Group Title: Pitirre (Camarillo, Calif.)
Title: El Pitirre
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100143/00018
 Material Information
Title: El Pitirre
Uniform Title: Pitirre (Camarillo, Calif.)
Abbreviated Title: Pitirre (Camarillo Calif.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wiley, James W
Wiley, James W
Society of Caribbean Ornithology
Society for the Study of Caribbean Ornithology
Publisher: Society for the Study of Caribbean Ornithology
Place of Publication: Camarillo Calif
Camarillo, Calif
Publication Date: 1993
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Ornithology -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Language: In English, with some Spanish.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1988)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 2002.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1, no. 3 covers the period May-Aug. 1988.
Issuing Body: Newsletter of the Society for the Study of Caribbean Ornithology, Jan/Feb.-Mar./Apr. 1988; the Society of Caribbean Ornithology, May/Aug. 1988-
General Note: Editor, 1988- James W. Wiley.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 15, no. 1 (spring 2002) (Surrogate)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100143
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 23284416
lccn - sn 99004863
issn - 1527-7151
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Journal of Caribbean Ornithology

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EL PTIRRE


El Pitirre is the newsletter of the Society of
Caribbean Ornithology.

El Pittirre es el boletfn informative de la
Sociedad de la Omitologfa Caribefla.

EDITOR: James W. Wiley, 2201 Ashland
St., Ruston, Louisiana 71270, U.S.A..
ASSISTANT EDITORS: Chandra Degia
and Garfield Brown, Grambling Cooperative
Wildlife Project, P.O. Box 4290, Grambling
State University, Grambling, Louisiana
71245, U.S.A.

News,comments orrequests should be mailed
to the editor for inclusion in the newsletter.

Noticias, comentarios o peticiones deben ser
enviadas at editor para inclusion en elboletin.


Tyrannus dominicensis


Pitirre. Gray Kingbird. Pestigre, Petchary


The Society of Caribbean Ornithology is a non-profit organization
whose goals are to promote the scientific study and conservation of
Caribbean birds and their habitats, to provide a link among island
ornithologists and those elsewhere, to provide a written forum for
researchers in the region (refereed journal-Ornitologia Caribefia.
published in conjunction with the Puerto Rico Ornithological So-
ciety) and to provide data or technical aid to conservation groups in
the Caribbean.

La Sociedad do la Ornitologfa Caribeila es una organizaci6n sin
fines de lucro cuyas melas son promover el estudio cientifico y la
conservacidn de la avifauna caribefla, auspiciar un simposio anual
sobre laomitologfacaribeia,publicarunarevistaprofesional ilamada
Ornitologfa Caribefia (publicada en conjunto con la Sociedad
Omitoldgica de Puerto Rico), ser una fuente de camunicaci6n entre
omit61logos caribefios y en otras ireas y proveer ayuda tdcnica o
datos a grupos de conservaci6a en en el caribe.

CONTENTS

AN UNUSUAL CONCENTRATnoN AND FIRST PaHTOGRAPro REcoRD OF
nE POMARME JAEZER (SmERcotaNuts POMARtus) ON Tam CAaBEAN
CoAsr OF GUATEMALA. Ronald Byrom..................................... 2
OaBSERVAnoNs oF THE WOOD SANOnrwR AND LarnL EoRErT i
BARBADOS. Martin Frost ..................................................... 3
ABSTRAcrs OF PAPERs PREENED AT THEm 1992 ANNuAL MEEIINGi oF
ITE SOCIETY OF CAU1BBEAN ONrrNIOLOY:
REAssEssMENr or BLAK-CAPPED PmET IN CUBA. D.S. Lee, N,
Vina, 0. Garrido, R.W. Dickerman, and J.C. Haney ............ 4
SURVEY OF LEAST T NESTIno SrrEs ALoNo TmE Sourn CoAst
orF JAMAICA. G.P. Alleng and CA. Alleng ......................... 4
GRown RAmTS OF BRDS FROM PREDATOR-FREE ISLANDS.
Carlos A. Bosque and Marta T. Bosque .............................. 4
RESOURC PARTITIONING AMONG A FLYCATCHER GUILD IN JAMAICA.
Alex Cruz................................... ................................ ... 5
EsTrWo PRELLMINAR EN DOS COMUNIDADES DE Aes E.N LA Lo.MA
NALGA DE MAco. Domingo N. Sir ................................ 5
Youm EtDUCAT-N Youtm. Garfield A. Brown and Chandra A.
D egia................................................................................. 6
POPULATION DECLtNE OF TiE PUERTO RICAN BROAD-WINGED HAWK
AND SHARP-SHINNED HAWK. Carlos A. Delannoy .......- 6


(Continued on page 15)







AN UNUSUAL CONCENTRATION AND FIRST PHOTOGRAPHIC RECORD OP THE POMARINE
JAEGER (STERCORARIUS POMARINUS) ON THE CARIBBEAN COAST OF GUATEMALA

RONALD BYROM
511 Lenora St.
Pittsburgh. PeN sylvania 15206, U.SA.


On 26 March 1992, I1 left Puerto Barrios, Guatemala, on the
regularly scheduled boat trip north to Livingston (15049'N,
8S 45'W) at the mouth of the Rio Dulce. The passage roughly
paralleled 22 km of the west coast of the Bay of Amatique,
Gulf of Honduras, about I km from shore. Half-way into the
journey, I began to encounter dark seabirds with white
patches in the primaries. These birds were substantially
larger than the Laughing Gulls (Larus atricilla) which were
also in the area. I also noted considerable barring on the body
and somewhat lighter base of the tailas the birds flew by the
boat, then rested on the sea. The boat passed more individuals
until we reached Livingston, where at least four or five more
birds were seen harassing Royal Terns (Sterna maxima) and
Sandwich Terns (S. sandvicensis) in the harbor.
During the afternoon of 27 March 1992,1 used a 200-mm
lens to take 4 color transparencies of the different jaegers as
they flew past my hotel dock, about I km upstream (west)
from the mouth of the Rio Dulce. On 28 March. I again
encountered the jaegers during the first half of my return boat
trip to Puerto Barrios. One of these individuals exhibited a
hint of a dark cap typical of jaegers (Stercorarius spp.), but
none of the birds had elongated tail feathers. I left Guatemala
uncertain of the species I had seen and photographed.
At the Carnegie Museum of Natural History (Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania), I asked D. ScottWood and Kristin M.Williams
to view the transparencies. Both tentatively identified the
birds asimmature PomarineJaegers (Stercorariuspomarinus).
I also forwarded the transparencies to David Lee, North
CarolinaState Museum ofNatural History, who also identified
the birds as immature Pomarine Jaegers. In all cases, the
iden tification was based on the depth of the body and the large
wing area, and my comparison of size with that of the
Laughing GulL
The American Ornithologists' Union Checklist (1983)
includes the West Indies and the northern coast of South
America within the winter range of the Pomarine Jaeger, but
states that this species has not been "recorded on the Carib-
bean coast of Middle America between southern Mexico and
Costa Rica." In the western Atlantic, the winter range of the
Pomarine Jaeger extends from both coasts of Peninsular
Florida, the southeastern Gulf of Mexico, and all of the
Caribbean Sea from the northern coast of the YucatAn Pen-
insula to Tobago, thence north and westward to the Bahama
Islands (Furness 1987). Land (1970) did not report records of
jaegers of any species from Guatemala, although 50Pomarine
Jaegers were seen 50- 100 kn offthe Pacific c oast of G uatemala
on 15 April 1973 (Jeh 1974). One recordofaParasitic Jaeger
(S. parasirics) exists for Belize (Wood et al. 1986). No


jaegers are listed among the avifauna of Hondumas (Monroe
1968). In Costa Rica, the Pomarine Jaeger is regarded as rare
and sporadic on both coasts, and immatures have been found
in two gulfs along the Pacific coast (S files and Sku cch 1989).
Pomarine Jaegers have been regularly seen in the Colon
Harbor on the Caribbean coast of Panama (Ridgely and
Gwynne 1989).
In the past 5 years, 1 have sailed the 28 km from Belize City
(200 km north of Livingston. Guatemala) to Caye Caulker,
Belize, 3 times during the months when jaegers might be
expected, including a trip 1 week after seeing jaegers at
Livingston. I saw no jaegers either from the boats or during
my stays on Caye Caulker.
Considering the scarcity of records for Ihe Caribbean coast
of Central America, the numbers of Pomarine Jaagers in the
Bay of Amadique is surprising. I observed at least 12 jaegers
in the 3 days.
The proximity of immature jaegers to the mainland coast
and in the Rio Dulce, 22 km west of the open ocean, and
consistent concentration within the Bay of Amatique sug-
gests that these birds are not restricted to open ocean. The
question remains: Were the jaegers at Livingston an isolated
occurrence, or is the areaa partof their normal winter range?

LrnERATURE C=TED

American Ornithologists' Union. 1983. Check-list of
North American birds, 6th edition. Washington, D.C.,
Am. Ornihol. Union.
Furness, R.W. 1987. The skuas. T. & AJ.D Poyser. Calton,
England.
Jehi, J.R., Jr. 1974. The near-shore avifauna of the Middle
American west coast Auk 91:681-699.
Land. H.C. 1970. Birds of Guatemala. Wynnewood,
Pennsylvania, Livingston PubL Co.
Monroe, B.L., Jr. 1968. A distributional survey of the birds
of Honduras. Omithol. Monogr. 7. Lawrence, Kansas.
Am. Omithol. Union
Ridgely, R.S., and IJA. Gwynne. 1989. A guide to thebirds
of Panama, 2nd edition. Princeton. New Jersey,
Princeton Univ. Press.
Stiles, F.G.. and Al. Skutch, 1989. A guide to the birds of
Costa Rica. Ithaca, New York, Comstock Publ, Assoc.
Wood. C.S.. R.C. Leberman, and D. Weyer. 1986.
Checklist of the birds of Belize. Pittsburgh. Pennsylva
nia, Carnegie Mus. Nat. Hist.


