Group Title: Pitirre (Camarillo, Calif.)
Title: El Pitirre
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100143/00025
 Material Information
Title: El Pitirre
Uniform Title: Pitirre (Camarillo, Calif.)
Abbreviated Title: Pitirre (Camarillo Calif.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wiley, James W
Wiley, James W
Society of Caribbean Ornithology
Society for the Study of Caribbean Ornithology
Publisher: Society for the Study of Caribbean Ornithology
Place of Publication: Camarillo Calif
Camarillo, Calif
Publication Date: 1995
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Ornithology -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Language: In English, with some Spanish.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1988)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 2002.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1, no. 3 covers the period May-Aug. 1988.
Issuing Body: Newsletter of the Society for the Study of Caribbean Ornithology, Jan/Feb.-Mar./Apr. 1988; the Society of Caribbean Ornithology, May/Aug. 1988-
General Note: Editor, 1988- James W. Wiley.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 15, no. 1 (spring 2002) (Surrogate)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100143
Volume ID: VID00025
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 23284416
lccn - sn 99004863
issn - 1527-7151
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Journal of Caribbean Ornithology

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Pitirre 8(2) 1995 ( PDF )


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Sociedadde la Ornitolo a Cabefia




..EL PITIRRE

Society of Cabab Ornithology

SSpring l' . '19.' I .1 r ; 1
.~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~ai' 1"'`brnii k i t: . lo . [i


Vol 8; No.2


EL PITIRRE

El Pitirre is the newsletter of the Society of
Caribbean Ornithology.

El Pitirre es el boletin informative de la
Sociedad de la Ornitologfa Caribefia.

EDrITOR: James W. Wiley, 2201 Ashland St.,
Ruston, Louisiana 71270, U.S.A.Telephone:
318-274-2499; Fax: 318-274-3870
ASSISTANT EtI-ORS: Chandra Degia and
Garfield Brown, Grambling Cooperative
Wildlife Project. P. O. Bax 4290. Grambling
State University, Grambling, Louisiana
71245. U.S.A.

News, come nts orrquests should be mailed
to the editor for inclusion in the newsletter.

Noticias, comentarios o peticiones deben ser
envfadas al editor parainclusi6n en el boletfn.


Tyrannus dominicensis


Pitirre. Gray Kingbird. Pestigre, Petchary


The Society of Caribbean Ornithology is a non-profit organization
whose goals are to promote the scientific study and conservation of
Caribbean birds and their habitats, to provide a link among island
ornithologists and those elsewhere, to provide a written forum for
researchers in the region (refereed journal--Omitologia Caribefia,
published in conjunction with the Puerto Rico Ornithological So-
ciety) and to provide dataor technical aid to conservation groups in
the Caribbean.

La Sociedad de la Ornitologin Caribefia es una organizaci6n sin
fines de lucro cuyas metas son promoter el estudio cientilico y la
conservaci6n de la avifauna caribelia. auspiciar un simposio annual
sobrelaornitologfacaribefia, publicar unarevistaprofesional1 lamada
Ornitologia Caribeita (publicada en conjunto con la Sociedad
Ornitol6gica de Puerto Rico), ser una fuenie de comunicaci6n entire
ornitdlogos caribefios y en otras areas y proveer ayuda tdcnica o
datos a grupos de conservaci6n en el caribe.


CONTENTS

ALPINE SWIFT (Ttc n-.. A., Pr MFLBA) OBSERVED IN GUADELOUPE,
LEssER ANTIt-LSF: A FOURTH RECORD FOR TE WESTERN
HEMIsPHERE, Philippe Feldmann and Claude Pavis............., 2
DEPREDACION DE MAIUQUITAS POR IlN FALCON COMMON.
Leopoldo M iranda .............................................. ...... ... 2
1995 M ErINO OF THE SCO ..... .......... ..... . ............... 3
CAIJ. FOR ABSTRACTS ., ... .......... ............. 2
BooK REvIEW S ............. .............. .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 4
BIRDS OF THE CAYMAN ISLANDS, REVISED EDMON ..... ......... 4
A NATURAL HISTORY ATLAs To Tni CAYS OF THE U. S. VIRGIN
ISLA ND S ......... ............. .... .... ... .. ... .. ........................ 4
B LUE M OUNTAIN G UD E .......... . ........ ............ ...... ......... ......... 5
THE BIRDS OF THE TURKS AND CAICOS ISI.ANDS: THE OFFICIAL
C HECK LIST .. ..... .................... ... ......... ..... .........................
BREEDING BIRD ATLAS OF CUBA AND ADJACENT ISLANDS ......... 6
A NNOUNCEMENTs ...................... .. ... .......... .... .... .......................6
REQUEST FOR ASSISTANxE ...... .. .... .... 7
NEWS OF MEMr ;S ................ ...... 7
NEW PUBLICArtors AVAILABLE ..... . .. .......... ........... ..............7
I M erLv.- s or INTEREST ............. ............ 7







