West Marion messenger

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Title:
West Marion messenger
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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English
Publisher:
Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Florida
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00100092:00201


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INDEX Rev. Snyder..........2 Fairfield Village..6 Quail Meadow......7 Ocala Palms......10 VOLUME 7, NUMBER 52 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 2014 Puzzles Page 9 ClassifiedsPage 1112 Wednesday, March 19, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000HHF0 Celebrating St. Patricks DayCarol Meissner won the 50/50 drawing at the Fairfield Village St. Patricks Day celebration. Maybe the green wig or her happy Leprechaun hubby, Jim, helped her to have the "Luck of the Irish" for the evening. More on Page 6. WASHINGTON, DC A new study shows that Americans nearing retirement age are ill-informed about their Social Security options, according to Dan Weber, president of the Association of Mature American Citizens. He said that AMACs establishment of a dedicated Social Security Web site, www.socialsecurityreport.org, was designed to provide a comprehensive source of answers to top-of-mind retirement issues. The study Weber cited was conducted by the retirement consulting firm, Financial Engines, and it showed confusion over the optimal age to begin collecting benefits is widespread. It also revealed that, as a result, many retirees apply at too early an age resulting in significant long-term losses. Many retirees and near-retirees are simply unaware of their Social Security claiming options. And this lack of knowledge means they could be leaving significant money on the table to the tune of as much as $100,000 or more for individuals and $250,000 or more for married couples, the consulting firm noted in a news release last week. Weber pointed out that theres a tendency to opt for early retirement and begin collecting benefits at age 62. But the experts will tell you that the longer you wait, the more youll get in monthly payments-25% more at age 66 and 76% more at age 70. The AMAC chief noted that medical breakthroughs and better living standards have been increasing the longevity of Americans consistently over the last several decades. The Social Security Administration figures that a 65 year old today will live, on average, until his or her mid-80s, he said, making it well worth the waiting for most individuals. But, he added, selecting the right age at which to retire is an important decision that should be made on an individual basis. There is no one-size-fits-all option. Weber said that the study points out that most people are uninformed about how Social Security works. More important, it shows that all of us need to get involved in ensuring the preservation of Social Security for we older Americans and for our children and grandchildren. Our socialsecurityreport.org Web site presents AMACs views on what can and what must be done to fix the problems evident in Social Security as it stands today. It also provides links to analyses of alternate proposals aimed at maintaining Social Security solvency. Study shows Social Security knowledge lacking by many PHOTO BY JIM CLARKVisiting the CoalitionThe State Road 200 Coalition was visited by Capt. James Pogue, public information officer for the Marion County Sheriffs Office, at the groups meeting last week. He spoke on access to crime information, noting the availability of the office on Facebook (www.facebook.com/marioncounty sheriffs); Twitter (www.twitter.com/SheriffMarionCo); and Pinterest (http://pinterest.com/marionso). From the left are Pogue, Cindy Congdon of the Coalition, Lt. Dennis Joiner of the Southwest District Office and Pat Gabriel of the Coalition. The Marion County Sheriffs Office held the fourth annual JROTC Bad to the Bone challenge March 15 on the main campus of the sheriffs office at the SWAT and physical agility courses. The event featured 11 high schools from five counties and hundreds of high school students. The students arrived just before sunrise from Duval, Levy, Citrus, Alachua and Marion Counties. Some student-teams competed on a course designed for members of SWAT. Other student-teams ran an agility course that is designed to help law enforcement professionals become better combat ready. The teams featured all boys, all girls and co-ed arrangements. Push-ups, sit-ups, pull-ups and flex arm hang challenges were available for a student who wanted to compete as an individual. The finale of the day came with the tug of war. Francis Marion Military Academy (FMMA) earned the title champions this year of the tug of war. An exhibition tug of war was held featuring FMMA taking on former SWAT professionals that included Sheriff Chris Blair. The final overall standings held Forest High School as top team. Forest High School students had the highest point score and that achievement allowed them to win this years coveted CommanBad to the Bone: JROTCs compete Above, the tug of war competition. At left, no fear of heights in this competition. Hundreds of student athletes and supporters join forces Thursday, March 20, to take part in Our Own Games at Maplewood Elementary from 10:30 a.m. to 12:39 p.m. These games give children with physical challenges the chance to compete against their peers and extend themselves beyond their perceived limits. Inspired by the Special Olympics, most participants in Our Own Games are not emotionally or mentally impaired. Instead, they take part in events demonstrating skills learned in physical therapy, occupational therapy and adaptive physical education. Nearly 50 students are participating from a dozen local schools. Following opening ceremonies, competitive events include wheelchair and bike races, walk and run races, ramp bowling, T-ball, accuracy and distance throws and a competition by students involved in the innovative M.O.V.E. (Mobility Opportunities Via Education) program. Student volunteers from Forest High Schools HOSA (Health Occupations Students of America) Club assist the students with encouragement and Physically-challenged students to hold games Please see GAMES, Page 10

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, March 19, 2014 11 2 W ednesday, March 19, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith aName Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTAL For your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 For your convenience, mail in with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 20441 E Pennsylvania Ave, Dunnellon, FL34432 or call... Todays New Ads CREATION ELECTRIC full service contractor Residential and Commercial Specialist. Lg or small repairs. Lic/Ins. EC13001722352-427-4216 Mention this ad for a 5% discount Be Creative Express yourself through water colors. Classes begin 4/2/14. Call Jackie 352-547-9110 RNSeeks Room to rent W/Bath. 352-359-2122 BRAND NEW Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress Set $150. Still in Original Plastic. (352) 484-4772 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. ATTN Homebuyers 100% financing avail. Government Program. You do not need perfect credit. Call or email to get qualified. Ph: (813) 470-8313 rickgbf@gmail.com Rick Kedzierski lic. loan originator.NLMS #267854, FL#9096 NLMS ID 76856 WE BUYR VS, TRAVEL TRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 WE BUY ANY VEHICLE In Any Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make, Any Model 813-335-3794 813-458-0584 Call AJ CHRYSLER2012 Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs Call T om for more info 352-325-1306 Caregiver/Aide/ Companion/Errands /Transportation Beth 352-861-9548 CREATION ELECTRIC full service contractor Residential and Commercial Specialist. Lg or small repairs. Lic/Ins. EC13001722352-427-4216 Mention this ad for a 5% discount Full Service Lawn Care Residential/Commercial Hot/Cold Pressure Washing Free Estimates 352-316-2629 BAKERS TREES 30 yrs. exper ience, trim & remo val. Free Estimates Palm T ree Exper ts! (352)425-5642 STUMP GRINDINGCALL JIM FOR FREE ESTIMATES (800) 478-8679 000HBDD westmarionmessenger.com Land/Home Financing FHA Loans VA Loans Buy For Loans Home Only Loans USDA Loans Equity Financing Alternative Income Financing 352-622-6324 or 1-800-313-6324 Prestige Home Centers, Inc. 4300 SOUTH PINE AVE. (441) OCALA Just one block north of Ocalas Drive-In Theater 2014 CONVERTIBLE!! We Also Have BANK-OWNED REPOSSESSED HOMES! Repos Available With Land or Without! SOUTH OCALA I-75 SR40 SR200 441 Prestige Home Centers, Inc. N NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY!! 000HD2J WE ARE THE BUILDER NOW $58,500 Financing Available YOUR CHOICE 3BR + DEN or 4 BRs 3BR + DEN or 4 BRs SAME PRICE SAME PRICE ONLY $508.00 Per Month stakes focus on standardized testing may be encouraging the drilllike drudgery of teaching to the test rather than innovative instruction that inspires student learning. Various polls also affirm that only one in four teachers consider standardized tests an accurate measurement of student learning. Whether one is pro or con, standardized tests are here to stay. However, their excessive use has swung the pendulum so far that a greater balance between testing and learning is needed. Standardized tests, therefore, should be one among several assessments for teacher accountability and student progress rather than the alpha and omega. Continuing to do otherwise promises to take the joy of teaching and learning out of the classroom to the detriment of both teachers and students.Citrus County Chronicle EDITORIALcontinued from Page 8 stays too low, the gap between companies like mine that are trying to do the right thing and the larger companies that are paying as low as they can, gets greater and greater. A growing gap makes it harder for businesses like mine to compete. Theres no reason for businesses to be paying a minimum wage of just $7.25 an hour $15,080 a year for full-time work. After all, thats the same minimum wage that businesses paid in 1950, adjusted for inflation. This is 2014, not 1950! Between 1950 and 1968, the minimum wage increased in real inflation-adjusted value, giving us stronger ground to anchor our income ladder to the middle class. But since 1968, the minimum wage has been allowed to lose about a third of its value, leaving even full-time workers in poverty and the rungs of the middle class further out of reach for a growing number of working families. We need to raise the minimum wage so full-time workers can get out of poverty and we can rebuild the consumer demand that drives our economy. As a business owner, I support the proposal to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016, and then adjust it annually to keep up with the cost of living. Indexing the minimum wage to the Consumer Price Index will make wages much more predictable for businesses. Better wages at the bottom helped my business succeed. A better minimum wage will help our nation succeed.Gina Schaefer is the owner of A Few Cool Hardware Stores, a group of nine Ace Hardware stores in Washington, D.C. and Maryland. COLUMNcontinued from Page 8 Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Ihave long ago given up trying to keep up with the Joneses, and not just because they have moved away. I have a hard enough time trying to keep up with myself, let alone trying to figure out what somebody else is doing so I can top them at it. One aspect of trying to keep up with the Joneses is being on top of what is referred to as being Politically Correct. As far as I know, I do not have a political bone in my body. I do have a bone to pick with some politicians, but that is another story. Everybody is so afraid they are going to break some PC rule and offend somebody. Most people today are so easily offended that it is virtually impossible not to offend somebody. I do not want to intentionally offend anybody and I try my best not to. However, for the life of me, I am not able to keep up with all of this political correctness that seems to be domineering in our country today. Because, as soon as you figure it out somebody changes the rules and another word or phrase has been deemed not politically correct. What was politically correct yesterday may be politically incorrect today. If you get your days mixed up and confused, you are not going to know what is politically correct. I think a book should be published every year listing all of the things that are politically correct and politically incorrect. Nobody is allowed to change any, at least for a year. Then, when they come to change it there has to be a national election to vote the political correctness in. Some people believe it to be unAmerican to use phrases that are politically incorrect. I for one, have a hard time keeping a list of all of these politically correct and incorrect words and phrases. I had some business with an attorney and once we finished our business, we had a few moments and were chatting together. I could tell from his chatting that he was rather politically correct in everything he does. I guess that is what comes to being an attorney. Somebody once said that sticks and stones may To be PC or not to be PC, that is the confusion break your bones, but words can never hurt you. Whoever said that was so wrong we need to take that phrase and make it politically incorrect. This is America, he pontificated with me, and we have freedom of speech. Everybody is free to have their opinion and to express it. That is what Americas all about. He went on and on about this matter of freedom of speech. Then, I am not quite sure how it happened, but we got on some rather indelicate subject that was positively politically incorrect. With the majority of people, freedom of speech does not really mean that the other person is free to speak. It simply means I have the freedom to speak. So, I said rather delicately trying to feel my way through this subject, you believe everybody has the freedom to express their opinion? Yes, sir, he said very emphatically. Then he went off on another pontificating spree asserting the rights of all Americans to express their opinion. I knew which side of the issue, he was on and so I broached it this way. You then believe, I said weighing each and every word and syllable, that you have the right to say a certain thing is right. I mentioned what the thing was but I do not need to include it here. Not only do I believe it, he said on another pontificating spree, but I practice it every day of my life. Nobody has the right to tell me what I can and cannot believe! Let me get this right, you have the freedom to say that this, and I mentioned what it was, is perfectly right. He nodded and smiled very broadly and then I continued my thought. Do I have any rights in this area? He nodded and indicated I could continue speaking. You have the right to believe that this certain thing is right, but do I have the right to believe that it is wrong? Well, you might have hit him with a double-barreled shotgun. He never thought of it that way. All he thought of was what his opinion was and that he had the complete freedom to express that opinion. Anybody who had a different opinion did not have the same right as he did to express it. I never thought of it that way, he stammered as he stared at me. Im going to have to give that some more thought. Somebody who believes something is right has the complete freedom to say so. On the other side of the track, the person who believes it is wrong has just as much right to think and say that it is wrong. It is hard to keep up with a world that is constantly changing, especially in this area. That is why I love the Bible so much. That is why I am a follower of Jesus Christ because neither one ever changes. I take great refuge in what the Bible says. Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever, (Hebrews 13:8). Today I rest in the unchanging grace and character of the God who loves me and provided for my salvation. And, tomorrow will be the same.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com. Out to Pastor Dr. James Snyder Letty Towles Dog Park (formerly Millennium Dog Park) has been chosen to be the recipient of funds raised by Macys Heart Your Park program. The program was recently introduced as part of Macys Secret Garden Campaign and is in partnership with the National Recreation & Parks Association (NPRA). The goal of this effort is to raise awareness of and dollars for community parks across the country. Beginning March 7 and ending March 31, customers at Macys Paddock Mall location may donate $1 or more during checkout at the register. One hundred percent of the proceeds will benefit Letty Towles Dog Park. In addition, Macys will match the total customer donation in each of its stores, dollar for dollar, up to $250,000. The Citys Recreation and Parks Department is thrilled to partner with Macys and NRPA, says Julie Johnson, the citys parks operations manager. We encourage our community to visit our local Macys during the month of March to support Letty Towles Dog Park. NRPA is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of community parks, recreation and conservation. Nationwide, Macys stores have selected 550 community parks or green spaces to support through the Heart Your Park program. For more information, contact Julie Johnson at 352-368-5517 or visit www.macys.com/parks. Macys helps raise dog park funds

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Wednesday, March 19 Good first aid kitOn March 19 at Bank of the Ozarks, State Road 200, Friendship Center at 8 a.m., the Kiwanis Club hosts a discussion on: What makes a good first aid kit? Presenters are Merrick Owen, first aid instructor and Stan Magen, pharmacist. A demonstration kit and first aid equipment will be demonstrated. Also, a list of kit contents will be given to attendees. Come early for coffee.Harmony and diversityMary Sue Rich, long time member of the Ocala City Council, will discuss the Racial Harmony and Cultural Diversity initiatives of the city of Ocala when The Interfaith Alliance hosts its next quarterly Womens Gathering at the Oakbrook Center for Spiritual Living on Wednesday, March 19, at 11:30 a.m. Weather permitting the potluck luncheon will be held in the beautiful gardens to the rear of the Center located at 1009 NE 28th Ave. In 2003 Ms. Rich spearheaded the effort to have Ocala join the National League of Cities campaign to promote racial justice and celebrate cultural diversity. With the City Councils blessing, she formed a task force which puts on a major week-long communitywide event each October focusing on racial harmony and cultural understanding. One Ocala One America was chosen as the theme. Rev. Peggy Hostetler, president of the Marion County chapter of The Interfaith Alliance and pastor of the Oakbrook Center for Spiritual Living, welcomes the opportunity to working more closely with the Racial Harmony and Cultural Diversity Task Force as its aims correlate closely with those of The Interfaith Alliance. Rev. Peggy quotes from The Interfaith Alliances mission statement which says we celebrate the diversity of paths within our community and join together to promote compassion and civility and create opportunities for mutual respect and and understanding. She invites you to join women of all ethnic and religious backgrounds in expanding our efforts to make Ocala truly a City of Compassion as the Mayor recently decreed. For more information and to RSVP please email tiaofmarioncountyfl@gmail.com or telephone 352-629-3897. You may also visit the web page at tiamarioncounty.org.Thursday, March 20 Young at Heart luncheonThe Young At Heart Luncheon, at College Road Baptist Church, will be March 20 at noon. We have to entertain us The Dueling Banjos. Come join us, bring a dish to share, along with your friends, guests and neighbors. Everyone is welcome. The church is at 5010 SW College Road (State Road 200). Phone 352-237-5741.Air Force group to meetThe March meeting of the Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association (AFA) will be held on Thursday, March 20 at 7 p.m. at the Ocala International Airport Administration Building, 750 SW 60th Ave., Ocala. All are welcome. For more information contact Mike Emig at 352-854-8328.Friday, March 21 Perrys in concertThe Perrys have proven that they have what it takes to rise to the top of Southern Gospel music, and what a journey it has been for them. 40 years ago, gathered around a piano, the music began talented vocalists and musicians singing the moving lyrics of traditionally based songs and today they are some of the most recognizable voices in Southern Gospel. Blessed, with musical abilities and communication with others, this team reaches audiences with Christ at the heart of their ministry. Enjoy The Perrys In Concert on Friday, March 21 at 6:30 p.m., and be touched deeply by their music. This is a free concert. A Love Offering will be taken. Christs Church Of Marion County, 6768 SW 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182 or http://www.ccomc.org/.The Circle of French FriendsLe Cercle Des Amis Franais meets on the third Friday of every month from 11 a.m. to noon at Marion County Sheriffs Office Community Conference Room located at 9048 Highway 200, about mile from Walmart.Saturday, March 22 Saddle Oak Club yard saleThe annual Saddle Oak yard sale will be Saturday, March 22, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saddle Oak is on State Road 200, across from Heathbrook Publix. The yard sale will be in the clubhouse and on clubhouse grounds by all the community residents. Breakfast will be served with sandwiches and coffee. Lunch will be soup and sandwiches. There will also be a great bake sale.Worship at TimberRidgeWorship Service at TimberRidge Nursing and Rehabilitation Center will be hel on Saturday, March 22 at 10:15 a.m. Countryside Presbyterian Church provides Christian Ministry to residents of TimberRidge Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, 9848 SW 110th St., Ocala and holds bimonthly worship services. If you have a loved one, or friend at the TimberRidge Center you are invited to attend our next service. For further information, please call the church office at 352-237-4633. M ore on Page 4 Three Ocala Palms residents were awarded the Presidents Award last month for their service to the Ocala Palms community. Don Schultz was one of the recipients. It was noted that Schultz was instrumental in acquiring a portable sound system for the community and designed and built several addition to the golf shop. Besides serving on the OPRAI Board in various capacities, including secretary and treasurer, he is president of the Republican Club this year. Jean Marra was honored for service in the communitys library. She has served as resident librarian for the last five years. She survives and regulates the hundreds of books and magazines coming through the overstocked library each week. Nick Keller was the financial secretary for the worship committee from 2006 to 2012. In addition he was involved with the sound system set-up for Sunday services. Keller also serves as the Republican Club membership chairman and is always willing to lend a hand with the spring show. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, March 19, 2014 3 10 W ednesday, March 19, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 000H64C 000H64C 000HJDG IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Seasonal Special Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2013 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $39 95 with 10% off repair With coupon. Expires 4/30/2014 000 HI0D COMPUTER REPAIR COMPUTER PROBLEMS SOLVED Your home or business 7 days a week. Microsoft certified engineer. 30+ years experience. PC Repairs/Upgrades Virus Removal Router/Network Setup New PC Installs Se habla espaol Tech Solutions of Ocala 352-207-4435 Mardi Gras Homosassa Style Saturday March 22 Y ulee Dr., Old Homosassa, FL 9 AM 6 PM Parade Starts at 10 AM Shrimp, Food, Beer & W ine, V endors, Kids Zone, Arts & Crafts Rotar y Club of Homosassa Springs Supported by: 000HJWB Ameriprise Financial Fresh from Florida Crystal Automotive The Freezer Gildans The Shed Neon Leons DiscoverCitrusCounty.com FDS Disposal Suncoast Plumbing Citrus 95.3/The Fox 96.7 Homosassa Printing Homosassa Wildlife Park Live Music Cash Prizes Info call 352-201-2520 or go to www.shrimpapalooza.com 000HLKB AIR CONDITIONING 352-208-4641 Locally Owned & Operated License # CAC1816140 WILSON AIR SERVICE Tune Up Special We Service All Brands Repairs Replacement Free Second Opinions 24-HR. Service $ 29 95 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000H0PY CONCRETE WORK REPAIRING OLD We Make Your Concrete Look Good Specializing in Repairing Concrete Driveways Pool Decks Patios Entrance Ways Advantages: Mildew & Oil Resistant Non Skid Protection Easy to Keep Clean Commercial Grade Quality RENEWED SURFACES 000HHHV PEST CONTROL SERVICES Hasta La Bye Bye. Tri-County Services, Inc. Pest Control, T ermite & Lawn Care Licensed and Insured Serving Central Florida for over 20 years Family owned and operated Toll Free 1-888-352-9290 or call Rick 352-266-4613 000HG5U Lanai Enclosures Glass Window Replacement Acrylic Windows Screen Room000HMPE WINDOW INSTALL 352-587-2735CERTIFIED RESIDENTIAL CONTRACTOR license # 1330701 GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 795 $ 795 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RAY RAY RAY CC C C C C ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION Crayconst.com Crayconst.com Crayconst.com 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G GA RA GE S CR EE N D OO R 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G 16 x 7 SLIDING GARAGE GARAGE SCREEN SCREEN DOOR DOOR 000HJZR We also install custom acrylic & glass windows. Beat The Love Bugs 000HMMC HANDYMAN Weekend Warrior Let Me Do All Your Chores Home Maintenance/ Repair Lawn & Y ard Pressure W ashing Painting, Etc. V ery Dependable, Competent & Affordable Excellent, Local References. Reclaim Your Fr ee Time! Contact W ayne Green at 352-875-6106 711185 DIALAPRO For Your Professional Needs For Your Professional Needs WEST MARION Messenger WEST MARION Messenger 000HNMB R&L Auto Detailing $ 29 95 Call for A pp t. 875-6486 6895 SW Hwy. 200 4 Miles West of I-75 ... because your car deserves better. Reg. $ 39 95 SPRING SPECIAL: HAND WASH & WAX Includes Windows, Vacuum Carpets, Wheel Treatment, Tire Shine & Door Jams WORLD CLASS SERVICE SINCE GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your P et Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 000HN7A Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting Look for us on Facebook Look for us Look for us on Facebook on Facebook 000HMN3 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run 352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm O CALA G OLF C ART 2010 EZ-GO RXV Reconditioned Garage Floor Mat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 49 High Speed Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 549 Sunbrella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 549 Windshield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 119 Mag Wheels 10in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 349 Stop and visit us before you buy! We Guarantee the Lowest Prices in Ocala! 10% Discount to Veterans labor & parts excluding batteries $4,995 2010 Club Car Precedent Reconditioned $4,995 Now Offering Sleekline Yamaha Great Prices, Best Selection 6-V 6 PACK $399 8-V 6 PACK $499 6-V T605 only $539 8-V T875 only $599 000HEPV All repairs done on premises. 14-k Gold Jewelry Fashion Jewelry Sterling Silver Diamonds 14-k Gold Jewelry Fashion Jewelry Sterling Silver Diamonds B ATTERIES $ 8 00 + tax Fine Jewelry For All Occasions Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 www.jandjjewelersocala.com Stor e Hours: T ues-Fri. 10-5 Sat. 10-2 B UYING G OLD A ND D IAMONDS Goats Milk Bath Pr oducts 000HKUM Carol Meissner won the 50/50 drawing. Perhaps Carols good fortune was aided by the bright green wig that she was wearing or, as some suggested, by her husband, Jim who was dressed as the largest Lucky Leprechaun any of us had ever seen. Announcements were made that there will be a Koffee Klatch Saturday morning, March 22 at 10 a.m. in the Clubhouse. All FFV neighbors are invited to come and socialize for an hour and enjoy morning coffee and snacks. The spring yard sale will be the following weekend on Saturday, March 29. There will be a special sale in the clubhouse itself to benefit the new Social Club and its functions. Each person who is participating in the yard sale will be donating items for the benefit of future social activities. All of Fairfield Village seems to be coming to life with the beautiful springtime flowers and the great weather that we have been enjoying. Even those gusty breezes of March are welcomed as the beautiful time of year returns. From FFV, the lively place filled with lovely people we send wishes for a fabulous springtime to all of Central Florida. Enjoy! FAIRFIELDcontinued from Page 6 support. Our Own Games began 34 years ago when school therapists and teachers in Alachua and Marion counties organized the new kind of athletic competition. The Games have grown over the years and now involve Marion County students exclusively. Maplewood Elementary has hosted the event since its inception and is located at 4751 SE 24th Street near Ocala. For more information, contact Julie Crowley at 352-671-6832 or Julie.Crowley@marion.k1 2.fl.us. GAMEScontinued from Page 1 Ocala Palms residents given the 2013 Presidents Award were, from left, Don Schultz, Jean Marra, and Nick Keller. Ocal a Pa lms b oar d ho no rs re si de nts Read the classifieds Happenings Read the classifieds

