<%BANNER%>
Jefferson County journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100099/00092
 Material Information
Title: Jefferson County journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: ECB Publishing Co.
Place of Publication: Monticello, Florida
Publication Date: 06-08-2012
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00100099:00092

Full Text
WATERMINELON FESTIVAL

IGICS-OFF TiIS WEEKEND!


ouml


50 0 46 +40


Friday, June 8, 2012


-A mPPI1~'F"~t
I -


Photo Courtsey of myFWC.com


Lake Drawdown


Starts Wednesday


GOAL IS TO

REVITALIZE MICCOSUKEE
LAZARO ALEMAN
ECB Publishing
Senior Staff Writer
State officials opened the north and south gates
of Lake Miccosukee on Wednesday morning, June 6,
beginning a planned drawdown that should dry the
greater part of 6,100-acre lake to allow for burning of
the excess vegetation and removal of the muck that
has accumulated on the lake bottom over the years.
Wednesday's action followed on the heels of the
public hearing that representatives of the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC)
held the previous evening in the courthouse annex to
explain to local residents the purpose of project, an-
swer questions and address concerns.
"It went well," FWC biologist Charlie Mesing
said Wednesday of the public hearing. "Everyone
Please See LAKE DRAWDOWNPage 3


BY EMERALD GREENE
This Monday evening, June 11, at 6 p.m., the Jef-
ferson County School Board will take a vote to decide
on whether they should leave Veteran's Day a paid
holiday or to remove it from the calendar and make
Martin Luther King Day a paid holiday
At this point in time, Martin Luther King Day is
a holiday, and workers do not have to show up to
work, however, it is not a paid holiday. Also, Vet-
eran's Day is a normal work day but is considered a
paid holiday
In my opinion, Monday will be a sad, sad day, in
Jefferson County The veterans of our country al-
ready are not given the proper respect that they de-
serve by Americans and now, the Jefferson County
School Board members are following suit.
The reason that these five commissioners (and all
the citizens of this county) have the freedom to vote,
make decisions and live without fear is BECAUSE OF
OUR VETERANS. The reason we can all wake up and
go to whatever church we want, read a non-govern-
mental controlled newspaper, have the right to bear
arms, etc. is BECAUSE OF OUR VETERANS!
Now, apparently certain people in Jefferson
County are trying to "pressure" others by basically
saying, "This day isn't important enough to be recog-
nized" and what is astonishing to me is the fact that
this pressure tactic has actually made it far enough
to be considered and about to be voted on. Where are
the backbones that should be standing up for our
country and what it was founded on (and the veterans
who fought and died for our freedoms)?
This editorial is NOT about having the paid hol-
iday moved to Martin Luther King Day This editorial
is about taking away the respect that we SHOULD
have for our Veterans and for Veterans Day. We ALL
should have that respect.
I was raised to love God and country and to re-
spect my country, flag and what it stood for. I was
raised to respect the veterans of this country and
show the respect that they deserve. Too few people
are raised in this manner any more, and it has taken
its toll on America. Monday evening at 6 p.m. is a
prime example of this.
I encourage everyone to call their school board
member and voice an opinion on honoring those who
have served and those who have fought for us, or feel
free to join the School Board meeting Monday
evening, June 11, at 6 p.m. It is a public meeting.
These five (5) members are supposed to be our voice.
You elected them to voice your opinion, so let your
opinion be known.
So as I see it..... there are actually three choices
for Monday evening.
SLeave the school calendar as it is
SVote to make Veteran's Day become a "non-
work" day It is already a paid holiday so just make
it so no one works on that day. (And remember....
Martin Luther King Day is a holiday on the school
calendar, already.)
S Or take away the Veterans Day holiday
While you're at it, slap every veteran in Jefferson
County (and the United States of America) in the face
and tell them, "You're just not important anymore."


1 Section 14 Pages
3-9 School & Sports 10
12 Outdoors 11 & 14
13 Viewpoints 2


2 CRASHES RESULT IN CRITICAL INJURIES


MAN CRITICALLY

INJURED IN CRASH
FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
A man was critically injured in a single-vehicle
crash over the weekend.
Florida Highway Patrol reported that on Sunday
June 3 at 12:15 a.m., Lucious Charles Lingo, 22, of La-
mont, was driving a 2002 Chevrolet pickup truck trav-
eling westbound on County Road 250, west of Upper
Cody Road.
As the vehicle entered a curve it traveled onto the
north shoulder of the road.
After leaving the roadway Lingo overcorrected
the vehicle to the left, causing it to rotate counter-
clockwise back across both lanes of travel.
After leaving the roadway a second time Lingo
over corrected the vehicle to the right, causing the ve-
hicle to rotate clockwise on the south shoulder of the
roadway
At which point, the vehicle began overturning,
ejecting Lingo onto the roadway
The vehicle came to a final rest on its roof par-
tially on the south shoulder facing north.
Lingo was transported to Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital for treatment of critical injuries.
Lingo was not wearing a seatbelt and whether the
crash in alcohol-related or not is pending.
The vehicle sustained $8,000 damage.
Assisting DHP on the scene were the Jefferson
County Sheriff's Office, Jefferson County Fire Res-
cue/EMS, the Leon County Sheriff's Office and Leon
County Fire Rescue/EMS.


WOMAN CRITICAL

INJURED IN CASH
FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
A woman was critically injured in a single-ve-
hicle crash over the weekend.
Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) reported that
on Sunday, June 3 at 10:38 p.m., Renee Clark, 33, of
Monticello was driving a 2004 Chevrolet Trail
blazer traveling westbound on Upper Cody Road at
an unsafe speed.
Clark crossed over a wooden bridge and began
to lose control of the vehicle, which traveled to the
southern edger of the roadway and began to rotate
clockwise.
The vehicle began to travel in a northwesterly
direction and exited the roadway on the north
shoulder, where the front of vehicle collided with
a tree and rotated clockwise striking a second tree
with its left side.
The vehicle came to a rest facing in a north-
westerly direction.
Clark was transported to Tallahassee Memo-
rial Hospital for treatment of critical injuries.
FHP deemed that the crash was alcohol-re-
lated and charges are pending.
Clark was wearing a seatbelt. The vehicle sus-
tained $6,000 damage.
FHP was assisted on the scene by Jefferson
County Fire Rescue/EMS and the Jefferson
County Sheriff's Office.


City Moving Forward On


$6.2M Federal Loan/Grant

I MONEYIS FOR NEW SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT I


The Monticello City Council
this week advanced another step
on its long and arduous journey to
secure millions of dollars in fed-
eral funding for construction of a
new treatment plant.
On Tuesday evening, June 5,
the council approved a resolution
that serves as a necessary step to
authorize the issuance of bonds in
an amount not to exceed $4,715,000
to finance a portion of the plant's
construction cost. The resolution,
in fact, is a supplement to a reso-
lution the council adopted last
June.
All city officials could say
about this latest measure was that
it was a procedural requirement
of Rural Development (RD), the
agency within the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture that is han-
dling the city's application.
"We're ready to go out for bids
and this is one of the procedures
we have to go through to go for-
ward with the project," was the
extent of City Manager Steve
Wingate's explanation to the coun-
cil.
To which comment City Clerk
and Treasurer Emily Anderson
added that a court proceeding
would follow the resolution. Not


even City Attorney Bruce Lein-
back, however, could say what ex-
actly that court proceeding or the
overall process entailed.
Suffice it to say that it's a re-
quirement the city must meet if it
wants to receive the funding; that
ultimately was all the advice that
the council members received.
Anderson said afterwards
that it would probably be only a
few more months before the city
receives the go-ahead to advertise
for bids. Given that the process
has been going on for more than a
year, however, a wait of several
months must appear a relatively
short period to officials by this
point.
It was in July 2011 that the
council learned the city had been
awarded $6.2 million for the con-
struction of a treatment plant,
with $4,715,000 in the form of a
low-interest loan and $1,540,800 an
outright grant.
That announcement came fol-
lowing the council's approval of a
first resolution the previous
month.
As RD area specialist Mary
Gavin explained it to the council
in June 2011, adoption of the ini-
tial resolution constituted an obli-


gation that did not incur immedi-
ate costs to the city Those costs
would come later, when the city
actually closed on the loan, a step
she said was likely to occur a year
or more in the future.
The 40-year loan that the city
is in the process of securing car-
ries an interest rate of 3.3750 per-
cent, with the first payment
scheduled to come due on the
Sept. 1 immediately following the
loan closing, and with subsequent
payments coming due each Sept. 1
thereafter. Rural Development cal-
culates the city's payments on the
$4.7 million loan will be $222,030
annually.
According to a previous
breakdown of the project's esti-
mated costs, $4,950,000 will go for
development of the treatment
plant; $20,000 will go to the fiscal
agent; $54,000 will go for legal fees;
$163,000 for interest; $573,800 for
engineering services; and $495,000
for "contingencies".
The funding conditions re-
quire that, prior to the start of
construction on the plant or the
closing of the loan, the city must
provide evidence or certification
Please See LOAN/GRANT
Page 3


CITY OFFICIALS GREEN LIGHT


DEMOLITION OF RARE DOOR


LAZARO ALEMAN
ECB Publishing
Senior Staff Writer
The plan calling for
the renovation, restora-
tion and redevelopment
of the group of historic
buildings anchored by
what was formerly Jack-
son's Drug Store in the
downtown district has
now reached the point of
action.
Following on the rec-
ommendation of the His-
toric Design Review
Board, the Monticello
City Council on Tuesday
evening, June 5, voted
unanimously to allow


Fri 8

Variable clouds with scattered
showers and thunderstorms,
mainly in the aft


the demolition of the
fire-damaged building
formerly housing the
Rare Door Restaurant.
As Mark Kessler, of
Kessler Construction
LLC, explained it to the
Historic Design Review
Board the previous
week, the demolition is
intended to restore the
block "to a more histori-
cally correct condition".
Kessler is the contractor
whose company will do
the demolition.
In his letter of appli-
cation to the city, Kessler
Please See RARE
DOOR Page 3


T .


Sat 88/0

Scattered thunderstorms. Hghs in
Ih p upper 80s and lows in the low
70s.


IIt


IT.


Sun 79/0
6/10
, iii iaij r lih J i .rr, i, Highs in
tl'? u:pe' 70s and lows in the low
70s.


Mon 85/70
611
A few thunderstorms possible.
Highs in the mid 80s and lows in
the low 70s.


"E l'-,..
r. vjI
1;2 r U
I ~~ V- rM


Tue 86/70
6/12
Scattered thunderstorms. g in
the mid 80s and ows in the low
70s.


,100
.'


i.t i


r ~rct: ~TYY"4~4EL~y~






2 Jefferson Col


www.ecbpublishing.com


Friday, June 8, 2012


viewpoints & opinions


Letters to the Editor are typed wordfor word, commafor comma, as sent to this newspaper.


1895 8th GRADE FINAL EXAM VS FCAT


Dear Editor:
As we read of the in-
creasingly disappointing
results of Florida's Public
Education System perhaps
a look at some past exam-
ples of "education require-
ments" in these United
States can serve as beacons
to guide us back to the
right path. It appears that
quality of public education
is inversely proportional to
money spent, students
passed from grade to grade
without being able to com-
plete the course work but
they are made to feel good
about themselves!
Schools should stop
trying to create the perfect
socialist human (the Sovi-
ets tried that for 70 years
and it didn't work!) and
concentrate on teaching
basic reading, writing, and
arithmetic. Armed with a
solid foundation in learn-
ing the students will be
able to figure out what is
important and what to ig-
nore as mankind have
done for millennia.
Though not perfect, we
have managed to move
from the cave to the pent-
house, from hunting/gath-
ering to producing surplus
food without all the social
conditioning to which kids
are now subjected.
With regards,
9ack SheAl&q


Remember when
grandparents and great-
grandparents stated that
they only had an 8th grade
education? Well, check this
out. Could any of us have
passed the 8th grade in
1895?
This is the eighth-
grade final exam from 1895
in Salina, Kansas, USA. It
was taken from the origi-
nal document on file at the
Smokey Valley Genealogi-
cal Society And Library in
Salina and reprinted by
the Salina Journal.
8th Grade Final Exam:
Salina, KS- 1895
Grammar (Time, one hour)
1. Give nine rules for
the use of capital letters.
2. Name the parts of
speech and define those
that have no modifica-
tions.
3. Define verse, stanza
and paragraph.
4. What are the princi-
pal parts of a verb? Give
principal parts of 'lie,
"play' and 'run.'
5. Define case; illus-
trate each case.
6 What is punctua-
tion? Give rules for princi-
pal marks of punctuation.
7- 10. Write a composi-
tion of about 150 words
and show therein that you
understand the practical
use of the rules of gram-
mar.
Arithmetic