ALPINE SWIFTr(TACIHYMARPTISMELBA) OBSERVED IN GUADELOUPE, LESSER ANTILLES: A
FOURTH RECORD FOR THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE

PHILIPP'E FELDMANN AND CLAUDE PAVIS
Association pam r I'Etude et la protection des VernibrlF des petites antilles (AEVA).
C/D Barr, Belair Desrozibrcs, 97170 Petit Bourg, Guadeloivpe, French West Indies


We were observing about20swallows (Barn Swallow Hirundo
rustic, Caribbean Martin Progne dominicensis) flying over
an artificial pond just behind Grande Anse's beach 30 mirn
before the sunset on 18 April 1987. The first bats were flying
and a Peregrine Falcon (Faicoperegrinus) just failed to catch
one. We then observed a large swift with white on the
abdomen and lower breast, light brown upperparts similar to
those of a Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia). and with a dark
forked tail, This swift was flying very fast about 50 m above
us. Its jizz. especially shape and flight, was quite distinctive,
reminding us of the Alpine Swift (Tachymarptis mrhla) with
which we are familiar in France. The whitish throat was not
quite visible to us, which is not unusual (Harris Le a]. 1990).
We noted that the swift was much larger than the Caribbean
Martins, with whichitwas flying. We were able to follow the
swift for about 3-4 mins before it disappeared high in the
sky. One of us drewa field sketch and we later examined the
literature for the bird's identification. We believe the ob-
served bird was most likely an Alpine Swift.
The three other records of this species in the Western
Hemisphere are well documented by Burke (1994). He noted
that two of these three records appear to be associated with the


passage of a tropical depression across the Atlantic Ocean.
Our observation of the Alpine Swift was made during Lhe
Spring migration of many bird species and at a time of the
year where there is usually no severe weather. We note that
the third record reported by Burke (1994) was made in the
sameyear as our observation, but three months later by Meler
et al. (in litt.) on 20 July 1987.
Our record was not published, but was listed in the checklist
ofbirds of Guadcloupe and Martinique prepared by AE VA in
1993. The note of Wayne Burke stimulated us to publish this
additional observation.

LITERATURE CTI-Eo

AEVA. 1993. Oiseaux de Guadeloupe et de Mautiidque,
Petit Bourg, Guadeloupe, 5pp.
Burke, W, 1994. Alpine Swift (Tachymarptis melba)
photographed on St. Lucia, Lesser Antilles: third
record for the western hemisphere. El Pitirre 7(3):3.
Harris, A,. L. Tucker, and K. Vinicombe. 1990. Bird
identification. The Macmillan Press Ltd., London and
Basingtone. 224 pp.


DEPREDACION DE MARIQU1TAS POR UN FALC6N COMMON

LErDOLOw MIRANDO
North Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Department cf Zoology.
Box 7617, North Carolina Slate University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7617, U.SA.A


El dia 29 de diciembre de 1994. en las parcels Triche del
barrio Boqueron de Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico, un Falc6n
Comtin ('alco sparverius) atac6 y atrap6 una Mariquita
(Ageluius xanthomus). A eso de las 17:30 hr un grupo de
aproximadamente 30 Mozambiques (QrQiscalus niger)
llegaron a un Area donde acostunibran pernoctar, Enire e[llos
sc encontraba un grupo de seis Mariquitas. Cuatro de ellas. al
igual que various Mozambiques. se presentahan lesiones,
similares a las causadas por la viruela, en el area de los ojos.
El comnportamiento de las avyes containinadas era mas pasivw


que las saludables. Ctrcadc losrbolesdonde se encontraban
las Mariquitas y los Mo/arnbiques lieg6 un Falc6n Comtin el
cual observe al grupo de aves purespacio de 5 min- AI cabo
de este tiempo una de las Mariquitas enfermas vol6 hacia el
tir. inmediatamnente el falc6n la atac6 en pleno vuelo y la
captured. Es menester mencionar que la Mariquita no hizo
ningiininvimientodefensivo. Seguraimente el sentido visual
de dicha Mariquita estaba afectLdo pr laenfernnmedad, lo que
poLsiblcmenre facility la capture del ave por part del falcrn.