El Pitirre 6(1)


Page 2









OBSERVATIONS OF THE WOOD SANDPIPER AND LITTLE EGRET IN BARBADOS


MARN FROST
Featherbed Lane
St, John, Barbados


On the morning of 28 November 1992, I1 observed a Wood
Sandpiper (Tringa glareola) in the artificial swamp at
Mangrove, SL Philip. Barbados. At20 cm, itwas marginally
smaller than the 2 juvenile Ruffs (Philomachus pugnax) and
Stilt Sandpipers (Calidris himantopus) feeding nearby, but
slightly larger than the White-rumped Sandpiper (C.
fuscicollis). Greater (Tringa melanoleuca) and Lesser (T.
flavipes) yellowlegs were also present.
Through the telescope, the most striking feature of the
Wood Sandpiper was the broad white superciliary stripe,
which stretched to the nape. The upperparts were dark
brown, heavily spotted with white, as compared with the
paler (i.e., gray-brown) upperparts of the Lesser Yellowlegs.
At rest, the Wood Sandpiper's wings did not extend beyond
the tail, unlike the Lesser Yellowlegs, whose wings extend
past the tail. The underparts were white with a dusky brown
wash on the throat and upper chest Its leg color was pale
yellow, intermediate between the orange yellow of the yel-
lowlegs and the green-yellow of the S tilt Sandpiper. At close
range, a thin white eye-ring was visible. The short bill was
straight and black. In flight, it revealed its white rump and
brown-barred tail, and the white outerprimary shaft was also
visible. The bird called with a high-pitched "chi-chi-pee" as
it took flight, which was fast and direct
The only other known record of the Wood Sandpiper in
Barbados is a specimen collected in October 1955 (Bond
1959, 1965). This arctic species normally winters from the
Mediterranean region south to southern Africa. Ceylon, the
Malay Peninsula, East Indies, and Australia (American Or-
nithologists' Union 1983). However, it has also been re-
corded from Barbados (Amos and Wingate 1983).
On the morning of 1 January 1993, I1 observed a slightly
largerwhite egretfeeding among Snowy Egrets (Egretta thula)
and an immature Little Blue Heron (E. caerulea) at the same
artificial swamp at Mangrove. The black legs of the uni-
dentified bird were much thicker than those of the Snowy
Egret, which were posteriorly yellowish-green. Closer ob-
servation through the telescope showed several distinctive
characteristics when compared with the Snowy Egrets. First,
the unidentified heron's cere was grayish and not bright
yellow. Second, as it waded, its lemon-yellow, not bright
yellow, feet were noted. In addition, the black bill was


slightly thicker and longer than that of the other herons.' The
bird stood more upright than the Snowy Egrets and was
definitely a more active feeder than the other egrets presenL
This bird was identified as a Little Egret (Egretta garzetta)
and is the second record for Barbados. This Old World
species principally winters in Southeast Asia and the African
and Austalian regions. A specimen of the Little Egret was
collected from Barbados in April 1954 (Bond 1966), whereas
West Indian records include St. Lucia (Norton 1985, 1986)
and Martinique (Bond 1966). Other New World records
include Newfoundland (American Ornithologists' Union
1983), Quebec (American Ornithologists' Union 1983),
Bermuda(Norton 1985), Trinidad (Bond 1966), and Surinam
(American Ornithologists' Union 1983). I suspect the Little
Egret was present in Barbados since November 1992, but was
overlooked among the Snowy Egrets.
The identifications of both species have been confirmed
by Edward Massiahand Captain Maurice Hulttboth of whom
have seen these species in Europe. Both the Wood Sandpiper
and Little Egret were still present at Mangrove on 25 January
1993.

LrrERATURE CrnED
American Ornithologists' Union. 1983. Check-list of
North American birds, 6th edition. Allen Press, Inc..
Lawrence, Kansas.
Amos. EJ.R.. and D.B. Wingate. 1983. First record of the
Wood Sandpiper Tringa glareola, from Bermuda. Am.
Birds 37:115-116,
Bond, J. 1959. Fourth supplement to the Checklist of
Birds of the West Indies (1956). Acad. Nat. Sci.
Philadelphia.
Bond, J. 1965. Tenth supplement to the Checklist of
Birds of the West Indies (1956). Acad. Nat. Sci.
Philadelphia.
Bond. J. 1966. Eleventh supplement to the Checklist of
Birds of the West Indies (1956). Acad. Nat. Sci.
Philadelphia.
Norton, R.L. 1985. West Indies region. Am. Birds 39:214-
215.
Norton. R.L. L986. West Indies region. Am. Birds 40:338-
340.


El Pitirre 6(1)


Page 3








ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PRESENTED AT THE 1992 ANNUAL MEETING
OF THE SOCIETY OF CARIBBEAN ORNITHOLOGY


REASSESSMENT OF BLACK-CAPPED PETREL
IN CUBA
(REEVALUCION DEL DIABLOTIN EN CUBA)

D, S. Lsa1, N, VNA2, 0. GARIDO3, R. W. Dicx ,4,
AND J. C. HANEY5
'North CarolinaStare Museum, North Carolina, USA, 2
University of Oriente, Cuba, 3Museo Nacional de la Historia
Natural, Cuba. 4Museum ofSW Biology, USA and SWoods Hole
Oceanographic Institute. Massachusetts, USA

Since late the 1970s several authors haveincluded the Sierra
Maestra of eastern Cuba as part of the breeding range of the
B lack-capped Petrel. Pterodoma hasitata. This was based on
a collection of six birds made in 1977. but the collection was
never formally reported. In 1992 we revisited the collection
site and concluded that breeding reports there are unfounded.
We heard petrels as they foraged in the oceanic fronts in deep
water (500 m) near the Cuban coast. They did not fly inland
and it is Iikely that they represent breeding birds commuting
from Haiti. The only known population is in southern
Hispaniola, and there is considerable evidence that it is
rapidly declining. We are very concerned about the conser-
vation of this Caribbean endemic. Based on population
estimates off the southeastern United States and incomplete
information from Haiti and the Dominican Republic, we
believe that there are currently fewer than 10,000 pairs of this
bird and the actual number may be far less.

Desde fines de la d6cada de 1970 varies autores han
incluido la Sierra Maestra en la parre occidental de Cuba
como parte del territorio reproductive del Diablotin,
Pterodoma hasitata. Esto se basa en la recolecci6n de sdis
plj aros durante 1977, pero la colecci6m ntinca fue reportada
formalmente. En 1992 revisitamos el sitio donde las aves
fueron recolectadas y concluimos que los reportes
reproducLivos eran infundados. Escuchamos Diablotines
mientras se alimentaban a Io largo del faraUldn oceAnico, en
aguasprofundas(500m), muy cerca de la costa cubana. Estos
no volaron tierra adentro, y es probable que representen aves
provenientes de Haiti. La poblaci6n del sur de la Hispaniola
es la lnica present actualmente, y hay considerable evidencia
de que esta declinando rapidamente: estamos muy
prcocupados por la conservaci6n de esta ave end6mica del
Canbe. Basado en estimados poblacionales en las afueras de
la costa sureste de los EE.UU. e informaci6n incompleta de
HaiLfy de [aRepdblicaDominicanacredmosqueactualmente
hay menos de 10.000 parejas de estas ayes y que el ndmerc
real puede ser ain mucho menor.


Page 4


SURVEY OF LEAST TERN NESTING SITES
ALONG THE SOUTH COAST OF.JAMAICA
(CENSO DE SmOS DE ANIDAJE DE LA GAVIOTA
PEQUEFA A LO LARGO DE LA COSTA SUR DE
JAMAICA)

G. P. AL.ENG AND C. A. ALLN w
Department of Zoology, University of Wesn Indies. Mona.
Kingston, Jamaica

Four wetland areas along the south coast of Jamaica, where
the nesting of the Least Tern (Sterna antillarum) has been
previously reported, were recently surveyed. Nesting colo-
nies were found at only two sites, Yallahs Salt Pond, SL
Thomas, and Long Pond, SL Catherine. The type ofsubstrate
and size of the colonies are described. The study attempts to
improve the lack of data on the nesting of these birds in
Jamaica and provides baseline information for management
and further research.

Cualro zonas anegadas a to largo de la costa str de Jamaica
donde la Gaviota Pequefla (Sterna antiltarum) ha sido
anteriormente reportada anidando fueron censadas
recientemente. Fueron encontradas colonias solo en dos
sitios, Yallahs Salt Pond, St. Thomas y en Long Pond, SL
Catherine. El tipo de terreno de la localidad y el tamafllo de la.
colonia son descritos. Este estudio pretende aumentar y
mejorar la informaci6n de anidaje de estas aves y servir de
base para su manejo y futuras investigaciones.

