Group Title: Pitirre (Camarillo, Calif.)
Title: El Pitirre
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100143/00023
 Material Information
Title: El Pitirre
Uniform Title: Pitirre (Camarillo, Calif.)
Abbreviated Title: Pitirre (Camarillo Calif.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wiley, James W
Wiley, James W
Society of Caribbean Ornithology
Society for the Study of Caribbean Ornithology
Publisher: Society for the Study of Caribbean Ornithology
Place of Publication: Camarillo Calif
Camarillo, Calif
Publication Date: 1994
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Ornithology -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Language: In English, with some Spanish.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1988)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 2002.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1, no. 3 covers the period May-Aug. 1988.
Issuing Body: Newsletter of the Society for the Study of Caribbean Ornithology, Jan/Feb.-Mar./Apr. 1988; the Society of Caribbean Ornithology, May/Aug. 1988-
General Note: Editor, 1988- James W. Wiley.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 15, no. 1 (spring 2002) (Surrogate)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100143
Volume ID: VID00023
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 23284416
lccn - sn 99004863
issn - 1527-7151
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Journal of Caribbean Ornithology

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Sociedad de la Ornitologia Caribefia


EL PITIRRE


Society of Caribbean Ornithology


C Fall 1994


Vol. 7. No. 3 .


EL PITIRRE

El Pitirre is the newsletter of the Society of
Caribbean Ornithology.

El Ptirre es el boletfn infornativo de la
Sociedad de ia Ornitologia Cari bei a.

EorroR: James W. Wiley, 2201 Ashland St.,
Ruston, Louisiana 71270. U.S.A.
AssLsTArn Eorroas: Chandra Degia and
Garfield Brown, Grambling Cooperative
Wildlife Project. P.O. Box 4290, Grambling
State Universily, Grambiing, Louisiana
71245, U.S.A.

News, comments or requests should be mailed
to the editor for inclusion in the newsletter.

Nontcias, comentarios o peticiones deben ser
enviadasal editor parainctus idn en el botetin.


Tyrannis domminicensis


Pitirre, Gray Kingbird, Pestigre, Petchary


The Society of Caribbean Ornithology is a non-profit organization
whose goals are to promote the scientific study and conservation of
Caribbean birds and their habitats, to provide a link among island
ornithologists and those elsewhere, to provide a written forum for
researchers in the region (refereed journal-Ornitologia Caribeha,
published in conjunction with the Puerto Rico Ornithological So-
ciety) and to provide data or technical aid to conservation groups in
the Caribbean.

La Sociedad de la Ornitologia Caribefia es una organizaci6n sin
fines de lucro cuyas mctas son promoter el studio cientifico y la
conservaci6n de la avifauna caribefa, auspiciar un simposio annual
sobre I a orn itologiacaribefa, publ icar una rcvista profesionall lanada
Ornicologfa Caribefia (publicada en conjunto con la Sociedad
Ornitotdgica de Puerto Rico), ser una fuente de comunicacidn entire
ornitdlogos caribeflos y en otras Areas y proveer ayuda t6cnica o
datos a grupos de conservacidn en el caribe.


CONTENTS
THE SrrroED RAIL PARDtuALLUS ACULAT.S IN JAMAICA. Cathernne Levy..... 2
ALPINE SwFr (TAo rcNyA-rFs M.uu.) PHOTOGRAPHED ON ST. LLUOA.
LESSER ANTILES THrRD RECORD FOR -nE WES EERN HEMISPHERE.
Wayne Burke ............................................................................... 3
SEINY CowH m;s (MooTLhusUS saslrl sS s ON NORTi- ANDROS iSLAND.
BAiA.IIMAS. M ichael E. Balaz ............................................................. 4
THE ABSENCE OF A NATAL PLUMAGE 1 TaE mH SPANIOLAN PALM CHAT. DaUts
DOM-vIeCUS (DL.UNAE, PASS RIFORMES). David Kenneth Wetherbee....... 4
Pu-ERTO RICAN PARn.OT Di 17 AGAIN 1994: ONCE AGAIN THEY HAVE
SHOWN THEIR ABrLITY To RECOVER. Jafel Vfle-Valentin ................... 4
ABSTRACTS OF SELECInTD PAPERS PRESENTED AT THE ANNUAL MEETING OF
THIE Sw'ETY OF CARIBBEAN OrrHTTaOLOcY, MARTINILUE. FRENCH
Wusr IsnIE ........ ................. ........... .. .... ....... ..... .. 5
NF-wS FRaM M.EmBERs
BERMLtDA, David B. Wingate ........ ......... ....................................... 12
ADDmo nAL RECORDS FOR A-TIGUA- BARB.'DA Nadtan P. Grcks .......... 12
III SI s o DE ZO O LOG IA .. ..... ... ... ................................ ........................ 12
REPORT ON THE .ME'.ING OF THE AsSOCTATION FOR PARROT
CONSERVATION, GUADALAJARA. MEXICO, 7-11 JUVE 1994,
D onald A nihnny ............................,.................................. ................ 13
CREATION OF A NATIONAL PARK ]N THE BAHAMA ISLANDS ............. .. . 13
A RUBA 5EABIRIDS THREATENED ................................... .... ..... ....... .................. 13


Canunued on back cover


a


I








THE SPOTTED RAIL PARDIRALLUS MACULA TUS IN JAMAICA


Catherine Levy
Gos s Bird Club, 2 Starlighl Avenue, Kingston 6, Jamaica


In early 1994. three sightings of the Spotted Rail Pardirallus
macuatris were reported from Jamaica. Only two sightings
of the Spotted Rai have been reported (1977 and 1987) since
the Gosse Bird Club began keeping records in 1963. Thus, the
three reports for 1994 are unusual enough to merit particular
notice, I also report on the breeding status of the species in
Jamaica. Dr. Richard Banks of the National Biological Sur-
vey at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington,
D.C., kindly provided much of the information for this
search-
All of the 1994 sightings were likely of the same individual
and were made in the area of the Black River Morass,
northeast of the town of Black River, St. Elizabeth parish,
southwestern Jamaica. The first observation was made by a
group of visiting birders, whereas the second and third were
made by experienced bird watchers resident on the island.
The lower morass is a complex of shallow brackish lagoons,
tidal marshes, mudflats, and mangroves near the coast, with
extensive freshwater marshes, seasonally flooded grassland,
and swamp forest (Scott and Carbonnel 1986). This area is a
continuation of the upper morass which, overmany years, has
been drained forvariousreasons and has been further degraded
by pollution and activities such as the planting of rice. Many
species, including several waterfowl, breed in the morass.
although the area's importance, especially to those species
considered threatened, has never been studied.
Early reports of Jamaica's birdlife, including those of
Gosse (1847). Scott (1892), and Sclater (1910), did not
include the Spotted Rail. The earliest mention that I have
found is that ofBangs (1913), who said, "The Spotted Rail of
Jamaica has undoubtedly become extinct, without a single
example having been preserved, so far as I am aware." The
implication here is that Bangs knew of its existence in
Jamaica, but no source is given. Although Bond did not know
of (or omitted) this reference in the preparation of his first
edition of Birds of the West Indies (1936), this was rectified
in his Check-list (1940), where he reported. "This species is
said to have formerly occurred on Jamaica."
The next known record was attained in 1977, when Allan
Keith (1979) observed a Spotted Rail in night (at a distance
of 6 m in full sunlight) on the Black River. The 1987 report
(Downer 1987) was of a bird, having flown into a glass
window, that was found dead in Mandeville (parish of
Manchester, to the east of the Black River area.), R. Banks
(pers, comm.) notes that "rails are notorious wanderers" is
it possible thai this was one such? The bird was prepared as
a specimen but, unfortunately. while it was drying, the skull
and crown were damaged by a rat. The salvaged specimen is
deposited in the Institute of Jamaica's Natural History Divi-
sion.
Downer and Sut on (1990) characterized the Spotted Rail
Page 2


as "Unreported from Jamaica in the last one hundred years,
until April 1977 (upper Black River Morass) and March 1987
(found dead in Mandevillei." Under Status they list the
species as a "very rare winter visitor." hut under Range, the
entry reads "P. m, inoptawts Cuba, Dominican Republic.
formerly Jamaica",
Lack (1976) doubted that the rail bred in Jamaica, as he
wrote"Breeding has not been proven for... [the] Spotted Rail
(now extinct)." Lack also pointed out that (as far as birds are
concerned) Jamaica is under-watched, so it is likely that it is
also under-reported.
The American Ornithologists' Union IAOU] Check-list
(1983) gives its distribution as: "Resident locally in... Jamaica
(at least formerly, a recent sight record from the Black River
marshes) ...." This is derived from James Bond's entry in the
5th edition of his Birds of the West Indies (1985).
However, it appears that there is no basis for the AOU
Check-list statement about former breeding on Jamaica. and
the next edition will reflect this (R. Banks, pers. comm.).
Further research is needed to reveal other early references to
this species and to discover the source of Bangs' (1913)
information. It would be valuable if studies on breeding and
migratory species that use the Black River System could be
soon undertaken before further habitat damage or destruction
occurs.

Literature Cited

American Ornithologists' Union, 1983, Check-list of North
American birds. 6th ed. Lawrence, Kansas.
Bangs, 0. 1913. New birds from Cuba and the Isle of Pines.
Proc. New England Zool, Club 4:89-92.
Bond. 11936. Field guide to birds of the West Indies.
Waerley Press, Baltimore.
Bond, J. 1940. Check-list of the birds of the West Indies.
Philadelphia. Academy of Natural Sciences.
Bond. J. 1985. Birds of the West Indies. 5th ed. Houghton
Mifflin Co., Boston.
Down. A. 1987. Spotted Rail. Gosse Bird Club Broadsheet
49:12,
Downer. A., and R. Sutton. 1990. Birds of Jamaica a
photographic field guide. Cambridge University Press,
Cambridge.
Gosse, P. H. 1847. The birds of Jamaica. London. Jon Van
Voorst.
Keith. A. 1979, Birding itinerary for trip to Jamaica, April 8
to 17. 1977. Gosse Bird Club Broadsheet 33:2-3.
Lack, D. 1976. Island Biology, illustrated by the land birds of
Jamaica- Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford,
Slater, P. L. 1910. Revised list of the birds of Jamaica. Pp.
596-619 In The handbook of Jamaica for 1910. The Insti-
El Pitirre 7(3)






Spoilcd Rail in Jamaica (continued)
tute of Jamaica, Kingston, Jamaica.
Scott. D. A-, and M. Carbrnnel (Compilers). 1986. A direc-
tory of neotropical wetlands. IUCN Cambridge and (WRB,
S limbridge,U.K.


