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Immokalee bulletin
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100151/00125
 Material Information
Title: Immokalee bulletin
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Independent Newspapers of Florida
Place of Publication: LaBelle, FL
Publication Date: 07-19-2012
Frequency: weekly (published on thursday)
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- La Belle (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hendry County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Immokalee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Collier County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Hendry -- La Belle
United States of America -- Florida -- Collier -- Immokalee
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 16, no. 15 (Apr. 17, 1997).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 36864856
lccn - sn 97027777
System ID: UF00100151:00125

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Thursday, July 19, 2012 V ol. 45 No. 27 See Page 2 for information about how to contact the newspaper.newszap.comFree SpeechFree Ads Back to School shots -Get them now Page 4 Rotary Club welcomes guest ...Page 5 Letters to the Editor ...Page 3 Inside... Pup needs a name!... Page 8 The Immokalee Foundation, a nonpro t organization that provides educational opportunities for Immokalee's children, recently took 45 rising seniors from Immokalee High School on a campus tour of six Florida colleges over a period of three days. The students visited the University of South Florida in Tampa, University of Florida and Sante Fe College in Gainesville, Florida State University and Florida A&M University in Tallahassee and University of Central Florida in Orlando. TIF gave the students the chance to view the character and diversity offered by each institute of higher education an opportunity they may not have otherwise been given. Rose Celbeau was grateful for the experience, "Never in my TIF students visit six state college campuses Special to the Immokalee Bulletin/ TIFNearly four dozen Immokalee Foundation students got a taste of what collegiate life will be all about when they had the opportunity to visit six Florida college campuses. See TIF — Page 2 By Patty BrantImmokalee Bulletin Girl power isn't what it used to be. No pink posies and Barbie dolls here, but Elmira "Myra" Johnson is making it felt at American Legion Post 130. In the end, it's not Girl Power it's Veteran Power! The rst female commander of Post 130, Myra may be just getting her feet wet, but she has all the skills and experience necessary for the job, thanks to the Good Lord and Uncle Sam. From July 21, 1991, through October 20, 2000, she served aboard several ships, Myra learned to make her way on her own in the military. So, being the rst female commander of Post 130 is a natural for her. Her rst assignment was on the destroyer tender USS Puget Sound out of Norfolk, Va. Her experience working in the all-male environment in the Puget's print shop was an adjustment, she recalls, but mostly for New female Legion Post commander makes history Special to the Immokalee Bulletin/ Rick HeersSupplies galoreNeed home improvement supplies for your next project? I HOPE Distribution can help with lots of products with great prices and proceeds to bene t a good cause. See story bottom of Page 2 See VFW — Page 2 Cmdr. Elmira Johnson



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2 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 To Reach UsMailing Address: P.O. Box 518 LaBelle, FL 33975 Physical Address: 22 Ft. Thompson Ave. Website: www.newszap.com/immokaleeTo Submit NewsThe Immokalee Bulletin welcomes submissions from its readers. Opinions, calendar items, story ideas and photographs are welcome. Call (239) 657-6000 to reach our newsroom. The deadline for all news items is 11 a.m. on Monday prior to the following Thursdays publication. E-Mail: ibnews@newszap.comTo Place a Display AdPhone: (239) 657-6000 day for the following Thursdays publication E-mail: cbadsales@newszap.comBilling DepartmentE-mail: billteam@newszap.comTo Place a Classi“ed AdCall 1 -877 353-2424 to place it from home or go to www.newszap.comFor SubscriptionsPhone: 1-800-282-8586 Visit circulation.newszap.com or email readerservices@newszap.com.StaffNews Editor: Patty Brant Community News Editor: Dee Hamilton Advertising Services: Dale Conyers Advertising Services: Barbara Calfee Executive Editor: Katrina Elsken Publisher: Tom ByrdOur PurposeƒThe Caloosa Belle is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida. Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspaper to pursue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community. Since no dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on pro“t margins below industrystandards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in Independents mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the communitys deliberation of public issues.We Pledgeƒ To operate this newspaper as a public trust and work, through our dedication to conscientious journalism. their own intelligent decisions about public issues. purposeful neutrality, fairness, objectivity, fearlessness and compassion. debate, not to dominate it with our own opinions. the prominence it deserves. compassion. the men. “After all,” she notes, “I’ve always been a girl” When she rst came on board, she was greeted by signs placed by her fellow lithographers like “No females beyond this point.” They were testing her, trying to push her buttons. When she walked in and one of the sailors behind the counter told her no girls w ere allowed back there, she gave it right back, asking, “So, why are you back there?” It was the right comeback and she soon became part of the team. When the Puget was decommissioned, Myra was reassigned to the Shenandoah, another destroyer tender. She deployed on a Med Cruise, seeing Spain, Italy, Israel and France, and also was at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. When the Shenandoah was also decommissioned, she was assigned to the aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy out of Mayport, FL one of the rst female sailors to serve on an aircraft carrier. When she was undergoing a dif cult pregnancy, she was assigned shore duty in Pensacola for two years. Her two youngest children require special care, so sea duty w as out of question. “I loved the military,” Myra recalls, “but it’s hard on a family.” Ultimately, she made the dif cult decision to leave the Navy she just couldn’t leave her two young children to go out to sea. A Collier County girl, Myra was born in Naples and raised in Immokalee. She graduated from Immokalee High School in 1991. Her dad, Pedro Gonzalez, and grandmother, Aurelia Gonzalez (who will be 99 in September), are still there. She joined the Navy right after graduation. At just 17 years of age, she embarked on a whole new life but she points out that people “mature fast in the military.” “It didn’t faze me,” she said, “I earned the right to be there.” She joined the Navy because she wanted to get away and see what the world was like. “I always like to try something different,” she added, “experience life.” Myra’s oldest daughter Alyssa is going off to college and is now the one anxious to get out into the world. Myra just cautions her to remember that “Home is Home.” After all, Myra herself was gone for nine years, but of all the places she could have gone, she returned to this area. Home. Myra said she would recommend the military to young people but counsel them to stay single for their rst four years. “You need to have a strong, stable relationship to survive long deployments of up to two years,” she points out, ”You also need faith in yourself and to learn respect for authority to be successful in the military.” She added that the military teaches you not to take your blessings for granted; to appreciate what you’ve got. In Myra’s case, she said she had to beat the “trifecta” going into the military: she was female, Hispanic and young all obstacles that not everyone has. She said the military has been a source of pride in herself, but not because of these obstacles. “It only has to do with being a proud American. You appreciate what you have more when you earned it.” Myra became acquainted with the American Legion when she and her husband, Richard, were looking for a place to renew their wedding vows. She didn’t even know what the American Legion was, but when she met Legionnaires Tony Alvarez and Bill Davis she said she learned quickly. Now her entire family are members of the American Legion Family. Last year Myra served as historian. Her husband, Richard Kohutek, is Sergeant-at-Arms of the Sons of the Legion and all four children, Alyssa, Bryce, Corbyn and Novie are Junior Legionnaires. They have all helped with the post’s sh fries, blood drives and the veterans’ organization’s Fallen Heroes event, Memorial and Veterans Day celebrations as well as Christmas and Thanksgiving dinners. Alyssa attended Girls State and received the Legion Riders scholarship. Myra feels it’s important to “give back to the whole community,” not just the veterans, and she is teaching her kids that ethic. The Legion has some 300 members but is always looking for new ones. She said the Post members have a common respect for each other, no matter what their age, gender, background, when or where they served. The common denominator is they all served. Myra said over her year as commander, she hopes to guide the post to become even more involved in the community that has been so great in helping veterans with whatever they may need, to extend its ability to reach out. In addition to the Legion, Myra is active in the Firehouse Community Center with her kids. She wants to see local youth get involved in the Legion’s Oracle contest for kids, a scholarship speaking contest promoting patriotism, and hopes to build the alread y successful blood drive and Children & Youth Fund projects. She added that there is a misconception that the American Legion is a bar for old vets to tell war stories. It is a place where veterans can experience the comradeship o f the military, but it is so much more. Commander Myra Johnson invites veterans, and anyone with a close connection to a veteran, to check out this organization. Without an Ameircan Legion Post in Immokalee, local veterans are welcome and encouraged to join Post 130, which is located on Hwy. 80W in LaBelle. Call 863675-8300. For LaBelle’s Legionnaires, the adjustment to its rst female commander is already underway. The guys are learning fast: “She’s not a lady, she’s a veteran.” V FWContinued From Page 1 life would I have had the chance to experience a tour of college life, but thanks to The Immokalee Foundation, I did. What made me even more excited was the visit to one of my top choice universities. It was a really great trip for me.” In addition to touring each campus, students had the chance to meet with nancial aid personnel and administrators to help them understand what to expect and how to prepare for their future. At the University of South Florida and Florida State University, students even had the opportunity to dine at the campus cafeteria. Joel Garcia said the experiences helped him learn rsthand what it takes to be in college, “Throughout the whole college tour, I was able to experience what it was like to be in college for a day and experience the unique atmosphere each college has to offer. It opened my eyes as to what college life has in store for me. It includes a lot of work, perseverance and walking.” For many students, the tour was an eye-opener. “I learned that colleges do not always help with nding housing, food or employment,” said Jesus Velazco. “It is your choice to decide what you would like to do in college.” Arturo Olvera said, “I learned work ethic is needed to get into college. I am thankful for the experience.” The Immokalee Foundation has a range of programs that focus on building pathways to success through college and career development, mentoring and tutoring, and opportunities for broadening experiences and life skills development. To learn more about volunteering as a mentor or for additional information, call 239-430-9122 or visit www.immokaleefoundation.org. TIFContinued From Page 1 By Rick HeersSpecial to the Immokalee Bulletin New deliveries of valuable goods are arriving each week at the I HOPE Distribution Center-deals that you can’t afford to miss! New shipments include dozens of brand new, impact windows for as little as $51-a savings of nearly $200; brand new wooden exterior doors, one with side-lights, originally over $2,200 on sale for $700; fantastic ceramic tile, granite and marble-marked down 75 percent; boxes of new bathroom faucets-were $79, now $25; lots and lots of Pergo and other ooring (limited quantities) but marked down from $50-$65 a box to $12-$15 per box depending on brand; blinds as low as $5 each. This week’s latest arrivals are gently used bedroom (queen size) furniture including mattress, box springs and bed frame. This week, the IDC will be open Saturda y from 9-noon. Credit/debit cards gladly accepted. The IDC will be closed for staff to take a vacation from July 30-Aug. 4. Remember, we are open Tuesday-Friday from 9 a.m.4:30 p.m. I HOPE Distribution Center offers great deals on home supplies



