Group Title: Pitirre (Camarillo, Calif.)
Title: El Pitirre
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100143/00027
 Material Information
Title: El Pitirre
Uniform Title: Pitirre (Camarillo, Calif.)
Abbreviated Title: Pitirre (Camarillo Calif.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wiley, James W
Wiley, James W
Society of Caribbean Ornithology
Society for the Study of Caribbean Ornithology
Publisher: Society for the Study of Caribbean Ornithology
Place of Publication: Camarillo Calif
Camarillo, Calif
Publication Date: 1996
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Ornithology -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Language: In English, with some Spanish.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1988)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 2002.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1, no. 3 covers the period May-Aug. 1988.
Issuing Body: Newsletter of the Society for the Study of Caribbean Ornithology, Jan/Feb.-Mar./Apr. 1988; the Society of Caribbean Ornithology, May/Aug. 1988-
General Note: Editor, 1988- James W. Wiley.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 15, no. 1 (spring 2002) (Surrogate)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100143
Volume ID: VID00027
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 23284416
lccn - sn 99004863
issn - 1527-7151
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Journal of Caribbean Ornithology

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Sociedad de Ia Ornitologia Caribeja




EL PITIRRE

Society of Caribbean Ornithology


EL P1TIRREL

El Pilirn is the newsletter of the Society of
Caribbean Ornithology.

El Pilirre es ci bulcifn infornativo de la
Soci edad de la Ornitologla Caribefta.

EDITOR: James W. Wiley, 2201 Ashland St.,
Ruston. Louisiana 71270, U.S.A.
ARssisTA NTi ER ons: Chandra Degia, Michael
Bobb, G r field Brown, A win Dornelly, and
Barbara Keesee, Gra mbling Cooperative
Wildli Fe Project, P. 0. Box 4290, Grambling
State University, Grambling, Louisiana
71245, U.S.A.

News, commentsorrequestssh uldbe mailed
Co die editor for inclusion in lice newsletter.

Noticias, comentarius a petici ones deben scr
envfadas al editor para inclusir enrie ulbo ietfn.


Tyramwus domtinicen asi


Pitir-e, Gray Kingbird, Pestigre. Petclhary


The Society oF Caribbeanit Ornithology is a non-profit organization
wlioseugals are to promote Ihe scientific study and conservation of
Caribbean birds and their habitats, to provide a link among island
ornithologists and those elsewhere, to provide u written [Drum for
researchers in the region (rererced journal-Oriiflogicki Caribeila,
published in conjunction with the Puerto Rico Ornithological So-
ciety) and to provide data or technical aid to con servalion groups in
the Caribbean.

La Sociedad de In Ornitologfa Carihefia es una organizacidn sin
lines de lucro cuyas mincis suni piimn1ovr ci Lstudio 'icmnliico y in
conservaciin de la avifauna caribeta, auspiciar un simpcsio manual
sobre laornito log acari be Fa, public aruna rev ista profesio nal lamada
Ondiroogfa Caribefla (publicada en conjunro con Ia Sociedad
Orntioldgica de Puerto Rico), saruna ruente de comunicacidn entre
ornitdlogos caribefios y en otras areas y proveer ayuda tdcnica o
datos a grupns de conservacidn en el caribe.


CONTENTS

Fitr'r Rl1'-JRT OF LBREWSTER'S WARBIn.E" JN HiSPANIOI.A,
Sliven C. Latta ......................................................................... 2
CuruILA-roTy STANrC OFTHE PURPLE-THROAIT-IJ CARII, E ,arris
JJIu.ARtS, W i iam Belton ........ .. ....................... ......................., 3
EL GUACAMAYO Az.U, V AMARILLO (ANA ARARAUNA) ExOitco
RESIDENT DE Pue PumI Rict. Radl A. Frez-Rivera,.................. 3
LA T'c li. (STREPTOrFEA DECAocTO) ANItANDO U CuUA,
Orlando H. Garifdo y Arct ro Kirkconneil............................. 4
An rRACTS OF PAPERS SuUMN'rrTn IOR PRESENTAllON AT IHE 1995
ANN JAl SCO MEETINu TRLmcDAD AND TOBAGO............ .. 5
EsrTUeIIO PFRELUMNARIES SOlR].: A NIDIFICACION DE LA
COTORuttA t. LA HISPANIOLA, AMAZO,,' VIENT.WS, EN I-'.
PARQOUE NAC1ONAL JARACGUA. RI.:'L1ncr.[CA DOMINICANA,
Jes7.s MA. A nwnte y Br(gido Jlierro .................................... 5
VARIATION IN SONG AND SZE tN CIRCLIUM-CARIB1URAN RUOLus-
RBRO WiE PII'P.ERSIHItKFS. J.O C. iartow and George Cook 5
EL, GUARAGUAO DE BOSQUE Y LA CoNSTi UCCION TIE LA PR# [0:
CONHFI.lCr U.SO POR TEHRENOS FOI-qs I'At.LS 1NTHRE I.A ArT,.
DE CARRETERAS Y UNA EsPEc.'IE EN PELGRO DrE EXTNCtON.
Carlos A. Delnnoy y Adrianne Ts.vas ............................. 6


Winter 1996


Vol. 9, No. 1








FIRST REPORT OF "BREWSTER'S WARBLER" IN HISPANIOLA

STEVEN C, LATTA
International lnnite of Tropical Forestry. USDA Forest Service,
P. 0. Box B, Palmer, Puierto Rico 00721

Current address; University ofMissouri, Division of Biological Sciences
110 Tucker Hall, Columbia, Missouri 65211, USA


Since October 1992 winter resident warblers of 14 species
have been color-banded in the Cordillera Central of the
Dominican Republic in a study of the population turnover of
migrants wintering in small versus large shade coffee
plantations (Wunderle and Latta, unpubl. data). The most
common migrant warblers present in these plantations are
Cape May (Dendroica rigrina), Black-throated Blue (D.
caerulescens), and Black-and-white (Mnioiitra varia)
warblers, American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla), and
Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus). Rarely occurring species
include the Tennessee Warbler (Vermivora peregrina),
Northern Parnla (Parula americana), Magnolia (Dendroica
magnolia), Black-throated Green (D. virens), Yellow-throated
(D. dominica), Prairie (D. discolor), and Palm (D. patmarum)
warblers, Louisiana Waterthrush (Seiurus moracilla), and
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas),
On 2 November 1994, while searching for color-banded
warblers in a coffee plantation 1 km west of Manabao, La
Vega Province, Dominican Republic (elevation 760 m), I
encountered an unbanded and previously unobserved
individual. From a distance of approximately 5-10 m I
observed this bird moving through the top of the coffee
plants, 1.5-2.0 m from the ground, actively gleaning insects
from the leaves. The bird was generally warm gray above,
with a light yellow wash restricted to the upper back, and two
broad white wingbars. The bird had a conspicuous yellow
crown which graded into the gray nape, but which was
highlighted by a pronounced black eyeline. The cheeks were
gray. The bird was mostly white below with a pure white
throat, lower belly, and undertail coverts, but with a broad
yellow wash across the upper breast. Afterrecording noteson
the bird's plumage characteristics and feeding behavior Ilost
sight of it in the coffee. The bird reappeared, 10 min later,
however, low in the understory of guaba (Inga vera) trees,
where it actively fed for 5 min on caterpillars from the top and
underside of leaves. The following day, 1. M. Wunderle, Jr.
spent 5 hrs in this coffee plantation but did not observe the
bird.
[I identified this bird as a "Brewster's Warbler," one uf two
phenotypes produced by the hybridization of the Bl ue-wi nged
Warbler (Vermivora pinus) and the Golden-winged Warbler
(V chrysoprera; Parkes 1951. Short 1963). Both forms are
described by Curson et al. (1994). The individual I observed
could be identified as aBrewster's Warbler by a combination
of the distinctive black eye mark and mostly clear white
underparts. Although this form is most commonly reported to
have yellow wingbars, white bars are occasionally seen
Page 2


(Curson et al. 1994). The bird was separated from other
Vermivora species, and the somewhat similar female Golden-
winged Warbler, by the strong eyeline and the plumage
pattern of the head, and from the B lue-winged Warbler by the
white underparts,
This report appears to be the first ofa Brewster's Warbler
in the Dominican Republic or in Hispaniola. Indeed, it
appears tobe the second report of this form outside the United
States. The first Brewster's Warbler recorded in the West
Indies was recently banded in Cuba (Rodriguez et al. 1995),
Observations of the Brewster's Warbler in Hispaniola should
not be entirely unexpected. Blue-winged and Golden-winged
Warblers frequently hybridize (Parkes 1951, Short 1963),
and although both species winterprimarily in Middle America
(American Ornithologists' Union 1983), reports indicate that
the Blue-winged Warbler (Dod 1978, Bond 1985, Wunderle
and Waide 1993; W, Arendt, pers. comm.) and the Golden-
winged Warbler (Bond 197], 1985) are rare winter visitors to
Hispaniola and the Greater Antilles (Gochfeld 1974, Pashley
1988a, b). The presence of the Blue-winged Warbler, in
particular, is supported by observations in a variety of habi-
tats in the Dominican Republic (Dod 1978), including
mangroves (Wunderle and Waide 1993) and pine forest
(pers. obs,, March [994), Confirmed reports of Golden-
winged Warblers in Hispaniola, beyond those of Bond (1971,
1985), are unknown Althoughcomparatively rare, Vermivora
hybrids may be overlooked orunder-reported by birdwatchers
and biologists -particularly in wintering areas. Clearly the
scarcity of these reports points to the need for more familiarity
with these species and forms, and the need to clarify the status
of these birds in Hispaniola and the other Greater Antilles.

