West Marion messenger

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Title:
West Marion messenger
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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English
Publisher:
Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Florida
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00100092:00210


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PAGE 1

INDEX Fairfield Village..2 Stone Creek........2 Rev. Snyder..........3 Quail Meadow......6 VOLUME 8, NUMBER 10 WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 2014 Puzzles Page 9 ClassifiedsPage 1112 Wednesday, May 28, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000I30G 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala (352) 629-0900 (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (352) 629-0900 Other locations throughout the southeast 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala GREAT FINANCING ON EZ-GO CARTS! WHAT BATTERY A RE Y OU L OOKING F OR ??? CUSTOM BATTERY PACKS LAPTOP COMPUTER BATTERIES CAMCORDER BATTERIES WHEELCHAIR BATTERIES SECURITY SYSTEM BATTERIES AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES FARM TRACTOR BATTERIES JET SKI BATTERIES GAME FEED BATTERIES MARINE BATTERIES CELL PHONE BATTERIES POWER WHEELS BATTERIES WATCH BATTERIES KEY REMOTE BATTERIES TRUCK BATTERIES CORDLESS PHONE BATTERIES EMERGENCY LIGHT BATTERIES ATV BATTERIES MOTORCYCLE BATTERIES LAWNMOWER BATTERIES Automotive Batteries 50 Bronze $ 79 95 exchange (Prices may vary according to your vehicle) FREE 10-Minute Installation (Most Models) 60 Silver $ 89 95 exchange 72 Gold $ 99 95 exchange 84 Platinum $ 109 95 exchange GOLF CARS STAR TING AT $2,295 & UP FRIDAY JUNE 6 10:30 AM WEDNESDAY JUNE 11 11:00 AM WEDNESDAY JUNE 4 11:00 AM2111 SW College Rd Ocala, FL 34474 000ICODTHURSDAY, JUNE 5 11:00 AM8075 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala, FL 34481 3393 SW College Rd Ocala, FL 34474 6998 N US Hw y. 27 Ocala, FL 34482 In its 2014 Atlantic hurricane season outlook issued today, NOAAs Climate Prediction Center is forecasting a nearnormal or below-normal season. The main driver of this years outlook is the anticipated development of El Nio this summer. El Nio causes stronger wind shear, which reduces the number and intensity of tropical storms and hurricanes. El Nio can also strengthen the trade winds and increase the atmospheric stability across the tropical Atlantic, making it more difficult for cloud systems coming off of Africa to intensify into tropical storms. The outlook calls for a 50 percent chance of a below-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season, and only a 10 percent chance of an above-normal season. For the six-month hurricane season, which begins June 1, NOAA predicts a 70 percent likelihood of 8 to 13 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 3 to 6 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 1 to 2 major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher). These numbers are near or below the seasonal averages of 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes, based on the average from 1981 to 2010. The Atlantic hurricane region includes the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. Thanks to the environmental intelligence from NOAAs network of earth observations, our scientists and meteorologists can provide life-saving products like our new storm surge threat map and our hurricane forecasts, said Kathryn Sullivan, Ph.D., NOAA administrator. And even though we expect El Nio to suppress the number of storms this season, its important to remember it takes only one land falling storm to cause a disaster. Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAAs Climate Prediction Center, said the Atlantic which has seen above-normal seasons in 12 of the last 20 years has been in an era of high activity for hurricanes since 1995. However, this high-activity pattern is expected to be offset in 2014 by the impacts of El Nio, and by cooler Atlantic Ocean temperatures than Hurricane season: Officials predict fewer storms Hurricane tracking map Page 6 Please see STORMS, Page 3 Quail Meadow had an entertaining evening recently when Elvis and Cher dropped in. The left photo shows Dottie Hefferon with Elvis. More photos on Page 6. Entertainment at Quail Meadow At last Tuesdays Marion County Board of County Commissioners meeting, State Fire Marshal Director Julius Halas recognized Marion County Fire Rescue Lt. Scott Chappell as the Florida Fire Chiefs Association 2013 Search and Rescue Responder of the Year. Each year, the Florida Fire Chiefs Association recognizes those in the fire service who have demonstrated excellence and ongoing commitment to the firefighting profession. State Fire Marshal Bureau Chief Barry Baker said Chappells award is significant because it is bestowed by fellow fire service members. Anytime in someones career when theyre recognized by their peers for excellence, as someone others look up to, thats pretty special, Baker said. During Tuesdays meeting, Halas presented commissioners with a resolution that outlined Chappells many roles and accomplishments since entering the fire service in 1993. Chappell was hired by Marion County Fire Rescue in 2000. In 2001, he began Firefighter honored Please see HONORED, Page 3 Garden visitMargie Santiago, a member of the Stone Creek Garden Club, recently entertained club members and showed off her garden. More photos on Pages 2 and 12. Over $21 million: Thats the amount of energy savings Marion County Public Schools has accumulated since 2005, when it started the Energy Management Program. That figure is the equivalent of three years of electricity cost for the entire district. The biggest savings come from renovations, more energy-efficient lighting and electricity components, regulated heating and air conditioning, nightly computer shutdowns, and four-day summer work weeks. The districts Energy Management Program to date has tallied $21,274,999 in avoidance costs. Despite adding nearly 1 million square feet of space since 2005, the district has used 8.5 million kilowatt hours less in the same time span. Electricity rates have also increased 22 percent since then. Additionally, the district uses 94 cents per square foot in energy costs, 18 percent less than the states $1.15 average. Over the past nine years, the average per-school savings is nearly 33 percent, with Vanguard High (56 percent savings), Lake Weir High (45 percent), Dunnellon Middle (45 percent), Maplewood Elementary (45 percent), BelleviewSantos Elementary (43 percent), North Marion Middle (43 percent), Howard Middle (43 percent), Dunnellon Elementary (42 percent), Oakcrest Elementary (39 percent), and North Marion High (38 percent) leading the charge. So far, this school years leaders include Vanguard High (44 percent), North Marion Middle (37 percent), Oakcrest Elementary (36 percent), Lake Weir Middle (35 percent), and Howard Middle (31 percent). Students and employees significantly contribute to these savings because they change behaviors and now take more conscious steps to conserve energy, save dollars, and keep things as green as possible. The district captured state and national attention for its energy-saving efforts. In addition to steps already listed, the district also unplugs electronic equipment during extended breaks, piloted an LED lighting project to replace fluorescent lighting, and carefully analyzes energy use for electricity, sewer, natural gas, and fuel oil. Energy dollars saved help maintain and improve schools and facilities around the district. The program is selffunded, meaning savings pay for the program and outreach efforts. Schools cite energy savings Photos from Stone Creek Garden Club The visitors to Margies garden. Margie is fourth from the left. Margie was a gracious host and a good cook.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, May 28, 2014 11 2 W ednesday, May 28, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000IBSD FL Seller Of Travel 13519 Marlene Kaiser OTOW resident 843-4133 marlenekaiser@yahoo.com Fireworks Dinner Cruise July 4, in Cocoa Bus, Buffet & Dinner $110pp Includes 6 piece Jazz Band Albuquerque Balloon Festival with Collette Oct. 4-9, 2014 Prices include airfare and meals 000IAJ0 TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith aName Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTAL For your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 For your convenience, mail in with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 20441 E Pennsylvania Ave, Dunnellon, FL34432 or call... BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 AUTO SW AP/ CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAP MEETS SUN. JUNE 1st. 1-800-438-8559 Looking to Care for YOUR LOVED ONE EXP. RELIABLE ACCOUNTABLE AND HONESTOver 10 Y ears Exp CALL SUSAN (352)484-0930 STUMP GRINDINGCALL JIM FOR FREE ESTIMATES (800) 478-8679 Trimming,Removal and Debris Clean Up. Reliable,Service, Reasonable Prices. Lic/Ins. 20 yrs Exp. FREE Estimates. Residential Commercial 352-873-6884 352-875-8317 $100,000. + Closing Cost will get you this 2,100 Sq. Ft., 3BR, 3BA, Fully Furn. Condo in Citrus Hills Call 352-419-5268 WE BUYR VS, TRUCKS, TRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, & MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 WE BUYR VS, TRUCKS, TRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, & MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 WE BUY ANY VEHICLE In Any Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make, Any Model 813-335-3794, Call AJ 813-458-0584 Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKSFREE TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. LET US WORKFOR YOU!CALL TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403WEST MARIONMESSENGERCLASSIFIEDSGET RESULTS! NOW ENROLLING CosmetologyDay & Night SchoolBarberNight SchoolMassageDay & Night SchoolNail & Skin CareDay School Starts Weekly Night School Mon-Tues-Wed 5:00PM-9:00PM Campus Locations: NEW PORT RICHEY SPRING HILL BROOKSVILLE(727) 848-8415 www.benes.eduSTAR T A CAREER IN A YEAR BRAND NEW Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress Set $150. Still in Original Plastic. (352) 484-4772 SW 55+ 4BR/3BACorner lot, enclosed porch, includes inlaw quarters, with bath & second kitchen $950. mo. Includes amenities and Community Pool. (352)854-7987 Call After 5pm Somebody else wants it!Got something special you no longer use? Sell it in the Classifieds. It may be just the perfect item to fill somebody elses need.TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 get some help in return. And dont do it for the glory and the recognition. The best volunteers are those who work behind the scenes, who get nothing out of it but personal satisfaction. 8. Finally, keep the faith, and not just religious faith. If you are a religious person, you will be tested. Most of those who are religious find great solace in that faith, so dont let yourself get tempted away from it. But there is another kind of faith, faith in your fellow human beings, faith in the country. Be aware of the times you live in, for sure, but realize there are so many places in the world that are worse off than we are (just look at the kidnapped girls in Nigeria). While we live in the fear that there could be another attack on us somewhere in the U.S., there are people who live with the very real fear of being blown up every day. While we have medical care available to us when we get sick, there are people who succumb to the least little illness because their bodies cant fight diseases, or they have no access to things as simple as an aspirin. As you depart from high school, thank your teachers, your counselors, your school employees. They surely dont get rich doing what they do, but almost all of them love their profession. Someday you will realize how good the days of high school were. But for now, youve reached your goal of getting your diploma, which is a job well done. Congratulations!Jim Clark is the editor of the South Marion Citizen and West Marion Messenger. GRADUATESCONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 Read the classifieds The Garden Club of Stone Creek recently viewed the garden of one of its members, Margie Santiago. Margie and her husband live in the Buckhead neighborhood on a corner lot. For the last seven years they have added to their beautiful garden. The idea for viewing gardens came from member Linda Cooper at one of the clubs idea meetings that was started by President Audrey Edwards to get members involved in the planning of events of the garden club. The Garden Club is looking to highlight a garden a quarter. If you have a garden that you would like showcased, you can contact any member of the Garden Club board. Margies home sits on a corner lot on 71st loop and when one passes her home, you can see Margie and husband out working in this beautiful garden. Margie said, We dont go to the gym so this is our exercise. Over the years, I have seen this garden transformed. There are two water features in the garden one in the front in the form of a fountain and one in the back. Margie said that there are about 100 different plants, trees and shrubs in the garden. Each plant in the garden is labeled which is wonderful for those of us who like something but do not know the name. Her backyard has become a private oasis of sorts with a patio and various flowering plants, trees and the sound of running water. She says that when she entertains her guests are treated to breakfast outside. Those in the club who came to view this amazing garden were also treated to Margie wonderful cooking. She made Pancit which is a noodle dish, Empanada which was filled with ground turkey and for dessert Baklava.What a treat she prepared for all of us! The Garden Club meets the first Thursday of each month and they are planning a trip on May 28 to the Butterfly garden in Gainesville. Be on the lookout for the next Stone Creek Garden to be featured and the other events this club is planning. Showcasing a garden Stone Creek Patricia Gizzi Part of Margies garden. More phtos on Page 12. There is a new face in the administrative office of the FFV Clubhouse. Maria Delarosa is our new administrative assistant, and we are all so happy to have her with us working Wednesday through Saturday. Maria came to the United States from Puerto Rico some 13 years ago, and she loves her home here in Ocala. In keeping with our theme for the month of May honoring Mothers, Maria is also a mother to three young children. She has a 12-year-old son, Jeremiah; a 9-year-old son, Rafael; and a 5-year-old daughter, Naracisa. Maria assures all FFV neighbors that she will have an open door policy and is ..here to help. She will be happy to have neighbors stop by to say hello so that she will get to know as many people as possible very soon. As we all get to know Maria, we should remember that there are Fairfield welcomes Maria Delarosa Maria Delarosa smiles a big welcome for those who come by her office in the Fairfield Village Clubhouse. Fairfield Village Priscilla Barnett literally hundreds of names for her to learn, so it would be helpful if we identify ourselves when we see her to assist her to become acquainted with those of us who live in Fairfield Village, the lively place filled with lovely people. Welcome to Fairfield Village, Maria Delarosa. Designed to rate how well hospitals protect patients from accidents, errors, injuries and infections, the latest Hospital Safety Score honored Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital with an A its top grade in patient safety. The Hospital Safety Score is compiled under the guidance of the nations leading experts on patient safety and is administered by The Leapfrog Group (Leapfrog), an independent industry watchdog. The first and only hospital safety rating to be peer-reviewed in the Journal of Patient Safety, the Score is free to the public and designed to give consumers information they can use to protect themselves and their families when facing a hospital stay. More than 2,500 U.S. general hospitals were assigned scores in spring 2014, with about 32-percent receiving an A grade. Safety should come first for patients and their families when selecting a hospital because errors and infections are common and can have devastating efHospitals earn safety honors Please see SAFETY, Page 11 fects, which is why safety is at the forefront of all our patient care initiatives, said Randy McVay, CEO, Ocala Health. The physicians and staff of Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital are committed to making the well-being of patients our top priority. To see Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospitals scores as they compare nationally and locally, visit the Hospital Safety Score website at www.hospitalsafetyscore.org, which also provides information on how the public can protect themselves and loved ones during a hospital stay. Ocala Health encompasses Ocala Regional Medical Center, a 200-bed facility located in the heart of Ocala, and West Marion Community Hospital, a 70-bed hospital located on State Road 200. SAFETYCONTINUED FROM PAGE 2 000ICJD Robins & Morton is currently seeking bids from qualified Subcontractors and Suppliers for the Ocala Regional Medical Center (ORMC) and West Marion Community Hospital (WMCH) construction projects. Ocala and other surrounding area businesses are invited to attend a Diversity Meet & Greet to learn more about procurement opportunities associated with the upcoming project. Robins & Morton and HCA are strongly committed to the development and implementation of initiatives which promote the inclusion of minority and women-owned businesses. What : The projects consist of a 70,000 sq. ft. 2-story ICU addition at ORMC, and a 5,300 sq. ft. Cath Lab addition, a 2,200 sq. ft. Lab expansion, and a 2-story 24-bed Med/Surg tower addition at WMCH. When : Wednesday, June 4, 2014 11:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Where : West Marion Community Hospital (2nd Floor Classroom) 4600 SW 46th Court Ocala, FL 34474 Bid Packages include : Concrete Roofing Masonry Structural & Misc Steel General Trades/Rough Carpentry Waterproof/Damproofing Caulking Doors & Hardware Glass & Glazing EIFS Metal Studs & Drywall Spray Fireproofing Flooring Painting Specialties Signage Casework Lead Shielding Window Blinds Equipment Supports Fire Protection Mechanical & Plumbing Electrical IT & Structured Cabling For information regarding bid packages or questions concerning this project, contact: Drew Duffy at (615) 377-3666 Email: dduffy@robinsmorton.com To RSVP for the upcoming Meet & Greet, contact: Rhea Kinnard, Diversity Consultant at (615) 941-8396 Email: kinn0167@aol.com Food and Refreshments will be provided ROBINS & MOR TON