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HERE’S MY CARDKeep the number of these locally owned businesses on hand for all of your service & shopping needs. Put your card in this space for six weeks for Only $90! Call us at 239-657-6000 or e-mail cbadsales@newszap.com for more info It all began in 1962. Fast forward 50 years and more than 35,000 graduates later, Edison State College continues to be a Southwest Florida leader in higher education. Our instructors are passionate about bringing real-world expertise to the classroom so our global market. See for yourself. Visit us on campus or online today. 863-674-6000www.edison.eduA Higher Degree of YouCheaper than the non-pro“ts and the traveling vets! Disclaimer: The Patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. 3 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 More on checkpointsChief Bloom, You seem unwilling to address the statistical evidence of hispanics being targeted by CSO checkpoints. Of 18 checkpoints since 2010, 9 have been in Immokalee, 4 in Golden Gate and 2 in Golden Gate Estates, areas w ith Collier County’s largest concentrations of Hispanics. The female driver of the May 25th incident, like most hispanics in Immokalee is afraid to report the incident, fearing retribution from the CSO, because hispanics in Immokalee are wary the CSO using traf c checkpoints as a means of discrimination. As evidence of CSO wrongdoing, please examine the May 25th traf c warning citation (ATTACHED) it is unsigned by the ofcer, which suggests violation of policy or criminal fraud by the CSO... I respectfully ask that you discontinue any future CSO traf c checkpoints in Immokalee. John Lundin Candidate for County Commissioner, District 5, DemocratImmokalee High School Hall of FameHello Immokalee and community friends, it’s time once again to submit names for the Immokalee High School Hall of Fame class of 2012. It gave us great pleasure to start the Hall of Fame in 2011 with our inaugural class which included some great names in the history of Immokalee High School. Many in this group have help build the tradition we have here today. That list included: Vic Kirk (Boys Basketball Coach), Bill Broxon (Football Coach), Ike Brown (Boys Track), Mary Stubs (Girls Track and Basketball), Johnny Smith (Football and Track), Edgerrin James (Football), John Weber (Football Coach) and Linda Ayer (I.H.S Contributor). Although these were the names chosen, each person who was nominated and completed an application last year is still eligible. If you were nominated and did not complete your application, do so and submit it to the high school as soon as possible. Any new potential candidates must be submitted to the high school by July 26. We would like to induct the next class at our rst regular season home football game on Friday, Sept. 14. Some items considered for induction include: Graduated from Immokalee High School for at least 5 years High school achievements Achievements beyond high school Established records Again we are only looking for potential candidates. If you are chosen as an applicant, you will receive further instructions about the process. I would like to say thank you to the community for all your support. Continue to encourage our young people to be their best and to keep The Immokalee Pride Alive! Yours in Activities, Tony Allen, Activities Director Letters to the Editor Local weather forecast for Immokalee and surrounding areas: Thursday: A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after 2 p.m. Widespread haze. Mostly sunny, with a high near 93. Calm wind becoming east around 6 mph in the afternoon. Thursday night: A 10 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms before 8 p.m. Mostly clear, with a low around 71. East wind around 7 mph. Extended ForecastFriday: A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after 2 p.m. Widespread haze. Mostly sunny, with a high near 93. East wind 5 to 7 mph. Friday night: A 10 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms before 8 p.m. Partly cloudy, with a low around 71. East wind 5 to 7 mph. Saturday: A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 91. East wind around 6 mph. Saturday night: A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, w ith a low around 72. East wind 5 to 7 mph. Sunday: A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 89. East wind around 8 mph. W eather Forecast Lipman has acquired a packing house from Manteca, California-based Ace Tomato Co., Inc., a tomato packer and fresh produce distributor. The newly acquired facility will join Lipman’s nationwide network of packing, repacking and processing companies after the 2012 growing season concludes. “We will continue to operate the packing house throughout the remainder of 2012. After that, we will turn the facilities over to Lipman,” said Kathleen Lagorio Janssen, president of Ace Tomato and daughter of the company’s founder, George B. Lagorio. “We are pleased to work with Lipman – another family owned produce company whose values and traditions are similar to ours.” This acquisition is Lipman’s fourth in eight months and is a key component to the company’s nationwide expansion. “As a year-round supplier, it’s critical that we operate in geographically and seasonall y diverse areas,” said Gerry Odell, chief farming of cer for Lipman. “This acquisition expands our reach in California and will allo w Lipman to increase distribution of fresh produce and tomatoes to customers in western states.” Lipman commands a signi cant percentage of the fresh tomato industry with 30 locations throughout the United States and Mexico. Lipman acquires packing house from Ace Tomato By Patty Brant Immokalee Bulletin Debra Tolar, a resident of LaBelle, will be available to sign copies of her book, Paint Me Black All Over, at Immokalee Branch Library Thursday, July 26, from 5-7 p.m. Heather Marie Fry was pretty, vivacious, popular, smart and witty. Everybody in town knew her and loved her. She was the pride of her teachers and as loving and kind as she was talented. But she was starting to get headaches, and they were rapidly growing worse. When her mother took her to the doctor, she was told that Heather was ne, but Heather’s health continued to deteriorate. Finally, they found someone who had the answer. Heather had a brain tumor. It was inoperable. Heather was twelve at the time. The doctors found the answer but not a solution. The best they could do was keep Heather as comfortable as possible for as long as possible. Family and friends rallied around Heather and Debra for support. Paint Me Black All Over is the story of a mother’s quest to nd the best help possible for her ill daughter and her struggle to keep her family together. Debra Tolar recounts the last year in the life of her daughter, Heather; the multiple bouts o f radiation and chemotherapy; and all the pain and sorro w that went along with it. But amidst all the sorrow, Debra also relates a message of hope and joy, of the friends and support she found, and of the never-ending strength of her daughter. Paint Me Black All Over is a heart-wrenching account of childhood cancer that will inspire others in similar situations to never give up the ght. Area author to hold book signing at library



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-Don’t wait until the last minute for mandatory back to school immunizations-The Collier County Health Department encourages all parents and caregivers to check the immunization status and school requirements for their children. As children and families across Collier County prepare to start another school year, it is vital that all students have their required immunizations. Immunization documentation on a DOH Form 680, Certi cation of Immunization, is required for all students in grades pre-Kindergarten (K) through 12. "We encourage everyone to get your children up-to-date with their immunizations and not wait for the school rush," states Dr. Joan Colfer, Director of the Collier County Health Department. "There is no time like the present to update children's immunizations and provide them with the required documentation to attend school." Colfer reminds, "Immunizations protect your child as well as his or her siblings, playmates and classmates from a variety of childhood illnesses including: Whooping Cough, Polio, Chickenpox, Measles, Mumps, Tetanus and Hepatitis. Immunizations are one of the most important steps parents can take for the health of their children." The Health Department in Immokalee (419 1st Street North) offers free immunizations for children through 18 years of age. Clinic hours are Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Appointments are not necessary. For questions, please call 252-7300. Documentation for required immunizations is mandatory for all students entering, attending, or transferring into a Florida school in grades pre-Kindergarten (K) through 12 as detailed in the Immunization Guidelines for Florida Schools, Childcare Facilities, and Family Daycare Homes. A 2012-2013 yer outlining school requirements is available here. The Bureau of Immunization launched their new website www.immunize orida. com to bring together the best resources on vaccines and provide consumers with easyto-understand vaccination information. The Department of Health (DOH) Online Newsroom has additional tools on immunization including an Ask the Expert video with Chuck Alexander and a public service announcement for parents called "Get On Board" which encourages school-aged children to get their immunizations in time for back to school. Follow us on Twitter at @HealthyFla and on Facebook. For news story ideas, interviews, videos and more from DOH Communications visit the DOH Online Newsroom. Health Dept. urges parents to get children immunized NEED FLOOD INSURANCE??? Did you know... Flood insurance is now required in Immokalee if your home has a mortgage. Just an inch of water can cause costly damage to your property. Homeowners insurance does not cover ”ood damage, rising water. Its important to buy insurance before ”oodwaters start to rise, there is a 30 day waiting period if not required by lender. Last year, one-third of all claims paid by the NFIP were for policies in low-risk communities. Contact us at Bruce Hendry Insurance for a FREE FLOOD QUOTE at 239-657-3614 florida.newszap.com Check out these new features: • Daily Local News Updates • New interactive and easy to navigate format • Plus much, much more!Come see for yourself! 4 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 The Florida Department of Education has released the 2012 school grades for elementary and middle schools across the state. High school grades will be released later in the school year. We are encouraged by the increase in the percentage of our schools scoring an "A." Statewide the percentage of "A's" from 2011 to 2012 dropped 15% from 58% to 43%. In Collier County the percentage of schools receiving "A's" increased 16% from 38% to 54%. In 2011, Collier had 20% fewer "A's" than the state while this year Collier has 11% more "A's" than the state. This is an outstanding accomplishment, particularly in a year when accountability standards were increased. Overall, a total of 39 schools in Collier County (excluding high schools and charter schools) were graded by the State. Of the schools graded both in FY11 and FY12, 21 schools received an "A" in FY12 compared to 15 schools in FY11. Twenty-seven schools, out of 39, were graded "A" or "B." Nine schools were graded "C" and three schools received a "D" grade. There are no "F" schools this year. Note: Excluding high schools and charter schools Of the 29 elementary schools with grades, 9 schools improved one grade, Manatee Elementary increased by two letter grades, 6 schools improved to an "A" grade, one school dropped to a "D", and there was no "F" school. Eighteen schools maintained the same letter grade. Of the 10 middle schools with grades, eight schools maintained the letter grade from the previous year and two schools dropped one letter grade. Other tables showed the elementary and middle school grades for FY11 and FY12. Table 5 shows a comparison between Collier County and the state. Compared to last year, Collier increased in the number of "A" schools while the State dropped. The results released today indicate three of our schools have lower grades than they did last year. This does not mean our students are not doing as well as they did last year. The Department of Education (DOE) expected the combination of changes to cause a drop in some schools' grades. We know the increased expectations will better prepare our students for the rigor of the Common Core State Standards and the aligned assessment. The DOE reminds us that each time Florida's school grading system has increased expectations student performance has improved over the course of time. However, lower school grades are disheartening as our teachers, students, administrators, and parents/community members work diligently every day to make sure highquality teaching leads to increased student learning. High school grades will be released later in the school year. Fifty percent of the high school grade is comprised of non-FCAT components which are not yet released by the State. These components include graduation rate of all students and those identi ed as academically at risk, participation and performance of students in accelerated coursework, and postsecondary readiness of students. The components for the calculation of school grades have changed somewhat for this past school year. The changes for elementary and middle schools are as follows: Uses new rigorous achievement level cut scores for FCAT 2.0 Reading and Mathematics and Algebra 1; Incorporates students with disabilities in Reading, Mathematics, Writing, and Science performance components in the same way as other students; Includes English Language Learners in Reading, Mathematics, Writing, and Science performance components like other students after only being in school one year and one day (instead of two years as previously required); Provides additional expectations for learning gains for students in levels 1 and 2 with additional weighting for those who exceed the expectations; Increases the weighting of learning gains for students moving into levels 4 and 5 from lower levels; Resets the Writing standards to 3.0; Allows the use of the Algebra 1 Endof-Course assessment scores in the middle school in lieu of the FCAT 2.0 scores; Adds a new component of acceleration for middle school grades which would include participation and performance on high-school level End-of-Course assessments. These changes have raised the bar and we do embrace setting high, yet realistic standards. State releases school grades District encouraged If you are the parent or guardian of an Immokalee student, this information is for y ou. All Collier County Public Schools in Immokalee will be changing student arrival and dismissal times beginning on the rst day of school, Monday, Aug. 20. The new hours for each school are listed below. Parents please make note of the new times and share them with your child. SCHOOL ARRIVAL DISMISSAL Eden Park Elem.-8:15 a.m.3:10 p.m. Highlands Elem.8:33 a.m. 2:58 p.m. Lake Trafford Elem.-8 a.m.3:30 p.m. Pinecrest Elem.-8:33 a.m.2:58 p.m. Village Oaks Elem.-8:33 a.m.-2:58 p.m. Immokalee Middle-8:58 a.m. 3:43 p.m. Immokalee High 7:05 a.m.-2:23 p.m. In order to accommodate the revised arrival and dismissal times, bus schedules will be adjusted. All bus schedules will be available online (http://bus.collierschools.com) by Tuesday, Aug. 7, and Immokalee-speci c schedules will be published in the Immokalee Bulletin on Thursday, Aug. 9. All after-school program times at Immokalee schools will also be adjusted based on the new school dismissal times. Questions? Please contact the Communications and Community Engagement Department at 239-377-0180. Immokalee district schools changing student hours