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Saturday, March 22 Silver Heirs covered dish mealCrossroads Church has a special place in their heart for the senior citizen, and we celebrate as we come together for everyones home-cooked meals. Bring a covered dish to share and join us for an informal time of feasting and fellowship. We meet in the Youth Building behind the sanctuary every fourth Saturday, beginning at noon. Hope to see you there.Tuesday, March 25 Breast Cancer Support GroupThe SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Breast Cancer Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 SW 105th St., Ocala, at 1 p.m. in the Chapel, room 235. Our meeting on March 25 will be a presentation by Evelyn B. Kelly, PhD, writer/speaker. Evelyn will talk to us about Thinking Young, were not over the hill yet. Please join us for this interesting topic.Sleep disorders topic of luncheon meetingOur Redeemer Lutheran Church will host its Food for Thought luncheon Tuesday, March 25, at 11:30 a.m. Dr. Amrth Bapatla, pulmonary critical care specialist, will speak on Sleep Disorder during the luncheon. The luncheon is free but RSVPs to 352-368-4028 are requested. Thursday, March 27 Triumphant Quartet at College Road The Winter Concert Series hosted by College Road Baptist Church, will come to its conclusion on Thursday, March 27, with the Triumphant Quartet. The concert begins at 7 PM and a $10 donation is requested at the door. The community is invited to enjoy the Triumphant Quartet at College Road Baptist Church, Saturday, March 29 Common Ground FellowshipFor the 40-something crowd in Crossroads Church, we will be gathering at Pavarottis Pizza at 8075 SW Highway 200, Ocala, in the Canopy Oak Center at 7 p.m. This is a time of reflecting on the blessings of God in an informal setting and purchasing good food to boot. Come and join us there.Crime prevention seminarChrists Church of Marion County will host a Metro Crime Prevention Seminar presenting topics such as identity theft, frauds and scams, purse snatching, guns and alternative weapons, hurricane safety. This is a free workshop, the main goal being to achieve more awareness about what is going on in the publics backyard. Lunch pizza, salad, dessert and drink will be offered for a donation. This event begins at noon. Registration is suggested: 352-861-6182. Christs Church of Marion County, 6768 SW 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, http://www.ccomc.org.Dining with the LionsThe Ocala 200 Lions Club is having a Dining with the Lions (Italian Style) at the Oasis Restaurant, 7651 SW State Road 200, on Saturday, March 29 from 4 to 7 p.m. Price will be $8 for spaghetti with meatballs, spaghetti with meat sauce or fettuccini alfredo (includes salad, bread, ice tea or coffee). First come, first served All proceeds from this benefit will be used for Charities.Sunday, March 30 Joy Night at Christs ChurchJoin with us as we lift our hearts and voices in praise, an evening of traditional and contemporary musical worship celebrated with participating Marion County Christian churches families and friends at 5 p.m. Refreshments follow the program. Christs Church of Marion County, 6768 SW 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182, http://www.ccomc.org.Marion chamber Music Society ConcertFor the last concert of this season, the Marion Chamber Music Society proudly presents The Best of the Ocala Piano Conservatory featuring award winning performers past and present playing the piano as well as organ, trumpet, marimba and voice. The free concert will be at Queen of Peace Catholic Church, 6455 SW Hwy. 200, Ocala, at 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 30. Hear beloved operatic arias and your favorite piano pieces by Chopin, Debussy, and Rachmaninoff, among others. Ryan Pagels, the Ocala Civic Theaters music director and Ocala Piano Conservatorys very first graduate, will also perform at the concert. For more information, call 352-876-1340 or visit: www.marionchambermusic.com or www.ocalapianoconservatory.com. Marion Chamber Music Society concerts: Always Exceptional, Always Free.Wednesday, April 2 Crossroads Carnival startsBring your family and enjoy a day at the carnival at Crossroads Church, beginning Wednesday, April 2, and concluding on Sunday, April 6. There will be games, rides, food and lots of fun. Open daily from 5 to 10 p.m., with earlier hours on Saturday and Sunday. Proceeds support Crossroads Student Ministries.Thursday, April 3 Southern Express at AppletonThe big band Southern Express will perform during the Rhythm & Art After Hours event at the Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, Thursday, April 3, at 5:30 p.m. Southern Express has been performing in Central Florida for more than 15 years. Many of the bands seasoned members have musical backgrounds rooted in military service, with almost every branch of service represented. Many members were or are active music educators. Doors open at 5 p.m. for complimentary samplings from Horse and Hounds Restaurant and cash bar. Music begins at 5:30 p.m. and admission is free for members and $10 for nonmembers. In addition to the After Hours musical program, visitors can also enjoy the Appletons current exhibitions, A Celebration of Japan, The Living Art of Bonsai, The Gathering of Legends, [in]justice, Industrial Nature: Work by Michelle Stitzlein, and the museums extensive permanent collection of European, American, Asia, African, Contemporary and pre-Columbian art and artifacts. The Appleton Museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, noon to 5 p.m. on Sundays, and closed on Mondays. In addition to daily admission, a 12-month membership is available for $25 for seniors 55 and over, $30 for adults 18 and over, $40 for two seniors over age 55, $50 for a family of two adults and any children under age 18, and $15 for college students and current or retired educators. Owned and operated by College of Central Florida, the Appleton Museum of Art is located at 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, just east of downtown on State Road 40 (exit 352 east off I-75 or exit 268 west off I-95). For more information call the Appleton Museum of Art at 352-291-4455 or visit AppletonMuseum.org. More on P age 5 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, March 19, 2014 9 4 W ednesday, March 19, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000HFWO 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS Christ the King The Rev Donald J. Curran, Rector Services: Rite I 8:00 am Rite II 10:15 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary 352-351-9727 www.ctkaocala.org Anglican Church 000H5UF is discovered through worshiping together 71 1187 000HLRE Locally Owned IP Resort $169 pp/dbl Beau Rivage $189 pp/dbl SOT #36723 Biloxi Ca$ino Tours 3 Nights April 21-24, May 19-22 Chance to win $50 CASH 352-840-0333 www. La ur aK an eT ra ve l. co m Includes $55 in freeplay & two breakfast vouchers Ask about the 5 for $50 deal T our Escort Janet Stefan Deluxe motor coach/3 nts. hotel Games played on the bus Refreshments served on bus ONE FREE TRIP GIVEN AW AY EACH MONTH National Cremation Society Considering Cr emation? REGISTER TO WIN A FREE CREMA TION PLAN Come join the National Cremation Society for a FREE Meal & Informational Seminar on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation When the time comes wouldnt you prefer your loved ones celebrate your legacy rather than stress about making arrangements? Give them the relief theyll need during a tough time. Well discuss: Affordable options and savings Veterans benefits Worldwide A wayFrom-Home Protection And much more... RESERV ATION REQUIRED Limited seating available. CALL NOW! 1-352-319-6816 First time attendees only please. *Free cremation does not include Travel Protection Plan. 000HNW A $100 $100 $100 Promotional Discount to all Attendees Promotional Promotional Discount to all Discount to all Attendees Attendees REDS RESTAURANT 8411 N. SR 200 Tuesday, March 25 10:00 AM OASIS RESTAURANT 7651 SW Hwy 200 Wednesday, March 26 3:30 PM WOLFYS RESTAURANT 2159 E. Silver Springs Blvd. Thursday, April 3 3:30 PM John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000H8TS 000HNKK Serving all areas west of I-75 Buying or Selling? Let s talk!Brett Shinn Brok er/Associatebrettshinn.com 352 433-6684Affiliates 7478-B SW 60th Av e. Ocala, FL 34476bs@brettshinn.com The W est Marion Messenger is a free comm unity newspaper cov ering ne ws of communities w est of Ocala including Fore Ranch, Stone Creek, Fairfield Village, Ocala P alms, Timberwood, Falls of Ocala, Quail Meado w, Fo xwood F arms and Golden Hills Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala, Fla., 34477. Prob lems getting the Messeng er: If your comm unity is listed abov e and the Messenger is not delivered to y ou or you are ha ving trouble getting the paper from bo xes around the S .R. 40 and S.R. 27 areas, call 854-3986.CONTACT INFORMATIONOffice (352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 489-6593 20441 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34432 EditorJim Clark 390-6444 Circulation Barbara Jag ger s 854-3986 Inside Sales/Office Coord. -Mic hel Northsea 854-3986 Adver tising Sales T om Rapplean 352-564-2957 Adver tising Sales Paig e Lefko witz 352-564-2902 Manag er John Murphy 352-563-6363 Deadline for ne ws : Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication. Member of the Community Papers of Florida I want to get news in the Messenger.Call editor Jim Clark at 352-390-6444 or send by e-mail to editor@westmarionmessenger.comCommunity news and photos must be received by Thursday the week before publication. Mail and photos must be e-mailed to editor@westmarionmessenger.com. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.Deadline for AdvertisingClassified Reader Ads 2 pm Friday Display Ads 5 pm Thursday ARI ES (March 21 to April 19) Youll want to discourage well-meaning but potentially ill-advised interference in what you intend to accomplish. Your work has a better chance to succeed if it reflects you. TA URU S (April 20 to May 20) The Bovines well-deserved reputation for loyalty could be tested if you learn that it might be misplaced. But dont rely on rumors. Check the stories out before you decided to act. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Youve been going on adrenaline for a long time, and this unexpected lull in a recent spate of excitement could be just what you need to restore your energy. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Friends can be counted on to help you deal with a perplexing personal situation. But remember to keep your circle of advisers limited only to those youre sure you can trust. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) Security-loving Lions do not appreciate uncertainty in any form. But sometimes changing situations can reveal hidden stresses in time to repair a relationship before its too late. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) This is a good time for single Virgos to make a love connection. Be careful not to be too judgmental about your new prospect at least until you know more about her or him. LI BRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Your sense of justice helps you resolve a problem that might have been unfairly attributed to the wrong person. Spend the weekend doing some long-neglected chores. SCOR PIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You might feel justified in your anger toward someone you suspect betrayed your trust. But it could help if you check if your suspicions have substance. SAGI TTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Ignore distractions if you hope to accomplish your goal by the deadline you agreed to. Keep the finish line in sight, and you should be able to cross it with time to spare. CA PRICO RN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Your creative self continues to dominate through much of the week. Also, despite a few problems that have cropped up, that recent romantic connection seems to be thriving. AQU ARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) As curious as you might be, its best to avoid trying to learn a colleagues secret. That sort of knowledge could drag you into a difficult workplace situation at some point down the line. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Instead of spending too much time floundering around wondering if you can meet your deadline, you need to spend more time working toward reaching it.