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weve seen in recent years. Atmospheric and oceanic conditions across the tropical Pacific are already taking on some El Nio characteristics. Also, we are currently seeing strong trade winds and wind shear over the tropical Atlantic, and NOAAs climate models predict these conditions will persist, in part because of El Nio, Bell said. The expectation of near-average Atlantic Ocean temperatures this season, rather than the above-average temperatures seen since 1995, also suggests fewer Atlantic hurricanes. NOAA is rolling out new tools at the National Hurricane Center this year. An experimental mapping tool will be used to show communities their storm surge flood threat. The map will be issued for coastal areas when a hurricane or tropical storm watch is first issued, or approximately 48 hours before the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds. The map will show land areas where storm surge could occur and how high above ground the water could reach in those areas. Early testing on continued improvements to NOAAs Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting model (HWRF) shows a 10 percent improvement in this years model compared to last year. Hurricane forecasters use the HWRF along with other models to produce forecasts and issue warnings. The HWRF model is being adopted by a number of Western Pacific and Indian Ocean rim nations. NOAAs seasonal hurricane outlook is not a hurricane landfall forecast; it does not predict how many storms will hit land or where a storm will strike. Forecasts for individual storms and their impacts will be provided throughout the season by NOAAs National Hurricane Center. It only takes one hurricane or tropical storm making landfall to have disastrous impacts on our communities, said Joe Nimmich, FEMA associate administrator for Response and Recovery. Just last month, Pensacola, Florida saw five inches of rain in 45 minutes without a tropical storm or hurricane. We need you to be ready. Know your risk for hurricanes and severe weather, take action now to be prepared and be an example for others in your office, school or community. Learn more about how to prepare for hurricanes at www.ready.gov/hurricanes. This week, May 25-31, is National Hurricane Preparedness Week. To help those living in hurricaneprone areas prepare, NOAA offers hurricane preparedness tips, along with video and audio public service announcements in both English and Spanish, featuring NOAA hurricane experts and the FEMA Administrator at www.hurricanes.gov/prepare. NOAA will issue an updated outlook for the Atlantic hurricane season in early August, just prior to the historical peak of the season.messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, May 28, 2014 3 10 W ednesday, May 28, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 795 $ 795 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RAY RAY RAY CC C C C C ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION Crayconst.com Crayconst.com Crayconst.com 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G GA RA GE S CR EE N D OO R 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G 16 x 7 SLIDING GARAGE GARAGE SCREEN SCREEN DOOR DOOR 000I45L We also install custom acrylic & glass windows. Beat The Lovebugs 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000H0PY CONCRETE WORK REPAIRING OLD We Make Your Concrete Look Good Specializing in Repairing Concrete Driveways Pool Decks Patios Entrance Ways Advantages: Mildew & Oil Resistant Non Skid Protection Easy to Keep Clean Commercial Grade Quality RENEWED SURFACES 000I6PZ COMPUTER REPAIR COMPUTER PROBLEMS SOLVED Your home or business 7 days a week. Microsoft certified engineer. 30+ years experience. PC Repairs/Upgrades Virus Removal Router/Network Setup New PC Installs Se habla espaol Tech Solutions of Ocala 352-207-4435 000I3EO IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Seasonal Special Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2013 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $39 99 With coupon. 000I6QC HAND YMAN Weekend Warrior Let Me Do All Your Chores Home Maintenance/ Repair Lawn & Y ard Pressure W ashing Painting, Etc. V ery Dependable, Competent & Affordable Excellent, Local References. Reclaim Your Fr ee Time! Contact W ayne Green at 352-875-6106 000IA18 CARPET CLEANING Countr yside Superior Carpet, Upholstery & Tile Cleaning 352-307-4100 SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 000HYK9 000HYK9 000HZMH AIR CONDITIONING 352-208-4641 Locally Owned & Operated License # CAC1816140 WILSON AIR SERVICE Tune Up Special We Service All Brands Repairs Replacement Free Second Opinions 24-HR. Service $ 29 95 000I4A1 PEST CONTROL SERVICES Hasta La Bye Bye. Tri-County Services, Inc. Pest Control, T ermite & Lawn Care Licensed and Insured Serving Central Florida for over 20 years Family owned and operated Toll Free 1-888-352-9290 or call Rick 352-266-4613 711185 DIALAPRO For Your Professional Needs For Your Professional Needs WEST MARION Messenger WEST MARION Messenger John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000I2C2 Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your P et Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 000I7SN Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting Look for us on Facebook Look for us Look for us on Facebook on Facebook Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 www.jandjjewelersocala.com 000IANF Come see why we are the peoples choice in Jewelry. Thanks to our valued customers 000I7AP No Matter What Your Age, Chances Are You Want a Better Future. Our Financial Workshop: Your Source for Financial Education is an easy way to learn how to save, invest and work toward your financial goals. Whether you are just starting out or want to learn something new, the workshop will give you real-world strategies that are easy to follow. When: Four-W eek Workshop Series 10:30 a.m. W ednesday, June 4, 11, 18 & 25 Where: Edward Jones Royal Palm Plaza 8960 SW Hwy. 200 Ste 3, Ocala, FL 34481 Refreshments and light snacks will be served. STORMSCONTINUED FROM P AGE 1 sharing his expertise with others as an instructor at the Florida State Fire College, where he currently serves as the Urban Search & Rescue/Hazardous Materials Program Coordinator. In February 2007, he was promoted to lieutenant and began leading the A-shift crew of MCFR Silver Springs Shores Station 17, where he currently serves and oversees monthly, department-wide training programs. Chappell is a member of MCFRs Technical Rescue Team and the Florida US&R Task Force 8, and is acting president of the Marion County Firefighter Benevolence Fund. He served as the program coordinator for the College of Central Floridas Fire Science Program and is on various committees and work groups for US&R/Hazmat and the State Homeland Security Grant Program (SHSGP). He also holds a bachelors degree from the University of Florida and a masters in Public Administration from Barry University. MCFR Fire Chief M. Stuart McElhaney said hes extremely proud of the work Chappell has done and to have him as a part of the department. Lt. Chappell represents the type of leader every organization hopes to employ. The extra hours he commits to training and development certainly make MCFR better. Through his work with the Benevolence Fund, hes also made a profound impact on the community and the lives of other fire service members, McElhaney said. STORYCONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 This week I came face-to-face with a genuine dilemma. I had several meetings across town and for some reason I miscalculated and ended up with a 2-1/2 hour gap between meetings. I hate to waste time, but if I drove back to my office, I would simply have to return to my meeting later and with the cost of gas these days, one cannot be too cautious. You know gas is getting high when it costs more to fill up the car than the car is really worth. The most valuable thing in my car is in my gas tank, at least when it is filled. I remedied the situation by stopping in a small coffee shop for cup of Joe. As far as I am concerned, there is no bad time to have a cup of coffee, in spite of the price. I ordered my coffee and when the waitress brought it to me, I began to think about coffee. Why did God give us coffee? Then my mind went back to my grandfather, whose greatest gift to me was a love of coffee. Nobody loved coffee more. I remember one of his favorite quotes, You can always tell a man by the coffee he drinks. Anathema to my grandfather was the idea of instant coffee. No man, in his judgment, would ever drink anything of the kind. If a man would drink instant coffee, my grandfather perked, theres no telling what else he would do. Never trust a man who drinks instant coffee. Making coffee was an art form to my grandfather. There was a right way and a wrong way to make coffee, and he always insisted on the right way. Of course, the right way was the way he made coffee. In grandfathers kitchen was an old wood-burning cook stove. On this old-fashioned stove, my grandfather brewed his famous mud broth. He never allowed my grandmother to make the brew; it was his job, which he took seriously. Once for his birthday, we all chipped in and bought him an electric coffee pot. I had never seen my grandfather so mad. When he saw what it was, he would not even take it out of the box. He had strong ideas about coffee and how it should be brewed and woe be to the person who contradicted his ideas. Grandfather always kept a fire in the old wood cook stove and on the back of the stove he kept his coffee pot, a large 2-gallon pot one of those old-fashioned percolators long since gone out of style. The coffee was always on, and no matter when you stopped in to see him, he always had fresh coffee brewing. When I say, fresh, I need to explain. Actually, the coffee was only fresh on Sunday. On Saturday night, he routinely emptied the coffee pot and prepared fresh coffee for Sunday morning. He had an old coffee grinder and ground the coffee beans on Saturday night. He put some other things in the coffee, I have never figured out what. One thing I know he put in was a crushed eggshell. What it did to his coffee, I have no idea but grandfather was sure it was an important ingredient. The freshly ground coffee beans were put in, the pot filled with fresh water and set on the back of the stove to slowly perk. This coffee would last the entire week. The coffee was so strong on Sunday that if it did not wake you in the morning, you were dead. In fact, Cousin Ernie died on a Sunday afternoon, so my grandfather tells the story, and one sip of his black coffee roused him and he lived seven more years, which was unfortunate for grandfather, as he had to support him. Before going to bed each evening my grandfather took care of his coffee. He would freshly grind a few coffee beans, sprinkle it on top of the old coffee grounds and then add a newly crushed eggshell. Then he would refill the coffee pot with water. His coffee percolated 24/7 and by Saturday it was so strong you needed a half-cup of sugar just to drink one cup. It was thick enough to use as syrup on your pancakes, but so strong, it dissolved your pancakes before you could eat them. My grandmother once tried washing the coffee pot. When my grandfather saw her, he became furious, Never wash that coffee pot, he spouted, youll ruin its character and a coffee pot needs a lot of character to make good coffee. Just why did God give us coffee? Out to Pastor Dr. James Snyder When my grandfather died, I looked at his old black coffee pot and discovered two things. One, the original color was blue. And two, although it was originally a 2gallon pot, it only could take three quarts of water. The character, so important to my grandfather, had built up so much over the years its capacity was diminished. In pondering my grandfather, I thought about my Heavenly Father and His gifts. The Bible puts it this way; Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning (James 1:17 KJV.) I really do not know why God gave us coffee, but I do know Gods character is of such a nature that it never diminishes His ability to bless me each day.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. Car show on State Road 200 benefits Kidney Foundation Lots of cars we grew up with were polished and restored at the car show at Big Lots on State Road 200 Friday night, May 16. Marion County Kidney Foundation accepted food in lieu of monetary donations at the show. (Photos by Mike Roppel) Two 1923 Fords were parked side by side. On display here is a 1957 Chevy. Another Chevy is displayed below. This 1965 Barracuda was on its second owner. Larry Conway described his Cuda as an original 273 V-8 Auto, bucket seats with console. A complete restoration was done in 2002. Recently the United Way announced at a gathering of key supporters that it has set a goal to raise $6.7 million in three years. It includes increases both to its community partners in the areas of Education, Income and Health, to its ReadingPals/early literacy program and its financial education program, as well as to its endowment fund. ReadingPals, an early literacy program funded for three years by the Carol & Barney Barnett Foundation has provided an avenue to help struggling kindergarten students with reading skills using volunteers. The program overseen by the United Way is an enhancement to the programs that are administered through the Academy programs in 15 Marion County public elementary schools, all of which have 70 percent or more students on free or reduced lunch. During the 2012/2013 school year 216 students participated and were read to by 162 volunteers. The overall average academy standardized test score improved 18 percent; in comparison to the overall average district standardized test scores which improved seven percent. United Way sets $6.7M three-year goal

