.com ApartmentsLOOKING FOR AFFORDABLE RENT? Come see Immokalee’s Newest Affordable Housing Community. Pay no more than 30% of your households adjusted monthly income for rent and utilities. ESPERANZA PLACE, affordable 1 & 3Br Apts, Handicap unit available Energy ef cient appliances, washer/dryer hook ups, spacious oor plans, community center on site with computer lab for resident use and classes. From access to Carl Kuehner Community Center educational and social programs. Must be farm or grove labor employed Call Rental Of ce at 657-2009 Mon-Fri, 8:00AM-5:00PM 2693 Marianna Way, #308 (TDD 1-800-955-8771) Equal Housing Opportunity Houses RentDuplex 2/2 Furnished, Lehigh Acres, Orange Grove/55+, Excellent condition, 880/sq.ft. New refrigerator, range, washer, carpet, vinyl, furniture, near shopping 39,000. 608-335-1719. Apartments Houses RentFarm Worker Village invites you to come home. Available now 1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom rental homes, starting as low as $425 per month. You may qualify for Rental assistance. Please Call us at: 239-657-3649 or stop by at 1800 Farm Worker Way. For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Mobile Home RentFELDA 2 br./2 ba. Private location in Orange Grove. Good cond. $500 month plus Security 239-369-9567. For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Campers/RVsWanted all Travel Trailers, Motor Homes and Fifth Wheels. Any Condition, Cash paid on the spot. Call 941-347-7171 One mans trash is another mans treasure. Turn your trash to treasure with an ad in the classifieds. Buying a car? Look in the classifieds. Selling a car? Look in the classifieds. Earn some extra cash. Sell your used items in the classifieds 10 Immokalee Bulletin August 9, 2012 Employment Full Time For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Employment Full Time For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Earn some extra cash. Sell your used items in the classifieds Buying a car? Look in the classifieds. Selling a car? Look in the classifieds.Your community directory is a click away! newszap.com Free Speech Free Ads

PAGE 11

By Pat DobbinsSpecial to the Immokalee Bulletin It’s summertime! Baseball games, swimming, camping, hiking, or just playing outdoors – These are all great summer activities, but don’t forget about ticks that may be in the same environment. There are several things you can do to help prevent tick bites and reduce your risk of tick-borne disease. After being in wooded areas, grassy areas, or even after a summer picnic, you should check your scalp and hair, behind the ears, the neck and under the arms. Usually ticks try to nd a nice warm spot to hide and latch onto to your skin, but sometimes they can choose the strangest places, so please check your whole body thoroughly. Some ticks are small enough to crawl into shoes or through socks, so when you are hiking, or taking a stroll through wooded areas, tuck your pant legs into your socks so that they cannot crawl up the inside of your pants. Also, it’s a good idea to wear light-colored clothing, because it will help you spot any ticks that may be crawling around looking for a place to bite! For added protection, you can also use an insect repellent with DEET, but please always follow the product instructions! Repellents containing 20% or more DEET can be applied to the skin, and can provide some protection for several hours. Please talk to your healthcare provider before applying any insect repellents on young children. Before you go into your home, chec k your clothing and your pets for ticks. Ticks may be carried into the house on clothing and pets and any ticks that are found should be removed immediately. Watch for signs o f illness such as rash or fever, and see a health care provider if these develop. Remember that it can take up to 30 days before you have symptoms of a tick related disease. Your risk of getting a tick-borne illness depends on many factors, including where you live, what type of tick bit you, and how long the tick was attached. If you become ill after a tick bite, please see your health care provider. You can get more information about ticks at this website: http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/ Ticks they could be in your own back yard! CORAL PINES APARTMENTS~ IMMOKALEE ~Apts. 601 to 613 Nassau St., 2BR, Central A/C, heat, carpet, verticals, laundry on premises. Convenient location in quiet residential area. $600 includes water/sewer/trash No Application Fee. Apply at 601 Nassau St. #4 Immokalee or Call 239-694-1951 For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Public Notice NOTICE OF MEETING There will be a Budget Hearing of the Board of Commissioners for the Immokalee Water & Sewer District on Wednesday, August 15, 2012 following the Regular Board Meeting, at the of ce of the Immokalee Water & Sewer District, located at 1020 Sanitation Road, Immokalee, Florida 34142. BUDGET MEETING AGENDA 1. Call to Order 2. Preliminaries A. Roll Call B. Adoption of Agenda 3. Review of Budget 4. Public Comment 5. Adoption of Budget 6. Adjournment SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the District of ce at (239) 658-3630, no less than ve (5) days prior to the above stated meeting date. The District is an equal opportunity provider and employer. 