El Pitirre 8.2)


Page 2







1995 MEETING OF THE SOCIETY OF CARIBBEAN ORNITHOLOGY


The1995 annual meeting of THE Soc:Trv OF C,aiJmiiAN O014l Iliowtr,v will be held in Trinidad, 27 July-3 Aug 1995, Society
members will receive an information packet by -mail in the near future. For information contact Dr. Rosemarie S. Gnam, 13
Rosemont Ave,, Alexandria, VA 22301, U.S.A.

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE FOl 1995 SCO MNETNG IN TRINIDAD


Thursday, July 27


Friday, July 28


Saturday, July 29




Sunday, July 30

Monday, July 31


Arrival and registration
Reception
Executive Committee meeting
Opening
Paper sessions
Board Meeting
Paper sessions (1/2 day)
Round-table: "The future of the
SCO"; Preparation Of
resolutions
[Videos]
Field trip (all day)
[Videos]
Paper sessions (all day)
General Assembly/Elections/
Resolutions


Tuesday, August I Round-table discussions:
(a) Record keeping local
and international
(b) Action: project cycle,
design (to include
migrants), proposal,
implementation,
evaluation
(c) Local involvement
(d) Advocacy
Banquet
Wednesday, August 2 Paper sessions or unfinished
business
[Possible 1/2 day field trip-
Nariva Swamp]


CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

Deadline for submission of abstracts is I June 1994. Abstracts, in English, French. or Spanish. should not exceed 300 words.
If you can provide a translation in an alternative language, it would be greatly appreciated. Also. copies of die abstracts nr
computer floppy disks would be quite helpful. Please use the enclosed form (inside back cover) and follow the format of
examples given below:


Example 1.


RESOURCE PARTITIONING AMONG A FLYCATCHER GUTLD IN JAMAICA


Alex Cruz
Environmental Population and Organismic Biology, University of Boulder, Colorado, 80309-0334 USA

I studied resource use by a flycatcher guild in a Jamaican weL limestone forest. Members of the guild included Tyrannidae
(Contopus caribaeus, Myarthus barbirostris, M.iduM yi Pachvramphu ign Tyrannus caudifasciatus) and Todidae (Todui
19ous). Most of the species foraged by .. .organi nation,

Example 2.
REASSESSMENT OF BLACK-CAPPED PETREL IN CUBA

D. S. Lee, N. Vina, 0. Garrido', R. W. Dicckrman', and J, C. Hai-cy'
'N, C. State Museum, Nonh Carolina, USA, ZUniversidad de Oriente, Cuba, 3Museo Nacional de la Historia Natural.
Cuba, 'Museum of SW Biology, USA and 5Wouds Hole Oceanographic Institute, Massachusetts. USA

Since late 1970s several authors have included the Sierra Maestraof eastern Cuba as part of the breeding range of the Black-
cappred Petrel, Plerodoma hasitata. This was based on ... less.


Abstracts should be submitted by 1 June to: James Wile3, 2201 Ashland St, Ruston, Louisiana 71270, U.S.A.

El Pitirre 8(2) Page 3







BOOK REVIEWS


BIRDS OF THE CAYMAN ISLANDS. Revised edition.
by Patricia Bradley. Photographs by Yves-Jacques Rey-
Millet and the author. Caerulea Press, Italy. 1995. 211 pp. 12
x 19 cm. 75 color plates (some with insets), line drawings,
maps. Index (including English and Latin names). ISBN
976-8052-10-4. Hardbound. USS30.00 to SCO members.