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Wednesday, May 28 Windstream meeting set The Board of County Commissioners will hold a community meeting regarding the Windstream Utilities acquisition at 6:30 p.m. in the Freedom Public Library (5870 SW 95th St., Ocala). For more information, contact the commission office at 352438-2323.Sunday, June 1 Blood, food drive at Goodwill OneBlood and Interfaith Emergency Services are having a blood and food drive in recognition of National Cancer Survivors Day. The drive will be Sunday, June 1, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Goodwill of Ocala, 2830 SW 27th Ave. All lifesaving blood donors will receive a voucher for a free movie ticket, a OneBlood wristband plus a wellness check-up including a cholesterol screening! All ALYX (Double Red Cell) donors will receive an additional $10 Darden Gift Card by mail! All attendees are urged to bring non-perishable food items to support Interfaith Emergency Services Food Bank! Generally healthy people age 16 or older who weigh at least 110 pounds can donate blood. To learn more about the importance of blood donation and how donors can target the power of their blood type visit oneblood.org. Every two seconds someone needs blood. Blood that is donated today will likely be transfused within two to three days. The turn-around is that fast, the need is constant. Saturday, June 7 Calling golfers for Veterans Open The Cherrywood Veterans Club will hold its annual Veterans Open at the Ocala Palms Golf and Country Club on Saturday, June 7. Men and women are welcome to enjoy breakfast, lunch, 18 holes of golf with cart, prizes, silent auction and more for $50 per player. Contact Rich Hurley, 352-873-7208 or John Everlove at 352-509-4428 to register or sponsor this tournament. Yoga in Sholom Park There will be yoga in Sholom Park on Saturday, June 7, at 9 a.m. Only lightning, thunder and heavy rain will keep us away. For more information, call Ingrid at 352854-7950. Car wash to benefit students Students will be washing cars on June 7 from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. to raise funds to attend summer camp. This is a Christian leadership camp for 7-12 graders that will take place for a week in July at Epsworth by the Sea in St. Simons, Georgia. The car wash will be by donation and will take place at College Road Baptist Church at 5010 SW College Road in Ocala. For more information, call 352-2375741. Chess club to meet The chess club that formed at the Freedom Public Library meets the first Saturday of the month, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Grab your board and chess pieces and come on down. Interested persons are invited to attend for a rousing game of chess. Its your move! For more information, call Ron at 352-873-2276.Sunday, June 8 Jazz Society to perform The Ocala Jazz Society will be performing a week early in June, on Sunday, June 8, from 2 to 5 p.m. at VFW Post 4781 across from Oak Run. The band usually performs on the third Sunday of each month, playing a variety of music including jazz, Big Band, Dixieland and songs from the past. $3 donation for Hospice. For more information, please call: 352-237-0234. Tuesday, June 10 Luau to benefit Hospice The Ocala Dance Club, CardioWaltz and The Institute for Cardio Excellence are hosting a Luau to benefit Hospice of Marion County on Tuesday, June 10, from 7 to 10 p.m. at St. Marks Methodist Church (1839 NE 8th Ave., Ocala). The event features dance exhibitions, open dancing, prizes and raffles, a dinner buffet and table seating. Attire is Hawaiian shirts for men and floral dresses for ladies. General admission tickets are $25/person, which includes dinner and beverages. Seating is limited to 90 people. Advance ticket purchase is highly recommended. Tables for six or eight persons with reserved seating are available for purchase in advance. To purchase individual tickets in advance, include full name, address, & phone number and mail check payable to The Ocala Dance Club, 2108 NE 50th Street, Ocala, FL 34479. All proceeds support Hospice of Marion County patient care programs. For additional information call Dennis Rose at 352-425-0500.Wednesday, July 9 CERT training to start A new Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training will begin Wednesday, July 9, and continue through Aug. 13 from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Marion County Sheriffs Office, 692 NW 30th Ave., Ocala. The next training session will begin Oct. 9. The CERT program helps to prepare participants how to take care of themselves during a disaster. This six-week course will offer training on disaster preparedness, fire safety, disaster medical operations and more. Once trained, participants have the opportunity to join their local neighborhood team that will assist first responders during a disaster. CERT Teams assist by assessing their community and providing basic medical treatment to those in need and report all the information to Emergency Management. The CERT Program is offered by the Marion County Sheriffs Office, Bureau of Emergency Management and is a free training to all who are interested. Early applications are important as the class fills up quickly. For more information and for an application, contact Emergency Management at 352-369-8100 or e-mail MarionCERT@marionso.com. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, May 28, 2014 9 4 W ednesday, May 28, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000I11T$2000The OriginalSUMMERTIME PLAYCARD Purchase Your Card At One Of These Fine Courses Or Call For Further Details.Play Available *May 1 October 31, 2014 **May 1 October 12, 2014 ***Play available only after 11:00 a.m., credit cards only. 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Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club352-746-4425$23.00* (Oaks or Meadows course)Inverness Golf and Country Club352-637-2526$23.00*Juliette Falls Golf and Country Club352-522-0309$32.00*Ocala National Golf Club 352-629-7980$24.00*Royal Oaks Golf Club 352-861-1818$24.00*Skyview at Terra Vista 352-746-3664$32.00**Southern Woods Country Club 352-382-5996$30.00***Sugarmill Woods Country Club352-382-3838 ext. 14$30.00*** EXCLUSIVE, PRIVA TE, DOOR TO DOOR 352-641-0651 Licensed & Insured For Y our Safety ORLANDO & T AMPA AIRPOR TS Port Canaveral & T ampa Port Authority The Best Door to Door Fare s to Central Florida Air ports & Seapor ts from Ocala 000I613 Private Door T o Door T ransfers to Orlando & T ampa Airports as W ell as Port Canaveral & T ampa Cruise Lines 000IBSW IP Resort $179 pp/dbl Beau Rivage $199 pp/dbl Biloxi Ca$ino Tours www. La ur aK an eT ra ve l. co m Includes $55 in freeplay & two breakfast vouchers Ask about the 5 for $50 deal Tour Escort Janet Stefan Deluxe motor coach/3 nts. hotel Games played on the bus Refreshments served on bus Locally Owned SOT #36723 352-840-0333 352-840-0333 3 Night T our June 16-19 July 14-17 Aug 11-14 Sept 15-18 Upcoming Day T rips Winter Park Playhouse..$80 July 10 Shout the Mod Musical Aug. 21 Backwards in High Heels The Ginger Rogers Musical Sept. 25 Theyre Playing Our Song Includes lunch at the Cheesecake Factory 000HIQC The T ruesdell Professional Building 200 N.W 52nd Avenue Ocala, Fl 34482 K ELLEA N K. TRUESDELL, J.D., LLM A ttorne y & Counselor at La w (352) 873-4141 or K elleanTruesdell.com My Flor ida Estate Planning W orkshop is a vailable an y da y at any hour Wills, Living T rusts, Financial and Medical Powers of Attorney Probate, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, Asset Protection, Federal Death T ax Minimization, Trust Administration, Elder Law and Personal LifeCare Services. The W est Marion Messenger is a free comm unity newspaper cov ering ne ws of communities w est of Ocala including Fore Ranch, Stone Creek, Fairfield Village, Ocala P alms, Timberwood, Falls of Ocala, Quail Meado w, Fo xwood F arms and Golden Hills Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala, Fla., 34477. Prob lems getting the Messeng er: If your comm unity is listed abov e and the Messenger is not delivered to y ou or you are ha ving trouble getting the paper from bo xes around the S .R. 40 and S.R. 27 areas, call 854-3986.CONTACT INFORMATIONOffice (352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 489-6593 20441 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34432 EditorJim Clark 390-6444 Circulation Barbara Jag ger s 854-3986 Inside Sales/Office Coord. -Mic hel Northsea 854-3986 Adver tising Sales T om Rapplean 352-564-2957 Adver tising Sales Paig e Lefko witz 352-564-2902 Manag er John Murphy 352-563-6363 Deadline for ne ws : Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication. Member of the Community Papers of Florida I want to get news in the Messenger.Call editor Jim Clark at 352-390-6444 or send by e-mail to editor@westmarionmessenger.comCommunity news and photos must be received by Thursday the week before publication. Mail and photos must be e-mailed to editor@westmarionmessenger.com. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.Deadline for AdvertisingClassified Reader Ads 2 pm Friday Display Ads 5 pm Thursday ARI ES (March 21 to April 19) Theres nothing an Aries Lamb likes less than having to tackle a humdrum task. But finding a creative way to do it can make all the difference. A more exciting time awaits you this weekend. T AU RU S (April 20 to May 20) Finishing up a job on time leaves you free to enjoy your weekend without any Taurean guilt pangs. A romantic attitude from an unlikely source could take you by surprise. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Moving in a new career direction might be seen by some as risky. But if you have both the confidence to see it through and the facts to back you up, it could prove rewarding. C ANCER (June 21 to July 22) Holding back on a decision might be difficult, considering how long youve waited for this opportunity. But until youre able to resolve all doubts, it could be the wiser course to take. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) You still need to move carefully where financial matters are concerned. Better for the Lion to move slowly than pounce on a promising prospect that doesnt keep its promises. VI RGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) A rejection of an idea you believe in can be upsetting. But dont let it discourage you. Get yourself back on track and use what youve learned to try again. LI BR A (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) The early part of the week could find you looking to balance your priorities between your family obligations and your career. Pressures ease by weeks end. SCORPI O (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) An associates problem could cause unavoidable delays in moving ahead with your joint venture. If so, use the time to look into another project you had previously set aside. SAGI TT AR IUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Although a financial problem could be very close to being resolved in your favor, its still a good idea to avoid unnecessary spending for at least a little longer. CA PRI CORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Support for some unwelcome workplace decisions begins to show up, and continues to build, so that by weeks end, the gregarious Goat is as popular as ever. AQUAR IUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Congratulations. Deciding to attend a social function you might have earlier tried to avoid could turn out to be one of the best decisions youve made in a long time. PI SCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Getting into a new situation could prove to be a more difficult experience than you expected. Dont hesitate to ask for advice in coping with some of the more irksome challenges. Happenings

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The Florida Department of Health in Marion County named Dr. Nathan Grossman Marion County Public Health Hero during the May 10 Passport to Health community health fair. Grossman takes his place with public health heroes recognized from all 67 Florida counties who dedicated their lives to making a difference for the families of Florida. Marion County Commissioner Earl Arnett and Ocala Mayor Kent Guinn were on hand to recognize Grossman. The Public Health Hero recognition program was developed by the Florida Department of Health as part of the Departments 125 years of Florida Public Health activities. The Department is recognizing 125 years of Florida Public Health during 2014 with educational and commemorative events. The Department published an online compilation of the stories of all the public health heroes, available at www.FloridaHealth.gov. Before he retired in 2013, Grossman was the countys public health officer for 29 years, working tirelessly to promote and improve community health. The Department works to protect, promote and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts. Follow us on Twitter at @HealthyFla and on Facebook. For more information about the Florida Department of Health please visit www.FloridaHealth.gov. 000Ibqt 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run 352-291-7626 Mon. 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Reg. $ 39 95 SUMMER SPECIAL: HAND WASH & WAX WORLD CLASS SERVICE SINCE Includes Windows, Vacuum Carpets, Wheel Treatment, Tire Shine & Door Jams FREE LOVEBUG REMOVAL! West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Hurricane season Meteorologists are predicting a smaller Atlantic hurricane season; But, between June I and Nov. 30, the weather along the East Coast will be predictably unpredictable. When it comes to hurricane preparedness in Florida, residents are often one of two extremes: those who have experienced the devastation that one of these massive storms can wield, worrying that every thunderstorm might be the big one, and the devil-may-care types who wont leave their house until the roof falls in. Both are understandable. Hurricanes are wicked sea monsters, capable of shifting course quickly, pounding the shores with wind and rain strong enough to knock down power lines, uproot trees and gut buildings. Hurricanes can trigger storm surges, tornadoes and catastrophic flooding. There is nothing like a hurricane to remind us of the power of Mother Nature, and on the Florida Peninsula the seaside blessing on three sides of our geography is also its curse. On the other hand, hurricanes are so common that its easy, particularly for lifelong residents, to develop a ho-hum attitude or even hurricane fatigue. After so many years of rushing to grocery stores, gathering emergency supplies, and for those near the coast, boarding up windows, battening down hatches and sitting in traffic jams on evacuation routes, especially when those evacuation routes bring the vehicles here to Marion County many times only to have a light rain pass through it is tempting to forego all the hassle and stay until the last moment. For the most peaceful summer possible, we suggest a middle ground is the best approach. This is the ideal time to stock up on batteries, flashlights, and even inexpensive generators. Create an emergency kit with these supplies along with bottled water and non-perishable food items. Store them together in a designated spot in the house and conduct family drills so everyone knows what to do. If youre worried about computer data, back it up regularly onto a thumb drive that can be snatched up on the way out the door in the event of evacuation. Sure, it is inconvenient and annoying to deal with hurricanes. But like sticky summers and hugs, they are part of life in Florida. Make an emergency plan, assemble that kit and when the season comes to an end, donate those canned goods to a food bankjust in time for the holidays. Our Message PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGANMANAGER: JOHN MURPHYEDITOR: JIM CLARK MessengerWEST MARION Editorial Guest column BY BOB FRANKEN Special to the MessengerIll tell you what: If Hillary Clinton doesnt run for president, a bunch of people will have wasted a whole lot of energy. Why else would Vanity Fair resurrect Monica Lewinsky so we could revisit the tawdry case that blemished the familys first White House go-around? There is a wide body of thinking that has it that rather than being Monicas Revenge, the article by that woman actually will help Hillary when she runs (yes, the word when was intentional), because it will put an end to discussion of the dark period once and for all, declare it old news and remove it from the campaign plate. As someone who covered that awful scandal for more than a year, and struggled during live TV shots to keep a straight face while using euphemisms about the infamous blue dress, I certainly hope the story finally does move into the who cares? zone. Nobody would give a hoot now, were we all not convinced that Hillary had risen from her mortification as first lady to making a run at the big prize. Republicans certainly are convinced that shell be their opponent. They have made it absolutely clear, with the formation of their select committee on Benghazi. I dont need to remind you who was secretary of state at the time. And if there ever was a sure thing, it would be that former Secretary Hillary Clinton will be called to testify. And even if theres another missing plane, the news networks will take it live. The GOPs can protest all they want that they are strictly motivated by a desire to present the truth about the tragedy in Libya, but this is really just a transparent effort to stick it to the Dems, particularly the one who will be their 2016 standard-bearer. Actually, its a risky strategy. When it comes to brawling, Hillary Clinton is no slouch. When her hearing is all said and done, it may be the Republicans who are left bleeding, exposed as shameless bullies who got a whuppin. However it turns out, itll be the TV blockbuster of 2014 or 2015. We already know what it will be in 2016. As hard as they try to control the GOP debates, the Republican National Committee will not succeed in its effort to add some dignity to their comedy shows. The party leaders are insisting that they will control the format and, by implication, even the questions to be asked, but they are courting a PR disaster the first time they tell one of their candidates who has not been preordained that he or she will not have an equal chance at television glory. And thats the Republican blessing and curse this time around. The party doesnt have a real leading light. While the ones we always hear mentioned are spread out from establishment to rabble rouser, the leadership wants to rein them into a cluster that extends only from right to extreme right. Usually, its the other way around; its the Democrats who are turning on one another. But it looks like they already have their candidate. If Hillary bails, then they dont have one. Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. This is a yearly column, updated with latest information.Next week is big for many young people in Marion County, as they leave high school and move on to the next phase of their lives. Graduation ceremonies are scheduled for local public high schools, a landmark day for a few hundred young adults who are ready to venture out into the world. This graduating class has been through a little more than many of us. These young people were kindergarten students on Sept. 11, 2001, when two planes smashed into the World Trade Center in New York, one hit the Pentagon and another crashed in Pennsylvania, changing the face of America forever. They are venturing into an uncertain world, one filled with fear of terrorism, one filled with eroding freedoms in the name of security. Those of us who have lived through many years of strife and conflict and many years of prosperity and peace, can give some words of advice to the young graduates. Whether they pay attention is up to them, and whether they agree is also up to them. But at least its a point of view that they can use to steer them in whatever direction they want to go. With just a few changes from the previous years columns, here we go: 1. If you have a chance to continue your education, by all means do so. In this era, it is almost impossible to advance yourself in the job market without some sort of post-secondary education. It can be college, junior college, trade school or specialized classes, but make sure you learn as much as you can. Youve made it through one important period youve got your high school diploma. Now look to see what else you can do to learn. Your brains are still relatively young you have a better capacity to learn than many of us old dogs, who find it hard to learn new tricks. 2. If you go to college, learn the difference between opinion and fact from your professors. The good ones will make it clear for you but there are some who will ram their thoughts down your throat, without making it clear that its what they think, not what the world accepts as truth. 3. If you havent already, develop a good work ethic. When it comes to studying and school assignments, the days of someone looking over your shoulder to make sure you are doing what you are supposed to are over. Youre on your own. Your education, or your job, are what you make them. Take a look at employment ads in almost every major field. Theyll say things like self-starter or must work well without supervision. Managers in the business world dont want to have to watch Our annual message to the graduates Among Friends Jim Clark every step that you do. Learn to work by yourself with maximum effort. Remember, the world doesnt owe you a living you have to go out and make your own mark. 4. Choose your friends wisely. Hang around with people who have good goals, who want to make a decent mark in this world. There was a great commercial on TV (I cant remember what product it was for) where one guy in a group of wild young people gets a suitand-tie job, so the others always want him to buy dinner, because they arent doing a thing. You will undoubtedly encounter some of these people steer clear and be your own person. Some years later, these will be the folks who will come to you begging for a job. 5. Stay active. There will come a time in your life when you cant exercise like you used to, but that day isnt here yet for most of you. Im afraid that we are producing a generation of computerchair potatoes (as opposed to couch potatoes), those who do nothing but sit in front of a computer screen or play with a phone or tablet for all their free time. Get out and do something. You can walk, you can run, you can play a sport, you can swim just do something. Its good for your mind and your body. 6. Along that same line, learn how to talk to people, face to face. There is entirely too much Facebook, Tweeting, and other social networking going on, but sometimes young people have to talk to someone in person and they dont know what to say, or how to behave. Get off the phone and the computer and speak to people. Someday when youre interviewing for a job, it wont be on Facebook. But someday during that same job interview, your potential boss is going to ask permission to look at your Facebook postings, and all that cute little stuff and foul language that some of you might use will come back to haunt you. 7. Volunteer in the community. There are all sorts of things that need doing. Some involve some physical work, others involve using your brains to help people. Give something back to the community show that you care. You never know someday you may be one of the people who needs help, and maybe there will be folks around who will recall what you did for others, and youll Hillary or time wasted Please see GRADUATES, Page 11 Grossman named Public Health Hero Mayor Kent Guinn, Dr. Nathan Grossman and Commissioner Earl Arnett. To understand the excitement of dedicating a new Torah, think along the lines of Halleys Comet and flights to the moon. These momentous, awe-inspiring, once-in-a-lifetime events stir a good deal of emotions in the people fortunate enough to view them first hand. On Sunday, June 1, Chabad of Marion County and The Villages will have the great fortune of holding just such an event. While publishers can knock out millions of copies with dozens of new titles a week, crafting a single torah scroll takes over a year to complete. Whats the holdup? Computerized printing presses make printing a cinch, although the results often have many errors. However, timeless dictums hold for a certified Torah scribe and everything from the character of the scribe to the quality of the parchment and type of ink are taken into account. Furthermore, each of the 304,808 letters and notation must be scripted to perfection. The slightest error voids the entire 54-portion parchment. To celebrate this auspicious occasion, the community is invited to join together as we welcome a brand new Sefer Torah with a completion and dedication ceremony. Participants will have opportunity to fill in a letter of the Torah, alongside the scribe during the completion ceremony which will be held Sunday, June 1 at 12:30 p.m. at On Top Of The World Communities, in the Live Oak and Cypress Halls. 8413 SW 80th St. Ocala. Celebrations will continue with a grand parade around Circle Square Commons, followed by a lunch buffet. With the participation of men, women and children, the celebration, replete with live music, singing, dancing crafts for children, promises to be a memorable event. Dedications are still available for our New Torah! Please visit www.JewishMarion.org email Rabbi@jewishmarion.org or call 352-291-2218 to reserve your torah portion! RSVP appreciated. For more information about Chabad Jewish Center of Marion County and The Villages please contact Rabbi Yossi Hecht at rabbi@Jewishmarino.org or 352-291-2218. New Torah coming to Ocala PHOTOS BY MIKE ROPPELOne of the riders makes adjustments on his bike. The cool 60 degree air and light breeze made for a comfortable bike ride for these riders. Before the 8 a.m.start on Saturday, May 17, riders were to choose between riding 30, 65, or 80-mile rides. Mechanics and other vehicles were provided by Brick City Bicycles. A light breakfast was provided at the Hospice center on SW 34th Avenue as well as well stocked rest stops. Proceeds from the ride were to benefit Hospice of Marion County. Bike ride benefits Hospice Above, the bikers were ready to go at 8 a.m. Read the classifieds

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, May 28, 2014 7 6 W ednesday, May 28, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Mon. Thurs. 11 am 8:30 pm Fri. & Sat. 11 am 9:30 pm Closed on Sunday 873-0223 8602 SW SR 200, 103rd St. Plaza Ocala, Florida 873-0223 873-0223 ONE LARGE CHEESE PIZZA $6.99 ONE LARGE CHEESE PIZZA $6.99 MONDAYS W ITH PURCHASE OF BEVERAGE E XP 6/6/14 Whole Wheat Pasta Available 000IAPU TUESDAYS W ITH PURCHASE OF BEVERAGE E XP 6/6/14 VALID IN OCALA ONLY 1 ST T OPPING F REE M ON & T HURS O NLY $6.99 $6.99 SPAGHETTI & MEATBALLS SPAGHETTI & MEATBALLS WEDNESDAYS & SATURDAYS W ITH PURCHASE OF BEVERAGE E XP 6/6/14 $20.00 $20.00 2 For BAKED DISHES CHICKEN PARMIGIANA VEAL PARMIGIANA BAKED DISHES CHICKEN PARMIGIANA VEAL PARMIGIANA I NCLUDES F REE C HEESECAKE OR Z EPPOLIS 000HFWO 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS Christ the King The Rev. Donald J. Curran, RectorServices: Rite I 8:00 am Rite II 10:15 am3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary 352-351-9727 www.ctkaocala.orgAnglican Church 000I9PL is discovered through worshiping together 71 1187 The clubhouse was really rockin and rolling Saturday night when 96 residents and guests gathered for an evening of Sally and Elvis. Sally Langwah has an outstanding voice (she has a 3 octave range). She has performed in the theater where she was voted Favorite Female Vocalist for her portrayal as Maria in The Sound of Music. She performs impressions of over 30 superstars. Assisting Sally with her music is her husband, Roy. The show for this performance was her Broadway Show. We heard songs from many of the popular shows. Its amazing how Sally can change costumes in just a matter of seconds. We heard a sample of everything from Catherine Zeta Jones singing All That Jazz to Marilyn Monroe singing Whatever Marilyn Wants and a special Happy Birthday for Jan Johnson and Billy Cooper. We were also entertained by Cher singing Summertime and Hey, Big Spender, and then Liza Minelli with her unforgettable New York, New York. The entire show was fabulous. For more information about Sally Langwah, go to her website: sallylangwah.com. Following the intermission Elvis (a.k.a. Billy Lindsey) made his appearance. What a great Elvis. Billy was the winner of the 2014 Elvis Extravaganza in Tampa. Elvis entertained us with many of the hits, such as You Aint Nothin But A Houndog, Love Me Tender, Glory, Glory Hallelujah, and many, many others. The show was to end at 9:00 PM, but continued on until after 9:30. To end the night, Sally joined Elvis and they sang Blue Hawaii. You can view Billy Lindsey on youtube. When the show ended all we heard was fabulous, outstanding, best show ever, and everyone wanted to know when they were coming back. Well, I can tell you, yes, they will return to Quail Meadow next year! When the date is confirmed you will be notified. Pictures from the Sally/Elvis night are on posters in the clubhouse. If you would like a DVD of the pictures (no sound), call the photographer, Richard Gunther, and he will make you a DVD for a small fee. Mark your calendars now for the QM birthday party. The date is June 13 (yes that is Friday, the 13th). This will be a night of cake, ice cream, and entertainment by Rick, the DJ. Ro ck n ro ll en te rt ainmen t at Qu ail M ead ow Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb Some of the folks watching the show. Norm Strnad and Sally Langwah. Sally Langwah performing. Carol Mowrey with Elvis. Another performance by Sally.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, May 28, 2014 7 6 W ednesday, May 28, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Mon. Thurs. 11 am 8:30 pm Fri. & Sat. 11 am 9:30 pm Closed on Sunday 873-0223 8602 SW SR 200, 103rd St. Plaza Ocala, Florida 873-0223 873-0223 ONE LARGE CHEESE PIZZA $6.99 ONE LARGE CHEESE PIZZA $6.99 MONDAYS W ITH PURCHASE OF BEVERAGE E XP 6/6/14 Whole Wheat Pasta Available 000IAPU TUESDAYS W ITH PURCHASE OF BEVERAGE E XP 6/6/14 VALID IN OCALA ONLY 1 ST T OPPING F REE M ON & T HURS O NLY $6.99 $6.99 SPAGHETTI & MEATBALLS SPAGHETTI & MEATBALLS WEDNESDAYS & SATURDAYS W ITH PURCHASE OF BEVERAGE E XP 6/6/14 $20.00 $20.00 2 For BAKED DISHES CHICKEN PARMIGIANA VEAL PARMIGIANA BAKED DISHES CHICKEN PARMIGIANA VEAL PARMIGIANA I NCLUDES F REE C HEESECAKE OR Z EPPOLIS 000HFWO 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS Christ the King The Rev. Donald J. Curran, RectorServices: Rite I 8:00 am Rite II 10:15 am3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary 352-351-9727 www.ctkaocala.orgAnglican Church 000I9PL is discovered through worshiping together 71 1187 The clubhouse was really rockin and rolling Saturday night when 96 residents and guests gathered for an evening of Sally and Elvis. Sally Langwah has an outstanding voice (she has a 3 octave range). She has performed in the theater where she was voted Favorite Female Vocalist for her portrayal as Maria in The Sound of Music. She performs impressions of over 30 superstars. Assisting Sally with her music is her husband, Roy. The show for this performance was her Broadway Show. We heard songs from many of the popular shows. Its amazing how Sally can change costumes in just a matter of seconds. We heard a sample of everything from Catherine Zeta Jones singing All That Jazz to Marilyn Monroe singing Whatever Marilyn Wants and a special Happy Birthday for Jan Johnson and Billy Cooper. We were also entertained by Cher singing Summertime and Hey, Big Spender, and then Liza Minelli with her unforgettable New York, New York. The entire show was fabulous. For more information about Sally Langwah, go to her website: sallylangwah.com. Following the intermission Elvis (a.k.a. Billy Lindsey) made his appearance. What a great Elvis. Billy was the winner of the 2014 Elvis Extravaganza in Tampa. Elvis entertained us with many of the hits, such as You Aint Nothin But A Houndog, Love Me Tender, Glory, Glory Hallelujah, and many, many others. The show was to end at 9:00 PM, but continued on until after 9:30. To end the night, Sally joined Elvis and they sang Blue Hawaii. You can view Billy Lindsey on youtube. When the show ended all we heard was fabulous, outstanding, best show ever, and everyone wanted to know when they were coming back. Well, I can tell you, yes, they will return to Quail Meadow next year! When the date is confirmed you will be notified. Pictures from the Sally/Elvis night are on posters in the clubhouse. If you would like a DVD of the pictures (no sound), call the photographer, Richard Gunther, and he will make you a DVD for a small fee. Mark your calendars now for the QM birthday party. The date is June 13 (yes that is Friday, the 13th). This will be a night of cake, ice cream, and entertainment by Rick, the DJ. Ro ck n ro ll en te rt ainmen t at Qu ail M ead ow Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb Some of the folks watching the show. Norm Strnad and Sally Langwah. Sally Langwah performing. Carol Mowrey with Elvis. Another performance by Sally.