Acknowledgments--Funding was provided by a grant from
the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and the John T.
and Catherine C. MacArthur Foundation to J. M, Wunderle,
Jr. Valuable comments were provided by Joe Meyers. Joe
Wunderle. and an anonymous reviewer,

LITERATURE CIED

American Ornithologists' Union. 1983. Check-list of North
American birds, sixth edition, Allen Press, Lawrence,
Kansas.
Bond,L. 1971. Sixteenth Supplementto the Checklist of birds
of the West Indies, Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia.
.___ 1985. Birds of the West Indies. Fi fth edition. Houghton
Mifflin Co., Boston.
El Piti-re 9(1)








Brewster's Warbler (ConAntued)
Curson, J., D. Quinn, and D. Beadle, 1994. Warblers of the
AmericaS, an identification guide. Houghton Mifflin Co..
New York, NY.
Dod, A. Stockton de, 1978. Aves dela Repdblica Dominicana.
Musee Nacional de Historia Natural, Santo Domingo.
Gochfeld, M. 1974. Status of the genus Vermivora (Aves:
Parulidne) in the Greater Antilles with new records from
Jamaica and Puerto Rico. Caribb, L Sci. 14:177-181.
Parkes, KC A. 1951. The genetics of the Golden-winged x
Blue-winged complex. Wilson Bull. 63:5-15.
Pashley, D. N. 1988a, Warblers of the West Indies I. The
Virgin Islands. Caribb. J. Sci. 24:11-22,


_ 198 &b, Warbers o f the West Indies II. The Western
Caribbean. Caribb. J. Sci. 24:112-126.
Rodriguez, P, B., A. L Stsa, and Kt Ridout. 1995. Primer
registry de la bijiritade Ia raza Brewster (Aves: Paulidae)
en Cuba. El Pifirre 8(3):2.
Short, L. L. 1963. Hybridization in the wood-warblers
Vermivora pinus and V. chrysopiera. Proc. XII Internat.
Ornithal. Congr,: 147-160.
Wunderle, 3. M., and R. 9. Waide. 1993. Distribution of
overwineri ng nearctic migrants in the Bahamas and Greater
Antilles. Condor 95:904-933.


COPULATORY STANCE OF THE PURPLE-THROATED CARIB, EULAMPIS JUGUL4IUS

WIu.AM B ELTON
HCR 62 Box 1628, Great Cacapon, West Virginia 25422-9734, USA


Wolf (Condor 77:140-144,1975) saw a "ventral approach"to
copulation by the Purple-throated Carib (Eulampisjugularis)
in Dominica. By his account this "required both birds to hang
somewhat below the perch in comparison to the regularperch
position.The birds were sitting adjacent to each other and the
abdomens metwhile each was flutteri ng sonmewhattomaintain
its position".
At 09:30 on 31 March 19951 noted much more definitive
"ventral approach" by this species. In the gardens of the
Papillote Hotel near Tafalgar Falls, in the mountains
approximately 7 km east of Roseau, Dominica, a pair of
Purpi e-throated Carib s was chasing through the shaded lower
portions of several patches of torch ginger (Nicolaia elat'or).
One bird, presumably a female, suddenly perched on a
slender, horizontal stem of the ginger. The other, presumably
a male, fluttered nearby briefly, then clutched the same stem


immediately beneath the female and hung upside down,
directly under her, facing in the same direction. He then
raised the rear portion of his body until he made cloacal
contact with the female above him. Although the contact was
brief, copulation appeared to have occurred. This action was
repeated afew seconds later. Shortly after, the male flew from
below the female to alight briefly on her back, where he
attempted to copulate in the standard position, although this
brief effort did not appear to be successful. After he dis-
mounted, both birds left the immediate area and started
feeding from torch ginger flowers, Dr. Richard Zusi (pers.
comm.) has observed, but not reported, this same "face-to-
face," male-beneath posture in this species, also in Dominica.
I thank him for his comments on the first draft of this
communication and for bringing the Wolf paper to my
attention.


EL GUACAMAYO AZUL Y AMARILLO (ARA ARARAUNA) EX6TICO
RESIDENT DE PUERTO RICO

RAftL A. Ptm.z-RivmtA
Departamento de Biologia
Univeridad de Puerto Rico CUH
HumacWo. PR 00792


Raffaele indica el haber observado a un individuo de
Guacamayo Azul y Amarillo (Ara ararnuna) el 25 de agosto
de 1972y luego, el mismo individuo, cnseptiemnbre en el drea
deTintillo. Bayam6n (Raffaele y Kepler 1992). En el verano
de 1985 observe a otra de estas aves en Torri mar, Guaynabo
C(Prez-Rivera 1992). Una tercera ave fue observada a partir
de agosto del 1985 por Oscar Diaz y Royeanne Salles entire
Torrecilla B aja (Carolin a) y Medianfa Alta (Pifortes) (Pdrez-
El Pitirre 9(1)


Rivera 1992). Amediados del 1986 observe a dos Guacamayos
Azul y Amarilloen los alcdedores de Ia urbanizaci6nTorrimar
en Guaynabo. No obstante, los vecinos del rea me indicaron
que habi a desaparecido una tercera ave del grupo. A principios
de diciembre de 1987 el colega Luis Lavergne, observ6 a
cinco de estas aves en laurbanizaci6n Garden Hi ls. Presurm
que las aves se habian reproducido per sF incremento en
ndmcro. A partir de entonces las ayes comenzaron avariar en
Page 3









Guacamaya Azul y Amarito en Puerto Rico (Continued)
ntimero desde dos hasta seis individuos, aparentemente
moviendose estas entire Tindllo, Torrimar y Garden Hills, En
junior de 1991 observ a catr aves en las cercanlas del centro
commercial de Garden Hills. El 13 de abril de 1992 observe a
otro de estos guacamayos on el Farque Luis Muitoz Marin
(Rio Piedras). El 7 de febrero de 1995 se obscrvaran cuatro
individuos en el Parque JulioE. Monagas (Bayam6n-Catafio)
y observed a aotro el 21 marzo en el Parque Luis Muioz Marin.
El grupo de Monagas ha seguido siendo observado con
regularidad por los empleados del Parquc (Fdlix Rivera, com.
per.). Aunque cabe la posibilidadde que ]as aves observadas
en el Parque Monagas, scan las mismas de Guaynabo, no hay
que descartar la posibilidad de que estas scan un grupo
diferente.
Este guacamayo ha logrado reproducirse en el estado


silvestre. Por various allos iua pareja de Ouacamayos Azul y
Amarillo, anidaron en la cavidad de unapalma rea (Roystonea
borinquena) mucrta que quedaba en el ceniro commercial
Garden Hills PI aza en Guaynabo. Esta palma fue removidaen
la segunda semada dejulio de 1995. No obstame, dos dias
antes la pareja fue fotografiada en el nido por el Sr. Larry
Sanchez.

LnTERATURA C]TADA

Perez-Rivera, R. A. 1992. Feral exotic Psittacifomnes from
Puerto Rico. Ornitologfa Caribefla 3:30-34.
Raffaele, H. A., and C. B. Kepler. 1992. Earliest records of
the recently introd uced avifauna of Puerto Rico, Ornitologfa
Caribefia 3:20-29.


LA TORTOLA (STREPTOPELIA DECAOCTO) ANIDANDO EN CUBA

ORLEANo H. GAIuuDn Y AFTURO KIRKCONNELU.
Musto Nacional de Historia Natural, La Habana, Cuba


Garrido y Kirkconnell(ElPitirre3(4):2, 1990) reportaronper
primera vez para Cuba el hallazgo de la T6rtola Asidtica o
Tdrtolade Collar (Strepropelia decaocto) conocidaca ingl6s
como Asian Collared Dove en los alrededores de la casa del
autor (OHG). En esa ocasi6n, so observe un s61o individuo
que permaneci6 en la vecindad per various dfas antes de
marcharse. Transcurrieron unos 3 aflos sin haberse vuclto a
detector su presencia; pero paulatinamente, so fueron
observando individuos aislados, en parejas, o en nmmero de
tres, en diversos barrios de Ila ciudad de La Habana.
Unos tres aliis despuds del primer report, so comenz6 a
observer asiduamente, a una pareja que aparentemente tenfa
un territorio circunscrito de alededor dc 800 m cuadrados.
Gustaban de posarse en perchas favorites come antenas di
tclevisi6n, drboles frutales o introducidos como Araucaria,
yagrumas (Cecropia), etc. Forrajeaban preferentemenre en
las azoteas de lascasas. Nuncalasobserv dcsccndcr al suelo,
a pesar de que en mi case hay un patio grande con gallinas y
un palomnar no obstante, mi vecino me inform 6 de haberlas
vi sto ocasionalmente bajar a su patio donde h ab[a galli nas. Sa
presencia se detetabacon frecuenciadebidoasu caracterstico
"curru cli" de reclamo y a especie de "grufiido" corto
y ispero que emiten general mente al Ilegar a una posica Con
frecuenciaeste sonido lo produce cuando un individuo de la
pareja se encuentra con el otro.
En dos ocasiones se les observe en trajines de cortejo, e
incluso so observaron dos c6pulas sobre una antenna de
tclevisi6n. Antes de ]a cdpula no se observe un ritual de
conduct similar al de las palpmas domrnsdcas, coma par
ejemplo la pauta de rcgurgitarse el alimento y el de asicalarse
ei plumaje corno si se rascaran. La c6pula sin embargo fuc
Page 4


similar, tantoensu mecanismo, comeoenduracidan.Laprimera
vez que se detect un nido no se observ6 la pareja
construydndolo, aunquese pudo local izar a gran alturaenuna
bifuraci6n casi terminal de una Araucaria. Este idoe disiaba
una distancia lineal de unos 120 m del palomar de mi casa.
Unos tres meses despuds, alrededor del mes dejulio de 1995,
la pareja que asiduamete concurrfa a los alrededores de mi
casa construy6 un nido entire las pencas de un cocatero
(Cocos nucifera) en el patio de la casa del vecino. El nido no
era visible desde abajo y s6lo se podfan observer las ayes
cuando entraban o salfan de e1. No se supo si sacaron no, ni
se vieron individuos adicionales; s6lo los tres que con
frecuencia meradeaban la casa. Es interesante destacar, que
enese cocotero, desde hacfa varies atios, dormna y criaba una
pareja deTotids (Dives aroviolacea), Enningdnmornento se
observe ningin tipo de interacci6n entire ambas species. En
los lItimos dfas del mes do octubre del propioa io, se observ6
a un nmiembrode la pareja cargando palitas secos de unaparra
de la azotea vecina. hacia la paric mas alta del docel de una
mata de mango (Mangifera indica) de la propia casa, a unos
15 m del nido anterior del cocotero. Por mAs quo se intentO
localizar el nido o hbabfa form d verlo. No obstante, el I I
de deciembre pudo observarse dicho nido desde la azoLea del
palomarde mi casa. Tenta dos pichones easi completamente
emplumados que se acicalaban las plumas en una ramita
contigua al nido. De acuerdo a la deducci6n de mi hijo
Alexander (quicn crfapalomas), los pichones debfan de tenor
alredednr de 25 dfas de nacido. que unido a lus 17 u 18 dfas
que debe dare laincubacidn se deduce, que los huevoshayan
sido puestos en los 61timus dfas del mes de octubre,
Si tomamos en consideraci6n el Lie mpo transcurrido entire
El Pilirre 9(l)