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Lipman, North America’s largest eld tomato grower, has committed to donating up to $35,000 to the Imaginarium Science Center in Fort Myers. The Imaginarium Group, Inc. – the nonpro t that supports the facility – will be gifted a match for all donations acquired until October 28 (or until the match is satis ed). The funds will be used to make improvements to the newly named Lipman Family Courtyard, which will serve as an integral part of The Caloosahatchee Experience exhibit (currently in phase II of construction). The area will be landscaped to include native and “Florida-friendly” plants and a butter y garden. “We rely on support from companies like Lipman to provide funds for educational programs and exhibitions,” said Matt Johnson, executive director of the Imaginarium Science Center. The nonpro t dedicated the Lipman Family Courtyard and kicked off fundraising for this project during its 2012 Cherish Gala. Once complete, the Lipman Family Courtyard will serve as a gathering area for educational programs, special events, and eld-trip orientations. Lipman provides matching grant funding for Science Center Celebrations .newszap.com/celebrationsEngaged? Just married? Golden anniversary? Birthday? Holiday? New baby? Share your news in print and onlineFor a modest charge, each package includes: and family Submit your good news today at Nationwide Insurance comes to ImmokaleeNationwide Insurance has partnered with Bruce Hendry Insurance in Immokalee offering Auto, Business Insurance, Life Insurance, Workers Comp, Boat, Motorcycle, RV and more... Call or stop by for an One Your SideŽ review. 5 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 Peace through Service theme announced for Rotary International“Peace is not something that can only be achieved through agreements, by governments, or through heroic struggles. It is something that we can nd and that we can achieve, every day in many simple ways.” Peace has different meanings for different people, Rotary International President, Sakuji Tanaka said. “No de nition is right, and no de nition is wrong,” he said. “However we use the word, that is what peace means for us. “No matter how we use, or understand the word, Rotary can help us to achieve it,” he said. Mr. Tanaka, a businessman from the greater Tokyo metropolitan area, shared how becoming a Rotarian broadened his understanding of the world. After joining the Rotary Club of Yashio, in 1975, he began to realize that his life’s purpose was not to make more money, but to be useful to other people. “I realized that by helping others, even in the simplest of ways, I could help to build peace,” Mr. Tanaka said. He noted that the tradition of putting the needs of society above the needs of the individual helped his country rebuild after the tsunami and earthquake in March of 2011. “This is a lesson that I think the whole w orld can learn from, in a positive way. When we see the needs of others as more important than our own needs — when we focus our energies on a shared goal that is for the good of all — this changes everything,” he said. “It changes our priorities in a completely fundamental way. And it changes how we understand the idea of peace.” “In Rotary, our business is not pro t. Our business is peace,” he said. “Our reward is not nancial, but the happiness and satisfaction is a better, more peaceful world, one that we have achieved through our own efforts,” Mr. Tanaka said. Local Rotary Club welcomes international guest speaker Courtesy photoRotary International President, Sakuji Tanaka visited with local Immokalee Rotarians recently. He brought with him a message for all Rotarians to carry with them, “Peace through Service.” By Matt KindermannSpecial to the Immokalee Bulletin Just as home owners should consider a licensed contractor for home repairs, parents should consider a licensed child care facility for the care of their children. Child care facilities organized under the Department of Children and Families (DCF) are categorized as one of the following: Licensed Child Care Facility, Licensed Family Child Care Home, Licensed Large Family Child Care Home, Licensed Specialized Facility for Mildly Ill Children or as a Registered Family Day Care Home. All licensed facilities are subject to onsite inspections by DCF except Registered Homes, which are not site inspected but do have to comply with employee certi cation requirements. In addition, all Licensed and Registered facilities must abide by state rules concerning staff credentials, capacity and ratio limits, safety and health precautions and proper record keeping. To nd licensed child care facilities and homes, go to www.dcf.state. .us/programs/childcare and click on “Child Care Provider Search.” All direct care staff of Licensed and Registered facilities must be credentialed by attending a 40 hour DCF course and receive 10 hours of continuing training each year thereafter. Credentialing classes are offered on-site in Lee and Collier counties, or they can be taken on-line. The classes cost $160, and the credential is essential in order to gain employment in the child care industry. Child care job seekers should be aware that there are currently more quali ed workers than available jobs in his eld. Competition is stiff and the median income in the Fort Myers metropolitan area is low at $19,300 or about $9.50 an hour. You can nd the credential class information at www.dcf.state. .us/programs/ childcare and click on “Course Registration.” Workforce funds do not currently cover the cost of credentialing because most positions pay less than the level of self-suf ciency. Residents of Collier County can receive scholarships for the credentialing and more information can be found at www.collierchildcare.org. Southwest Florida Works is the regional state workforce board for Hendry, Glades, Charlotte, Lee and Collier counties. For job search assistance or employer support, speak with an employment representative nearest you by going to www.sw works. org and click on “Locations.” Career focus on child care Matt Kindermann The Democratic Club of Immokalee will meet on Tuesday, July 24, at 6:45 p.m. at Rib City, 621 North 15th Street, Immokalee, 239-657-4003. The club will discuss the upcoming August 14 primary election and ballot races and issues. The meetings are open to all. Immokalee area Democratic Club plans to meet



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For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Employment Full Time Animal Control Of cer (Seminole Tribe of Florida Immokalee Reservation): Enforce ordinance & state laws pertaining to animal control. Patrol & respond to animal control issues. HS Dip/GED reqd. Animal Control Of cer License. 3 yrs.exp.. Able to work varied hours & on-call. Valid FL DL. Contact: joshualohn@semtribe.com Drivers: Dedicated Account! Top Pay, Bene ts, Miles, Great Home-Time & More! Werner Enterprises: 1-888-567-4854PIPE LAYERS & FOREMAN experienced in water & wastewater. Labors and Equipment Operators for a project located in Immokalee, Please call Jay Bright at 561-902-4660 starting 7-16-12. Employment Full Time For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Business Opportunities NOTICEIndependent Newspapers will never accept any advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises of guaranteed income from work-athome programs if it sounds too good to be true, chances are that it is. If you have questions or doubts about any ad on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the Better Business Bureau at 772-878-2010 for previous complaints. Some 800 and 900 telephone numbers may require an extra charge, as well as long distance toll costs. We will do our best to alert our reader of these charges in the ads, but occasionally we may not be aware of the charges. Therefore, if you call a number out of your area, use caution. For more listings, go to www.newszap.com AppliancesWASHER & DRYERKenmore stackable. In LaBelle. $300. Call 239-770-5729 How do you find a job in todays competitive market? In the employment section of the classifieds For more listings, go to www.newszap.com ApartmentsCORAL PINES APARTMENTS~ IMMOKALEE ~Apts. 601 to 613 Nassau St., 2BR, Central A/C, heat, carpet, verticals, laundry on premises. Convenient location in quiet residential area. $600 includes water/sewer/trash No Application Fee. Apply at 601 Nassau St. #4 Immokalee or Call 239-694-1951 Apartments ApartmentsLOOKING FOR AFFORDABLE RENT? Come see Immokalee’s Newest Affordable Housing Community. Pay no more than 30% of your households adjusted monthly income for rent and utilities. ESPERANZA PLACE, affordable 1, 2 & 3Br Apts, Handicap unit available Energy ef cient appliances, washer/ dryer hook ups, spacious oor plans, community center on site with computer lab for resident use and classes. From access to Carl Kuehner Community Center educational and social programs. Must be farm or grove labor employed Call Rental Of ce at 657-2009 Mon-Fri, 8:00AM-5:00PM 2693 Marianna Way, #308 (TDD 1-800-955-8771) Equal Housing Opportunity Houses RentFarm Worker Village invites you to come home. Available now 1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom rental homes, starting as low as $425 per month. You may qualify for Rental assistance. Please Call us at: 239-657-3649 or stop by at 1800 Farm Worker Way. Looking for a place to hang your hat? Look no further than the classifieds. Shop here first! The classified ads For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Houses SaleLEHIGH ACRES 2/2 Condo, 55+, very good condition, smooth top electric range, frig, W/D, furnished. $60 condo fees. $39,000. Call 608-335-6008. For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Mobile HomeSale3br/2bath doublewide located on E Road between LaBelle and Immokalee on 1/2 acre lot. Owner nancing good or bad credit $5,000 down and $500 monthly. Call Kenny 863-673-4325 863-675-8888 4br/2bath doublewide owner nancing on 1/2 acre lot between LaBelle and Immokalee. $5,000 down and $510 monthly Call Kenny 863-673-4325 or 863-675-8888 FOR SALE: 3 BR, 2 BA, Good condition. New central air and heat. Set up in Davernport Mobile Home Park. Nice neighborhood. $11,000 (239)823-1254 Buying a car? Look in the classifieds. Selling a car? Look in the classifieds. How fast can your car go? It can go even faster when you sell it in the classifieds. For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Campers/RVsWanted all Travel Trailers, Motor Homes and Fifth Wheels. Any Condition, Cash paid on the spot. Call 941-347-7171 For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Automobiles1998 FORD F150 XLT TRITON ONE OWNER TITLE IN HAND, 136,700 miles, maroon, V-8, extended cab, three doors, bed liner, interior like new, power locks, automatic transmission, air conditioning. $4,500 (954)643-7292 or (410)913-5754 When doing those chores is doing you in, its time to look for a helper in the classifieds. Love the earth Recycle your used items by selling them in the classifieds. Your next job could be in todays classifieds. Did you look for it? Its never too late to find the perfect gift. Look for it in the classifieds. When you want something sold, advertise in the classifieds. Earn some extra cash. Sell your used items in the classifieds Reading a newspaper provides the opportunity to get involved in your community.No wonder newspaper readers are more popular! Reading a newspaper makes you a more informed and interesting person.No wonder newspaper readers are more successful! 6 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 Shop here first! The classified ads For more listings, go to www.newszap.com For more listings, go to www.newszap.com