Scot, W. E. D. 1891-1893, Observations, on the birds of
Jamaica, West Indies. Auk 8:353-365. 249-256; 9:9-15,
120-129,273-277. 369-375; 10:177- IS. L339-342,


ALPINE SWIFT (TACHYMARPTIS MELBA) PHOTOGRAPHED ON ST. LUCIA,
LESSER ANTILLES THIRD RECORD FOR THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE

Wayne Burke
31 Sunnv Acres Road, Km gston. Ontario K7M 3N3. Canada


On the afternoon of 19 August 1992. T was standing near the
summit of the Moule a Chique headland or precipitous cliffs
at 223 m elevation, the southern-most extension of St. Lucia.
At 17; 13 h. an unknown bird rapidly approached at eye level
from seaward (SSE). I soon determined that the bird was a
swift (Apodidae), but not a species I had seen before.
The following description is taken from my field notes
thai were made at the time of the observation. The swift was
larger than a Black Swift (Cvpseloides niger), which is a
summer resident on St. Lucia (Bond 1985, pers. obs.), and
was similar in size to the White-collared Swift (Streproprocne
zonaris). The head and upperparts were uniform light brown,
the throat was whitish, the band across the breast was light
brown. the lower breast and abdomen were white, the under
tail coverts and forked tail were brown, as were the under
wing coverts and wing. Its flight profile was distinctive, with
the long bent wing giving the bird a "boomerang" shape. Its
powered flight was fasti but interrupted by long glides, with
its wings bent back at the wrist and held stiffly below the
horizontal. The forked tail was obvious even when the tail
was fanned, A field sketch was made in addition to the written
description and the swift was photographed (VIREO b3511/
003 and b35/1/004). The bird was observed continuously
from 17:13 to 17:48 h as it made regular circuits of the Moule
a Chique headland and at times preened on the wing. Range
varied from about 6 m on close passes lo about 100 m on the
apogee of the circuit. The weather was clear with no haze or
cloud cover and wind was from the southeast at about 5 knots.
As the swift made circuits around me. viewing conditions
varied from poor, when the bird was to the west, through fatr
to excellent, when the swift was east of me.
The first documented record of the Alpine Swift for the


Western Hem sphere was made by Captain Maurice Hutt in
Barbados. Hutt (in -t.) recalled that "The bird was first seen
about 300 meters inland at Gibb's on the west (leeward) coast
of the island on September 20, 1955, The bird was seen by a
Mr. Webster for several days and wascollectedon September
27th. The specimen (ANSP #16986B. sex ?) was examined
and identified by Hutt, who made a skin and sent it to [James]
Bond at the Academy of Natural Science at Philadelphia."
The second record wass Desecheo Island. off the west coast
of Puerto Rico, on 20 July 1987 (Meier et al. 1989).
Both the Barbados and the St. Lucia birds appear to have
been associated with the passage of a tropical depression
across the At anlic Ocean. The Barbados bird was first seen
two days before Hurricane Janet passed to the south of the
island. Interestingly, the specimen from Barbados is labelled
as the North African race (tuneti), based on its distinctly paler
dorsal coloration compared to the nominate race (melba)
(Robert Rid gely, pers. comm. to Allan Keith). At 05:00 h on
18 August 1992, tropical sIorm (later Hurricane) Andrew was
about 1100 km (700 miles) E of St. Lucia and passed about
900km (560 miles) ENEof the island at 17:00h the same day.
The Alpine Swift was first seen at 17:13 h the next day.
Acknowledgments.-I thank Captain Hun for details of the
Barbados record, and Allan Keith and Mark Robbins for
information and comments on a First draft of this note.

Literature Cited
Bond. J. 1985. Birds of the West Indies. 5th ed, Collins,
London,
Meier, A. J., R. E, Noble. and H. A. Raffaele. 1989. The birds
of Desecheo Island, Puerto Rico. including a new record
for Puerto Rican territory. Caribbean J. Sci. 25:24-29,


El Pitirre 7(3)


Page 3






SHINY COWBIRDS (MOLOTHfRUS BONARIENSIS) ON NORTH ANDROS ISLAND, BAHAMAS


Michael E. Baltz
110 Turker Hal!, Universit of Missouiri-Columbia, Columbvo, Missouri 65211, U.S.A.


From 13-30 July 1994, 1 observed and photographed Shiny
Cowbtrds on several occasions in the seulement of Staniard
Creek, North Andros Island, Bahamas. I saw up to five
individuals (2 males, 3 females oriuvLniles) at one time and
birds were regularly seen on the western shore of the creek
that runs through the settlement.


A recent survey of this island (Baltz. Florida Field Nat.
21:115-117) failed to detect the species, and I believe this
record represents the firsi for the Bahamas. Observers
throughout ihe Bahama Islands should be alert for additional
sightings because the spread of this species through the
archipelago is worthy of documentation.


THE ABSENCE OF A NATAL PLUMAGE IN THE HISPANIOLAN PALM CHAT, DULUS DOMINICUS
(DULINAE, PASSERIFORMES)

David Kenneth Wetherbee
Monciin, Proa. Samnage Rodriiuez. Repriblrca Dorinicana


Abstraci.-The Palm Chat (Dulus dominicusi of
Hispaniola has no natal plumage. This condition is
rare among passerines and allies Dutus with
Bombvcilla, which also lacks a natal plumage. Dulus
and Bombycilla are thus set apart at the subfamily
level from Phainopepla. which has a copious natal
down,

The endemic Palm Chat of Hispaniola, usually regarded to be
a monotypic family or subfamily, has always presented
problems to taxonomists. Phainopeplfa and Bornmbycifa are
usually regarded to be the closest relatives of Dulus. Com-
parisons of natal plumages among avian groups can provide
clues to relationships. However, a comprehensive review of
the literature on the Palm Chat revealed no information on its
neonatal plumage (We therbee 1992). Thus. my observations
of the Palm Chat at hatching are of special interest.
Absolute nakedness at hatching is a rare condition among
passerine genera. Wetherbee (1957) found complete naked-
ness only in such diverse genera as Passer. Progne, and
Bombycilla. On 10 May 1994 at Moncidn, Repuiblica
Dominicana. 1 observed three neonate Dulus, which were
completely naked. Whereas the absence of neosoptiles in
DMuusstrongly supports its putative alliance withBRnmbycila,
this absence stands in con trast to the condition in Phainopepla,


The most appropriate way to show the relationships is to
combine Dlu/ts and Bombycilla in the same subfamily and to
keep Phainopepla in its own subfamily. T suggest that terms
Dulidae and/or Dulinae he discarded, for nothing is quite so
useless as a monotypic higher category unless there is good
reason for such.
Other notes on Dutus neonates include: rictal flanges and
mouth lining bright yellow (not stained by berries, although
the diet consisted of such fruits); skin dark gray; dorsal
feathertract(in phaniom) minimally expanded and(strangely)
without an apterium--- absence of a mid-dorsal apterium is
not expected for a species often placed so early (before the
crows) in the passerine series,

Literature Cited

Sibley. C.. 1973. The relationships of the silky flycatchers.
Auk 90:394-410.
Wetherbee.D.K. 1957. Natal plumages and downy pteryloses
of passerine birds of North America. Bull. Arn.Mus. Nat.
Hist. 113:339-436,
Wetherbee, D.K. 1992. La ave national de Reptiblica
Dominicana: el esclavo-l'esclave. Dulus dominicus de
Hispaniola. y las species en peligro de extinci6n. Pri-
vately published. Shelburne. Massachusetts. 120pp.


PUERTO RICAN PARROTS DID IT AGAIN IN 1994: ONCE AGAIN
THEY HAVE SHOWN THEIR ABILITY TO RECOVER
Jafet Vdle7-Valcnt(n
U, S. Fth and Wildlife Service. Puerto Rrcan Parroi Field Office, LiJquflJ, Puerto Rico


The Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona inttat). one of the most
endangered of parrots, reached the lowest number of indi-
viduals by 1975. with a total wild population of 13 birds.
During the following 14 years. (1975-1989). the population

Page 4


increased front 13 to 47 birds in the wild, However, on 18
September 1989, Hurricane Hugo passed over northeastern
Puerto Rico. after which the population declined to about 22
parrots in the wild. The hurricane caused major habitat
El Pilirre 7(3)







Puertno Rican Parrot (continued)
damage in the Caribbean National Forest, the last refuge of
the Puerto Rican Parrot. No damage occurred to the captive
population at the Luquillo Aviary, where 53 birds existed at
that time.
Breeding acuvity in 1990 was low, but in 1991 the wild
population produced a record successful nests. Six pairs of
parrots in 1992 produced 10 chicks and with another fostered
from the Luquillo aviary, a total of 11 chicks fledged from
wild nests. In 1993. a project record of 22 chicks hatched and
15 fledged: 13 front wild nests and 9 in captivity.
In I994, 14chicks fledged from wild nests, whereas a total
of 7 chicks fledged in capuvity at the Luquillo Aviary. Most
importantly, more new breeding pairs were formed using
DNA fingerprinting information as the primary selection
criteria. As result of this, seven pairs ofcaptive Puerto Rican
Parrots laid fertile eggs.
Improved management techniques that have contributed
to this improvement in productivity include structural modi-


fications of natural cavities, fostering techniques, use of
molecular genetics techniques to maximize genetic repre-
sentation, a closed circuit camera system to monitor captive
breeders, and use of PVC nesting structures for captive
breeders to provide a re-usable, cleaner, and drier environ-
ment.
A second captive program has begun in a cooperative
effort with the Common wealth of Puerto Rico Department of
Natural and Environmental Resources. Six breeding pairs of
captive Puerto Rican Parrots were transferred to the Rio
Abajo Aviary during 1993 to form the nucleus of the second
capti ve population. Two chicks fledged ai that aviary in 1994,
The recent successes for the recovery of the Puerto Rican
Parrot are the result of many factors, including the inherent
ability of the parrot to recover, the enhanced management
techniques, and the effective habitat management but. most
ofall, the special touch ofagroupof people highly committed
to the recovery of the parrot.