GROWTH RATES OF BIRDS FROM
PREDATOR-FREE ISLANDS
(VELOCIDAD DE CRECIMIENTO DE LAS AVES EN
ISLAS LIBRES DE DEPREDADORES)

CARLOS A. BOSQuB AND MARIA T. BOSQUE
Departamento de Biologta de Organismos, Universidad Sim6n
Boivar. Apartado 89000, Caracas, Venezuela

Altricial birds have the highest rate of development of any
group of vertebrates. A high rate of development allows birds
to minimize the time spent in the egg and nestling stages.
Since mortality, particularly due to predators, is greater
during this period it follows that a high rate of growth allows
birds to reduce the time spent during the more vulnerable
stages. This observation has led to the generally accepted idea
that the high rate of growth of altricial birds has been molded
by nest predation pressure as a selective force. As an indirect
rest of this hypothesis, we have compared the length of the
incubation and nestling periods of species of birds from
oceanic, predator-freec islands with those of related species
from continental areas. We find (hat, when controlling for
El Pitirre 6(1)









body mass, total nest period of native oceanic species is
greater than that of related continental species. However,
species introduced by man to the islands have similar nest
periods to those of continental populations. We conclude that
predation has been an important factor in the evolution of
growth rates of birds.

Los pAfjaos altriciales tienen la mayor tasa de desarrollo de
cualquier grupo de vertebmdos. Un alto grado de desarrollo
permite a los pajaros reducirel tiempo invertido durante las
elupas de incubaci6n y empollamiento. Debido a que la
mortalidad, particularmente por depredadores, es mayor
durante este period, se desprende que un alto grado de
desarrollo permi tir a] ave reducirel tiempo invertidodurante
esta etapa mds vulnerable. Esta observacion ha conducido a
la idea generalmente aceptadade que lagran sade dcsarrollo
de las ayes altriciales ha sido moldeada por la presi6n de
depredacion a los nidos como una presi6n selectiva. Como
una prueba indirecta de esta hip6tesis hemos comparado el
period de incubaci6n y anidaje de species de aves en islas
oceanicas, libres de depredadores, con aquellas especies
relacionadas de tierra firme. Encontramos que, cuando
controlamos la masa corporal.el perfodo total de anidaje para
las espec ies oceAnicas nativas es mayor que para las especies
relacionadas continentales. Sin embargo, las especies
introducidas por el hombre aestas islas tienen un periodo de
anidaje similar que aquellas de la poblaci6n continental.
Concluimos que la depredacidna ha sido un factor importante
en la evoluci6n de tasas de crecimiento en las aves.

RESOURCE PARTITIONING AMONG A
FLYCATCHER GUILD IN JAMAICA
DIVISIONN DEL USO DEL RECURSO ENTRE UN
GRUPO DE AVES INSECTIVORAS EN JAMAICA)

AuLx CRuz
Environmemnal Population and Organismic Biology, University
of Boulder, Colorado. 80309-0334 USA

I studied resource use by a flycatcher guild in a Jamaican wet
limestone forest. Members of the guild included Tyrannidae
(Contopus caribaeus, Myarchus barbirostris, M. validus,
Pachyramphus niger, Tyrannus caudifasciaus) andTodidae
(Todus todus). Most of the species foraged by sally-hovering
for insects from leaf surface, butaerial hawkingand frugivory
were also important foraging modes. Differences and simi-
larities in the foraging ecology and morphology of the species
within the guild are discussed and related to community
organization.

Estudid ci uso de rccursos entre un grupo homog6neo de
aves insec ivoras en un bosquc hdimedo decalizox en Jamaica.
Miembros del grupo inclufan la familia Tyranidae (Contopus
caribaeusMyarchusbarbirostris,M validus.Pachyramphus
tfger. Tyrannus caudifasciattus) y la familia Todidae (Todus


todus). La mayoria de las especies so alimentaba median
brevessaltossostenidos ("sally-hovering") atapando inseclos
en la superficie de las hojas, pero Ia alimentacidn en vuelo
("aerial hawking") y Ia frugivoridad fueron amrnbidn m6todos
importanes de forragdo. Diferencias y similitudes en la
ecologiaalimenticia yen lamorfologia de las especies dentro
del grupo son discutidas y relacionadas a la organizacion
comunal.

ESTUDIO PRELIMINARY EN DOS COMUNIDADES
DE AVES EN LA LOMA NALGA DE MACO
(PRELIMINARY STUDY OF TWO BIRD
COMMUNITIES IN LOMA NALGA DE MACO)

DoMNGoo N. Suta
Departamenio de Vida Silvestre, Secretaria de Estado de
Agricultura, Santo Domingo, Repdblica Dominicana

So presentan lo resultados de los estudios que sobre avifauna
se realizaron en la Loma Nalga de Maco, provincia de Elias
Pifla, la cual estt enmarcada en la Cordillera Central. Los
mismos se llevaron a cabo durante los meses de marzo, abril
y agosto de 1991. Para la realizacidn de los censos se
escogieron dos zonas: una de cultivos con bosques ribereflos
(Rio Limpio) y otra de bosque latifoliado (Vallecito y Pinar
Claro)con alturade 800,1200y 1700m, respectivamente.Las
especies mis comunes fueron: el Carpintero (Melanerpes
striatus), coan abundancia de 3.2 aves/Km, el Barrancolf
(Todus angustirrostris) y la Ciguita Comain (Coereba
flaveola), ambos con abundancia de 2.6 aves/km. Dentro de
los migratorios se detectaron s61o cuatro especies; las mds
abundanes fueron: Dendroica c. caerulescens y Setophaga
ruticilla. En cl rea se observaron otras aves consideradas
muy amenazadas como son: la Cotorra (Anazona ventralls),
la Cia (lyecornis rufig aris), laCiguita Aliblanca(Xenoligea
montana) y laPalomaCeniza (Columba inornata), entre otras.

We present the results of avifaunal studies on Loma Nalga
de Maco. Elfas Pifna Province, in the Cordillera Central,
during March. April, and August 1991. Two zones were
selected for the censuses: an agricultural area with riverside
forest (Rio Limpio, 800 m) and a broadleaf forest
(Vallecito,1200 m and Pinar Claro, 1700 m). The most
common species were the Hispaniolan Woodpecker
(Melanerpes striatus). with an abundance of 32 birds/kmn..
the Narrow-billed Tody (Todus angustirrostris) and the
Bananquit (Coerebaflaveola), both with an abundance of 2.6
birds/km. Among the migratory birds, only four species were
detected, and the mostcommon were Dendroica caertdescens
and Setophaga ruticilla. Birds considered threatened were
observed in the area. including the Hispaniolan Parrot
(Amazona ventralis), Bay-breasted Cuckoo (Hyetornis
rqigularis). White-winged Warbler (Xenoligeamontana). and
Plain Pigeon (ColImba inornata).


El Pit-ire 6(1)


Page 5







YOUTH EDUCATING YOUTH
(JOVENES EDUCANDO JOVENES)

GAR-iELD A. BRowN AND CHANDKA A. DElnA
Wildlife and Environmental Conservation Action Now
(W .C.A N), Hope Zoo,
Royal Hope Botanical Gardens. Kingston 6, Jamaica

W.E.C.A.N. has been in existence for a little over one year
and has approximately 1 10 members. The group spansa wide
cross-section of Jamaican society. Members are from 9 to 24
years old, with an average age ofabou L15 years.W.E.C.A.N.'s
aim is to become a resource center for environmental issues
for children. Conservation activities and environmental edu-
cation are developed for and by youth. Through bird watch-
ing. bird banding, constructing and maintaining bird feeders,
and employing various other methods, the club has been
dedicated to the study and conservation of Jamaican birds.

"W.E.CAN." haestadofuncionandoporpoco mdsde un
aflo y cuenta con aproximadamente 110 miembros.El grupo
abarca una amplia seccida de la sociedad jamaiquina. Los
miembros tienen de 9 a 24 aflos de edad con un promedio de
15. La meta de "W,E.C.AN." es convertirse en un centro de
recursos de asuntos ambientales para nifos. Las actividades
conservacionistas y la educacidn ambiental son por y para
j6venes. A trayvs de la observaci6n do aves. anillaje.
construcci6n y mantenimien to de comederosy del emplo de
varios otros mdtodos, el club ha estado dedicado al estudio y
la conservaci6n de las ayes de Jamaica.

POPULATION DECLINE OF THE PUERTO RICAN
BROAD-WINGED HAWK AND
SHARP-SHINNED HAWK
(MERMA POBLACIONAL DEL GUARAGUAO DE
BOSQUE Y DEL FALCON DE SIERRA)

CA.Los A. DELANNOY
Department of Biology, University of Puerto Rico, P. 0O. Box
5000, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681

From August 1991 to May 1992,1 conducted a status survey
of the Broad-winged Hawk (Bureo plarypterus) and Sharp-
shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus) in Puerto Rico. Broad-
wingedHawks occur in montane habitatof RioAbajo,Carite,
and Luquillo Forest Sharp-shinned Hawks are restricted to
montane habitats in Maricao, Toro Negro, Guilarte,Luquillo,
and Carite Forests. There are approximately 150 Sharp-
shinned Hawks and 130 Broad-winged Hawks island-wide.
The Sharp-shinned Hawk has experienced a 40% population
decline in a period of 7 years (from 250 individuals in 1985
to 150 in 1992). Locally, the Carite population experienced
a 60% decline and the Luquillo population a 93% decline.
There are approximately 50 Broad-winged Hawks in Rio
Abajo and Carite Forest and 22 in Luquillo. Broad-winged
Hawks have experienced a local population decline of ap-


Page 6


proximately 50% in Luquillo Forest fromn 50 individuals in
1984 to 22 in 1992). Current threats to this species and its
habitats are serious obstacles to its continued survival. Broad-
winged Hawk threats are: furtive hunting, highway develop-
ment through prime Broad-winged Hawk habitat in Rio
Abajo Forest. and lack of comprehensive management plans
for all Commonwealth Forests.