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Business & Service Directory AUCTION ROOFING Metal Roofs Re-Roofs Roof Repairs Seamless Gutters Soffit & Fascia Free Estimates Lic# CCC037019 981 Cowboy Circle Office (863)675-7045 Fax (863)612-1158 7 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 Outdoor music festival includes Miami Food Trucks, live entertainment, costume contests, games, prizes and morePut on your favorite bell bottoms and highest platforms and head on over to Seminole Casino Immokalee’s “Fantasy of Funk” festival on Saturday, July 21, from 1 p.m. to 10 p.m. The outdoor event features performances by George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic, The Nouveaux Honkies, Bonerama, Glen David Andrews Band and Boogie Freaks. Attendees will enjoy more than 16 Miami Food Trucks, costume contests, trivia games and prizes. At 1 p.m., Florida’s own The Nouveaux Honkies will take the stage with a special funk only set. At 3 p.m. brass funk rock band Bonerama will bring New Orleans funk and jazzavored numbers to Immokalee. The band was formed by trombonists Mark Mullins and Craig Klein, both of whom had been members of Harry Connick Jr.’s big band from 1990 to 2006. Bonerama has been recognized as the “Best Rock Band” by the Big Easy Awards. At 5 p.m. funk/gospel/R&B act Glen David Andrews Band will perform. The highenergy ensemble veers from traditional jazz to gospel, rock, blues and funk, all in the same show. Andrews was inducted into the Louisiana Hall of Fame in 2010. He has also been named “Best Male Performer” by the Big Easy Awards and “Best R&B Performer” by the Best of the Beat Awards. At 7 p.m., the funkiest-dressed attendees will be invited on stage for the ultimate costume contest. The winner will receive a grand prize, along with bragging rights. The “Godfather of Funk” George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic will top off the music festival with an electrifying performance of generation-spanning jams, beginning at 7:30 p.m. This celebrated band is 26 members strong, fully prepared to bring dance fever to Southwest Florida. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997. They are also among Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of “100 Greatest Artists of All Time” (2002), SPIN Magazine’s “50 Greatest Bands of All Time” (2010), and VH1’s list of “The Greatest Artists of All Time” (2010). They have more than 40 R&B hit singles and three platinum albums. DJ Ramo G will also spin the latest hits in between stage acts. Additionally, Y100 Miami, 98.9 The Beach, 95.3 The River, and 105.5 The Beat will provide entertainment with music, games and giveaways. The Miami Food Trucks will serve up delectable treats throughout the festival. They include Chef On 4 Wheels, ChurroMania, Dolce Gourmet Cupcakes, Kitchen Kabab, Kona Ice, Lan on the Go, Miami Spice Grill, Mobile Culinary Kitchen, Nosh Truck, Out of Many, Roly Poly, Roy’s BabyBacks, South Beach Concession, Tango Grill and Waf eosophy. In addition to food trucks, there will be water, sodas, beer and wine for sale. No coolers and no pets. Bring your own chairs. Rain or shine. Festival tickets are $25 in advance and are available at the Casino Cage or by calling 1-800-218-0007. Player’s Club members will receive a discount and should visit the Player’s Club for more details. Online tickets are $28 and can be purchased at www. seminolecasinoevents.com. Tickets can be purchased the day of the show at the gate for $30. Must be 21 years of age or older. To kick off the day of funk, Seminole Casino Immokalee will host a free party at its Zig Zag Lounge on Friday, July 20, from 6 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. 95.3 The River’s on air personality Amy Lynn will host the evening’s events. From 6:45 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., attendees can register to participate in contests. There’ll also be pet rock decorating, temporary tattoos, a 1970s trivia contest, a Rubik’s cube race and more. Party-goers out tted in their best will be rewarded with great prizes. They’ll also groove to live tunes from The Nouveaux Honkies and disco band Boogie Freaks. Also in the Zig Zag Lounge on Friday, from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m., the casino celebrates ladies with complimentary cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, great prizes and giveaways. Ladies must be Seminole Casino Players Club members (membership is free). Must be 21 years of age or older. Seminole Casino Immokalee is easily accessible to all of Southwest Florida via I-75, and Southwest Florida International Airport is only a 45-minute drive from the casino. Located between Miami and Naples, north of Alligator Alley on Highway 846, it’s ve blocks south of Highway 29. Approximatel y 30 minutes from Naples and Fort Myers, the casino is a 90-minute drive from Miami and Fort Lauderdale. For directions or other information call toll-free 800-218-0007; fax 239-658-0204 or write: 506 South 1st Street, Immokalee, Florida 34142; www.seminoleimmokaleecasino.com. George Clinton to perform at Seminole Casino Immokalee Inaugural ‘Fantasy of Funk’ concert The David Lawrence Center, Collier County’s only comprehensive, not-for-pro t mental health and substance abuse treatment facility serving children, adults and families, is pleased to announce that two grants awarded by Collier County will be used to purchase and install a new emergency back up generator with suf cient fuel capacity to work for up to 120 hours. The Collier County Housing, Human and V eteran Services has awarded the David Lawrence Center a Community Development Block Grant provided by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in the amount of $175,000 and the Collier County Health Facilities Authority provided an additional $50,000 grant to fund the generator. This critical funding will greatly upgrade the Center’s ability to provide auxiliary power in three key buildings on the main campus off of Golden Gate Parkway. The new equipment will provide the capacity to generate full power to the Acute Care Building which houses the inpatient Crisis Stabilization Unit, Emergency Services Assessment Center, Collier County Baker Act Receiving Facility and Adult Detoxi cation Unit, the Adult Outpatient and Urgent Care Services Building and Administration which houses the servers that operate the Center’s electronic medical record data. Locally, HUD funds have been earmarked, in part, for infrastructure improvements for facilities that provide services that bene t individuals with low to moderate income and improve the conditions of life in Collier County. The Health Facilities Authority assists in the nancing of qualifying, nonpro t human health care facilities through the issuance of tax-exempt bonds. Gulf Coast Construction was awarded the contract and began installation this month. David Schimmel, CEO of the David Lawrence Center, states, “We are extremely pleased to have been awarded these grants to enhance our ability to provide life-saving mental health and substance abuse services to those in need. As a true local resource dedicated to Collier County, the Center relies on donations, fees and grants of this nature to invest in the health, safety and wellbeing of our community. We greatly appreciate our collaborative partnership with Collier County and their continued nancial support of our mission.” David Lawrence Center is a not-for-profit, behavioral health agency that provides comprehensive, innovative mental health and substance abuse services in Southwest Florida. In addition to helping children with behavioral, emotional and substance abuse challenges, the Center provides counseling and rehabilitative services to adults in crisis and individuals with persistent mental illness. David Lawrence Center has eight locations in Collier County and touches the lives of more than 30,000 people each year. It is David Lawrence Center’s mission to restore and rebuild the lives of all of those in need. For more information about David Lawrence Center call 239-455-8500 or visit www. DavidLawrenceCenter.org. County grants fund new emergency generator Free Health Fair coming to ImmokaleeImmokalee Health Fair is set for Sunday, J uly 29, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, Sanders Hall, South 9th Street, Immokalee. Enjoy complimentary health information, medical orientation and free health screenings! A lecture on How to prevent skin cancer will be presented as well as blood pressure screening, blood sugar testing and much more. For more information, please call 845-616-1509.Church to host youth eventBe a “B.A.B.E!” (Beautiful, Accepted, Blessed, Eternally Signi cant!) event. This event set for Aug. 25 from 9 a.m. until 8 p.m., is for middle and high school girls. Join Andrea Stephens and special guest Chandra Simmons. Middle school girls will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and high school girls from 4 to 8 p.m. Pizza will be served and every girl that attends will receive a free book. First United Methodist Church of Immokalee, 303 N 9th Street, Immokalee. For more information, please email the Church at fumc_ imm@yahoo.com, or call the Church of ce at 239-657-2841. Community News in Brief



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8 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 Special to the Immokalee Bulletin/Waddy ThompsonA Gallanule at Lake TraffordA relatively common sight in South Florida and the Everglades, this purple Gallanule (Water Hen) treks through the muck and marshy surface around Lake Trafford. These birds appreciate subtropical regions all over the world. They are very small, about the size of a bantam hen. They have long legs that allow them to run over oating vegetation. They have a noisy, squawky call and make their nest in rushes on or near the water. She’s affectionate. She’s feisty. Her brothers probably would agree she’s bossy. This 8-week-old golden retriever seems to have it all: good looks, a winning personality and a permanent job assisting a wounded veteran when she nishes school. But the one thing the Collier County Sheriff’s Ofce’s newest service-dogintraining doesn’t have is a name. Yet. You can help name her. Submit a name or vote for a name that has already been submitted by visiting CCSO’s Facebook page. The deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 24. Go to http://on.fb.me/ LV08xe to like us on Facebook and then submit your entry in the comment section underneath her photograph. If you want to vote for an entry that someone else has submitted, just click “Like” next to that name. The winning name will be the one that garners the most “likes.” The person who submits the name will receive a CCSO T-shirt. Name the CCSO service dog contest announced Courtesy photo/ CCSOAt just 8 weeks old, this cute little girl has got a lot of work ahead of her before she can become a best friend to a wounded veteran. First, she needs a name.



