West Marion messenger

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Title:
West Marion messenger
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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English
Publisher:
Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Florida
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00100092:00214


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INDEX Happenings..........2 Rev. Snyder..........3 Fairfield Village..4 Quail Meadow......7 VOLUME 8, NUMBER 20 WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 2014 Puzzles Page 6 ClassifiedsPage 78 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000I4P0 000INV7 PHOTO BY PRISCILLA BARNETTStarting youngScrapbooking is a hobby for young and old and, in this case, especially young. Little Mia Gracie Parades from Fort Riley, Kansas, was visiting her grandmother and attending a Fairfield Village scrapbook meeting. See column on Page 4. BY JIM CLARK EditorThe Florida Highway Patrol joined other law enforcement agencies in several states along Interstate 75 in starting strict enforcement of the move-over law. At a press conference at the Marion County northbound rest area along the highway, newly named Maj. Eileen Powell of Troop B, which serves Marion and several other counties, announced that the major push was taking place June 27-29. But she explained the law that is in effect all the time. Drivers who approach an emergency vehicle or tow truck with lights flashing on the shoulder must move over one lane if on a four-lane or wider highway, such as the Interstate. If one a two-lane road or if it is impossible to move over, then the driver must slow to 20 mph below the posted speed limit or to 5 mph if the speed is 20 or below. She also added the caveat unless directed to do otherwise by law enforcement. While the enforcement is multi-state and also includes Interstate 95, Powell did say that the FHP changed its focus from motorcycle safety to the move-over law, partly because of the recent accident on Interstate 75, near the rest area, where Trooper Chelsea Richard and two others were killed while working a previous accident. FHP issues reminder about move-over law PHOTO BY JIM CLARKAt a press conference Friday morning, The Florida Highway Patrol announced it was joining several other states from Florida to Michigan for special enforcement of the Move-over law. From the left, holding signs that read #moveover, are Ocala Police officer R.D. Grady and Billy Woods; Troopers Jamie Mulverhill and Sgt. Mark Boatright, holding sign that reads "Staying alive on 75; Troop B Major Eileen Powell and Sgt. Tracy Hisler-Pace, public information officer for Troop B. Its called Buckin. Thats a technique thieves use when trolling for unlocked vehicles. The thief moves about a neighborhood, checking vehicle doors to see if any are unlocked, said Judge Cochran, Marion County Sheriffs Office Public Information Officer. Thats the buckin element. During a recent vehicle burglary investigation, detectives arrested a 16year-old who admitted to buckin and doing it because he was bored. The teenager told detectives he would walk up to vehicles to check doors and if the doors were locked, he moved on. But, in one incident, the teenager found an unlocked vehicle and stole two winning lottery tickets. Detectives say the teen gave one lottery ticket to his mother, who cashed it. Detectives working with both the store that sold the tickets and state lottery security officials were able to get video of the person cashing that ticket. Additional information led to the identity of the woman. She told detectives her son gave her that ticket and detectives had permission to speak to the son. He admitted to the crime. The juvenile was arrested and transported to the Marion County Juvenile Detention. He will face charges of burglary and petit theft. A second teen may have the other ticket. In Marion County, 93% of car burglaries are of unlocked vehicles. Detectives say when students are out of school, vehicle burglaries go up. Burglars target unlocked cars BY JOHN EVERLOVE Special to the MessengerObviously proud of the uniform she was wearing, she walked confidently onto the field in front of the nearly filled bleachers. Holding a microphone steadily in her hands she said in a clear; concise; resonant tone, Good Morning. A few people in the crowd responded meekly so she repeated her greeting more forcefully. Good morning! Everyone quickly got the message and answered in unison, Good morning. A slight smile briefly crossed her face and then she began to speak. I am Brigadier General Lori Reynolds, Commanding General; Marine Corp Recruit Training; Parris Island South Carolina. The occasion for our meeting was the flag raising ceremony at 8 a.m. in front of the Base Headquarters. As General Reynolds pointed out in her remarks; it is a ceremony that occurs daily on each Marine Base and at 170 embassies around the world. Pointing out 5 young Marines holding the large Garrison Flag, Gen. Reynolds reminded each of us in the audience that for over nearly 240 years the nation has trusted the Marines to make sure that our flag is defended and protected and that the ideals for which it stands are upheld and supported. Speaking on behalf of the Marines on this day; she assured the crowd; the Marines will always protect the flag and the Nation it represents. Everyone stood and the band sounded The Star Spangled Banner. With ease and grace Old Glory glided to the top of its staff. A slight breeze caught the red, white and blue material blowing it free from the lanyard and pole. The huge flag extended to its full length and breadth as if returning the salute of the several hundred people standing at attention beneath it. That was my introduction to Parris Island and I was impressed. Many years have passed since I wore the uniform of my country. With pride I saw my son Scott as he went off to Navy Basic Training at Great Lakes. On this day however, I would witness my grandson, Private First Class Corey Sharp, graduate from Marine Corp Basic Training. From the stands I viewed Corey and his fellow graduates march across the parade ground. Every one of them was in step; marching straight and tall; their eyes fixed and their postures exuding confidence. In speeches from the officers, we learned what the past three months of grueling training had been like for these young men and women. We gained an even greater appreciation for the commitment; endurance and patriotism that our loved one had displayed. Like his fellow recruits, a few short months ago my grandson had been a civilian; today through his perseverance; dedication and sacrifice; he was a Marine. Pass in review! the Adjutant ordered and the formation began to march past the reviewing stand and bleachers. Loud cheers greeted each platoon as they marched by and while the uniformed Marines who were watching maintained their military bearing; the civilians let lose with wild applause. Paying a visit to Parris Island to a Marine Corps ceremony Scott Everlove, son and Corey Everlove, grandson of reporter John Everlove. Please see PARRIS, Page 3 legal separation of the American colonies from Great Britain occurred on July 2, 1776, when the Second Continental Congress voted to approve a resolution of independence that had been proposed in June by Richard Henry Lee of Virginia. After voting for independence, Congress turned its attention to the Declaration of Independence. Thomas Jefferson was the principal author of this document. Congress debated and revised the Declaration; finally approving it on July 4, 1776. Most delegates actually signed the Declaration on August 2, 1776. Only two of the men who signed the Declaration of Independence later became President of our country John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. It is interesting to note that these two men died on the same day, July 4, 1826, the 50th anniversary of the USA. It wasnt until 1938 that Congress made Independence Day a paid federal holiday. In 1870, Congress made the day an unpaid holiday for federal employees. In 1778, General George Washington celebrated the day by giving his soldiers a double ration of rum and also an artillery salute. Today, military bases give a salute to the union by firing one gun for each state. Have you ever thought about the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence and what kind of lives they led? Twenty-four of these men were lawyers and jurists, 11 were merchants, and nine were farmers or plantation owners. They were all well-educated and knew the risks they were taking by signing this document. They also knew that if captured, their penalty would be death. Five of the men were captured by the British and tortured, 12 had their homes ransacked and burned, two lost their sons who were serving in the Revolutionary Army, another had his two sons captured. Thomas McKeam served in Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding. He lost all his possessions. Many others had their homes looted. Several died bankrupt. John Hart lived in the forests and caves for over a year; when he returned home his wife had died and his 13 children had vanished. Lets each take a moment to reflect on what these men did and the sacrifices they paid in order for us to have our freedom today. When was the last time you read the Declaration of Independence? Have a happy and safe holiday! QUAILCONTINUED FROM PAGE 7

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Thursday, July 3 Red, White & Blues festivalThe City of Ocala will host the Red, White & Blues Festival Thursday, July 3, from 6 to 9 p.m. The free festival will take place at Citizens Circle just south of downtown. Entertainment will include live music by the Brown Brothers Band. Guests can enjoy hot dogs, ice cream, watermelon and a cupcake walk. The event will include craft vendors and activities for the entire family. The splash pad will be in full operation. For more information, call 352-368-5517.Saturday, July 5 Yoga at Sholom ParkYoga will take place at Sholom Park at 9 a.m. on Saturday, July 5. For more information, call Ingrid at 352-854-7950.Chess Club to meetThe chess club that formed at the Freedom Public Library meets the first Saturday of the month, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Grab your board and chess pieces and come on down. Interested persons are invited to attend for a rousing game of chess. Its your move! For more information, call Ron at 873-2276.Tuesday, July 8 Mac users to meetThe Ocala Macintosh User Group will meet Tuesday, July 8, from 7 to 9 p.m. This months featured presentation, Apps for Managing Your Finances, will be given by Angie Yoder. Tech Tips, Q & As, and the monthly raffle will follow. Meetings are held in the St. George Anglican Cathedral Parish Hall, 5646 SE 28th St., Ocala. Visitors are always welcome. Check out our website at http://ocalamug.org to learn more about the group.Wednesday, July 9 CERT training to startA new Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training will begin Wednesday, July 9, and continue through Aug. 13 from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Marion County Sheriffs Office, 692 NW 30th Ave., Ocala. The next training session will begin Oct. 9. The CERT program helps to prepare participants how to take care of themselves during a disaster. This six-week course will offer training on disaster preparedness, fire safety, disaster medical operations and more. Once trained, participants have the opportunity to join their local neighborhood team that will assist first responders during a disaster. CERT Teams assist by assessing their community and providing basic medical treatment to those in need and report all the information to Emergency Management. The CERT Program is offered by the Marion County Sheriffs Office, Bureau of Emergency Management and is a free training to all who