Desde agosto de 1981 hasta mayo de 1992 llev6 a cabo un
censo de Guaragao de Bosque (Buteo platypterus) y Falc6n
de Sierra (Accipiter striatus) en Puerto Rico. Los Guaragao
de Bosque habitan en las montafias de los bosques de Rfo
Abqjo, Carite y Luquillo. Los Falcdnes de Sierra estin
restringidos a las montafias de los bosques de Maricao, Toro
Negro, Guilarte, Luquillo y Carite. Hay en la actualidad 150
Falc6nes de Sierra y 130 Guaragao de Bosque en toda la isla.
El Falc6n de Sierra ha sufrido un declive del 40% en un
periodo de7 aflos (de 150 individuos en 1985 a 100 en 1992).
Localmente, la poblaci6n de Carite experiment una merma
del 60% y la poblacidan de Luquillo una de 93%. Hay
aproximadamente 50 Guaragaos de Bosque en los bosques de
Rio Abajo y Carite y 22 en el de Luquillo. El Guaragao de
Bosque ha experimentado un declive poblacional de
aproximadamente el 50% (de 50 en 1984 a 22 en 1992). Las
amenazas actuales aestas especies son seriosobsthculos para
su supervivencia. Las amenazas del Guaragan de Bosque
son: caceria furtiva, desarrollo de carreteras en el habitat
6ptimo de esta especie en el bosque de Rfo Abajo y la falta de
un plan de manejo abarcador para todos los bosques
administrados por el Gobiemo de Puerto Rico.

FIRST RELEASE OF PUERTO RICAN PLAIN
PIGEON COLUMBA INORNATA WETMOREI
(PRIMERA LIBERACION DE PALOMAS
SABANERAS CRIADAS EN CAUTIVERIO)

CARLOS R, Rult-LEssRN AND JUAN J. MoRALES Rios
Department of Natural Resources. P. O. Box 5887. San Juan,
Puerto Rico 00906

The first ten captive-bred Puerto Rican Plain Pigeons will be
released in September 1992 in an effort to re-introduce this
species to anew location in PuertoRico. The release site is the
Smith-Kline Beecham Pharmaceutical facility in Cidra. cen-
tral Puerto Rico. Birds to be released were reared, in part, on
natural foods. Natural food supplied consisted of: Miconia
sp., Solanum eriantum. Cordia sulcata. Guapira fragans.
Cestrum diurnum, Cecropia pellata. Eugenia jambos,
Roystonea borinquena. and others. Commercial pellets were
also provided as a food supplement Dummy radio-tramnsmit-
ters (11 grams) were placed on birds. This is to examine if
changes in behavior occur with the transmitters.

Las primeras didz Palomas Sabaneras criadasen cautiverio
serial libemdas en septiembre, 1992, en un esfucrzo por
reintroducir esta especie a una nueva localidad de Puerto
El Piirre 6(1)









Rico. El sitio de aI restaumacidn sera las facilidades de la
farmacdu lica Smith-Kline Beecham en Cidra, en el centro de
Puerto Rico, Los pjaros a ser liberados fueron criados en
pane con alimento natural. Radiotransmisores falsos (11
gramos) le fueron colocados a las ayes para examinar si so
produc ian cam bios en el comportamientoporlos wansmisores
una vez colocados. El alimento natural provisto consiste de
Miconia sp., Solanum erantum, Cordia sulcata, Guapira
fragans, Cestrum diurnum, Cecropiapeltata.Eugeniajambos.
Roystonea borinquena y otros. Comida disponible
comercialmene les fu6 provistacomo suplementoalimenticio.

BIRD CONSERVATION IN TRINIDAD AND
TOBAGO: A MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVE
(LA CONSER VACION DE LAS AVES EN TRINIDAD
Y TOBAGO: UNA PERSPECTIVE DE MANFJO)

HOWARD NaLson
Wildlife Section, Forestry Division, Farm Road, St. Joseph,
Trinidad W. L

This presentation examines some of the major bird conser-
vation issues of the islands of Trinidad and Tobago. The
management options currently being pursued by the Wildlife
section, and present constraints to management, are also
evaluated. Finally, an assessment is made of the current
trends in habitat change observed in these islands, and the
effects of these changes on resident and migrant bird popu-
lations.

Esta presentaci6n examina algunos de los principales
problems de la conservaci6n en las islas de Trinidad y
Tobago. Tambidn son evaluadas las opciones de manejo
presentandose ac tualmente por la seccidn de Vida Silvestre y
las actuales dificultades de manejo. Finalmente, se hace una
evaluacidn de las tendencias actuales en tomo a los cambios
observados enelhAbitatdeestas islasylasconsecuencias que
dichos cambios puedan tener sobre las poblaciones de aves
residences y migratorias.

CONSERVATION OF THE RED-TAILED AMAZON
(AMAZONA BRASILIENSIS) IN
SOUTHEASTERN BRAZIL
(CONSERVACION DELA COTORRA DE COLA ROJA
(AMAZONA BRASILIENSIS) EN EL
SUDESTE DE BRASIL)

P. MAmRTsca wU ND P. ScHERER NETO
CEPARNIC, Caixa Postal 26. 11990-Cananeia-SP, Brazil

The Red- tailed Amazon.Amazona brasiliensis, is considered
one of the South American amazons in greatest danger of


extinction. It is endemic to enstem Brazil and is now confined
to a narrow snip of forest along the states of Sao Paulo and
Parani, from sea level to 200 m altitude in the estuarine
lagoon system. The parrot's habitat is characterized by a
mosaic of mangroves, sand-plain vegetation ("Restinga"),
coastal plain rain forest, "Caixetal" forest (Tabebuia spp.
woodland) and coastal montane rain forest (Atlantic rain
forest), and is particularly associated with dominance of the
"Guanandi" tree. Calophyllum brasiliensis (Guttifera). Ob-
served flock sizes have ranged from 2 to 100 birds. They feed
on fruits, seeds, leaves, and flowers (59 plant species). The
nests are predominantly in flood-plains. We studied 36 nests
in 9 species of trees. Mean nest entrance height was 6.20 m.,
internal diameters ranged from 0.17-0.42 m. Nesting occurs
in October and November, with 2 to 4 eggs laid; incubation
lasts 28 days. Scherer Neto (1989) estimated a population of
no more than 4,000 birds. Illegal collection for the pet trade,
habitat destruction, and hunting for human consumption has
reduced thisestimate in 1991-1992to 2,000in the wild.Our
recommendations include the continuation of research in the
field, an end to illegal trafficking, re-introduction to the wild
of parrots apprehended in the illegal tade. conservation
education, and effective protection of the habitat

La Cotorra de Cola Roja. Amazona brasiliensis, esta
considerada como una do las cotorras en mayor peligro de
extinci6n en Sur America. Es end6mica de la region este del
Brasil y ahora esiA confinada a una franja angosta de bosque
en los estados de Salo Paulo y Parand, del nivel del mar has ta
los 200 m. de altitud, en el sistema de laguna estuarino. El
habitat de la cotorra estA caracterizado por un mosaico de
mangles, vegetaci6n de llanos arenosos ('Restinga"), bosque
pluvial del llano costero, bosque "Caixetal" (bosque de
Tababuia spp.) y bosque pluvial montano costero (Bosque
PluvialAtlantico) yasociadaparticularmente con dominancia
al drbol "Guanandi" Calophyllum brasiliensis (G uttifera). El
tamailo de la bandada es de 2 a 100 individuos. Se atimenian
de frutas, semillas, y flores, (59 especies). Lcs aidos esian
localizadosprimordialmen teen llanosinundables. Estudiamos
un total de 36 nidos encontrados en 9 especies de drboles con
entrada al nido a una altura promedio de 6.0 m., diametros
intemos de 0.17 m. a 0.42 m. Los nidos son puestos de octubre
anoviembre, con2a4 huevos; con unaincubacidn de 28 das.
Scherer Nero (1989) estiino la poblacidn en no mis de 4000.
La recoleccidn ilegal para el mercado do mascotas, la
destruccidn del habitat y la caceria ilegal para consumo
human hd reducido este estimado en 1991/1992 en 2000, o
menos, individuos silvestres. Nuestras recomendaciones
incluyen la continuacidn de la investigacidn do campo, un
alto al trifico legal. reintmrducci6n al habitat natural de las
colorras confiscadas en el trdfico legal. educacidn sobre
conservaci6n y una proteccidn efectiva del hl6bitat


El Pitirre 6(1)


Page7







CONDUCTAS REPRODUCTIVAS Y DESARROLLO
MORFOLOGICO EN CAUTIVERIO DE LA
COTORRA DE LA HISPANIOLA
(AMAZONA VENTRALIS)
(REPRODUCTIVE BEHAVIOR AND MORPHOLOGIC
DEVELOPMENT ON CAPTIVE HISPANIOLAN
PARROTS AMAZONA VENTRAUS)

SiM6N GuMnaeMo
Sociedad Pro Conservacidn de las Aves. C. 29 Este No. 6. E.
Luper6n, Santo Domingo, Repdblica Dominicana

Se presentan dates sobre eldesarollo morfoldgico deAmazonaz
ventratis durante las primeras siete semanas de vida. Los
datos incluyen aumento de peso, aparicidn y desarrollo de las
plunmas primarias y caudales, aperture de los ojos y cafda del
diente embrionario. Se describen, ademds, conductas
reproductivas tales como cortejo, edpula, incubacidn y
alimentacidn de los polluelos.

Morphological development data on Amazona ventralis
during the first seven weeks of life are presented. These data
include weight gain, growth and development of tail and
primary feathers, opening of the eyes, and loss ofthe eggtooth.
Reproductive behavior is described, including courtship,
copulation, incubation, and feeding of chicks.