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Thursday, July 19, 2012 V ol. 45 No. 27 See Page 2 for information about how to contact the newspaper.newszap.comFree SpeechFree Ads Back to School shots -Get them now Page 4 Rotary Club welcomes guest ...Page 5 Letters to the Editor ...Page 3 Inside... Pup needs a name!... Page 8 The Immokalee Foundation, a nonpro t organization that provides educational opportunities for Immokalee's children, recently took 45 rising seniors from Immokalee High School on a campus tour of six Florida colleges over a period of three days. The students visited the University of South Florida in Tampa, University of Florida and Sante Fe College in Gainesville, Florida State University and Florida A&M University in Tallahassee and University of Central Florida in Orlando. TIF gave the students the chance to view the character and diversity offered by each institute of higher education an opportunity they may not have otherwise been given. Rose Celbeau was grateful for the experience, "Never in my TIF students visit six state college campuses Special to the Immokalee Bulletin/ TIFNearly four dozen Immokalee Foundation students got a taste of what collegiate life will be all about when they had the opportunity to visit six Florida college campuses. See TIF — Page 2 By Patty BrantImmokalee Bulletin Girl power isn't what it used to be. No pink posies and Barbie dolls here, but Elmira "Myra" Johnson is making it felt at American Legion Post 130. In the end, it's not Girl Power it's Veteran Power! The rst female commander of Post 130, Myra may be just getting her feet wet, but she has all the skills and experience necessary for the job, thanks to the Good Lord and Uncle Sam. From July 21, 1991, through October 20, 2000, she served aboard several ships, Myra learned to make her way on her own in the military. So, being the rst female commander of Post 130 is a natural for her. Her rst assignment was on the destroyer tender USS Puget Sound out of Norfolk, Va. Her experience working in the all-male environment in the Puget's print shop was an adjustment, she recalls, but mostly for New female Legion Post commander makes history Special to the Immokalee Bulletin/ Rick HeersSupplies galoreNeed home improvement supplies for your next project? I HOPE Distribution can help with lots of products with great prices and proceeds to bene t a good cause. See story bottom of Page 2 See VFW — Page 2 Cmdr. Elmira Johnson

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2 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 To Reach UsMailing Address: P.O. Box 518 LaBelle, FL 33975 Physical Address: 22 Ft. Thompson Ave. Website: www.newszap.com/immokaleeTo Submit NewsThe Immokalee Bulletin welcomes submissions from its readers. Opinions, calendar items, story ideas and photographs are welcome. Call (239) 657-6000 to reach our newsroom. The deadline for all news items is 11 a.m. on Monday prior to the following Thursdays publication. E-Mail: ibnews@newszap.comTo Place a Display AdPhone: (239) 657-6000 day for the following Thursdays publication E-mail: cbadsales@newszap.comBilling DepartmentE-mail: billteam@newszap.comTo Place a Classi“ed AdCall 1 -877 353-2424 to place it from home or go to www.newszap.comFor SubscriptionsPhone: 1-800-282-8586 Visit circulation.newszap.com or email readerservices@newszap.com.StaffNews Editor: Patty Brant Community News Editor: Dee Hamilton Advertising Services: Dale Conyers Advertising Services: Barbara Calfee Executive Editor: Katrina Elsken Publisher: Tom ByrdOur PurposeƒThe Caloosa Belle is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida. Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspaper to pursue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community. Since no dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on pro“t margins below industrystandards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in Independents mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the communitys deliberation of public issues.We Pledgeƒ To operate this newspaper as a public trust and work, through our dedication to conscientious journalism. their own intelligent decisions about public issues. purposeful neutrality, fairness, objectivity, fearlessness and compassion. debate, not to dominate it with our own opinions. the prominence it deserves. compassion. the men. “After all,” she notes, “I’ve always been a girl” When she rst came on board, she was greeted by signs placed by her fellow lithographers like “No females beyond this point.” They were testing her, trying to push her buttons. When she walked in and one of the sailors behind the counter told her no girls w ere allowed back there, she gave it right back, asking, “So, why are you back there?” It was the right comeback and she soon became part of the team. When the Puget was decommissioned, Myra was reassigned to the Shenandoah, another destroyer tender. She deployed on a Med Cruise, seeing Spain, Italy, Israel and France, and also was at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. When the Shenandoah was also decommissioned, she was assigned to the aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy out of Mayport, FL one of the rst female sailors to serve on an aircraft carrier. When she was undergoing a dif cult pregnancy, she was assigned shore duty in Pensacola for two years. Her two youngest children require special care, so sea duty w as out of question. “I loved the military,” Myra recalls, “but it’s hard on a family.” Ultimately, she made the dif cult decision to leave the Navy she just couldn’t leave her two young children to go out to sea. A Collier County girl, Myra was born in Naples and raised in Immokalee. She graduated from Immokalee High School in 1991. Her dad, Pedro Gonzalez, and grandmother, Aurelia Gonzalez (who will be 99 in September), are still there. She joined the Navy right after graduation. At just 17 years of age, she embarked on a whole new life but she points out that people “mature fast in the military.” “It didn’t faze me,” she said, “I earned the right to be there.” She joined the Navy because she wanted to get away and see what the world was like. “I always like to try something different,” she added, “experience life.” Myra’s oldest daughter Alyssa is going off to college and is now the one anxious to get out into the world. Myra just cautions her to remember that “Home is Home.” After all, Myra herself was gone for nine years, but of all the places she could have gone, she returned to this area. Home. Myra said she would recommend the military to young people but counsel them to stay single for their rst four years. “You need to have a strong, stable relationship to survive long deployments of up to two years,” she points out, ”You also need faith in yourself and to learn respect for authority to be successful in the military.” She added that the military teaches you not to take your blessings for granted; to appreciate what you’ve got. In Myra’s case, she said she had to beat the “trifecta” going into the military: she was female, Hispanic and young all obstacles that not everyone has. She said the military has been a source of pride in herself, but not because of these obstacles. “It only has to do with being a proud American. You appreciate what you have more when you earned it.” Myra became acquainted with the American Legion when she and her husband, Richard, were looking for a place to renew their wedding vows. She didn’t even know what the American Legion was, but when she met Legionnaires Tony Alvarez and Bill Davis she said she learned quickly. Now her entire family are members of the American Legion Family. Last year Myra served as historian. Her husband, Richard Kohutek, is Sergeant-at-Arms of the Sons of the Legion and all four children, Alyssa, Bryce, Corbyn and Novie are Junior Legionnaires. They have all helped with the post’s sh fries, blood drives and the veterans’ organization’s Fallen Heroes event, Memorial and Veterans Day celebrations as well as Christmas and Thanksgiving dinners. Alyssa attended Girls State and received the Legion Riders scholarship. Myra feels it’s important to “give back to the whole community,” not just the veterans, and she is teaching her kids that ethic. The Legion has some 300 members but is always looking for new ones. She said the Post members have a common respect for each other, no matter what their age, gender, background, when or where they served. The common denominator is they all served. Myra said over her year as commander, she hopes to guide the post to become even more involved in the community that has been so great in helping veterans with whatever they may need, to extend its ability to reach out. In addition to the Legion, Myra is active in the Firehouse Community Center with her kids. She wants to see local youth get involved in the Legion’s Oracle contest for kids, a scholarship speaking contest promoting patriotism, and hopes to build the alread y successful blood drive and Children & Youth Fund projects. She added that there is a misconception that the American Legion is a bar for old vets to tell war stories. It is a place where veterans can experience the comradeship o f the military, but it is so much more. Commander Myra Johnson invites veterans, and anyone with a close connection to a veteran, to check out this organization. Without an Ameircan Legion Post in Immokalee, local veterans are welcome and encouraged to join Post 130, which is located on Hwy. 80W in LaBelle. Call 863675-8300. For LaBelle’s Legionnaires, the adjustment to its rst female commander is already underway. The guys are learning fast: “She’s not a lady, she’s a veteran.” V FWContinued From Page 1 life would I have had the chance to experience a tour of college life, but thanks to The Immokalee Foundation, I did. What made me even more excited was the visit to one of my top choice universities. It was a really great trip for me.” In addition to touring each campus, students had the chance to meet with nancial aid personnel and administrators to help them understand what to expect and how to prepare for their future. At the University of South Florida and Florida State University, students even had the opportunity to dine at the campus cafeteria. Joel Garcia said the experiences helped him learn rsthand what it takes to be in college, “Throughout the whole college tour, I was able to experience what it was like to be in college for a day and experience the unique atmosphere each college has to offer. It opened my eyes as to what college life has in store for me. It includes a lot of work, perseverance and walking.” For many students, the tour was an eye-opener. “I learned that colleges do not always help with nding housing, food or employment,” said Jesus Velazco. “It is your choice to decide what you would like to do in college.” Arturo Olvera said, “I learned work ethic is needed to get into college. I am thankful for the experience.” The Immokalee Foundation has a range of programs that focus on building pathways to success through college and career development, mentoring and tutoring, and opportunities for broadening experiences and life skills development. To learn more about volunteering as a mentor or for additional information, call 239-430-9122 or visit www.immokaleefoundation.org. TIFContinued From Page 1 By Rick HeersSpecial to the Immokalee Bulletin New deliveries of valuable goods are arriving each week at the I HOPE Distribution Center-deals that you can’t afford to miss! New shipments include dozens of brand new, impact windows for as little as $51-a savings of nearly $200; brand new wooden exterior doors, one with side-lights, originally over $2,200 on sale for $700; fantastic ceramic tile, granite and marble-marked down 75 percent; boxes of new bathroom faucets-were $79, now $25; lots and lots of Pergo and other ooring (limited quantities) but marked down from $50-$65 a box to $12-$15 per box depending on brand; blinds as low as $5 each. This week’s latest arrivals are gently used bedroom (queen size) furniture including mattress, box springs and bed frame. This week, the IDC will be open Saturda y from 9-noon. Credit/debit cards gladly accepted. The IDC will be closed for staff to take a vacation from July 30-Aug. 4. Remember, we are open Tuesday-Friday from 9 a.m.4:30 p.m. I HOPE Distribution Center offers great deals on home supplies