are interested. Early applications are important as the class fills up quickly. For more information and for an application, contact Emergency Management at 352-369-8100 or e-mail MarionCERT@marionso.com.Thursday, July 17 Medication seminar scheduledOn July 17 at 1 p.m., College Road Baptist Church will host an educational program that covers common medication issues and how they impact older adults. Bring your list of medications and questions. Brookdale Senior Living Solutions at Chambrel will provide the desserts for this seminar. All are welcome. The church is at 5010 SW College Road (State Road 200). Phone: 352-237-5741.Sunday, July 20 Jazz Society to performThe Ocala Jazz Society will be performing on Sunday, July 20 from 2-5 p.m. at VFW Post 4781 across from Oak Run. The band performs on the third Sunday of each month, playing a variety of music including Jazz, Big Band, Dixieland and songs from the past. There is a $3 donation for Hospice. For information, call 352-237-0234. Monday, July 21 Ivy House hosts gala for HospiceThe Ivy House Restaurant invites you to the first Vintage Gala in honor of Hospice of Marion County on Monday, July 21. The event features live entertainment, a silent auction, a best-hat contest and caricature artist. Attire is vintage, linen, lace and hats. The event will begin at 6 p.m. with a social hour and cash bar; assorted heavy hors doeuvres will be available buffet-style at 7 p.m. Advance tickets are $80; tickets at the door are $90. Tickets may be purchased at www.hospiceofmarion.com or at the Hospice Administration office (3231 SW 34th Ave. Ocala). All proceeds support Hospice of Marion County childrens bereavement programs. For additional information call 352-854-5218.Tuesday, July 29 Breast cancer support group to meetThe SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Breast Cancer Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 SW 105th St., in the Chapel, Room 235. The meeting on Tuesday, July 29, will be an informal information exchange including sharing some of our experiences.Sunday, Aug. 10 Lola and the Saints in benefit concertThe TLC Time Capsule is set to transport you and your friends back in time to the golden era of the 50s and 60s. Lola and the Saints will perform a concert at the West Port High School Performing Arts Center, 3733 Southwest 80th Avenue, Ocala, from 3 to 5 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 10. Tickets are $15 each and are available at www.tlcocala.org under the Donate button. Proceeds from this concert will support the programs and dream of Transitions Life Center to benefit adults with special needs who have aged out of the ESE programs within the public school system. Please contact Ginger Broslat at 352-861-0252 or ginger@tlcocala.org.Tuesday, Sept. 23 Candidates invited to forumThe GFWC Womans Club of Ocala will conduct a Candidates Forum for candidates in the November elections on Tuesday, Sept. 23, at the Marion County Public Library Headquarters, 2720 E. Silver Springs Blvd., in Meeting Room C from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Evelyn B. Kelly will serve as moderator. Candidates for the Marion County Commission, the Marion County School Board, and the Florida House of Representatives are invited to participate. For further information contact Frances at 352-629-7397 or email: ocaladowns@yahoo.com. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, July 2, 2014 7 2 W ednesday, July 2, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Mon. Thurs. 11 am 8:30 pm Fri. & Sat. 11 am 9:30 pm Closed on Sunday 873-0223 8602 SW SR 200, 103rd St. Plaza Ocala, Florida 873-0223 873-0223 ONE LARGE CHEESE PIZZA $6.99 ONE LARGE CHEESE PIZZA $6.99 MONDAYS W ITH PURCHASE OF BEVERAGE E XP 7/10/14 Whole Wheat Pasta Available 000ILIE TUESDAYS W ITH PURCHASE OF BEVERAGE E XP 7/10/14 VALID IN OCALA ONLY 1 ST T OPPING F REE M ON & T HURS O NLY $6.99 $6.99 SPAGHETTI & MEATBALLS SPAGHETTI & MEATBALLS WEDNESDAYS & SATURDAYS W ITH PURCHASE OF BEVERAGE E XP 7/10/14 $20.00 $20.00 2 For BAKED DISHES CHICKEN PARMIGIANA VEAL PARMIGIANA BAKED DISHES CHICKEN PARMIGIANA VEAL PARMIGIANA I NCLUDES F REE C HEESECAKE OR Z EPPOLIS 000IMJX R&L Auto Detailing Call for Appt. 875-6484 6895 SW Hwy. 200 4 Miles West of I-75 ... because your car deserves better. Reg. $ 39 95 SUMMER SPECIAL: HAND WASH & WAX WORLD CLASS SERVICE SINCE Includes Windows, Vacuum Carpets, Wheel Treatment, Tire Shine & Door Jams FREE LOVEBUG REMOVAL! SUVs/PICKUPs $10 000HIQC The Truesdell Professional Building 200 N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Fl 34482 KELLEAN K. TRUESDELL, J.D., LLM Attorney & Counselor at Law (352) 873-4141 or KelleanTruesdell.com My Florida Estate Planning Workshop is available any day at any hour. Wills, Living Trusts, Financial and Medical Powers of Attorney, Probate, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, Asset Protection, Federal Death Tax Minimization, Trust Administration, Elder Law and Personal LifeCare Services. Quiet Oaks 11311 SW 95th Circle Near 484 off of SR 200 behind Soapys Carwash 352-861-2088 000IE7D Stop By For A Visit & See Why VOTED THE BEST AGAIN! LICENSE #AL9315 16 Y ears of Great Cars & Great Shows F RIENDSHIP B ARBERS Sponsoring F RI ., J ULY 4, 2014 B EGINNING AT 6:00 P M FREE CAR SHOW IN THE WINN DIXIE PLAZA Its Gonna Be G reat! John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000I2C2 Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your P et Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommoda tions for Your Pet Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www .palmettokennels.com 000IGR8 Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting Look for us on Facebook Look for us Look for us on Facebook on Facebook 000II4Y DR YER VENT CLEANING DONT LET Y OUR DR YER STAR T A FIRE! Call 1-352-566-6615 Dr. V ent 1-855-4DRVENT Locally Owned 15+ Y ears Licensed, Bonded, Insured Flat Rate No Hidden Costs $ 39 TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD, CALL Toll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith aName Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTALFor your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 For your convenience, mail in with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 20441 E Pennsylvania Ave, Dunnellon, FL 34432 or call... IMMEDIATE NEED FOR RNSCITRUS & MARION COUNTY HOSPITALS ********************** MED-SURG, ED & ICU Please call 352-432-0080 BRAND NEW Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress Set $150. Still in Original Plastic. (352) 484-4772 SW 55+ 4BR/3BACorner lot, enclosed/ screened porch, 2 car Carport, Many Updates $875 + Ammenities Including Pool Spruce Creek North (352)854-7987 LET USWORK FORYOU!CALL TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403West Marion Messenger Classifieds Get Results! PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. WE BUYR VS, TRUCKS, TRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, & MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 AUTO SW AP /CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAP MEETS NO SHOWJULY & AUGUST SEE YOU IN SEPTEMBER 1-800-438-8559 CHRYSLER2012 Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs Call T om for more info 352-325-1306 Blue Skies Lawn Service, LLC Monthly or weekly rates. Special discount for 55+ communities. 352-572-0161 ask for Brad. Clean out your closets, go through your garage, attack your attic and then use the classifieds to get rid of stuff you no longer use. And the FREE listing means you have more money left over after the sale!You can list any single item priced under $100 for sale for FREE!PUTTHEPOWER ANDCONVENIENCE OFTHECLASSIFIEDS TOWORKFORYOU!Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKSFREE TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403 Whats changed since 1964? A massive public disinvestment from higher education has shifted the costs of college onto students and families. Just in the past few years, state funding per student was cut by an average of 27 percent nationwide. Private interests have filled the void, transforming college finance into a vehicle for financial industry profits. Private lenders have moved aggressively into the student loan market, offering loans with interest rates in the double digits. The explosion of student loan debt has also fueled a burgeoning student loan debt collection industry. Translation: Wall Street has turned our college students into a new cash cow. It doesnt have to be this way. If were serious about giving our children and grandchildren real freedom freedom from student debt we need to reverse the trend of public disinvestment, put a stop to private profiteering, and recommit to free college in America. Then we need to marshal the resources to make it happen. Ending offshore tax giveaways to multinational corporations and millionaires would be one way to get there. Is solving the student debt crisis going to take a fight, given the political clout of the financial interests that are making big money off the status quo? Of course. But its a fight worth having. Lets make college in America what it should be: a free, shared vehicle for building an educated people, not another costly way for special interests to take us for a ride.Hall is executive director of the Alliance for a Just Society, a national research, policy, and organizing network that advances state and national campaigns for economic and social equity. STUDENTSCONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 Only two more days until the Fourth of July. That means were getting ready for another fun and exciting day here in Quail Meadow. At the time this is being written almost 100 tickets have been purchased for the chicken dinner. Reminder: The parade will begin at the clubhouse at 9 a.m. and will travel throughout the neighborhood. The patriotic music can be heard on your FM radio dial at 97.7. Following the parade the awards ceremony will take place in the clubhouse (cookies and lemonade will be provided). Parade participants will begin lining up at 8 on NW 32nd Street (north side of the clubhouse). The cars will line up at 8, followed at 8:15 with the golf carts, and all others at 8:30. Check the July QM Reporter for a map that shows the parade route. Chicken, corn-on-the-cob, baked beans, cole slaw, potato salad, and watermelon are on the menu for the dinner. Entertainment will be provided by R Music For You. This is going to be a great day in Quail Meadow. In case of rain (it never rains in the morning) the parade will take place on Saturday; but the dinner will still be on the 4th. Independence Day July 4th a day for remembering how our country became the United States of America. During the American Revolution, the Quail Meadow to celebrate the 4th Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb Please see QUAIL, Page 8 Happenings