The community is invited to join in
the celebration. Guest speakers are
Rev. Isiah Montgomery from Perry
and Allen Dickey from Tallahassee.
Guest choir will be from the Oak
Grove Missionary Baptist Church
in Boston, GA. Our young males
will be the main focus of the pro-
gram. Rev. Ernest Bruton, pastor.
JUNE 10
Casa Bianca Missionary Baptist
Church will celebrate its 138th An-
niversary on Sunday beginning
with church school at 9:30 a.m. Pas-
tor Ben Ransom, Jr. and Sweetfield
Missionary Baptist Church will be
guest pastor and congregation at the
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship Serv-
ice. Pastor Isaac Manning, Jr. and
Bethpage Missionary Baptist
Church will be guest pastor and con-
gregation at 3:00 p.m. "We are re-
questing your presence to come and
help us lift the name of the Lord.
Yours in Christ," Tobbie Berrian III,
pastor/teacher. For more informa-
tion contact Burnette Thompson at
850-997-4484.
JUNE 10-15
Memorial Missionary Baptist
Church/Rev. Dr. James B. Duval, and
Fellowship Missionary Baptist
Church/Rev. Dr. Melvin Roberts,
will host a Community Revival, 7
p.m. Sunday through Friday at Me-
morial MBC on Martin Luther King
Avenue at Second Street. Guest
speaker will be Rev. Simon Simmons
Sr, pastor of Wilson Chapel Mission-
ary Baptist Church in Cairo, GA.
Music will be provided by the Memo-
rial Youth Choir, Memorial Senior
Choir and the Fellowship Choir.
Come to receive a blessing. For more
information call 850-878-9613.
JUNE 11-15
First United Methodist Church will
hold 'SonRock Kids Camp' Vacation
Bible School Monday through Fri-
day beginning at 9 a.m. For more in-


(Time,1 hour 15 minutes)
1. Name and define the
fundamental rules of
Arithmetic.
2. A wagon box is 2 ft.
deep, 10 feet long, and 3 ft.
wide. How many bushels
of wheat will it hold?
3. If a load of wheat
weighs 3,942 lbs., what is it
worth at 50cts/bushel, de-
ducting 1,050 lbs. for tare?
4. District No 33 has a
valuation of $35,000.. What
is the necessary levy to
carry on a school seven
months at $50 per month,
and have $104 for inciden-
tals?
5. Find the cost of
6,720 lbs. coal at $6.00 per
ton.
6. Find the interest of
$512.60 for 8 months and 18
days at 7 percent.
7. What is the cost of
40 boards 12 inches wide
and 16 ft. long at $20 per
metre?
8. Find bank discount
on $300 for 90 days (no
grace) at 10 percent.
9. What is the cost of a
square farm at $15 per
acre, the distance of which
is 640 rods?
10. Write a bank
check, a promissory note,
and a receipt
U.S. History
(Time, 45 minutes)
1. Give the epochs into
which U.S. History is di-
vided


formation, call Rev. Wayne Cook at
850-997-5545.
JUNE 11-15
Wacissa United Methodist Church
will hold 'Operation Overboard' Va-
cation Bible School Monday through
Friday, ending with a program and
water celebration. Each night will
begin with a meal at 5:30 p.m., every-
one is invited to come and enjoy
what God is doing in the lives of our
young people. Pastor Jim Gamble.
JUNE 11-15
First Baptist Church of Lloyd will
hold 'Amazing Wonders Aviation'
Vacation Bible School Monday
through Friday beginning each
night with a meal at 6 p.m. Pre-reg-
istration is not required. For more
information call 850-997-5309.
JUNE 12
Sons of Allen of the Union Bethel
Circuit meets monthly on the sec-
ond Tuesday from 7 to 8 p.m., rotat-
ing between the Elizabeth and
Union Bethel AME churches. En-
couraging young men and older
males to come be part of the meet-
ings. If you have any questions, con-
tact President Leman Ulee at
850-274-6268.
JUNE 14
Bible Study is held at 7 p.m. every
Thursday at the Lloyd Woman's
Club. Join with Elder Linda D. Ross
for an evening of Christian faith.
For more information contact her at
850-322-3424.
JUNE 17
Welaunee Missionary Baptist
Church, located at 75 Avalon Side
Road, will celebrate its 35th Home-
coming. The event will begin at 9:45
a.m. with Sunday School; and Morn-
ing Worship at 11 a.m. Elder Ervin
Donaldson, pastor of Zion Hill PB
Church of Sopchoppy, will deliver
the message. Everyone is invited to
attend. Elder Herbert R. Thomas,
Sr. Travelin' Shoes, pastor.


NTY JOURNAL
Established 2007
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed
for the express reading pleasures of the people of its
circulation area, be they past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing, Inc., 180
West Washington St. Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals
p postage PAID at the Post Office in Monticello, Florida
32345.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
MONTICELLO NEWS, P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL
32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any ad-
vertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the
opinion of the management, will not be for the best in-
terest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper,
and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB Publishing, Inc. for publica-
tion in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6
months from the date they are dropped off. ECB
Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond
Said deadline.


6. Give two uses of
silent letters in spelling. Il-
lustrate each.
7. Define the following
prefixes and use in connec-
tion with a word: bi, dis-
mis, pre, semi, post, non,
inter, mono, sup.
8. Mark diacritically
and divide into syllables
the following, and name
the sign that indicates the
sound: card, ball, mercy,
sir, odd, cell, rise, blood,
fare, last.
9. Use the following
correctly in sentences:
cite, site, sight, fane, fain,
feign, vanes vain, vein,
raze, raise, rays.
10. Write 10 words fre-
quently mispronounced
and indicate pronuncia-
tion by use of diacritical
marks And by syllabica-
tion.
Geography
(Time, one hour)
1 What is climate?
Upon what does climate
depend?
2. How do you account
for the extremes of climate
in Kansas ?
3. Of what use are
rivers? Of what use is the
ocean?
4. Describe the moun-
tains of North America.


2. Give an account of
the discovery of America
by Columbus.
3. Relate the causes
and results of the Revolu-
tionary War.
4. Show the territorial
growth of the United
States.
5. Tell what you can of
the history of Kansas.
6. Describe three of
the most prominent battles
of the Rebellion.
7. Who were the fol-
lowing: Morse, Whitney
Fulton, Bell, Lincoln,
Penn, and Howe?
8. Name events con-
nected with the following
dates:1607, 1620, 1800, 1849,
1865.
Orthography
(Time, one hour)
[Do we even know what
this is??]
1. What is meant by
the following: alphabet,
phonetic, orthography, ety-
mology syllabication?
2. What are elemen-
tary sounds? How classi-
fied?
3. What are the follow-
ing, and give examples of
each: trigraph, subvocals,
diphthong, cognate letters,
linguals.
4. Give four substi-
tutes for caret 'U.' (HUH?)
5. Give two rules for
spelling words with final
'e.' Name two exceptions
under each rule.


JUNE 8
New Hope Ministries Church of
God will host a Blood Drive from 12
to 6 p.m. on Friday in the Winn
Dixie parking lot on South Jeffer-
son. Free lunch will be served to all
donors. For more information con-
tact the Southeastern Community
Blood Center at 850-877-7181. Donors
will also receive a 'Save A Life' t-
shirt.
JUNE 8
Tent of the Holy Guests offers
prayer for the sick and a special
scripture message every Friday at
7:30 p.m. The Tent is located at 295
West Palmer Mill in Monticello.
JUNE 9
Mt. Olive AME Church will hold its
Father's Day Program at 3 p.m. on
Saturday. All are welcome to come
and participate. Rev. Clifford Hill
Sr., pastor.
JUNE 9
C.H. Henry Chapter #20 OES, PHA
invites the community to come and
enjoy the taste of fresh mullet
and/or fresh tilapia beginning at 10
a.m. on Saturday in the parking lot
of the Monticello News. The
fundraiser will offer fish sand-
wiches and dinners for sale. Con-
tact Althera Johnson at 850-933-2012
for preorders and more informa-
tion.
JUNE 9 AND 10
Memorial Missionary Baptist
Church invites the community to its
annual Youth Fun Day from 12 to 3
p.m. on Saturday Come enjoy food,
games and lots of fun in the church
parking lot. On Sunday, the Youth
Department will hold its Youth Day
Program at 11 a.m. Pastor Corey
King of Thomasville, Georgia will
be the speaker.
JUNE 10
Philadelphia Missionary Baptist
Church will hold its first 100 Men In
Black program at 3 p.m. on Sunday


JEFFERSON COUI


Emerald Greene
Publisher/Owner


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
Deadline for classified is Monday at 3:00 p.m. for Wednesday's paper,
and Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. for Friday's paper.
Deadline for Legal Advertisement is Monday at 3:00 p.m. for Wednesday's
paper, and Wednesday at 3 p.m. for Friday's paper.
There will be a 1000 charge for Affidavits.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Subscription Rates:
Florida $45 per year
Out-of-State $52 per year


5. Name and describe
the following: Monrovia,
Odessa, Denver, Manitoba
, Hecla, Yukon, St. Helena,
Juan Fernandez, Aspin-
wall and Orinoco.
6. Name and locate the
principal trade centers of
the U.S. Name all the re-
publics of Europe and give
the capital of each.
8. Why is the Atlantic
Coast colder than the Pa-
cific in the same latitude?
9. Describe the process
by which the water of the
ocean returns to the
sources of rivers.
10. Describe the move-
ments of the earth. Give
the inclination of the
earth.
NOTICE THAT THE
EXAM TOOK FIVE
HOURS TO COMPLETE.
Gives the saying 'he
only had an 8th grade edu-
cation a whole new mean-
ing, doesn't it?!
No wonder they
dropped out after 8th grade.
They already knew more
than they needed to know!
No, I don't have all the
answers! And I don't think
I ever did!


The Big Bend Horseman's Association will host an
Open Horse Show at the College Park Arena beginning
at 9 a.m. on Saturday, June 9. Halter, English, Gaited,
Western and Speed will be judged by Dara Strickland.
High Point awards for English, Western and High Point
of the Day! Helmets are encouraged for all riders and re-
quired for any child under 16 years of age. The show is
PAC (APHA) and OHSA sanctioned. The address is 2729
West Washington just west of downtown Monticello.
There will be concessions on site. This show is sure to
be well attended.
With the school year winding down and summer
fast approaching, your mentoring relationship may also
be coming to an end. Though the thought of ending this
relationship can trigger some very mixed emotions, it is
also a time of celebration and reflection on your experi-
ences together. Spending one day a week for the whole
school year is a long time together. As summer ends this
regular time together, talk about all the things you've
learned together and celebrate by creating a nurturing,
visual or tangible memento together which reminds the
student of your time together. Be willing to stay in-
volved in the student's life in a meaningful way. And, is
the process gets tough... remember that that separation
is a big part of life's learning. A caring ending is also a
very important gift to a student.
Summer Bible Day Camp, sponsored by the God
Squad Power Club, will be offered at the Jefferson
County Bailar Public Library Camp will be held from 11
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday's beginning on June 16
through July 28. The subject of the camp is to make
Jesus real to children. Children are hungry for a real
God and need to be captured before their teen years. For
more information call 850-997-0832 or 850-997-8018 after
2 p.m.
Sustainable Agriculture Programs Manager Claire
Mitchell invites the community to the Tomato Feastival
beginning at 4 p.m. on Sunday, June 10, at Turkey Hill
Farm, 3546 Baum Road in Tallahassee. Last year, Katie
Harris of Full Earth Farm was the first place winner of
the 'Ugliest Tomato' prize. What is the Tomato Feastival
you say? Well it's a party to celebrate the High Spring
Season. And, it's a fundraiser for the Red Hills Small
Farm Alliance. The tomato contest has lots of categories
for many entries. This year Green Industries Institute
will participate, as well as other local farmers. A cake-
walk will be held, with lots of good treats to select from
should you be a winner. There will be a Silent Auction,
with only eclectic items. And, you've got to try the
Paella, a delicious Spanish seafood dish prepared by
family and friends in a huge pan. There will also be a
veggie version! The feast of a covered dish dinner can
be enjoyed under the pecan trees in the front of the GII
facility Since this is a fundraiser, it does cost to get in.
The cost is $5 to $15 per person, on a sliding scale. The
festivities
Just a reminder about the County Relay For Life
Wrap-Up Celebration and Recognition Ceremony on
Monday, June 11, beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Beau
Turner Youth Conservation Center, on South Jefferson
Street. This will be a 'potluck' meal, so bring a little
something to share. For more information contact Coor-
dinator Dana Lastinger at 508-2174.


80 West Washington
Street
Monticello, Florida



P.O. Box
32345
850-997-3568
Fax 850-997-3774
Email: monticellonews
@embarqrnall.com -A


~I~ILIXF~Xt~ ~Yr~Er~VrS~





Jefferson County Journal 3


e


Loan/Grant


that the sewer system maintain this reserve
serves 1,293 customers, fund over the life of the
1,075 of them residential loan, or at least until the
and 218 commercial. equivalent of one annual
Also as part of the installment has been re-
RD loan requirements, served. This reserve is
the city must establish required to establish an
and fund a debt service emergency fund for
reserve fund equal to 10 emergency maintenance
percent of the annual and repairs and debt re-
payments, or $22,203 an- payment should the need
nually The city must arise.