Tdria et Cuba (Continwud)
los tires nidos reportados, se pude inferir, que la pareja debe
tener un minimo de tces sacas al adno El I8 de diciembre
estaban de nuevo preparindose para anidar en el cocotero
anteriormente mencionado. Los dos pichones permaneclan
entire el follaje de la mata de mango ya completamenre
emplumados. Por otro lado, es evidence que existen varias
parejas establecidas en diferentes barrios; lo que indica que
la especie estA en pleno perfodo do asentamiento aunque
nunca se hayan observado mas de tires individuals juntos;
come Cs el caso de oatrs territories no tan recientemente
colonizados como los del sur del estado dc la Florida


(Homestead, Miami y Cayo Hueso).
El primer record official para Cuba loconstiluyc una hcmbra
adulta doposirada en el Museo Nacional de Historia Natural
(MNHN 607) obtenida viva con aun jaula de trampa en La
Vfrgen del Camino, San Miguel dcl Padr6n, provincia Habana,
el 23 de septiembre de 1995 y traldo al Musco por Emilia
Alfaru,
Queremos agradecer la cooperaci6n brindada por Luis
Oero, GuillermoCeballos, Carlos Yeray Alexander Garrido
en la observacidn y localizaci6n de estas t6drolas,


ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS SUBMITTED FOR PRESENTATION AT THE 1995 ANNUAL SCO
MEETING, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO


STUDIOS PRELIMINARES SOBRE LA
NIDIFICACION DE LA COTORRA DE LA
HISPANIOLA AMAZONA VENTRALIS EN EL
PARQUE NATIONAL JARAGUA, REPOBLICA
DOMINICANA
JE0s M. ALMOarE Y BRtFIDO HIERRO
Grupo Jaragua, Inc., Calle El Vergel No. 33, Reparto El Verge,
Santo Domingo, Repiblica Dominicana

Amazona ventralis es unacspecie nddmicade LaHispaniol a
y consideradacoma especie vulnerable porel Depanamento
de Vida Silvestre de Ia Repdblica Dominicana, debido a
presidn que se ejerce sobre las poblaciones silvestres, la
destruccidn de su habitat y el trifico de pollulos para el
mercado de mascotas. El decreto de veda que regula la caza
y comercializaci6n delay fauna del pafs si tia aesta especie en
la categoara de "veda permanente" Amazona ventralis esta
incluida ademds, en cl apdndice I de la Convenci6n CITES
de la cual la Reptblica Dominicana es signaari a. Sin embargo,
ia captura.y comercializacifn de estaespecie es frecuetme en
todo el territorio national. El present trabajo es el resultado
de studios realizados desde 1993 a 1995 en un area de
anidamiento ubicada en el "Parque Nacional Jaragua",. en el
suroeste del pals. Se ofrecen datos sohbre los &rboles
seleccioanados como lugares de anidamiento y la vegetaci6n
asociada a los mismos. Se presentan tambi6n datas sabre la
altura, profundidad, dismrtro de la entrada de los nidos,
nimero de nidos actives y proporci6n de nidos saquacados.
Se ofrecen resultados sbre densidad poblac ional dec especial
usando diferentes mrtodos,

PRELIMINARY STUDY ON THE NESTING OF
THE IIISPANIOLAN PARROT AMAZONA
VENTRALIS AT JARAGUA NATIONAL PARK,
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
JEs0s M. ALMOImm, Am' BRGimo HrEaEo


The endemic Hispaniolan Parrot, Amazona ventralis, is
considered vulnerable by the Domin icean Republic's Wildlife
Department due to the destruction of its habitat and the trade
of nestlings for the pet market. The decree that regulates the
hunting and trade of the fauna in the country includes this
species in a "permanent ban." Amazona ventralis is also
included in appendix IT of CITES, a convention to which the
Dominican Republic is a signatory. Nevertheless, the capture
and trade of this species is common through out the Dominican
Republic. The present paper is ihe result of field studies from
1993 to 1995 on a nesting area at Jaragua National Park, in
southwestern Dominican Republic. Data on trees selected as
nest sites and the associated vegetation are presented, as well
as height, depth and diameter of the nesting cavity's entrance,
and the number of active nests and those robbed by poachers.
Density of the population in the area was estimated based on
methods discussed here.

VARIATION IN SONG AND SIZE IN
CIRCUM-CARIBBEAN RUFOUS-BROWED
PEPPERS HRIKES
JoN C. BARLOW AND GEORGE COOKE
Department of Omithology, Royal Ontario Museuon, Toronto,
Ontario, MSS 2C6 Canada

Rufous-browed Peppershrikes, Cyclarhis gujanensis, vary
in size and song type in their circum-Caribbean range- which
extends from southern Tamaulipas to Trinidad. Island
populations have simpler songs (Isla Margarita) and are
larger in size (Margarita and Isla Cozumel) than are mainland
populations (Belize. Costa Rica, Venezuela), Mass varies
from 20 to 40 grams (Venezuelan mainland versus the
peppershrikes of Isla Margarita) and variation in number of
syllable types Cl5 vs. 6) occurs similarly between the sites
representing size differences in Venezuela. This peppershrike
has 20-25 described race s many of which differ substantially
in phenotype and song. Genetic assay may show, as with


El]Pitirre 9()


Page 5








SCO Abstracts (Continued)
other vireos, that several species are, in fact, involved,

EL GUARAGUAO DE BOSQUE Y LA
CONSTRUCTION DE LA PR #10: CONFLICT DE
USO POR TERRENOS FORESTALES ENTIRE LA
AUT. DE CARRETERAS Y UNA ESPECIE EN
PELIGRO DE EXTINCI6N
CARLos A. DmANNOY Y AnmDMWE TossAs
Departamento de Biologra, Universidad de Puerto Rico-RUM.
Mayagiez. Puerto Rico 00681

El Guaraguao de Bosque Burro platypterus brunnescens es
una subespecie end6mica, una de 2 especiesde guaraguao en
Puerto Rico. Existen poblaciones en los bosques de Rio
construccidn de la Carr, PR #10 a terrenos forestalls en el
Bosque de Rio Abajo, represent un claro conflict per use
deespacia entrelaAul. de Carretcral y unaespecie en petigro
do extincifn. El conflict de uso de terrenos forestales entire
la AuL de Carreteras y el Guaraguao de Bosque surge de un
desconocimiento de los requisitos biol6gicos y de espacio
previo a la fase de planificacidn y deseflo y ahora de
construcci6n de la PR #10. Sabemos que este conflict se ha
resuelto en detrimento de esta especie. Esto es asf, ya quelos
2.10 kms. de carretera en construccidn irrumpen sobre at
menos 2 territories en habitat preferido de esia especie,
inevitablemente destruydndolo. Et desalojo forzado levanta
incertidumbre sobre la reubicacidn de parejas en otras areas
debosque,

NESTING SITE HABITAT DESCRIPTION AND
SPACE REQUIREMENTS OF THE PUERTO RICAN
BROAD-WINGED HAWK
CARLos A. DELANNOY AND ADR!ANNE TOSSAS

The nesting site and space requirements of the Puerto Rican
Broad-winged Hawk Btleo plarypwerus brunnescenr were
assessed in Rio Abajo, Puerto Rico during the breeding
season of 1994. The habitat of nine pairs was described
according to the nest tree variables and to forest type (plantation
and secondary forest). The hawks chose nest trees taller than
the canopy, -with a large diameter and crown, Nesting sites in
plantations and secondary forest had similar vegetation
structure, There were only significant differences in two
structural variables (basal area of canopy trees and number of
stems >32.I cm dbh). Broad-winged Hawk nesting range
averaged 41.0 ha. This range size was similar to home range
estimates of the Ridgway's Hawk (Buteo ridgwayi), its
ecological counterpart in Hispaninla, but smaller than Red-
tailed Hawk (B. jamaicensis) home range in Puerto Rico and
other Buteo species in North America. The smaller Broad-
winged Hawk range could be related to its smaller body size,
strong intra-specific competition for available space, high


population density, and more abundant food resources. The
ranges were aggressively defended against conspecifics,
resulting in little or total absence of overlap.

JAMAICA DRY FOREST CONSERVATION: AN
INVENTORY OF THE AVIFAUNA OF THE
HELLSHIRE HILLS, PORTLAND RIDGE, AND
BRAZILLETTO MOUNTAINS, JAMAICA,
WEST INDIES
CHANDRA DGIA AND GARNILD BROWN
Gorse Bird Club. Kingston, Jamaica, and Grambling State
University, Louisiana

A lotal of 16 weeks was spent working in the dry limestone
forest of the Hel shire Hills, Portland Ridge, and the Brazil leto
Mountains. To create an inventory of bird species, we found
point counts more appropriate, as it gave a higher species
diversity than did mist netting. No transect counts were
performed as the terrain was sometimes impassable. Totals of
49, 34, and 42 species have been recorded in the Hellshire
Hills, Portland Ridge, and BrazillettoMountains, respectively.
Also, totals of 22 and 11 species (mainly shore birds) were
recorded within 200 m of the Hellshire Hill and Portland
Ridge, respectively. The number of points needed to detect
all species varied between habitat and may be a function of
habitat size. Percentage detection and mean detection were
calculated for all bird species recorded during point counts in
all three habitats. Approximately four weeks were used for
preparation and execution of educational activities. Slide and
audio shows were given at three locations. Culminating
activities for these presentations came in the form of bird-
watches, games or craft,

LISTE DES OISEAUX DE GUADELOUPE,
MARTINIQUE ET DE LEURS DEPENDANCES
PmHIUPE FELDMANN, ARNAULI LE DRu, PERRE-JosEPl
BULENS, CLAUDIE PAVIS, AND PASCAL Va.LARD
Association pour 'Erude et la protection des Venrhrds des
perties Antilles, clo Enarrn, Bedair Desrozires, 97170 Petit
Bourg. Guadeloupe, French West Indies

Au course des 50 dernires anndes. 238 esptccs d'oiseaux ont
et6 rdpertorides en Guadeloupe et en Martinique. Cette lisle
ajoute 35 nouvelles espoces non mentionn6es dans la
littdrature. Seize d'entre elles sont des espdces rares ou
accidentelles. Dix huit d'entre elles sont des espdces
introduites, pri acipaleme nt exotiques ou Psittacidds. La urent-
ciq ui6meestune nouvelle espce de Trembleur Cinclocerthia
gucturalis qui a t& s6par6e du Cinclocerthia ruficauda. Cette
Rccroissenmcnt de plus de 15% du nombre d'espdces rdsulte
principalementdel'augmentation dunombre d'ornithologues
el de la prise compete d'esples introdaites.