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When it comes to politics, I am as confused as the politicians themselves. I do not like to discuss politics because I do not understand it and just as soon as you understand one opinion, everything changes and you do not know where you are. I know I do not understand much that goes on in the political arena, but one of the things I have been hearing has to do with what they call, The Haves and the Have Nots. What do people mean when they use this phrase? Who are these Haves? And who are these Have Nots? Probably more importantly, what is it that these Haves have that the Have Nots want? The problem as I see it is simply this. If I want what somebody else has, am I really going to be happy when I have what he has? There are many things that I do not have and I am quite happy that I do not have them. I do not have an incurable disease. I do not have a debt so far above my head that I am going into bankruptcy. I do not have a table full of bills that I cannot pay. I am happy that I do not have any of these things. But as a part of the older generation, I do not really need anything that I do not have. I suppose it would be nice to have a new truck, but there is nothing wrong with my old truck. It still gets me where I want to go, the air conditioner still works and the radio still plays my kind of music. Why would I need a new truck? It probably would be nice to have a new house. At our age, my wife and I do not have the energy to pack up everything and unpack everything in a new place. As it stands, everything in our house is exactly where we want it. I choose to focus not on what I Have Not but on what I really do Have. I have a wonderful wife, but do not tell her I said so, it might get me into some kind of a situation. This year we will have been married some 43 years and why she has put up with the likes of me all this time I will never know. Actually, the fact that she has put up with me all these years brings into question her sanity. I have some wonderful children and grandchildren. It would be nice to live long enough to see my greatgrandchildren, but I am not pushing that issue. I am rejoicing in what I have. The best thing that I have, the thing I treasure the most, is my relationship with God. I can identify with what David said, The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want (Psalm 23:1). What David is really saying here is that when the Lord is my Shepherd, then the reality is simply, I shall not want. The other side of the picture is true as well. If I find myself constantly in want, maybe the Lord is not my Shepherd.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net or website www.jamessnyderministries.com. The Haves, the Have Nots and the Whatnots Out to Pastor Dr. James Snyder messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, July 2, 2014 3 6 W ednesday, July 2, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 www.jandjjewelersocala.com www.jandjjewelersocala.com Missing Diamonds? Diamonds Replaced! Insurance Claims Handled! 000IK0B 000IK37 There r eally is a difference in salons . . Nelly Has Reloca ted 854-653 1 Walk-Ins W elcome 61 60 SW Hwy. 200, Ocala, Suite 99 in the Ja smine Plaza FOURTEEN YEARS EXPERIENCE Come See Nelly DeJesus 000INNM Come exper ience this fabulous R on Garl design in Ocala LA RGE GROUPS WELCOME 352-401-6940 2201 NW 21st St. Ocala, FL GOLF FOURSOME SPECI AL Plus Tax After 9am Includes: 18 holes, 2 carts, and hot dog lunch. (Lunch served between 11am and 3pm) Expires 7/31/14. Must present coupon. Make your tee time online www .pineoakocala.com 18 HOLES 7 DA YS A WEEK! Christ the King The Rev. Donald J. Curran, RectorServices: Rite I 8:00 am Rite II 10:15 am3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary 352-351-9727 www.ctkaocala.orgAnglican Church 000I9PL 000IHUS 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS is discovered through worshiping together 71 1187 Before long, the units were once again formed across the field from where I sat. The more than 300 graduating Marines stood silently at attention as did the cadre in and around the stands. Sensing the moment; the gallery fell silent. Even the youngsters ceased their fussing. It was then that the band struck up the familiar strains of the Marine Corp Hymn. For the brief moments that the music played; everyone stood a little straighter; everyone felt a bit prouder; and some like myself, got that familiar lump in the throat. Later as I hugged my grandson I felt more pride and love than my mere words could ever express. Fortunately, men know that about each other so we dont try; we just know. The world is a scary place; have no doubt about that. There are those who would take our way of life and our very lives if it werent for the men and women of our military. We are truly fortunate that we are defended by young men and women who are ready; willing and able to protect us. They are less than 1% of the population; those who wear the uniform of our nation. We owe them our loyalty; our support and undying gratitude. My prayer is for the safety of all our service personnel and that our leaders will have good judgment in using them. I thank you, my readers, for letting me share this experience with you.John Everlove is the Cherrywood correspondent for the South Marion Citizen. PARRISCONTINUED FROM P AGE 1 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Dont be surprised if, in spite of your well-made plans, something goes awry. But dont worry. Your knowledge of the facts plus your Arian charm will help you work it out. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A personal relationship seems to be demanding more than you feel youre able to give. Best advice: Confront the issue. You could find the situation surprisingly easy to work through. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Resist being pressured into meeting your self-imposed deadline. This is important if you really feel that taking more time to finish a project could save time in the long run. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A vacation choice seems less interesting than when you first made it. Could it be a matter of the place or the people going with you? Find out before you consider a change of plans. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) Someone might be overriding your logic to get you to agree to favors you would normally avoid. See what youve been asked to do and see if youve been misled. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Try to keep that emerging judgmental aspect in check. Too many critiques on relatively unimportant issues could create a lot of negative bounce-back reactions. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Facing unpleasant facts about an associate isnt easy. But ignoring them isnt wise. Ask a trusted (and neutral) friend to help guide you on what to do and how you might do it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) A shift in opinion regarding a workplace situation could go a long way in vindicating the stand youve taken. But be aware that a resolution could still be a way off. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Its not like you to choose the easy way rather than the right way to do things. So, follow your instincts and feel assured they will lead you to the right decision. Good luck. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Hold off on making a personal commitment until you find out what it entails and whose interests are involved. There could be hidden facts you need to know. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) A new friend offers an unexpected opportunity that could lead to a career change. Check it out carefully and consider getting an assessment from someone familiar with this field. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) A surprising discovery leads to mixed reactions from those involved in the revelation. But as you come to appreciate the truth, youll be able to also come to terms with your feelings. PHOTO BY RON RATNERFarmers marketNothing like a farmers market in season to draw crowds. This photo was taken recently at the On Top of the World Circle Square Commons. The Ocala Symphony Orchestra will be performing the Red, White and OSO Blue: A Salute to our Troops concert on Friday, July 4 at 7 p.m. The event will be held at the Circle Square Cultural Center at On Top of the World, 8395 SW 80th St., Ocala. The Symphony will perform patriotic favorites such as the American Salute and Stars and Stripes as well as music from Porgy and Bess, selections from Apollo 13 and John Williams Midway March. There will also be a special salute to our veterans during the performance. The Ocala Symphony is working with Veterans Helping Veterans to give 100 complimentary tickets to veterans. Tickets are $19 and can be purchased at www.ocalasymphony.com, by calling the office at 352-351-1606, or at the door. Beginning at 4 p.m., On Top of the World will be filled with food, drinks, dancing, patriotic displays, and fireworks occurring after the OSO performance. Ocala Symphony to put on special program on July 4 Ocala Civic Theatre is pleased to be able to provide several college scholarships each year to students planning to pursue a degree in the performing arts. Many local students get their start in the performing arts through our Education Department youth programs, and we are delighted to watch them develop their talents and remain active in theatre as they grow up. Since the Ocala Civic Theatre scholarship program was established in 1981, more than $119,500 has been awarded to Marion County students majoring in the performing arts. This year, Ocala Civic Theatre and ACT 4 are honored to provide a total of $9,400 in scholarship funds to 12 talented students. We are proud to support their pursuit of higher education as well as the future of the performing arts. This years winners are: Barbara Purvis Memorial Scholarship: Cody LeFleur Bill Bartlett Memorial Scholarship: Michelle Ware Bridget Bartlett Memorial Scholarship: Sarah Scalf Founders Scholarship: Kevin Imes Fran Clemons ACT 4 Scholarships: David Leppert, Rebekah Leppert, Kelsey Plante, Tim Steis, and Victoria Wells Harvey Klein Memorial Scholarship: Savannah Hirst Leon Schmehl Memorial Scholarship: Greg Hersey Susan and Randall Moring Scholarship: Zachary Titterington Ocala Civic Theatre lists winners of annual scholarships

PAGE 4

messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, July 2, 2014 5 4 W ednesday, July 2, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO ADVERTISECall854-3986 ADVERTISING SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 000HYK9 000HYK9 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000H0PY CONCRETE WORK REP AIRING OLD We Make Y our Concrete Look Good Specializing in Repairing Concrete Driveways Pool Decks Patios Entrance Ways Advantages: Mildew & Oil Resistant Non Skid Protection Easy to Keep Clean Commercial Grade Quality RENEWED SURFACES 000IEMY IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Seasonal Special Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2013 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $39 99 With coupon. 000IGA1 COMPUTER REPAIR COMPUTER PROBLEMS SOLVED Your home or business 7 days a week. Microsoft certified engineer. 30+ years experience. PC Repairs/Upgrades Virus Removal Router/Network Setup New PC Installs Se habla espaol Tech Solutions of Ocala 352-207-4435 000IFWK AIR CONDITIONING 352-208-4641 Locally Owned & Operated License # CAC1816140 WILSON AIR SERVICE Tune Up Special We Service All Brands Repairs Replacement Free Second Opinions 24-HR. Service $ 29 95 GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 795 $ 795 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RAY RAY RAY CC C C C C ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION Crayconst.com Crayconst.com Crayconst.com 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G GA RA GE S CR EE N D OO R 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G 16 x 7 SLIDING GARAGE GARAGE SCREEN SCREEN DOOR DOOR 000IEML We also install custom acrylic & glass windows. Beat The Price Increase! 