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HERE’S MY CARDKeep the number of these locally owned businesses on hand for all of your service & shopping needs. Put your card in this space for six weeks for Only $90! Call us at 239-657-6000 or e-mail cbadsales@newszap.com for more info It all began in 1962. Fast forward 50 years and more than 35,000 graduates later, Edison State College continues to be a Southwest Florida leader in higher education. Our instructors are passionate about bringing real-world expertise to the classroom so our global market. See for yourself. Visit us on campus or online today. 863-674-6000www.edison.eduA Higher Degree of YouCheaper than the non-pro“ts and the traveling vets! Disclaimer: The Patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. 3 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 More on checkpointsChief Bloom, You seem unwilling to address the statistical evidence of hispanics being targeted by CSO checkpoints. Of 18 checkpoints since 2010, 9 have been in Immokalee, 4 in Golden Gate and 2 in Golden Gate Estates, areas w ith Collier County’s largest concentrations of Hispanics. The female driver of the May 25th incident, like most hispanics in Immokalee is afraid to report the incident, fearing retribution from the CSO, because hispanics in Immokalee are wary the CSO using traf c checkpoints as a means of discrimination. As evidence of CSO wrongdoing, please examine the May 25th traf c warning citation (ATTACHED) it is unsigned by the ofcer, which suggests violation of policy or criminal fraud by the CSO... I respectfully ask that you discontinue any future CSO traf c checkpoints in Immokalee. John Lundin Candidate for County Commissioner, District 5, DemocratImmokalee High School Hall of FameHello Immokalee and community friends, it’s time once again to submit names for the Immokalee High School Hall of Fame class of 2012. It gave us great pleasure to start the Hall of Fame in 2011 with our inaugural class which included some great names in the history of Immokalee High School. Many in this group have help build the tradition we have here today. That list included: Vic Kirk (Boys Basketball Coach), Bill Broxon (Football Coach), Ike Brown (Boys Track), Mary Stubs (Girls Track and Basketball), Johnny Smith (Football and Track), Edgerrin James (Football), John Weber (Football Coach) and Linda Ayer (I.H.S Contributor). Although these were the names chosen, each person who was nominated and completed an application last year is still eligible. If you were nominated and did not complete your application, do so and submit it to the high school as soon as possible. Any new potential candidates must be submitted to the high school by July 26. We would like to induct the next class at our rst regular season home football game on Friday, Sept. 14. Some items considered for induction include: Graduated from Immokalee High School for at least 5 years High school achievements Achievements beyond high school Established records Again we are only looking for potential candidates. If you are chosen as an applicant, you will receive further instructions about the process. I would like to say thank you to the community for all your support. Continue to encourage our young people to be their best and to keep The Immokalee Pride Alive! Yours in Activities, Tony Allen, Activities Director Letters to the Editor Local weather forecast for Immokalee and surrounding areas: Thursday: A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after 2 p.m. Widespread haze. Mostly sunny, with a high near 93. Calm wind becoming east around 6 mph in the afternoon. Thursday night: A 10 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms before 8 p.m. Mostly clear, with a low around 71. East wind around 7 mph. Extended ForecastFriday: A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after 2 p.m. Widespread haze. Mostly sunny, with a high near 93. East wind 5 to 7 mph. Friday night: A 10 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms before 8 p.m. Partly cloudy, with a low around 71. East wind 5 to 7 mph. Saturday: A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 91. East wind around 6 mph. Saturday night: A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, w ith a low around 72. East wind 5 to 7 mph. Sunday: A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 89. East wind around 8 mph. W eather Forecast Lipman has acquired a packing house from Manteca, California-based Ace Tomato Co., Inc., a tomato packer and fresh produce distributor. The newly acquired facility will join Lipman’s nationwide network of packing, repacking and processing companies after the 2012 growing season concludes. “We will continue to operate the packing house throughout the remainder of 2012. After that, we will turn the facilities over to Lipman,” said Kathleen Lagorio Janssen, president of Ace Tomato and daughter of the company’s founder, George B. Lagorio. “We are pleased to work with Lipman – another family owned produce company whose values and traditions are similar to ours.” This acquisition is Lipman’s fourth in eight months and is a key component to the company’s nationwide expansion. “As a year-round supplier, it’s critical that we operate in geographically and seasonall y diverse areas,” said Gerry Odell, chief farming of cer for Lipman. “This acquisition expands our reach in California and will allo w Lipman to increase distribution of fresh produce and tomatoes to customers in western states.” Lipman commands a signi cant percentage of the fresh tomato industry with 30 locations throughout the United States and Mexico. Lipman acquires packing house from Ace Tomato By Patty Brant Immokalee Bulletin Debra Tolar, a resident of LaBelle, will be available to sign copies of her book, Paint Me Black All Over, at Immokalee Branch Library Thursday, July 26, from 5-7 p.m. Heather Marie Fry was pretty, vivacious, popular, smart and witty. Everybody in town knew her and loved her. She was the pride of her teachers and as loving and kind as she was talented. But she was starting to get headaches, and they were rapidly growing worse. When her mother took her to the doctor, she was told that Heather was ne, but Heather’s health continued to deteriorate. Finally, they found someone who had the answer. Heather had a brain tumor. It was inoperable. Heather was twelve at the time. The doctors found the answer but not a solution. The best they could do was keep Heather as comfortable as possible for as long as possible. Family and friends rallied around Heather and Debra for support. Paint Me Black All Over is the story of a mother’s quest to nd the best help possible for her ill daughter and her struggle to keep her family together. Debra Tolar recounts the last year in the life of her daughter, Heather; the multiple bouts o f radiation and chemotherapy; and all the pain and sorro w that went along with it. But amidst all the sorrow, Debra also relates a message of hope and joy, of the friends and support she found, and of the never-ending strength of her daughter. Paint Me Black All Over is a heart-wrenching account of childhood cancer that will inspire others in similar situations to never give up the ght. Area author to hold book signing at library

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-Don’t wait until the last minute for mandatory back to school immunizations-The Collier County Health Department encourages all parents and caregivers to check the immunization status and school requirements for their children. As children and families across Collier County prepare to start another school year, it is vital that all students have their required immunizations. Immunization documentation on a DOH Form 680, Certi cation of Immunization, is required for all students in grades pre-Kindergarten (K) through 12. "We encourage everyone to get your children up-to-date with their immunizations and not wait for the school rush," states Dr. Joan Colfer, Director of the Collier County Health Department. "There is no time like the present to update children's immunizations and provide them with the required documentation to attend school." Colfer reminds, "Immunizations protect your child as well as his or her siblings, playmates and classmates from a variety of childhood illnesses including: Whooping Cough, Polio, Chickenpox, Measles, Mumps, Tetanus and Hepatitis. Immunizations are one of the most important steps parents can take for the health of their children." The Health Department in Immokalee (419 1st Street North) offers free immunizations for children through 18 years of age. Clinic hours are Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Appointments are not necessary. For questions, please call 252-7300. Documentation for required immunizations is mandatory for all students entering, attending, or transferring into a Florida school in grades pre-Kindergarten (K) through 12 as detailed in the Immunization Guidelines for Florida Schools, Childcare Facilities, and Family Daycare Homes. A 2012-2013 yer outlining school requirements is available here. The Bureau of Immunization launched their new website www.immunize orida. com to bring together the best resources on vaccines and provide consumers with easyto-understand vaccination information. The Department of Health (DOH) Online Newsroom has additional tools on immunization including an Ask the Expert video with Chuck Alexander and a public service announcement for parents called "Get On Board" which encourages school-aged children to get their immunizations in time for back to school. Follow us on Twitter at @HealthyFla and on Facebook. For news story ideas, interviews, videos and more from DOH Communications visit the DOH Online Newsroom. Health Dept. urges parents to get children immunized NEED FLOOD INSURANCE??? Did you know... Flood insurance is now required in Immokalee if your home has a mortgage. Just an inch of water can cause costly damage to your property. Homeowners insurance does not cover ”ood damage, rising water. Its important to buy insurance before ”oodwaters start to rise, there is a 30 day waiting period if not required by lender. Last year, one-third of all claims paid by the NFIP were for policies in low-risk communities. Contact us at Bruce Hendry Insurance for a FREE FLOOD QUOTE at 239-657-3614 florida.newszap.com Check out these new features: • Daily Local News Updates • New interactive and easy to navigate format • Plus much, much more!Come see for yourself! 4 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 The Florida Department of Education has released the 2012 school grades for elementary and middle schools across the state. High school grades will be released later in the school year. We are encouraged by the increase in the percentage of our schools scoring an "A." Statewide the percentage of "A's" from 2011 to 2012 dropped 15% from 58% to 43%. In Collier County the percentage of schools receiving "A's" increased 16% from 38% to 54%. In 2011, Collier had 20% fewer "A's" than the state while this year Collier has 11% more "A's" than the state. This is an outstanding accomplishment, particularly in a year when accountability standards were increased. Overall, a total of 39 schools in Collier County (excluding high schools and charter schools) were graded by the State. Of the schools graded both in FY11 and FY12, 21 schools received an "A" in FY12 compared to 15 schools in FY11. Twenty-seven schools, out of 39, were graded "A" or "B." Nine schools were graded "C" and three schools received a "D" grade. There are no "F" schools this year. Note: Excluding high schools and charter schools Of the 29 elementary schools with grades, 9 schools improved one grade, Manatee Elementary increased by two letter grades, 6 schools improved to an "A" grade, one school dropped to a "D", and there was no "F" school. Eighteen schools maintained the same letter grade. Of the 10 middle schools with grades, eight schools maintained the letter grade from the previous year and two schools dropped one letter grade. Other tables showed the elementary and middle school grades for FY11 and FY12. Table 5 shows a comparison between Collier County and the state. Compared to last year, Collier increased in the number of "A" schools while the State dropped. The results released today indicate three of our schools have lower grades than they did last year. This does not mean our students are not doing as well as they did last year. The Department of Education (DOE) expected the combination of changes to cause a drop in some schools' grades. We know the increased expectations will better prepare our students for the rigor of the Common Core State Standards and the aligned assessment. The DOE reminds us that each time Florida's school grading system has increased expectations student performance has improved over the course of time. However, lower school grades are disheartening as our teachers, students, administrators, and parents/community members work diligently every day to make sure highquality teaching leads to increased student learning. High school grades will be released later in the school year. Fifty percent of the high school grade is comprised of non-FCAT components which are not yet released by the State. These components include graduation rate of all students and those identi ed as academically at risk, participation and performance of students in accelerated coursework, and postsecondary readiness of students. The components for the calculation of school grades have changed somewhat for this past school year. The changes for elementary and middle schools are as follows: Uses new rigorous achievement level cut scores for FCAT 2.0 Reading and Mathematics and Algebra 1; Incorporates students with disabilities in Reading, Mathematics, Writing, and Science performance components in the same way as other students; Includes English Language Learners in Reading, Mathematics, Writing, and Science performance components like other students after only being in school one year and one day (instead of two years as previously required); Provides additional expectations for learning gains for students in levels 1 and 2 with additional weighting for those who exceed the expectations; Increases the weighting of learning gains for students moving into levels 4 and 5 from lower levels; Resets the Writing standards to 3.0; Allows the use of the Algebra 1 Endof-Course assessment scores in the middle school in lieu of the FCAT 2.0 scores; Adds a new component of acceleration for middle school grades which would include participation and performance on high-school level End-of-Course assessments. These changes have raised the bar and we do embrace setting high, yet realistic standards. State releases school grades District encouraged If you are the parent or guardian of an Immokalee student, this information is for y ou. All Collier County Public Schools in Immokalee will be changing student arrival and dismissal times beginning on the rst day of school, Monday, Aug. 20. The new hours for each school are listed below. Parents please make note of the new times and share them with your child. SCHOOL ARRIVAL DISMISSAL Eden Park Elem.-8:15 a.m.3:10 p.m. Highlands Elem.8:33 a.m. 2:58 p.m. Lake Trafford Elem.-8 a.m.3:30 p.m. Pinecrest Elem.-8:33 a.m.2:58 p.m. Village Oaks Elem.-8:33 a.m.-2:58 p.m. Immokalee Middle-8:58 a.m. 3:43 p.m. Immokalee High 7:05 a.m.-2:23 p.m. In order to accommodate the revised arrival and dismissal times, bus schedules will be adjusted. All bus schedules will be available online (http://bus.collierschools.com) by Tuesday, Aug. 7, and Immokalee-speci c schedules will be published in the Immokalee Bulletin on Thursday, Aug. 9. All after-school program times at Immokalee schools will also be adjusted based on the new school dismissal times. Questions? Please contact the Communications and Community Engagement Department at 239-377-0180. Immokalee district schools changing student hours