Rare Door


said the demolition would apply
only to structures that were addi-
tions to the original historic build-
ings.
"The exact date that these
building additions were con-
structed cannot be determined,
but they appear to have been built
between 1929 and 1966," he wrote.
"The Jefferson County Building
Department has no building
records prior to 1978. A map at the
Jefferson County Public Library
dated 1929 shows the building lay-
out in the downtown area with no
reference to the building that we
are requesting to demolish."
Kessler provided paperwork to
show that a structural engineer
had twice visited the site and de-
termined that the Rare Door build-
ing could be taken down safely and
separately, without adverse effect
to the remaining buildings.
"The engineer will visit the
site a third time after we have com-
pleted a separation of the build-
ings to inspect and ensure that
there are no structural deficien-


continued from page 1


Additionally, the city
must deposit $7,000 per
year in an asset manage-
ment reserve for short-
lived assets.
The reason the city
is building a new treat-
ment plant is because of
structural problems
with the old plant that
arose out of its defective


that its walls are bowing
and in danger of collaps-
ing, apparently the cause
of structural problems
in its construction that
the city's engineer at the
time failed to catch.
The city's new engi-
neers have offered assur-
ance that the new plant
should last a minimum


construction. Meaning of 50 years.


cies," Kessler said. "Then we will
proceed with the complete build-
ing demolition."
Kessler said once the Rare
Door structure and a small portion
of the Jackson Drug Store build-
ing were demolished, the appro-
priate steps would be taken to
make the exposed facades of the
remaining buildings presentable
and historically accurate. He indi-
cated that these steps would in-
clude the addition of doors and
windows that matched those exist-
ing on the buildings.
Likewise, he said, finishing
details would be undertaken to
close in the roof, soffit and fascia,
making the roof system exposed
by the demolition functionally and
aesthetically compatible with the
other buildings.
"This project gives the com-
munity an opportunity to restore
a portion of our city to its histori-
cal condition," Kessler said. "The
buildings have been hidden from
view by a structure that adds no
historical charm to the surround-


continued from page 1


ing buildings. We hope our project
will encourage other property
owners to invest in the mainte-
nance and preservation of their
historical properties."
The goal is to attract viable
shops to the area and ultimately
reinvigorate the downtown area.
The partners in the venture are
Main Street Monticello, the Jeffer-
son County Historical Society and
Tracey and Charles Jackson, own-
ers of many of the affected build-
ings.
The idea first surfaced offi-
cially at the February meeting of
the City Council; it was Jack Car-
swell who raised it.
As Carswell described it the
plan then, it also called for the re-
moval of the parking lot just north
of the Rare Door and conversion
of this space into a public plaza
and patio.
"We think this project can
spark redevelopment in the down-
town area," Carswell said at the
time. "We think this is within our
grasp."


U>
mi~j---l
it


IR



i


JEFFERSON COUNTY

SCHOOL BOARD

TRANSPORTATION

DEPARTMENT SUMMER

SCHOOL ROUTE

SCHEDULE FOR 2012

** STARTING TIME 6:00 A.M. **

BUS #1
DRIVER: MAZIE WHITE 0828
PINNEY WOODS & CR 158 NORTH END'- CHURCH
CHRISTMAS ACRES AT TAYLOR RD. & CR 158
LLOYD ACRES at CR 158
LAWRENCE STORE INTERSECTION CR 158 & SR 59
ST. PHILLIP INTERSECTION CR 59 & ST. AUGUSTINE
BOLAND STORE WACISSA
WALKER SPRING RD. & SR 259
WALKER STORE-WAUKEENAH
REAMS STORE-LAMONT
END OF JORDAN RD AT PECAN HOUSE
JEFFERSON PLACE APTS. & WAUKEENAH ST.


BUS #2
DRIVER: CHRISTINE FORD- 12-49
NORTH END OF WEST LAKE & LAKE RD.
PARKWAY PINES
ASHVILLE HWY. & CLARK RD.
NORTH END OF BASSETT DAIRY & ASHVILLE HWY.
ASHVILLE HWY & DEERWOOD IAUCILLA SHORES)
END OF ASHVILLE HWY SR 221 TURN AROUND
KWIKY MART AUCILLA
1976 E. WASHINGTON ST.
BRANCH ST. AT FUNERAL HOME
CORNER OF KING & PARK ST. (ENTRANCE JEFFERSON


ARM APTS.)


* 1%._


I.




.k


efferson journal

MONTICELLO NEWS


850-997-3568


Lake Drawdown
continued from page 1
seems to be onboard with the drawdown."
Mesing said the duck hunters in particular ap-
preciated the fact that the FWC had waited to initiate
the drawdown, allowing for the most recent duck-
hunting season.
Mesing, who was involved in the last drawdown
of the lake 12 years ago, is heading the current effort.
On Tuesday evening at the presentation, Mesing
introduced the various members of his team, which
includes FWC biologists Matt Phillips, Michael Hill
and Joe Benedict. The number of experts and other
FWC personnel at the presentation, in fact, matched
by almost half the 15 residents in the audience.
Mesing started his presentation by pointing out
that the lake was 3 1 feet down as of April as a con-
sequence of the drought. Ideally, he said, the draw-
down should have started in the fall to match the
period of the drought. But his agency had made a de-
cision to keep the lake open during the last duck sea-
son, he said.
Mesing cited the opening of three new sinkholes
in the southern part of the lake as clear and signifi-
cant evidence of a severe drought.
"We're late to match the drought," he said. "But
unfortunately, you don't know you're in a drought
until you look backwards."
Mesing referred to a Lake Miccosukee manage-
ment plan generated by group of experts in 1989 that
calls for periodic drawdowns of the lake every five to
seven years to keep it healthy. As it was, he said, the
last drawdown was in 2000, making a drawdown at
this time overdue by at least five years.
He cited Lake Miccosukee as one of several lakes
in the region that are historically known to "disap-
pear" during extended droughts. Which dry periods,
it turns out, are good for lakes, Mesing said, as it kills
the aquatic vegetation that tends eventually to clog
up these shallow water bodies.
What happened, Mesing said, was that during the
1950s the damming of shallow water bodies became
a prevalent practice among lake managers. That
damming has now been shown to be counterproduc-
tive and actually detrimental to the health of lakes is
yet another example of a generally accepted practice
that is subsequently debunked by a later generation
of experts.
Mesing's point, however, was that the damming
of lakes promotes stabilization, which leads to the
propagation of vegetation and its associated ills,
such the built-up of muck from plant decomposition
and the depletion of oxygen.
He showed maps depicting large areas of Lake
Miccousukee heavy that are heavily concentrated
with vegetation and floating islands of woody tus-
socks, which he said currently take up some 2,000 of
the lake's 6,100 acres the result of nearly 60 years of
stabilization.
Mesing said the plan was to lower the water level
by another 312 feet, remove 25 acres of muck in the
vicinity of three boat ramps to rejuvenate the fish
habitats at these locations, and conduct prescribed
burns of the tussock islands. He said fishing would
be allowed throughout the drawdown.
Mesing said a plan was also under consideration
that called for annual burning of the tussock islands,
to bring these under control and help restore and re-
vitalize the lake.
He said the plan was to open the lake's north and
south gates in June; implement the muck removal in
November and December, if conditions permitted;
conduct the burns from January to March; and close
the gates again in March 2012 to begin the refilling of
the lake.
He said if rains came in the interim, his team
would close the gates and "go home". The intention,
he said, was to mimic the patterns of nature, not go
against them. In other words, if the drought ended,
it made the drawdown pointless.
A member of the public asked about the impact
of the drawdown on the fish population. Mesing said
the drawdown and muck removal would actually ben-
efit the fish, as it would ultimately increase the lake's
oxygen level and provide sandy bottom for the fish to
lay their eggs.
"Typically, when you dry and refill a lake, it's
good for the fish," Mesing said.
In any case, the FWC would restock the lake if
the fish population suffered as a consequence of the
drawdown, he said, adding that he had already or-
dered 600,000 bluegills and 60,000 largemouth bass for
restocking purposes.
As to why the muck removal was limited to 25
acres, Hill responded that the primary reason was
the high cost of muck removal. He said $200,000 had
been allocated just for the scraping of the 25 acres.
The other consideration, he said, was that rules
required that the removed muck be placed some-
where. It was difficult to find landowners willing to
have tons of muck dumped on their properties, he
said.


TE GET OUR IHWS




SU HORSES MOUTH
^*k^Vo ^^ ^


----- ----- -Y~C~~~c--I


Friday, June 8, 2012


I




I

i

II
r
~


-,s~
"~rr ~





4 *Jefferson


.


Friday, June 8, 2012


County Journal www.ecbpublishing.com


jJefferson Qounty
efFath


ith Father's Day
und the corner,
time to sit back


II I have always had the feeling
I could do anything and my
dad told me I could. I was in col-
lege before I found out he might
be wrong." -- Ann Richards

II father carries pictures
lAwhere his money used to
be." -- Anonymous

II" ife was a lot simpler when]
What we honored was father
and mother rather than all major
credit cards." -- Robert Orben


II A father is a man who expects his|
"Achildren to be as good as he meant
to be." -- Carol Coats

II Fatherhood is pretending the present
you love most is soap-on-a-rope."
-- Bill Cosby


II B becoming a father is easy
enough, but being one can
be very rough." -. Wilhelm Busch

II The older I get, the smarter
Imy father seems to get."
- Tim Russert


and reflect on some of
the funniest Father's
Day quotes ever made.
These funny Father's Day quotes
come from a mix of well known
celebrities, and a few
not-so-well known sources.
Either way, the result is quotes that
will make you laugh.
Use these funny Father's Day
quotes inside Father's Day cards,
scrapbook pages, orjust share
them with others. Remember that in
parenting a sense of humor is your
best weapon!


Iq


ratners uay


Tr'T (r. lTTlT


Ll"


A


-N--, M


LN J LEF A


Gulf Coast Lumber Supply, In
1400 South Jefferson Street Monticello, FL
h- 850-997-2519


May Sale Extension... Limited time... Ends June loth...
-w .... 3" =


26,500 BTU Gas Grill
280 sq. in. total cooking
are. Porcelain steel lid and
firebox. 2 burner control,
plastic shelves withhandle
and tool hooks. Push button
ignition
6ft. Utility Table
Great for indoor and
outdoor activities.


$74-79


$79.39 & 28.49 .


18in Charcoal Kettle
Grill
324 sq. in cooking area.
Long life sturdy steel con-
struction with porcelain
Senamel finish. Top and
bottom vents.


10 ft. x 10 ft. Essentials
Magnum Pro Canopy
Blue canopywith staight/pull
pin steel legs. Canopyis water,
UV and fire coated. Top denier
thickness, 420D, includes
storage bag


$ og9.29
Pro Deluxe Charcoal
Grill
800 sqintotal cooking area.
Steel construction, castiron
adjustable cooking grtes, built
r \ in heat gauge, wood shelf,
easy dump ash pan.


~- --W Window Air
Conditioner
S5 ,000 BTU.
I_ Low-cost cooling
~ comfort. Easy to
j install. Two-speed
fan, cross ambient


June 2012 Door Busters


Roach/Ant/Flea
Indoor Foggers
Eox of 3. Kills on
contact.
$5.09 Kills
bidden
bugs and neutralizes
odor. Each can treats
up to 2,000 cubic ft


5 gal. MobileHome
Aluminum Coating
Reflective silver finish Helps
protect roof sufaces. Easyto
use. Fiber ed roof coating.
$3. 09


20ft Aluminum Flag Pole Kit
Celebrate Independence with this beautiful, made in the
USA flag pole kit. Lightweight 100 percent nylon flag
flies in the slightest breeze, retains color, dries quickly,
and maintains durability. Set includes 3'x 5'flag, pole, 3"
aluminum ball, cleat, strong halyard rope, snap hooks,
ground sleeve, and pulley..


$141.89


Pine Shims
8" longtapered pine
shims. 5/16" down to
1/32". 14 slimsper buidle



6 Oz. unscented
Backwoods Insect
Repellent
Protects against ticks,
chiggers, gats and
flies.Providesupto 8
hours of protection


QuamikJ WEia lst
i^^^g ..'&

q. 0 S S -p~7^L^^^ r~ff?^^T^^


U!living


Fathers Day

17, 2012t
just arot
u it's t


II WIhen I was a boy of fourteen, my father
IV was so ignorant I could hardly stand to
have the old man around. But when I got to be
twenty-one, I was astonished at how much he
had learned in seven years." -- Mark Twain


$40.29


v


- -


I


lor


PJ


069





Friday, June 8, 2012 www.ecbpublishing.com Jefferson County Journal 5



3Jefferson _Qounty giving


4#I*0*NnI rY


JUNE 8
Watermelon Festival Chamber
Kickoff Dinner at 5 p.m. on Fri-
day at the Monticello Opera
House.
JUNE 8
Altrusa 11th Annual Watermelon
Festival Bed Race begins at 7 p.m.
on Friday, on Mulberry Street, ad-
jacent to the Monticello Opera
House. There is a $25 entrance fee
for each team. Contact Mary
Frances Gramling at 850-997-3657
or Anita Ashworth at 850-997-1666
for more information.
JUNE 8
Monticello Jamboree Band will
perform music for dancing at 7
p.m. every Friday evening at 625




I rtkdsg











Celebrate #10
With A'Mya
Keaton
Come one, come all, to
a birthday celebration for
A'Mya Keaton! She would like
for all her classmates, friends
and family to help celebrate her
10th birthday with a 'Birthday
Bash' at her grandmother's
house on Saturday, June 23,
2012.
The fun will begin at 1 p.m.
at 875 Shady Lane in Monti-
cello; and will continue until 6
p.m.; be sure to bring your
swimsuit and towel.
For more information and
directions, contact Ms. Earnes-
tine Keaton at 850-212-2261.