000IK5Z CARPET CLEANING Countr yside Superior Carpet, Upholstery & Tile Cleaning 352-307-4100 711185 DIALAPRO For Your Professional Needs For Your Professional Needs WEST MARION Messenger WEST MARION Messenger West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Stay safe while celebrating the 4th When the Declaration of Independence was approved in 1776, our founding fathers probably did not foresee the day when it would be a national celebration filled with fireworks, barbecues, parades and festivals. What they did foresee was an upcoming rough time with the British military as the Europeans didnt want to lose control of this upstart group of colonies across the pond. But the dedication of those fathers and all our ancestors who fought the Revolutionary War made possible our freedom to celebrate as we do this week. Around here, the celebration features such events as Red, White and Blues on Thursday evening in Citizens Circle a couple of blocks south of the Downtown Square in Ocala. On Friday, God and Country Day will be observed off U.S. 27 Northwest as it has been for years. There are also golf cart parades and celebrations in various communities around the area, as well as the shooting of firecrackers by many individuals throughout Marion County. Its the firecrackers that scare us a little. Most people have the attitude that it cant happen to me when they shoot off dangerous material just for fun. Yet, over the years, there have been many stories of fireworks going off prematurely and backyard celebrations turning into tragedy. While many of these fireworks are illegal, this is one of those laws in which our law enforcement community looks the other way. Some may complain about the noise, but if law enforcement does any more than drive through a neighborhood, its a surprise. This year it might be a little more intensive, since the Fourth falls on a Friday. So when it comes to shooting off fireworks, youre on your own when it comes to safety. Please be careful we dont want anyone losing an eye, a finger or worse. Stay safe for the holiday. Travel agencies say the roads will be just as busy as usual, even though gas prices are the highest since 2008. But if youre driving somewhere, make sure you dont drink and drive and no matter what, watch out for the other guy. You may think youre safe, but that car coming in the opposite direction may not be as lawabiding as you are. Our Message PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGANMANAGER: JOHN MURPHYEDITOR: JIM CLARK MessengerWEST MARION Editorial Guest column Wall Street turns students into cash cowBY LEEANN HALL Special to the MessengerThe U.S. Senate held a vote recently to bring up legislation allowing student debt holders to refinance old loans at lower current interest rates. The motion to debate the Bank on Students Emergency Loan Refinancing Act (S. 2432) garnered a 56-38 majority but fell short of the 60 votes needed to open debate. Republicans cast 37 of the 38 no votes. Only three Republicans joined 53 Democrats and Independents in voting to debate the bill. For members of the college and high school classes of 2014, and for past graduates, this effort to tackle the student debt issue is sorely needed. For whether their degrees are in math, science, history or English, our graduates are coming out of college schooled in something else entirely: the crushing weight of student loan debt. With outstanding student debt now topping $1.2 trillion, 40 million Americans are facing the consequences of our failing national commitment to higher education. This situation poses a threat to Americas economic vitality and its promise of opportunity. The Federal Reserve reports that growing student loan debt is holding borrowers back from buying homes and cars. This is bad news for an economy still trying to get its mojo back since the Great Recession. And student loans have turned into a big business for the U.S. Department of Education, which reportedly made a profit of $41.3 billion from federal student loans last year. If the agency were a corporation, it would be one of the most profitable in the world. Its time to address the student debt crisis and the toll its taking on the economy. Allowing refinancing will save borrowers thousands of dollars in interest payments. That will free up disposable income, boost consumer spending, and strengthen the economy. However, to fix the overall student debt picture, we need to think even bigger big enough to put free college back on the national agenda. Does free college sounds like magical thinking? Its more like a walk down memory lane. Fifty years ago in California, tuitionfree college wasnt pie in the sky, it was state policy. In 1964, a world-class education in the public University of California system came with free tuition and fees totaling just $220 for the year. At the 1964 minimum wage of $1.25 an hour, you could earn $220 in four and a half weeks of full-time work. That means a University of California student 50 years ago could earn enough to pay for a years college costs by flipping burgers for a month in the summer. Today, even at in-state rates, with tuition and fees averaging $8,893 for the 2013-2014 school year, it would take seven months of full-time work at the $7.25 federal minimum wage to make that much. Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. For years now, I have not watched beauty pageants such as Miss Florida, Miss America or Miss Universe. I know, they call them scholarship pageants, but get online and find pictures of all the contestants in any pageant, and tell me if any of them arent good looking. So I wasnt watching Miss Florida recently when Elizabeth Fechtel, 20, a University of Florida student and a resident of Leesburg, won. I can just hear the announcer saying something like this: The new Miss Florida, Elizabeth Fechtel! After that she probably took the walk down the runway with some sort of flowers and tears flowing. But several days later we found out the awful truth: Through no fault of her own, Elizabeth didnt win. She came in second. Pageant officials found, through an audit, that the scores were not tabulated correctly and the real winner was the young lady named runner-up, Victoria Cowen of Panama City. She now assumes the title of Miss Florida and goes to compete in the Miss America pageant. So here is my question: Cant we get people who know how to add to correctly tabulate the scores? There was something written that a judge had changed his mind and crossed out an old score and written in a new one, but the old one was counted. If we can get all of our Congressmen to push a button to vote correctly (and that seems to be a stretch), can we not get a system where the judges in beauty pageants can push a button to vote? Knechtel proved herself to be a deThere she is ... wait ... there she isnt Among Friends Jim Clark serving non-winner. She has a blog, and posted that she was devastated but the God has a plan. She added, A title does not define me. It opens doors, but it does not dictate who I am and where I am going. She also said that Cowen will be a good Miss Florida. One of the problems we read was that pageant officials require the winner to be available for appearances and therefore they have to drop out of college if they are attending. Knechtel did so, and I only hope that UF lets her be readmitted without penalty. In Delaware last week, Miss Delaware was also stripped of her title because she was three months too old to compete. She said she submitted a birth certificate and drivers license, but no pageant official caught the mistake. So the next time you watch one of these pageants, you should be wondering, what is going to be messed up behind the scenes. When stories such as this are not the contestants fault, you have to consider that in the past, maybe some things have been covered up. Will we ever know for sure? I doubt it.Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger and South Marion Citizen. Please see STUDENTS, Page 7 The West Marion Messenger is a free community newspaper covering news of communities west of Ocala including Fore Ranch, Stone Creek, Fairfield Village, Ocala Palms, Timberwood, Falls of Ocala, Quail Meadow, Foxwood Farms and Golden Hills. Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala, Fla., 34477. Problems getting the Messenger: If your community is listed above and the Messenger is not delivered to you or you are having trouble getting the paper from boxes around the S.R. 40 and S.R. 27 areas, call 854-3986.CONTACT INFORMATIONOffice (352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 489-6593 20441 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34432 EditorJim Clark 390-6444 Circulation Barbara Jaggers 854-3986 Inside Sales/Office Coord. -Michel Northsea 854-3986 Advertising Sales Tom Rapplean 352-564-2957 Advertising Sales Paige Lefkowitz 352-564-2902 Manager John Murphy 352-563-6363 Deadline for news : Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication. Member of the Community Papers of Florida I want to get news in the Messenger.Call editor Jim Clark at 352-390-6444 or send by e-mail to editor@westmarionmessenger.comCommunity news and photos must be received by Thursday the week before publication. Mail and photos must be e-mailed to editor@westmarionmessenger.com. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.Deadline for AdvertisingClassified Reader Ads 2 pm Friday Display Ads 5 pm Thursday It must be a really good sign when even a very young lady enjoys scrapbooking with her grandma. That was the case when the group met for its monthly afternoon of sharing ideas and creations in the FFV Clubhouse. Among those present was 4-month-old Mia Gracie Parades who was visiting with her grandmother, Jackie Abel. All the other ladies were thrilled to have the beautiful little visitor who seemed much more mature than someone so very young. There was work being done in many different types of projects and those present invited anyone interested to meet with them at the next scheduled meeting which will be listed in the FFV newsletter calendar. HOA Holds Semi-Annual Business Meeting on June 19 The Fairfield Village Homeowners Association held its only summer meeting in June. Meetings will not be held in July or August but will resume in September. President Larry Hansen welcomed back the treasurer, Carol Shaw, who had missed the previous two monthly meetings due to a serious illness. Mrs. Shaw received a round of applause from the board members and from the community residents who attended the meeting. Carol thanked everyone for all the good wishes she had received and prayers that she had heard about. She pointed out that both the good wishes and the prayers were part of the blessings that she feels made a difference in her recovery. Fairfield ladies love to scrapbook Fairfield Village Priscilla Barnett Proud grandma Jackie Abel was so excited to bring her 4 month old granddaughter with her to the scrapbook group that meets in the Fairfield Village Clubhouse every third Friday of each month. Little Mia Gracie Parades lives in Kansas at Fort Riley. Several items of interest to the community as a whole were discussed including some improvements that the residents could anticipate. Larry Hansen said that in meetings with Community Manager, Rachel Muse, the issue concerning one of the retention ponds would be addressed with the application of treatment that would inhibit the problem with mosquitoes during the very rainy season. Hansen also fielded concerns from several different residents that he promised to bring to the attention of the community manager. He announced that the televisions in the media room and main room that were damaged by lightning had been replaced and were fully functioning again. The meeting was brought to a close with good wishes from the HOA board to all FFV neighbors for a pleasant and safe summer. From the lively place filled with lovely people known as Fairfield Village, we wish all our friends, family, and neighbors a safe and happy Fourh of July. Remember the Fourth of July celebration that will be held in the Clubhouse. Happy birthday, U.S.A.! The Fairfield Village HOA held its semi-annual business meeting on June 19 in the FFV clubhouse. The board welcomed back the treasurer, Carol Shaw, who had been ill and is now recuperating very well. The board members left to right include Kerry Breeden, Larry Hansen, Chuck Belcher, Carol Shaw, Rubben Harvey and Ken Stiles. These lovely ladies were incorrectly identified last week. They are members of the McLean family. Young Amaya (far right) presented a touching tribute to her grandfather, Calvin McLean for Fathers Day.