Page 6


El Pitirre 9(1)









SCO Abstracts (Contfinud)


CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF GUADELOUPE,
MARTINIQUE, AND THEIR OFFSHORE ISLANDS

PrHIPr FL.DMANN, ARNAUD LE DRU,. PIERRE-JOSEPH
BULjes, CLAUDIE PAVIS AND PSCAL VaLAud

In Guadeloupe and Martinique, 238 bird species have been
recorded in the past 50 years. This checklist adds 35 species
not recorded in previous publications. Sixteen of them are
rare, vagrant or accidental. Eighteen arc introduced species,
mainly exotics and Psittacidae. The 35th species is a new
species of Trembler, Cinclocerthia gutturals, that has been
separated from C. rvficauda. This increases by more than
15% the number of bird species for these islands. More
birdwatchers and the addition of introduced species are the
main reasons for this change.


RARE CENTER PROVIDES GRANT TO SCO

The RARE Center for Tropical Conservation has again
provided the Society with a substantial grant to allow
production and distribution of El Pitirre to Assoc ate Members
residing in the Caribbean. We gratefully acknowledge this
important contribution and the continuing support from
RARE.


BOOK REVIEWS


COMMON BIRDS OF SAN SALVADOR ISLAND,
BAHAMAS, by Brian White. Bahamian Field Station, Ltd.,
San Salvador, Bahamas. With illustrations by David W.
White. 57 pp. Color cover photograph, 33 black-and-white
line drawings, I map. iSBN 0-935909-34-6.

This birding guide was primarily written for the Bahamian
Field Station but is suitable for use all over San Salvador
Island. This handbook helps to fill the gap of information
concerning common birds of the San Salvador Island. White
does n tdefine"common" as birds occurring in large numbers
but rather as birds that will] 1 be present in suitable habitat at the
right time of the day (or night). Of the roughly 100 birds that
White has observed, only 45 of the more common birds have
been included in the guidebook. The guide gives tips on how
to use clues such as habitat, time of day, and bird behavior to
help identify birds in the field. The author encourages
birdwatchers to take time to appreciate bird behavior as well
as to take notes and make sketches. White also encourages the
use of fishingg" to draw birds closer to the observer. He
makes note in the individual species accounts of how
responsive each bird is to "pishing."
Several sites are described and a useful map is provided to
aid in locating those places. The Catchanent Area Pond of the
Bahamian Field Station is reported as having birds present
"almost always." There are three possible routes that one can
lake to get to the catchment area, each of which is related in
the guide. The Reckley Hill Pond Trail is characterized by
mangroves, small labeled bushes and trees and Reckley Hill
Pond! The author recounts how to get to the trail and, most
importantly, how to return to the Bahamian Field Station
campus- Cut Cay, in Grahams Harbor, can hbe accessed by
boat or by wading Ihrough shallow water from North Point
Peninsula. The author cautions wading across during high
El Pitirre 9(1)


tide, In addition, general precautionary notes on speeding
cars, dangerous precipices, and hostile plants are provided.
Generally speaking, White arrangesthe birds in the sequence
used in Peterson's "A field guide to birds east of the Rockies"
and Brudenell-Bruce's "The birds of New Providence and the
Bahama Islands." White uses only common names and
classifies birds as "resident," "winter visitor," or "summer
visitor." Where possible he indicates whether a species
breeds on San Salvador. The birds described include the
Least Grebe. White-tailed Tropichbird, Antillean Nighthawk.
Bahama Woodstar, Bahama Mockingbird, and the Indigo
Bunting. Line drawings, by David White, accompany most
descriptions of birds.
White does not offer his guide as a comprehensive field
guide. As is the case in several other Caribbean islands,
birders have to tote several field guides. Peterson's "A field
guide to the birds east of the Rockies" and Brudenell-Bruce's
"The birds of New Providence and the Bahama Islands" are
recommended by Brian White as supplements.-Garfield A.
Brown, Grambling Cooperative Wildlife Project, P. O. Box
4290, Grambling State University. Grambling, Louisiana
71245. USA.

VIEQUES Y SU FAUNA/VIEQUES WILDLIFE
MANUAL, by Jgi E. Saliva. United States Department of
the Interior, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Boquer6n,
Puerto Rico. 1994. 243 pp. 14 x 21.5 cm. 115 color plates,
Bibliography. Index (English. Spanish, and Latin names).
Softcover.

With ihis manual the author hopes to encourage a local
appreciation of the most commonly encountered wild fauna
of Vieques Island, which lies just east of Puerto Rico. Jorgd
Salivu is particularly qualified for that undertaking, as he has
Page 7








Book Reviews (Continued)
worked on the seabirds of Vicques and Culebra islands for
many years and is intimately acquainted with the ecosystems
of these islands. The value of this well-designed and beauti-
fully illustrated book goes far beyond the community of
Vieques. It will be of interest to all students of West Indian
birds.
The main body of the book is divided into four sections:
Birds (96 species), Reptiles (15), Amphibians (3) and
Mammal (1). Birds occupy the bulk of the book with 191
pages devoted to this group. An additional section ("General
Information") includes a bibliography and index of English,
Spanish, and Latin names- For each species the bilingual tnext
includes taxonomic information and a description of the
species, along with its status, habitat, and additi onal comments.
On the facing page, a full-color photograph of the subject is
displayed. Most of these are lovely shots of wild birds.
Unfortunately, only a limited number of copies were
produced through an arrangement with the U. S. Navy
whereby they would be distributed free of charge to schools,
government agencies, and private organizations primarily in


Vieques. Those interested in obtaining a copy should contact
Mr. Winston Martfnez, U. S. Naval Station Roosevelt Roads.
Box 3021, FPO Miami, Florida 34051-3021; telephone;
809-865-4429,.-WW,

CHECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF GUADELOUPE,
MARTINIQUE AND THEIR OFFSHORE ISLANDS/
LISTE DES OISEAUX DE GUADELOUPE,
MARTINIQUE ET DE LEURS DEPENDANCES by
Philippe Feldmann, Arnaud Le Dru, Claudie Pavis, and
Pascal Villard, A,.RV.A., Petit Bourg, Guadeloupe, French
West Indies, 16 pp.-This checklist adds 37 species to the
240 forms recorded in the subject area in the past 50 years.
Scientific, French, Creole, and English names are provided
for each species, as well as notes on status and distribution in
the French West Indies (including St. Barthelemy and St.
Martin). Copies can be obtained by contacting A.E.V.A.-Le
Tol bois c/u M. Barn-, Belair Desrozibres, 97170 Petit
Bourg, Guadeloupe, French West Indies. Tel JFax: 590-95-
08-19,-JWW.


NEW PUBLICATIONS


The recently formed Neotropical Bird Club publishes its
journal. Codnga, twice annually.TheWest Indies are included
in the region covered by the journal, with a section entitled
"Neotropical Notebook" devoted to recent records from the
Caribbean and other neotropical areas. Recent issues have
included reports on the status of the Ivory-billed Woodpecker
(Campepdilus principals, by Martjan Lammertink) in Cuba
and the threatened birds of Cuba project. Each issue contains
many color photographs, and a color painting of the Cuban
Trogon (Priotelus temnurus) appeared on the February 1995
cover. Membership is open to all, and costs US$24/12 per
year (US$10 reduced rate for nationals residentin neotropical
countries). To join or for further details contact the


Membership Secretary. NBC, c/o The Lodge, Sandy,
Bedfordshire SGO 19 2DL, United Kingdom.

KEY AEAS FOi THRATWENED BIRDS IN THE N oTorocs, by
D.C. Wege and A. J. Long. 22.00, A unique site-based guide
to the major threatened bird conservation hotspots in the
neotropics, with concise information on the region's priority
areas for globally threatened birds. Data are presented site-
by-site for each country in a highly accessible format, which
includes maps and tables, Available from BirdLife
International, Wellbrook Court, Girton Road. Cambridge,
CB3 ONA, United Kingdom.


ISLAND REPORT


REPORT FROM THE CAYMAN ISLANDS
BV PATRICiA E. BRADLEY
SCO Representative


The new Minister and government officers in the Department
of the Environment are cooperating fully with the National
Trust of the Cayman Islands in their efforts to secure and
protect Crown land to the Trust. Due to the human population
increase in Grand Cayman (1I,000 in 1984 to an estimated
33,000 in 1995) terrestrial avian habitats are increasingly
being developed into urban areas and this building boom is
not expected to slow in the foreseeable future. The Trust, as
the foremost NGO in conservation, has therefore directed its
efforts to acquiring and protecting areas of pristine terrestrial
and wetland habitat. Some of our recent accomplishments
Page 8


include:

* 240 acres of dry limestone woodland in central Grand
Cay man, the Mastic, have been purchased by the Trust and
protected under Trust Laws; further areas will be bought as
funds allow and owners are prepared to sell. The Mastic
Reserve is breeding habitat [or all the endemic species of
ierrestrial birds. Money has been received from RARE to
re-open an historic right-of-way as a walking path through
the reserve which, with a trained guide, is revenue-raising
with tourists and is nn area used to expose young people to
El Pitirre 9(1)








Cayman islands Report (Coninuedj
environmental education.

* The Trust continues, with the help of the Department of the
Environment, to seek ways to protect the Central Mangrove
Swamp, which is regarded as a critical wetland. It seems
that purchasing the whole area is the only long term solu-
tion. The government has passed a proposal for the creation
of a second Ramsar site to include the Swamp border with
the North Sound, a parcel of Crown land, and several cays.

* The Rookery in Little Cayman, site of an estimated 400
pairs of Red-footed Boobies (Sula suaa) and 150 pairs of
Magnificent Frigatebirds (Fregafa magnificent), is now a
Ramsar site and ownership has been transferred to the
National Trust. Ground has been broken for an interpretive
centre and viewing platform, and management plans for
the colony and ponds are underway. Funding was received
from the Governor's Fund, the British Government, local
Trust members, and the National Trust Council.