When Patricia Bradley's splendid guide first appeared 10
years ago, it set a high standard for the treatment of island
avifauna. Indeed, this beautifully illustrated (with color
photographs) guide to the birds and their habitats in the
Cayman Islands established a benchmark by which other
guides to West Indian birds have been measured. Soon after
completing her guide, Ms. Bradley left the Cayman Islands to
work on conservation projects in die Turks and Caicos and to
live for a short time in her native United Kingdom.
Nevertheless, she made several return visits to the Caymans,
and continued to interact with visiting and resident birders,
Through her observations and interactions with others
(particularly the Cayman Islands Bird Club), Ms. Bradley
accumulated considerable new information on the islands'
birds. Now, a short 10 years after the public tion of her book,
the author is back with a thoroughly revised version of her
guide. If ever there was a case of gilding the lily, this is it!
That this is a revised version is evident as soon as one picks
up the book, as it sports new photographs (Cuban Parrot.
West Indian Whistling-Ducks) on the front and back covers.
Inside, Ms, Bradley provides new or expanded treatments of
her introductory sections, including completely re-worked
presentations on Cayman Island ecosystems, the derivation
o fthe avifauna, and geology, and a more extensive introduction
to the islands' avifauna. A checklist of endemic subspecies
has been improved from the earlier edition, making it easier
to use. New sections have been added on "Threats to habitats"
and "Threats to species." In her section on "Conservation
efforts," Ms. Bradley discusses progress and problems in bird
conservation in the Islands. The section on "Ecosystems and
habitat zones" has been extensively revised, adding new
material. The scale used for describing bird status has been
refined. Finally, the glossary and illustrations of bird to-
pography have been enhanced.
As before, the main body of the book is devoted to species
accounts, which have been up-dated and otherwise revised to
include more recent information, and to reflect recent
nomenclature and population changes. Thirty-one species.
many of which were listed as incidentals in the first edition.
now receive full species accounts (2 species formerly given
full accounts are now relegated to the vagrant list). Ms.
Bradley has improved the presentation of information for all
species in these accounts and has added substantial new
information to the various topics. The species accounts are
supplemented by a fine checklist of breeding birds, with
information on their status and distribution among the three


islands. Additional annotated lists of vagrant, rare, and
introduced species appear in the appendices. Ms. Bradley has
improved on her earlier presentation of suggested birding
sites and access, with new maps and additional recommended
locations (Appendix 3). Finally, an updated and expanded
bibliography is included.
The photographs have also received some revision, with
clearer shots of several species (e.g., Thick-billed, Black-
whiskered, and Yucatdn vireos) and the addition of
photographs for other species or races (e.g., Cayman Brac
Parrot is included as a comparison with the Grand Cayman
race). Three new habitat photographs are included and
repositioned in the introductory section. Unfortunately, the
color reproduction is somewhat inferior to that of the first
edition because much of the brilliance of Yves-Jacques Rey-
Millet's fine photographs is lost.
This is a high-quality publication, with excellent
information on resident and visiting birds gathered through
extensive observations in the field, and illustrated with good
graphical material. As in her earlier edition, the author targets
both resident and tourist, expert and amateur, making this an
easily read introduction to the islands' ecosystems and
avifaunas. Beyond that, the book contains a wealth of
information on the biology of the birds of the Cayman
Islands. It is recommended as essential to the visitor to the
Cayman Islands and to the student of West Indian birds. Ms.
Bradley has generously provided for the Land Fund of the
National Trust for the Cayman Islands to receive some of die
proceeds from the sale of the book. JWW.


A NATURAL HISTORY ATLAS TO THE CAYS OF
THE U. S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, by Arthur E. Dammann
and David W. Nell s. Pineapple Press. Inc., Florida, U.S.A,
160 pp, 22 x 28 cm. Color photographs, maps. Index. ISBN
1-56164-022-0. Softcover, US$24.95.

From the moment you open to the title page and view the
splendid color photograph of a Great Blue Heron in the
frontispiece, you suspect you are in for a treat. The contents
of this volume do not disappoint, The text, written by long-
time Virgin Islands residents Dammann and Nellis, is
informative and the photographs (by Nellis) are excellent.
In their introduction Danunann and Nellis orient us 10 the
location and characteristics of the 56 cays and adjacent rocks
covered in the book. They present a discussion of the
importance of shoreline relative to island surface area,
followed by a general description of the cays' climate, soils,
salt ponds, plants, historic changes, and human influences.
Information on past and present breeding sites of 17 seabirds
among 22 cays and the main islands of St. Thomas, St. Croix,
and St. John, as well as Tobago (British Virgin Islands), is
nicely consolidated into a table.