PAGE 5

messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, July 2, 2014 5 4 W ednesday, July 2, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO ADVERTISECall854-3986 ADVERTISING SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 000HYK9 000HYK9 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000H0PY CONCRETE WORK REP AIRING OLD We Make Y our Concrete Look Good Specializing in Repairing Concrete Driveways Pool Decks Patios Entrance Ways Advantages: Mildew & Oil Resistant Non Skid Protection Easy to Keep Clean Commercial Grade Quality RENEWED SURFACES 000IEMY IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Seasonal Special Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2013 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $39 99 With coupon. 000IGA1 COMPUTER REPAIR COMPUTER PROBLEMS SOLVED Your home or business 7 days a week. Microsoft certified engineer. 30+ years experience. PC Repairs/Upgrades Virus Removal Router/Network Setup New PC Installs Se habla espaol Tech Solutions of Ocala 352-207-4435 000IFWK AIR CONDITIONING 352-208-4641 Locally Owned & Operated License # CAC1816140 WILSON AIR SERVICE Tune Up Special We Service All Brands Repairs Replacement Free Second Opinions 24-HR. Service $ 29 95 GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 795 $ 795 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RAY RAY RAY CC C C C C ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION Crayconst.com Crayconst.com Crayconst.com 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G GA RA GE S CR EE N D OO R 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G 16 x 7 SLIDING GARAGE GARAGE SCREEN SCREEN DOOR DOOR 000IEML We also install custom acrylic & glass windows. Beat The Price Increase! 000IK5Z CARPET CLEANING Countr yside Superior Carpet, Upholstery & Tile Cleaning 352-307-4100 711185 DIALAPRO For Your Professional Needs For Your Professional Needs WEST MARION Messenger WEST MARION Messenger West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Stay safe while celebrating the 4th When the Declaration of Independence was approved in 1776, our founding fathers probably did not foresee the day when it would be a national celebration filled with fireworks, barbecues, parades and festivals. What they did foresee was an upcoming rough time with the British military as the Europeans didnt want to lose control of this upstart group of colonies across the pond. But the dedication of those fathers and all our ancestors who fought the Revolutionary War made possible our freedom to celebrate as we do this week. Around here, the celebration features such events as Red, White and Blues on Thursday evening in Citizens Circle a couple of blocks south of the Downtown Square in Ocala. On Friday, God and Country Day will be observed off U.S. 27 Northwest as it has been for years. There are also golf cart parades and celebrations in various communities around the area, as well as the shooting of firecrackers by many individuals throughout Marion County. Its the firecrackers that scare us a little. Most people have the attitude that it cant happen to me when they shoot off dangerous material just for fun. Yet, over the years, there have been many stories of fireworks going off prematurely and backyard celebrations turning into tragedy. While many of these fireworks are illegal, this is one of those laws in which our law enforcement community looks the other way. Some may complain about the noise, but if law enforcement does any more than drive through a neighborhood, its a surprise. This year it might be a little more intensive, since the Fourth falls on a Friday. So when it comes to shooting off fireworks, youre on your own when it comes to safety. Please be careful we dont want anyone losing an eye, a finger or worse. Stay safe for the holiday. Travel agencies say the roads will be just as busy as usual, even though gas prices are the highest since 2008. But if youre driving somewhere, make sure you dont drink and drive and no matter what, watch out for the other guy. You may think youre safe, but that car coming in the opposite direction may not be as lawabiding as you are. Our Message PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGANMANAGER: JOHN MURPHYEDITOR: JIM CLARK MessengerWEST MARION Editorial Guest column Wall Street turns students into cash cowBY LEEANN HALL Special to the MessengerThe U.S. Senate held a vote recently to bring up legislation allowing student debt holders to refinance old loans at lower current interest rates. The motion to debate the Bank on Students Emergency Loan Refinancing Act (S. 2432) garnered a 56-38 majority but fell short of the 60 votes needed to open debate. Republicans cast 37 of the 38 no votes. Only three Republicans joined 53 Democrats and Independents in voting to debate the bill. For members of the college and high school classes of 2014, and for past graduates, this effort to tackle the student debt issue is sorely needed. For whether their degrees are in math, science, history or English, our graduates are coming out of college schooled in something else entirely: the crushing weight of student loan debt. With outstanding student debt now topping $1.2 trillion, 40 million Americans are facing the consequences of our failing national commitment to higher education. This situation poses a threat to Americas economic vitality and its promise of opportunity. The Federal Reserve reports that growing student loan debt is holding borrowers back from buying homes and cars. This is bad news for an economy still trying to get its mojo back since the Great Recession. And student loans have turned into a big business for the U.S. Department of Education, which reportedly made a profit of $41.3 billion from federal student loans last year. If the agency were a corporation, it would be one of the most profitable in the world. Its time to address the student debt crisis and the toll its taking on the economy. Allowing refinancing will save borrowers thousands of dollars in interest payments. That will free up disposable income, boost consumer spending, and strengthen the economy. However, to fix the overall student debt picture, we need to think even bigger big enough to put free college back on the national agenda. Does free college sounds like magical thinking? Its more like a walk down memory lane. Fifty years ago in California, tuitionfree college wasnt pie in the sky, it was state policy. In 1964, a world-class education in the public University of California system came with free tuition and fees totaling just $220 for the year. At the 1964 minimum wage of $1.25 an hour, you could earn $220 in four and a half weeks of full-time work. That means a University of California student 50 years ago could earn enough to pay for a years college costs by flipping burgers for a month in the summer. Today, even at in-state rates, with tuition and fees averaging $8,893 for the 2013-2014 school year, it would take seven months of full-time work at the $7.25 federal minimum wage to make that much. Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. For years now, I have not watched beauty pageants such as Miss Florida, Miss America or Miss Universe. I know, they call them scholarship pageants, but get online and find pictures of all the contestants in any pageant, and tell me if any of them arent good looking. So I wasnt watching Miss Florida recently when Elizabeth Fechtel, 20, a University of Florida student and a resident of Leesburg, won. I can just hear the announcer saying something like this: The new Miss Florida, Elizabeth Fechtel! After that she probably took the walk down the runway with some sort of flowers and tears flowing. But several days later we found out the awful truth: Through no fault of her own, Elizabeth didnt win. She came in second. Pageant officials found, through an audit, that the scores were not tabulated correctly and the real winner was the young lady named runner-up, Victoria Cowen of Panama City. She now assumes the title of Miss Florida and goes to compete in the Miss America pageant. So here is my question: Cant we get people who know how to add to correctly tabulate the scores? There was something written that a judge had changed his mind and crossed out an old score and written in a new one, but the old one was counted. If we can get all of our Congressmen to push a button to vote correctly (and that seems to be a stretch), can we not get a system where the judges in beauty pageants can push a button to vote? Knechtel proved herself to be a deThere she is ... wait ... there she isnt Among Friends Jim Clark serving non-winner. She has a blog, and posted that she was devastated but the God has a plan. She added, A title does not define me. It opens doors, but it does not dictate who I am and where I am going. She also said that Cowen will be a good Miss Florida. One of the problems we read was that pageant officials require the winner to be available for appearances and therefore they have to drop out of college if they are attending. Knechtel did so, and I only hope that UF lets her be readmitted without penalty. In Delaware last week, Miss Delaware was also stripped of her title because she was three months too old to compete. She said she submitted a birth certificate and drivers license, but no pageant official caught the mistake. So the next time you watch one of these pageants, you should be wondering, what is going to be messed up behind the scenes. When stories such as this are not the contestants fault, you have to consider that in the past, maybe some things have been covered up. Will we ever know for sure? I doubt it.Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger and South Marion Citizen. Please see STUDENTS, Page 7 The West Marion Messenger is a free community newspaper covering news of communities west of Ocala including Fore Ranch, Stone Creek, Fairfield Village, Ocala Palms, Timberwood, Falls of Ocala, Quail Meadow, Foxwood Farms and Golden Hills. Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala, Fla., 34477. Problems getting the Messenger: If your community is listed above and the Messenger is not delivered to you or you are having trouble getting the paper from boxes around the S.R. 40 and S.R. 27 areas, call 854-3986.CONTACT INFORMATIONOffice (352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 489-6593 20441 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34432 EditorJim Clark 390-6444 Circulation Barbara Jaggers 854-3986 Inside Sales/Office Coord. -Michel Northsea 854-3986 Advertising Sales Tom Rapplean 352-564-2957 Advertising Sales Paige Lefkowitz 352-564-2902 Manager John Murphy 352-563-6363 Deadline for news : Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication. Member of the Community Papers of Florida I want to get news in the Messenger.Call editor Jim Clark at 352-390-6444 or send by e-mail to editor@westmarionmessenger.comCommunity news and photos must be received by Thursday the week before publication. Mail and photos must be e-mailed to editor@westmarionmessenger.com. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.Deadline for AdvertisingClassified Reader Ads 2 pm Friday Display Ads 5 pm Thursday It must be a really good sign when even a very young lady enjoys scrapbooking with her grandma. That was the case when the group met for its monthly afternoon of sharing ideas and creations in the FFV Clubhouse. Among those present was 4-month-old Mia Gracie Parades who was visiting with her grandmother, Jackie Abel. All the other ladies were thrilled to have the beautiful little visitor who seemed much more mature than someone so very young. There was work being done in many different types of projects and those present invited anyone interested to meet with them at the next scheduled meeting which will be listed in the FFV newsletter calendar. HOA Holds Semi-Annual Business Meeting on June 19 The Fairfield Village Homeowners Association held its only summer meeting in June. Meetings will not be held in July or August but will resume in September. President Larry Hansen welcomed back the treasurer, Carol Shaw, who had missed the previous two monthly meetings due to a serious illness. Mrs. Shaw received a round of applause from the board members and from the community residents who attended the meeting. Carol thanked everyone for all the good wishes she had received and prayers that she had heard about. She pointed out that both the good wishes and the prayers were part of the blessings that she feels made a difference in her recovery. Fairfield ladies love to scrapbook Fairfield Village Priscilla Barnett Proud grandma Jackie Abel was so excited to bring her 4 month old granddaughter with her to the scrapbook group that meets in the Fairfield Village Clubhouse every third Friday of each month. Little Mia Gracie Parades lives in Kansas at Fort Riley. Several items of interest to the community as a whole were discussed including some improvements that the residents could anticipate. Larry Hansen said that in meetings with Community Manager, Rachel Muse, the issue concerning one of the retention ponds would be addressed with the application of treatment that would inhibit the problem with mosquitoes during the very rainy season. Hansen also fielded concerns from several different residents that he promised to bring to the attention of the community manager. He announced that the televisions in the media room and main room that were damaged by lightning had been replaced and were fully functioning again. The meeting was brought to a close with good wishes from the HOA board to all FFV neighbors for a pleasant and safe summer. From the lively place filled with lovely people known as Fairfield Village, we wish all our friends, family, and neighbors a safe and happy Fourh of July. Remember the Fourth of July celebration that will be held in the Clubhouse. Happy birthday, U.S.A.! The Fairfield Village HOA held its semi-annual business meeting on June 19 in the FFV clubhouse. The board welcomed back the treasurer, Carol Shaw, who had been ill and is now recuperating very well. The board members left to right include Kerry Breeden, Larry Hansen, Chuck Belcher, Carol Shaw, Rubben Harvey and Ken Stiles. These lovely ladies were incorrectly identified last week. They are members of the McLean family. Young Amaya (far right) presented a touching tribute to her grandfather, Calvin McLean for Fathers Day.