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The Florida Department of Health in Marion County named Dr. Nathan Grossman Marion County Public Health Hero during the May 10 Passport to Health community health fair. Grossman takes his place with public health heroes recognized from all 67 Florida counties who dedicated their lives to making a difference for the families of Florida. Marion County Commissioner Earl Arnett and Ocala Mayor Kent Guinn were on hand to recognize Grossman. The Public Health Hero recognition program was developed by the Florida Department of Health as part of the Departments 125 years of Florida Public Health activities. The Department is recognizing 125 years of Florida Public Health during 2014 with educational and commemorative events. The Department published an online compilation of the stories of all the public health heroes, available at www.FloridaHealth.gov. Before he retired in 2013, Grossman was the countys public health officer for 29 years, working tirelessly to promote and improve community health. The Department works to protect, promote and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts. Follow us on Twitter at @HealthyFla and on Facebook. For more information about the Florida Department of Health please visit www.FloridaHealth.gov. 000Ibqt 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run 352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm OCALA GOLF CART OCALA GOLF CART OCALA GOLF CART 8-V T875 only $ 609 8-V T875 only $ 609 12-V T1275 only $ 609 12-V T1275 only $ 609 8-V 8-V 6 PACK 6 PACK $ 499 $ 499 6-V 6-V 6 PACK 6 PACK $ 399 $ 399 6-V T605 only $ 499 6-V T605 only $ 499 $ 4,995 starting at $ 4,995 $ 4,995 EZ-GO RXV Club Car Precedent Same Day Service (most jobs) 10% Discount to Veterans l abor & parts excluding batteries BUY SELL TRADE SERVICE FREE pickup within 5 miles S ale Ends May 3 0 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, May 28, 2014 5 8 W ednesday, May 28, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000I0RI 000IAWK R&L Auto Detailing Call for Appt. 875-6484 6895 SW Hwy. 200 4 Miles West of I-75 ... because your car deserves better. Reg. $ 39 95 SUMMER SPECIAL: HAND WASH & WAX WORLD CLASS SERVICE SINCE Includes Windows, Vacuum Carpets, Wheel Treatment, Tire Shine & Door Jams FREE LOVEBUG REMOVAL! West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Hurricane season Meteorologists are predicting a smaller Atlantic hurricane season; But, between June I and Nov. 30, the weather along the East Coast will be predictably unpredictable. When it comes to hurricane preparedness in Florida, residents are often one of two extremes: those who have experienced the devastation that one of these massive storms can wield, worrying that every thunderstorm might be the big one, and the devil-may-care types who wont leave their house until the roof falls in. Both are understandable. Hurricanes are wicked sea monsters, capable of shifting course quickly, pounding the shores with wind and rain strong enough to knock down power lines, uproot trees and gut buildings. Hurricanes can trigger storm surges, tornadoes and catastrophic flooding. There is nothing like a hurricane to remind us of the power of Mother Nature, and on the Florida Peninsula the seaside blessing on three sides of our geography is also its curse. On the other hand, hurricanes are so common that its easy, particularly for lifelong residents, to develop a ho-hum attitude or even hurricane fatigue. After so many years of rushing to grocery stores, gathering emergency supplies, and for those near the coast, boarding up windows, battening down hatches and sitting in traffic jams on evacuation routes, especially when those evacuation routes bring the vehicles here to Marion County many times only to have a light rain pass through it is tempting to forego all the hassle and stay until the last moment. For the most peaceful summer possible, we suggest a middle ground is the best approach. This is the ideal time to stock up on batteries, flashlights, and even inexpensive generators. Create an emergency kit with these supplies along with bottled water and non-perishable food items. Store them together in a designated spot in the house and conduct family drills so everyone knows what to do. If youre worried about computer data, back it up regularly onto a thumb drive that can be snatched up on the way out the door in the event of evacuation. Sure, it is inconvenient and annoying to deal with hurricanes. But like sticky summers and hugs, they are part of life in Florida. Make an emergency plan, assemble that kit and when the season comes to an end, donate those canned goods to a food bankjust in time for the holidays. Our Message PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGANMANAGER: JOHN MURPHYEDITOR: JIM CLARK MessengerWEST MARION Editorial Guest column BY BOB FRANKEN Special to the MessengerIll tell you what: If Hillary Clinton doesnt run for president, a bunch of people will have wasted a whole lot of energy. Why else would Vanity Fair resurrect Monica Lewinsky so we could revisit the tawdry case that blemished the familys first White House go-around? There is a wide body of thinking that has it that rather than being Monicas Revenge, the article by that woman actually will help Hillary when she runs (yes, the word when was intentional), because it will put an end to discussion of the dark period once and for all, declare it old news and remove it from the campaign plate. As someone who covered that awful scandal for more than a year, and struggled during live TV shots to keep a straight face while using euphemisms about the infamous blue dress, I certainly hope the story finally does move into the who cares? zone. Nobody would give a hoot now, were we all not convinced that Hillary had risen from her mortification as first lady to making a run at the big prize. Republicans certainly are convinced that shell be their opponent. They have made it absolutely clear, with the formation of their select committee on Benghazi. I dont need to remind you who was secretary of state at the time. And if there ever was a sure thing, it would be that former Secretary Hillary Clinton will be called to testify. And even if theres another missing plane, the news networks will take it live. The GOPs can protest all they want that they are strictly motivated by a desire to present the truth about the tragedy in Libya, but this is really just a transparent effort to stick it to the Dems, particularly the one who will be their 2016 standard-bearer. Actually, its a risky strategy. When it comes to brawling, Hillary Clinton is no slouch. When her hearing is all said and done, it may be the Republicans who are left bleeding, exposed as shameless bullies who got a whuppin. However it turns out, itll be the TV blockbuster of 2014 or 2015. We already know what it will be in 2016. As hard as they try to control the GOP debates, the Republican National Committee will not succeed in its effort to add some dignity to their comedy shows. The party leaders are insisting that they will control the format and, by implication, even the questions to be asked, but they are courting a PR disaster the first time they tell one of their candidates who has not been preordained that he or she will not have an equal chance at television glory. And thats the Republican blessing and curse this time around. The party doesnt have a real leading light. While the ones we always hear mentioned are spread out from establishment to rabble rouser, the leadership wants to rein them into a cluster that extends only from right to extreme right. Usually, its the other way around; its the Democrats who are turning on one another. But it looks like they already have their candidate. If Hillary bails, then they dont have one. Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. This is a yearly column, updated with latest information.Next week is big for many young people in Marion County, as they leave high school and move on to the next phase of their lives. Graduation ceremonies are scheduled for local public high schools, a landmark day for a few hundred young adults who are ready to venture out into the world. This graduating class has been through a little more than many of us. These young people were kindergarten students on Sept. 11, 2001, when two planes smashed into the World Trade Center in New York, one hit the Pentagon and another crashed in Pennsylvania, changing the face of America forever. They are venturing into an uncertain world, one filled with fear of terrorism, one filled with eroding freedoms in the name of security. Those of us who have lived through many years of strife and conflict and many years of prosperity and peace, can give some words of advice to the young graduates. Whether they pay attention is up to them, and whether they agree is also up to them. But at least its a point of view that they can use to steer them in whatever direction they want to go. With just a few changes from the previous years columns, here we go: 1. If you have a chance to continue your education, by all means do so. In this era, it is almost impossible to advance yourself in the job market without some sort of post-secondary education. It can be college, junior college, trade school or specialized classes, but make sure you learn as much as you can. Youve made it through one important period youve got your high school diploma. Now look to see what else you can do to learn. Your brains are still relatively young you have a better capacity to learn than many of us old dogs, who find it hard to learn new tricks. 2. If you go to college, learn the difference between opinion and fact from your professors. The good ones will make it clear for you but there are some who will ram their thoughts down your throat, without making it clear that its what they think, not what the world accepts as truth. 3. If you havent already, develop a good work ethic. When it comes to studying and school assignments, the days of someone looking over your shoulder to make sure you are doing what you are supposed to are over. Youre on your own. Your education, or your job, are what you make them. Take a look at employment ads in almost every major field. Theyll say things like self-starter or must work well without supervision. Managers in the business world dont want to have to watch Our annual message to the graduates Among Friends Jim Clark every step that you do. Learn to work by yourself with maximum effort. Remember, the world doesnt owe you a living you have to go out and make your own mark. 4. Choose your friends wisely. Hang around with people who have good goals, who want to make a decent mark in this world. There was a great commercial on TV (I cant remember what product it was for) where one guy in a group of wild young people gets a suitand-tie job, so the others always want him to buy dinner, because they arent doing a thing. You will undoubtedly encounter some of these people steer clear and be your own person. Some years later, these will be the folks who will come to you begging for a job. 5. Stay active. There will come a time in your life when you cant exercise like you used to, but that day isnt here yet for most of you. Im afraid that we are producing a generation of computerchair potatoes (as opposed to couch potatoes), those who do nothing but sit in front of a computer screen or play with a phone or tablet for all their free time. Get out and do something. You can walk, you can run, you can play a sport, you can swim just do something. Its good for your mind and your body. 6. Along that same line, learn how to talk to people, face to face. There is entirely too much Facebook, Tweeting, and other social networking going on, but sometimes young people have to talk to someone in person and they dont know what to say, or how to behave. Get off the phone and the computer and speak to people. Someday when youre interviewing for a job, it wont be on Facebook. But someday during that same job interview, your potential boss is going to ask permission to look at your Facebook postings, and all that cute little stuff and foul language that some of you might use will come back to haunt you. 7. Volunteer in the community. There are all sorts of things that need doing. Some involve some physical work, others involve using your brains to help people. Give something back to the community show that you care. You never know someday you may be one of the people who needs help, and maybe there will be folks around who will recall what you did for others, and youll Hillary or time wasted Please see GRADUATES, Page 11 Grossman named Public Health Hero Mayor Kent Guinn, Dr. Nathan Grossman and Commissioner Earl Arnett. To understand the excitement of dedicating a new Torah, think along the lines of Halleys Comet and flights to the moon. These momentous, awe-inspiring, once-in-a-lifetime events stir a good deal of emotions in the people fortunate enough to view them first hand. On Sunday, June 1, Chabad of Marion County and The Villages will have the great fortune of holding just such an event. While publishers can knock out millions of copies with dozens of new titles a week, crafting a single torah scroll takes over a year to complete. Whats the holdup? Computerized printing presses make printing a cinch, although the results often have many errors. However, timeless dictums hold for a certified Torah scribe and everything from the character of the scribe to the quality of the parchment and type of ink are taken into account. Furthermore, each of the 304,808 letters and notation must be scripted to perfection. The slightest error voids the entire 54-portion parchment. To celebrate this auspicious occasion, the community is invited to join together as we welcome a brand new Sefer Torah with a completion and dedication ceremony. Participants will have opportunity to fill in a letter of the Torah, alongside the scribe during the completion ceremony which will be held Sunday, June 1 at 12:30 p.m. at On Top Of The World Communities, in the Live Oak and Cypress Halls. 8413 SW 80th St. Ocala. Celebrations will continue with a grand parade around Circle Square Commons, followed by a lunch buffet. With the participation of men, women and children, the celebration, replete with live music, singing, dancing crafts for children, promises to be a memorable event. Dedications are still available for our New Torah! Please visit www.JewishMarion.org email Rabbi@jewishmarion.org or call 352-291-2218 to reserve your torah portion! RSVP appreciated. For more information about Chabad Jewish Center of Marion County and The Villages please contact Rabbi Yossi Hecht at rabbi@Jewishmarino.org or 352-291-2218. New Torah coming to Ocala PHOTOS BY MIKE ROPPELOne of the riders makes adjustments on his bike. The cool 60 degree air and light breeze made for a comfortable bike ride for these riders. Before the 8 a.m.start on Saturday, May 17, riders were to choose between riding 30, 65, or 80-mile rides. Mechanics and other vehicles were provided by Brick City Bicycles. A light breakfast was provided at the Hospice center on SW 34th Avenue as well as well stocked rest stops. Proceeds from the ride were to benefit Hospice of Marion County. Bike ride benefits Hospice Above, the bikers were ready to go at 8 a.m. Read the classifieds