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Lipman, North America’s largest eld tomato grower, has committed to donating up to $35,000 to the Imaginarium Science Center in Fort Myers. The Imaginarium Group, Inc. – the nonpro t that supports the facility – will be gifted a match for all donations acquired until October 28 (or until the match is satis ed). The funds will be used to make improvements to the newly named Lipman Family Courtyard, which will serve as an integral part of The Caloosahatchee Experience exhibit (currently in phase II of construction). The area will be landscaped to include native and “Florida-friendly” plants and a butter y garden. “We rely on support from companies like Lipman to provide funds for educational programs and exhibitions,” said Matt Johnson, executive director of the Imaginarium Science Center. The nonpro t dedicated the Lipman Family Courtyard and kicked off fundraising for this project during its 2012 Cherish Gala. Once complete, the Lipman Family Courtyard will serve as a gathering area for educational programs, special events, and eld-trip orientations. Lipman provides matching grant funding for Science Center Celebrations .newszap.com/celebrationsEngaged? Just married? Golden anniversary? Birthday? Holiday? New baby? Share your news in print and onlineFor a modest charge, each package includes: and family Submit your good news today at Nationwide Insurance comes to ImmokaleeNationwide Insurance has partnered with Bruce Hendry Insurance in Immokalee offering Auto, Business Insurance, Life Insurance, Workers Comp, Boat, Motorcycle, RV and more... Call or stop by for an One Your SideŽ review. 5 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 Peace through Service theme announced for Rotary International“Peace is not something that can only be achieved through agreements, by governments, or through heroic struggles. It is something that we can nd and that we can achieve, every day in many simple ways.” Peace has different meanings for different people, Rotary International President, Sakuji Tanaka said. “No de nition is right, and no de nition is wrong,” he said. “However we use the word, that is what peace means for us. “No matter how we use, or understand the word, Rotary can help us to achieve it,” he said. Mr. Tanaka, a businessman from the greater Tokyo metropolitan area, shared how becoming a Rotarian broadened his understanding of the world. After joining the Rotary Club of Yashio, in 1975, he began to realize that his life’s purpose was not to make more money, but to be useful to other people. “I realized that by helping others, even in the simplest of ways, I could help to build peace,” Mr. Tanaka said. He noted that the tradition of putting the needs of society above the needs of the individual helped his country rebuild after the tsunami and earthquake in March of 2011. “This is a lesson that I think the whole w orld can learn from, in a positive way. When we see the needs of others as more important than our own needs — when we focus our energies on a shared goal that is for the good of all — this changes everything,” he said. “It changes our priorities in a completely fundamental way. And it changes how we understand the idea of peace.” “In Rotary, our business is not pro t. Our business is peace,” he said. “Our reward is not nancial, but the happiness and satisfaction is a better, more peaceful world, one that we have achieved through our own efforts,” Mr. Tanaka said. Local Rotary Club welcomes international guest speaker Courtesy photoRotary International President, Sakuji Tanaka visited with local Immokalee Rotarians recently. He brought with him a message for all Rotarians to carry with them, “Peace through Service.” By Matt KindermannSpecial to the Immokalee Bulletin Just as home owners should consider a licensed contractor for home repairs, parents should consider a licensed child care facility for the care of their children. Child care facilities organized under the Department of Children and Families (DCF) are categorized as one of the following: Licensed Child Care Facility, Licensed Family Child Care Home, Licensed Large Family Child Care Home, Licensed Specialized Facility for Mildly Ill Children or as a Registered Family Day Care Home. All licensed facilities are subject to onsite inspections by DCF except Registered Homes, which are not site inspected but do have to comply with employee certi cation requirements. In addition, all Licensed and Registered facilities must abide by state rules concerning staff credentials, capacity and ratio limits, safety and health precautions and proper record keeping. To nd licensed child care facilities and homes, go to www.dcf.state. .us/programs/childcare and click on “Child Care Provider Search.” All direct care staff of Licensed and Registered facilities must be credentialed by attending a 40 hour DCF course and receive 10 hours of continuing training each year thereafter. Credentialing classes are offered on-site in Lee and Collier counties, or they can be taken on-line. The classes cost $160, and the credential is essential in order to gain employment in the child care industry. Child care job seekers should be aware that there are currently more quali ed workers than available jobs in his eld. Competition is stiff and the median income in the Fort Myers metropolitan area is low at $19,300 or about $9.50 an hour. You can nd the credential class information at www.dcf.state. .us/programs/ childcare and click on “Course Registration.” Workforce funds do not currently cover the cost of credentialing because most positions pay less than the level of self-suf ciency. Residents of Collier County can receive scholarships for the credentialing and more information can be found at www.collierchildcare.org. Southwest Florida Works is the regional state workforce board for Hendry, Glades, Charlotte, Lee and Collier counties. For job search assistance or employer support, speak with an employment representative nearest you by going to www.sw works. org and click on “Locations.” Career focus on child care Matt Kindermann The Democratic Club of Immokalee will meet on Tuesday, July 24, at 6:45 p.m. at Rib City, 621 North 15th Street, Immokalee, 239-657-4003. The club will discuss the upcoming August 14 primary election and ballot races and issues. The meetings are open to all. Immokalee area Democratic Club plans to meet

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For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Employment Full Time Animal Control Of cer (Seminole Tribe of Florida Immokalee Reservation): Enforce ordinance & state laws pertaining to animal control. Patrol & respond to animal control issues. HS Dip/GED reqd. Animal Control Of cer License. 3 yrs.exp.. Able to work varied hours & on-call. Valid FL DL. Contact: joshualohn@semtribe.com Drivers: Dedicated Account! Top Pay, Bene ts, Miles, Great Home-Time & More! Werner Enterprises: 1-888-567-4854PIPE LAYERS & FOREMAN experienced in water & wastewater. Labors and Equipment Operators for a project located in Immokalee, Please call Jay Bright at 561-902-4660 starting 7-16-12. Employment Full Time For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Business Opportunities NOTICEIndependent Newspapers will never accept any advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises of guaranteed income from work-athome programs if it sounds too good to be true, chances are that it is. If you have questions or doubts about any ad on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the Better Business Bureau at 772-878-2010 for previous complaints. Some 800 and 900 telephone numbers may require an extra charge, as well as long distance toll costs. We will do our best to alert our reader of these charges in the ads, but occasionally we may not be aware of the charges. Therefore, if you call a number out of your area, use caution. For more listings, go to www.newszap.com AppliancesWASHER & DRYERKenmore stackable. In LaBelle. $300. Call 239-770-5729 How do you find a job in todays competitive market? In the employment section of the classifieds For more listings, go to www.newszap.com ApartmentsCORAL PINES APARTMENTS~ IMMOKALEE ~Apts. 601 to 613 Nassau St., 2BR, Central A/C, heat, carpet, verticals, laundry on premises. Convenient location in quiet residential area. $600 includes water/sewer/trash No Application Fee. Apply at 601 Nassau St. #4 Immokalee or Call 239-694-1951 Apartments ApartmentsLOOKING FOR AFFORDABLE RENT? Come see Immokalee’s Newest Affordable Housing Community. Pay no more than 30% of your households adjusted monthly income for rent and utilities. ESPERANZA PLACE, affordable 1, 2 & 3Br Apts, Handicap unit available Energy ef cient appliances, washer/ dryer hook ups, spacious oor plans, community center on site with computer lab for resident use and classes. From access to Carl Kuehner Community Center educational and social programs. Must be farm or grove labor employed Call Rental Of ce at 657-2009 Mon-Fri, 8:00AM-5:00PM 2693 Marianna Way, #308 (TDD 1-800-955-8771) Equal Housing Opportunity Houses RentFarm Worker Village invites you to come home. Available now 1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom rental homes, starting as low as $425 per month. You may qualify for Rental assistance. Please Call us at: 239-657-3649 or stop by at 1800 Farm Worker Way. Looking for a place to hang your hat? Look no further than the classifieds. Shop here first! The classified ads For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Houses SaleLEHIGH ACRES 2/2 Condo, 55+, very good condition, smooth top electric range, frig, W/D, furnished. $60 condo fees. $39,000. Call 608-335-6008. For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Mobile HomeSale3br/2bath doublewide located on E Road between LaBelle and Immokalee on 1/2 acre lot. Owner nancing good or bad credit $5,000 down and $500 monthly. Call Kenny 863-673-4325 863-675-8888 4br/2bath doublewide owner nancing on 1/2 acre lot between LaBelle and Immokalee. $5,000 down and $510 monthly Call Kenny 863-673-4325 or 863-675-8888 FOR SALE: 3 BR, 2 BA, Good condition. New central air and heat. Set up in Davernport Mobile Home Park. Nice neighborhood. $11,000 (239)823-1254 Buying a car? Look in the classifieds. Selling a car? Look in the classifieds. How fast can your car go? It can go even faster when you sell it in the classifieds. For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Campers/RVsWanted all Travel Trailers, Motor Homes and Fifth Wheels. Any Condition, Cash paid on the spot. Call 941-347-7171 For more listings, go to www.newszap.com Automobiles1998 FORD F150 XLT TRITON ONE OWNER TITLE IN HAND, 136,700 miles, maroon, V-8, extended cab, three doors, bed liner, interior like new, power locks, automatic transmission, air conditioning. $4,500 (954)643-7292 or (410)913-5754 When doing those chores is doing you in, its time to look for a helper in the classifieds. Love the earth Recycle your used items by selling them in the classifieds. Your next job could be in todays classifieds. Did you look for it? Its never too late to find the perfect gift. Look for it in the classifieds. When you want something sold, advertise in the classifieds. Earn some extra cash. Sell your used items in the classifieds Reading a newspaper provides the opportunity to get involved in your community.No wonder newspaper readers are more popular! Reading a newspaper makes you a more informed and interesting person.No wonder newspaper readers are more successful! 6 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 Shop here first! The classified ads For more listings, go to www.newszap.com For more listings, go to www.newszap.com