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When it comes to politics, I am as confused as the politicians themselves. I do not like to discuss politics because I do not understand it and just as soon as you understand one opinion, everything changes and you do not know where you are. I know I do not understand much that goes on in the political arena, but one of the things I have been hearing has to do with what they call, The Haves and the Have Nots. What do people mean when they use this phrase? Who are these Haves? And who are these Have Nots? Probably more importantly, what is it that these Haves have that the Have Nots want? The problem as I see it is simply this. If I want what somebody else has, am I really going to be happy when I have what he has? There are many things that I do not have and I am quite happy that I do not have them. I do not have an incurable disease. I do not have a debt so far above my head that I am going into bankruptcy. I do not have a table full of bills that I cannot pay. I am happy that I do not have any of these things. But as a part of the older generation, I do not really need anything that I do not have. I suppose it would be nice to have a new truck, but there is nothing wrong with my old truck. It still gets me where I want to go, the air conditioner still works and the radio still plays my kind of music. Why would I need a new truck? It probably would be nice to have a new house. At our age, my wife and I do not have the energy to pack up everything and unpack everything in a new place. As it stands, everything in our house is exactly where we want it. I choose to focus not on what I Have Not but on what I really do Have. I have a wonderful wife, but do not tell her I said so, it might get me into some kind of a situation. This year we will have been married some 43 years and why she has put up with the likes of me all this time I will never know. Actually, the fact that she has put up with me all these years brings into question her sanity. I have some wonderful children and grandchildren. It would be nice to live long enough to see my greatgrandchildren, but I am not pushing that issue. I am rejoicing in what I have. The best thing that I have, the thing I treasure the most, is my relationship with God. I can identify with what David said, The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want (Psalm 23:1). What David is really saying here is that when the Lord is my Shepherd, then the reality is simply, I shall not want. The other side of the picture is true as well. If I find myself constantly in want, maybe the Lord is not my Shepherd.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net or website www.jamessnyderministries.com. The Haves, the Have Nots and the Whatnots Out to Pastor Dr. James Snyder messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, July 2, 2014 3 6 W ednesday, July 2, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 www.jandjjewelersocala.com www.jandjjewelersocala.com Missing Diamonds? Diamonds Replaced! Insurance Claims Handled! 000IK0B 000IK37 There r eally is a difference in salons . . Nelly Has Reloca ted 854-653 1 Walk-Ins W elcome 61 60 SW Hwy. 200, Ocala, Suite 99 in the Ja smine Plaza FOURTEEN YEARS EXPERIENCE Come See Nelly DeJesus 000INNM Come exper ience this fabulous R on Garl design in Ocala LA RGE GROUPS WELCOME 352-401-6940 2201 NW 21st St. Ocala, FL GOLF FOURSOME SPECI AL Plus Tax After 9am Includes: 18 holes, 2 carts, and hot dog lunch. (Lunch served between 11am and 3pm) Expires 7/31/14. Must present coupon. Make your tee time online www .pineoakocala.com 18 HOLES 7 DA YS A WEEK! Christ the King The Rev. Donald J. Curran, RectorServices: Rite I 8:00 am Rite II 10:15 am3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary 352-351-9727 www.ctkaocala.orgAnglican Church 000I9PL 000IHUS 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS is discovered through worshiping together 71 1187 Before long, the units were once again formed across the field from where I sat. The more than 300 graduating Marines stood silently at attention as did the cadre in and around the stands. Sensing the moment; the gallery fell silent. Even the youngsters ceased their fussing. It was then that the band struck up the familiar strains of the Marine Corp Hymn. For the brief moments that the music played; everyone stood a little straighter; everyone felt a bit prouder; and some like myself, got that familiar lump in the throat. Later as I hugged my grandson I felt more pride and love than my mere words could ever express. Fortunately, men know that about each other so we dont try; we just know. The world is a scary place; have no doubt about that. There are those who would take our way of life and our very lives if it werent for the men and women of our military. We are truly fortunate that we are defended by young men and women who are ready; willing and able to protect us. They are less than 1% of the population; those who wear the uniform of our nation. We owe them our loyalty; our support and undying gratitude. My prayer is for the safety of all our service personnel and that our leaders will have good judgment in using them. I thank you, my readers, for letting me share this experience with you.John Everlove is the Cherrywood correspondent for the South Marion Citizen. PARRISCONTINUED FROM P AGE 1 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Dont be surprised if, in spite of your well-made plans, something goes awry. But dont worry. Your knowledge of the facts plus your Arian charm will help you work it out. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A personal relationship seems to be demanding more than you feel youre able to give. Best advice: Confront the issue. You could find the situation surprisingly easy to work through. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Resist being pressured into meeting your self-imposed deadline. This is important if you really feel that taking more time to finish a project could save time in the long run. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A vacation choice seems less interesting than when you first made it. Could it be a matter of the place or the people going with you? Find out before you consider a change of plans. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) Someone might be overriding your logic to get you to agree to favors you would normally avoid. See what youve been asked to do and see if youve been misled. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Try to keep that emerging judgmental aspect in check. Too many critiques on relatively unimportant issues could create a lot of negative bounce-back reactions. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Facing unpleasant facts about an associate isnt easy. But ignoring them isnt wise. Ask a trusted (and neutral) friend to help guide you on what to do and how you might do it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) A shift in opinion regarding a workplace situation could go a long way in vindicating the stand youve taken. But be aware that a resolution could still be a way off. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Its not like you to choose the easy way rather than the right way to do things. So, follow your instincts and feel assured they will lead you to the right decision. Good luck. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Hold off on making a personal commitment until you find out what it entails and whose interests are involved. There could be hidden facts you need to know. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) A new friend offers an unexpected opportunity that could lead to a career change. Check it out carefully and consider getting an assessment from someone familiar with this field. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) A surprising discovery leads to mixed reactions from those involved in the revelation. But as you come to appreciate the truth, youll be able to also come to terms with your feelings. PHOTO BY RON RATNERFarmers marketNothing like a farmers market in season to draw crowds. This photo was taken recently at the On Top of the World Circle Square Commons. The Ocala Symphony Orchestra will be performing the Red, White and OSO Blue: A Salute to our Troops concert on Friday, July 4 at 7 p.m. The event will be held at the Circle Square Cultural Center at On Top of the World, 8395 SW 80th St., Ocala. The Symphony will perform patriotic favorites such as the American Salute and Stars and Stripes as well as music from Porgy and Bess, selections from Apollo 13 and John Williams Midway March. There will also be a special salute to our veterans during the performance. The Ocala Symphony is working with Veterans Helping Veterans to give 100 complimentary tickets to veterans. Tickets are $19 and can be purchased at www.ocalasymphony.com, by calling the office at 352-351-1606, or at the door. Beginning at 4 p.m., On Top of the World will be filled with food, drinks, dancing, patriotic displays, and fireworks occurring after the OSO performance. Ocala Symphony to put on special program on July 4 Ocala Civic Theatre is pleased to be able to provide several college scholarships each year to students planning to pursue a degree in the performing arts. Many local students get their start in the performing arts through our Education Department youth programs, and we are delighted to watch them develop their talents and remain active in theatre as they grow up. Since the Ocala Civic Theatre scholarship program was established in 1981, more than $119,500 has been awarded to Marion County students majoring in the performing arts. This year, Ocala Civic Theatre and ACT 4 are honored to provide a total of $9,400 in scholarship funds to 12 talented students. We are proud to support their pursuit of higher education as well as the future of the performing arts. This years winners are: Barbara Purvis Memorial Scholarship: Cody LeFleur Bill Bartlett Memorial Scholarship: Michelle Ware Bridget Bartlett Memorial Scholarship: Sarah Scalf Founders Scholarship: Kevin Imes Fran Clemons ACT 4 Scholarships: David Leppert, Rebekah Leppert, Kelsey Plante, Tim Steis, and Victoria Wells Harvey Klein Memorial Scholarship: Savannah Hirst Leon Schmehl Memorial Scholarship: Greg Hersey Susan and Randall Moring Scholarship: Zachary Titterington Ocala Civic Theatre lists winners of annual scholarships