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Wednesday, May 28 Windstream meeting set The Board of County Commissioners will hold a community meeting regarding the Windstream Utilities acquisition at 6:30 p.m. in the Freedom Public Library (5870 SW 95th St., Ocala). For more information, contact the commission office at 352438-2323.Sunday, June 1 Blood, food drive at Goodwill OneBlood and Interfaith Emergency Services are having a blood and food drive in recognition of National Cancer Survivors Day. The drive will be Sunday, June 1, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Goodwill of Ocala, 2830 SW 27th Ave. All lifesaving blood donors will receive a voucher for a free movie ticket, a OneBlood wristband plus a wellness check-up including a cholesterol screening! All ALYX (Double Red Cell) donors will receive an additional $10 Darden Gift Card by mail! All attendees are urged to bring non-perishable food items to support Interfaith Emergency Services Food Bank! Generally healthy people age 16 or older who weigh at least 110 pounds can donate blood. To learn more about the importance of blood donation and how donors can target the power of their blood type visit oneblood.org. Every two seconds someone needs blood. Blood that is donated today will likely be transfused within two to three days. The turn-around is that fast, the need is constant. Saturday, June 7 Calling golfers for Veterans Open The Cherrywood Veterans Club will hold its annual Veterans Open at the Ocala Palms Golf and Country Club on Saturday, June 7. Men and women are welcome to enjoy breakfast, lunch, 18 holes of golf with cart, prizes, silent auction and more for $50 per player. Contact Rich Hurley, 352-873-7208 or John Everlove at 352-509-4428 to register or sponsor this tournament. Yoga in Sholom Park There will be yoga in Sholom Park on Saturday, June 7, at 9 a.m. Only lightning, thunder and heavy rain will keep us away. For more information, call Ingrid at 352854-7950. Car wash to benefit students Students will be washing cars on June 7 from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. to raise funds to attend summer camp. This is a Christian leadership camp for 7-12 graders that will take place for a week in July at Epsworth by the Sea in St. Simons, Georgia. The car wash will be by donation and will take place at College Road Baptist Church at 5010 SW College Road in Ocala. For more information, call 352-2375741. Chess club to meet The chess club that formed at the Freedom Public Library meets the first Saturday of the month, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Grab your board and chess pieces and come on down. Interested persons are invited to attend for a rousing game of chess. Its your move! For more information, call Ron at 352-873-2276.Sunday, June 8 Jazz Society to perform The Ocala Jazz Society will be performing a week early in June, on Sunday, June 8, from 2 to 5 p.m. at VFW Post 4781 across from Oak Run. The band usually performs on the third Sunday of each month, playing a variety of music including jazz, Big Band, Dixieland and songs from the past. $3 donation for Hospice. For more information, please call: 352-237-0234. Tuesday, June 10 Luau to benefit Hospice The Ocala Dance Club, CardioWaltz and The Institute for Cardio Excellence are hosting a Luau to benefit Hospice of Marion County on Tuesday, June 10, from 7 to 10 p.m. at St. Marks Methodist Church (1839 NE 8th Ave., Ocala). The event features dance exhibitions, open dancing, prizes and raffles, a dinner buffet and table seating. Attire is Hawaiian shirts for men and floral dresses for ladies. General admission tickets are $25/person, which includes dinner and beverages. Seating is limited to 90 people. Advance ticket purchase is highly recommended. Tables for six or eight persons with reserved seating are available for purchase in advance. To purchase individual tickets in advance, include full name, address, & phone number and mail check payable to The Ocala Dance Club, 2108 NE 50th Street, Ocala, FL 34479. All proceeds support Hospice of Marion County patient care programs. For additional information call Dennis Rose at 352-425-0500.Wednesday, July 9 CERT training to start A new Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training will begin Wednesday, July 9, and continue through Aug. 13 from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Marion County Sheriffs Office, 692 NW 30th Ave., Ocala. The next training session will begin Oct. 9. The CERT program helps to prepare participants how to take care of themselves during a disaster. This six-week course will offer training on disaster preparedness, fire safety, disaster medical operations and more. Once trained, participants have the opportunity to join their local neighborhood team that will assist first responders during a disaster. CERT Teams assist by assessing their community and providing basic medical treatment to those in need and report all the information to Emergency Management. The CERT Program is offered by the Marion County Sheriffs Office, Bureau of Emergency Management and is a free training to all who are interested. Early applications are important as the class fills up quickly. For more information and for an application, contact Emergency Management at 352-369-8100 or e-mail MarionCERT@marionso.com. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, May 28, 2014 9 4 W ednesday, May 28, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000I11T$2000The OriginalSUMMERTIME PLAYCARD Purchase Your Card At One Of These Fine Courses Or Call For Further Details.Play Available *May 1 October 31, 2014 **May 1 October 12, 2014 ***Play available only after 11:00 a.m., credit cards only. May 1 September 30, 2014Plus Tax Pay $20.00 For Your Playcard & Receive 20 ROUNDS OF GOLF As Low As ONLY $23.00 *Plus tax. A limited quantity of cards include 10 bonus rounds at no additional cost.Purchase your card now! Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club352-746-4425$23.00* (Oaks or Meadows course)Inverness Golf and Country Club352-637-2526$23.00*Juliette Falls Golf and Country Club352-522-0309$32.00*Ocala National Golf Club 352-629-7980$24.00*Royal Oaks Golf Club 352-861-1818$24.00*Skyview at Terra Vista 352-746-3664$32.00**Southern Woods Country Club 352-382-5996$30.00***Sugarmill Woods Country Club352-382-3838 ext. 14$30.00*** EXCLUSIVE, PRIVA TE, DOOR TO DOOR 352-641-0651 Licensed & Insured For Y our Safety ORLANDO & T AMPA AIRPOR TS Port Canaveral & T ampa Port Authority The Best Door to Door Fare s to Central Florida Air ports & Seapor ts from Ocala 000I613 Private Door T o Door T ransfers to Orlando & T ampa Airports as W ell as Port Canaveral & T ampa Cruise Lines 000IBSW IP Resort $179 pp/dbl Beau Rivage $199 pp/dbl Biloxi Ca$ino Tours www. La ur aK an eT ra ve l. co m Includes $55 in freeplay & two breakfast vouchers Ask about the 5 for $50 deal Tour Escort Janet Stefan Deluxe motor coach/3 nts. hotel Games played on the bus Refreshments served on bus Locally Owned SOT #36723 352-840-0333 352-840-0333 3 Night T our June 16-19 July 14-17 Aug 11-14 Sept 15-18 Upcoming Day T rips Winter Park Playhouse..$80 July 10 Shout the Mod Musical Aug. 21 Backwards in High Heels The Ginger Rogers Musical Sept. 25 Theyre Playing Our Song Includes lunch at the Cheesecake Factory 000HIQC The T ruesdell Professional Building 200 N.W 52nd Avenue Ocala, Fl 34482 K ELLEA N K. TRUESDELL, J.D., LLM A ttorne y & Counselor at La w (352) 873-4141 or K elleanTruesdell.com My Flor ida Estate Planning W orkshop is a vailable an y da y at any hour Wills, Living T rusts, Financial and Medical Powers of Attorney Probate, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, Asset Protection, Federal Death T ax Minimization, Trust Administration, Elder Law and Personal LifeCare Services. The W est Marion Messenger is a free comm unity newspaper cov ering ne ws of communities w est of Ocala including Fore Ranch, Stone Creek, Fairfield Village, Ocala P alms, Timberwood, Falls of Ocala, Quail Meado w, Fo xwood F arms and Golden Hills Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala, Fla., 34477. Prob lems getting the Messeng er: If your comm unity is listed abov e and the Messenger is not delivered to y ou or you are ha ving trouble getting the paper from bo xes around the S .R. 40 and S.R. 27 areas, call 854-3986.CONTACT INFORMATIONOffice (352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 489-6593 20441 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34432 EditorJim Clark 390-6444 Circulation Barbara Jag ger s 854-3986 Inside Sales/Office Coord. -Mic hel Northsea 854-3986 Adver tising Sales T om Rapplean 352-564-2957 Adver tising Sales Paig e Lefko witz 352-564-2902 Manag er John Murphy 352-563-6363 Deadline for ne ws : Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication. Member of the Community Papers of Florida I want to get news in the Messenger.Call editor Jim Clark at 352-390-6444 or send by e-mail to editor@westmarionmessenger.comCommunity news and photos must be received by Thursday the week before publication. Mail and photos must be e-mailed to editor@westmarionmessenger.com. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.Deadline for AdvertisingClassified Reader Ads 2 pm Friday Display Ads 5 pm Thursday ARI ES (March 21 to April 19) Theres nothing an Aries Lamb likes less than having to tackle a humdrum task. But finding a creative way to do it can make all the difference. A more exciting time awaits you this weekend. T AU RU S (April 20 to May 20) Finishing up a job on time leaves you free to enjoy your weekend without any Taurean guilt pangs. A romantic attitude from an unlikely source could take you by surprise. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Moving in a new career direction might be seen by some as risky. But if you have both the confidence to see it through and the facts to back you up, it could prove rewarding. C ANCER (June 21 to July 22) Holding back on a decision might be difficult, considering how long youve waited for this opportunity. But until youre able to resolve all doubts, it could be the wiser course to take. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) You still need to move carefully where financial matters are concerned. Better for the Lion to move slowly than pounce on a promising prospect that doesnt keep its promises. VI RGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) A rejection of an idea you believe in can be upsetting. But dont let it discourage you. Get yourself back on track and use what youve learned to try again. LI BR A (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) The early part of the week could find you looking to balance your priorities between your family obligations and your career. Pressures ease by weeks end. SCORPI O (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) An associates problem could cause unavoidable delays in moving ahead with your joint venture. If so, use the time to look into another project you had previously set aside. SAGI TT AR IUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Although a financial problem could be very close to being resolved in your favor, its still a good idea to avoid unnecessary spending for at least a little longer. CA PRI CORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Support for some unwelcome workplace decisions begins to show up, and continues to build, so that by weeks end, the gregarious Goat is as popular as ever. AQUAR IUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Congratulations. Deciding to attend a social function you might have earlier tried to avoid could turn out to be one of the best decisions youve made in a long time. PI SCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Getting into a new situation could prove to be a more difficult experience than you expected. Dont hesitate to ask for advice in coping with some of the more irksome challenges. Happenings

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weve seen in recent years. Atmospheric and oceanic conditions across the tropical Pacific are already taking on some El Nio characteristics. Also, we are currently seeing strong trade winds and wind shear over the tropical Atlantic, and NOAAs climate models predict these conditions will persist, in part because of El Nio, Bell said. The expectation of near-average Atlantic Ocean temperatures this season, rather than the above-average temperatures seen since 1995, also suggests fewer Atlantic hurricanes. NOAA is rolling out new tools at the National Hurricane Center this year. An experimental mapping tool will be used to show communities their storm surge flood threat. The map will be issued for coastal areas when a hurricane or tropical storm watch is first issued, or approximately 48 hours before the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds. The map will show land areas where storm surge could occur and how high above ground the water could reach in those areas. Early testing on continued improvements to NOAAs Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting model (HWRF) shows a 10 percent improvement in this years model compared to last year. Hurricane forecasters use the HWRF along with other models to produce forecasts and issue warnings. The HWRF model is being adopted by a number of Western Pacific and Indian Ocean rim nations. NOAAs seasonal hurricane outlook is not a hurricane landfall forecast; it does not predict how many storms will hit land or where a storm will strike. Forecasts for individual storms and their impacts will be provided throughout the season by NOAAs National Hurricane Center. It only takes one hurricane or tropical storm making landfall to have disastrous impacts on our communities, said Joe Nimmich, FEMA associate administrator for Response and Recovery. Just last month, Pensacola, Florida saw five inches of rain in 45 minutes without a tropical storm or hurricane. We need you to be ready. Know your risk for hurricanes and severe weather, take action now to be prepared and be an example for others in your office, school or community. Learn more about how to prepare for hurricanes at www.ready.gov/hurricanes. This week, May 25-31, is National Hurricane Preparedness Week. To help those living in hurricaneprone areas prepare, NOAA offers hurricane preparedness tips, along with video and audio public service announcements in both English and Spanish, featuring NOAA hurricane experts and the FEMA Administrator at www.hurricanes.gov/prepare. NOAA will issue an updated outlook for the Atlantic hurricane season in early August, just prior to the historical peak of the season.messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, May 28, 2014 3 10 W ednesday, May 28, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 795 $ 795 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RAY RAY RAY CC C C C C ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION Crayconst.com Crayconst.com Crayconst.com 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G GA RA GE S CR EE N D OO R 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G 16 x 7 SLIDING GARAGE GARAGE SCREEN SCREEN DOOR DOOR 000I45L We also install custom acrylic & glass windows. Beat The Lovebugs 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000H0PY CONCRETE WORK REPAIRING OLD We Make Your Concrete Look Good Specializing in Repairing Concrete Driveways Pool Decks Patios Entrance Ways Advantages: Mildew & Oil Resistant Non Skid Protection Easy to Keep Clean Commercial Grade Quality RENEWED SURFACES 000I6PZ COMPUTER REPAIR COMPUTER PROBLEMS SOLVED Your home or business 7 days a week. Microsoft certified engineer. 