ABSTRACTS OF SELECTED PAPERS PRESENTED AT THE ANNUAL MEETING OF
THE SOCIETY OF CARIBBEAN ORNITHOLOGY, MARTINIQUE, FRENCH WEST INDIES


PROYECTO EVALUATIVO DE LAS POBLAC[ONES
DE TORCAZA CABECIBLANCA (COLUMBA
LEUCOCEPHALA) EN LA ISLA DE LA
JUVENTUD, CUBA
Rolando Ambr6dn y Esteban Godinez2
Direccidn a, Sivrctfcilra, Conill e/Ave. Independencia v
Manno, Plaza 10600, Ciudad Habana, Cuba. and Insituto de
Ecologia y Sistemdrica. Carr. Varona Km 3-1/2. AP 8010, CP
10800, Habana 8, Ciudad Habana, Cuba

Las poblaciones de Torcaza Cabeciblanca (Columba
leucocephalajena Isia de laJuventud. no ban side evaluadas
desde el final de la decada de los afos 70. Aunque no existen
registros de estudios recientes, hay evidencias de que la
especic aun se mantiene en la Isla y posee perspectivas de
nmcrementarse sus poblaciones. En el presence proyecto, se
desarrollariun estudioevaluativo integral de las poblaci ones
existentes con vistas a obtener Los elementos cieniffico.
tdcnicos necesarios para la protecci6n y manejo ad ecu ado de
este recurso. La situac i6n general del as coloniasreproductivas
y zonas de alimentacidn, los cruces de torcazas entire ambas
areas, perfodos y dxitos reproductivos, depredadores y otros
aspects biologic us, serAnestudiadosen el present proyecto.


EFFECTS OF HURRICANE HUGO ON
MONTSERRAT'S FOREST BIRDS AND THEIR
HABITAT
Wayne J. Arendt
USDA Forest Service, IITF/CWC P. 0, Box.t B, Palmer, PR
00721

As a result of Hurricane Hugo, damage sustained by
Montserrat's forests was severe, Throughout the island"
three interior mountain ranges (Centre, Soufriere. & South
SoufriereHills) from lower-to mid-elevations. 527- fn=203)
of the moist- and wet-forest trees sampled suffe- loss or
damage to their primary branches. Trunks, often s;' .pped of
all branches, were left standing. Six months following Hugo.
manyofthe surviving treetrunks showedextensive generation
of primary branches and foliage via adventitious :--' og and
epicormic growth. Damage was more severe at L. gher el-
evations in hygrophytic forest and especially in elfin wood-
land on the upper slopes of the South Soufriere Hills, the
hardest hit by Hugo. Of 369 trees sampled. 63% suffered
trunk snap or throw (including uprooting and "trunk lean" >
45 degrees). A combination of misi-net, transect. and fixed-
radius point count census methods showed that six months


El Pitirre 7(3)


Page 5







Marinique meeting abstracis continued)
following disturbance: (I ) Avian populations in general, but
especially frugivorous and nectarivorous species, had not
obtained pre-disturbance sizes. (2) Many species, including
the endemic Montserrat Oriole (fcrerus oberi). had emigrated
from montane forest seeking habitat refugia in the more
protected, steep-sided arroyos (ghauts) and more advanced
regenerated forest bells found at tower-tn-mid elevations. (3)
Whereas most species were sparser in dry forest and hard-hit
elfin woodland, nectarivores were more plentiful in these
habitats, aggregating around ihe abundant, flowenng epi-
phytes and ground-cover plants. (4) Most forest birds ob-
served foraging in montane habitats were forced to feed
within 1-2 m of the ground. (5} Six species (3 of which were
mimids), all habitat and food generalists, were common in
every area sampled. (6) The most abundant species was the
Pearly-eyed Thrasher (Margarops fuscatus), a major agri-
cultural pest. predator, and general pest. (7) The Caribbean
Elaenia (Elaenia martinica) showed extreme population
fluctuations over the past 50 years. mccurnng in large num-
bers following major hurricanes, then all but disappearing
during the interim.

EVALUATION OF THE MICROBIAL FLORA FOUND
IN NESTS AND CHICKS OF WILD AND CAPTIVE
PUERTO RICAN PARROTS (AMAZONA VITTATA
A, B. Arnizaut1, D. Cepeda2, C. Betancounrt2,
and F. J. Vilellat
I US. Fish and Wildlife Service, Luqrdlo. Puerro Rica. 2Deparf-
men of Biolog3y. University' of Puerto Rico. Maavagtue.
Puerto Rico

Five natural cavities in palocolorado(Cyrilla racenmiflora)and
one in tabonuco (Dacryodes excelsa) trees in the rain forest
of the Luq uilloMountains, Puerto Rico. were sampled forthe
presence of bacteria and fungi. Samples were also collected
at the Luquillo aviary from nest boxes made of plywood and
PVC plastic. In the wild. samples were collected during the
nesting season of Puerto Rican Parrots and included collec-
tion of wood chips from the nest bottoms and swabs of the
nest walls. Additionally, swabs of the egg surface and of the
choana and cloaca of wild and captive parrot chicks were
collected. The preliminary results presented will include
approximate number of colonies detected as well as the
specific composition of the most prevalent microorganisms
identified from the samples collected. Management recom-
mendations derived from the database generated for the
captive parrot population at the Luquillo Aviary will be
discussed,

INTER-ISLAND SONG DIFFERENTIATION AND
MEME FLOW IN WEST INDIAN BLACKWHIS-
KERED VIREOS (VIREO ALTILOQUUS SSP. i
Jon C. Barlow
Dept. Ornithrology. Royal Ontarro Museum and Dept. Zoology,
Unrm of Toronto. Toronto, Ontar. Canada MA55 2C6
Page 6


Black-whiskered Vireos are migratory (Vireoa. ahiloquus, V.
a- barbatulus)orsedentary (V. a. harbadensis. V, a, canescens,
V. a. grandiar) and inler-island differences in sung are re-
flected in the migratory habit. Some song syllables are shared
among subspecies and within subspecies of the 10 popula-
tions examined in this study (St. Vincent, Guadeloupe, and
Moniserrat. barbadensis; Puerto Rico, New Providence.
Andros, and Cuba. barhatuds; Jamaica, attiloquts; San
Andrds, canescens; Providencia, grandinr). A population of
the Yucatan Vireo (V. m. magister) from Cozumel island is
used as an outgroup. Numbers ofsyllables shared diminish as
a function of the transition From migratory to sedentary habit
in these vireos and also asa function of the degree of isolation
of populations. There is substantial syllable similarity be-
iween magister and the large sedentary canescens and
grandior. Bottlenecking and subsequent drift may also be a
factor in the inter-island cultural evolution of song in V
affiloquus ssp.

CARACTERIZACION ECOLOGICA DE LA AVI-
FAUNA CUBANA EN PELIGRO DE EXTINCION
Vicente Berovides y Xiomara Gdlvez
Empresa Nacional para la Proleccirn de la Flora v ato Fauna,
Ainisterro de Agnciultura, Cuba

En este trabajo se reconocen 20 species de aves residents
urbanas en peligro de extinci6n (4 gdneros enddmicus, 6
especiesenddmicas, 4 subespecies enddmicas y 6 species no
enddmicas). De este grupo solo dos son acuaticas y el resto es
de bosques y arboledas. Una especie. el Carpintero Real
(Campephilus prin cipalis) aparentem enter ya esta e x inguido.
tires species se encuentran confinadas a una sola airea
geogrifica y las restantes se encuentran en poblaciones
dispersas por today la isla de Cuba- La causa principal de
amenazapara todas las species es la destruccion de[ habitat,
y para algunas ademas la caza y colecta de sus pichones. Ocho
especiesposeen rareza natural, por loque deben serpnonzadas
para la conservacidn, junto con ias de nicho ecol6gico
especializado (trece speciess.

STUDIO DE LOS HUMEDALES DE MAYOR
IMPORTANCIA PARA LAS AVES ACUATICAS EN
LA PROVINCIA DE MATANZAS. CUBA
Pedro Blanco
InstnMto de Ecologia y Sistemdiica, Mnisterio de la Crencia,
Tecnologia y Medio Ambiente, Ciudad de La Habana. Cuba

El creciente desarrollo industrial-turisLico y el aumento del
nivel del mar a consecuencia del calentamiento global
advierten el peligro que corrcn los ecosistemas costeros del
Caribe de disminuir en numcro y extension territorial. Este
fen6meno engendra una seria y alarmante amenaza que
atenta contra la dinamnica. bellcza y biodiversidad de los
humedales costeros tropicales par to que nuestros esfuerzos
deben estar prioritariamente dirigidos hacia la ubicacidn,

El Pitirre 7(3)







Martinique melcing abstracis (continued)
studio y conservaci6n de estas dreas y sus valores naturaes.
En ci trabajo se exponen los principals resultados obeenidos
durante los censos y Ja evaluacifOn de lascomunidades de aves
ac uAicas residentesy ntgraoriasnein cas asaci adasacuatra
hum etda [es de importancia en la provincia de Matanras en el
period de 1989-1992. Se ofrece una relaci6n de 51 species
de aves censadas en la provincia penenecientes a 5 ordenes,
I [ familiar y 30 gdneros, dcstacdndose pot su abundancia
relative Phoenicopterus raber. Himantopus mexicants,
Calidrismauri, C. pusiila, C. minutiia y Pluvialissquaiarola
entire otros, asi coma una breve caracterizaci6n de la
arnitofuana y los valores ornitol6gicos registrados en cada
uno de los humedales estudiados, en tre los que se encuentran
las espec ies Charadriu nmelodus. C, alexandrinus, Phalaropus
tricolor y Haemaropusi palliatus. Se presenia finalmente un
mapacon la ubicacidn de los humedates de mayor irportancia
para las aves acuiticas evaluados en laprovinciade Matan zas
y las Areas potenciales propuestas para continuar 6ste lipo de
studio en otras regions del Archipidlago cubano en un
future.