South Water Street, in the old
JCHS gym. There are doorprizes,
cold soft drinks and snacks.
Everyone is welcome to come
dance, listen to some of the finest
music and just enjoy the fun and
camaraderie with neighbors and
friends. Band members and musi-
cians include Bobby Connell, Don
Corbitt, John Howell, Ashley
Morgan, Sue and Wanzie Tucker,
Arlene and Leon Roberts and
Wendell Quick. This is a non-
profit charitable organization.
For questions or concerns con-
tact Curtis Morgan at 850-933-8136
or Bobby Connell at 850-445-0049.
JUNE 9
C.H. Henry Chapter #20 Order of
Eastern Star, PHA, will host a
Fish Fry fundraiser on Saturday
beginning at 10 a.m. at the Monti-
cello News parking lot.
JUNE 9
Watermelon Festival Pageants
will be held at the old JCHS in the
auditorium. Baby to Tween Pag-
eant, 10 a.m.; Teen Miss Water-
melon and Miss Watermelon
Pageants, 7 p.m.
JUNE 9
'Bless the Beast' fundraiser for
the Jefferson County Humane So-
ciety will be held from 6 to 10 p.m.
on Saturday at The Mays House,
catered by Carrie Ann & Co.
Ticket cost is $25 per person and

Congratulation
Promotion
Ren Thomps


FESTIVAL LUNCHEON A]
ACCESSORIES SHOW
DEBBIE SNAPP tival Luncheon and Fash-
ECB Publishing ion Accessories Show will
Staff Writer begin at 12 p.m. on Thurs-
The Watermelon Fes- day, June 14 in the


4w~


includes a dinner buffet, silent
and live auctions, 50/50 cash
drawing, cash bar and entertain-
ment by the 'Booger Holler String
Band'. For more information,
contact JCHS Secretary Teresa
Kessler at 850-997-4540.
JUNE 9
'Invitation to the Muse: A Writing
Adventure' with Katya Taylor,
will be held at the One Heart
Earth Center from 1 to 4 p.m. on
Saturday. Bring a journal or other
writing material. Space is limited
to 10 participants. OHEC is lo-
cated at 450 West Madison Street.
OHEC is a 501 c 3 non-profit and
tax-deductible. Go to oneheart-
earthcenter@embarqmail.com or
call 850-997-7373 for reservations
and for more information.
JUNE 9
NO RED HATS MEETING. In-
stead, the Scarlet O'Hatters will
be getting ready for the Water-
melon Parade. Those that want to
may attend the Watermelon Festi-
val Style Show Luncheon on June
14, tickets and information for the
event are available at the Cham-
ber of Commerce or the Monti-
cello Opera House. Everyone is
looking forward to the Red Hats
parade float and all the BLING!
JUNE 9-30
Jefferson Arts will hold its 'Mem-
bers Exhibit,' featuring the works
of various artists,
ISO in the Gallery The
S On Jefferson Arts
Gallery is located at
575 West Washing-
ton in downtown
Ofl Monticello and is
open to the public
Graduate, from 10 a.m. to 2
majored in p.m. on Wednesdays
m. and Saturdays, or
by appointment.
For more informa-
Stion about the Arts
or to ask about free
summer art classes,
call 850-997-3311 or


ND FASHION
JUNE 14
Monticello Opera House;
hosted by the Monticello
Woman's Club.
The ladies will pre-
pare a homemade chicken
salad meal with lots of
cold beverages and home-
made desserts. Tickets are
$15 and door prizes will be
awarded.
For ticket purchase,
contact the Opera House
at 850-997-4242 or the Mon-
ticello/Jefferson County
Chamber of Commerce at
850-997-5552 or MWC mem-
bers. For more informa-
tion about this event or
the MWC, contact Club
President Strickland at
850-997-3382.


go to info@jeffersonarts
gallerycom or wwwjeffersonarts-
gallerycom.
JUNE 11
Big Bend Horseman's Club meets
at 7 p.m. on the second Monday at
Green Industries Institute for a
brief program and meeting. This
is an open horse club for all
breeds. Everyone is welcome. Go
to www.bigbendhorse.com for
more information.
JUNE 11
Jefferson County Lions Club
Monday Night BINGO. Doors and
snack bar open at 5 p.m., at the
Capitol City BP Travel Center, in
the Big Bend Family Restaurant,
2716 Gamble Road, Lloyd (Inter-
statel0, Exit 217, Highway 59.)
Call 850-997-3538 for directions.
JCLC is a non-profit organiza-
tion, raising funds for area resi-
dents in need. All are welcome to
come have fun, play and win!
Help the JCLC by contributing to
others. Remember... one free
Jackpot BINGO card for every
eyeglass donation! Contact Lion
June at 850-997-1754 for more in-
formation.
JUNE 11
Al-Anon meetings are held at 8
p.m. every Monday at the Angli-
can Church, 124 Jefferson Avenue
in Thomasville. For more infor-
mation go to www.al-anon.ala-
teen.org
JUNE 11
AA women's meetings are held on
Monday at 6:45 p.m.; AA meet-
ings follow at 8 p.m., at the Christ
Episcopal Church Annex, 425
North Cherry Street. For more in-
formation, call 850-997-2129 or 850-
997-1955.
JUNE 12
AA classes are held every Tues-
day at 8 p.m. for those seeking
help. The classes are held at the
Harvest Christian Center, 1599
Springhollow Road. Contact Mar-
vin Graham, pastor, at 850-212-
7669 for more information.


LILLIAN
BECKER
Lillian Arlene Becker,
age 87, died on Saturday,
June 2, 2012 in Erwin, TN.
She was born on Novem-
ber 27, 1925, in Fishers,
NY She lived in Erwin, for
the last four years and be-
fore that in Linville, NC
and Monticello, FL. She
was known to be tena-
cious, quick-witted and
quite a wordsmith.
Special thanks to Lil-
lian's caregivers Lisa
Terry and Sharon Shelton.
Lillian is survived by a
sister Ada Belle Bortle; her
children Fred (Dianna)
Bevins, Mike Bevins,
Kathy (Bert) Ward, Billy
(Mary Sue) Becker and
Bob (Patti) Becker; her
grandchildren Brandon
(Wendy) Bevins, Jennifer
(Ed Grendys) Bevins, Tre-
janna (Hector) Syquia,
Holly (Cole) Erickson,
Travis (Rachel) Ward,
Katie Watts, Susie Ward,
Ridgley (Kourtney) Becker
and Harrison Becker; and
10 great-grand children.
Lillian was prede-
ceased by her husband of
53 years, William Albert
Becker.
The family will hold a
private memorial service
on Saturday, June 9 in
Erwin


Complete Water Treatment!


Cleiner Skin
and Hair

Great Tasting Water Siter aundry



Crstalear Easier Cleaning
CrystolClswar
Glassware


Call your local Culligan ManTM today to enjoy
all the benefits of Culligan Total Home System:
Soft water spend less time cleaning
Reverse osmosis drinking water.
Cheaper than soda!
Salt and bottled water delivery
Exceptional service Available 24 hours


$200 OFF
Receive up to $200 off a
I Culligan Total Home System.
(includes a water softener and
drinking water system)
Dealer participation may vary. Limited time of
fer. 2011 Clligan International Company.
Not valid wth other offers. Not redeemable for cash.


850-580-0300 Juaa
II1. T^ II I0


ulluigan laiianassee.com


bottr water, pur and snpl.


Loca


Business Directo


Bell Mobile Home

Transport & Setuo


Relevel Tie-downs *
Permits
SCall For FREE Estimates
Kevin Bell
Sr 850-948-3372
WE INSTALL METAL ROOFS


._ I1( \ I( \ It CELLO'S ONLY LOCAL
III. \' \t A: COOLING COMPANY
K'-,tewart Heating

& Cooling
Fair Friendly Service
FAMILY OWNED
Office: 850-342-3294
Lic. #RA0067121 ell 850-509-0306

315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile Off US 19 South


REGISTER'S

MINI-STORAGE I


850-997-2535


K.

( .


1L~ON'S r,`3
le SERVICE LLC

ICC
I I '
completee Tree Care Experts


Rev. Walter
Lorenzo Thompson,
Sr. and Betty Thomp-
son would like to
send out special
CONGRATULATIONS
to their son Walter
Lorenzo 'Ren'
Thompson, Jr. for his
promotion to Direc-
tor on WTXL ABC
Channel 27HD
Evening News, Talla-
hassee, Florida.
Walter is a 2004
graduate of Rickards
High School and a


ASv


- i. Septic Tank &
Sep tc TLand Clearing

Complete Septic Service & Repair
S Lot Preparing & Land Clearing

Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
339 Alexander Rd., Lamont, FL. 32366
ph: 997-5536 cell: 933-3620


- filly 8immon's-
*SEPTICTANK CONrRACTOR I
New Installation Repair Pump)inig
Backhoe & Hauling
LAND CLEARING DIG PONDS FILL DIRT DRIVE
WAY & CULVERT INSTALLATION' ROAD BUIL DING

850-997-0877 850-509-1465
FDOT CERTIFIED LICENSED AND INSURED


-.-j


op


2010 FAMU
where he n
Journalism


4X*i xtto





6 Jefferson


1 11 1 *


County Journal www.ecbpu bisning.com Finda.




Jefferson ( county giving


y, June 8, 2012


CARRIE WHITE BOONE ASSEMBLY BLACK HISTORY OBSERVANCE


In recognition of
Black History Month, the
Carrie White Boone As-
sembly #331 Order of the
Golden Circle (OGC),
hosted a program on Feb-
ruary 26 at the Mt. Mo-
rilla Church in Lamont,
where Reverend Louise
Wallace serves as pastor.
The theme of the pro-
gram was, "From The
Fields To The Hills With
Our Heads Held High."
Sister Caroline L. Wade is
the Loyal Lady Ruler.
Loyal Lady Latossya
Williams presided. The
program was opened with
the song, "Lift Every
Voice And Sing." The de-
votion was led by Sister
Leola Moore and Past
Loyal Lady Ruler Mathye
McCloud. They hymn for
the service was, "Guide
Me 'O Thy Great Jeho-
vah."
The Holy Ghost Re-
vival served as the guest
choir for the occasion, the
opening selection was,
"Jesus Is Alive And
Well." Additional songs
rendered throughout the
program included; "God
is My Everything" and


"Jesus Said You Can Lean
On Me."
Loyal Lady Shalonda
Perry performed the solo,
"I Won't Complain."
Loyal Lady Yulonda
Cooper gave the official
greeting and occasion,
along with a synopsis of
the first recognition of
Black History in 1926 by
Author Carter G. Wood-
son, also known as the,
"Father of History" It
was told that Woodson
holds an outstanding po-
sition in the early 20th
Century American His-
tory. He has authored nu-
merous scholarly books
on contributions of
Blacks to the develop-
ment of America and
published many maga-
zines and articles analyz-
ing the contributions and
roles of Black Ameri-
cans. He reached out to
schools and the general
public through the estab-
lishment of a key organi-
zation and he founded,
"Negro History Week"
(precursor of Black His-
tory Month.) His mes-
sage, "Blacks should be
proud of their heritage


and other Americans
should also understand
it."
Dr. Woodson stated
that he often hoped that
the time would come
when Negro History
Week would be unneces-
sary; when all Americans
would willingly recognize
the contributions of
Black Americans as a le-
gitimate and integral
part of history in the
country. Whether it is
called Black History,
Negro History or Afro-
American History, his
philosophy has made the
study of Black History
and legitimate and ac-
ceptable area of intellec-
tual inquiry Dr.
Woodson's concept of
Black History has given a
profound sense of dignity
to all Americans.
An inspirational
reading was given by
Loyal Lady Marva V'dell
entitled, "Reincarnation
of a Black Woman."
The introduction of
the speaker was given by
the speaker's spouse, Sis-
ter Trisheka Nelson, Past
Worthy Matron of Gold


i ,.





r .


Carrie White Boone Assembly #331 members include; seated, left to right, Dr.
Tracy Thomas, GAM; Juan Cox, SGLLR; front standing left to right, Mary Madison,
PLLR; Mathye McCloud, PLLR; Carolyn Wade, LLR; Nancy Benjamin, PSGLLR; Marva
V'dell, LL; Rossie McGollie, LL; back left to right, Eloise Livingston, LL and other
African-attired guests.