IMPROVED CAPTURE TECHNIQUES FOR
PSITTACINES
(TECNICAS MEJORADAS DE CAPTURA DE
PSITACIDOS)

J. MIOCAEL MEYEas
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Srvice. Paturan Wildlife Research
Center, P. 0. Box N, Palmer, Puerto Rico. 00721

I created and evaluated several techniques for efficient and
safe capture of psittacines in Puerto Rico. Elevated mist nets
reduced (P = 0.09) capture rates of incidental birds and may
have increased capture rates of parakeets (0.06-0.52 cap-
tures/net-hr). Playing recordings of parakeet vocalizations
enabled me to reduce the number of nets from 12 to 6, which
reduced the number of incidental birds captured (P = 0.0002)
and may have increased the capture of parakeets. Compared
to other methods, elevated mist nets (7.3 m high), operated
with recordings of parrot foraging calls and live decoys
nearby, increased (P = 0.05) capture rates for Amazona sp.
When the parrots were in position, they were frightened into
the nets that encircled the tree. This method was only effective
in the morning. I captured 46 Aratinga sp. in 91 net-hrand 8
Amazona sp. in 505 net-hr with these methods. I will also
present methods to safely remove parrots from mist nets.

Cred y evalud varias tccnicas para la capture de Psitacidos
de forma segura y cficienteen PuertoRico. Redes orn itoldgicas
elevadas redujeron (P = 0.09) la capture de ayes inicidenatces


y pudo haber incrementado la captura de perfcos (0.06-0.52
capturas/red-hora). La repruduccidn grabada de
vocalizaciones de pericos me permitid reducir el ninmero de
redes de 12 a 6, Io cual redujo el nimero de aves inc ideniales
capturadas (P = 0.0002) y pudo haber aumentado la capture
de pericos. Comparado con otros mdtodos, las redes
omitoldgicas elevadas (73 m) operadas con grabaciones del
Uanmado de cotorras alimentandose y sefluelos vivos en la
proximidad. aumento (P = 0.05) la captura de Amazona sp.
Cuando las cotorras se encontraban en posicidn, se les
espantaba hacia las redes que circulaban tmn rbol. Este
m6eodo solo fu6 efectivo en la manana. Capturd 46 Arafinga
sp. en 91 redes/horas y 8 Amazona sp. en 505 redes/horas con
este m6todo. Tambien expongo mdtodos para remover con
seguridad las colorras de las redes.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT IN THE
CONSERVATION OF THE RED-TAILED AMAZON
IN SOUTHEASTERN BRAZIL
(PARICIPACION COMUNAL EN LA
CONSERVACION DE COTORRAS COLIROJAS
EN EL SURESTE DE BRAZIL)

MIRIAM MLANELO
CEPARNIC, Caixa Postal 26,11990. CananIa, SP, Brazil

The Red-tailed Amazon (Amazona brasiliensis) is endemic
to the local coastal rain forest of southeastern Brazil. The
habitat of this Amazon is diminishing as a result of large-
scale deforestation. In addition, with only limited popula-
tions remaining, their numbers are decreasing because of
local people collecting nestlings for the pet trade. As a part of
theAmazona brasiliensis project, the Community Education
Program was initiated in the Cananeia estuarine region in
1991. It is important to have the human population living
within the range of the endangered species help the animal
The major aim of this environmental education proposal is to
encourage the government and the local people (residents)
and tourists to develop conservation activities related to this
amazon species. First, 420 persons (from every community)
answered a questionnaire and a survey about knowledge,
feeling, and behavior related to this bird and its habitat. The
results showed that less than 5% of the respondents knew the
Red-tailed Amazon to be an endemic bird, and less than 10%
knew its endangered stausand reasons for its decline. Through
slide shows in schools and churches, school programs, forest
reserve visits, posters, and lectures, local people have been
exposed to the amazon and its current status. Educational
material is being prepared. Only after the next breeding
season will it be possible to evaluate if local attitudes are
changing in relation to this amazon.

La Cotorra Coliroja es enddmica del bosque pluvial
costanerodel sureste del Brasil. El hIbitat de esta cocorra est,
disminuyendo como resultado de la deforeslaci6n. Ademds,
quedando solo una poblacidn limitada. sus ndmeros siguen
El Pitirrc 6(I)








disminuyendo debido a la caceria furtiva dirigida al mercado
de mascotas. Como parte del proycctoAmazona brasiliensis,
el Programa do Educacidn Comunitaria fue empezado en
1991 en la regi6n estuarina de Canandia Es muy important
que I a poplacidm humana que comparre el 6rea vital con una
especie animal, pueda ayudar a la misma. especialmente si
dsm estA amenazada. La principal merea de este programa es
estimular al gobierno y a los lugareflos a participar en
actividades conservacionistasrelacionadas aestacoorna. Se
les pidid a 420 personas de toda la comunidad lenar un
cuestionario relacionado a su conocimiento y opinion en
cuanto a vista ave y su habitat Los resultados mostraron que
menos del 5% sabfan que la Cotorra Coliroja era enddmica,
y menos del 10% sabfan que estabaamenazada nicuales ean
las razones para su disminucidn. A travds de diapositivas en
escuelas e iglesias, programs escolares, visitas al bosque,
carte ones y conferencias, lacotorray suestado actual se esta
exponiendo al pdblico. Material educacional adicional se
estA preparando. Solo luego de la pr6xima temporada de
anidaje seraposible evaluarel cambio de actitudes hacia esta
cotorra en la comunidad.

PROMOTING PROTECTION THROUGH PRIDE
(PROMOVIENDO LA PROTECCION A TRAVES
DEL ORGULLO)

MONIQUE CLAwImK
Bahama Parrot Conservation Committee. Nassau, Bahamnas

After intensive scientific research on the Bahama Parrot
(Amazona leucocephala bahamensis), it was agreed that a
comprehensive education program was needed in order to
sensitize the Bahamian people to the plight of this bird.
RARE's innovative education program was introduced to the
relevant agencies byPaul Butler. The BahamaParrotConser-
vation Committee was formed. This committee is composed
of representatives from the Department of Agriculture, The
Bahamas National Trust, The Department of Lands and
Surveys, Friends of the Abaco Parrot, and Friends of the
Environment; all working together to implement the Bahama
Parrot Project. I will highlight some of the conservation
efforts in the Bahamas to save our indigenous Bahama Parrot
from possible extinction.

Luego de in tensiva investigation cien fficaenlaCotorrade
Bahamas (Amazona leucocephalabahmnensis),se acorddde
qua un programa de educaci6n intensiva era necesario para
poder sensibilizar al pdblico de las Bahamas de la situaci6n
deesiaave. El programaeducacional innovadorde RARE fu6
preseniadoalas agenciaspertinentesporel Sr. Paul Butter. El
Comite do Conservacidn de la Cotorra de Bahamas fu6
creado. El mismo comprende represenantes del Departamento
de Agricultura, el Fideicomiso Nacional de las Bahamas, el
Depariamento de Tierras. Amigos de la Colorra de Abaco y
Amigos del Ambiente; todos trabajando juntos para
implementar ei proyecio Cotorra de aIs Bahamas, Voy a
El Pitirre 6(1)


resaltar algunos de los esfuerzos de conservacidn en las islas
para library de una possible extinci6a la nadva Cotorra de
Bahamas.

AN INTRODUCTION TO AVIAN MEDICINE AND
EMERGENCY CARE WITH EMPHASIS ON THE
GENUS AMAZONA
(INTRODUCCION A LA MEDICINA AVICOLA Y
CUIDADO EN EMERGENCIAS CON ENFASIS EN EL
GENERO AMAZONA)

ANA B. ANimzAurr
US. Fish and Wildlife Service. Puerto Rican Parrnt Field Office,
P.O. Box 488. Panmer, Puerto Rico 00721

There are more than 10 threatened species and subspecies of
amazon parrots within the Caribbean Basin. Most of them
had their numbers reduced because of habitat loss. Puerto
Rico is one of the few islands in the Antilles to have a captive
propagation project This presentation willfocus on psittacine
preventive medicine, captive management, infectious dis-
eases, and emergencies during breeding and non-breeding
season.

Hay mdsde 10especiesysubespeciesdcolorrasamazonas
amenazadas a lo largo de la Cuenca del Caribe. La mayorfa
de ellas han reducido sus ndmeros a trevez de los aflos debido
a la deforestaci6n y a la pdrdidadel hAbitat. Puerto Rico es una
de las pocas islas del Caribe que 1leva a cabo un proyecto de
propagacidn en caudverio.Estapresentacidnestaraenfocada
enlamedicinapreventivade Psitlcidos, manejoen cautiverio,
enfermedades infecciosas y emergencias durante todas las
dpocas del alto.