DISTRIBUTION Y ESTIMADO POBLACIONAL
ACTUAL DE CUATRO AVES ACUATICAS NATIVAS
EN PUERTO RICO
G. Banilla. M. Vdsques y E. Derrios
Divisiiin de Ecologin Terresire, Deparramenao de Recursos
Namiraoes Y Ambrenales. San Juan, P.R. 00906

Desde 1878 varies autores hacen mencidin de Ia distribuci6n
y cl estimado poblacinnal para aves acuaticas nativas en
PuenoRico. Apartirde 11991 hemosestudiado adistribuci n,
uso del habitat a traves de la isla. y factors que afectan Ias
poblaciones de cuatro aves acuiticas naiivas. Esie studio
present la reducci6n en la distribuci6n de la Chiriria Nativa
(Dendrocygna arborea), el Pato Quijada Colorada (Anas
bahamensis), el Pato Chorizo (Ormura jamaicensis) y el
Gallinazo Nativo (Fuiicacaribaea). Sedectia unareduccidn
en el estimado poblacional de la Chirirfa Native (100 ind, a
partir 1986) y el gallinazo native (4,600 ind. a partir del
1931). El Palo Quijada Colorada y e] pawe chorizo presentan
un ligero aumento en su estimado poblacional de (400-500
ind.) y (700-800 ind.)respectivamente, a partir de los ultimos
acho afios. Vari-s problems han afeciado las poblacionesde
escas ayes acuaticas, coma por ejemplo: la destrucci6n de su
habitkculo y la sobrecaceria. entire otros. Sc discuce la
protecci6n dada a esias waves por las agencies esitaales y Jas
recomendaciones de manejo para sus habiticulns.

THE HUMMINGBIRDS OF MARTINIQUE
Marcel Bon Saint Come
Beleme Lamentin, Martiniqjie

The four species of hummingbirds resident in Martinique
will be described, along with discuss ions of the ir flight, diet,
and plumage characteristics.
El Pitirre 7(3)


BIRD SPECIES INTRODUCED TO MARTINIQUE IN
THE PAST 40 YEARS
Marcel Bon Saint Come
Belau, Lamennr Martimtque

Among the escaped cage and other exotic or non-native birds
that have been observed in Martinique in the past40yearsare:
Estrildidae-Anrandava anmandava, Lochura malacra,
U/raeginthus sp.: Ploccidae-Euplectes orix. Ploceus
cucutlatus: Icteridae-Molothrubovariensis; Fri ng i lIidae-
SicalisrbneoflaTurdidae-Turdustudigienis; and Analidac-
Dendrocygna arborea, The status of these species and their
potential impact on native populations will be discussed,

L'AVIFAUNE SEDENTAIRE DE LA MARTINIQUE:
UN PROGRAMME PEDAGOGIQUE INFORMATISE
Beatriz Conde
Fort de France, Martinrque

Prdsen taomn d'un support pddagogique multi-med a, destined
SIla connaissance de I'avifaune sedentaire de la Martinique
dans le cadre d'un programme d'dducation de I'environ-
nemen t,


USO DE NIDOS ARTIFICALES POR GUACAMAYA
BANDERA Y LORO REAL EN LA RESERVE
PRIVADA DE FLORA Y FAUNA MATACLARi
BAUL. ESTADO COJEDES. VENEZUELA
Elena Del Conte Ayala y Antonio J, Gonzldez-Fernaii...-
Unrversidad de las Lanos "Ezequwe Zawora ", UNELLEZ-
Grtnare. Estado Poriuguesa. Vene:uela

Con el objeto de evaluar la ufilidad de los aidos artificiales
para mcjorar el hbitat de poblaciones silver ses de Guacamaya
Bandera (Ara macao) y Loro Real (Amazona ochrocephala)
afectadas por las deforestaciones y explotaciones madereras,
se realized durante 1993 y 1994, un studio en la Reserva
Privaeda de Flora y Fauna MATACLARA ubizada en la
region del macizo rocosa de El Bail en el estado Cojedes,
Venezuela. En mmarzo de 1993 se colocaron 18n idos artifici ales
de madera, colgados en Ios troncos de algunos Arboles de la
vegetaci n natural. Los nidos fueron visitados frecuentemente
por guacamayas y lores, siendo Ia exitosa la reproducci6n de
v arias parejas de Pato Gturiri (Dendrocygna autumnalisj y
Halc6n P rmito(Falco sparverius). Seconcluye que los nidos
artificiales pueden scr una media eficiente para recuperar
poblaciones alectadas par ia destrucci6n del habitat. Por
uiltimo, se agradece el financiamiento otorgado par la
asociacidn EcoNatura y el apnyo logistico sum inistrado por
las organizaciones no gubernamentales MANFAUNA,
ASOMUSEO y la Reserva Privada de Flora y Fauna
MATACLARA.


Page 7







Martinique meeting absirais t continued)
THE CONSERVATION AND ECOLOGY OF THE ST.
LUCIA PARROT: A PRELIMINARY REPORT
JW, Dawson'. D. Anthony2, and N- Snyder3
7'hte Wildif Presenration Trusts. U.S.A.: 2Forest and Lands
Department. Go'emrnent of ._i Lucia; Wildlife Preseranaon
Trust Intermatonaf. U.S.A.

We studied the St. Lucia Parrot (Amazona versicolor) from
March to July, 1994, as part of a cooperative research effort
among the Government of St. Lucia, Jersey Wildlife Pres-
ervation Trust, and Wildlife Preservation Trust International-
We initiated an active field program of locating nests and
obtaining detailed observations of nesting behavior. Fifteen
nest cavities were located, Of these, further observations
indicated that six nests were active and contained eggs or
young during the study. Three others were the primary
cavities of non-breeding pairs. and the remainder were cavi-
ties that were visited occasionally by pairs. In one instance,
we found a post-fledgling area with 2 offspring present, but
were not able to locate the nest. We used an ethogram code.
data forms, scan sampling, and all occurrences sampling to
record behavior of adults and nestlings. Over 800 hours of
observation at active nests were accrued during the study. We
report on the progress of the study and discuss preliminary
findings concerning parentalcare at the nest, conflict with the
Pearly-eyed Thrashers (Margarops fuscatus), possible nest
site limitations, and feeding observations. We also discuss
Ihe initiation ofa more comprehensive study tobeLginin 1995.

CONSERVING BERMUDA'S ENDANGERED
EASTERN BLUEBIRD POPULATION
Steven De Silva
Department f Agriculture. Fisheries & Parks, P.O. Box AH
834, Hamilton HM CX, Bermuda

Bermuda supports the only disjunct, non-migratory popula-
tion of the Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialia)cse of cas sm
North America. Both populations share similar conservation
problems and both are in need of management As a cavity
nester, the bluebird has suffered serious nest site competition
from the introduced cavity nesting House Sparrow (Passer
domesticus) and European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Both
populations have suffered from indirect pesticide poisoning
and habitat change, which reduced availability of nesting
cavities. In Bermuda. the loss of the once dominant endemic
cedar (Jumperus bermnudiana) forest, which provided most
of the nesting cavities, has made the species almost totally
dependent on artificially provided nest boxes. Progressive
urbanizaton has reduced availability of suitable feeding
habitat in favor of the sparrow and starling. By 1993 the
bluebird population was estimated at less than 500 pairs.
Responding well to manipulative intervention on its behalf,
the bluebird has made an ideal candidate for a community-
based conservation project. Research conducted by Ihe
Conservation Division of the Department of AgricuLture in
Page 8


the 1960s and 1970s (Wingate) revealed 2 major factors
limiting the bluebird population in Bermuda: availability of
competilion-free nesting cavities and mortality from House
Sparrow aggression, The tropical Fowl mite (Ornithonysus
bursa) was also revealed to be a common nest parasite,
causing high mortality of chicks under certain circumstances.
Accordingly, nest box provisioning and management, in
conjunction with House Sparrow control, has been promoted
with the objective of persuading private land owners or
managers with suitable habitat to erect and manage their own
nest boxes. As a result. Bermuda has succeeded in arresting
the earlier trend of rapid decline, Currently, a cooperative
research program is being undertaken with Dr. Patricia Adair
Gowaty (University of Georgia) to analyze comparative
demography and breeding biology of the bluebird.