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Thursday, July 3 Red, White & Blues festivalThe City of Ocala will host the Red, White & Blues Festival Thursday, July 3, from 6 to 9 p.m. The free festival will take place at Citizens Circle just south of downtown. Entertainment will include live music by the Brown Brothers Band. Guests can enjoy hot dogs, ice cream, watermelon and a cupcake walk. The event will include craft vendors and activities for the entire family. The splash pad will be in full operation. For more information, call 352-368-5517.Saturday, July 5 Yoga at Sholom ParkYoga will take place at Sholom Park at 9 a.m. on Saturday, July 5. For more information, call Ingrid at 352-854-7950.Chess Club to meetThe chess club that formed at the Freedom Public Library meets the first Saturday of the month, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Grab your board and chess pieces and come on down. Interested persons are invited to attend for a rousing game of chess. Its your move! For more information, call Ron at 873-2276.Tuesday, July 8 Mac users to meetThe Ocala Macintosh User Group will meet Tuesday, July 8, from 7 to 9 p.m. This months featured presentation, Apps for Managing Your Finances, will be given by Angie Yoder. Tech Tips, Q & As, and the monthly raffle will follow. Meetings are held in the St. George Anglican Cathedral Parish Hall, 5646 SE 28th St., Ocala. Visitors are always welcome. Check out our website at http://ocalamug.org to learn more about the group.Wednesday, July 9 CERT training to startA new Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training will begin Wednesday, July 9, and continue through Aug. 13 from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Marion County Sheriffs Office, 692 NW 30th Ave., Ocala. The next training session will begin Oct. 9. The CERT program helps to prepare participants how to take care of themselves during a disaster. This six-week course will offer training on disaster preparedness, fire safety, disaster medical operations and more. Once trained, participants have the opportunity to join their local neighborhood team that will assist first responders during a disaster. CERT Teams assist by assessing their community and providing basic medical treatment to those in need and report all the information to Emergency Management. The CERT Program is offered by the Marion County Sheriffs Office, Bureau of Emergency Management and is a free training to all who are interested. Early applications are important as the class fills up quickly. For more information and for an application, contact Emergency Management at 352-369-8100 or e-mail MarionCERT@marionso.com.Thursday, July 17 Medication seminar scheduledOn July 17 at 1 p.m., College Road Baptist Church will host an educational program that covers common medication issues and how they impact older adults. Bring your list of medications and questions. Brookdale Senior Living Solutions at Chambrel will provide the desserts for this seminar. All are welcome. The church is at 5010 SW College Road (State Road 200). Phone: 352-237-5741.Sunday, July 20 Jazz Society to performThe Ocala Jazz Society will be performing on Sunday, July 20 from 2-5 p.m. at VFW Post 4781 across from Oak Run. The band performs on the third Sunday of each month, playing a variety of music including Jazz, Big Band, Dixieland and songs from the past. There is a $3 donation for Hospice. For information, call 352-237-0234. Monday, July 21 Ivy House hosts gala for HospiceThe Ivy House Restaurant invites you to the first Vintage Gala in honor of Hospice of Marion County on Monday, July 21. The event features live entertainment, a silent auction, a best-hat contest and caricature artist. Attire is vintage, linen, lace and hats. The event will begin at 6 p.m. with a social hour and cash bar; assorted heavy hors doeuvres will be available buffet-style at 7 p.m. Advance tickets are $80; tickets at the door are $90. Tickets may be purchased at www.hospiceofmarion.com or at the Hospice Administration office (3231 SW 34th Ave. Ocala). All proceeds support Hospice of Marion County childrens bereavement programs. For additional information call 352-854-5218.Tuesday, July 29 Breast cancer support group to meetThe SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Breast Cancer Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 SW 105th St., in the Chapel, Room 235. The meeting on Tuesday, July 29, will be an informal information exchange including sharing some of our experiences.Sunday, Aug. 10 Lola and the Saints in benefit concertThe TLC Time Capsule is set to transport you and your friends back in time to the golden era of the 50s and 60s. Lola and the Saints will perform a concert at the West Port High School Performing Arts Center, 3733 Southwest 80th Avenue, Ocala, from 3 to 5 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 10. Tickets are $15 each and are available at www.tlcocala.org under the Donate button. Proceeds from this concert will support the programs and dream of Transitions Life Center to benefit adults with special needs who have aged out of the ESE programs within the public school system. Please contact Ginger Broslat at 352-861-0252 or ginger@tlcocala.org.Tuesday, Sept. 23 Candidates invited to forumThe GFWC Womans Club of Ocala will conduct a Candidates Forum for candidates in the November elections on Tuesday, Sept. 23, at the Marion County Public Library Headquarters, 2720 E. Silver Springs Blvd., in Meeting Room C from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Evelyn B. Kelly will serve as moderator. Candidates for the Marion County Commission, the Marion County School Board, and the Florida House of Representatives are invited to participate. For further information contact Frances at 352-629-7397 or email: ocaladowns@yahoo.com. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, July 2, 2014 7 2 W ednesday, July 2, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Mon. Thurs. 11 am 8:30 pm Fri. & Sat. 11 am 9:30 pm Closed on Sunday 873-0223 8602 SW SR 200, 103rd St. Plaza Ocala, Florida 873-0223 873-0223 ONE LARGE CHEESE PIZZA $6.99 ONE LARGE CHEESE PIZZA $6.99 MONDAYS W ITH PURCHASE OF BEVERAGE E XP 7/10/14 Whole Wheat Pasta Available 000ILIE TUESDAYS W ITH PURCHASE OF BEVERAGE E XP 7/10/14 VALID IN OCALA ONLY 1 ST T OPPING F REE M ON & T HURS O NLY $6.99 $6.99 SPAGHETTI & MEATBALLS SPAGHETTI & MEATBALLS WEDNESDAYS & SATURDAYS W ITH PURCHASE OF BEVERAGE E XP 7/10/14 $20.00 $20.00 2 For BAKED DISHES CHICKEN PARMIGIANA VEAL PARMIGIANA BAKED DISHES CHICKEN PARMIGIANA VEAL PARMIGIANA I NCLUDES F REE C HEESECAKE OR Z EPPOLIS 000IMJX R&L Auto Detailing Call for Appt. 875-6484 6895 SW Hwy. 200 4 Miles West of I-75 ... because your car deserves better. Reg. $ 39 95 SUMMER SPECIAL: HAND WASH & WAX WORLD CLASS SERVICE SINCE Includes Windows, Vacuum Carpets, Wheel Treatment, Tire Shine & Door Jams FREE LOVEBUG REMOVAL! SUVs/PICKUPs $10 000HIQC The Truesdell Professional Building 200 N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Fl 34482 KELLEAN K. TRUESDELL, J.D., LLM Attorney & Counselor at Law (352) 873-4141 or KelleanTruesdell.com My Florida Estate Planning Workshop is available any day at any hour. Wills, Living Trusts, Financial and Medical Powers of Attorney, Probate, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, Asset Protection, Federal Death Tax Minimization, Trust Administration, Elder Law and Personal LifeCare Services. Quiet Oaks 11311 SW 95th Circle Near 484 off of SR 200 behind Soapys Carwash 352-861-2088 000IE7D Stop By For A Visit & See Why VOTED THE BEST AGAIN! LICENSE #AL9315 16 Y ears of Great Cars & Great Shows F RIENDSHIP B ARBERS Sponsoring F RI ., J ULY 4, 2014 B EGINNING AT 6:00 P M FREE CAR SHOW IN THE WINN DIXIE PLAZA Its Gonna Be G reat! John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000I2C2 Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your P et Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommoda tions for Your Pet Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www .palmettokennels.com 000IGR8 Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting Look for us on Facebook Look for us Look for us on Facebook on Facebook 000II4Y DR YER VENT CLEANING DONT LET Y OUR DR YER STAR T A FIRE! Call 1-352-566-6615 Dr. V ent 1-855-4DRVENT Locally Owned 15+ Y ears Licensed, Bonded, Insured Flat Rate No Hidden Costs $ 39 TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD, CALL Toll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith aName Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTALFor your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 For your convenience, mail in with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 20441 E Pennsylvania Ave, Dunnellon, FL 34432 or call... IMMEDIATE NEED FOR RNSCITRUS & MARION COUNTY HOSPITALS ********************** MED-SURG, ED & ICU Please call 352-432-0080 BRAND NEW Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress Set $150. Still in Original Plastic. (352) 484-4772 SW 55+ 4BR/3BACorner lot, enclosed/ screened porch, 2 car Carport, Many Updates $875 + Ammenities Including Pool Spruce Creek North (352)854-7987 LET USWORK FORYOU!CALL TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403West Marion Messenger Classifieds Get Results! PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. WE BUYR VS, TRUCKS, TRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, & MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 AUTO SW AP /CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAP MEETS NO SHOWJULY & AUGUST SEE YOU IN SEPTEMBER 1-800-438-8559 CHRYSLER2012 Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs Call T om for more info 352-325-1306 Blue Skies Lawn Service, LLC Monthly or weekly rates. Special discount for 55+ communities. 352-572-0161 ask for Brad. Clean out your closets, go through your garage, attack your attic and then use the classifieds to get rid of stuff you no longer use. And the FREE listing means you have more money left over after the sale!You can list any single item priced under $100 for sale for FREE!PUTTHEPOWER ANDCONVENIENCE OFTHECLASSIFIEDS TOWORKFORYOU!Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKSFREE TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403 Whats changed since 1964? A massive public disinvestment from higher education has shifted the costs of college onto students and families. Just in the past few years, state funding per student was cut by an average of 27 percent nationwide. Private interests have filled the void, transforming college finance into a vehicle for financial industry profits. Private lenders have moved aggressively into the student loan market, offering loans with interest rates in the double digits. The explosion of student loan debt has also fueled a burgeoning student loan debt collection industry. Translation: Wall Street has turned our college students into a new cash cow. It doesnt have to be this way. If were serious about giving our children and grandchildren real freedom freedom from student debt we need to reverse the trend of public disinvestment, put a stop to private profiteering, and recommit to free college in America. Then we need to marshal the resources to make it happen. Ending offshore tax giveaways to multinational corporations and millionaires would be one way to get there. Is solving the student debt crisis going to take a fight, given the political clout of the financial interests that are making big money off the status quo? Of course. But its a fight worth having. Lets make college in America what it should be: a free, shared vehicle for building an educated people, not another costly way for special interests to take us for a ride.Hall is executive director of the Alliance for a Just Society, a national research, policy, and organizing network that advances state and national campaigns for economic and social equity. STUDENTSCONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 Only two more days until the Fourth of July. That means were getting ready for another fun and exciting day here in Quail Meadow. At the time this is being written almost 100 tickets have been purchased for the chicken dinner. Reminder: The parade will begin at the clubhouse at 9 a.m. and will travel throughout the neighborhood. The patriotic music can be heard on your FM radio dial at 97.7. Following the parade the awards ceremony will take place in the clubhouse (cookies and lemonade will be provided). Parade participants will begin lining up at 8 on NW 32nd Street (north side of the clubhouse). The cars will line up at 8, followed at 8:15 with the golf carts, and all others at 8:30. Check the July QM Reporter for a map that shows the parade route. Chicken, corn-on-the-cob, baked beans, cole slaw, potato salad, and watermelon are on the menu for the dinner. Entertainment will be provided by R Music For You. This is going to be a great day in Quail Meadow. In case of rain (it never rains in the morning) the parade will take place on Saturday; but the dinner will still be on the 4th. Independence Day July 4th a day for remembering how our country became the United States of America. During the American Revolution, the Quail Meadow to celebrate the 4th Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb Please see QUAIL, Page 8 Happenings

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INDEX Happenings..........2 Rev. Snyder..........3 Fairfield Village..4 Quail Meadow......7 VOLUME 8, NUMBER 20 WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 2014 Puzzles Page 6 ClassifiedsPage 78 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000I4P0 000INV7 PHOTO BY PRISCILLA BARNETTStarting youngScrapbooking is a hobby for young and old and, in this case, especially young. Little Mia Gracie Parades from Fort Riley, Kansas, was visiting her grandmother and attending a Fairfield Village scrapbook meeting. See column on Page 4. BY JIM CLARK EditorThe Florida Highway Patrol joined other law enforcement agencies in several states along Interstate 75 in starting strict enforcement of the move-over law. At a press conference at the Marion County northbound rest area along the highway, newly named Maj. Eileen Powell of Troop B, which serves Marion and several other counties, announced that the major push was taking place June 27-29. But she explained the law that is in effect all the time. Drivers who approach an emergency vehicle or tow truck with lights flashing on the shoulder must move over one lane if on a four-lane or wider highway, such as the Interstate. If one a two-lane road or if it is impossible to move over, then the driver must slow to 20 mph below the posted speed limit or to 5 mph if the speed is 20 or below. She also added the caveat unless directed to do otherwise by law enforcement. While the enforcement is multi-state and also includes Interstate 95, Powell did say that the FHP changed its focus from motorcycle safety to the move-over law, partly because of the recent accident on Interstate 75, near the rest area, where Trooper Chelsea Richard and two others were killed while working a previous accident. FHP issues reminder about move-over law PHOTO BY JIM CLARKAt a press conference Friday morning, The Florida Highway Patrol announced it was joining several other states from Florida to Michigan for special enforcement of the Move-over law. From the left, holding signs that read #moveover, are Ocala Police officer R.D. Grady and Billy Woods; Troopers Jamie Mulverhill and Sgt. Mark Boatright, holding sign that reads "Staying alive on 75; Troop B Major Eileen Powell and Sgt. Tracy Hisler-Pace, public information officer for Troop B. Its called Buckin. Thats a technique thieves use when trolling for unlocked vehicles. The thief moves about a neighborhood, checking vehicle doors to see if any are unlocked, said Judge Cochran, Marion County Sheriffs Office Public Information Officer. Thats the buckin element. During a recent vehicle burglary investigation, detectives arrested a 16year-old who admitted to buckin and doing it because he was bored. The teenager told detectives he would walk up to vehicles to check doors and if the doors were locked, he moved on. But, in one incident, the teenager found an unlocked vehicle and stole two winning lottery tickets. Detectives say the teen gave one lottery ticket to his mother, who cashed it. Detectives working with both the store that sold the tickets and state lottery security officials were able to get video of the person cashing that ticket. Additional information led to the identity of the woman. She told detectives her son gave her that ticket and detectives had permission to speak to the son. He admitted to the crime. The juvenile was arrested and transported to the Marion County Juvenile Detention. He will face charges of burglary and petit theft. A second teen may have the other ticket. In Marion County, 93% of car burglaries are of unlocked vehicles. Detectives say when students are out of school, vehicle burglaries go up. Burglars target unlocked cars BY JOHN EVERLOVE Special to the MessengerObviously proud of the uniform she was wearing, she walked confidently onto the field in front of the nearly filled bleachers. Holding a microphone steadily in her hands she said in a clear; concise; resonant tone, Good Morning. A few people in the crowd responded meekly so she repeated her greeting more forcefully. Good morning! Everyone quickly got the message and answered in unison, Good morning. A slight smile briefly crossed her face and then she began to speak. I am Brigadier General Lori Reynolds, Commanding General; Marine Corp Recruit Training; Parris Island South Carolina. The occasion for our meeting was the flag raising ceremony at 8 a.m. in front of the Base Headquarters. As General Reynolds pointed out in her remarks; it is a ceremony that occurs daily on each Marine Base and at 170 embassies around the world. Pointing out 5 young Marines holding the large Garrison Flag, Gen. Reynolds reminded each of us in the audience that for over nearly 240 years the nation has trusted the Marines to make sure that our flag is defended and protected and that the ideals for which it stands are upheld and supported. Speaking on behalf of the Marines on this day; she assured the crowd; the Marines will always protect the flag and the Nation it represents. Everyone stood and the band sounded The Star Spangled Banner. With ease and grace Old Glory glided to the top of its staff. A slight breeze caught the red, white and blue material blowing it free from the lanyard and pole. The huge flag extended to its full length and breadth as if returning the salute of the several hundred people standing at attention beneath it. That was my introduction to Parris Island and I was impressed. Many years have passed since I wore the uniform of my country. With pride I saw my son Scott as he went off to Navy Basic Training at Great Lakes. On this day however, I would witness my grandson, Private First Class Corey Sharp, graduate from Marine Corp Basic Training. From the stands I viewed Corey and his fellow graduates march across the parade ground. Every one of them was in step; marching straight and tall; their eyes fixed and their postures exuding confidence. In speeches from the officers, we learned what the past three months of grueling training had been like for these young men and women. We gained an even greater appreciation for the commitment; endurance and patriotism that our loved one had displayed. Like his fellow recruits, a few short months ago my grandson had been a civilian; today through his perseverance; dedication and sacrifice; he was a Marine. Pass in review! the Adjutant ordered and the formation began to march past the reviewing stand and bleachers. Loud cheers greeted each platoon as they marched by and while the uniformed Marines who were watching maintained their military bearing; the civilians let lose with wild applause. Paying a visit to Parris Island to a Marine Corps ceremony Scott Everlove, son and Corey Everlove, grandson of reporter John Everlove. Please see PARRIS, Page 3 legal separation of the American colonies from Great Britain occurred on July 2, 1776, when the Second Continental Congress voted to approve a resolution of independence that had been proposed in June by Richard Henry Lee of Virginia. After voting for independence, Congress turned its attention to the Declaration of Independence. Thomas Jefferson was the principal author of this document. Congress debated and revised the Declaration; finally approving it on July 4, 1776. Most delegates actually signed the Declaration on August 2, 1776. Only two of the men who signed the Declaration of Independence later became President of our country John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. It is interesting to note that these two men died on the same day, July 4, 1826, the 50th anniversary of the USA. It wasnt until 1938 that Congress made Independence Day a paid federal holiday. In 1870, Congress made the day an unpaid holiday for federal employees. In 1778, General George Washington celebrated the day by giving his soldiers a double ration of rum and also an artillery salute. Today, military bases give a salute to the union by firing one gun for each state. Have you ever thought about the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence and what kind of lives they led? Twenty-four of these men were lawyers and jurists, 11 were merchants, and nine were farmers or plantation owners. They were all well-educated and knew the risks they were taking by signing this document. They also knew that if captured, their penalty would be death. Five of the men were captured by the British and tortured, 12 had their homes ransacked and burned, two lost their sons who were serving in the Revolutionary Army, another had his two sons captured. Thomas McKeam served in Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding. He lost all his possessions. Many others had their homes looted. Several died bankrupt. John Hart lived in the forests and caves for over a year; when he returned home his wife had died and his 13 children had vanished. Lets each take a moment to reflect on what these men did and the sacrifices they paid in order for us to have our freedom today. When was the last time you read the Declaration of Independence? Have a happy and safe holiday! QUAILCONTINUED FROM PAGE 7