EB Pitirre 8(2)


Page 4







Reviews (cont.) -Dammrana & Nellis- Cays of Virgin Islands

The main body of the book consists orfinformation for each
of the 56 cays, as well as manglars, man-made or-destroyed
islands, and unvegetated rocks. Two full pages of this over-
sized book are dedicated to each cay. One is immediately
impressed by the excellent color photographs, which cover
one of these two pages and a part of the second. The
photographs consist of an aerial shot for each cay and,
usually, a ground-level view of the site or its characteristic
habitat. Other photographs of flora and fauna (many birds)
accompany the account for each cay, with many of these
photos having a sidebar of information about the species or
group depicted.
The text describing each cay occupies about half a page,
and is packed with vital information on the cay's position,
owner, size, elevation, and shoreline. Geological, near-
shore, and man-made features are described, as are floral and
fauna characteristics. Among the latteraredescriptions of the
nesting populations of birds, some with historical and present
compositions, and breeding numbers. B asedon their exte nsive
experience in the Virgin Islands, the authors present a set of
recommendations for each of the cays,
Anyone who has had to sort out the myriad of older names
for these cays will appreciate the glossary of place names,
wherein synonyms are cross-indexed and sources uo
information are included. The authors include a short bibli-
ography and an index to species names (English and scien tific),
which includes reference to the photographs. Finally, a
general index includes subjects and sites.
The book is fittingly dedicated to George Seaman, the
pioneer conservationist in the Virgin Islands, It is highly
recommended as a visual rendering of the islands, as well as
anexcellent description of the past and presentcharacte ristics
of the cays of the U. S. Virgin Islands. JWW.


BLUE MOUNTAIN GUIDE. Margaret Hodges (Editor).
Natural History Society of Jamaica, Kingston, Jamaica, Pear
Tree Press/Hyde, Held & Blackburn Ltd, 56 pp. ISBN 976-
8092-74-2. JS 100.00 (-US$3.00).

This guide, which had been a vision for many years, has
finally become a reality. This was possible with ithCe ,j istn.
of many experts in their respective fields. The authors cover
various aspects of natural history, which are non-technical,
scmi-technicat, and tchnicuul. The booklet takes a
comprehensive look at the Blue Mountain range. Jamaica,
with one chapter devoted to birds,
The first section presents various routes from which the
Blue Mountain trails may be accessed as well as accommo-
dations and tour options, It gives tips on appropriate hiking
gear, as well as simple do's and don't's, The reader is taken
on a tour of historical sites and other places of interest.
winding from Cooperage up through Hardwar Gap. across to


Silver Hill Gap. down toGuava Ridge, and finally completing
the circle back at Cooperage.
The second section of the guide describes the human and
geological history of the range. This starts with a description
of the French seulers in the mountains and traces the devel-
opmnent of the region up until the deforestation and erosion
that accompanied the introduction of coffee and other plants.
Following this is a technical overview of the geology of the
mountain range.
The final section gives details on the flora and fauna of the
area, with one chapter dedicated solely to the avifauna of the
Blue Mountain range. Beautiful photographs and line draw-
ings of plants, including introduced species. epiphytes, and
herbs, from the forest boundary to the Blue Mountain peak,
are presented- The guide makes note of the 65 species of
orchids and the unique elfin woodland found in the Blue
Mountains. Readers are taken on a night trek to discover
invertebrates such as "blinkies" and "peeny-wallies."
Honeybees, butterflies, walking sticks, and spiders are ex-
amined during the day. The number of vertebrates found in
the Blue Mountains is small. Frogs. bats, mongooses, birds.
and three species of lizards occur there.
The guide ends with a chapter on the common birds that
dwell in the Blue Mountains. These include the abundant
Red-billed Streamertail, noisy Jamaican Woodpecker, and
diminutive Jamaican Tody. Some ofthe uncommon bi rds and
their peculiarities are also described. The"Wildpine Sergeant"
foraging in bromeliads, the "Mountain Witch" with its
haunting call, and the quiet "Ringtail" all contribute to the
unique beauty of the Blue Mountains, In addition to de-
scriptions, checklists oflaamaican birds and North American
migrants found from mid- to high-levels are provided. For
birders who desire a more comprehensive description of die
birds of the Blue Mountains, a list of recommended guide
books is included, ChandraA. Degia. Grambling Cooperative
Wildlife Project, P.O. Box4290, GramnblingState University,
Grambling, Louisiana 71245. USA.


THE BIRDS OF TH ETURKS AND CAECOS ISLANDS:
THE OFFICIAL CHECKLIST, by Patricia Bradley.
National Trust of the Turks and Caicos Islands. Grand Turk,
Turks and Caicos Islands. 24 pp. Map.