The Trust and concerned citizens on Little Cayman are
monitoring government plans for a new site for dithe airport
which may impact the booby population. Pressure is build-
ing to ensure the strip remains a short grass runway


unsuitable for jet traffic.

* The Nature Trail at the Royal Botanic Park is open to
tourists and residents. This area of managed secondary
habitat is proving an excellent place to observe and
photograph indigenous and m igrant landbirds. An enclosure,
funded by the World Wildlife Fund, is part of the iguana
breeding programme. A monitoring system for this area is
being established.

* A walking trail has been opened by the Trust on the border
of the parrot reserve on the bluff, Cayman Brac. The
population of the Cayman Brac Parrot (Amazona
leucocephala hesterna) showed a slight increase during a
1994 survey.

* A count of breeding Least Terns (Sterna antillarum) by the
Cayman Islands Bird Club rcvealedt20 pairs and 53 juve-
niles.

The bad news is a pair of Shiny Cowbirds (Molothrus
bonariensis) was observed at Hutland for a week the first
record.


WESr ITNDAN INSTiflrmTNS
MUSEO DE CIENCIAS NATURALES "FELIPE POEY"
FACULTAD DE BiOLOGtA
UmVERSIDAD DE LA HABANA


Creado en 1842 per el insigne naturalista cubano Don Felipe
Poey y Aloy, es el museo de Ciencias Naturales mis antiguo
delpafi. Cuentaconnumerosos pieces descriptosypreparados
por el, asM como una amplia variedad de sus manuscripts
originals sobrediversos aspects denuestra fauna aut6ctona.
En la actual dad estdn presents la magnifica colecci6n de
conchas de moluscos creada por uno de sus discipulos, el Dr.
Carlos de la Torre; la colecci6n de lepid6pteros dcl Dr.
Salvador de la Torre, asf como otras colecciones de
invertebradosmnarinos, insectosy made 1700pielesdeaves.
En la sala de exposiciones pueden admirarse una amplia
variedad de pieces, reptiles, ayes y mamfferos colectados en
Cuba, Sedestacaporsuaamplitud Ia exhibicidnde aves, dode
estin presentes todas las species endfmicas de nuestro
territorio, ast como species amenazadas o en peligro de
exti ncidn. como el Carpintemr Real (Campephilusprincipalis).
Como hecho relevant puede citarse la presencia de la
Gallinuela de Santo TomAs (Cyanolimnas cerverai), g6nero
y species endtmicas de Cuba y del que s6lo existe on
ejemplar disecado en el mundo.
Este mu seo, dada sa aniguedad y con ten ido, constituye un
interesante aporte al conocimiento de la biodiversidad
faunistica de nuestros tempos pasados y actuales.
Servicios que ofrece el museo:


El Pitirre 9(1)


Cons ulia especializadas en colecciones de insects,
moluscos y aves.
Exposici6npermancntedecarteles sobreinvestigaciones
zooldgicas.
Ciclos de muestras trimestrales que abarcan grupos
importantes de problems biol6gicos y que se denominan:
1) La migracidn de los anim ales
2) El hombre y la naturaleza
3) El endeinismo
4) El pdeigro de la extincidn
Conferencias
Concursos sobre temas zool6gicos

Horario; De Lunes a Viernes
De 9:00 AM a 4:00 PM
Lugar: Edificio Poey
Unlversidad de La Habana
Precio de entrada: 1.00 USD
Para m&s informaci6n, dirijase a:
Lic. Mrtfin Acosta Cruz
Director
Museo "Felipe Poey"
Facultad de Biologia
Universidad de La Habana
Teldfonio 537-32-9000; Fax: 537-32-1321
Page 9










"FELIPE POEY" MUSEUM OF NATURAL SCIENCES
FACULTAD DE BtOLOOh
UNIVERsmAD DE LA HAANAw


Established in 1842 by the noted Cuban naturalist Don Febpe
Poey y Aloy, this is the oldest museum of natural sciences in
Cuba. The Museum contains numerous fish described and
prepared by Poey, as well as a wide variety of his original
manuscripts on diverse aspects of our native fauna.
At presentamagnificent collection of mollusk shells made
by Dr. Carlos de la Torne, one of Poey's pupils, the butterfly
collection of Dr. Salvador de la Ton'e, as well as other
collections of marine invertebrates, insects, and more than
1700 bird skins are housed in the Museum.
In the exhibit hall, visitors can view a wide variety of fish,
reptiles, birds and mammals collected in Cuba. Of particular
interest is the bird exhibit, where all Cuban endemic birds are
displayed, as well as threatened and endangered species, like
the Ivory- billed Woodpecker (Campephilus prin ciplis). The
Museum also contains the world's only mounted specimen of
the Zapata Rail (Cyanolimnvs cerverai), a genus and species
endemic to Cuba.
This museum, given its long history and content, constitutes
an interesting institution for learning about our past and
present faunal biodiversity.
Among the services offered by the Museum are:
Consultants specialized in insect, mollusk, and bird
collections.


Permanent expositions of posters describing zoological
research.
Changing (quarterly) exhibits that demonstrate important
biological problems that during 1995-96 include:
1) Animal migration
2) Man and the environment
3) Endemism
4) The threat of extinction
Conferences
Talks on zoological subjects

Hours: Monday to Friday
9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Location: Poey Building
Universidad de La Habana
Entrance fee: US$ 1.00
For more information, contact:
Lie. Martin Acosta Cru
Director
Museo "Felipe Poey"
Facultad de Biologfa
Universidad de La Habana
Telephone: 537-32-9000; Fax: 537-32-1321


RESOLUTIONS FROM THE 1995 ANNUAL MEETING


The following resolutions were passed by the Society of
Caribbean Ornithology at the August 1995 annual meeting in
Trinidad:

I. The Society of Caribbean Ornithology resolves not to
support the development of the Fairy Glade Trail in the
Blue Mountains of Jamaica as proposed. The Society
further urges that alternatives to the proposed trail be
explored, such as the re-development of other existing
trails, or the development of a new trail in less sensitive
habitats.
Our position is laken recognizing that the potential
effects of increased access, such as human disturbance and
the introduction ofex otic species, may adversely effect the
unique flora and fauna of the area. We also recognize that
the proposed trail would dissect a particularly critical area
which serves as one of the last remaining refuges in this
part of the island. This refuge supports numerous species
of birds and other life forms which significantly con tribute
to Jamaica's biological richness.
2. The Society of Caribbean Ornithology strongly urges

Page 10


authorities in the French Antilles to set bag limits, and
change the opening date of the hunting season for columbids
(pigeons and doves). Current studies indicate that Caribbean
columbids, such as the Zenaida Dove (Zenaidaaurita),are
still breeding at the onset of the current hunting season,
Such harvest prior to termination of the reproductive
period can have detrimental effects on populations of
game species not only in the French Antilles, but also on
other Caribbean islands, due to the continual inter-island
exchange. These effects include reproductive failure and
reduction in the rate that juveniles are recruited into the
harvestable population.
The application of a bag limit, and the establishment of
an opening date for the hunting season in the latter part of
September, would be consistent with the management of
columbids on neighboring islands. It would also promote
the conservation of columbids, and a sustainable harvest
of this valuable resource in perpetuity.
3. The Society of Caribbean Ornithology resolves not to
support the proposal to con struct a dam within the National
Park System in Guadeloupe, The proposed project would

El Pitirre 9(1)


f .








SCO Resolu ions (Condtnud)
coincide with a designated Biosphere Reserve, inundate
15 hectares of rainforest, and result in the destruction of an
additional 20 hectares. The proposed construction of the
dam is incompatible with National Park goals: to afford an
aesthetic experience while protecting natural ecosystems.
Construction of the dam would also establish a precedent
which contradicts existing conservation policy.
4. Whereas the Grenada Dove (Leptotilawellsi) is recognized
as an endangered species; whereas the Grenada Dove is
endemic to the island of Grenada; whereas the Grenada
Dove was named the National Bird of Grenada by the
Government of Grenada: and whereas the Grenada Dove
population has drastically declined since 1987.

Therefore be it resolved that the Society of Caribbean
Ornithology:

a. Encourages efforts to protect the Grenada Dove and its
habitat;
b. Urges the Government of Grenada to protect the remain-
ing habitat of this species, particularly the wooded
hillsides of the Mount Harnnian estate;
c. Encourages conservation education, public outreach,
and continued research and management of the Grenada


Dove; and
d- Is willing to offer technical assistance to work with the
Government of Grenada on these items to whatever
extent is possible,

5. Recognizing that the northeastern coast of SL Lucia,
extending from the Marquis in the north to Dennery Knob
in the south, contains an exceptionally high diversity of
native flora and fauna; and recognizing that the last
remaining populations of several species of birds now rare
in St. Lucia (c.g., White-breasted Thrasher, Ramphocin-
clus brachyarus; St. Lucia Nightja or. Caprfm ulgus otiosus;
St. Lucia House Wren, Troglodytes aeton; and the Forest
Thrush, Cichtheminia lherminieri) are now restricted to
this area; be it resolved that the Society of Caribbean
Ornithology fully supports the Grand Anse Advisory
Committee in the establishment of the Grande Anse Estate
as a National Park, to conserve these vital habitats and the
viability of the unique species associated with them.
To submit resolutions for the next annual meeting please
contact the chairman of the resolutions committee: Mr.
Ernesto Garci a, Wildlife Biologist, Caribbean National Forest,
USDA Forest Service, P. 0. Box B, Palmer, Puerto Rico
00721.


ANNOUNCEMENTS


The Puerto Rican Ornithological Society has been acti-
vated. The Board of Directors consists of young and talented
persons, including Carlos Rufz (President), and Marelisa
Rivera (Vice-president). For information, contact Radl A.
Pdrez-Rivern, Colegia Universitario de Humacao, Estaci6n
Postal 428, UniversidaddePuerto Rico, Hum acao, PR 00633.

A formal Trinidad and Tobago Rare Bird Committee has
been formed. The charters members are Dr. Floyd Hayes
(Secretary), Richard ffre nch, Ian Lambie, William L. Murphy,
Victor Quesnal. and Graham White. For more information


contact The Secretary. Department of Biology, Caribbean
Union College, P. 0. Box 175, Port of Spain. Trinidad, WL
Tel.- 809-662-224 112(w); 645-6223 (h); Fax: 809-662-1197;
e-mail: cuct844@aol.com

The second edition ofWilliam Murphy's,Birder's Guide to
Trinidad and Tobago, is just about ready to go to press. This
new edition will have spiral metal binding that allows it to lie
flare, yet will have a cover that provides a spine on the
bookshelf.