423646 IB 8/9/2012 NOTICE OF MEETING There will be a Regular Meeting of the Board of Commissioners for the Immokalee Water & Sewer District on Wednesday, August 15, 2012 at 3:30 P.M. at the of ce of the Immokalee Water & Sewer District, located at 1020 Sanitation Rd, Immokalee, FL 34142. REGULAR MEETING AGENDA 1. Call to Order 2. Preliminaries A. Pledge of Allegiance B. Roll Call C. Adoption of Agenda D. Employee Recognition 1. JuneEmployee of the Month Christopher Lofton E. Public Concerns F. Staff Good Cause Items G. Board Concerns H. Old Business 1. RFP’s I. New Business 3. Consent Agenda A. Adoption of Minutes 1. July 18, 2012 Regular Meeting B. Civil Rights Compliance Report C. July Budget Review D. Fixed Assets Acquisitions-Disposals E. Various Reports F. USDA Reporting for Stimulus Money G. Project Change Orders H. Engineer’s Report Greeley and Hansen I. Director’s Report 4. Action Agenda A. Bad Debt Write-Off 5. Discussion Agenda A. Attorney’s Report 6. Other Public Interests 7. Adjournment SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the District of ce at (239) 658-3630, no less than ve (5) days prior to the above stated meeting date. The District is an equal opportunity provider and employer. 423645 IB 8/9/2012 Apartments Public Notice Apartments Business & Service Directory AUCTION ROOFING Metal Roofs Re-Roofs Roof Repairs Seamless Gutters Soffit & Fascia Free Estimates Lic# CCC037019 981 Cowboy Circle Office (863)675-7045 Fax (863)612-1158 11 Immokalee Bulletin A ugust 9, 2012 Reading a newspaper makes you a more informed and interesting person.No wonder newspaper readers are more successful! For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Despite the dangers associated with smoking cigars, research shows that statewide and locally, youth cigar use is on the rise. According to the 2011 Florida Youth Tobacco Survey, 9.6 percent of middle school and 28 percent of high school students had reported smoking cigars at least once, statistically showing an increase from the 5.1 percent of middle school and 14.5 percent of high school youth that reported in 2010. Comparatively, the 2010 Florida Youth Tobacco Survey determined that in Collier County, 3.9 percent of middle school and 15.1 percent of high school students reported smoking cigars on one or more times during the past 30 days increasing slightly from the 2.6 percent of middle school and 14.6 percent of high school youth that reported cigar usage in 2008. In 2009, President Obama signed the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control act which restricted the sale of avored cigarettes. Despite this restriction, many other avored tobacco products remain on the market including cigars and little cigars known as cigarillos. With 90 percent of adult smokers beginning before the age of 18, studies have shown avored tobacco products such as cherry, sour apple, peach and watermelon are marketed and produced as a way to entice youth and young adults into a lifetime of addiction. Flavored products, also known as starter products, are meant to hide the harsh taste of tobacco for novice users. Some youth believe the misconception that avored products are safer than nonavored products. Regular cigar use is associated with an increased risk for cancers of the lung and esophagus, as well as linked to tooth loss and gum disease. The mission of the Tobacco-Free Collier Partnership is to make tobacco less desirable, acceptable, and accessible. We as k that citizens, especially parents, remember that all avored tobacco, including cigars and cigarillos, are a growing trend amongst youth. Educate your children on the dangers of avored tobacco products. Youth cigar smoking shows increase in use By Pat DobbinsSpecial to the Immokalee Bulletin With only a few weeks left of summer break, parents are probably thinking about getting their child ready to go back to school. Along with school clothes and school supplies, parents should make sure preventative health measures are included on their child’s back-to-school checklist. Success in school starts with keeping students healthy and safe. Parents should take their children to a healthcare provider for an annual “well-child” check-up and to make sure all vaccinations and medical records are in order. Healthy eating, adequate physical activity and good sleep patterns are also instrumental to success in school. Parents should talk with their children about traveling safely to and from school. This includes planning safe routes for walking or riding a bike, reminding them to stay on the sidewalk, crossing the street only at designated crosswalks, and showing them how to properly wear a bicycle helmet if they are riding a bike to school. If your child is old enough to start driving a car to school, please remind them of some of the basic rules of the road. Don’t be afraid to talk to your teen about safe driving. Allo w them to take Driver’s Education if it’s offered at their high school. Ask your vehicle insurance company about programs available to teach teens about safe driving tips. Children in Florida should never have to be without health care. Insurance can improve a child’s access to medications and treatment they may need to control childhood illnesses and decrease absences from school. The state of Florida offers KidCare, a health insurance program for children from birth through age 18. Children can be eligible even if one or both parents are working. Children covered by Florida KidCare are eligible for comprehensive health care, including sports physicals, doctor visits, check-ups, immunizations, surgery, prescriptions, vision and hearing screenings, mental health care, dental check-ups and hospital stays. Students with access to these and other preventative health care services are likely to be healthier and perform better in school. For more information about KidCare, visit www. FloridaKidCare.org or call 1-888-540-5437. It’s back to school time Enjoy a healthy, safe year Courtesy photo/ UF IFAS ExtensionTicks in your yard can be hazardous to family and pets. They carry diseases including Lime Disease.