ESTADO DE LAS POBLACIONES CUBANAS
DE COTORRA (AMAZONA LEUCOCEPHALA) Y
CRIA EN CAUTIVERIO
(STATUS OF THE CUBAN PARROT (AMAZONA
LEUCOCEPHALA) POPULATION AND
CAPTIVE BREEDING)

HIRAM GowzALaz, MARkA E. GA&acA ROME-R Y
EsrEBAN GoDNtNZ
Institute de Ecologfay SistemAica,.A.C.C.. Ciudad de La
Habana. Cuba

Laspoblaci6nes deCotorra(Amazonarleucocephata) en Cuba
estan restringidas a las areas boscosas y mAs protogidas.
Posden un amplio espectro alimentario al consumir flores,
frutos y semillas de al menos treina species de planeas. Su
period reproductivo es de febrero a junio, poniendo un
promedio de 2.9 huevos/nido y logran 1.86 pichones/nido en
las poblaciones estudiadas. Se detectaron doce tipos de
vocalizaciones asociadas a diferentesconductas. Elestadode
sus poblaciones puede clasificarse como Vulnerable. En
condiciones de cautiverio se logr aIn cfa de dos pichones, los


Page 9








cuales abandonaron el aido a los 53 y 55 dfas,


The populations of the Cuban Parrot (Amazona
leucocephala) in Cuba are restricted to the forested, most
protected areas. They have a wide range of foods, foraging on
flowers,. fruits, and seeds of at least 30 plant species. Their
breeding season is from February to June. Pairs lay an
average of 2.9 eggs per nest and hatch 1.86 chicks per nest.
We detected 12 vocalization types associated with different
behaviors. The status of the populations may be classified as
Vulnerable. Two chicks were raised in captivity, one of
which left the nest at53 days. whereas the other left at 55 days
of age,

RESULTADOS PRELIMINARES DEL PROYECTO
NACIONAL PARA LA CONSERVACION DE LA
COTORRA CUBANA (AMAZONA
LEUCOCEPHALA LEUCOCEPHALA)
(PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF THE NATIONAL
PROJECT FOR THE CUBAN PARROT AMAZONA
LEUCOCEPHALA LEUCOCEPHALA)

XiolmARA GALvE -AGUIIRA, V, BERovmEs. A. LL.ANES,
R. MARilNEZ Y 0. Pnaemt.L
Inst ituo de Ecologla y Sistemdlica, A.C.C., Ciudad de La
Habana, Cuba

En el presente irabajo se exponen los primeros resultados del
Proyecto Nacional para laConservacidn de laCotorraCubana
(Amazona leucocephala ieucocephata) que comenz6 a
desarrollarseen 1988yqueabarael estudioen 11 localidades
del pafs, manejo ycrfaen cautiveriode lamisma. Sepresentan
en detalle el resultado del trabajo entre 1988 y 1991 en el
refugio de fauna Los Indios. en la Isla dc la Juventud, que cs
un area formada power sabanas arenosas con palmas barrigonas
(Capothrinax wright), tlnico sustrato que utiliza la cotonra
para anidar en esta localidad.Se detallan las investigaciones
para el manejo, asM como los mdtodos que han permitido el
incremento de la poblacidn nidificanie en Los Indios, de
menos de 100 nidos en 1979 hasta 437 en 199 1Se exponen
ademas los datos preliminares relatives a abundancia y datos
reproductivos de las localidades de Mil Cumbres, Cayo
Potreros, Hato Milian y Loma de Cunaga. Por dltimo, se
presentan datos relatives alacrfaen cautiverio de 12 pichones
y el diseno elaborado para el establecimiento de criaderos
artificiales.

This work presents the first results of the National Project
for the Conservation of the Cuban Parrot (Amazona
leucocephala leucocephala), which began in 1988. Eleven
localities throughout the country were involved in manage-
ment and captive breeding of the parrot. Detailed results of
work conducted from 1988 to 1991 in Los Indios wildlife
refuge, Isla de la Juventud (a sandy savannah area with
Bellied Palms, Capothrinax wright. the only nesting sub-
strate the parrot used in this locality) are presented. Man-
Page 10


agement research is presented. as well as methodology that
has allowed an increase in the nesting population from 100
nests in 1979 to 437 nests in 1991. Preliminary data are
presentedregardingrelative abundance andbreeding biology
in Mil Cumbres, Cayo Potreros, Hato MiliAn, and Loma de
Cunaga. Finally, data on the captive breeding of 12 chicks are
presented, and the design developed for the establishment of
aviaries.

BANANAQUIT VOCAL BEHAVIOR IN A HIGH
DENSITY POPULATION
(COMPORTAMIENTO VOCAL DE LA REINITA
COMUN EN UNA POBLACION DE
ALTA DENSIDAD)

NmeIA I. RAMOS OSCAR J. VAzQUEZ1, AND
JosEPH M. WUNDERJuE. JR.2
IDepartment of Biology. University of Puerto Rico. Cayey,
2institute of Tropical Forestry, P.O. Box B, Palmer, Puerto Rico
00721

APuerto Rican population ofBananaquits (Coerebaflaveola)
with a high population density, small permanent territories.
and numerous intraspecific interactions showed many of the
song attributes predicted for species with such ecological
trails. These song attributes include: high singing rates, large
song repertoires, predominance of rare song types, and se-
quence of song types presented with a pattern approaching
immediate variety. Different song types were produced pri-
marily by the addition ordeletion of notes at the end of a song,
whereas the introductory notes were less variable. Males
differed from each other in note usage and song types, but
produced similar levels of song variation. Most note types,
but few song types, were shared by neighbors. But, contrary
to predictions, no consistent relationship was found between
singing continuity and song versatility.

Una poblaci6n de Reinitas Comunes en Puerto Rico
(Coereba flaveola), con una alta densidad poblacional,
pequeflos territorios permanentes y numerosas interacciones
intraespecificas mostr6 muchos de los atributos para el canto
predictospara especies con tales carac tersticaa, Estos atributos
incluyen: razones de canto alias, largos repertorios de cantos.
predominancia de tipos de cantos raros y secuencia de tipos
de cantos presentados con an patr6n de pacercamiento de
variedad inmediata. Diferentes tipos de cantos fueron
producidos primordialmente mediante la cancelacidn o
afiadidura de notas al final del canto, en donde las notas de
introducci6n fueron menos variables. Los machos se
diferanciaban unos do otros mediante el uso de notas y el ripo
dc canciones, peroprodujeron similares niveles de variacidn
cn el canto. La mayoria de los lipos de noeas. pero pocos tipos
de cantos, fueron compartidos por aves vecinas. Sin em-
bargo. contrario a las predicciones, ninguna relacidn
consistenteseenconut entrecantoscontinuosy laversatilidad
del canto.


El Pitirre 6(1)








CONSERVATION NEEDS FOR THE AMAZON
PARROTS OF JAMAICA
(NECESIDADES DE CONSERVACION DE LAS
COTORRAS DE JAMAICA)

WEpDY VAN BERNEVED
Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory. University of the West Indies,
Discovery Bay, Jamaica

Jamaica's two endemic species of amazon parrots,Amazona
agilis. the Black-billed Parrot, and A, collaria, the Yellow-
billed Parrot, are increasingly threatened by habitat destruc-
tion, hunting, and the pet trade. The Jamaican public (includ-
ing the police) is largely ignorant of laws protecting wildlife,
and parrots are openly offered for sale and kept as pets. Much
remains unknown about their numbers. distribution, habitat
requirements, behavior and, in particular, their breeding
biology. Conservation needs include a comprehensive cen-
sus and field studies oflamaican parrots; theestablishmentof
a viable captive population (preferably more than one) for
research and educational purposes; and a public awareness
program to educate Jamaicans about these beautiful, unique,
and threatened birds.

Las dos especies end6micas de cotorras amazonas de
Jamaica, Anazona agilis, la Cotorra de Pico Negro y A.
collaria, la Cotorra de Pico Amarillo, estan siendo
progresivamente amenazadasporla destruccidn de su habitat,
la cacerfa y el mercado de mascotas. El ptiblico de Jamaica
(incluyendo la poliefa) ignora en gran medida las leyes de
protecci6n de vida silvestre, y las cotorras son ofrecidas
abiertamente para la venta y mantenidas como mascotas.
Mucho ignoramos sobre su ndmero, distribuci6n, requisitos
de habitat, comportamiento, y en particular sobre su biologia
reproductiva, Las necesidades de conservaci6n incluyen un
censo abarcador y estudios de campo: el establecimiento de
una poblacidn cautiva viable (preferiblemente mis de una)
pampropdsitos investigativos y educacionales; y un programa
de concientizaci6n pdblica para educar a los Jamaiquinos
sobre estas aves dnicas, hermosas y amenazadas.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF THE BAHAMA
PARROT AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ITS
CONSERVATION
(BIOLOGIA REPRODUCITVA DE LA COTORRA DE
LAS BAHAMAS E IMPLICACIONES
PARA SU CONSERVACION)

RosEMAU R GNAM1 AND ROBERT F. ROCKWELL2
lAmerican Institute a Biological Sciences, 730 11th. St.,
Washington, DC 20001; -Department of Ornithology. American
Jusemn of Naiural History, New York. NY 10024. USA

Bahama Parrots (Amazona Ieucocephala bahamensis) nest in
limesrone-solution cavities beneath the ground, a habitat
unique among New World parrols. Current population esti-


El Pitirre 6(1)


mates range from 860 to 1300 parrors. From 1985 to 1988 we
located 76 nests in 2 nesting areas on southern Abaco. We
evaluated reproductive investment and loss using a fitness
components model that corresponds to stages of the repro-
ductive cycle. On average, a pair produced 3.6 eggs, but
fledged 0.8 young, a 77% loss on their initial invesrtmnt.
While the losses accrued throughout the cycle, they were
higher during the hatching and post-hatching stages. The
implementation of a conservation management plan that
would reduce total nest and brood failures is needed. The
Abaco population is under stress from nest predation by feral
cats, development of its habitats, and poaching. Conservation
measures need to be implemented now while numbers are
sufficiently large to maintain biological viability. The
translocation of wild-caught individuals to other Bahamian
islands would increase its probability of surviving catastro-
phes, such as hurricanes.