30+ years experience. PC Repairs/Upgrades Virus Removal Router/Network Setup New PC Installs Se habla espaol Tech Solutions of Ocala 352-207-4435 000I3EO IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Seasonal Special Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2013 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $39 99 With coupon. 000I6QC HAND YMAN Weekend Warrior Let Me Do All Your Chores Home Maintenance/ Repair Lawn & Y ard Pressure W ashing Painting, Etc. V ery Dependable, Competent & Affordable Excellent, Local References. Reclaim Your Fr ee Time! Contact W ayne Green at 352-875-6106 000IA18 CARPET CLEANING Countr yside Superior Carpet, Upholstery & Tile Cleaning 352-307-4100 SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 000HYK9 000HYK9 000HZMH AIR CONDITIONING 352-208-4641 Locally Owned & Operated License # CAC1816140 WILSON AIR SERVICE Tune Up Special We Service All Brands Repairs Replacement Free Second Opinions 24-HR. Service $ 29 95 000I4A1 PEST CONTROL SERVICES Hasta La Bye Bye. Tri-County Services, Inc. Pest Control, T ermite & Lawn Care Licensed and Insured Serving Central Florida for over 20 years Family owned and operated Toll Free 1-888-352-9290 or call Rick 352-266-4613 711185 DIALAPRO For Your Professional Needs For Your Professional Needs WEST MARION Messenger WEST MARION Messenger John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000I2C2 Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your P et Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 000I7SN Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting Look for us on Facebook Look for us Look for us on Facebook on Facebook Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 www.jandjjewelersocala.com 000IANF Come see why we are the peoples choice in Jewelry. Thanks to our valued customers 000I7AP No Matter What Your Age, Chances Are You Want a Better Future. Our Financial Workshop: Your Source for Financial Education is an easy way to learn how to save, invest and work toward your financial goals. Whether you are just starting out or want to learn something new, the workshop will give you real-world strategies that are easy to follow. When: Four-W eek Workshop Series 10:30 a.m. W ednesday, June 4, 11, 18 & 25 Where: Edward Jones Royal Palm Plaza 8960 SW Hwy. 200 Ste 3, Ocala, FL 34481 Refreshments and light snacks will be served. STORMSCONTINUED FROM P AGE 1 sharing his expertise with others as an instructor at the Florida State Fire College, where he currently serves as the Urban Search & Rescue/Hazardous Materials Program Coordinator. In February 2007, he was promoted to lieutenant and began leading the A-shift crew of MCFR Silver Springs Shores Station 17, where he currently serves and oversees monthly, department-wide training programs. Chappell is a member of MCFRs Technical Rescue Team and the Florida US&R Task Force 8, and is acting president of the Marion County Firefighter Benevolence Fund. He served as the program coordinator for the College of Central Floridas Fire Science Program and is on various committees and work groups for US&R/Hazmat and the State Homeland Security Grant Program (SHSGP). He also holds a bachelors degree from the University of Florida and a masters in Public Administration from Barry University. MCFR Fire Chief M. Stuart McElhaney said hes extremely proud of the work Chappell has done and to have him as a part of the department. Lt. Chappell represents the type of leader every organization hopes to employ. The extra hours he commits to training and development certainly make MCFR better. Through his work with the Benevolence Fund, hes also made a profound impact on the community and the lives of other fire service members, McElhaney said. STORYCONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 This week I came face-to-face with a genuine dilemma. I had several meetings across town and for some reason I miscalculated and ended up with a 2-1/2 hour gap between meetings. I hate to waste time, but if I drove back to my office, I would simply have to return to my meeting later and with the cost of gas these days, one cannot be too cautious. You know gas is getting high when it costs more to fill up the car than the car is really worth. The most valuable thing in my car is in my gas tank, at least when it is filled. I remedied the situation by stopping in a small coffee shop for cup of Joe. As far as I am concerned, there is no bad time to have a cup of coffee, in spite of the price. I ordered my coffee and when the waitress brought it to me, I began to think about coffee. Why did God give us coffee? Then my mind went back to my grandfather, whose greatest gift to me was a love of coffee. Nobody loved coffee more. I remember one of his favorite quotes, You can always tell a man by the coffee he drinks. Anathema to my grandfather was the idea of instant coffee. No man, in his judgment, would ever drink anything of the kind. If a man would drink instant coffee, my grandfather perked, theres no telling what else he would do. Never trust a man who drinks instant coffee. Making coffee was an art form to my grandfather. There was a right way and a wrong way to make coffee, and he always insisted on the right way. Of course, the right way was the way he made coffee. In grandfathers kitchen was an old wood-burning cook stove. On this old-fashioned stove, my grandfather brewed his famous mud broth. He never allowed my grandmother to make the brew; it was his job, which he took seriously. Once for his birthday, we all chipped in and bought him an electric coffee pot. I had never seen my grandfather so mad. When he saw what it was, he would not even take it out of the box. He had strong ideas about coffee and how it should be brewed and woe be to the person who contradicted his ideas. Grandfather always kept a fire in the old wood cook stove and on the back of the stove he kept his coffee pot, a large 2-gallon pot one of those old-fashioned percolators long since gone out of style. The coffee was always on, and no matter when you stopped in to see him, he always had fresh coffee brewing. When I say, fresh, I need to explain. Actually, the coffee was only fresh on Sunday. On Saturday night, he routinely emptied the coffee pot and prepared fresh coffee for Sunday morning. He had an old coffee grinder and ground the coffee beans on Saturday night. He put some other things in the coffee, I have never figured out what. One thing I know he put in was a crushed eggshell. What it did to his coffee, I have no idea but grandfather was sure it was an important ingredient. The freshly ground coffee beans were put in, the pot filled with fresh water and set on the back of the stove to slowly perk. This coffee would last the entire week. The coffee was so strong on Sunday that if it did not wake you in the morning, you were dead. In fact, Cousin Ernie died on a Sunday afternoon, so my grandfather tells the story, and one sip of his black coffee roused him and he lived seven more years, which was unfortunate for grandfather, as he had to support him. Before going to bed each evening my grandfather took care of his coffee. He would freshly grind a few coffee beans, sprinkle it on top of the old coffee grounds and then add a newly crushed eggshell. Then he would refill the coffee pot with water. His coffee percolated 24/7 and by Saturday it was so strong you needed a half-cup of sugar just to drink one cup. It was thick enough to use as syrup on your pancakes, but so strong, it dissolved your pancakes before you could eat them. My grandmother once tried washing the coffee pot. When my grandfather saw her, he became furious, Never wash that coffee pot, he spouted, youll ruin its character and a coffee pot needs a lot of character to make good coffee. Just why did God give us coffee? Out to Pastor Dr. James Snyder When my grandfather died, I looked at his old black coffee pot and discovered two things. One, the original color was blue. And two, although it was originally a 2gallon pot, it only could take three quarts of water. The character, so important to my grandfather, had built up so much over the years its capacity was diminished. In pondering my grandfather, I thought about my Heavenly Father and His gifts. The Bible puts it this way; Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning (James 1:17 KJV.) I really do not know why God gave us coffee, but I do know Gods character is of such a nature that it never diminishes His ability to bless me each day.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. Car show on State Road 200 benefits Kidney Foundation Lots of cars we grew up with were polished and restored at the car show at Big Lots on State Road 200 Friday night, May 16. Marion County Kidney Foundation accepted food in lieu of monetary donations at the show. (Photos by Mike Roppel) Two 1923 Fords were parked side by side. On display here is a 1957 Chevy. Another Chevy is displayed below. This 1965 Barracuda was on its second owner. Larry Conway described his Cuda as an original 273 V-8 Auto, bucket seats with console. A complete restoration was done in 2002. Recently the United Way announced at a gathering of key supporters that it has set a goal to raise $6.7 million in three years. It includes increases both to its community partners in the areas of Education, Income and Health, to its ReadingPals/early literacy program and its financial education program, as well as to its endowment fund. ReadingPals, an early literacy program funded for three years by the Carol & Barney Barnett Foundation has provided an avenue to help struggling kindergarten students with reading skills using volunteers. The program overseen by the United Way is an enhancement to the programs that are administered through the Academy programs in 15 Marion County public elementary schools, all of which have 70 percent or more students on free or reduced lunch. During the 2012/2013 school year 216 students participated and were read to by 162 volunteers. The overall average academy standardized test score improved 18 percent; in comparison to the overall average district standardized test scores which improved seven percent. United Way sets $6.7M three-year goal

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, May 28, 2014 11 2 W ednesday, May 28, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000IBSD FL Seller Of Travel 13519 Marlene Kaiser OTOW resident 843-4133 marlenekaiser@yahoo.com Fireworks Dinner Cruise July 4, in Cocoa Bus, Buffet & Dinner $110pp Includes 6 piece Jazz Band Albuquerque Balloon Festival with Collette Oct. 4-9, 2014 Prices include airfare and meals 000IAJ0 TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith aName Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTAL For your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 For your convenience, mail in with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 20441 E Pennsylvania Ave, Dunnellon, FL34432 or call... BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 AUTO SW AP/ CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAP MEETS SUN. JUNE 1st. 1-800-438-8559 Looking to Care for YOUR LOVED ONE EXP. RELIABLE ACCOUNTABLE AND HONESTOver 10 Y ears Exp CALL SUSAN (352)484-0930 STUMP GRINDINGCALL JIM FOR FREE ESTIMATES (800) 478-8679 Trimming,Removal and Debris Clean Up. Reliable,Service, Reasonable Prices. Lic/Ins. 20 yrs Exp. FREE Estimates. Residential Commercial 352-873-6884 352-875-8317 $100,000. + Closing Cost will get you this 2,100 Sq. Ft., 3BR, 3BA, Fully Furn. Condo in Citrus Hills Call 352-419-5268 WE BUYR VS, TRUCKS, TRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, & MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 WE BUYR VS, TRUCKS, TRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, & MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 WE BUY ANY VEHICLE In Any Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make, Any Model 813-335-3794, Call AJ 813-458-0584 Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKSFREE TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. LET US WORKFOR YOU!CALL TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403WEST MARIONMESSENGERCLASSIFIEDSGET RESULTS! NOW ENROLLING CosmetologyDay & Night SchoolBarberNight SchoolMassageDay & Night SchoolNail & Skin CareDay School Starts Weekly Night School Mon-Tues-Wed 5:00PM-9:00PM Campus Locations: NEW PORT RICHEY SPRING HILL BROOKSVILLE(727) 848-8415 www.benes.eduSTAR T A CAREER IN A YEAR BRAND NEW Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress Set $150. Still in Original Plastic. (352) 484-4772 SW 55+ 4BR/3BACorner lot, enclosed porch, includes inlaw quarters, with bath & second kitchen $950. mo. Includes amenities and Community Pool. (352)854-7987 Call After 5pm Somebody else wants it!Got something special you no longer use? Sell it in the Classifieds. It may be just the perfect item to fill somebody elses need.TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 get some help in return. And dont do it for the glory and the recognition. The best volunteers are those who work behind the scenes, who get nothing out of it but personal satisfaction. 