Thliearac-tively illustrated euver fthc checklist provides the
bird-watcher with a sneak preview of the birds to be seen in
the Turks and Caicos Islands. For those who are unfamiliar
with the geography of these islands, a map is provided on the
firsL page, There is also a Table of Contents for quick access
oi the families in the actual checklist, as well as an overview
that piNsents a general description of the location, island
constituents, protected areas, vegetation, and avian
composition of the Turks and Caicos Islands. A key to


El Pitirre 8(2)


Page 5






Rcview. (ceont.) Bradley -Turks & Caico* Chccklist

relative abundance, status, and bird occurrence on each
island group is provided for use with the checklist. The
checklist itself is divided into Waterbirds, from the grebes
(Podicipedidae) to the gulls and tcrns (Laridae), and Landbirds.
from the pigeons and doves (Columbidac) to the finches and
sparrows (Emberizidae), Space is provided for recording
new sightings and notes. In addition, a list of recommended
books is given. Bird-watchers are reminded that permits are
required to visit sanctuaries, and that birds in the Turks and
Caicos Islands are protected. Chandra A. Degia, Grambling
Cooperative Wildlife Project, P. 0. Box 4290, Grambling
State University, Grambling, Louisiana 71245, U, S. A.




BREEDING BIRD ATLAS OF CUBA AND
ADJACENT ISLANDS

As announced at the Society's 1993 annual meeting in Playa
Gir6n. Cuba. the Breeding Bird At as of Cuba Project proposes
to provide data on the status and distribution of the
approximately 160 species that nest on the main island of
Cuba, Isla de la Juventud (formerly Isla de Pinos), and
adjacent keys. Preliminary results of the Project were presented
at the XXI International Ornithological Congress held in
Vienna, Austria last year. The Project is coordinated at the
Zoology Department of the Universidad de Salamanca, Spain,
with participating ornithologists from several Cuban agen-
cies and institutions. Cuban ornithologists are in charge of
finding and evaluating information from their colleagues. To
date, funding for the Project has come mainly from the
participating institutions, but a grant has been requested from
the Instituteo de Cooperaci6n Iberoamericano of Spain.
The Project organizers invite individuals and organizations
interested in ornithology, biodiversity, and conservation to
collaborate with them, or to send any suggestions Ihey may
have. They also request that interested ornithologists or
birdwatchers who have visited Cuba during the breeding
season send data for inclusion in the database. Each
contribution will be acknowledged in the Atlas, and the
organizers hope to offer copies of the book to collaborators at
a reduced rate. The organizers request that curators of orni-
thological collections send a list of Cuban bird skins (with
dates and localities) in their collections. All information and
inquiries should bc sent to:
Prof, Dr, Salvador 1. Peris
Depto. de Biologfa Animal-Zoologfa
Facultad de Biologia
Universidad de Salamanca
37071 Salamanca, Espafia
Telephone: 923-294463
Fax: 923-294513


ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE Onwri-rHoti.oicA. C.ouNCL

The Ornithological Council is the public voice for
ornitdologists in the United States. It was founded in 1992 by
seven scientific societies, including the American
Ornithologists' Union, Association of Field Ornithologists,
Colonial Waterbird Society. Cooper Ornithological Society,
Pacific Seabird Group. Raptor Research Foundation, and
Wilson Ornithological Society. These societies represent
more than 5000 scientists and students of bird life with
worldwide membership and expertise. The objectives of the
Council and its members include to (1) Link the scientific
community with public and private decision-makers; (2)
Provide timely information about birds to help ensure
scientifically-based decisions, policies, and management
actions: (3) Inform ornithologists of proposals and actions
that affect birds or the study of birds; and (4) Speak for
scientific ornithology on public issues. Among the services
provided by the Council are (I) Development of a database of
expertise, (2) Analyses of funding trends in ornithological
programs, and (3) Information exchange to improve the
quality of decisions. A brochure describing The Ornithologi -
cal Council and is activities is available from:
Dr. David Blockstein
NIE
730 1 lth St., NW, Suite 300
Washington. D. C. 20001-4521
Telephone: 202-628-1731



STATUS OF PUERtTO RicAN RAPTORS

The Puerto Rican Broad-winged Hawk (Buteo platypterris
brunnescens) and Puerto Rican Sharp-shinned Hawk (Ac-
cipiter striatus venator) were listed as Endangered by the
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service on 9 September 1994.