Standard Chapter #48.
The speaker, Rev-
erend Al Nelson, District
Deputy Grand Master #10
from Lake City, reflected
from the programs to reit-
erate a biblical point that
we must never forget
where we came from and
we must continue to
focus on three significant
words in our journey in
life and in living: Pur-
pose; Labor; and Harvest.
The invocation to dis-
cipleship was offered by
Past Grand Instructor
Reverend John Peck. Of-
fertory was col-
lected by
Brother
Jonathan
Moody, Brother
Samuel Pier-
rre-Louis and
Brother Carlos
Brown.
Past State
Grand Loyal
Lady Ruler
Nancy Ben- 1
jamin pre-
sented the
Chapter's Hu-
manitarian
Award to
Willard and
Dorothy Barn-
hart, Sr. for
their contribu- Past
tions to the sented th
community. Barnhart,
Loyal Lady February
Wade ex-
pounded, when seeking a
recipient and learning
what the selected theme
was, "It was a no-brainer"
as to who the honorees
would be. The Barnhart
family was recognized as
the 2012 Jefferson County
Outstanding Farm Fam-
ily of the Year. This award
is presented annually to a
local farm family that the
agricultural community
determines best exempli-


* Ponds Fill Dirt


Paul Kinsley


During the February 26 meeting of the Carrie White
Boone Assembly #331 LL Marva V'dell and guest speaker
Reverend Al Nelson, DDGM, District 10 of Lake City, FL,
smile for the camera.


State Grand Loyal Lady Ruler Nancy Benjamin, right, pre-
e Chapter's Humanitarian Award to Willard and Dorothy
Sr. for their contributions to the community, during the
26 meeting of the Carrie White Boone Assembly #331.


fies rural values. It was
noted that the Barnharts
own a combined 162 acres
of farmland, where they
plant whatever is in sea-
son from seed. Mr. Barn-
hart thanked the program
committee for presenting
him with such an es-
teemed honor.
Past Loyal Lady Mc-
Cloud recognized visitors
and special guests. They
included Idella Scott, City
Council member/Mayor;
Brother Carlos Brown,
DDGI District #10; Dr.
Tracy Thomas, Grand As-
sociate Matron,
Jerusalem Grand Chap-
ter; Brother James Mc-
Gollie, District Deputy
Grand Master; and Sister
Juan Cox, State Grand
Loyal Lady Ruler of the
Fred Alexander State As-
sembly


She remarked and
thanked everyone for
coming out and making
the program asiuccdess.
Reverend Nelson gave
brief remarks and ren-
dered the blessing and
benediction, after which
everyone retired to the
Fellowship Hall for a din-
ner of baked chicken, yel-
low rice with gravy, green
beans, rolls, fresh mixed
fruit and iced tea.
The Carrie White
Boone Assembly #331 was
organized in 1978 under
the guidance/tutelage of
the late Brother Moses
White, who was a 33-de-
gree Mason; Commander
in Chief; and Grand In-
spector General. The as-
sembly is named after the
mother of Brother White,
Sister McCloud and Sis-
ter Carrie Howard.


Quit Smoking DoW!


If you are ready to quit using tobacco
We will provide you with


The Tools to Quit


For further Information contact:


Preston Mathews
850 728-5479
Email: Dmathews(@biabendahec.ora


Tobacco Free
Florida
com


!y 1YAHEC ll
Th $ pfFom it tponsr4d by Iht florld4b AHEC Netwrk nd IIhe Fiotide DCprtiMAI ef HtaltI


Pioneer Excavating


& Tractor Service





SSmall Site Clearing

Home Site Preparation

Fence Rows Small Fields


* Culverts


SBDC -
Small Business
Development Center



Free Workshop
"How to Bid on State and Federal
Government Contracts"




T .. Ime: 11:"P I


|,hTo reserve a space[ please cll: 85-997-1 85 ['ITI


I


I


--





Friday, June 8, 2012 www.ecbpublishing.com



Jefferson Qounty


Jefferson County Journal 7


42nd Annual Gallon/Hankins Family Reunion Begins Friday IT'


FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
The 42nd annual Gallon/Hankins Family
Reunion will begin Saturday, June 9 at noon
with a picnic beginning at noon in Jack
McLean Park in Tallahassee.
Sunday, June 10, family members will
come together at 11 a.m. at New Bethel AME
Church, located on Ashville Highway, for the
traditional service.
The service will begin with the doxology,
"Praise God From Whom All Blessings Flow"
and continue with the hymn, "Amazing
Grace." A prayer will be offered by Archie
Gallon of Daytona Beach, followed by a selec-
tion performed by the Gallon-Hankins Choir,
assisted by musician Rev. Michael Rogers of
Tallahassee.
Reverend Denise Banks of Thomasville
will read the scripture and the welcome will
be given by Brother John Dickey of Tallahas-
see.
Greetings will be offered by Monticello


Mayor Idella Scott and a selection will be per-
formed by the Gallon-Hankins Choir.
The offering will be collected by Dennis P
Gallon of West Palm Beach. Willie Thomas of
Monticello, Essie Mae Alexander of Monti-
cello and Washington Bailey, Jr. of Willing-
boro, NJ.
An opportunity for presentations will be
offered followed by the recognition of all
guests, visitors, friends and a selection per-
formed by the Gallon-Hankins choir.
Vernon R. Office of St. Petersburg, FL
will introduce the guest speaker Minister
Weather Harrell-Hill of Pleasant Grove Mis-
sionary Baptist Church in Monticello.
Invitation to discipleship will be offered
by Reverend Elizabeth G. McGhee of Jack-
sonville.
Reverend Jimmie Dickey will make re-
marks, followed by grace/benediction offered
by Minister Eather Harrell-Hill of Monticello.
Special guests include: Steve Walker of
Monticello; National VFW Deputy Chief of
Staff/District II Commander John Nelson, Sr.;


Jefferson County Judge Bobby Plaines; CUP
(Concerned United People) President CP
Miller; Kathi Sloan-Hansberry, Mortician/Di-
rectress of Branch Street Funeral Home in
Monticello; Jefferson County Tax Collector
Lois H. Hunter; Doris Tillman of Monticello;
Mortician/Director-Owner of Tillman Fu-
neral Home Al Hall; Jefferson County School
Board member/retired educator Shirley
Washington; Jefferson County Sheriff David
Hobbs; Jefferson County Clerk of Court Kirk
Reams; Monticello City Mayor Idella Scott;
Monticello Chief of Police Fred Mosley; Jef-
ferson County Property Appraiser Angela
Gray; Monticello City Councilman George
Evans; Jefferson County School Board Super-
intendent Bill Brumfield; Florida State Sena-
tor Al Lawson; Florence Murphy of
Tallahassee; Reverend and Mrs. Henry Grif-
fin, retired presiding elder/minister and for-
mer pastor of New Bethel AME Church;
James Scott of Monticello; and Reverend
Willie Hagan, manager of Hagan/Bradwell
Funeral Service of Monticello.


VFW Post 251
made a generous do-
nation to this year's
July 4th Celebration
and Fireworks.
Buddy Westbrook, a
committee member
for the group accept-
ing donations for the
annual event and
American Legion
Post 49 Past Com-
mander, accepted
the donation on Sun-
day, June 3, 2012.
Pictured from left to
right are: VFW Post
251 Vice-Comman-
der Rev. Ben Ran-
som, Dennis Gallon,
Lonnie Griffin, Sam
Madison, Nathaniel
Gallon, Commander
Ned Hill and West-
brook.


15023 Hwy. 19 South
Thomasville, Georgia
229-226-6060
MOVIE TIMES
ARE GOOD THRU
Dates of
June 8-June 14
Battleship(PG13)
Fri-Thurs-1 5*4:30*7:20,10:10

Madagascar 3 2-D PG)
Fri-Thurs-1:15*725
NO PASSES

Madagascar 3 3-D (G)
Fri-Thurs-4:1007:10
NO PASSES

Men In Black 3 2-D (PG13)
Fri-Thurs- 1.5405,7fl5,9:40
NO PASSES

Prometheus 2-D (R)
Fri-Thurs-4:25*9:45
NO PASSES

Prometheus 3-D (R)
Fri-Thurs-l1:15*9:40
NO PASSES

Snow White & The
Huntsman (PG13)
Fri-Thurs-l:20*4:20*7:15I1005
NO PASSES

Avengers 2D (G 13)
Fri-Thurs- 1fl-4004007fl-00 I

What to expect when
you are expecting G 13)
Fri-Thurs- l:10.4:15*7fl59:40
NO PASSES


HEALTH DEPT. SEEKS PERSONS

RELIANT ON KIDNEY DIALYSIS


Jefferson County
Health Department Direc-
tor Kim Barnhill is asking
that anyone who is reliant
on kidney dialysis contact
at her cell phone, (850) 510-
1378.
Barnhill is working
with DaVita, Inc to get a
kidney dialysis care unit
in Monticello.
"This would be a


great thing for the clients,
as well as for the economy
of the city," Barnhill said.
"We currently have
around 25 patients requir-
ing dialysis in Jefferson
County. But, I am particu-
larly interested in anyone
who may be driving to
Thomasville to receive the
dialysis."
DaVita, Inc., is one of


the country's largest kid-
ney care companies, with
its headquarters in Den-
ver, CO. DaVita's offerings
include hemodialysis, in-
center nocturnal dialysis,
peritoneal dialysis,
chronic kidney disease ed-
ucation, and renal diet as-
sistance.
DaVita means giving
life in Italian.


NORTH FLORIDA


PAINT & BODY
1524 S. SR 53 Madison




W ewAcce-ptIc-Art Paint Boo

Body & Collision Repair
Complete Auto Painting s
Replace Window Motors *
Headlights Resurfaced *
Dent & Ding Removal *
Frame Straightening* !
SBedliners *
We Paint Semi-Trucks




II


Su lmmer



SALE






201216x80 3BR/2BA


$29, 900 r Only 90/mo.
Delivered & Set Up on Your Property
LIVING BEDROOM
MASTER ROOM 3 BEDROOM
BEDROOM





28x80 4BR/2BA


$49,900 Or Only316/mo.
Delivered & Set Up on Your Property

SI I BEDROOM
E21g FAMILY ROOM 4



MASTER LIVING BEDROOM BEDROOM
BEDROOM RETREAT ROOM 2 3



CORBETT'S MOBILE HOME CENTER


1126 Howard St. E. Hwy 90,
Live Oak, FL 32064


386-364-1340


W- . Bobby o 4 'k -.


1L ving





8 Jefferson County Journal


www.ecbpublishing.com


Friday, June 8, 2012


zoiz Waternelo n estival Do Wloto Contest Warners

39 beautiful baby
photos were
featured in this
years contest.
Displayed in the
window at the
Monticello O
Opera House, B
the entries were
judged in six age
categories
ranging from
newborn to 4 Newborn to 5 Months Girl: Kamrynn Patricia Brown,
years of age. parents Jeremy & Krissy Brown
A Girl and Boy
winner was
voted on in each Newborn to 5 Months Boy: Spencer Cooksey 6 Months to 11 Months Girl: Mikayla
category by a W V, __ Strickland, parents Andy & Samantha Strickland Suzanne Hopkins, parent Caytie Hopkins
panel of three
judges. .
Co-Chairs of the
contest, Angela ...
Gray and Cherri
Linn will ,,
introduce
winners and
present awards 6 I
at the Friday
June 8th Kick-off "9
Dinner at the -
Monticello
Opera House.
The winners
will also ride in
the annual
Parade Saturday 2 Year Olds At left, Boy: James
Morning 6 Months to 11 Month Boy: Connor D. 1 Year Old Boy: Benjamin Hayes Bishop. "Jay" Brevard Oldham II,
June 16th. Williams. parents Chris & Molly Williams parent 7Zane R Mischa Rishon parents James "Bo" & Sarah


Ptlt\- O I ll W IZOA- UZO-r


3 Year Old Boy: Mason 3 Year Old Girl: Madison
James Bonfanti, parents Jessica Ann Bullock, parents 4Year Old Girl: Megan Grace Fulford, parents
Mike & Becky Bonfanti Joshua & Karen Bullock Ernest & Sarah Fulford


so ^I


10ir':. iSTOMER
DUNN^ m BonyniSuNop^^


, i . . / -





Friday, June 8, 2012 www.ecbpublishing.corn



jefferson county


Jefferson County Journal 9


/ I Auditions For Agatha Christie Play


(E HOMETOWN

_HEROES


JEFFERSON COUNTY

VETERANS REMEMBERED
CLEMON ALEXANDER, DENNIS ANDERSON,
WINFRED B. ALEXANDER, HAROLD ANDERSON,
JARED BARNES, LEROY BELL, HOMER BIRD, WILL
BOLEN, MARRION BRADSHAW, CARADINE
BRASWELL, BAILEY BRINSON, DR. JOHN BRINSON,
MAYOR BROWN JR, DAVID CHANCY, NOAH HARRI-
SON CONNELL, EARL COOKSEY, OLIN COOKSEY, AS-
BERRY COOPER, CORBETT COOPER JR, CORBETT
COOPER SR, THOMAS DANIEL, MANUEL EVERETT,
DENNIS GALLON, FRED GALLON, WASHINGTON
GALLON SR, ALPHONSO GANZY, CLYDE GANZY,
ROBERT HAIR, GEORGE HAMPTON, RAYMOND
HATCHER JR, LOUIS HILL JR, BENJAMIN JACKSON,
EDDIE JACKSON, CLIFFORD JENKINS, SAMMY
JENKINS, CLEVELAND JOHNSON, SYLVESTER
JOHNSON, OLA JONES, RANDOLF JONES, HAY-
WOOD JORDAN, RAIFORD KERSEY, CHINK KERSEY,
CRAIG KNIGHT, JIM KREBS, WILLIAM LLOYD, JOHN
H. MADRY, ROBERT MADRY, STEPHEN MADRY, RUS-
SELL MALLOY, JAMES MASSEY, MAYNARD MC-
CLOUD, CHARLIE MERCER, GIBBES ULMER MILLER,
SR, EARNEST MILLS, CLYDYNE NELSON, CITIZEN
PASCO, WILLIAM DENHAM PASCO, DAVID PECK SR,
JERRY PECK, ANDREW PLAIR, RUSSELL PLATT,
RICHARD PLUMMER, KENNETH RECTOR, JOE ALEX
REGISTER, JOHNNY ROBINSON, RICHARD RUSS,
LEROY SEABROOKS, E.I. BOOTS THOMAS, ROBERT
THOMAS SR, FLEMING THOMPSON, RAYMOND
THOMPSON, ERWIN WALKER JR, OTTO WALKER,
CHOICE WILLIAMS JR., THE MISSING IN ACTION
AND THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER.