DIFERENCIACION SEXUAL EN LA COTORRA
CUB ANA (AMAZONA LEUCOCEPHALA
LEUCOCEPHALA)
Xiomara Gailvez y V. Berovides
Empresa N'acona) para la Protaccirin de la Flora y 1a Fauna,
Minisierio de Agrrcuiturn, Cuba

Los psitacidos en general no presentan demorfismo sexual. y
estoesun granproblema para suestudio. Nosotrosanalizamnos
12 machos y 8 hembras de Cotorra Cubana (Amazona
Leucocephala leucocephala) provenientes de todo cl pais,
para analizar las diferencias sexuales en 10 medidas
morfondtricas y cinco de coloraci6n del ptumaje, midiendo
lanto las diferencias de valares medics en terminos absolutos
y relatives, asi coma el grado de sobrelapamiento de esos
valores. Los patrons de coloracidn no diferencian los sexos,
pero se presenid un polimorfismo del patron de color ab-
dominal, con dos morfos que siempre se encontraron en un
98% en la naturaleza emparejados de forina heterogdmica, to
quc se interpret como un caso de apareamiento disociativo,
Los grades de sobrelapaniento entire las variables relatives
ancho cabeza/largo del pico y ancho cabeza/largo del torso
fueron extrcmadamente bajos (cerca de un 35%) y al parecer
pueden separar los sexos con un error de entire el 15-20%,

THE STATUS OF THE KEY WEST QUAIL-DOVE
(AVES: COLUMBIDAE) IN "CAYO HUESO" (KEY
WEST), FLORIDA, UNITED STATES AND ITS
MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATION THROUGHOUT ITS
RANGE
Orlando H. Garrido
Museo Ntccional De Htistaia Natural, La Habana. Cuba

A total of212 specimens of Key West Quail-Dove (Georrngon
chrrsia) were examined to determine the morphological
variation among the West IndLan populations: Cuba. including
the Isle of Youth (formerly Isle of Pines) and Cayo Coco:
Hispaniola, including Haiti and the islands ofGonave and de
laTortue. Puerto Rico; Bahamas; and Florida (Fort Lauderdale
to Key West). However, only 188 specimens were considered

El Pitirre 7(3)







Maninique meeting abstracts {cnntinued)
for the statistical analysis because many specimens bad worn
plumage or were not fully adults. I concluded that the nest
with two white eggs reported by Audubon belonged to
Siarnoena cyanocephala rather than to G. chrnsia. The
quotations of Audubon and other 191h century authors, as
well as the finding of 3 specimens collected in 1897 by John
Atki ns (probably remnants o f a rel ic popular ion) and another
by Audubon at Key West, gave support to the existence of a
population of G- chrysia inhabiting Key West and perhaps
other Florida Keys in the past, despite the sporadic arrival of
stragglers to Florida in years after the deforestation of Key
West. An analysis of the populations of all the islands showed
no significant variation in pattern and color, but substantial
variation in size- The ,single male from Puerto Rico and the 4
birds from Key West seem to be smaller than birds in other
populations. No significant geographical variation was found
among Cuban populations segreg aied by provinces or among
Hispaniol an populations. No suitable habitats for Stamoenas
orG. chrysiawere found at Key West. but in someof the other
southern Florida keys considerable sui able habitat was found
to harbor G. chrysia and Zenaida aurita. Therefore, the
reintroduction of these two species in some of the empty
habitats of the southern Florida Keys is recommended.

ANALYSE STATISTIQUE DE CHASSE DANS LES
ANTILLES FRANCAISE
Raymond Garrigues
Office Nadanal de la Chasse. Martiniqte

Analyse statistique de tableau de chasse chez la
Tourierelle (Zenaida auria) de 1986 1993, dans les
Antilles Francaise et egalement la maniire d'illustrer la
differentiation des 4ges par nla coloration des pates chez la
Tounerelle en piriode de chasse.


LA PHENOLOGIE DE LA REPRODUCTION CHEZ LE
TOURTERELLE A QUEUE CARREE (ZENAIDA A.
A URITA) DETERMINE A L 'AIDE DES ANALYSES
DE TABLEAUX DE CHASSE
R. Garrigues1, E. Terouanne2, D. Reudet-1.
M. Anseline and G. Taylay4
Minisrere de IEn vironment, Office national de to chase.
"Universiti Mrmtpelier Ii; 3Pare national de la Gntadeourpe;
and FedIration ddpartementale des chasseurs de Marinique

L'Office national de la chasse effeeue depuis 1986 des
analyses de tableaux de chasse avec le concours de la
F6ddraUon d6pancmencale des chasseurs de la Martinique.
Environ 150 200 tourterelles onm dt6 examines par an
quand au sexe, N l 'age et ka activity6 de reproduction. L'Eiude
de la priodc de reproduction, mal cemrnt dans les Antilles
frangaises, se fonde sur la determination de la date d 'dclosion
des juveniles, estimde en fonclion de la mue des rrmiges
prim aires. D'autres r esures effeciu&essurl cs aduties factlivite
El Pitirre 7(3)


s6crdtrice du jabot, dimensions des gonades males ou activity
des ovaires) concourent N situer la pdriode de chasse par
rapport ia pdri ode de reproduction- L overturee de la chasse
a eu lieu en fin juilIet de 1986 1990ct experimenialcment
en fin about de 1991 a 1993. La comparison des dates
d'eclosion de ces deux piriodes monte que:
1 L 'ouverture fin juillel intervenait en pieine pdrinod de
reproduction,
2 La production des jeunes Ecait affected tant par
S'ouverture en fin juillet qu'en fin aoat.
L 'analyse de la sdcrdlion du jabot confirm ] 'importance de
1 activityd de reproduction pendant les pdriodes de chasse de
1986 1992. Cependant, en 1993, contrairement aux autres
annees, I'activit tide reproduction dtait en phase dderoissanIe
a la date d'ouverture. 11 semblerait done que la fin de la
pcriode d la reproduction puissese situer. ban an mal an a [a
mi-septembre, cc qui reste a confirmed.

ESTUDIO DE RADAR SOBRE CORREDORES
DE AVES MIGRATORIAS ENCIMA DE
LA HABANA. CUBA
Esteban Godinez
Insitura de Ecofagfa v Sisfemdrica. Carr, Varona Km 3-I/2, AP
8010. CP 10800, BoYeros, Habana 8, Cuba

El uso de las tienicas de radiolocalizaci6n en investigaciones
ornitol6gicas en Cuba, fue iniciada, de forma experimental
en 1988. logrdndose los primeros registros rnmitoldgicos a
travds de un radar meteorol6gicos a] afio siguiente, lo que
permitli ampliar las perspectivas futuras dec su utilizaci6n
con propdsi os deestudios fundamentalesyde aplicaci6n ala
aviacidn. Los objetivos principals de este studio en
ejecuci6n, consistent en el anAlisis y caracteristicas de las
ecosefales de aves, con respect a su ubicacidn, velocidad,
direccitn y altitud de las mismas. Asi como, detectar y
prccisarloscorredores migracionatesdelasavesque atraviesan
los territories de las provincias habaneras. Para la deteccion
de las aves migratorias, se utiliza un radar de vigilancia
meteoroldgica (MRL-5), ubicadoen a Estacidn deCasablanca
(Ciudad de La Habana). Este, siempre sc emplea en la
longitud de onda de 10 ctn y a una escala de irabajo con
alcance mdximo de 50 km. Los ecos de aves en los indic adores
del radar, son registrados por observac irn direct y/o median te
tomas fotogrdficas. Se han deterrinado las distribuciones
preliminares de los ecos de aves en cuanio a su altitude.
iocalizaci6n, trayectorias y velocidades de los
desplazamientos. La altitude media dc ]as sefales de aves se
registr6 a 1.32 km duranie la migracidn primaveral (1989) y
a 2,81 km en la migraci6n otoifaT (199 1). De acuerdo con la
distribucion de las trayeciorias seguidas por las aves, In
mayor cantidad de estas se mueven hacia el interior de la Islea
con un rumbo predominante hacia el SE-S (56.2%) mientras
que en su salida los desplazamientos principles indican quc
buscan [as runas del Mississippi (71%) y el Atldnico (20%).
Tal informacion. constitute an resuttado de importancia
Page 9






Maninique meeiing abstracis (continued)
fundamentalen La caracterizaci6n da loscorredoresy patrons
migiracionales que pasan por nuestro territorio. Al mismo
tempo. per-mite valorar la posible coincidencia de ]as aves
migratorias, con las aeronaves que realizan su trafico adreo.

The use of radar techniques in ornithological research in
Cuba was experimentally begun in 1988. with the first
ornitLological records using a meteorological radar obtained
the next year. This permitted us to extend the use of radar in
fundamental bird studies and (ri applied purposes. Thet
principal objectives of this study were to characterize and
analyze birds with respect to their position, speed, track
direction, and altitudes. Also, objectives included detecting
and estimating with precision the bird migration fly ways thai
cross over the territories of Havana provinces. A meteoro-
logical surveillance radar (MRL-5) in the Meteorological
Station of Casablanca (Havana City) used to detect migrant
birds. The bird echoes in the radar indicators were recorded
by watching and/or photographing the screens. Preliminary
distributions of bird echoes were estimated with regard to
altitude, position. track direction, and ground speed of the
movements. The mean al itude of bird signals was recorded
at I.32 km during the spring migration 1989) and 2.8I km in
the fall migration period (1991). According the bird track
distribution, the majority of migrant birds moved toward the
interior of Cuba, mostly to the SE-S (56.2%), whereas the
birds moved to Mississippi (71.0%) and Atlantic (20.0%)
routes in their departure, This information is important to the
knowledge of migrant bird flyway patterns crossing the
Cuban territory. At the same time. it could be used to estimate
the probable coincidence of migrant birds with aircraft traf-
ric.