Las Cotorras de Bahamas (Amazona leucocephala
bahamensis) anidan en cavidades de piedra caliza bajo tierra.
un habitat dnico entre las cotonas del Nuevo Mundo.
Estimados actuales de la poblacidm oscilan entre 860 a 1300
cotorras. Entre 1985 y 1988 localizamos 76 nidos en dos
dreas de anidaje al sur de Abaco. Evaluamos la inversion y
pdrdida reproductiva usando un modelo de components de
aptitudque correspondfan a etapas del ciclo reproductivo. En
promedio, un par producfa 3.6 huevos. pero .solo 0.8 pichones
sobreviven, una perdida del 77% de lainversidn inicial. Alin
cuando las pdrdidas ocurrfan a travys de todo el ciclo
reprocductivo, eran mayores en la etapa de empollamiento y
volanton. La implementacidn de un plan de manejo de
conservaci6n que pueda reducir el Eracaso total do nidos y
camadas es necesaria. La poblaci6n de Abaco estr bajo
presi6n debido a la depredacidn causada pot gatos ferales. el
desarrollo de su habitat, y la caza furtiva. Es neccsario
implementar medidas de conservacidon ahora mientras los
nmimeros sean suficientemente grandes para mentener la
viabilidad biol6gica. Latranslocacidn de indiv.duos atrapados
en el estado silvestre hacia otras islas de las Bahamas
aumentard las probabilidades de sobrevivir a eventuales
catdstrofes, tales como los huracdnes.

CLASIFICACION NUMERICA DE ALGUNAS
COMUNIDADES DE AVES DEL
ARCHIPIELAGO CUBANO
(NUMERIC CLASSIFICATION OF SOME AVIAN
COMMUNITIES IN THE CUBAN ARCHIPELAGO)

M. E. GARCIA ROMERO Y LAEWO GN CONZAL
Instituto de Ecologfa y Sistematica, A.C.C.. C. Habana. Ciba

Se discuten los resultados obtenidos de la clasificacidn
num6rica de 19 comunidades de aves pertenecientes a igual
numero de localidades que estan carncterizadas pordiftren tci
tipos de formaciones vegetates y se hayan ubicadas en
distintos puntos geogrnificos del Archipidlago Cubano. Para
Page 11







este estudio se tomaron en cuenta un total de 162 especies de
ayes, el indice de similitud utilizado fu6 el de Sorensen y el
mtodo de agrupamiento considerado,el WPGMA. Al analizar
las afinidades entre las localidades, mediante el dendrograma
obtenido, se pudo conocer que existe una tendencia hacia el
agrnparniento de tres gremios independientes el primer
grupo esti formado por 9 localidades abarcando todos los
tipos de bosque que se ruvieron en cuenta, asf como algunos
cayos que presentan zonas boscosas de tierra fire. El
segundo agrupa a 6 cayos ubicados en las regiones occidental
y central del pals, donde la vegetacidn es mis bien del tipo
xeromorfo. y 0l tercero incluye 4 zonas antropizadas (dos
zonas de cultivo y dos zonas de vegetacidn costera).

Results of the numerical classification of 19 bird commu-
nides belonging to an equal number of localities character-
ized by different types of vegetation formations and situated
in different areas of the Cuban Archipelago. are discussed.
We used 162 birds for the study, using the Sorensen similarity
index and the WPGMA grouping method. When we analyzed
the localities affinity, using the obtained dendrogram, we
found a tendency towards grouping in three guilds. The first
group is formed by 9 localities comprising all forest types
used in the study, and some keys with characteristics similar
to mainland forests. The second group comprises 6 keys on
the western and central parts of Cuba. where vegetation is
primarily xeromorphic. The third group includes 4 human-
altered zones (two agricultural and 2 shore zones),

CHANGES IN LOCAL ABUNDANCE AND
HABITAT USE BY THE WHITE-CHEEKED
PINTAIL IN NEW PROVIDENCE ISLAND,
BAHAMAS, 1985-1991
(CANMBIOS EN ABUNDANCIA LOCAL Y USO DEL
HABITAT DEL QUIJADA COLORADA
EN LA ISLA DE NEW PROVIDENCE. BAHAMAS.
DE 1985 A 1991)

B. L. WooDWORaT, J. PORT, F. McKin-EY, A. HAR'm,
L. G. SoRENsoN, AND L. RurrTAN
Janws Ford Bell Museum ofNatural History, University of
Minnesoia, Minneapolis. MN 55455, USA

The White-cheeked Pintail (Anas bahamensis) is distributed
throughout the West Indies, and has experienced population
declines on many islands. We have studied a marked popu-
lations ofpintails on New Providence Island, Bahamas. since
1985. Results of this long-term study have revealed both a
decline in local abundance and a change in the use of the
islands and cays around New Providence. In addition, anec-
dotal evidence suggests that pintails may be more mobile
than previously believed- This paper reviews the species'
historic distribution and abundance, discusses causes of
population decline, changes in local area use, potential for
inter-island movement, and suggests directions for future
research.


Page 12


El pato Quijada Colorada (Anas bahamensis) esta
distribuido por todas las Antillas y ha experimentado un
declive poblacional en varias islas. Estudiamos una poblacidn
marcada de estas ayes en la isla de New Providence. Baha-
mas. desde 1985. Los resultados de este studio a largo plazo
demuestran anto una mermn en la abundancia local, como un
cambio en el uso de las islas y cayos alrededor de New
Providence. Ademas, cierta avidencia anecdotal indica que
estos patos pueden ser rains movibles de lo que se creia
anteriormente.Ese trabajorevisaladistribuci6n y abundancia
actual histdrica, discutelas causasdela mermapoblacional,
cambios en el uso del area local, potencial del movimiento
interisleio, y sugieredireccionespara investigaciones futuras.

DATOS SOBRE LA REPRODUCCION DE
MELANERPES S. SUPERCIALIARIS Y COLAPTES
FERNANDINAE (AVES: PICIDAE) EN LA
CIENAGA DE ZAPATA
(REPRODUCTIVE DATA ON MELANERPES S.
SUPERCIALIARIS AND
COLAPTES FERNANDINAE (AVES: PICIDAE) IN THE
ZAPATA SWAMP)

MAilA E. GARCfA ROMERO
Institute de Ecolog(a y Sistemntica, A.C.C., Ciudad de La
Habana. Cuba

El Carpintero Jabao (Melanerpes s. superciaiaris) es una
subespecie muy comtin y se encuentra bien distribuida por la
mayorisladelArchipidlagoCubano y Cayo Cantiles, mientras
que el Carpintero Churroso (Colaptesfernandinae) es una
especie enddmicaram y tiene una distribuci6n mas restringida.
El objetivo del presente trabajo consiste en aportar algunos
datos sobre la biologfa reproductiva de estas dos ayes en la
Cienaga de Zapata, Provincia de Matanzas. Se estudiaron un
total de 23 nidos de Carpintero Jabado y 2 de Carpintero
Churroso, durante los meses de julio, junio y abril de 1987,
1989 y 1990. respectivamente. Los Arboles que anis utilizan
paranidificarson laPalmaCana(Savalparviflora)y laPalma
Real (Roysionea regia). Ponende tres acincohuevos blancos
y 6valos: ambos padres participan el el cuidado de los
pichones y en la defensa del territorio.

The Cuban Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes s.
superciliaris) is common and widespread throughout the
main islands of the Cuban Archipelago and Cayo Candles,
while the Fernandina's Flicker (Colaptesfernandinae) is a
rare endemic with a more limited distribution. The objective
of this work is to shed some light on the breeding biology of
these two birds in the Zapata Swamp, Matanzas Province. A
total of 23 Cuban Red-bellied Woodpecker nests and 2
Fernandina's Flicker nests were studied during the months of
July 1987, June 1989, and April 1990. The most frequently
used trees for building nests wereCana Palm (Savalparviflora)
and Royal Palm (Roystonea regia). They lay 3 to 5 white.oval
eggs; both parents participate in the breeding and territorial
defense. El Pitirre 6(1)








INTERNATIONAL MIGRATORY BIRD DAY

Saturday, 8 May 1993, will be the First annual International
Migratory Bird Day. On the second Saturday in May each
year, individuals and organizations throughout the Western
Hemisphere will participate in activities dedicated to the
conservation of all migratory birds songbirds, shorebirds.
raptors. and waterfowl. International Migratory Bird Day
will provide a focal point for the numerous conservation
efforts already underway through the Partners in Flight-
Aves de las Americas Program, and will inspire others into
action. The concern of scientists will be taken to the press, the
pu blic, and legislators. Grassrootsorganizers in North America
will join forces with their counterparts in Latin America.
Children will encourage adults to "see" a warbler for the very
first time.

To obtain a workbook of ideas (U.S.$5.00) or to let others
know what you are doing, contact Jamie Doyle. Bird Conser-
vation Specialist, The Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center,
National Zoological Park, Washington., D.C. 20008, U.S.A.
(telephone: 202-673-4908). For more information on the
Partners in Flight Aves do las Americas Program, contact
Peter Stangel. The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation,
1120 Connecticut Avenue. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036.
U.S.A


ORNITHOLOGY JOURNALS AVAILABLE

Ms. Patricia Bradley, SCO Secretary, has recent issues of
several ornithological journals (includinglbis,Auk, Colonial
Waterbirds, American Birds, Florida Naturalist) which she
would like to donate to an interested ornithologist, preferably
in the West Indies. The recipient would need to provide
postage charges. If interested, please contact Jim Wiley or
Ms. Bradley:

Government House
Turks and Caicos Islands
B.W.I.
telephone: 809-946-2309
fax: 809-946-2903

NOTICES
AVAaALrTY oF JOURNAL IssUm NUMBERa 1 AND 2

Many Society members have inquired about obtaining back
issues of the journal, Ornirologia Caribeia. to complete their
sets. Issues number one and two were produced in limited
quantities by the Society of Puerto Rican Ornithology (the
precursor to the Society of Caribbean Ornithology). We have
located a copy of number two from which we can make
photocopies and mail to interested members. If anyone has a
copy of issue number one. please send acopy tome andI will


El Pitirre 6(l)


make additional copies available to members. A suggested
contribution ofU.S.$6.00 to the Society is requested to cover
copying and mailing costs.