Whole Food Healthy


DEBBIE SNAPP
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
No time for home
cooked meals? Need ideas?
Is fresh food too expen-
sive? The Jefferson
County Health Depart-
ment is sponsoring a few
specialty classes at its lo-
cation, 1225 West Washing-
ton Street in Monticello.
Register now by calling
850-342-0170; classes are
free.
*Kid Friendly Whole
Food Meals Cooking for
children can be a chal-
lenge. This class is geared
toward meals that no kid
can refuse; offering deli-
cious, easy recipes for the
busy family, plus lots of
extras too. This is a fun
class with plenty of time
for questions, talk on how
to save time and money
and a lot of extras. A
lunch meal of samples
will be served at the end
of class. Classes continue
on Saturday June 9; Satur-
day, June 16; and Saturday
June 30. Pick one date and
join from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
*Modern Meat & Pota-
toes Whole Food Meals A
good solid meal is just
right for supper, but that
takes time. This class will
help you see ways to save
time and plan ahead with
meals that are packed
with nutrition and are
tasty too; lots of hands on
helping and plenty of time
to ask questions. The class
will end with a sampling
of things made. Each par-
ticipant will also leave


Cool


with lots of new recipes,
ideas and extras. The next
class is on Sunday, June 10
from 1 to 4 p.m.
*Fast Monday Friday
Whole Food Meals The
weekdays are especially
busy for most people. This
class will attack the chal-
lenges of eating quickly
during the busy week with
lots of simple ideas and
recipes for breakfasts and
suppers. A chance to help
out will get you knowl-
edgeable about the tools
commonly used in the
kitchen. Participants will
taste lots of things along
the way and focus on
healthy, fresh sauces,
dressings and dips to com-
pliment simple meats and
vegetables. No one leaves
empty handed. There will
be lots of extras and
recipes for all. Classes
continue on Monday, June
11 and on Tuesday June 12
from 6 to 8 p.m.
Anyone with an inter-
est in being a host church
(you must have a good
working kitchen) respond
with the date you
prefer. The purpose of this
activity is to educate fam-
ilies on ways to eat
healthy, fast, home cooked
meals that are delicious
but also
inexpensive. There are 10
classes total for Jefferson
and Madison counties and
each class will support 12
attendees on a first come
first served basis. Each
host church will receive
the cooking kit used in the
presentation, along with


S The Opera House
Stage Company will hold
auditions for Agatha
Christie's 'The Mouse-
trap,' at 3 p.m. on Sunday,
July 8 and at 7 p.m. on
Monday, July 9 at the Mon-
ticello Opera House.
This play is widely re-
garded as Agatha
Christie's best; it has been
running in London for 60
consecutive years.
A group of strangers
who are stranded in a
boarding house during a
snowstorm. One of them
is a murderer and two oth-
ers are intended victims.
Everyone is a potential
suspect and/or victim.
Tensions mount and tem-
pers fly, as the evidence
seems to point in all direc-
tions.


'-F


There are eight parts.
Mollie is the wife of
the pair who have just
opened Monkswell Manor.
She is in her late 20's or
early 30's. She and her
husband have been mar-
ried for just a year, after
knowing each other for
only three weeks. She be-
gins to wonder if she
knows him at all.
Giles is Mollie's hus-
band, her age or some-
what older. At one point,
they each suspect the
other of an affair... or
worse.
Christopher is a guest
in his 20's. He has an
overly dramatic personal-
ity He might be a bit ef-
feminate. He is clearly
emotionally unstable.
Miss Casewell is in


her 20's. She is edgy, abra-
sive and secretive.
Major Metcalf is re-
tired from the British
army and a proper gentle-
man. He could be 40 to 60
years old.
Mr. Paravicini ap-
pears to be an older Ital-
ian businessman. As the
plot progresses, the others
realize they don't really
know who he is or what he
does for a living. This part
has already been cast.
Sgt. Detective Trotter
is in his late 30's or early
40's. He arrives at
Monkswell Manor on
skis, anticipating that
murders are going to take
place.
Mrs. Boyle is a retired
jurist, 50 or more years
old. She is demanding, ir-


JEFFERSONCOUNTY CIME EA


FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
Jason M. Stuart, 34, of
Jefferson County was ar-
rested May 30 and charged
with possession of a con-
trolled substance and viola-
tion of probation. Bond
was withheld and he re-
mained at the County Jail
June 7.
Charlie Ervin, 41, of
Jefferson County was ar-
rested June 1 and charged
with leaving the scene with


king Classes
other items for the
church. The classes are for
adults' age 18 and older
and they will be fun, edu-
cational and interactive.
If your church is in-
terested in participating,
contact Senior Health Ed-
ucator Marianne Arbulu
at the Jefferson County
Health Department at 850-
342-0170x207 or 850-528-
5758 or
marianne_arbulu@doh.st
ate.fl.us. JCHD, to protect
and promote the health of
all residents and visitors
in Jefferson County. For
FREE help quitting a to-
bacco habit, call the Quit-
line at 1-877-U-CAN-NOW
or 1-877-822-6669.


property damage and crim-
inal mischief. A total bond
of $5,000 was set and he
bonded out of jail the fol-
lowing day
Althai Lee Streeter, 51,
of Tallahassee, was ar-
rested June 2 and charged
with driving under the in-
fluence; driving under the
influence refusal to submit,
third offense; and giving a
false name to law enforce-
ment. A total bond of $1,500
was set and he remained at
the County Jail June 7.
Elvis Ray Pandolfi, 20,
of Lake City, FL, was ar-
rested June 3 and charged
with driving under the in-
fluence. Bond was set at
$750 and he bonded out of
jail the same day
Terrell Brown, 20, of


Jefferson County, was ar-
rested June 4 and charged
with violation of proba-
tion on the charge of resist-
ing an officer with
violence. He was released
on his own recognizance
the same day
Lacayia Williams, 22,
of Tallahassee, was ar-
rested June 4 and charged
with violation of probation
on the charge of throwing
a missile into a building or
vehicle. Bond was withheld
and she remained at the
County Jail June 7.
Ubiel Solis-Vasquez,
42, of Panama City FL, was
arrested June 4 and
charged with no driver's li-
cense. Bond was set at $100
and he bonded out of jail
the following


ritable and difficult.
ACTORS NEED NOT
FIT THE CHARACTERS'
AGES CLOSELY. THAT'S
WHY WE HAVE WIGS
AND MAKEUP!
Jan and Jack
Williams will direct. Per-
formances will be held on
September 13, 14, 15, 21, 22,
28 and 29... with a possible
Sunday matinee. For more
information email to
jackbwill@juno.com or
call 850-933-9726.




Central
Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Carl Desmartin, Minister
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11 AM Worship Hour
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

Revelation 1:10-12
I was in the Spirit on the
Lord's day, and I heard
behind me a loud voice like
a trumpet (11) saying,
"Write what you see in a
book and send it to the
seven churches, to Ephesus
and to Smyrna and to
Perganum and to Thyatira
and to Sardis and to
Philadelphia and to
Laodicea." (12) Then I
turned to see the voice that
was speaking to me, and on
turning I saw seven golden
lampstands,


Come and worship
with us! (John 4:24)


HINSON OIL COMPANY

Distributors of BP and Shell Products



A 2040 ML King Blvd
Quincy, Florida
(8501627-6295


Rehabilitation Care!

Brynwood Center offers Physical,
Occupational, and Speech Therapy.
Visit our Private Therapy Suites at
"Business After 5"- June 19th from 5p.m.
to 7p.m. Healthy hor d'oeuvres by our


Other services include long-term, respite,
hospice, and short-term
medical/nursing care.


Pioneer Excavating

& Tractor Service



Small Site Clearing
SHome Site Preparation
Fence Rows Small Fields
Culverts Ponds Fill Dirt

Paul Kinsley


'4 ving





10 Jefferson County Journal


www.ecbpublishing.com


Friday, June 8, 2012


school l &$ports


Altrusa Awards Three Scholarships


DEBBIE SNAPP
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
Altrusa of Monti-
cello recently awarded
three scholarships to
three very deserving in-
dividuals. They are Mau-
rey Beggs, Kristin Keli
Dollar and Simone L.
Williams.
Maurey Beggs, a
member of Altrusa, re-
ceived the 'Hands Up'
Scholarship. This is an
award given to a single
working mother. Her goal
is to become a Registered
Nurse. She is now em-
ployed at Farmers & Mer-
chants Bank.
Keli Dollar is also
continuing her education
to become Registered
Nurse. She is a 2012 grad-
uate of Aucilla Christian
Academy and this schol-
arship will be a help in
reaching her goal.


Simone Williams


U


SAINT LEO UNIVERSITY MADISON


(850) 973-3356

madison@saintleo.edu

www.saintleo.edu/madison


SAINT LEO

UNIVERSITY.


Founded 1889


I -' 6








Housecleanig Save your Back We offer extreme
.....................................spring cleaning to meet
New Home ive Us fl TrJ all your lawn and
& Rental Cleanups Serg Jer garden needs, also bed
Ierving Leon, Jefferson
Special pricing and Taylor Counties preparation, mulching
for Realtors *Licensed and Insured* and planting.
( (850) 6 7
(85)55-20 Jie
L c'-I


Simone L.
Williams is a 2012
graduate of Jeffer-
son County Mid-
dle/High School.
This scholarship
will be a great help
to her in reaching
her goal as a Physi-
cian-Pediatrician.
Altrusa Inter-
national is an inter-
national
association of busi-
ness executives and
professionals who
volunteer their en-
ergies and expert-
ise in projects
dedicated to com-
munity better-
ment. As a
community serv-
ice organization, Altrusa
supports volunteerism
and services, advocates
literacy and helps to com-
bat HIV/AIDS.


o\ ER FoSS


H ai alroads


1 madison
FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
The Sunshine Express faced off against Madison
Sunday and the Express railroaded their opponent
for a 48-44 victory
The Express jumped out to a 15-7 lead and never
looked back throughout the game.
Destiny Vangates went seven for seven with six
RBI's and one homerun.
Rodney Bernard went seven for seven with nine
RBI's.
Joe Andrews went seven for seven with three
RBI's.
Chad Brooks went five for seven with six RBI's
and one homerun. Eldred Jennings went five for
seven with three RBI's.
Ronzo Wade went five for seven with three RBI's.
Calvin Holmes went five for seven with four
RBI's and one homerun.
Melvin Holmes went five for seven with three 4
RBI's.
Karlon Blue went four for seven with three RBI's
and one homerun.
Jay McQue went four for six with three RBI's.
Bonnel Gallon went four for six with six RBI's
and one homerun.
Nick Russell went three for seven with three
RBI.s
Coach Roosevelt Jones named Vangates as the
MVP of the game. He added that he would like to
thank a of the local fans who attended the game inn
Madison.
Jones added that thus far in the season the Ex-
press are 7-5. He added that so far during the season
Vangates is the team's number one player with 25
points, 25 RBI's and nine homeruns. Karlon Blue is
the number two place for the Express with 14 points,
20 RBI's and four homeruns. Tye Jones is in third
place with 16 points and 18 RBI's.
There are 16 players on the team, they include;
Kelvin Jones, Joe Andrews, Karlon Blue, Eldred Jen-
nings, Nick Russell, Chad Brooks, Donnell Gallon,
Jay McQue, Rodney Barnard, Melvin Holmes, Des-
tiny Vangates, Ronzo Wade, Calvin Holmes, Frankie
Steen, Steven Rivers and Mario Rivers.





Friday, June 8, 2012


www.ecbpublishing.com Jefferson County Journal 11



arm & outdoors


Grubbs Petroleum Sales

and NAPA Auto Parts
735 East Pearl Street
Monticello, Florida
For parts: 997-2509
997-5632
we offer gas, road diesel
and Farm diesel at
pumps 24 hours with any
major credit card.