BuYER BEWARE BROCHURE AVAILABLE

The World Wildlife Fund, together with several Caribbean
governments and the Convention on International Trade in
Endangered Species (CITES), has put together a brochure to
educate tourists and protect endangered wildlife. "Buyer
Beware" summrnarizes which wildlife and wildlife products
should generally be avoided when looking for souvenirs. For
a copy, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to World
Wildlife Fund, 1250 24th Street, NW, Washington, D-C.
20037, U.S.A., Attn.: "Buyer Beware" Brochure for the
Caribbcan.


Page 6


E PiLirre S(2)







Announcemcnis (continued)


CARIBHEAN NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE (CANARI)
WORKSHOP ON REVENUE GENERATION For PROTECrIv
AREAS
SABA, NETHERLANDS ANTILLES
5-9 JUNE 1995

Objectives of the Workshop include to (1)Expose partcipant s
to a range of mechanisms for financing protected areas,
particularly those that have proven successful in theCaribbean;
(2) Explore opportunities for collaboration between govern-
ments. NGOs. the private sector, and community institutions
in the financing and management of protected areas; and (3)
Support participants in the preparation of revenue generation
strategies for their own countries or protected areas. Admit-
tance to the Workshop is by application only. Application
forms can be obtained front CANARI at either of the following
addresses:
1104 Strand Street
Suite 208
Christiansted, St. Croix
U. S. Virgin Islands 00820
Telephone: 809-773-9854
Fax: 809-773-5770
or
Clarke Street
Vieux Fort
St. Lucia
Telephone: 809-454-6060
Fax: 809-454-5188


REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE

WRST INDIAN WHISTLING.DUCK (DENDROCVGNA AROREA)

Research is currently being conducted on this species in the
Bahamas by a graduate student from University af M innesota,
We are aware that this duck has a precarious status within its
limited range in the West Indies and there is a movement to
conduct an education and conservation program on the few
islands where it occurs. To ascertain important habitat
requirements for the duck, we need specific information on
nesting: dates of observation, location, description of
construction, type of surrounding vegetation, number of
cggs, distance from nearest body of water, and whether this
is salt. brackish, or fresh water. Because the nests of this
species are difficult to find, we would appreciate assistance
from members who may have been able to observe nests.
Contributors to this much needed data will certainly be
acknowledged. Send information to:
Mars Van Liefde
1313 S. Military Tr. #300
Deertield Beach. FL 33442, U.S.A,


NEWS OF MEMBERS

PATRICIA E. BRADLEY AWARDED THE MBE

Society Secretary Patricia E. Bradley was awarded an MIBE
by the Queen of England at a ceremony at Buckingham
Palace in November 1994. The award was made inrecognition
ao Ms. Bradley's many import nt contributions to conservati on
in the Cayman Islands and Turks and Caicos Islands. Ms.
Bradley is the author of "Birds of the Cayman Islands" and
die "Check-list of birds of Turks and Caicos," among many
other publications. Patricia has served as the Society's
Secretary since 1991. Congratulations. Patricia!



NEW PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE

The following publications on West Indian birds have recently
become available:

BMas orF THE CAYMAN ISLANDS, second edition. By Patricia
Bradley, Available from Ms. Bradley, Box 907, Grand
Cayman, Cayman Islands, B. W. 1. Cost to Society members-
US$30.00 including postage.

CHECK-LIST OF BIRDS OF TURKS AND CAICOS. By Patricia
Bradley. Available form National Trust, P. 0. Box 261,
Grand Turk. Turks and Caicos Islands, B. W_. I Cost -
US$10.00 plus postage. IAll proceeds go to the Turks and
Caicos National Trust]

MONOGRAPH ON THE AVIFAlUNA OF THE CAYMAN ISLANDS, By
Patricia Bradley. Available as a separate from "The Cayman
Islands Natural History and Biogeography," (Brunt and
Davies, Editors), Kluwer Acad. Publs. Request from Ms.
Bradley with postage to cover shipping.



MEETINGS OF INTEREST

4-7 May 1995 Wilson Ornithological Society I Virginia
Sowirty of Ornithology joint meeting, Fort Magrudet Inn
and ConferenceCenter, Williamsburg, Virginia. U.S.A. [Ruth
A. Beck, Department of Biology, College of William and
Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia].