8. Finally, keep the faith, and not just religious faith. If you are a religious person, you will be tested. Most of those who are religious find great solace in that faith, so dont let yourself get tempted away from it. But there is another kind of faith, faith in your fellow human beings, faith in the country. Be aware of the times you live in, for sure, but realize there are so many places in the world that are worse off than we are (just look at the kidnapped girls in Nigeria). While we live in the fear that there could be another attack on us somewhere in the U.S., there are people who live with the very real fear of being blown up every day. While we have medical care available to us when we get sick, there are people who succumb to the least little illness because their bodies cant fight diseases, or they have no access to things as simple as an aspirin. As you depart from high school, thank your teachers, your counselors, your school employees. They surely dont get rich doing what they do, but almost all of them love their profession. Someday you will realize how good the days of high school were. But for now, youve reached your goal of getting your diploma, which is a job well done. Congratulations!Jim Clark is the editor of the South Marion Citizen and West Marion Messenger. GRADUATESCONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 Read the classifieds The Garden Club of Stone Creek recently viewed the garden of one of its members, Margie Santiago. Margie and her husband live in the Buckhead neighborhood on a corner lot. For the last seven years they have added to their beautiful garden. The idea for viewing gardens came from member Linda Cooper at one of the clubs idea meetings that was started by President Audrey Edwards to get members involved in the planning of events of the garden club. The Garden Club is looking to highlight a garden a quarter. If you have a garden that you would like showcased, you can contact any member of the Garden Club board. Margies home sits on a corner lot on 71st loop and when one passes her home, you can see Margie and husband out working in this beautiful garden. Margie said, We dont go to the gym so this is our exercise. Over the years, I have seen this garden transformed. There are two water features in the garden one in the front in the form of a fountain and one in the back. Margie said that there are about 100 different plants, trees and shrubs in the garden. Each plant in the garden is labeled which is wonderful for those of us who like something but do not know the name. Her backyard has become a private oasis of sorts with a patio and various flowering plants, trees and the sound of running water. She says that when she entertains her guests are treated to breakfast outside. Those in the club who came to view this amazing garden were also treated to Margie wonderful cooking. She made Pancit which is a noodle dish, Empanada which was filled with ground turkey and for dessert Baklava.What a treat she prepared for all of us! The Garden Club meets the first Thursday of each month and they are planning a trip on May 28 to the Butterfly garden in Gainesville. Be on the lookout for the next Stone Creek Garden to be featured and the other events this club is planning. Showcasing a garden Stone Creek Patricia Gizzi Part of Margies garden. More phtos on Page 12. There is a new face in the administrative office of the FFV Clubhouse. Maria Delarosa is our new administrative assistant, and we are all so happy to have her with us working Wednesday through Saturday. Maria came to the United States from Puerto Rico some 13 years ago, and she loves her home here in Ocala. In keeping with our theme for the month of May honoring Mothers, Maria is also a mother to three young children. She has a 12-year-old son, Jeremiah; a 9-year-old son, Rafael; and a 5-year-old daughter, Naracisa. Maria assures all FFV neighbors that she will have an open door policy and is ..here to help. She will be happy to have neighbors stop by to say hello so that she will get to know as many people as possible very soon. As we all get to know Maria, we should remember that there are Fairfield welcomes Maria Delarosa Maria Delarosa smiles a big welcome for those who come by her office in the Fairfield Village Clubhouse. Fairfield Village Priscilla Barnett literally hundreds of names for her to learn, so it would be helpful if we identify ourselves when we see her to assist her to become acquainted with those of us who live in Fairfield Village, the lively place filled with lovely people. Welcome to Fairfield Village, Maria Delarosa. Designed to rate how well hospitals protect patients from accidents, errors, injuries and infections, the latest Hospital Safety Score honored Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital with an A its top grade in patient safety. The Hospital Safety Score is compiled under the guidance of the nations leading experts on patient safety and is administered by The Leapfrog Group (Leapfrog), an independent industry watchdog. The first and only hospital safety rating to be peer-reviewed in the Journal of Patient Safety, the Score is free to the public and designed to give consumers information they can use to protect themselves and their families when facing a hospital stay. More than 2,500 U.S. general hospitals were assigned scores in spring 2014, with about 32-percent receiving an A grade. Safety should come first for patients and their families when selecting a hospital because errors and infections are common and can have devastating efHospitals earn safety honors Please see SAFETY, Page 11 fects, which is why safety is at the forefront of all our patient care initiatives, said Randy McVay, CEO, Ocala Health. The physicians and staff of Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital are committed to making the well-being of patients our top priority. To see Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospitals scores as they compare nationally and locally, visit the Hospital Safety Score website at www.hospitalsafetyscore.org, which also provides information on how the public can protect themselves and loved ones during a hospital stay. Ocala Health encompasses Ocala Regional Medical Center, a 200-bed facility located in the heart of Ocala, and West Marion Community Hospital, a 70-bed hospital located on State Road 200. SAFETYCONTINUED FROM PAGE 2 000ICJD Robins & Morton is currently seeking bids from qualified Subcontractors and Suppliers for the Ocala Regional Medical Center (ORMC) and West Marion Community Hospital (WMCH) construction projects. Ocala and other surrounding area businesses are invited to attend a Diversity Meet & Greet to learn more about procurement opportunities associated with the upcoming project. Robins & Morton and HCA are strongly committed to the development and implementation of initiatives which promote the inclusion of minority and women-owned businesses. What : The projects consist of a 70,000 sq. ft. 2-story ICU addition at ORMC, and a 5,300 sq. ft. Cath Lab addition, a 2,200 sq. ft. Lab expansion, and a 2-story 24-bed Med/Surg tower addition at WMCH. When : Wednesday, June 4, 2014 11:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Where : West Marion Community Hospital (2nd Floor Classroom) 4600 SW 46th Court Ocala, FL 34474 Bid Packages include : Concrete Roofing Masonry Structural & Misc Steel General Trades/Rough Carpentry Waterproof/Damproofing Caulking Doors & Hardware Glass & Glazing EIFS Metal Studs & Drywall Spray Fireproofing Flooring Painting Specialties Signage Casework Lead Shielding Window Blinds Equipment Supports Fire Protection Mechanical & Plumbing Electrical IT & Structured Cabling For information regarding bid packages or questions concerning this project, contact: Drew Duffy at (615) 377-3666 Email: dduffy@robinsmorton.com To RSVP for the upcoming Meet & Greet, contact: Rhea Kinnard, Diversity Consultant at (615) 941-8396 Email: kinn0167@aol.com Food and Refreshments will be provided ROBINS & MOR TON

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INDEX Fairfield Village..2 Stone Creek........2 Rev. Snyder..........3 Quail Meadow......6 VOLUME 8, NUMBER 10 WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 2014 Puzzles Page 9 ClassifiedsPage 1112 Wednesday, May 28, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000I30G 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala (352) 629-0900 (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (352) 629-0900 Other locations throughout the southeast 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala GREAT FINANCING ON EZ-GO CARTS! WHAT BATTERY A RE Y OU L OOKING F OR ??? CUSTOM BATTERY PACKS LAPTOP COMPUTER BATTERIES CAMCORDER BATTERIES WHEELCHAIR BATTERIES SECURITY SYSTEM BATTERIES AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES FARM TRACTOR BATTERIES JET SKI BATTERIES GAME FEED BATTERIES MARINE BATTERIES CELL PHONE BATTERIES POWER WHEELS BATTERIES WATCH BATTERIES KEY REMOTE BATTERIES TRUCK BATTERIES CORDLESS PHONE BATTERIES EMERGENCY LIGHT BATTERIES ATV BATTERIES MOTORCYCLE BATTERIES LAWNMOWER BATTERIES Automotive Batteries 50 Bronze $ 79 95 exchange (Prices may vary according to your vehicle) FREE 10-Minute Installation (Most Models) 60 Silver $ 89 95 exchange 72 Gold $ 99 95 exchange 84 Platinum $ 109 95 exchange GOLF CARS STAR TING AT $2,295 & UP FRIDAY JUNE 6 10:30 AM WEDNESDAY JUNE 11 11:00 AM WEDNESDAY JUNE 4 11:00 AM2111 SW College Rd Ocala, FL 34474 000ICODTHURSDAY, JUNE 5 11:00 AM8075 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala, FL 34481 3393 SW College Rd Ocala, FL 34474 6998 N US Hw y. 27 Ocala, FL 34482 In its 2014 Atlantic hurricane season outlook issued today, NOAAs Climate Prediction Center is forecasting a nearnormal or below-normal season. The main driver of this years outlook is the anticipated development of El Nio this summer. El Nio causes stronger wind shear, which reduces the number and intensity of tropical storms and hurricanes. El Nio can also strengthen the trade winds and increase the atmospheric stability across the tropical Atlantic, making it more difficult for cloud systems coming off of Africa to intensify into tropical storms. The outlook calls for a 50 percent chance of a below-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season, and only a 10 percent chance of an above-normal season. For the six-month hurricane season, which begins June 1, NOAA predicts a 70 percent likelihood of 8 to 13 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 3 to 6 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 1 to 2 major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher). These numbers are near or below the seasonal averages of 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes, based on the average from 1981 to 2010. The Atlantic hurricane region includes the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. Thanks to the environmental intelligence from NOAAs network of earth observations, our scientists and meteorologists can provide life-saving products like our new storm surge threat map and our hurricane forecasts, said Kathryn Sullivan, Ph.D., NOAA administrator. And even though we expect El Nio to suppress the number of storms this season, its important to remember it takes only one land falling storm to cause a disaster. Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAAs Climate Prediction Center, said the Atlantic which has seen above-normal seasons in 12 of the last 20 years has been in an era of high activity for hurricanes since 1995. However, this high-activity pattern is expected to be offset in 2014 by the impacts of El Nio, and by cooler Atlantic Ocean temperatures than Hurricane season: Officials predict fewer storms Hurricane tracking map Page 6 Please see STORMS, Page 3 Quail Meadow had an entertaining evening recently when Elvis and Cher dropped in. The left photo shows Dottie Hefferon with Elvis. More photos on Page 6. Entertainment at Quail Meadow At last Tuesdays Marion County Board of County Commissioners meeting, State Fire Marshal Director Julius Halas recognized Marion County Fire Rescue Lt. Scott Chappell as the Florida Fire Chiefs Association 2013 Search and Rescue Responder of the Year. Each year, the Florida Fire Chiefs Association recognizes those in the fire service who have demonstrated excellence and ongoing commitment to the firefighting profession. State Fire Marshal Bureau Chief Barry Baker said Chappells award is significant because it is bestowed by fellow fire service members. Anytime in someones career when theyre recognized by their peers for excellence, as someone others look up to, thats pretty special, Baker said. During Tuesdays meeting, Halas presented commissioners with a resolution that outlined Chappells many roles and accomplishments since entering the fire service in 1993. Chappell was hired by Marion County Fire Rescue in 2000. In 2001, he began Firefighter honored Please see HONORED, Page 3 Garden visitMargie Santiago, a member of the Stone Creek Garden Club, recently entertained club members and showed off her garden. More photos on Pages 2 and 12. Over $21 million: Thats the amount of energy savings Marion County Public Schools has accumulated since 2005, when it started the Energy Management Program. That figure is the equivalent of three years of electricity cost for the entire district. The biggest savings come from renovations, more energy-efficient lighting and electricity components, regulated heating and air conditioning, nightly computer shutdowns, and four-day summer work weeks. The districts Energy Management Program to date has tallied $21,274,999 in avoidance costs. Despite adding nearly 1 million square feet of space since 2005, the district has used 8.5 million kilowatt hours less in the same time span. Electricity rates have also increased 22 percent since then. Additionally, the district uses 94 cents per square foot in energy costs, 18 percent less than the states $1.15 average. Over the past nine years, the average per-school savings is nearly 33 percent, with Vanguard High (56 percent savings), Lake Weir High (45 percent), Dunnellon Middle (45 percent), Maplewood Elementary (45 percent), BelleviewSantos Elementary (43 percent), North Marion Middle (43 percent), Howard Middle (43 percent), Dunnellon Elementary (42 percent), Oakcrest Elementary (39 percent), and North Marion High (38 percent) leading the charge. So far, this school years leaders include Vanguard High (44 percent), North Marion Middle (37 percent), Oakcrest Elementary (36 percent), Lake Weir Middle (35 percent), and Howard Middle (31 percent). Students and employees significantly contribute to these savings because they change behaviors and now take more conscious steps to conserve energy, save dollars, and keep things as green as possible. The district captured state and national attention for its energy-saving efforts. In addition to steps already listed, the district also unplugs electronic equipment during extended breaks, piloted an LED lighting project to replace fluorescent lighting, and carefully analyzes energy use for electricity, sewer, natural gas, and fuel oil. Energy dollars saved help maintain and improve schools and facilities around the district. The program is selffunded, meaning savings pay for the program and outreach efforts. Schools cite energy savings Photos from Stone Creek Garden Club The visitors to Margies garden. Margie is fourth from the left. Margie was a gracious host and a good cook.