WChevron


NAPI


School is out! All
across Florida, students
looking for summer activi-
ties. No wonder so many
national programs high-
light the fun of getting out-
doors. June has the most
daylight hours and the
longest day of the year,
providing plenty of oppor-
tunity for families and
friends to enjoy nature and
each other.
June is celebrated
across the nation as Great
Outdoors Month. Presi-
dent Barack Obama issued
a proclamation urging
Americans to spend time
outdoors and to uphold our
nation's legacy of conserv-
ing our lands for future
generations. The procla-
mation suggests families
and friends explore, play
and grow together, while
hiking, wildlife-watching
canoeing, hunting, fishing
or playing in the neighbor-
hood park activities that
help kids stay healthy, ac-
tive and energized.
Gov. Rick Scott's 2012
proclamation says during
"Great Outdoors Month,
we celebrate the rich bless-
ings of our state's natural
beauty and we renew our
commitment to protecting
our environment so that
we can leave our children
and grandchildren a
healthy and flourishing
land." It goes on to say,
"Great Outdoors Month
will encourage cooperative
conservation and new
technologies to help en-
sure America's outdoors
remain places where fami-
lies and friends can learn,
exercise, and create mean-
ingful memories."
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC), along
with Florida State Parks,
the Florida Forest Service
and national forests, parks
and wildlife refuges each
promote a variety of activ-


FWC DIVISION

OF LAW

ENFORCEMENT

WEEKLY REPORT
May 25 31, 2012
This report represents
some events the FWC han-
dled over the past week;
however, it does not in-
clude all actions taken by
the Division of Law En-
forcement.

JEFFERSON
COUNTY
Officer Stefanie
Wilcox was on patrol in the
Wacissa River and ob-
served a boater operating
his vessel in a willful or
wanton reckless manner.
While conducting a safety
check, Officer Wilcox no-
ticed a very strong odor of
an alcoholic beverage com-
ing from the vessel owner.
Officer Wilcox performed
field sobriety tasks and
found the operator to be
impaired. She transported
him to the Jefferson
County Jail where he was
booked for operating a ves-
sel with an unlawful
breath alcohol level of .08
or above and willful or
wanton reckless operation.


ities to support Great Out-
doors Month and other
events in June.
Get Outdoors Florida!
lists June events across the
state on its website,
GetOutdoorsFlorida.org.
The Recreational
Boating and Fishing Foun-
dation is asking Facebook
fans (Facebook.com/take-
mefishing) to choose the
"Top Eight State Parks" in
the U.S. that offer fishing.
Florida is the only two-
time winner of the Na-
tional Gold Medal Award
for Excellence in Park and
Recreation Management,
as well as being the Fish-
ing Capital of the World, so
visit your favorite state
park fishing spot, then
vote. You will be eligible
for weekly Bass Pro Shops
gift card giveaways, as well
as the grand prize: an all-
expense-paid vacation to
your choice of one of the
Top Eight State Parks.
June is also recog-
nized as Recreational Fish-
ing Month by VISIT
FLORIDA, which helps
promote Florida as the
Fishing Capital of the
World (Fishing
Capital.com). Events at its
visitors' centers help high-
light the tourism value of
recreational fishing to
Florida. Florida has about
a million anglers who
come from out-of-state
each year, and they make
up a substantial part of the
$7.5 billion economic im-
pact from recreational
fisheries that support
nearly 80,000 Florida jobs.
June 2-10 is promoted
as National Fishing and
Boating Week (TakeMe-
Fishing.org). The FWC
supports this effort by pro-
viding license-free saltwa-
ter fishing on the first
Saturday (June 2) and li-


The Jefferson Journal WARD GUNS, LL

Fish & Game Feeding Chart 9


How to use: the major and minor feeding times for each day are
listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the sportsman
and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also have good
success, but last only about 1 hour.
The Week of June 8, 2012 through June 15, 2012
Major Feed Times are marked by an asterisk (*)


Friday, Saturday,
June 8 June 9
*4:50 AM *5:40 AM
11:00 AM 11:50 AM
*5:20 PM *6:10 PM
11:30 PM

Tuesday, Wednesday,
June 12 June 13
1:50 AM 2:30 AM
*8:10 AM *8:40 AM
2:10 PM 2:50 PM
*8:20 PM *9:00 PM


Sunday, Monday,
JunelO June 11
12:20 AM 1:10 AM
*6:30 AM *7:20 AM
12:40 PM 1:30 PM
*7:00 PM *7:40 PM

Thursday, Friday,
June 14 June 15
3:20 AM 3:55 AM
*9:30 AM *10:00 AM
3:30 PM 4:10 PM
*9:40 PM *10:20 PM


1Ir


INTO GUNS!




* -ppraisals. one gun or entire collections g *
* Hunting Camping travel trailers 4-ailable *Buy
* School Eertified Gunsmith -Sell
* Certified IIR4 Pistol Instructor .Consignment
* Certified Dura-.oat Finisher .Gunsmithing
* Eamo Patterns 4- ailable Gunsmithing
Monticello. FL Call Keith at 850-997-3129


Hunter Safety Course

Offered In Jefferson County
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety course in Jef-
ferson County.
The course will be held at the Beau Turner Youth
Conservation Center, 9194 S. Jefferson Highway, Monti-
cello. Instruction is from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 23 and 1 to
5 p.m. June 24.
Students who have taken the Internet course and
wish to complete the classroom portion must bring the
online-completion report and attend only the June 24 ses-
sion from 1 to 5 p.m.
An adult must accompany children under the age of
16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil
and paper with them to take notes.
The hunter safety course is required for people born
on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting li-
cense. The FWC course satisfies hunter-safety training
requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces.
People interested in attending this course can regis-
ter online and obtain information about future hunter
safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling
Hunter Safety Coordinator George Warthen at the FWC's
regional office in Panama City at 850-265-3676.


cense-free freshwater fish-
ing on the second Saturday
(June 9).
"Florida's license-free
fishing days are an excel-
lent opportunity to share
the fun, excitement and to-
getherness of a fishing
trip with the entire family.
This also is a great time for
experienced anglers to in-
troduce friends to the
sport, even if they don't
have a fishing license,"
said Nick Wiley FWC exec-
utive director. "By having
these events on weekends,
we hope Florida residents
and visitors will experi-
ence the joy of saltwater
and freshwater fishing. We
expect many will discover
a healthy sport they can
enjoy for a lifetime." All
other fishing rules apply
on these days
(MyFWC.com/Fishing).
In addition, June 2 is
National Trails Day
(AmericanHiking.org),
and the theme is "Amer-
ica's Largest Trailgating
Party!" The American
Hiking Society is encour-
aging hikers and volun-
teers to help maintain
their favorite trails and af-
terward celebrate with an
eco-friendly party FWC is
celebrating its third pad-
dling trail being desig-
nated as part of the
national trails system on
June 2 at Wacissa River
County Park, Jefferson
County Come out and join
the fun from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m.
June 9 is also National
Get Outdoors Day the pur-
pose of which is to in-
crease first-time visitors to
public lands and reconnect
youth to the great out-
doors. As a result, it is a
Fee-Free Day for U.S. De-
partment of Interior sites,
such as national wildlife


refuges, national parks
and national forests
(Recreation.gov).
Finally, the Great
American Campout is
June 23. Visit NWForg for
great tips, suggestions and
to share your adventure.
The neat thing about this
day is that families do it in
the safety and comfort of
their own backyard.
Many celebrations
take place in June the
month believed to be
named after the Juno, the
Roman goddess of mar-
riage and youth includ-
ing Father's Day.
So get together to re-
connect not only with each
other but with nature.
Get Outdoors Florida!
and enjoy your summer.


Get Real auto insurance

that comes with a real Agent
Get real answers about your auto insurance from a real, local agent.
Call today for a free, no-obligation quote on your Auto, Home, and Life coverage.

850-997-2213 I www.floridafarmbureau.com
105 W Anderson St. Monticello
Freddy Pitts
Agency Manager
freddy.pitts@ffbic.com
Glen L. King 24/7 Claims Service
glenking@ffbic.com Call 1-866-275-7322
glen.king@ffbic.com


.V !
4.,
j


Kh-o--4 -R.- .. j

oriS


Prints Start At $5 And Are Available
For Viewing & Purchase At tommygreene.con
Or Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695 S. Sr 53,


Madise

',


.for More Infor.qtion


ii,,


"C


JUNE AN OUTDOOR EXTRAVAGANZA -
NO EXCUSES; GET OUTDOORS FLORIDA!


Own A Piece Of

Original Art

Drawn By

Tommy Greene


on FL. Or Call (850) 973-4141


;-rAlrmaA s... .............. .-


- -a


"I


L'
i;
r r


. ." .


I


i:j!


ii
g,' J,'i r....
B .,.


1 4,





12 Jefferson Journal


www.ecbpublishing.com Friday, June 8, 2012





BARGAIN
LL/440 WFO4A1pp FO'fYgo4PDPF230Ap p3:/oo pif ON/4fO1D414/4S
fAL/,4/1P F FORF2/DPPAPEf3:oo 00Pi. O4f/WftFO/fSAOd


-o -ESe


CHILDREN'S
white long dressed
3,4,7,8, $50. Whit
size 16, $100. A
lime green dress w
size 14, $300. Call
leave message.

HOLLAND'S BLI
NOW OPEN, U-1
$8.00 Gallon 350
Monticello 997-3


2006 Golf Cart (
New batteries, 48 v
4713

Lawn Vacuum Bri
33BHK PolyVac Sys
9HP Briggs & Strato
and John Deere BM2
Utility cart, $850. C
4


DRESSSMR. STUMP
gowns size STUMP GRINDING
s/gowns size
:e long gown 850-509-8530 Quick Responses.
lso gorgeous 6/22, tfn.
/sequins, teen BECOME A CNA! Quest
850-973-3497 training offers a 40hr., nurse
taught prep course. No GED or
2/23, tfn, nc. Diploma required if age 18yrs.
UEBERRIES Day & Evening classes. A short
PICK drive but great benefits. Come
2 Aucilla Rd. with your friends and carpool.
404 Call 386-362-1065
404


5/25-6/8, pd.5/11-6/6, pd
Club Car) PERSONAL ASSISTANT
V. 850-408- Will do house cleaning,
organizing, ironing, mending
6/1, tfn, n. and more. Have references
Call 242-1921
nleyLVS- 6/1, tfn, c.
item with
n Engine, PERFECT ACTIVITY FOR
21513/10P SUMMER!! Learn a skill
all 997-0901 everyone will love and improve
/18, tfn, nc. your brain at the same time.
Take piano or voice lessons.
Sissy Kilpatrick, 480 Willow St.,
997-3717 or 933-7858. Buy 3,
get 1 free! Call while openings
are available. Daytime &
evenings available. Ages 5 95
6/6-15, pd.


CHICKENS Large Brown
Egg Layers & Meat bird variety.
Chicks 1 day old-4wks. Popu-
lar freedom rangers. $2.50 -
3.50 each. discount for 25 or
more. Call 850-251-9540
6/1, tfn, c.
ANTIQUE BUFFET $350.
Large entertainment center
$750., dresser, couch, chairs,
and many other items. Call 850-
242-9471
6/6, 8, pd.
MOVING SALE. Fri 6/8 and
Sat 6/9. 8:00 A.M. Until.
30 Tandy Lane in Lloyd Acres.
997-4577
6/6, 8, pd.




17TH ANNUAL
BLESS THE BEAST
SILENT & LIVE AUCTION
June 9th 6-10 p.m. for more de-
tails please call the Jefferson
County Humane Society at
850-342-0244 or 850-997-4540
6/1,6,8 nc.













I TI
























Y RI I
BUSINESS

DON'T


ADVERISE

Fogtthtyu aet


EARN $$ You call the shots;
This summer and beyond. A
business of your own. Sales and
Business Development. Call
Dennis at 850-339-7696
6/6-22, pd.


1 & 2 BEDROOM APART-
MENTS AVAILABLE. Eld-
erly, Disabled and Handicapped
persons with or without chil-
dren. Must meet income require- STATEWIl
ments. 850-997-5321 FOR M(
SaTHROUG
:."S! 11/23, tfn, c.Ado
____~______ Adoption
Coopers Pond 2BR/1BA
W/D Hook-up, Carport, Utility Are you
room, quiet neighborhood. married c
Call 997-5007. Financial
2/1, tfn, c. each other.
& Max. As
FOR RENT Huge room w/ 5260. FL
walk-in closet and adjoining
room for office/den. Private Announce
bath. Upstairs. Kitchen privi-
leges. $450. mo. plus 1/2 utili- ADVERT
ties. Move in ready. First SUCCESS
Month rent plus $200 security your bus
deposit. Must have checkable fied ad in
references. Adult Professional. one order.
Call 850-242-1921 of Florida
2/22, tfn, c.
1 BR PARK MODEL UNIT Auctions
furnished and available now!
3BR/2BA trailer available. No (2) Public
calls before 9:30 am or after 6 tions Onli
pm 997-1638 -SwaimN
3/28, tfn, c. Scottsboro
Seal Serv
TWO classic homes, in town: a Florida. C
cute, spacious, comfy 2 BR, 1 Shears -
BA -AND a lovely 3 (or 4) BR now
HISTORIC, w/ den or office. wwwHort
Rent or buy. 631-0577. www. Sold
6/6-15, c. HortonAL
1 BR/ 1 BA APARTMENT.
$375. month plus deposit. Utili- Absolute
ties included. 850-251-9540 home C
6/1,tfn, c. equipment
GTAuction
LARGE 2 BR TRAILER 0833, Grand
$425. month plus deposit. Proof ciates, Jacl
of ability to pay 1st of each
month. 850-251-9540 Help Wan
6/1, tfn, c.