Dr. Rosemarie S. Gnam
23 Mount Vernon Ave.
Alexandria, Virginia 2230 1, U.S.A.

REMINDER
1993 MEMBERSHIP DUES

Please check your address label to determine if membership
dues have been paid for 1993. Members who have paid their
1993 dues will have an "M" on the label. Regular member-
ship remains at U.S.$ 15.00.




MEETINGS OF INTEREST

26-29 March 1993-The Endangered Species Coalition and
associated groups will host"Celebrating the diversity of life:
twenty years of the Endangered Species Act," Washington.
D.C., U.S.A. (Randy Snodgrass: telephone 202-547-9009).

15-17 April 1993 -Second conference on Orientation and
Navigation-Birds, Humans and Other Animals,Wadham
College, Oxford University, England. (TheRoyallnstitute of
Navigation, 1 Kensington Gore, London SW7 2AT, En-
gland).

29 April-1 May 1993-The Wilson Ornithological Society.
University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. (Alex
Middleton, Zoology Department, University of Guelph,
Guelph, Ontario N 1G 2W1, Canada).

7-9 May 1993 Association of Systematic Collections,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. (ASC, 730 11th Street,
N.W.. Washington, D.C. 20001, U.S.A. Telephone: 202-
347-2850, fax: 202-347-0072).

7-12 June 1993 The Society for the Preservation of
Natural History Collections, annual meeting, Royal British
Columbia Museum, Victoria, British Columbia. (Grant
Hughes, Royal British Columbia Museum, 675 Belleville
SL.Victoria,British Columbia, V8V 1X4,Canada.Telephone:
604-387-5706).

8-13 June 1993 The American Ornithologists' Union,
Fairbanks, Alaska, U.S.A. (Edward C. Murphy, Institute of
Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks. Alaska
99775-0180, U.SA).

24-30 July 1993- Animal Behavior Society, University of
California, Davis, California. U.S.A. (Benjamin Hart, De-
Page 13








parent of Physiology, School of Veteminary Medicine,
University of Califomia. Davis, California 95616, U.S.A.).

29 July-6 August 1992 The Society of Caribbean Orni-
thology, Cienaga de Zapata. Cuba. (Catherine Levy. 2
Starlight Ave., Kingston 6. Jamaica).

15-21 August 1993 International Union of Game Bi-
ologists XXI Congress, Halifax. Canada. Theme. "Forest/
Wildlife and Biodiversity...Toward the 21st Century." (ID.
Thompson. Forestry Canada, Box 6028. SL John's. New-
foundland, Canada AIC 5X8. Telephone: 709-772-4903.
fax: 709-772-2576 [Canada code= 1]).

15-21 August 1993 Asia-Pacific Symposium on Man.
grove Ecosystems, Hong Kong. (Linda Yam, Conference
Secretariat, Research Centre, Hong Kong University of
Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong
Kong).

21-26 June 1994 The American Ornithologists' Union,
The Cooper Ornithological Society, and The Wilson
Ornithological Society, joint meeting, University of Mon-
tana, Missoula, Montana, U.S.A.

Early July [tentatively] 1994 Animal Behavior Society,
University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. U.S.A.

21-27 August 1994 XXI International Ornithological
Congress, Vienna. Austria. (Interconvendon.A-1450Vienna,
Austria).


'THE SOCIETY OF CARIBBEAN ORNITHOLOGY

President: Mrs. Catherine Levy. 2 Starlight Ave.,
Kingston 6. Jamaica

Vice President: Dr. Joseph Wunderle, Jr.. Institute of
Tropical Forestry, P.O. Box 8. Palmer, Puerto
Rico 00721

Secretary: Ms. Patricia F. Bradley, Government House,
Turks and Caicos Islands, West Indies
FAX: 809-946-2903

Treasurer, Dr. Rosemarie Gnam, 23 Mount Vernon
Ave., Alexandria, Virginia 22301, U.S.A.




SOCIETY OFFICERS FOR 1993-1994

Because only one nomination for an officer (re-election) was
received, the present Society officers will continue in their
respective posts for the next two years.


Florida Ornithological Society Special Pblicaion No. 5


WEST INDIAN Bua RECORDs iN A iERcAN Bnms AND Auuroi FILD NOTES
(1947-1990): SPECIES INDEX BY ISLANDS

by

Robert W. Lofti .

This is a taxonomically anangedspecies index to records of birds from 125 islands and keys of the West Indies (including
Bermuda) published in American Birds and itspredeces Auudu eldNotesolumesthrough 44 Included arerec'rds
from seasonal reports,: articles, and photographs. Records are listed byislands, with onlyrecordspertaining toa particular
island included. Islands are listed alphabetically uider five regional headings: Bermuda; Bahama Islands, Greater Antilles.
Lesser Antilles, and Southern Islands. An alphabetic index to the islands, as well as an index of Christmas Bird Counts are
Sapped ed. .. : :: : .: : .: : :..;: i:::: ..: :-: .: : .:.:

1992. 90pp. Paper.

Copies are available at $8.00 (USD)plus $1.00 for shipping and handling from Jim Wiley, Society of Caribbean
Ornithology. 2201 Ashland SL, Ruston, Louisiana 71270, U.SA.


Page 14


El Pitirrie 6()








Contents (continued)
ABSTRACTS OF PAP' PRESENTED AT THE 1992 ANNUAL MEETING OF THE SocaMrr oF CARIBBEAN OtwrrtOOOY (continued)
Fmftr RzLEASE OF PUERFM RICAN PLAIN PIGEON COwMA JNORNATA WATMORF. Carlos R. Rutr-Lebr6n and
J.uan Morales Rfos ............ ......... 6
BIRD CONSERVATION IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: A MANAGEMENT PrnsPinvE. Howard Nelson ..... .,,..... 7
CONSERVATION OF TIE RED-TAILED AMAZoN (AMAZONA BRA$ittEts) Iw SottnjEArRN BRAZIL Martuscelli and P.
Scherer Ne;o .......................... 7.......______._.__ __._ .
ComNDUCTAS REPRODUCI.VAS Y DESARROLLO MORFOLOGICO EN CAUITVERI DE LA CoTORRA ,DE LA HSPANlOLA (ALAZ0NA
vewrAu.s). Simon Guerrero ............................ ... ........... ....
LMPROVED CAPTURE TECHNIQUES FOR PsrrrAGNEs. J. Michael Meyers. ......., .... .
CoMMtuNY INVOLVEME- r IN THE CONSERVATION OF THE RED-TA.ED AMA20N IN SouniMASTERN BRaL.
Miriam Milanelo .... .
PROMO1nNo PROTECTION THROUGH PRIDE. Monique Clarke.... 9
AN Lr' oDUcnoN TO AvIAN MwEDiNE AND EMERGENCY CARE wmi EMPHASIS ON THE GENUS AMAZONA.
Ana B. Arnizut .. .............. .........,.................. 9
ESTADO DE LAS POBLACIONES CUBANAS DE COTORRA (AMAZONA LEUCOCEPHALA) Y CRIA EN CALUTIMVERIO.
Hirdm Gonzdlez, Marfa E. Garc(a Romero y Esteban Godindz .......... .......... ....._ .... 9
RESULTADOS PREUMINARES DEL PROyacrO NAcIONAL PARA A CONSERVATION DE LA COTORRA CUBANA (AMAZONA
LEUCOCEPHALA LUVCOCEPHAA). Xiomara Gdlvez-Aguilera, V. Berovides, A. Lldnes, R. Martinez y
O. Pimnee .... 10
BANAN.AQUIT VocAL BEiAVIOR IN A HnGH DENsrrY POruAtnon. Nidia 1. Ramos, OscarJ. Vdzquez, and
Joseph M. Wunderle, Jr. .... ..........,.......................... 10
CONSERVATION NEEDS FOi THE AMAZON PARRaTS OF JAMAICA. Wendy van erneveld..... .................. 11
REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF THE BAHAMA PARROT AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ITS CONSERVAnTON. Rosemarie S. Gnam
and Robert F. Rockwell-_. ....I..__....__ ,. .____ 11
CLASImcAcION NUMERICA oD ALwuNAs CoMuNIDAuEs ov AVES DEL ARCHIPELAGO CBAN'o, M.E. Garcia Romero y
Laredo Gonzdle: ............. .. .11
CHANoGES IN LocAL ABUNDANc AND HABI-AT USE BY TfE W m-CmEKED PINTAR. IN NEW PROVMDENCe IslgW,
BAHAMAS, 1985-1991. BL. Woodworth, J. Port, F. McKinney, A. Harth, L.G. Sorenson, and L. Ruttan ....... 12
DATos SoaRe LA REPRoDuccION e MELANEPs s. SUPECLUA US Y CoLAFtES FRNANDiAtE (Avns: PlM ) EN LA
CIENAGA DE ZAPATA. Marfa E. Garcfa Romero ........... ... ............. ......... ....................... 12

INTERNATIONAL MIGRATORY BImD DAY .................... ........_........ 13
ORNrmoro JoUa NAR -s AVA Bu3........ .- ..... ... .. ... ......... .......... .. 13
NOTICES .. ........ ............ ............. ... ....... 13
ME O RST ........... ... ........ ... ........ ....... ....... 1
SomErY OF ICERS F tOR 1993-1994 .......... .. _........ .. .. ................ ......... ......... .... ............... 14


El Pitinc 5(3)


Pige 15




























From; Dr. James W. Wiley
2201 Ashland St.
Ruston, Louisiana 71279. U.S.A.


FIRST CLASS
PRINTED MATTER




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