COMPOSICION Y ABUNDANCIA DE LA AVIFAUNA
TERRESTRE EN SEIS LOCALIDADES DEL AREA
MPROIT IDA MIL CUMBRES, P. DEL RIO, CUBA
Hitsm GonzAlez'. A. ULaest. M. McNicholl2, E,.
Godina P P.lBanco1M. LM racken2. y R. Oviedo!
linstiuro de Ecologia y Sistemnwra. Carr. Varona Km 3-1/2. AP
80/0, CP 10800. Soyerow. Habawm 8, Cuba; and Long Point
Bird Obsen'atory. Port Rowan, Canadd

La investigaci6n se desarroll]]6 c eis localidades del Area
Progagida Mil Cumbres, Pinar dl Rio, Cuba entire ei 30 de
nero y el 1 de febrero de 1993 y entire el 26 de enero y el 9
de febrero de 1994, Se dcterrninaron lascaracteristicas cuali-
y cuanti-tativas de a flora y vegetarian de Las 6 iocalidades
al aplicar el m6todo de James y Shugart (1970) con
modificaciones propuestas por Wallace (1991) a 56 parcelas
de vegetacidn. Se deiterin6 la coposici6n y abundancia
re lativa de la avifaiuapoarklio atim ,conteos porparcel as
circular, icapmaE5 cn i i WuO icas. Se capturaron
y iuu7lT5aISvsocmcrspondcntes a 17espec iesmi gratorias


neticas neotropicales y 22 species residents permanentes.
Los mayores v'alores dc abundancia relative y tasa dc capture
correspondieron a los habitats cuyavegetacifn predominante
era i Pinar. Se relacionaron lascaracteristicasde la vegetaci6n
con ia composicidn y abundancia de la avifauna.

UPDATE ON MIGRANT AND NATIVE BIRD SPE-
CIES OF GRENADA, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE
TO THE GRENADA DOVE (LEPTOTILA WELLSI, AN
ENDANGERED SPECIES
Aria Johnson
Zaoolojg DeMpartment. iiverirv of the West tIndies, Jamaica

An update on the status of the migrant and native bird species
of Grenada is presented, including times of migration and
conditions of habitats. An overview of the conservation
efforts for the endangered Grenada Dove is given-

ECOLOGICAL NOTES ON THE STYGIAN OWL iASIO
STYGIUS SGUAPA) IN CUBA
Arturo Kirkconnell Douglas Wechsler.- and Christine
Bush-
Atfseo Nacional de Hisroria Natural de Cuba. La Habana,
Cuba; "Academy of Natmrat Science.r of Philadelphia. Philadeb-
phia. U.S.A.

The Stygian Owl is widely distributed in Cuba and the Isle of
Pines. The owl is typically found in forested areas, including
deciduous woods and pine forest., Morphological vacation
related losex and breeding data are presented. including: nest
shape and clutch size. Also, some aspects of its diet, as well
as its behavior, are discussed,

PROBLEMS IN JAMAICAN ORNITHOLOGY
Catherine Levy
Gosse Bird Club, 2 Siarlight Avenue, Kingsion 6. Jamaica, W.I.

In 1965, James Bond proposed three subjects thea wiled
research in Jamaican ornithology. The disappearance of the
Jamaican Petrel and the Jamaican Pauraque, and the study of
waterfowl in the southwestern section of the island. After
nearly 30 years. research on these subjects is still lacking.
This paper describes the situation today and re-examines
in format ion n these and other problems.The lack of progress
in research appearstobedue to: )use ofsecondary,i accurate
or incomplete information; 2) lack of both Jamaican personnel
and the necessary resources to undertake research projects;
and 3) short-term and sometimes inconclusive studies, es-
pecially by foreign researchers. Attempts to correci the
misinformation andio establish a reliable records system will
at least solve one of the problems plaguing research on birds
in Jamaiwca


El Pitirre 7(3)


Page 10







Maninique meeting itbstracts (contlnUd)
CHANGES IN TIlE BIRD SPECIES LIST FOR
ANTI GUA- BARBUDA
Kevel Lindsay
Envrimmenrai AAwvarenest Grorup LAG), B.n S03, St. John's.,
Antigrio-Ba rbnda

Mr. Nathan Gricks initiated a regular programme of bird
watching in AnTigua- Barbuda. From 1992 to spring 1994,
over 40 new species were added to the local list, bringing the
final lisi to over 180 species.

STUDIO DE LA GOLONDRINA DE CUEVAS
HIRUNDODO FULVA) EN AGRAMONTE. PROVI NCIA
DE MATANZAS.CUBA
Alcijandro Llanes E y Eduardo Abreu2
InstmaJo de Ecologia v Sislemdticv. Cuba, v EMA, Victorio de
Girdni, Cienaga de Ztipaw, Cuba

De las aves migratorias de primavera que arrihan a nuestro
territorio. la Golondrina de Cuevas (finmndoafidva) es una
especie conmdn que se encuentradistribuida en Cuba e Isla de
la Juventud. La misma utiiiza para su nidificacidin cuevas y
casas aisladas en el campo, pero ademias construye sus nidos
en edificios habitados e instalaciones fabriles de nuestras
ciudades. Este trabajo se realiz6cn las cuevas de Berovides
y Sebastiin situadas a 1.5 km al este del pueblo] de Agramonte
en la provincia de Matanzas. Sc dan aspeccos relacionados
con la reproducci6n de esta especie entrelos que se destacan:
dimenciones y altura de los nidns, tamafio de los huevos,
centre oiros. Se mniucstran algunas dc las medidas
mrnorfomit icas de Ia especie talcs com:o- argo de[ pico, tarso,
ala plegaday cola, Se analiza ademais la utilizaci6n del parched
de cria y la protuberancia c[oacal para el sexado de las aves
capturadas durante la etapa reproductive. Par ultimo se
ofrecen datos preliminaries acerca de la muda de esta ave
migratoria,

AN OVERVIEW OF THE POSSIBLE MORTALITY
FACTORS FOR POPULATIONS OF NEARCTIC
MIGRATORY SONG BIRDS DUE TO DEFORESTA-
TION IN THE NEOTROPICS
Marcia Mundle
Gosse Bird Club, 2 Starlight A venue. Kirrgsrtn 6. Jamaica

Data from the Breeding Bird Survey (Robbins et aL.. 1986)l
have shown that there are significantdeclinesin the populations
of breeding birds in North America. This is especially sig-
nificant for species which winter south of the United States -
Mexico border. Among the reasons cied for this decline is
deforestation in the neotropics. I analyzed the possible
mortality factors, which could be associated wilh deforesta-
tion. on populations of non-breeding, migrant msectivorous
birds in the neotropics. Some of the factors investigated were
predation. destruction (f stop-over sites, competition for
food. space, shelter, and other effects which may be mani-
El Pilirre 7(3)


tested on the breeding grounds, 1 also provide suggestions for
integrating the monitoring of local and migrant species in
Jamaica, so that species and habiIal management planscan be
devised which are complementary both to migrants and
residents, and especially the endemics.

PARC NATUREL REGIONAL DE LA MARTINIQUE
Josd Nose]
/D.rreCtr. Reserve Ornifhocfgrque des fters de Sarte-Annc,
Martrimtqmt

En 1983, le Parc Nature] Regional de la Martinique entreprend
le project de mise en reserve de quatre iloLs situes a Sainte-
Anne. Commune du Sud de la Martinique. don't ia population
est compose d'especes migratrices: Stenia fuscrra, Sterna
anaethesus, Anous stolidus, Sterna hir-ndo, ei Puffinus
Jhenrinieri.

A SUMMARY OF CARIBBEAN BIRD SPECIMENS IN
CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
Kenneth C. Parkes
Carnegie Musewn of Naiural Hisror. 4400 Forbes Ave..
Pitshburgh, PA 15213, U.S.A.

For the benefit of workers doing specimen-based research on
Caribbean birds, the history and scope of the Caribbean bird
collections in Carnegie Museum of Natural History are
summarized. This will alert workers who may not be aware
of our strong holdings from some areas, and will save others
the trouble of writing io us for loans or information regarding
birds from areas lacking or sparsely represented in our
collections,

VOCALIZATION DIFFERENCES IN THE LESSER
ANTILLEAN PEWEE
G.B. Reynard
105 Midway St. Riverfon. New Jersey 08077. U.S.A.

In "Birds of the West Indies" (Bond 1985), the Lesser
Antillean Pewee {(Contopus latirstris Iconsists of three sub-
species. C. F. larirostris in St. Lucia; C. i. bnimneicapillus in
the islands of Dominica. Guadeloupe. and Martinique; and C
,1 blancoi in Puerto Rico. Bond earlier f1936) had some
uncertainty in the classification, stating. e.g.. that the St.
Lucia bird "..is so different from the other two races that it
might well be regarded as a distinct species": in 1965, "of the
three forms of this species the nominant race of SI. Lucia is
the most distinctive in plumage and in voice"; and finally, in
1980 (23rd Supplement to 1956 Check-list) "vocalizations of
the three forms of Contopus...of Puerto Rico and the Lesser
Antilles arc as distinctive as those of Mviarchus from Puerto
Rico and mt St. Lucia." Plumage and niorphometric data.
color slides, and tape recordings, many from other SCO
members, are being studied to reconsider the classification.
Information to date tends to support return to three species,
Page I I







III SIMPOSIO DE ZOOLOGIA


BERMUDA
In October 1993, we recorded our first Sandhill Cranei Grus
canadensis), which wintered in Bermuda. Also, the first
Tufted Ducks (AvyjtyafatiigaIl were recorded in December
1993. Our Christunas Bird Count was held on 29 December,
with a total of 89 species observed. DAvin B- WINGATE. OD-
portment of Agrirutuire, Fish & Parks, P.O. Box HM 834,
Hamiltoni HM CX, Bermuda.