7-11 June 1995 Annual Meeting of the Society for
Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort
Collins, Colorado. U.S.A. [Richard L. Knight, Department of
Fishery and Wildlife Biology, Colorado State Uruversity,
Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, U.S.A.J.


El Pitirre 8(2)


Page 7






Meetings of Interest (Continued)


mid-June 1995 The Second Mesoamerican Workshop on
the Conservation and Management ofMancaws,Costa Rica.
[Center for the Study of Tropical Birds, Inc., 218 Conway
Dr., San Antonio, Texas 78209-1716, U.S.A.; Fax: 512-828-
5911].

8-13 July 1995 Animal Behavior Society. University of
Nebraska, Lincoln, U.S.A. [ABS 1995, School of Biological
Sciences. 348 Manter Hall, University of Nebraska, Lincoln,
Nebraska 68588-0118, U.S.A.; Telephone: 402-472-9073.
Fax: 402-472-2083; e-mail: ABS95@niko.un1.edu].

5-11 August 1995 V Neotropical Ornithological Congress,
Asunc ion, Paraguay. [Nancy Lopez de Kochalka. clo Comitd
Organizador Local del V CON, Museo Nacional de Historia
Natural del Paraguay, Sucursal 19, Campus. Central XI,
Paraguay, South America; Telephone: 595-21-5050751.


RESULTS OF THE ELECTION OF SOCIETY
OFFICERS WILL BEANNOUNCED ATTHEANNUAL
MEETING IN TRINIDAD


THE SOCIETY OF CARIBBEAN ORNITHOLOGY


President:


Vice President:


13-20 August 1995 American Ornithologists' Union Secretary:
Annual Meeting, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. [Robert Kennedy,
Museum of Natural History. 1720 Gilbert Ave., Cincinnati,
Ohio 45202, U.S.A.; Telephone: 513-345-8510; Fax: 513-
345-8501].

1-4 November 1995 The Raptor Research Foundation
Annual Meeting. Duluth. Minnesota, U.S.A. [University of
Minnesota Duluth Center for Continuing Education & Ex-
tension; Telephone: 218-726-6819; Fax: 218-726-6336; e-
mail: merickso@d.umn.edu].

8-12 November 1995 Colonial Waterbird Society and
Pacific Seabird Group Joint Meeting, Victoria, British
Columbia, Canada. [Dr. Rob Butler, Pacific Wildlife Research
Centre, Canadian Wildlife Service, Box 340, Delta, British
Columbia V4K 3Y3 Canada; or Dr. Ron Ydenberg, Dept. of
Biosciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British
Columbia V5A 156 Canada].

3-7 June 1996 Society of Avian Paleontology and
Evolution, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. [Storrs Olson, NHB
MRC 116 (Birds), Smithsonian Institution. Washington.
D.C. 20560, U.S.A.; Telephone: 202-357-2031: Fax: 202-
786-2328].

29 September 4 October 1996 6th International Be-
havioral Ecology Congress. Australian National Unilversity.
ACT, Australia. [Andrew Cockburn, Botany and Zoulogy,
Australian National University, ACT, 0200. Australia: e-
mail: isbe6@anu.edu.au].

16-22 August 1998 XXII International Ornithological
Congress, Durban, South Africa.


CAn-THERINE LEVY, 2 Starlight Ave.. Kingston
6, Jamaica

DR. Josr WCNo-,DI., Jr., International
Institute of Tropical Forestry, P.O. Box B,
Palmer, Puerto Rico 00721

Ms. PATRict F. BRADLEY. P. 0. Box 907,
Grand Cayman. Cayman Islands, B.W,L

DR. ROSEMARIE GNAM, 13 East Rosemont
Ave., Alexandria, Virginia 22301. U.S.A.


El Pitirre 8(2)


Page B











SOCIETY OF CARIBBEAN ORNITHOLOGY
A wAL MEETGa, 27 JuLY 2 AuGusT 1995
TRINIDAD


ABSTRACT


Please complete your abstract within the space provided below:


If possible. please submit abstracts as computer files on floppy disks.


Send completed abstract to:

Dr. James Wiley
2201 Ashland St.
Rustoni, Luuislana 71270, U.S.A.
Fax: 318-274-3870


Page 9


El Pitirre 8(2)

























Dr. James W. Wiley
2201 Ashland St.
Ruston, Louisiana 71270, U.S.A.


FIRST CLASS
PRINTED MATTER


El Pitirre 8(2)




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