MEETINGS OF INTEREST


27-31 March 1996 -Cooper Ornithological Society. Bahia
Hotel, San Diego. California. (Barbara Kus or Abby Powell,
Department of Biology. San Diego State University, San
Diego, Cali fornia 92182, U.S.A.; Telephone: 619-594-4357/
594-1685; Fax: 619-594-5676/594-2035;
bkus@ sun stroke.sdsu.edulapowe] I @perl.sdsu.eduj.

31 March-5 April 199 6- VI international Symposium on
Avian Endocrinology, Chateau Lake Louise, Alberta,
Canada. (Dr. Robert J. Etches, Department of Animal and
El Pitirre 9( 0)


Poultry Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario.
Canada NIG 2W]; Telephone: 519-824-4120;
retches @ aps. uruguelph.ca).

1 I-14 April 1996 Wilson Ornithological Society, Grand
Hotel, Cnpe May. New Jersey, (Pete Dunne, local chair).

19-22 May 1996 Annual Meeting of the Association of
Systematics Collections, Agricultural Research Center,
Beltsville, Maryland. (Amy Y. Rossman; Telephone: 301-

Page 11








Meetings (Continued)


504-5364; Fax: 301-504-5810).

3-7 June 1996 Society of Avian Paleontology and
Evolution, Washington, D.C. [Storrs Olson. NHB MRC 116
(Birds), Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560,
U, SA.; Telephone: 202-357-2031; Fax: 202,786-2328}.

2-7 August 1996 Society of Caribbean Ornithology,
Nassau, Bahama Islands, (Jim Wiley. 2201 Ashland St.,
Ruston, Louisiana 71270, U.SA Telephone: 318 S-274-2499;
Fax: 318-274-3870).

13-17 August 1996 American Ornithologists' Union,
Boise State University, Boise, Idaho. (Peter Lowther, Field
Museum of Natural History, Roosevelt Road at Lakeshore
Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60605, U.S A.; lowther@ fmnh.org).

20-24 August 1996 2nd International Symposium and
World Congress on the Preservation and Conservation of
Natural Science Collections, St. Johns College, Cambridge,
UnitedKingdom. (Chris Collins, Natural Sciences Congress


'96, Geological Conservation Unit. Department of Earth
Sciences, Downing St., Cambridge, CB2 3EQ. United
Kingdom; Telephone: 0223-62522; Fax: 0223-60779).

29 September 4 October 1996 6th International Be-
havioral Ecology Congress, Australian National University,
ACT, Australia. [Andrew Cockburn, Botany and Zoology,
Australian National University, ACT, 0200, Australia; e-
mail: isbe6@anu.edu.au].

2-5 October 1996 2nd Raptor Research Foundation
International Conference on Raptors, University ofUrbino,
Urbino, Italy, (Dr. Massimo Pandolfi, Insituto di Scienze
Morfologiche, Via Oddi 21,61029 Urbino, Italy; Telephone:
39-722-328033, Fax: 39-722-329655).

16-22 August 1998 XXII International Ornithological
Congress. Durban, South Africa. (Dr. Aldo Berruti, Depart-
ment of Ornithology, Durban Natural Science Museum,
Durban, South Africa; Fax: 27-31-262-6114;
berut @ superbowl, .undac. a).


REQUEST FOR INFORMATION


Dear Sir/Madam,


I am writing to bring to your attention, and to ask for your
assistance on a project currently being undertaken by the
Bermuda Aquarium, Museum and Zoo. The West. Indian
Conservation Project has been established to provide a data-
base for ongoing initiatives promoting the conservation of
endangered animals throughout the West Indies, with which
Bermuda is both historically and biotically Linked. The ulti-
mate goal is to provide a directory of the work being conducted
both by individuals and by organizations which will serve as
a reference, enablingconservationists and funders to recognize
and prioritise threatened species and direct attention and/or
funding to areas where it is most needed.
With this aim we are mailing a questionnaire to
conservationists, researchers, funding agencies and local
government agencies active in such projects in the region.
The information obtained from this questionnaire will then
be used to produce the directory, a copy of which will be sent
out to all respondents. If you are interested in participating in
this programme, we would be grateful if you would com plete
the enclosed questionnaire. We are trying to encourage as


many respondents as possible, so if you know of any other
appropriate target individuals or agencies please supply a
contact name and address. Finally, if you are aware of any
other efforts to establish a similar database, please let us
know as we would be keen to promote a collaborative
programme.
I look forward to hearing from you, and thank you for your
attention to this matter,

Yours sincerely,

Anne F Glasspool Ph .D.
(Project Coordinator)
Bermuda Aquarium
Natural History Museum and Zoo
P .O. Box FL 145
Flatts FL BX, Bermuda
Tel: (809) 293-2727
Fax: (809) 293-3176


Questionnaire forms are at the end of this tssue of El Pitirre


El Pitirre 9(1)


f m I


Page 12








THE FUTURE OF THE SOCIETY OF CARIBBEAN ORNITHOLOGY (SCO): THE RESULTS OF A ROUND.
TABLE DISCUSSION, SOME IDEAS, AND A QUESTIONNAIRE TO THE MEMBERSHIP

FRANK F. RwVERA-MILAM, RoSEMARIE GNAM, AND HERBEKaT A, R.rFAtLE
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Inteawdionai Affairs. 4401 North Fairfhx Drive.
Suite 860-ARLSQ. Arlingfon, Virginia 22203, US.A,


During the 1995 Annual Meeting held in Trinidad we had
a round-table discussion about the future of the SCO. The
discussion, in part, provided a follow-up to a paper published
in El Pitirre (Vol. 8. No. 1. Pp. 8-10). Here we present a
synopsis of the results of the round-table discussion, provide
some additional ideas, and solicit, through a questionnaire,
further input from the SCO membership. This questionnaire
will help us in contacting a large number of members
(hopefully the whole membership1, and will serve as a tool
to prioritize future actions according to what we wish to
accomplish as an organization primarily concerned with the
conservation of birds and their habitats in the Caribbean
region,

During the round-table discussion the following points
were mentioned by one or more members:

(1) The need to increase the participation of local people in
the annual meetings, not just amateur and professional
ornithologists, but other persons representing other discipli nes
(e.g., environmental sciences, education, resource managers)
and socioeconomic interests (e.g., ecotourism, developers.
politicians) to make our meetings more relevant to the
conservation of birds and their habitats in particular, and to
the conservation of biodiversity and natural resources in
general.

The Local Committee should become more involved in
the coordination of the annual meeting. For example, the
Local Committee should ad vertise the meeting and secure the
participation of key persons from government and non-
governmental organizations involved in important
conservation issues (e.g., unregulated hunting, urban devel-
opment, resource planning, nature reserves management).

(2) The development of policy statements to clarify our
position regarding important conservation issues (e.g., the
benefits and costs of eco tourism, bird trade, the establishment
and management of natural reserves and buffer zones). The
development of policy statements should involve the Ex-
ecutive Board in direct consultation with the Island
Representatives and the active membership of the Society.

(3) The need of reaching a wide audience at national and
regional levels with our conservation message. Why is the
conservation of birds so important? What do we gain .by
spending our limited res sources in bird conservation pn'j ects?
How can the public help in conserving birds and their


habitats? What is our position regarding ecolourism projects
and, for example, the constructions of access roads and trails
insideandoulside natural reserves? Can we help in providing
feasible alternatives to development projects?

It was agreed that El Pitirre should be our main channel
of communication. However, we should also contact other
newsletters and actively involve other local and regional
organizations in our conservation efforts (e.g.. CCA.
CANARL, UNICA, NAAEE; see H. A. Raffaele. 1995.
Building partnerships: ideas for expanded Society
collaboration. El Pitirre 8(3):7). For example, the Local
Committee may contact public or private TV and radio
stations or may publish articles in magazines and newspapers
to reach the public in general,

Moreover, each year, the SCO may give an award to a
prominent person (say, the Minister of the Environment of
the island in turn or the leader of an important NGO) for his
or her contribution to the conservation of birds and their
habitats. Needless to say, the local press should be formally
invited to the ceremony, which might take place on a specific
day dedicated to the discussion of local conservation issues
with decision makers representing public and private
organizations dealing with the environment.

As part of SCO public outreach efforts, it was suggested
that a brochure be prepared with a simple mission statement,
a directory of expertise, a document about the conservation
and management of endangered and threatened bird species
("flagships") and their habitats. Also suggested was a [0-
year anniversary document summarizing the achievements
of the Society,

(4) The need of conducting fund raising activities to make the
SCO more self-sustainable was also discussed, as was the
idea of selling at the meeting T-shirts with our logo, bird
stamps, drawings, posters, photos, books, field guides, and so
forth.

In our opinion, the 1995 meeting at Trinidad was an
excellent first step in becoming more interactive as members
of a Society promoting the conservation of birds and their
habitatsin the region. We now need to sustain that momentum
in preparation for taking a second step in the Bahamas. You
can help by filling out and returning the attached question-
naire.


El Pitirre 9(L)


Page 13









SCO QUESTIONNAIRE (1996)


INWrRUCIONS.- Except when indicated, answer all the ques-
lions by selecting only one alternative per question. At the
end of the questionnaire, please write your name, addresses,
telephone, fax, and c-mail in the space provided. (The results
of the questionnaire will be statistically analyzed and dis-
cussed in our next meeting in the B ahamas; the identity of the

1. How often should we hold meetings?
A. Every year
B. Every two years
C. Every three years or more

2. When should we hold meetings?
A. June
B. July
C. August
D. September
E. Other:

3. For how long should we hold meetings?
(Note: excluding arrival and departure days, but
including field trips),
A. Three days
B Four days
C. Five days
D. Six days
E. Other.

4. Should we hold meetings jointly with other
conservation organizations?
A. Yes
B, No
C. Don't care

5. If you chose (A), indicate with how many and what size
of organizations?
A. One small organization (less than 150 participants
B. Two small organizations (less than 300
participants)
C. One large organization (more than 500
participants)
D One small and one large organization (500-1000
participants)

6. How many SCO meetings have you attended since
19887
A. None
B. One
C. Two
D. Three
E,. Four or more


Page 14


surveyed members will be kept confidential and will be used
only for statistical purposes). Return the questionnaire as
soon as possible to. Frank F. Rivera-Milan, U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, Office of International Affairs, 4401 N.
Fairfax Dr., Suite B60-ARLS Q. Arlington, VA 22203, U.S A.