AnnmTiONAL RECORDS FOt ANTIGUA-BARBULIDA
Wilson's Phalarope (Plhiaropus rricolor)t--A Wilson's
Phalarope in winter plum age was observed on 8 March 1994
at MeKinnons salt pond. From its size. I determined the bird
was a male. 11 was with a flock of several hundred Stilt
Sandpipers i Cai'dris himaniopus). The phalarope remained
ai the salt pond ai least unmil 14 March. This is the first record
of Ihis species for Ancigua-Barbuda.
Ruff(Phitinmchuspugnas. )- A second record (seeE fPiifrre
7( 1i, 1994. for first record) for Antigua-Barbuda was attained
on 19 February 1994 when a female was observed at Pot works
reservoir. The same individual was seen at McKinnons salt
pond on 14 and 19 March 1994.
Curlew Sandpiper (Catidris ferrugimea).--r n 14 March
1994 at McKinnons sail pond. I struggled to identify a winter
plumage bird which was with a group of several hundred
Semipalmated Sandpipers (Calidris pusifal]. The unknown
bird was active and fed along a narrow mud bar by stopping
io pickevery three or four paces. It only occasionally entered
the shallow water.
The bird displayed the characteristic decurved bill, white
uppertail covetas, and "necky" jizz (the latter at least when
standing alert). It was dumpy and did not exude grace as per
several bird guides' descriptions. I[t seemed less "leggy" than
those same guides suggested. But my main problem was that
the bird had a cold gray-brown plumage, including the wash
of color over the breast. My experience with the species in the
Old World is nearly exclusively from May to September
(brick red breeding plumage shown all or partially). I did not
hear its call. The sole previous record of two birds at Jolly
Harbour was made in 1976 (Holland and Williams, Amn. Birds
32(6):1095. 1105. 1978).
White Stork (Ciconia ciconia again in Antigua.-The same
White Stork reported from Augusi 1993 (Ef Piirre. 7(l)):2.
1994) was re-located on 31 March 1994 near the original
observation site. It appeared to be faring well and paraded in
paddocks on a fenced estate. drawing a crowd of three
admirers NAtuAN P. GRuCKS. P.O. Box672. St. John s, Antigua.
West Indies.


The fo allowing papers on West Indian birds were presented at
thie June 1994 Simposio de Zoologia in La Habana Cuba.

Situaci6n poblacional de la Grulla Cubana (Grus canradensis
nesitres). Vincente Bornvides y Xiomara Guiver
Ecologia tr6fico de ia avifauna de un matorral xeromorfo
costero duranmc la cstaciihn de seca. Garc'[a Nidia y
Vincenie Berovidcs
Ecologia alimentaria y uso del habitat en el Yapuasfn
(Dendror'gna bicolorJ en la arrocera de Sur del Jlibaro.
Lourdes Mugica, Martin Acosta y R. Ydenberg
Abundancia y diversidad de Ja avifauna de Cayo Coco,
Archipii ago Sabana-Camaguey. en tres habitats
deferentes. Arturo Kirkconnell y Vincente Berovides
Hdhbitas alimentarios del Sabancro (Sturnella magna) (Aves:
Emberizidae) en un agroecosistema cubano. M. E. Garcfa
y 1. Fermindez
Estructura espacial de una comunidad de aves acugiticas.
Martin Acosta, Lourdes Mugica y C. Mencina
Distribucidn y composici6n de las aves acuuticas de Cayo
Coco. Barbara Sanchez y Daysi Rodriguez
Incidencia de las migraciones de aves con [as ruias de
aviacidn en La Habana. Esteban Godinez
Estructurn y composici6n de la ornitocenosis de bosque
semideciduo de ia Peninsula de Guanahacabibes. Alma
Pdrez, R. Varela y F. Delgado
Invcntario y anillamienio de aves en manglares de San
Miguel de Parada, Santiago de Cuba. Cuba. Luis 0.
Meliin y M. Ayarde
Evaluaci6n mensual de la comunidad de aves del humedal
Punta Sal, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba. Luis 0. Meliin y M.
Ayarde
Estudio cleetroforctica de dos species en simpatria. el caso
de los Estominos (Sturnus sp.) (Aves: Sturnidae). P. de ia
Cruz, J. E. Rosel]6 y S. J, Peris
Studio del origen y reuso de cavidades para anidar, por la
Cotorra de Cuba (A mazono ieucocephala } Xiomara G lvez
y Vincentc Berovides Alvarez
Estudio de Ia Golondrina de Cuevas (Hirundo ftva) en
Agramontes. provincial de Macanzas, Cuba. Alejandro
Lanes
Hunmedales de importancia parI las aves acuAticas en la
provincial de Matanzas. Cuba. Pedro Blanco
Ornidiv: based dalos informiticaparaestudiaosde diversidad
en aves cubanas. Esteban Godinez y J, L. Gonzdlez
AnDlisis de la inforrnacidn de los cjemplares depositados en
Ia colec idn de ayes de I nstitu to do Ecologfa y S istemitica-
Rafacla Aguilera y Laredo Gonzalez SAnchez
Biodiversidad de Ia avifauna en Ia Isla de la Juventud, Cuba.
Torris R. Escobar Herrera y Vincence Berovides


El Pitirre 7(3)


NEWS FROM MEM13ERS


Page 12







REPORT ON THE MEETING OF THE ASSOCIA-
TION FOR PARROT CONSERVATION,
GUADALAJARA, MEXICO, 7-11 JUNE 1994
Donald Anthony
P. O. Box 1438. Caries. Srf. Law. Wi

The meeting of the Association for Parrot Conservation
[APCJ was held in Guadalajara, Mexico. together with the
annual meetings of the Society for Conservation Biology and
the Association for Tropical Biology. These were internal ion al
meetings, with con servatists. biologists. zoo directors, pro-
fessors. aviculturists, students, funding agencies, and job
seekers participating.
The Association o f Parrol Con servation was d warned when
compared to the attendants of the other two associations.
However, when discuss ions took place and argument ts ensued,
our voices were heard. Several topics and issues dealing with
the conservation of parrots were discussed, for example.
habitat destruction. trade, captive breeding, and trafficking in
pet birds.
Three draft APC poEicy statements on reintroduction,
sustainable use and trade of birds, and captive breeding were
discussed, with disagreements and many heated arguments;.
At one time. it was like being among sharks and barracudas.
Time did nni permit for full discussion and amendments of
the draft documents, so participants were asked to send in
their comments to various authors by 15 July 1994,
At this meeting, I met a new breed of conservationist:
people who have never been in the field or worked with a
species, but seem to know all about the species and how best
to conserve it, and are tenacious in their conviction,
I did not agree with all that was said, and voiced my
disagreement. especially on the issue of captive breeding.
Some participants said that captive breeding is extremely
important for the conservation of parrots. I am sure we all
know otherwise.
The meeting was very informative. I met many experi-
enced people, especially those who work with parrots. I
would like to thank the Society of Caribbean Ornithology for
sponsoring me and look forward to seeing the amended APC
policy statements soon,

CREATION OF A NATIONAL PARK IN THE
BAHAMA ISLANDS
Rosemarie S. Onarn
Friends of rhe Abace Parrot, 13 East Rosemotmr Ave.. Airxarr-
dria. Virginia 22301, U.S.A,

I know that many of you share my joy in announcing that the
Prime Minister of the Bahamas, Hon. Hubert Ingraham. has
declared the creation of national park on southern Abaco for
the endangered Bahama Parrot (Amrazona lercocephala
bahamensis). When I began my research project on the
breeding biology of the parrot on Abaco in 1985, the overall


objective was to develop a biological understanding of the
Bahama Parrot upon which a conservation program could be
based. In 1985, the national park was a dream, but today it is
a reality.
I applaud the Bahama Parrot Education Committee. the
Bahamas National Trust, and The RARE Center for Tropical
Conservation for their efforts to increase conservational
awareness fnr the parrot's plight, and their educational
campaign in the Bahamas, which they initiated in 1992. The
diligent efforts of these groups have helped achieve the
desired results the national park on Ahaco,
I thank all of you who played a role in this research project.
My field assistants worked enthusiastically to collect data
that helped to conserve the parrot. In addition, this project
would not have been possible without the many other persons
who supported the project-
With most of the Bahama Parrot's nesting habitat now
protected on Abaco, attention can be focused on the man-
agement of this parrot population and plans for its recovery
can be implemented. The future now looks brighter for one of
the world's endangered parrots. More importantly, this de-
vclopmeni demonstrates that parrot conserve at ion can succeed
in the wild! Too often, we give up hope. So, for today, let us
congratulate the Bahamas and celebrate with them'


ARUBA SEABIRDS THREATENED

The government in Aruba, Dutch West Indies, inien. to
develop an area near sensitive coral reefs and seabird nesting
colonies for watersports, including for jet-skis and water-
scooters, This plan seriously endangers 10,000 pairs of 9
species of nesting seabirds. including Sandwich and Roseate
terns. Aruba conservationists are greatly alarmed by these
prospects. More information is available from Foundation
Stimaruba. Urataka 6, Sta. Cruz, Aruba, Dutch West Indies.
[from U.S. Birdwatch, 1994]



FUNDS FOR CONSERVATION PROJECTS

BirdLife International and the Fauna and Flora Preservation
Society, with support from British Petroleum, hold an annual
competition for conservation exploration projects. Projects
entering the competition are judged especially on the level of
host country involvement and the global importance of the
conservation issues on which the project is focused. Proposals
for 1995 expeditions must be entered nolater than 31 December
1994.
For further information, contact: Michael K. Poulsen,
BirdLife International. Wellbrook Court. Girton Road,
Cambridge. CB3 ONA, United Kingdom: Telephone: (44-
223) 277318, Fax: (44--2231 277200.