PAGE 12

GENERIC ARICEPT USERS SPECIAL OFFER FOR CASH CUSTOMERSIf you ll three new prescriptions with American Discount Pharmacy (including our Free List). We will ll your Generic ARICEPT Prescription for HALF OFF our regular low price. WITH THIS OFFER $25 FOR 90 TABLETS. Cash paying customers only. No government insurance patients are eligible. Restrictions app ly. Call Pharmacy for details. Amlodipine/Norvasc – 2.5, 5 or 10mg Furosemide/Lasix – 20 or 40mg Atenolol/Tenormin – 25, 50 or 100mg Warfarin/Coumadin – 5mg Folic Acid/Folate – 1mg Simvastatin/Zocor – 5, 10, 20 or 40mg Lisinopril/Zestril – 2.5, 5, 10, 20 or 30mg Glipizide/Glucotrol – 5 or 10mg Anastrozole/Arimidex – 1mg Metformin/Glucophage – 500 or 850mg Hydrochlorothiazide/Hydrodiuril – 25mgTHE NATION’S LARGEST FREE PRESCRIPTION LISTGeneric Equivalents 90 Day Supply We compound Veterinary, Dermatological, and Hormone Replacement Therapy at up to75% off Generic ARICEPT 5 and 10MG 90 TABLETS $50 Generic LEVAQUIN 250, 500 & 750MG 10 TABLETS $10 Generic FLOMAX 0.4MG and PROSCAR 5MG 90 TABLETS $50 Generic XALATAN 1 BOTTLE $20 Generic COZAAR and HYZARR 90 TABLETS $25 Generic IMITREX for Migraines 27 TABLETS $55 Generic FEMARA 2.5MG 30 TABLETS $30 Generic ZOFRAN 4MG 90 TABLETS $50 Generic PROTONIX 40MG 90 TABLETS $25 Generic RISPERDAL (most strengths) 180 TABLETS $90 Generic TOPAMAX 50MG 180 TABLETS $30 Generic VALTREX 500MG 30 TABLETS $90 Generic FOSAMAX 35 and 70MG 12 TABLETS $20 Generic MIRAPEX (all strengths) 90 TABLETS $20 Generic KEPPRA (most strengths) 90 TABLETS $40 Generic LAMICTAL (all strengths) 180 TABLETS $50 Generic DEPAKOTE 180 TABLETS 250MG $30 500MG $40 Generic NEURONTIN 100 & 300MG 90 CAPSULES $12 Generic EFFEXOR XR $70 (most strengths) 90 CAPSULES $50 Generic FAMVIR 250MG 30 TABLETS $50 500MG $90 GENERICLIPITOR$50 FOR 90 TABLETSGENERICSINGULAIR$40 FOR 30 TABLETS $100 FOR 90 TABLETSGENERICLIPITOR$50 FOR 90 TABLETS Mention this ad and receive a FREE GIFT!(your choice of an over the counter porduct valued at up to $5.00 WE NOW HAVE LOWEST PRICES ON MEDICATIONS FOR YOUR PETS TOO. Huge savings on generics. We will also work with your veterinarian to compound medications speci“cally for Compounding your pet. We now compound specially formulated medications. With a database of more than 6,000 preparations we work closely with the physician and patient to achieve the desired results.Compounding Pharmacy Gold Certi“cate CALL US FOR PRICES ON YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS 12 Immokalee Bulletin August 9, 2012