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Saturday, April 5 Womens Spring BreakCelebrate with the Womens Spring Break. Join the Womens Ministry enjoying a continental breakfast, friendship; lunch at the baked potato bar, fellowship; special events with speakers Alan Tison, Director of Advancemant at Johnson University Florida and Twila Sias, Childrens Ministry and teaches in areas of education and psychology; and special sessions including a Make & Take card making class. Event starts at 9 a.m. Free to all women. Child care is available (note need on registration). door prizes. To register, please call 352-8616182 or http://www.ccomc.org/. Christs Church Of Marion County, 6768 SW 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182 or http://www.ccomc.org/. Sunday, April 6 Master Choir performsThe Central Florida Master Choir, conducted by Dr. Harold W. McSwain, Jr., will perform a concert on Sunday, April 6, at 3 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, located at 1126 East Silver Springs Blvd. (which is State Road 40) diagonally across the street from the old Ritz Hotel in Ocala, Florida. The program will include Leonard Bernsteins Chichester Psalms and other works. Admission to the concert is free but an offering will be taken to benefit the Tuesday Morning Outreach Ministry to help the homeless. For further information about the concert, call 352-537-0207.Saturday, April 12 Benefit for Therapeutic groupJoin the Marion Therapeutic Riding Association as we dance away the winter Blahs at a Beach Party with music from the 50s through the British Invasion. Not only will there be dinner and dancing to the band 3 For the Road, a regular band at the Villages, we have added a comedy show by the Villages Theatre Company to entertain you. On Saturday, April 12, the Beach Party will be held at the South MarionVillages Elks Lodge 2730, 7655 East Highway 25, Belleview starting at 5 p.m. with a happy hour followed by dinner at 6 p.m. and entertainment to follow. Tickets for a 60s vintage buffet along with an evening of fun-filled entertainment are just $ 25 per person. Tickets are available on the Marion Therapeutic Riding Association (MTRA) website, www.mariontherapeuticriding association.org or by calling the MTRA office at 352-732-7300.Saturday, April 19 Easter EggstravaganzaThe excitement is building for Crossroads Easter Eggstravaganza on Saturday, April 19 from 10 a.m. to noon. Everything is free! Egg hunts will be supervised by age group, with 15,000 eggs on the property! There will be games, bounce houses, cotton candy, hot dogs, drinks, sno-cones, chips, prizes, and the gospel message will be shared. Families are welcome.Sunday, April 20 Crossroads United Easter serviceWe are looking forward to celebrating Easter this year, and have reserved a meeting place at the ballroom in the Hilton Hotel at 3600 SW 36th Ave., Ocala for this joyous occasion. Plan on joining us Sunday, April 20 at 10:30 a.m. for our United Easter Service. Spanish translation will be made available and nurseries are provided.Sunday, April 27 German American picnic setThe German American Club of Marion County will host a picnic on Sunday, April 27, at noon, in Coehadjoe Park. Bratwurst and Polish sausage will be prepared by club members and served buffet style. Please bring a dish to share and your own snacks. Music will be provided by Bavarian Oskar. Tickets purchased before the picnic are $7 per member or $10 per non-member. Tickets purchased on the day of the picnic are $9 per member or $12 per non-member. For tickets, call Barb Hartmann at 352-751-4207.Saturday, May 3 Yoga in Sholom ParkThe outdoor season of yoga begins at 9 a.m. and will continue on the first Saturday of the month for 7 months. For more information, call Ingrid at 352854-7950.Monday, May 5 Savannah, Charleston tripHave you been wanting to see the sites in Savannah, Georgia, and Charleston, South Carolina, but didnt want to drive? Well, sit back, relax and enjoy a bus trip with your friends from First Congregational Church. The trip dates are May 5 to May 8 with accommodations in the Historic District of Savannah at the Holiday Inn Express. River Street, Savannahs famed squares and restaurants are convenient and within walking distance. The cost includes the bus; three-nights accommodations, including buffet breakfast; a one-day tour of Savannah and a one-day tour of downtown Charleston. To reserve your spot and get pricing information, call Gen at 352-873-3377, or Janet at 352-237-2309. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, March 19, 2014 5 8 W ednesday, March 19, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Citrus, Marion, & Sumter Counties 352-610-3018 000HNFC 000HK2F West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Excessive testing counter-productive Standardized tests have been a part of American education since the mid-1800s. However, since the 2002 passage of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) that mandated yearly testing of students from third grade onward in all 50 states, state spending on standardized tests has skyrocketed from $423 million to nearly $2 billion annually. The NCLB testing mandate and attendant rise in the use of standardized tests has fueled an ongoing debate as to whether such testing positively or negatively impacts student learning. Proponents contend standardized tests benefit both teachers and students. As an assessment tool, they aid teachers in determining how a student is performing and progressing academically over time as compared to students nationwide, statewide and locally. For students, standardized tests are a fairly accurate measurement of their academic strengths and weaknesses and a predictor of success in college. Opponents counter that standardized tests do more harm than good. Favoring achievement of a specific score to measure teacher accountability and student performance, they tend to decrease non-test-related instruction time at the expense of a well-balanced education. Also, they contribute to making learning a stressful experience that diminishes the joy of learning for teachers and students alike. Adding to the pro and con debate is the questionable effectiveness of standardized tests relative to U.S. students as indicated by the results of the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), which tests 15-year-olds from around the world every three years to gauge their reading, math and science skills. When the PISA was first conducted in 2000, U.S. students were ranked 11th in the world for reading, 14th for science and 18th for math. After a decade of increased emphasis on standardized tests, the U.S. global ranking in 2012 fell to 21st for reading, 24th for science and 31st for math. The sharp fall in the global rankings of the U.S. since 2000 suggests that the NCLBs excessive, highOur Message PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGANMANAGER: JOHN MURPHYEDITOR: JIM CLARK MessengerWEST MARION Editorial Guest column Weak minimum wage wont build economyBY GINA SCHAEFER Annapolis CapitalIt didnt take long after my husband and I opened our first hardware store in 2003 for people to start coming in and asking us to open in their neighborhood, too. By 2009, we had grown to six Ace Hardware stores in Baltimore and Washington, D.C., with our seventh store opening in 2010 in Takoma Park, Maryland. The next year, Old Takoma Ace Hardware was one of four stores, out of 4,500 locally owned and operated Ace Hardware stores worldwide, to win the Coolest Hardware Store award from Ace Hardware Corporation. We expanded further in 2012, growing from seven stores to nine with additional Washington DC and Maryland locations. We may own the business, but we didnt do this alone. Our growth would not have been possible without the help of our dedicated employees. Paying fair wages helped our business grow fast to nine stores and nearly 200 employees even as our country suffered a terrible economic downturn. Our starting pay for sales associates is $10. We know that gradually raising the minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 an hour makes good business sense. Raising pay at the bottom is good for the bottom line in key ways: When employees earn a decent starting wage, they can concentrate on their job without continual stress over how they are going to afford basics like rent, groceries or transportation. Businesses like mine count on good customer service, and good customer service depends on employees who are treated fairly and invested in our business. Our employees know we value them, and we know they value our customers. Satisfied customers dont just keep coming back themselves, they tell their friends and families about us. Paying better wages helps us attract and retain good employees, increase sales, expand our business, and hire more employees. When the minimum wage goes up it puts money in the paychecks of people who most need to spend it from making rent to buying things they could not afford before from the grocer, the pharmacy, the shoe store, the auto repair, and, yes, the hardware store. Local businesses depend on local customers with money to spend. A higher minimum wage means more money circulating in our local economy. Our employees shop at other businesses, and the employees of other businesses shop at our stores. A higher minimum wage is a boost for our local tax base as well. Too many large companies pay wages so persistently low that many of their employees have to turn to food banks or food stamps and other public assistance for the most basic essentials. This means companies that could pay higher minimum wages, but arent, are being heavily subsidized by taxpayers. Moreover, when the minimum wage Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. This week I didnt have time to write a regular news column for publication. I was too busy trying to figure out how to fill out my brackets you know, for the NCAA basketball tournament. Its commonly called March Madness, a registered trademark, and there are various contests conducted that give people an opportunity to fill out a bracket, once the pairings for the tournament are announced. That happened Sunday evening. Now everyone, millions of us, have to figure out whos going to win each game. In most of these contests, whoever gets the most points as assigned by the contest administrators wins a prize. Some of them can be substantial. Ive been entering for years, and Ive never won a dime. As I look at this year, the first thing is to decide whether I want to start from the outside and work in, or start with the overall winner and work out. Of course, there are many contests, so you can do it both ways. The logical thing is to pick the Florida Gators to win it all. After all, theyre the No. 1 seed, they swept through the SEC season with a 21-0 mark and have only lost two close games, on the road, this year. But they struggled in trying to hold a lead Sunday against Kentucky, and didnt look like world-beaters in the first half Saturday against Tennessee. So do you stick with them or not? Then there are the Cinderella teams. You always have to consider the teams that seemingly dont have a chance, but sneak in all the way to the finals. Wichita State was one such team last year, making it all the way to the Final Four. This year, though, the Brackets: No time for anything else Among Friends Jim Clark Shockers are a No. 1 seed and are 34-0, so it wouldnt exactly be a surprise for them to advance that far. It might be a surprise if they lose early. And on and on it goes. Nothing is a sure thing in this tournament, which starts this week at various sites. I have to admit that, except for a couple of big games involving Duke, all Ive seen this season are Florida Gator games. At this time of year, when the big games are taking place, Im generally watching a baseball game on the MLB channel, particularly if the Mets are on, so thats even less basketball. But I will sit down and go through the schedule and the seedings, and see which teams the NCAA Selection Committee thinks will advance and generally pick against them. Thats how accurate they usually are being a No. 1 seed doesnt automatically qualify you to win the regional and advance to the Final Four. So Im sure Ill have a winner somewhere in my brackets oh well, at least its nice to dream. Maybe Ill at least finish in the top one million. That would be progress.Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger and South Marion Citizen. Please see COLUMN Page 11 Please see EDITORIAL, Page 11 The 37th season of the Ocala Symphony Orchestra will conclude in a rousing fashion with this Boston Pops style salute to Americas most popular music. The concerts will take place on Saturday, April 5 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 6 at 3 p.m., both at Ocala Breeders Sales Auditorium. Fans of Gershwin will appreciate Porgy and Bess complete with bassoon soloist Arnold Irchai. The Maestro will make a special guest appearance as soloist in Leroy Andersons The Typewriter. These pieces, in addition to a concert suite from Victory at Sea as well as Laras Theme from Dr. Zhivago, are sure to make for a very entertaining concert. The OSO will also perform Aaron Coplands Fanfare for the Common Man, a well-known brass salute written by one of Americas most famous composers. More Pops pieces that the OSO will present include a Pops Hoedown, a Tribute to Irving Berlin, Variations on a Shaker Melody, and Casey at the Bat for Narrator and Orchestra. With multiple guest appearances and a plethora of Americas popular music, the conclusion of the OSOs 37th season is sure to leave the audience anxiously awaiting another fun-filled, fan-fortified musical journey in the 38th season! Theres no telling what our Maestro will pull out of the bag for this special concert. Dont miss this fun celebration of all things USA and OSO! This 4th subscription concert is open to the public, and tickets are $5 to $30 each, which can be purchased by visiting www.ocalasymphony.com, by calling 352-351-1606, or at the door. The Ocala Symphony Orchestra is Marion Countys premier cultural arts organization. Founded in 1975, the orchestra averages a dozen concerts throughout the year in front of nearly 10,000 area citizens. Its mission is to have the highest caliber music performed by skilled musicians Ocala Symphony salutes popular music

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St. Patricks Day was on Monday, so guess its OK to give you a few facts about this special day. St. Patricks Day is celebrated on March 17, the anniversary of his death in the fifth century. The Irish have observed this day as a religious holiday for more than 1,000 years. On St. Patricks Day Irish families would traditionally attend church in the morning and celebrate in the afternoon. Lenten prohibitions against eating meat were waived and people would dance, drink and feaston the traditional meal of Irish bacon and cabbage. St. Patrick is the patron saint and national apostle of Ireland. Born in Roman Britain, he was kidnapped and brought to Ireland as a slave at the age of 16. He later escaped, but returned to Ireland and was credited with bringing Christianity to its people. In the centuries following his death the mythology surrounding his life became ever more fixed in the Irish culture: One of the most well known legends is that he explained the Holy Trinity (Father, Son and Holy Spirit) using the three leaves of a shamrock. The first parade held to honor St. Patricks Day took place, not in Ireland, but in the United States. On March 17, 1762, Irish soldiers serving in the English military marched through New York City. Along with their music, the parade helped the soldiers reconnect with their Irish roots, as well as with fellow Irishmen serving in the English army. In 1848, several New York Irish Aid societies decided to unite their parades to form one official New York City St. Patricks Day Parade. Today, that parade is the worlds oldest civilian parade and the largest in the United States, with over 150,000 participants. Each year, nearly 3 million people line the 1.5mile parade route to watch the procession, which takes more than five hours. Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia and Savannah also celebrate the day with parades involving between 10,000 and 20,000 participants each. The annual St. Patricks Day parades became a show of strength for Irish Americans, as well as a must-attend event for many political candidates. As Irish immigrants spread out over the United States, other cities developed their own traditions. One of these is Chicagos annual dyeing of the Chicago River green. The practice started in 1962, when city pollution-control workers used dyes to trace illegal sewage discharges and realized that the green dye might provide a unique way to celebrate the holiday. That year they released 100 pounds of green vegetable dye into the riverenough to keep it green for a week! Today, in order to minimize environmental damage, only 40 pounds of dye are used, and the river turns green for only a few hours. Although Chicago historians claim their citys idea for a river of green was original, some natives of Savannah, Georgia believe the idea originated in their town. They point out that, in 1961, a hotel restaurant manager named Tom Woolley convinced city officials to dye Savannahs river green. The experiment didnt exactly work as planned, and the water only took on a slight greenish hue. Savannah never attempted to dye its river again, but Woolley maintains (though others refute the claim) that he personally suggested the idea to Chicagos Mayor Richard J. Daley. Green is the chosen color because it represents Ireland, also known as the Emerald Isle. It also represents shamrocks and spring in Ireland. A tradition often observed is if you arent wearing green you get pinched to remind you to wear green next year! Several of our Red Hot Fillies spent an afternoon last week at the home of Dottie Hefferon making feathers and flowers hair pieces. Dottie and her daughter were very helpful in assisting the women with their designs. We will look for these creations at our next outing. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, March 19, 2014 7 6 W ednesday, March 19, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger If you are not completely satisfied, the aids may be returned for a full refund within 45 days of the completion of fitting, in satisfactory condition. Fitting fees may apply. See store for details. Bluetooth is a registered trademark of Bluetooth SIG. Limited Time Discount. No other offers or discounts apply. Discount does not apply to prior sales. J 4 WELCOME BACK SNOWBIRDS! Dickey RichardsonLicensed Hearing Aid Specialist Inside SEARS Paddock Mall(352) 237-1665 Rickey RichardsonLicensed Hearing Aid Specialist9570 SW Hwy 200 (Corner of Hwy 484 & 200)(352) 291-1467 Inside ANOTHER LOCATION INSIDE CRYST AL RIVER MALL (NEXT TO K-MART)CHECK QUALIFICATION CALL352-291-1467 WALK-INS WELCOME! Call for a FREE demo today! Must present coupon. Any make or model. In office only. One week only.FREEHEARING TEST BATTERY REPLACEMENT HEARING AID REPAIRS BAT TERIESPREMIUM ZINC BATTERIES99Limit 1 Coupon Per Visit. Limit 2 Packs Per Visit. Must present coupon. One week only. 0%FINANCINGONE WEEK ONLY!12 MONTHS SAME AS CASHFactory pricing for non-qualifiersBlue Cross Blue Shield Federal Insurance FREE HEARING AIDSTHATS RIGHT Y OU PA Y ZERO$$ Travel With Confidence . Miracle Ear Will Be There.Over 1,300 locations nationwide! Miracle-Ear has been caring for people for over 60 years. Isnt it comforting to know theyll be there when you need them, whenever you are? Patrick Duffy, Actor New Location Inside Crystal River Mall (Next to K-Mart)pays total cost of 2 Miracle Ear Digital Hearing AidsFederal Government Insurance code #104, #105, #111, or #112.Empire State Insurance Planpays for total cost of 2 Miracle Ear Digital Hearing Aids 000HNTA 000HIQC The Truesdell Professional Building 200 N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Fl 34482 KELLEAN K. TRUESDELL, J.D., LLM Attorney & Counselor at Law (352) 873-4141 or KelleanTruesdell.com My Florida Estate Planning Workshop is available any day at any hour. Wills, Living Trusts, Financial and Medical Powers of Attorney, Probate, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, Asset Protection, Federal Death Tax Minimization, Trust Administration, Elder Law and Personal LifeCare Services. 000HF2U Patsy Clines second No. 1 hit was Shes Got You but on Saturday night in the Fairfield Village Clubhouse that song became the No. 1 hit for a former neighbor. Part of the entertainment for the St. Patricks Day dinner planned and coordinated by Loretta Zang and Jean Chapman was the surprise visit from Sandy and Norris Williams former neighbors who moved to Dunnellon this past year. Loretta was able to keep the special entertainment a secret, and she was aided in her presentation by another new neighbor, Mike the DJ who introduced and took care of the accompaniment for Sandy Williams hilarious rendition of Patsy Cline singing Shes Got You. As the photos show, Sandy pulled a type of teasing lip syncing act with all kinds of symbols from the songs lyrics being pulled from the bust of her glamorous black sequined outfit. There were hoots of laughter as one item after another magically appeared while the bosom of her outfit dwindled proportionately. There were the old-fashioned 45 recordsat least 5 or 6 of themsilk handkerchiefs, ladies gloves, sentimental gift tokens from the memory of the lost love, and a very long bright red feather boa that seemed it would never end. During the number, Patsy, aka Sandy, kept dramatically admiring the ring that her lost love had given her with tear-jerking emotion. When the song concluded and after the applause died down, Sandy returned the ring to her former neighbor, Ray Sluss (who had loaned her the ring) with a dramatic announcement I guess our engagement is formally ended now! A large number of Fairfield Villagers had gathered to enjoy the delicious Corned Beef and Cabbage dinner provided by Loretta Zang, Jean Chapman, and those who had helped. Little did they know that the evening would turn out to be one of special entertainment. Mike the DJ encouraged those present to enjoy not only the Irish music, but also to enjoy dancing to some fun-filled classics. There was gales of laughter during the dancing to the Village Peoples classic YMCA. At one point, a group shared some cleaned up Irish limericks and enjoyed some traditional Irish jokes. Most people came dressed in the Irish green some even brought some tall green flagons to add to the green and white decorations that helped to set the tone of the evening. Sandy Williams' comic interpretation of Patsy Cline's hit song, "She's Got You," was the highlight of the entertainment of the St. Patty's Day celebration at the FFV clubhouse. Patsy Cline highlights Fairfield evening Fairfield Village Priscilla Barnett Please see FAIRFIELD, Page 10 These are photos from the Red Hot Fillies hat-making party. The story of St. Patricks Day Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb

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St. Patricks Day was on Monday, so guess its OK to give you a few facts about this special day. St. Patricks Day is celebrated on March 17, the anniversary of his death in the fifth century. The Irish have observed this day as a religious holiday for more than 1,000 years. On St. Patricks Day Irish families would traditionally attend church in the morning and celebrate in the afternoon. Lenten prohibitions against eating meat were waived and people would dance, drink and feaston the traditional meal of Irish bacon and cabbage. St. Patrick is the patron saint and national apostle of Ireland. Born in Roman Britain, he was kidnapped and brought to Ireland as a slave at the age of 16. He later escaped, but returned to Ireland and was credited with bringing Christianity to its people. In the centuries following his death the mythology surrounding his life became ever more fixed in the Irish culture: One of the most well known legends is that he explained the Holy Trinity (Father, Son and Holy Spirit) using the three leaves of a shamrock. The first parade held to honor St. Patricks Day took place, not in Ireland, but in the United States. On March 17, 1762, Irish soldiers serving in the English military marched through New York City. Along with their music, the parade helped the soldiers reconnect with their Irish roots, as well as with fellow Irishmen serving in the English army. In 1848, several New York Irish Aid societies decided to unite their parades to form one official New York City St. Patricks Day Parade. Today, that parade is the worlds oldest civilian parade and the largest in the United States, with over 150,000 participants. Each year, nearly 3 million people line the 1.5mile parade route to watch the procession, which takes more than five hours. Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia and Savannah also celebrate the day with parades involving between 10,000 and 20,000 participants each. The annual St. Patricks Day parades became a show of strength for Irish Americans, as well as a must-attend event for many political candidates. As Irish immigrants spread out over the United States, other cities developed their own traditions. One of these is Chicagos annual dyeing of the Chicago River green. The practice started in 1962, when city pollution-control workers used dyes to trace illegal sewage discharges and realized that the green dye might provide a unique way to celebrate the holiday. That year they released 100 pounds of green vegetable dye into the riverenough to keep it green for a week! Today, in order to minimize environmental damage, only 40 pounds of dye are used, and the river turns green for only a few hours. Although Chicago historians claim their citys idea for a river of green was original, some natives of Savannah, Georgia believe the idea originated in their town. They point out that, in 1961, a hotel restaurant manager named Tom Woolley convinced city officials to dye Savannahs river green. The experiment didnt exactly work as planned, and the water only took on a slight greenish hue. Savannah never attempted to dye its river again, but Woolley maintains (though others refute the claim) that he personally suggested the idea to Chicagos Mayor Richard J. Daley. Green is the chosen color because it represents Ireland, also known as the Emerald Isle. It also represents shamrocks and spring in Ireland. A tradition often observed is if you arent wearing green you get pinched to remind you to wear green next year! Several of our Red Hot Fillies spent an afternoon last week at the home of Dottie Hefferon making feathers and flowers hair pieces. Dottie and her daughter were very helpful in assisting the women with their designs. We will look for these creations at our next outing. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, March 19, 2014 7 6 W ednesday, March 19, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger If you are not completely satisfied, the aids may be returned for a full refund within 45 days of the completion of fitting, in satisfactory condition. Fitting fees may apply. See store for details. Bluetooth is a registered trademark of Bluetooth SIG. Limited Time Discount. No other offers or discounts apply. Discount does not apply to prior sales. J 4 WELCOME BACK SNOWBIRDS! Dickey RichardsonLicensed Hearing Aid Specialist Inside SEARS Paddock Mall(352) 237-1665 Rickey RichardsonLicensed Hearing Aid Specialist9570 SW Hwy 200 (Corner of Hwy 484 & 200)(352) 291-1467 Inside ANOTHER LOCATION INSIDE CRYST AL RIVER MALL (NEXT TO K-MART)CHECK QUALIFICATION CALL352-291-1467 WALK-INS WELCOME! Call for a FREE demo today! Must present coupon. Any make or model. In office only. One week only.FREEHEARING TEST BATTERY REPLACEMENT HEARING AID REPAIRS BAT TERIESPREMIUM ZINC BATTERIES99Limit 1 Coupon Per Visit. Limit 2 Packs Per Visit. Must present coupon. One week only. 0%FINANCINGONE WEEK ONLY!12 MONTHS SAME AS CASHFactory pricing for non-qualifiersBlue Cross Blue Shield Federal Insurance FREE HEARING AIDSTHATS RIGHT Y OU PA Y ZERO$$ Travel With Confidence . Miracle Ear Will Be There.Over 1,300 locations nationwide! Miracle-Ear has been caring for people for over 60 years. Isnt it comforting to know theyll be there when you need them, whenever you are? Patrick Duffy, Actor New Location Inside Crystal River Mall (Next to K-Mart)pays total cost of 2 Miracle Ear Digital Hearing AidsFederal Government Insurance code #104, #105, #111, or #112.Empire State Insurance Planpays for total cost of 2 Miracle Ear Digital Hearing Aids 000HNTA 000HIQC The Truesdell Professional Building 200 N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Fl 34482 KELLEAN K. TRUESDELL, J.D., LLM Attorney & Counselor at Law (352) 873-4141 or KelleanTruesdell.com My Florida Estate Planning Workshop is available any day at any hour. Wills, Living Trusts, Financial and Medical Powers of Attorney, Probate, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, Asset Protection, Federal Death Tax Minimization, Trust Administration, Elder Law and Personal LifeCare Services. 000HF2U Patsy Clines second No. 1 hit was Shes Got You but on Saturday night in the Fairfield Village Clubhouse that song became the No. 1 hit for a former neighbor. Part of the entertainment for the St. Patricks Day dinner planned and coordinated by Loretta Zang and Jean Chapman was the surprise visit from Sandy and Norris Williams former neighbors who moved to Dunnellon this past year. Loretta was able to keep the special entertainment a secret, and she was aided in her presentation by another new neighbor, Mike the DJ who introduced and took care of the accompaniment for Sandy Williams hilarious rendition of Patsy Cline singing Shes Got You. As the photos show, Sandy pulled a type of teasing lip syncing act with all kinds of symbols from the songs lyrics being pulled from the bust of her glamorous black sequined outfit. There were hoots of laughter as one item after another magically appeared while the bosom of her outfit dwindled proportionately. There were the old-fashioned 45 recordsat least 5 or 6 of themsilk handkerchiefs, ladies gloves, sentimental gift tokens from the memory of the lost love, and a very long bright red feather boa that seemed it would never end. During the number, Patsy, aka Sandy, kept dramatically admiring the ring that her lost love had given her with tear-jerking emotion. When the song concluded and after the applause died down, Sandy returned the ring to her former neighbor, Ray Sluss (who had loaned her the ring) with a dramatic announcement I guess our engagement is formally ended now! A large number of Fairfield Villagers had gathered to enjoy the delicious Corned Beef and Cabbage dinner provided by Loretta Zang, Jean Chapman, and those who had helped. Little did they know that the evening would turn out to be one of special entertainment. Mike the DJ encouraged those present to enjoy not only the Irish music, but also to enjoy dancing to some fun-filled classics. There was gales of laughter during the dancing to the Village Peoples classic YMCA. At one point, a group shared some cleaned up Irish limericks and enjoyed some traditional Irish jokes. Most people came dressed in the Irish green some even brought some tall green flagons to add to the green and white decorations that helped to set the tone of the evening. Sandy Williams' comic interpretation of Patsy Cline's hit song, "She's Got You," was the highlight of the entertainment of the St. Patty's Day celebration at the FFV clubhouse. Patsy Cline highlights Fairfield evening Fairfield Village Priscilla Barnett Please see FAIRFIELD, Page 10 These are photos from the Red Hot Fillies hat-making party. The story of St. Patricks Day Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb

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Saturday, April 5 Womens Spring BreakCelebrate with the Womens Spring Break. Join the Womens Ministry enjoying a continental breakfast, friendship; lunch at the baked potato bar, fellowship; special events with speakers Alan Tison, Director of Advancemant at Johnson University Florida and Twila Sias, Childrens Ministry and teaches in areas of education and psychology; and special sessions including a Make & Take card making class. Event starts at 9 a.m. Free to all women. Child care is available (note need on registration). door prizes. To register, please call 352-8616182 or http://www.ccomc.org/. Christs Church Of Marion County, 6768 SW 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182 or http://www.ccomc.org/. Sunday, April 6 Master Choir performsThe Central Florida Master Choir, conducted by Dr. Harold W. McSwain, Jr., will perform a concert on Sunday, April 6, at 3 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, located at 1126 East Silver Springs Blvd. (which is State Road 40) diagonally across the street from the old Ritz Hotel in Ocala, Florida. The program will include Leonard Bernsteins Chichester Psalms and other works. Admission to the concert is free but an offering will be taken to benefit the Tuesday Morning Outreach Ministry to help the homeless. For further information about the concert, call 352-537-0207.Saturday, April 12 Benefit for Therapeutic groupJoin the Marion Therapeutic Riding Association as we dance away the winter Blahs at a Beach Party with music from the 50s through the British Invasion. Not only will there be dinner and dancing to the band 3 For the Road, a regular band at the Villages, we have added a comedy show by the Villages Theatre Company to entertain you. On Saturday, April 12, the Beach Party will be held at the South MarionVillages Elks Lodge 2730, 7655 East Highway 25, Belleview starting at 5 p.m. with a happy hour followed by dinner at 6 p.m. and entertainment to follow. Tickets for a 60s vintage buffet along with an evening of fun-filled entertainment are just $ 25 per person. Tickets are available on the Marion Therapeutic Riding Association (MTRA) website, www.mariontherapeuticriding association.org or by calling the MTRA office at 352-732-7300.Saturday, April 19 Easter EggstravaganzaThe excitement is building for Crossroads Easter Eggstravaganza on Saturday, April 19 from 10 a.m. to noon. Everything is free! Egg hunts will be supervised by age group, with 15,000 eggs on the property! There will be games, bounce houses, cotton candy, hot dogs, drinks, sno-cones, chips, prizes, and the gospel message will be shared. Families are welcome.Sunday, April 20 Crossroads United Easter serviceWe are looking forward to celebrating Easter this year, and have reserved a meeting place at the ballroom in the Hilton Hotel at 3600 SW 36th Ave., Ocala for this joyous occasion. Plan on joining us Sunday, April 20 at 10:30 a.m. for our United Easter Service. Spanish translation will be made available and nurseries are provided.Sunday, April 27 German American picnic setThe German American Club of Marion County will host a picnic on Sunday, April 27, at noon, in Coehadjoe Park. Bratwurst and Polish sausage will be prepared by club members and served buffet style. Please bring a dish to share and your own snacks. Music will be provided by Bavarian Oskar. Tickets purchased before the picnic are $7 per member or $10 per non-member. Tickets purchased on the day of the picnic are $9 per member or $12 per non-member. For tickets, call Barb Hartmann at 352-751-4207.Saturday, May 3 Yoga in Sholom ParkThe outdoor season of yoga begins at 9 a.m. and will continue on the first Saturday of the month for 7 months. For more information, call Ingrid at 352854-7950.Monday, May 5 Savannah, Charleston tripHave you been wanting to see the sites in Savannah, Georgia, and Charleston, South Carolina, but didnt want to drive? Well, sit back, relax and enjoy a bus trip with your friends from First Congregational Church. The trip dates are May 5 to May 8 with accommodations in the Historic District of Savannah at the Holiday Inn Express. River Street, Savannahs famed squares and restaurants are convenient and within walking distance. The cost includes the bus; three-nights accommodations, including buffet breakfast; a one-day tour of Savannah and a one-day tour of downtown Charleston. To reserve your spot and get pricing information, call Gen at 352-873-3377, or Janet at 352-237-2309. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, March 19, 2014 5 8 W ednesday, March 19, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Citrus, Marion, & Sumter Counties 352-610-3018 000HNFC 000HK2F West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Excessive testing counter-productive Standardized tests have been a part of American education since the mid-1800s. However, since the 2002 passage of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) that mandated yearly testing of students from third grade onward in all 50 states, state spending on standardized tests has skyrocketed from $423 million to nearly $2 billion annually. The NCLB testing mandate and attendant rise in the use of standardized tests has fueled an ongoing debate as to whether such testing positively or negatively impacts student learning. Proponents contend standardized tests benefit both teachers and students. As an assessment tool, they aid teachers in determining how a student is performing and progressing academically over time as compared to students nationwide, statewide and locally. For students, standardized tests are a fairly accurate measurement of their academic strengths and weaknesses and a predictor of success in college. Opponents counter that standardized tests do more harm than good. Favoring achievement of a specific score to measure teacher accountability and student performance, they tend to decrease non-test-related instruction time at the expense of a well-balanced education. Also, they contribute to making learning a stressful experience that diminishes the joy of learning for teachers and students alike. Adding to the pro and con debate is the questionable effectiveness of standardized tests relative to U.S. students as indicated by the results of the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), which tests 15-year-olds from around the world every three years to gauge their reading, math and science skills. When the PISA was first conducted in 2000, U.S. students were ranked 11th in the world for reading, 14th for science and 18th for math. After a decade of increased emphasis on standardized tests, the U.S. global ranking in 2012 fell to 21st for reading, 24th for science and 31st for math. The sharp fall in the global rankings of the U.S. since 2000 suggests that the NCLBs excessive, highOur Message PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGANMANAGER: JOHN MURPHYEDITOR: JIM CLARK MessengerWEST MARION Editorial Guest column Weak minimum wage wont build economyBY GINA SCHAEFER Annapolis CapitalIt didnt take long after my husband and I opened our first hardware store in 2003 for people to start coming in and asking us to open in their neighborhood, too. By 2009, we had grown to six Ace Hardware stores in Baltimore and Washington, D.C., with our seventh store opening in 2010 in Takoma Park, Maryland. The next year, Old Takoma Ace Hardware was one of four stores, out of 4,500 locally owned and operated Ace Hardware stores worldwide, to win the Coolest Hardware Store award from Ace Hardware Corporation. We expanded further in 2012, growing from seven stores to nine with additional Washington DC and Maryland locations. We may own the business, but we didnt do this alone. Our growth would not have been possible without the help of our dedicated employees. Paying fair wages helped our business grow fast to nine stores and nearly 200 employees even as our country suffered a terrible economic downturn. Our starting pay for sales associates is $10. We know that gradually raising the minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 an hour makes good business sense. Raising pay at the bottom is good for the bottom line in key ways: When employees earn a decent starting wage, they can concentrate on their job without continual stress over how they are going to afford basics like rent, groceries or transportation. Businesses like mine count on good customer service, and good customer service depends on employees who are treated fairly and invested in our business. Our employees know we value them, and we know they value our customers. Satisfied customers dont just keep coming back themselves, they tell their friends and families about us. Paying better wages helps us attract and retain good employees, increase sales, expand our business, and hire more employees. When the minimum wage goes up it puts money in the paychecks of people who most need to spend it from making rent to buying things they could not afford before from the grocer, the pharmacy, the shoe store, the auto repair, and, yes, the hardware store. Local businesses depend on local customers with money to spend. A higher minimum wage means more money circulating in our local economy. Our employees shop at other businesses, and the employees of other businesses shop at our stores. A higher minimum wage is a boost for our local tax base as well. Too many large companies pay wages so persistently low that many of their employees have to turn to food banks or food stamps and other public assistance for the most basic essentials. This means companies that could pay higher minimum wages, but arent, are being heavily subsidized by taxpayers. Moreover, when the minimum wage Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. This week I didnt have time to write a regular news column for publication. I was too busy trying to figure out how to fill out my brackets you know, for the NCAA basketball tournament. Its commonly called March Madness, a registered trademark, and there are various contests conducted that give people an opportunity to fill out a bracket, once the pairings for the tournament are announced. That happened Sunday evening. Now everyone, millions of us, have to figure out whos going to win each game. In most of these contests, whoever gets the most points as assigned by the contest administrators wins a prize. Some of them can be substantial. Ive been entering for years, and Ive never won a dime. As I look at this year, the first thing is to decide whether I want to start from the outside and work in, or start with the overall winner and work out. Of course, there are many contests, so you can do it both ways. The logical thing is to pick the Florida Gators to win it all. After all, theyre the No. 1 seed, they swept through the SEC season with a 21-0 mark and have only lost two close games, on the road, this year. But they struggled in trying to hold a lead Sunday against Kentucky, and didnt look like world-beaters in the first half Saturday against Tennessee. So do you stick with them or not? Then there are the Cinderella teams. You always have to consider the teams that seemingly dont have a chance, but sneak in all the way to the finals. Wichita State was one such team last year, making it all the way to the Final Four. This year, though, the Brackets: No time for anything else Among Friends Jim Clark Shockers are a No. 1 seed and are 34-0, so it wouldnt exactly be a surprise for them to advance that far. It might be a surprise if they lose early. And on and on it goes. Nothing is a sure thing in this tournament, which starts this week at various sites. I have to admit that, except for a couple of big games involving Duke, all Ive seen this season are Florida Gator games. At this time of year, when the big games are taking place, Im generally watching a baseball game on the MLB channel, particularly if the Mets are on, so thats even less basketball. But I will sit down and go through the schedule and the seedings, and see which teams the NCAA Selection Committee thinks will advance and generally pick against them. Thats how accurate they usually are being a No. 1 seed doesnt automatically qualify you to win the regional and advance to the Final Four. So Im sure Ill have a winner somewhere in my brackets oh well, at least its nice to dream. Maybe Ill at least finish in the top one million. That would be progress.Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger and South Marion Citizen. Please see COLUMN Page 11 Please see EDITORIAL, Page 11 The 37th season of the Ocala Symphony Orchestra will conclude in a rousing fashion with this Boston Pops style salute to Americas most popular music. The concerts will take place on Saturday, April 5 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 6 at 3 p.m., both at Ocala Breeders Sales Auditorium. Fans of Gershwin will appreciate Porgy and Bess complete with bassoon soloist Arnold Irchai. The Maestro will make a special guest appearance as soloist in Leroy Andersons The Typewriter. These pieces, in addition to a concert suite from Victory at Sea as well as Laras Theme from Dr. Zhivago, are sure to make for a very entertaining concert. The OSO will also perform Aaron Coplands Fanfare for the Common Man, a well-known brass salute written by one of Americas most famous composers. More Pops pieces that the OSO will present include a Pops Hoedown, a Tribute to Irving Berlin, Variations on a Shaker Melody, and Casey at the Bat for Narrator and Orchestra. With multiple guest appearances and a plethora of Americas popular music, the conclusion of the OSOs 37th season is sure to leave the audience anxiously awaiting another fun-filled, fan-fortified musical journey in the 38th season! Theres no telling what our Maestro will pull out of the bag for this special concert. Dont miss this fun celebration of all things USA and OSO! This 4th subscription concert is open to the public, and tickets are $5 to $30 each, which can be purchased by visiting www.ocalasymphony.com, by calling 352-351-1606, or at the door. The Ocala Symphony Orchestra is Marion Countys premier cultural arts organization. Founded in 1975, the orchestra averages a dozen concerts throughout the year in front of nearly 10,000 area citizens. Its mission is to have the highest caliber music performed by skilled musicians Ocala Symphony salutes popular music

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Saturday, March 22 Silver Heirs covered dish mealCrossroads Church has a special place in their heart for the senior citizen, and we celebrate as we come together for everyones home-cooked meals. Bring a covered dish to share and join us for an informal time of feasting and fellowship. We meet in the Youth Building behind the sanctuary every fourth Saturday, beginning at noon. Hope to see you there.Tuesday, March 25 Breast Cancer Support GroupThe SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Breast Cancer Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 SW 105th St., Ocala, at 1 p.m. in the Chapel, room 235. Our meeting on March 25 will be a presentation by Evelyn B. Kelly, PhD, writer/speaker. Evelyn will talk to us about Thinking Young, were not over the hill yet. Please join us for this interesting topic.Sleep disorders topic of luncheon meetingOur Redeemer Lutheran Church will host its Food for Thought luncheon Tuesday, March 25, at 11:30 a.m. Dr. Amrth Bapatla, pulmonary critical care specialist, will speak on Sleep Disorder during the luncheon. The luncheon is free but RSVPs to 352-368-4028 are requested. Thursday, March 27 Triumphant Quartet at College Road The Winter Concert Series hosted by College Road Baptist Church, will come to its conclusion on Thursday, March 27, with the Triumphant Quartet. The concert begins at 7 PM and a $10 donation is requested at the door. The community is invited to enjoy the Triumphant Quartet at College Road Baptist Church, Saturday, March 29 Common Ground FellowshipFor the 40-something crowd in Crossroads Church, we will be gathering at Pavarottis Pizza at 8075 SW Highway 200, Ocala, in the Canopy Oak Center at 7 p.m. This is a time of reflecting on the blessings of God in an informal setting and purchasing good food to boot. Come and join us there.Crime prevention seminarChrists Church of Marion County will host a Metro Crime Prevention Seminar presenting topics such as identity theft, frauds and scams, purse snatching, guns and alternative weapons, hurricane safety. This is a free workshop, the main goal being to achieve more awareness about what is going on in the publics backyard. Lunch pizza, salad, dessert and drink will be offered for a donation. This event begins at noon. Registration is suggested: 352-861-6182. Christs Church of Marion County, 6768 SW 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, http://www.ccomc.org.Dining with the LionsThe Ocala 200 Lions Club is having a Dining with the Lions (Italian Style) at the Oasis Restaurant, 7651 SW State Road 200, on Saturday, March 29 from 4 to 7 p.m. Price will be $8 for spaghetti with meatballs, spaghetti with meat sauce or fettuccini alfredo (includes salad, bread, ice tea or coffee). First come, first served All proceeds from this benefit will be used for Charities.Sunday, March 30 Joy Night at Christs ChurchJoin with us as we lift our hearts and voices in