El Pitirre 7(3)


Page 13







GRUPO ECOLOGISTA TINGLAR
Santo Domingo, Repziblica Dominicana
Fundado ei 28 de ocruhre de 1985

El grupo Ecologista TINGLAR es una organizacidn sin fines
de lucro inspirada en la Declaraci n de las Naciones Unidas
para el Medio Humao, doe Estocolmo. 1972. y cuyn objectives
es trabajar en ]a defense del medio ambiente, los recursos
naturales y la calidad de vida .del pueblo dominicano por
medio de una esirategia de Educcacici Anibienral a rravts de
ta Accidn Co unitaria.
TINGLAR es el nombre vulgar de la tortuga marina
De nrmschetis coriacea. muy amenazada en nuestro pais, debido
a la depredacidn humana, alteracidn de su habitat y
contaminaci6n del mar. Tomamos ese nombre para Itamarla
atenci6n sobre hechos como estos.
Groupo Tinglar esti constituido por un equipo
muludisciplinario de volunlarios. Por acuerdo con Grupo
Jaragua, Inc. estamos ubicados en la calle El Vergel #33,
Reparto El Vergel, Santo Domingo. Repibhlica Donminicana.
Nuestras acciones a] prosen e se concentran en trabajos en
cuatro barrios en In ciudad de Santo Domingo, en los que
estamos vinculados a organizacioncs de base. tratando de
animar un enfoque ecologist en la soluci6n de los diversos
problems qu cenfre n an esas comun i dade s, generalmente de
condiciones socio-econdmicas insuficientes.
En relaci6n a la educacidn para la coniservaci6n de la
biodiversidad. realizamos contmuamente actividades.
tomando como base panicularmente [a poplacidn escolar con
la que ejecutamos acciones en coordinacion y asesorfa de
otras entidades. generalmenie en dreas protegidas.
Para contactos y mayor informacidn, favor de dirigirse a
Teodoro Lara y/o Rafael Lorenzo, GRUPO ECOLOGISTA
TINGLAR, calle El Vergel #33, Reparto El Vergel. Santo
Domingo, Reptblica Dominican a; tcidfono: (809)472-1036.
Fax: (8091472-1235 y 472-1728.

LATIN AMERICAN LIBRARY
ENHANCEMENT PROJECT

Dear Colleague:

Several years ago, we initiated the LATIN AMERICArN
LIBRARY ENTANCEMENT PROorCT (LALEP) with the goal of
increasing the exchange of information among Western
Hemisphere scientists intercsied in natural history. Its first
activity was to survey research natural history libraries in
Middle and South America and the Caribbean (for conve-
nience. "Latin America") to determine who their primary
users arc and what their needs might he.
After the results of the survey were published. LALEP
began di st ributi on of scent ific journals and other publications
produced by institutions in the United States to research
natural history libraries in Latin America. Nearly 100 Latin
America institutions have participated in the program so far.
We are now initiating another phase of the project that will
Page 14


focus on scientific journals produced by institutions in Latin
America.
This phase of the project has two goals. The first goal is to
facilitate the distribution of Latin American scientific jour-
nals to libraries and individuals in countries throughout Latin
America, in the United Staces, and elsewhere. The second
goal is to inform investigators about Latin American scien-
tiic.i journals that may serve as publication outlets for reports
on theirresearch. We hope that this will encourage scientists
from all countries to publish results from their studies in
journals produced in the country in which the research was
carried out.
As a first step toward achieving these goals. LALEP is
conducting a survey of Latin American scientific journals
oriented toward ecology, evolution, behavior, systematics.,
and ot heraspec ts of natural h history. S u rvey forms are avail able
fhr forwarding information to me. Also available is a list of
publications by country which you may want to examine for
completeness. Your assistance with both these activities is
greatly appreciated,

Mercedes 5- Faster
Coordinator. LALEP
National Biological Survey
National Museum of Natural History
Washington. D.C. 20560-0111
Telephone: (202) 357-1970
Fax: (202J 357-1932
e-mail: MNHVZ_67@SIV M.S1.EDU

[Note: copies of the survey form are being enclosed with this
newsletter to selected members. Others can obtain copies
from Dr. Foster or from me. Editor


REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE

1 thank those of you who earlier provided slides, tapes, or
other data on Contopus caribaeus. I would appreciate similar
information for a study of the Lesser Antillean Pewee. C.
latirostris, Also, I would appreciate receiving tape recordings
of the black-hawk (Buteogallus) group in the Caribbean rce
gion. and Nyctibius from anywhere in Central America.

George B. Reynard. 105 Midway St., Riverton, New Jersey



1995 SCO MEETING IN TRINIDAD

The 1995 annual meeting of the Society of Caribbean Orni-
thology will be held from 27 July through 3 August 1995 in
Trinidad. Details and a call for abstracts will appear in a
Future edition of the bulletin.


El Pitirre 7(3)







MEETINGS OF INTEREST


24-28 October 1994 III International Conference of
Ecological Economics, Costa Rica. (Organizing Commit-
tee, IIl 1CEE. P.O. box 555. 3000 Heredia, Costa Rica; FAX:
506-37-6868),

2-6 November 1994 The 18th State Meeting of the Co-
lonial Waterbird Society. Shell Island Resort Hotel,
Wnghtsville Beach. North Carolina. (James Kushlan, De-
partmeni of Biology, University of Mississippi. University.
Mississipp i 3677, U-S-A.; Telephone 601-232-7 203; FAX:
601-232-5144).

3-6 November 1994 Raptor Research Foundation An-
nual Meeting. Flagstaff, Arizona, U.S.A. (Patricia A. Hall.
Local Chairperson. 436 E. David Dr., Flagstaff, Arizona
86001, U.S.A.; Telephone: 602-774-004 ).

21-22 November 1994 Limnology and Waterfowl
(Monitori ng, modeling. and management), S opron. Hungary-
(J. Kerekes, Canadian Wildlife Service. Bedford insitute of
Oceanography, P.O. Box 1006. Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.
Canada. Telephone: 902-426-6356. FAX: 902-426-7209).

5-8 January 1995 -The American Society of Zoologists,
S t. Louis, Missouri. U.S.A. (American Society of Zoologis is,
401 N. Michigan Avenue. Chicago, Illinois 60611-4267.
U.S.A.; Telephone: 312-527-6697; FAX: 312-527-6640).

1 1 April 1995 Paragigms in Transition: Natural Re-
sources Management in the New Century, Fort Collins,
Colorado, U.S.A. [Rick Knight (303-491-6714), Dan B rinkley
(303-491-6519); or Joyce Berry (303-491-5405)].


21-23 April 1995 Eastern Bird Banding Association,
Cape May, New Jersey, U.S.A. (Barbara M. Ross. 308
Thornhill Road, Baltimore, Maryland 21212).

4-7 May 1995 Wilson Ornithological Society/Virginia
Society or Ornithology joint meeting, Williamshurg, Vir-
ginia, U.S.A. (Ruth A. Beck, Department of Bioogy, College
of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, U.S.A.

7- I I June 1995 -Annual Meeting of the Society for Con-
servation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins,
Colorado. U.S.A. IRichard L. Knight, Depanment ofFishery
and WildlifeBiology. Colorado State University. Fort Collins,
Colorado 80523, U.S.A.]

mid-June 1995 Second Mesoamerican Workshop on
the Conservation and Management of Macaws, Costa Rica-
eCcnter for the Study of Tropical Birds, Inc.. 218 Conway
Dr., San Antonio. Texas 78209-1716; Fax: 512-828-59111

5-1 i August 1995 V Neotropical Ornithological Con-
gress. Asuncion. Paraguay. (Nancy Lopez de Kochalka, c/o
Comilt Organizador Local del V CON, Museo Nacional de
Historia Natural del Paraguay. Sucursal 19, Campus. Central
XI. Paraguay, South America; Telephone: 595-21-505075).

13-20 August 1995 American Ornithologists' Union,
Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.

12-17 September 1995- The Wildlife Society Second An-
nual Conference. Portland, Oregon, U.S.A. (The Wildlife
Society; Telephone: (301) 897-9770; FAX: (301) 530-247 1.


MEMBERS PLEASE NOTE

NOMINATING AND VOTING PROCEDURES FOR SCO OFFICERS


Executive Officer posts lor the 1995 election are the Society
President. Vice-President, and Secretary. The incumbent
President and Vice-President are ineligible fnr re-c lec lion to
their present offices. but the present Secretary can stand for
re-election. Members should send nominations fur these
Executive Offices by mail to The Secretary (Ms. Patricia E.
Bradley. P.O. Box 907, Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands,
B.W.Ir Fax and telephone: 809-947-5925), by 31 December
1994. The nominations must be signed and dated, and must
be accompanied by a signed acceptance of the nominee.
Members will be informed of candidates' names in a ballot
thai will be distributed to members. The deadline for re turning
completed ballots will be 30 April 1995. The following


persons have been nominated to date:


President:


Vice-President:

Secretary:


Simon Guerrero (Dominican Repub
lie)
Joe Wunderle (Puerto Rico)
Roeland De Kort (Aruba)
Christopher Cox (St. Lucia)
Marcia Mundle (Jamaica)
Patricia Bradley (Cayman Islands)


Nominees are asked to send a brief curriculum vitae as soon
as possible to the Editor of El Pitirre so that Ihis may be
included in the ballot.


El PiTirre 7(3)


Page 15







THE SOCIETY OF CARIBBEAN ORNITHOLOGY
Pret'ident: Ctrchrine Levy. 2 Starlight Ave.. Kingston 6, Jamaica
Vice Presiden[; Dr, Joseph Wundere Jr., Ineremational Institute nr Tropical Forestry,
P.O. Box B, Palmer. Puerto Rico 0072]
Sccretnar-; K Patricia F. Bradley, P.O. SBo 907. Grand Cayman, Cayman Iilards., B.W.I.
Treasurer. Dr. RosemarJe Gnarm. 13 East Ro.semrona Ave.. Alexandria. Vltrirnia 2230]. U.S.A.


















Dr. James W, Wiley
2201 Ashland Si.
Ruston. Louisiana 71270. U.S.A.


FIRST CLASS
PRINTED MATTER


CowrromN (CONTINUED FROM MINT PAGE)


FUNDS FOk CONSFFRVATION PROJECTS
GRL'PO ECOLOGISTA TINGLAR ... ......
LATIN AMERICAN LIBRARY ENHANCeatL-r PRci-rTs
REQUEsT FOR ASSISTANCE .
1995 SCO MEETING i TRINIDAD .....
M EETINGS OF INTER ST .... . . . .... ....................... ....
NOMINATING AN1 VOTWG PFROCEIRES FOR SCO OFFERS .......... ..


.. .. ..... .... ..... . . .. . . .
15
15


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El Pitirre 7(3)




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