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Business & Service Directory AUCTION ROOFING Metal Roofs Re-Roofs Roof Repairs Seamless Gutters Soffit & Fascia Free Estimates Lic# CCC037019 981 Cowboy Circle Office (863)675-7045 Fax (863)612-1158 7 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 Outdoor music festival includes Miami Food Trucks, live entertainment, costume contests, games, prizes and morePut on your favorite bell bottoms and highest platforms and head on over to Seminole Casino Immokalee’s “Fantasy of Funk” festival on Saturday, July 21, from 1 p.m. to 10 p.m. The outdoor event features performances by George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic, The Nouveaux Honkies, Bonerama, Glen David Andrews Band and Boogie Freaks. Attendees will enjoy more than 16 Miami Food Trucks, costume contests, trivia games and prizes. At 1 p.m., Florida’s own The Nouveaux Honkies will take the stage with a special funk only set. At 3 p.m. brass funk rock band Bonerama will bring New Orleans funk and jazzavored numbers to Immokalee. The band was formed by trombonists Mark Mullins and Craig Klein, both of whom had been members of Harry Connick Jr.’s big band from 1990 to 2006. Bonerama has been recognized as the “Best Rock Band” by the Big Easy Awards. At 5 p.m. funk/gospel/R&B act Glen David Andrews Band will perform. The highenergy ensemble veers from traditional jazz to gospel, rock, blues and funk, all in the same show. Andrews was inducted into the Louisiana Hall of Fame in 2010. He has also been named “Best Male Performer” by the Big Easy Awards and “Best R&B Performer” by the Best of the Beat Awards. At 7 p.m., the funkiest-dressed attendees will be invited on stage for the ultimate costume contest. The winner will receive a grand prize, along with bragging rights. The “Godfather of Funk” George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic will top off the music festival with an electrifying performance of generation-spanning jams, beginning at 7:30 p.m. This celebrated band is 26 members strong, fully prepared to bring dance fever to Southwest Florida. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997. They are also among Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of “100 Greatest Artists of All Time” (2002), SPIN Magazine’s “50 Greatest Bands of All Time” (2010), and VH1’s list of “The Greatest Artists of All Time” (2010). They have more than 40 R&B hit singles and three platinum albums. DJ Ramo G will also spin the latest hits in between stage acts. Additionally, Y100 Miami, 98.9 The Beach, 95.3 The River, and 105.5 The Beat will provide entertainment with music, games and giveaways. The Miami Food Trucks will serve up delectable treats throughout the festival. They include Chef On 4 Wheels, ChurroMania, Dolce Gourmet Cupcakes, Kitchen Kabab, Kona Ice, Lan on the Go, Miami Spice Grill, Mobile Culinary Kitchen, Nosh Truck, Out of Many, Roly Poly, Roy’s BabyBacks, South Beach Concession, Tango Grill and Waf eosophy. In addition to food trucks, there will be water, sodas, beer and wine for sale. No coolers and no pets. Bring your own chairs. Rain or shine. Festival tickets are $25 in advance and are available at the Casino Cage or by calling 1-800-218-0007. Player’s Club members will receive a discount and should visit the Player’s Club for more details. Online tickets are $28 and can be purchased at www. seminolecasinoevents.com. Tickets can be purchased the day of the show at the gate for $30. Must be 21 years of age or older. To kick off the day of funk, Seminole Casino Immokalee will host a free party at its Zig Zag Lounge on Friday, July 20, from 6 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. 95.3 The River’s on air personality Amy Lynn will host the evening’s events. From 6:45 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., attendees can register to participate in contests. There’ll also be pet rock decorating, temporary tattoos, a 1970s trivia contest, a Rubik’s cube race and more. Party-goers out tted in their best will be rewarded with great prizes. They’ll also groove to live tunes from The Nouveaux Honkies and disco band Boogie Freaks. Also in the Zig Zag Lounge on Friday, from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m., the casino celebrates ladies with complimentary cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, great prizes and giveaways. Ladies must be Seminole Casino Players Club members (membership is free). Must be 21 years of age or older. Seminole Casino Immokalee is easily accessible to all of Southwest Florida via I-75, and Southwest Florida International Airport is only a 45-minute drive from the casino. Located between Miami and Naples, north of Alligator Alley on Highway 846, it’s ve blocks south of Highway 29. Approximatel y 30 minutes from Naples and Fort Myers, the casino is a 90-minute drive from Miami and Fort Lauderdale. For directions or other information call toll-free 800-218-0007; fax 239-658-0204 or write: 506 South 1st Street, Immokalee, Florida 34142; www.seminoleimmokaleecasino.com. George Clinton to perform at Seminole Casino Immokalee Inaugural ‘Fantasy of Funk’ concert The David Lawrence Center, Collier County’s only comprehensive, not-for-pro t mental health and substance abuse treatment facility serving children, adults and families, is pleased to announce that two grants awarded by Collier County will be used to purchase and install a new emergency back up generator with suf cient fuel capacity to work for up to 120 hours. The Collier County Housing, Human and V eteran Services has awarded the David Lawrence Center a Community Development Block Grant provided by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in the amount of $175,000 and the Collier County Health Facilities Authority provided an additional $50,000 grant to fund the generator. This critical funding will greatly upgrade the Center’s ability to provide auxiliary power in three key buildings on the main campus off of Golden Gate Parkway. The new equipment will provide the capacity to generate full power to the Acute Care Building which houses the inpatient Crisis Stabilization Unit, Emergency Services Assessment Center, Collier County Baker Act Receiving Facility and Adult Detoxi cation Unit, the Adult Outpatient and Urgent Care Services Building and Administration which houses the servers that operate the Center’s electronic medical record data. Locally, HUD funds have been earmarked, in part, for infrastructure improvements for facilities that provide services that bene t individuals with low to moderate income and improve the conditions of life in Collier County. The Health Facilities Authority assists in the nancing of qualifying, nonpro t human health care facilities through the issuance of tax-exempt bonds. Gulf Coast Construction was awarded the contract and began installation this month. David Schimmel, CEO of the David Lawrence Center, states, “We are extremely pleased to have been awarded these grants to enhance our ability to provide life-saving mental health and substance abuse services to those in need. As a true local resource dedicated to Collier County, the Center relies on donations, fees and grants of this nature to invest in the health, safety and wellbeing of our community. We greatly appreciate our collaborative partnership with Collier County and their continued nancial support of our mission.” David Lawrence Center is a not-for-profit, behavioral health agency that provides comprehensive, innovative mental health and substance abuse services in Southwest Florida. In addition to helping children with behavioral, emotional and substance abuse challenges, the Center provides counseling and rehabilitative services to adults in crisis and individuals with persistent mental illness. David Lawrence Center has eight locations in Collier County and touches the lives of more than 30,000 people each year. It is David Lawrence Center’s mission to restore and rebuild the lives of all of those in need. For more information about David Lawrence Center call 239-455-8500 or visit www. DavidLawrenceCenter.org. County grants fund new emergency generator Free Health Fair coming to ImmokaleeImmokalee Health Fair is set for Sunday, J uly 29, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, Sanders Hall, South 9th Street, Immokalee. Enjoy complimentary health information, medical orientation and free health screenings! A lecture on How to prevent skin cancer will be presented as well as blood pressure screening, blood sugar testing and much more. For more information, please call 845-616-1509.Church to host youth eventBe a “B.A.B.E!” (Beautiful, Accepted, Blessed, Eternally Signi cant!) event. This event set for Aug. 25 from 9 a.m. until 8 p.m., is for middle and high school girls. Join Andrea Stephens and special guest Chandra Simmons. Middle school girls will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and high school girls from 4 to 8 p.m. Pizza will be served and every girl that attends will receive a free book. First United Methodist Church of Immokalee, 303 N 9th Street, Immokalee. For more information, please email the Church at fumc_ imm@yahoo.com, or call the Church of ce at 239-657-2841. Community News in Brief

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8 Immokalee Bulletin July 19, 2012 Special to the Immokalee Bulletin/Waddy ThompsonA Gallanule at Lake TraffordA relatively common sight in South Florida and the Everglades, this purple Gallanule (Water Hen) treks through the muck and marshy surface around Lake Trafford. These birds appreciate subtropical regions all over the world. They are very small, about the size of a bantam hen. They have long legs that allow them to run over oating vegetation. They have a noisy, squawky call and make their nest in rushes on or near the water. She’s affectionate. She’s feisty. Her brothers probably would agree she’s bossy. This 8-week-old golden retriever seems to have it all: good looks, a winning personality and a permanent job assisting a wounded veteran when she nishes school. But the one thing the Collier County Sheriff’s Ofce’s newest service-dogintraining doesn’t have is a name. Yet. You can help name her. Submit a name or vote for a name that has already been submitted by visiting CCSO’s Facebook page. The deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 24. Go to http://on.fb.me/ LV08xe to like us on Facebook and then submit your entry in the comment section underneath her photograph. If you want to vote for an entry that someone else has submitted, just click “Like” next to that name. The winning name will be the one that garners the most “likes.” The person who submits the name will receive a CCSO T-shirt. Name the CCSO service dog contest announced Courtesy photo/ CCSOAt just 8 weeks old, this cute little girl has got a lot of work ahead of her before she can become a best friend to a wounded veteran. First, she needs a name.