7. Besides the SCO inmeeting, approximately how many
meetings do you attend per year?
A. None
B. One
C. Two
D. Three
E. Four or more

8. Besides your SCO membership, how many
memberships do you bold in conservation
organizations?
A. None
B. One
C. Two
D. Three
E. Four or more

9. List one or two examples of other organizations that
you are member of:


10. How much time should we dedicate to round-tablz
discussions of local issues incorporating the
participation of local decision makers?
A. None
B. Less than one day
C. One day
D. Two days
E. More than two days

11. How much time should we dedicate to workshops and
round-table discussions of regional issues?
A. None
B. One day
C, Two days
D, Three days
E. Four days or more

12. How much time should we spend presenting papers?
A. None
B. One day
C. Two days
D. Three days
E. Four days or more

El Pitin 9(1)


f- I .








SCO Questionnmire (Cuatinued)


13. Do you think we need concurrent sessions to reduce
the time spent presenting papers?
A. Yes
B. No
C. Don't care

14. How many field trips would you like to attend per
meeting?
A. None
B. One
C. Two
D. Three
E. Four or more

15. Should the SCO conduct fund raising activities during
the meeting?
A. Yes
B. No
C. Don't care

If yes. provide suggestions:







16. Besides the money for registration and membership
tees, how much money (US$) can you spend buying
fund raising products (posters, T-shirts, field guides,
stamps, etc.)?
A. $5.00SlOAOO
B. $10.00-520,00
C, $20.00-S50.00
D. More than $50.00
E. I can't afford it.

17. Have you received support from the SCO to
participate in meetings?
A. Yes
B. No

18. If you chose (A), indicate how many times have you
received support from the SCO'?
A- One
B. Two
C. Three
D. Four or more

19. Do you think you can raise matching travel funds to
attend meetings?
A. Yes
B. No


20. If you chose (A), indicate approximately the level of
matching?
A. 10% ($50 of $500)
B. 25% (S125 of $500)
C. 50% ($250 of $500)
D, I can cover my travel expenses
E. I can't cover my travel expenses

21, Do you see the SCO mainly as a scientific
organization?
A. Yes
B. No

22. Rank the level of success of the SCO in promoting the
conservation of birds and their habitats in the
Caribbean?
A. High
B. Moderate
C, Poor
D. Unsuccessful

23. Do you think the Columbid and Psittacid Working
Groups serve a function in meeting SCO goals?
A. Yes
B. No
C. Don't care

24. Do you think SCO should form a Migratory Bird
Working Group?
A. Yes
B. No
C. Don't care

25. Rank the following themes for workshops by the level
of importance as: 0 = not important, I = low, 2 =
moderate, 3 = high.
Conservation Education

Monitoring and Management Techniques

Landscape Ecology. Resource Planning, and
Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Basic Statistics and Elementary Survey
Sampling Designs

Ecotourism, Public Outreach and Fund
Raising Strategies

Environmental hupact Assessment and
Decision Making Processes


El Pitirre 9(1)


Page 15









SCO Questionnaire (Continued)


If needed, rank and provide additional themes for
workshops:


conservation programs they represent. (IV)
Repetitive financing of the same individuals,
despite meeting the mentioned requirements, will
be discouraged through a gradual decline in the
level of assistance.


26. Should the SCO have a Resolution Committee?
A. Yes
B. No
C. Don't care

27. Should the SCO support specific projects that can
serve as models for promoting the conservation of birds
and their habitats?
A, Yes
B. No
C. Don't care

28. If you chose (A), what kind of projects should be a
priority for the SCO?
(Note: select one alternative only).
A. Research
B. Inventories. Surveys, Monitoring
C. Management
D, Education
E. Ecotourism
F, Interdisciplinary (team work)

29. What do you think of the following policy for
members requesting SCO support?

(I) Applicants must work with other interested
individuals/groups on their island/country to
develop mutual interest and partnerships with the
Society to achieve conservation goals and objec-
tives. (I1) Priority should be given to applicants
who can raise matching travel funds or raise in-
kind contributions on their island/country. (III)
Applicants must provide a one-page statement on
how their participation in the meeting will
contribute to their professional development and to


Agree
Disagree
Don't care


30. If you chose (B), with what of the above criteria do
you disagree?
(Note:- elect more than one, if needed),
A. I
B. 11
C. III
D. IV
E. All of them


Please provide the following information:

Name:

Organization
Address:


Tel.:


Fax.- _ __ _ _

E-mail-

Home Address: _________________


El Pitirre 9(l)


Page 16








PRESIDENT'S COMMENTARY


Note: I would like to use this column to comment on various
topics of interest to the Society's membership. assuming that
I can make the editor's deadlines. In addition. I intend to
provide a version in Spanish in the future. Additional
comments or rebuttals are welcome.

PL.UGGoG THE CARMBBEN INFORMATION DRAIN

To appreciate the difficulties faced by island residents
trying to obtain information about the flora and fauna or
ecosystems of their particular islandss, it is useful to realize
that most of the information on these subjects resides outside
of their islandss. In fact, with the exception of some
universities, government agencies, and NGO libraries
scattered throughout the region, much of this relevant
information cannot be readily found in the Caribbean. Most
of the published information is accessible in the academic
libraries of North America and Europe and specimens are
often only available in the continental museums and herbaria.
Therefore it is not surprising th atisland residents are sen si i ve
to this information drain from their island territories. To make
matters worse, some visiting investigators have been
insensitive to these concerns and have made no effort to
"repatriate" the results of their island studies. Admittedly, in
the past it was difficult for some foreign investigators to know
just where or to whom to send the results of their island
studies in the Caribbean. These problems, of course are not
unique to the Caribbean, as developing nations throughout
the tropics have routinely suffered this information drain,
Obviously, the inaccessibility of this information delays both
the appreciation of the native flora and fauna by island
residents and subsequent conservation efforts.
The Society of Caribbean Ornithology was founded, in
part, to provide a forum for the exchange of information
relating to ornithology and conservation in an effort to
improve the flow of information to and from the region and
to facilitate exchange among island residents. The Society's
annual meetings and our newsletter, El Pitire, all contribute
to this effort. These efforts have enabled continental
investigators and managers to present their island findings
and experiences to some of the folks who might be nefit most
from these studies as well as enabling island residents to


exchange valuable information among themselves. No longer
do continental or is] and investigators and managers have the
excuse that regional mechanisms are nonexistent for the
exchange of information in the Caribbean. The Society's
methods of communication have evolved over time from the
publication of an irregularly issued journal (Ornfioiog[a
Caribefa) to a regularly published newsletter, and annual
meetings based on traditional 15 minute presentations, to
meetings with a combination of traditional presentations,
workshops, and round-table discussions. This evolution of
the Society's information exchange format has been healthy
and the trend towards more interactive meetings should be
continued. The more interac ive meeting formatshould enable
us to move beyond the simple exchange of information to an
emphasis on identifying its importance and how it might be
applied,
The problem of locating the ornithological literature
specific to an island territory has been partially solved by a
computerized bibliography of Caribbean ornithology,
compiled by Jim Wiley. Jim first presented the design and
format of this bibliography at our annual meeting in August
1994, inMartinique. This massive undertaking which includes
about 10,000etries oncomputer diskettewith cross references
by key words, author's names, and titles will greatly facilitate
our ability to identify authors and their studies conducted
anywhere in the Caribbean. The maj or hurdle now facing this
bibliography is finding a publisher willing to publish the
bibliography and provide the necessary diskettes, and obtain-
ing funding to complete publication. Jim has approached the
executive board of the Society for backing of the bibliogra-
phy. Given the importance of such a bibliography to our
membership, I would hope that our board provides
endorsement of Jim's valuable efforts, which are consistent
with the Society's objectives. Once the bibliography is finally
published we will need to develop mechanisms to enable
island residents to easily obtain copies of the literature
relevant to their island territories. These efforts will help the
Society ensure that the ornithological and conservation
information relevant to the Caribbean is available in the
region.

Joe Wunderle


El Pitirre 9(1)


Page 17








ACKNOWLEDGMENT


The Society of Caribbean Ornithology would like to acknowledge the donation made by the Fairfax Audubon Society
(Virginia, USA) of used binoculars and a spotting scope to the Gosse Bird Club (Jamaica). The equipment was received in
excellent condition and will help to promote birding activities in Jamaica.

The Fairfax Audubon Society is also interested in helping other Caribbean islands with similar donations (Gary Sielerman,
personal communication). For further information contact: Frank F. Rivera-MilIn (U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office
of International Affairs, 4401 North Fairfax Drive, Suite 860-ARLSQ. Arlington. Virginia, USA; Tel: 703-358-2103; fax:
703-358-2849; e-mail: Frank Rivera@mail.fws.gov).


BAHAMA SWALLOW CONSERVATION PROGRAM


One of the Bahama Islands' three endemic species, the
Bahama Swallow (Tachycinera cyaneoviridis), has been the
s subject of an experimental recovery effort. Although popul a-
tions are thought to be stable, little is known of the species'
biology and there is concern for its future. The Bahama
Swallow breeds only in pine forests in the northern Bahama
islands of Abaco, Andros, New Providence, and Grand
Bahama. The swallow nests in cavities, usually woodpecker
holes in dead pine trees. Unfortunately, pine forests are
limited in the Bahamas and those small tracks are under


increasing threat of logging and other uses.
As part of conservation program for the swallow, 227 nest
boxes have been placed at several sites in Grand Bahama,
including farm fields, golf courses, mangrove forests, stands
of dead pine trees, and an abandoned missile tracking base.
This year three of the boxes were occupied, and contained an
average of three eggs each. The incubation period. was 15
days and the nestling period was about 22 days. One pair
raised two broods during the year.


SCO ANNUAL MEETING
2-7 AUGUST 1996
NASSAU, BAHAMA ISLANDS


Society Treasurer, Rosemarie Gnam, and Society
Representative for the Bahamas, Carolyn Wardle, recently
met in Nassau to continue organizational plans for the 1996
annual meeting of the Society of Caribbean Ornithology.
They report the Local Committee consists of about 12 people,
including both govermncnt and non-government representa-
fives. The Bahamas National Trust [BNT] already has a
beautiful design for the t996 T-shirt, which depicts 6 Bahamian
birds in color.
The Local Committee has interest in a workshop on habitat
conservation and restoration efforts in the West Indies, as
they feel that habitat loss and degradation are the Bahamas'


major conservation threat.
The Society meeting will be held at the South Ocean Resort.
Room rates For standard garden-view rooms are $60 per
night, plus tax and room gratuities, or S30 per person for
double-occupancy. Therm will be a breakfast and lunch package
for $20 per person. The banquet will be held at the hotel for
$30 plus tax per person with a cash bar. Most importantly,
there is good birding on the hotel's grounds.
Announcements and Call for Papers for the 1996 meeting
will be sent to SCO members in mid-February. We hope you
will attend.