Pro Drive
Details on
age 2 Mo
(877)258-:
truck.com/


ESTATE DE CLASI F I E PR G AI


DE CLASSIFIED ADS
ONDAY 06/04/2012
H 0610/2012



pregnant? A young
ouple seeks to adopt.
security. Let's help
Expenses paid. Holly
;k for Adam (800)790-
Bar No. 0150789

ements

ISE YOUR WAY TO
S! Call now to grow
less. Get your classi-
119 newspapers with
Advertising Networks
-(866)742.1373



Machine Shop Auc-
ne Bidding Only! #1
machine Company, Inc.
,Alabama #2 -Golden
ices, Inc. Marianna,
NC Machines Lathes
Welders, MORE! bid
@
onAuction.com or
[Alabama.com Pete
L#213 (800)548-0130

Auction- 2 story log
ullman, AL. 5bd/5ba,
t barn, 11+/acres
ns.com, (205)326-
iger, Thagard &Asso-
k F Granger, #873

ited

ers Wanted Call for
Our New Pay Pack-
os CDL Class A Exp
8782 www.melton-
/drive


FOR SALE 2 BR/ 2 BA
Modular Home. Large family Drivers Earn $45-$50k annu-
room, large screened porch on ally. Daily or weekly pay, Van
3 acres. Corner lot in Lloyd and Refrigerated freight. Single
acres on Tandy Ln. 850-997- source dispatch. Flexible home-
4577 time. CDL-A, 3 months current
6/6, 8, pd. OTRexperience. (800)414-9569
www.drivekni ht.com

D FU~n -JS.j MEDICAL OFFICE
....... TRAINEES NEEDED! Train
Our pools create online to become a Medical Of-
Generations of Memories fice Assistant! No Experience
everyday. vacallons never end l needed! Training & Local Job


CrawlerTractors, Hydraulic Excavators, Motor Graders, Wheel Loaders,
Loader Backhoes, Farm Tractors, Service & Bucket/Sign Trucks,
Flatbed &Dump Trucks, Truck Tractor & Lowboys, Paving Equipment,
Durangos, Late Model Chevrolet, Ford and Dodge Pickups
and MUCH, MUCH MORE!
For Detailed Listing & Photos, Go To www.imwood.com
Bryant Wood M MW OOD (334)264-3265
AL LIC#1137 W S I I (,Zo6




Get your business noticed

One Call One Order One Payment


00[ost 1 Oillion Dell els stOtelile OOe 10itin[ t
S Deltisin[ Iess Oe. Oon[t Oke tlel D it On



1-866-742-1373



Advertising Netlwrks
O l'r 9i'
-.t :.SL


aldxilliulli stlellnygl
analgesic creme for
temporary relief from:
Joint pain
Arthritis pain
Muscle pain
Back pain


placement assistance thru SC
Training. HS Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed! (888)374-
7294

NEW TO TRUCKING? Your
new career starts now! $0 Tu-
ition Cost No Credit Check *
Great Pay & Benefits Short em-
ployment commitment required
Call (866)297-8916 www.join-
CRST.com

EXPERIENCED OTR
FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50
up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign
on to qualified drivers. Home
most weekends. Vets welcome.
Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghi-
way.com EOE

DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive
for Schneider National! Earn
$700 per week! No experience
needed! Local CDL Training.
Job Ready in just 15 days!
(888)368-1964

Land For Sale

20 Acres-Live On Land
NOW!! Only $99/mo. $0 Down,
Owner Financing, NO CREDIT
CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas,
Beautiful Mountain Views! Free
Color Brochure. (800)755-8953
www. sunsetranches. com

Miscellaneous


ATTEND COLLEGE ON-
LINE from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Criminal Justice,
*Hospitality. Job placement as-
sistance. Computer available. Fi-
nancial Aid if qualified. SCHEV
certified. Call (877)206-5165
www. CenturaOnline. com

AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA ap-
proved program. Financial aid if
qualified Housing available
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769

Meet singles right now! No
paid operators, just real people
like you. Browse greetings, ex-
change messages and connect
live. Try it free. Call now
(888)744-4426

Misc. Items for Sale

STOP GNAT & MOSQUITO
BITES! Buy Swamp Gator All
Natural Insect Repellant, Family
Safe, Use Head to Toe. Available
at Ace Hardware, The Home
Depot & HomeDepot.com

OTR Drivers Wanted

Drivers- Class A Flatbed -$-
Home Weekends, Run Southeast
US, Requires 1 Yr OTR Flatbed
experience, & Pay UP TO
.390/mile Call (800) 572-5489
x227, SunBelt Transport, LLC


Are you suffering from a

DEFECTIVE METAL ON METAL
HIP REPLACEMENT?



I I~.,-,,,, ,, T, If, ,p,, ,,,. I
l- ,,I , l , I ,i ll, 11


We are accepling cases lor iinuries compoinenIc products manulaclured by
caused by certain hip replacement several companies
W enz & Luxenheig . I..il,:. .: ....... ... :i: i. ...I.
, .i i. ..I.ii I I .i. 1 888 I11 LAWS i52'1 :
SI.. .l:. r li HllDeiul :eR i:dall i.:I


I,~ II .\\ lllIIIII


FOSAMAX
FEMUR HIP FRACTURES


CLASSIFIED AD FORM
I I
U se This Form To Place Your Classified Ad
I I

By Mail
I I


SPayment In Advance Is Required


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

20 words, Two Edition $12.00
I I
S DEADLINE FOR WEDNESDAY PAPER
I I
3:00 P.M. ON MONDAYS

DEADLINE FOR FRIDAY PAPER 3:00 P.M.

ON WEDNESDAYS
I I


DATES TO BE PUBLISHED
I I
I I
I I

CLASSIFICATION
I I
I I
I I

I WRITE YOUR AD HERE
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
* MONTICELLO NEWS 8&
I I
I Jefferson County Journal I

II
PO Box 428
I I
I Monticello, FL 32345 1
I.------------------------------------------------------------i


(850) 997-4340
Realtor@timpeary.com

1405 S. Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida 32344

Simply the Best
Simply the Best!


www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida


I elEtt


i


...Xm&-Omm


MA





Friday, June 8, 2012


www.ecbpublishing.com




^Legals


Jefferson County Journal 13


N1\ II 111(I 1.) BII)
Ill. N0, 11 1 .1 A .!1. .1 1., .t. -" 1 1 n I, -hl. II hii d 'l1- ,1 I I l,. Ad
I. r l .. I i Ii . I )ii I. I l i, l ll, I d. I .1I I ';44 hii -
L .. 1111 .I .i J III I I I I -I t 111, Lt 11. 1 HI I l. .I I .d j,
In tll l 1 i i iL .IL I pI L 11 1. I l h tl1. .1 L 11 I l .i la
N ,, ,ll \\ .llI NI L L N 1 l. ..I I .J. 11 1 B44 H 'd. I. L
I. l dIl diiI L I I 'I .1J1dJ .I l 'l I. ilid h J .d HILL H .ll 1) I I I
i 1 IL I I I -l. 1t 1111,Nti I. I. H .. J I. i L
Illi 11 i I I IL I I 1 il l hid
0 s I 2 C




ii h. Ih 11' '. .

I)I ICE.Il.






.nOII h:.
I .. .i..ll. .. .. , 1 d h. , . .1 I .... .. ._ 1 1. I. ,
I'hl l .. l ll.-.' . .i h h .. 1 h.111.h..II I ....h I
i .. ...I ,J I I. II I ...
i.. .I .li I .i 1 I h. II I. '. I _11 I .11' 1.
I 'I I . I1 1 hI. II II .I i . I I I L '. I I I




i I0

I I .. .. I ...I I I I Iq.. i . . I I I 'I I '


K .i 1 | i '
i I'K I .1 ..' 1 i r. I i 111 1..1 . i i. I .






, i '. I l .l. .l I' .' i. l ''li .. i i..i irir !
I ..h I i i .i 1 hi -.. i 1. 1 -I V, 1- I
I I t I I Il 1 1 11- .11 l I 111 1. ..1l 1 1 1 Ji I, 11 -
..i .. .i 'i I i I III II. .II . . i .! I i -

I I., i i . i i.- I i i 'NJ I II i i i, .i I
i i 1 111i' i t .
. I I ,, .. 1 1 .II ~ I.II. 1 1 i . I 1. . ,. .. ..
I '1 ill Il 1 .I1.. 1, .nn, .,' I l . 1 I ...- i. -
I e ,. . II.. I lh. ,,i. 1 11~ I l l..n 1 I,.I, .

. n..... I". .-I. - "I"I " _" I -m " .nn11. 1'.
I ... I 1, I .. 1 s. . . ..". I ., I i .. . . . ..1 i II I ,, n


Read


it. Live it. Li


ve it!


One look at Monticello News &

Jefferson County Journal and

you're sure to fall in love with it.

For the best in business,enter-

tainment, sports and local news,

there is no better source. Call

today to start doorstep delivery

tomorrow.


Monticello News &

Jefferson County Journal

997-3568


m - - - - - - - - - - - - - U


I


H Name:

Add ress:


Subscription
I


I Phone Number:
In State$45.
I In State .......... $45.OO


/ Out of State .... $52.00


Please fill out and mail this back with a check or
money order made out to


I Monticello News *


P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL 32345


Em - - - - - - - - - - - - - ME


LEGAL NOTICE
SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
MODIFIED PHASE III WATER SHORTAGE ORDER NUMBER 12-0005
EFFECTIVE JUNE 13, 2012
The Suwannee River Water Management District's Governing Board has declared a Modified Phase III Water
Shortage pursuant to the provisions of 40B-21, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.).
ORDERED
Based on Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law, it is hereby ORDERED:
A Modified Phase III Water Shortage is declared for all ground and surface waters within the
District's fifteen-county area.
County and city officials and all law enforcement authorities shall enforce this Order when
requested, pursuant to the Plan and Section 373.609, F.S. Penalties subject to 373.613, F.S.
Water shortage restrictions enacted by county and city officials affecting their local jurisdictions
("Local Action") that are as restrictive as this Modified Phase III Water Shortage Order are hereby
ratified and authorized to continue in effect. In the event that a Local Action is less restrictive than this
Order, this Order shall supersede the Local Action, unless the county or city officials obtain a variance
or waiver from this Order.
This order shall remain in effect from June 13, 2012, until September 30, 2012, unless other
wise modified, revoked, or rescinded by the Governing Board.
ALL WATER USERS:
Lawn and landscape watering is limited to the hours of 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. once per week as
follows:
Addresses with House Numbers: May only irrigate on:
Ending in 0 or 1 Monday
Ending in 2 or 3 Tuesday
Ending in 4 or 5 Wednesday
Ending in 6 or 7 Thursday
Ending in 8 or 9 Friday
No address (community common areas, etc.) Friday
CAR WASHING
Car washing by individuals and businesses shall be limited to once per week on the designated
watering day for the location.
Fundraising and commercial car washes, including mobile detail businesses may operate on any day.
Emergency and other first responder vehicles may be washed on any day as needed.
WATER UTILITIES:
To the greatest extent practicable, utilities
shall institute conservation measures Hamilton
such as improving and accelerating leak '
.efferson. -
detection surveys and repair programs, a-r-.
installing and calibrating meters, and .
stabilizing and equalizing system sn
'S SColumbia
pressures. Tyor A.b Union.
BTaylora union r
New water line flushing and disinfection Lafyene ... Bradford
shall be limited to minimum
requirements. .
S'Gilchrist Alachu -
QUESTIONS: Dixie
Please call 386.362.1001 or .
800.226.1066 (Florida only) or visit our
website at www.mysuwanneeriver.com W" Levy
This notice is only a summary of the
Suwannee River Water Management
District Water Shortage Order Number 12-0005. For complete information, please visit the
District's website.
Pursuant to the provisions oftheAmericans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodations
is asked to advise the District by calling (386)362-1001 or 1(800)226-1066 (Florida Only). Ifyou are hearing or
speech impaired, please contact the agency using the Florida Relay Service, 1(800)955-8 771 (TDD) or
1(800)955-8770 (Voice).




14 Jefferson Journal


Hook up
with your family and
friends and weigh in on some fun


Friday, June 8, 2012


and Boating Week,
S June 2-10


www.ecbpublishing.com
arm & outdoors


__ _


C~Ci