Page 18


El Pitirre 9(1)










WEST INDIAN CONSERVATION PROJECT QUESTIONNAIRE (Concluded)

INumber of workers associated with project:

Time-frame of project: Please see over ...........

Please lst any recently completed projects on threatened or endangered species in your island that you Feel should be included in this directory.


a~et MeoPriEct L&WUQ O&[n iiLUk


Ad,


P bli i f ces


Other conservation issues you feel need to be addressed:




Nomination of other appropriate target agencies:

P project L leader: ....................................................... ... ........................................... ................ .. ..................
A d d re ss: ... ............. ........................ ................. ...................... .............. ...................................


P rojec t L e ad er, ........................................... ............ .... .............. ...... .... ... ......... ......... ............... ....
A d d re ss : . .............................................













WEST INDIAN CONSERVATION PROJECT QUESTIONNAIRE



C ou ntry : ............................................................................ T target S species: ................. ... ..... ............. ........

P roje ct T title .. .... ........ .- ............................................................ .......... .. ... ....... .. .... .............................

P project L leader: ................ .... ....................... ..... ...... A agency; .... ............... .... ............................ ............

A d d ress: ...................................................................................... .................... ........... ......... .... .............................

T el N o ; ................. .......... .... ..... ................................. F ax N o .. ......................... ... ...... ........... .... . ..

Collaborating agencies: 1) ................................................... 2) ..... ......... .... ............ ..... ..................

Address: ..... ...................... ............ ......... ........... .. ...... ....... .. ..... ...... .......................


Tel. N o.: ................................ Fax. No.: .............. .... .......... Tel. N o. ............ ............ Fax. No,: ..... ..........

Project description (100 words max.):










Number of workers associated with project:

Time-frame of project:




Country; ............................................ ................................ Target Species; .. ... ........... ........... ..............

P project T ille; ....................... .. ... ....... ........ ........ ....... ........................................................ ..................

Project L leader: ............................... .................................... A agency : ............... ......... ..... .... ...................

A address: ............... ....... ....... ........................................................,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ...., .. ...... ,,, .............. ..

Tel N o. ........ .. ...... ............ .. .... ............... ...... ............. Fax No.. ........................... ..........

Collaborating agencies: 1) ........ ................. ........................ 2) ....... ...... ...... ........

Address.: ... ,, ,,,.. ..................... ....... ................ ............. r-.. ........ ........ .. .... ...... ...


Tel. No. .............. .............. Fax. Nor: ............................ Tel. No.: ................... Fax. No. ..:..... .......

Project description (100 words max.);










CARIBBEAN POSTERS AVAILABLE

The CITES Conservation Treaty Support Fund (CTSF) has just published a beautiful poster entitled "Wild
Treasures of the Caribbean," depicting sea tunics, birds, coral, and other endangered species of the Caribbean.
The poster ties in with a brochure published by World Wildlife FundJTRAFFIC USA as part of the "Buyer
Beware" campaign that urges tourists and others not to buy endangered species or their products. The poster is
beautiful and depicts Caribbean wildlife in a natural setting. Its design was done by the renowned wildlife artist,
Mary Helsaple.
The Society of Caribbean Ornithology helped fund the production of this poster as part of the Society's
public education effort. The idea for the poster and brochure was conceived at the 1992 CITES Training
Workshop for English-speaking Caribbean nations.
Posters will be made available for free to the CITES Management Authorities on each Caribbean island.
SCO Island Representatives can contact the CITES Management Authority on their island to help with
distribution of the posters. A limited number of posters is available to the public to help raise funds for CITES
and our Society.The Society of Caribbean Ornithology will receive a 10% profit from sales of the poster. Society
members can obtain the poster by sending a check or postal money order for $25 (US) to the Conservation Treaty
Support Fund (CTSF), 3705 Cardiff Road, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815 USA. Please indicate that you are a
SCO member on your order. Discounts are available for wholesale purchases (20 posters or more). For further
information, contact George Furness, Jr. at (301) 654-3150 or by fax at (301) 652-6390. PLEASE HELP
SUPPORT THE SCO IN THIS FUND-RAISING PROJECTr![!



SOCIETY OF CARIBBEAN ORNITHOLOGY T-SHIRTS AVAILABLE

The SCO has produced a t-shirtto promote the Society and heip raise muchneeded funds toward the Society's annual
operating costs. The t-shirt depicts the Society's logo, the Pitirre or Gray Kingbird, on a light blue shirt Large and
X-large shirts are available. The cost of the shirt is $15 (U.S.), which includes shipping costs. Please purchase a
shirt today and help support the Society! The shirt makes a great gift for Caribbean birdwatchers. Send your order
and a check or postal money order made payable to the Society of Caribbean Ornithology to Rosemarie Gnam,
Treasurer SCO, 13 East Rosemont Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22301, U.S.A. Please don't miss outon this opportunity
to promote the Society?




ORCHIDS OF JAMAICA

BYav A.NCILE GLOUDON AND CiCEL. TOBIscH

Orchids of Jamaica brings together over S years of methodical collection of plants from various parts of the island
and over 30 and 15 years growing experience by Gloudon and Tobisch, respectively. Detailed, clear, and precise
descriptions are provided for over one-half of the more than 220 orchid species that occurin Jamaica. All are based
on original observations of freshly collected plants. Equally important and welcome inclusions are a glossary, which
the amateur orchid collector will find particularly useful, as well as an account of the topography of the island home
and habitats of the various genera and species selected by the authors. A series of fine line drawings and over 90
colour photographs are display the natural beauty and splendor of these plants.

Orchids of Jamaica has been written tu heighten an awareness of 'he diversity and beauty of dithe Jamaican orchid
flora and is intended for the specialist and orchid hobbyist alike. The long-awaited book is available through the
Jamaica Orchid Society at US$35.00 per copy; shipping and handling-20%. Freight will be by surface mail, unless
the customer is willing to pay air freight and other charges. You may place your orders by fax at 809--978-688S.
For further inform action, do not hesitate to contact the Society President, Claude Harnilton by telephone at 809-927-
6713 or 809-977-2668.


El Pitirre 9(l)


Page 19








NEsrING STE HABTuAT DESCnuvnON AND SPACE REQUIREMENTS OF THE PUERTO RtCAN BfROAn-WLN4CW HAiWK.
Carlos A. Delannoy and Adrianne Tossas ......................... ................... ........... ........................ 6
JAMAICA DRY FoREsT CONSERVATION: AN INVENTORY OF THE AvFAuNA OF T HELL HIRE HuIs, PORTLAND RIDGE,
AND BRAZILErro MoUNTAINS, JAMAICA, WESTl NDES Chandra Degia and Garfield Brown ............................. 6
L=ISE DES OISEAUX DE GUADELOUPE, MARTINIQUE ET DE LEARm DEPEmN ANCEs. Philippe Feldmnann. Amaud Le Dmr
Pierre-Joseph Bulens, Claudie Pavis, and Pascal Villard................................................................................. 6
R ARE C E NMER PROVIDES G RANT TO SC O ............................. .......... ...-- ........................... ....- .... ..................... ...................... ......................... 7
BooK R VIEW ........................... ..... ............................. ..... ............. ............................ 7
COMMON BIRs OF San SALVADOR ISLANCh BAHAMAS, by Brian White....................... .. ........................................... 7
VIQUES Y su FAUNA/VIEQUES WILDLIFE MANUAL, by Jorgi E& Saliva .............".... ............. ........... ............... 7
CFECKLIST OF THE BIRDS OF GUADELOUPE, MARTNQUE AND THEIR OFFSHORE ISLANDSLTE DES OISEAU DE
GuADEoupn, MaTNouE ET Dr LEuRS DiPEnUAcm, by Philippe Feldmann, Arnaud Le Dru, Claudie Pavis.
and Pascal Villard ........ .............. .......... ..................................... .... ...... .. .. ........ .......... 8
N EW P UBL CATIONS ........................... .. .................. .... ........ .......... ........ ..... .......... ... ....... . ....... ......... 8
.SLAND REPORT REPORT FROM THE CAYMAN ISLANDS. Patricia E Bradley....................................................... .. ....... 8
WHsr INDIAN INSTrtrrtIONS: MusE DE CIENCIAS NATURAUwL "FEUaE POE." .. .. ...... ................ ................... 9
R ESoLunm oN FROM THE 1995 A NNUAL M EE I G ..... ..................................... ............. ................ .. ....... .. ............... ....... ..................... ... ..... 10
A N OUNcE .-ME ES E .... ....... ............................ ................................................ ................ ... .. ...... ...... . ..... ......... 11
M EETINGS OF INTERES ..T ... .. ... .............................. .............. ............................. .. ...... ...... ........... ......... .............. ............... 11
R EQUEST FOR INFORMATTON ........... ................................ .... ... .................... ....... .. ....... ,.......... .. .... ....... .............. -.... 12
THE FUTURE OF THE SOCIETY OF CARBBEAN OfITrHOLOOY: RESULTS OF A ROUND-TABLE DiSCUSSION, soME IDEAS, AND A
QUESONNAIRE To THE MEMBERSHIPm Frank F. Rivera-Mildn, Rosemarie Gnam, and Herbert A. Raffaele............. 13
PRESIDENTr's COMMENTARY, Joe W underie ............................. ....................................................... ....................... 17
A CKNOWLEDGM ENT ............... ... ....... ...... ..................... ............ ....... ............................................ ............... 18
BAHAMA SWALLOW CONSERVATION PROGRAM ....-............................. ............-.................... .... .... ... .................. 18
SCO ANNuAL M EEm NG, 2-7 AuGuST 1996, NAssAU, BAHAMA ISLANDS .............................................................. ............. ............ ... 18
A D vaE n s .t M rrs .................... ..................... ..................... .. .. ... .............................................................. 19












From: Dr. James W. Wiley
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Ruston, Louisiana 71270, U.S.A.




TO;






FIRST CLASS
PRINTED MATTER


El Pitirre 9(1)




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