praise, an evening of traditional and contemporary musical worship celebrated with participating Marion County Christian churches families and friends at 5 p.m. Refreshments follow the program. Christs Church of Marion County, 6768 SW 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182, http://www.ccomc.org.Marion chamber Music Society ConcertFor the last concert of this season, the Marion Chamber Music Society proudly presents The Best of the Ocala Piano Conservatory featuring award winning performers past and present playing the piano as well as organ, trumpet, marimba and voice. The free concert will be at Queen of Peace Catholic Church, 6455 SW Hwy. 200, Ocala, at 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 30. Hear beloved operatic arias and your favorite piano pieces by Chopin, Debussy, and Rachmaninoff, among others. Ryan Pagels, the Ocala Civic Theaters music director and Ocala Piano Conservatorys very first graduate, will also perform at the concert. For more information, call 352-876-1340 or visit: www.marionchambermusic.com or www.ocalapianoconservatory.com. Marion Chamber Music Society concerts: Always Exceptional, Always Free.Wednesday, April 2 Crossroads Carnival startsBring your family and enjoy a day at the carnival at Crossroads Church, beginning Wednesday, April 2, and concluding on Sunday, April 6. There will be games, rides, food and lots of fun. Open daily from 5 to 10 p.m., with earlier hours on Saturday and Sunday. Proceeds support Crossroads Student Ministries.Thursday, April 3 Southern Express at AppletonThe big band Southern Express will perform during the Rhythm & Art After Hours event at the Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, Thursday, April 3, at 5:30 p.m. Southern Express has been performing in Central Florida for more than 15 years. Many of the bands seasoned members have musical backgrounds rooted in military service, with almost every branch of service represented. Many members were or are active music educators. Doors open at 5 p.m. for complimentary samplings from Horse and Hounds Restaurant and cash bar. Music begins at 5:30 p.m. and admission is free for members and $10 for nonmembers. In addition to the After Hours musical program, visitors can also enjoy the Appletons current exhibitions, A Celebration of Japan, The Living Art of Bonsai, The Gathering of Legends, [in]justice, Industrial Nature: Work by Michelle Stitzlein, and the museums extensive permanent collection of European, American, Asia, African, Contemporary and pre-Columbian art and artifacts. The Appleton Museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, noon to 5 p.m. on Sundays, and closed on Mondays. In addition to daily admission, a 12-month membership is available for $25 for seniors 55 and over, $30 for adults 18 and over, $40 for two seniors over age 55, $50 for a family of two adults and any children under age 18, and $15 for college students and current or retired educators. Owned and operated by College of Central Florida, the Appleton Museum of Art is located at 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, just east of downtown on State Road 40 (exit 352 east off I-75 or exit 268 west off I-95). For more information call the Appleton Museum of Art at 352-291-4455 or visit AppletonMuseum.org. More on P age 5 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, March 19, 2014 9 4 W ednesday, March 19, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000HFWO 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS Christ the King The Rev Donald J. Curran, Rector Services: Rite I 8:00 am Rite II 10:15 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary 352-351-9727 www.ctkaocala.org Anglican Church 000H5UF is discovered through worshiping together 71 1187 000HLRE Locally Owned IP Resort $169 pp/dbl Beau Rivage $189 pp/dbl SOT #36723 Biloxi Ca$ino Tours 3 Nights April 21-24, May 19-22 Chance to win $50 CASH 352-840-0333 www. La ur aK an eT ra ve l. co m Includes $55 in freeplay & two breakfast vouchers Ask about the 5 for $50 deal T our Escort Janet Stefan Deluxe motor coach/3 nts. hotel Games played on the bus Refreshments served on bus ONE FREE TRIP GIVEN AW AY EACH MONTH National Cremation Society Considering Cr emation? REGISTER TO WIN A FREE CREMA TION PLAN Come join the National Cremation Society for a FREE Meal & Informational Seminar on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation When the time comes wouldnt you prefer your loved ones celebrate your legacy rather than stress about making arrangements? Give them the relief theyll need during a tough time. Well discuss: Affordable options and savings Veterans benefits Worldwide A wayFrom-Home Protection And much more... RESERV ATION REQUIRED Limited seating available. CALL NOW! 1-352-319-6816 First time attendees only please. *Free cremation does not include Travel Protection Plan. 000HNW A $100 $100 $100 Promotional Discount to all Attendees Promotional Promotional Discount to all Discount to all Attendees Attendees REDS RESTAURANT 8411 N. SR 200 Tuesday, March 25 10:00 AM OASIS RESTAURANT 7651 SW Hwy 200 Wednesday, March 26 3:30 PM WOLFYS RESTAURANT 2159 E. Silver Springs Blvd. Thursday, April 3 3:30 PM John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000H8TS 000HNKK Serving all areas west of I-75 Buying or Selling? Let s talk!Brett Shinn Brok er/Associatebrettshinn.com 352 433-6684Affiliates 7478-B SW 60th Av e. Ocala, FL 34476bs@brettshinn.com The W est Marion Messenger is a free comm unity newspaper cov ering ne ws of communities w est of Ocala including Fore Ranch, Stone Creek, Fairfield Village, Ocala P alms, Timberwood, Falls of Ocala, Quail Meado w, Fo xwood F arms and Golden Hills Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala, Fla., 34477. Prob lems getting the Messeng er: If your comm unity is listed abov e and the Messenger is not delivered to y ou or you are ha ving trouble getting the paper from bo xes around the S .R. 40 and S.R. 27 areas, call 854-3986.CONTACT INFORMATIONOffice (352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 489-6593 20441 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34432 EditorJim Clark 390-6444 Circulation Barbara Jag ger s 854-3986 Inside Sales/Office Coord. -Mic hel Northsea 854-3986 Adver tising Sales T om Rapplean 352-564-2957 Adver tising Sales Paig e Lefko witz 352-564-2902 Manag er John Murphy 352-563-6363 Deadline for ne ws : Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication. Member of the Community Papers of Florida I want to get news in the Messenger.Call editor Jim Clark at 352-390-6444 or send by e-mail to editor@westmarionmessenger.comCommunity news and photos must be received by Thursday the week before publication. Mail and photos must be e-mailed to editor@westmarionmessenger.com. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.Deadline for AdvertisingClassified Reader Ads 2 pm Friday Display Ads 5 pm Thursday ARI ES (March 21 to April 19) Youll want to discourage well-meaning but potentially ill-advised interference in what you intend to accomplish. Your work has a better chance to succeed if it reflects you. TA URU S (April 20 to May 20) The Bovines well-deserved reputation for loyalty could be tested if you learn that it might be misplaced. But dont rely on rumors. Check the stories out before you decided to act. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Youve been going on adrenaline for a long time, and this unexpected lull in a recent spate of excitement could be just what you need to restore your energy. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Friends can be counted on to help you deal with a perplexing personal situation. But remember to keep your circle of advisers limited only to those youre sure you can trust. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) Security-loving Lions do not appreciate uncertainty in any form. But sometimes changing situations can reveal hidden stresses in time to repair a relationship before its too late. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) This is a good time for single Virgos to make a love connection. Be careful not to be too judgmental about your new prospect at least until you know more about her or him. LI BRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Your sense of justice helps you resolve a problem that might have been unfairly attributed to the wrong person. Spend the weekend doing some long-neglected chores. SCOR PIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You might feel justified in your anger toward someone you suspect betrayed your trust. But it could help if you check if your suspicions have substance. SAGI TTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Ignore distractions if you hope to accomplish your goal by the deadline you agreed to. Keep the finish line in sight, and you should be able to cross it with time to spare. CA PRICO RN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Your creative self continues to dominate through much of the week. Also, despite a few problems that have cropped up, that recent romantic connection seems to be thriving. AQU ARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) As curious as you might be, its best to avoid trying to learn a colleagues secret. That sort of knowledge could drag you into a difficult workplace situation at some point down the line. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Instead of spending too much time floundering around wondering if you can meet your deadline, you need to spend more time working toward reaching it.

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Wednesday, March 19 Good first aid kitOn March 19 at Bank of the Ozarks, State Road 200, Friendship Center at 8 a.m., the Kiwanis Club hosts a discussion on: What makes a good first aid kit? Presenters are Merrick Owen, first aid instructor and Stan Magen, pharmacist. A demonstration kit and first aid equipment will be demonstrated. Also, a list of kit contents will be given to attendees. Come early for coffee.Harmony and diversityMary Sue Rich, long time member of the Ocala City Council, will discuss the Racial Harmony and Cultural Diversity initiatives of the city of Ocala when The Interfaith Alliance hosts its next quarterly Womens Gathering at the Oakbrook Center for Spiritual Living on Wednesday, March 19, at 11:30 a.m. Weather permitting the potluck luncheon will be held in the beautiful gardens to the rear of the Center located at 1009 NE 28th Ave. In 2003 Ms. Rich spearheaded the effort to have Ocala join the National League of Cities campaign to promote racial justice and celebrate cultural diversity. With the City Councils blessing, she formed a task force which puts on a major week-long communitywide event each October focusing on racial harmony and cultural understanding. One Ocala One America was chosen as the theme. Rev. Peggy Hostetler, president of the Marion County chapter of The Interfaith Alliance and pastor of the Oakbrook Center for Spiritual Living, welcomes the opportunity to working more closely with the Racial Harmony and Cultural Diversity Task Force as its aims correlate closely with those of The Interfaith Alliance. Rev. Peggy quotes from The Interfaith Alliances mission statement which says we celebrate the diversity of paths within our community and join together to promote compassion and civility and create opportunities for mutual respect and and understanding. She invites you to join women of all ethnic and religious backgrounds in expanding our efforts to make Ocala truly a City of Compassion as the Mayor recently decreed. For more information and to RSVP please email tiaofmarioncountyfl@gmail.com or telephone 352-629-3897. You may also visit the web page at tiamarioncounty.org.Thursday, March 20 Young at Heart luncheonThe Young At Heart Luncheon, at College Road Baptist Church, will be March 20 at noon. We have to entertain us The Dueling Banjos. Come join us, bring a dish to share, along with your friends, guests and neighbors. Everyone is welcome. The church is at 5010 SW College Road (State Road 200). Phone 352-237-5741.Air Force group to meetThe March meeting of the Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association (AFA) will be held on Thursday, March 20 at 7 p.m. at the Ocala International Airport Administration Building, 750 SW 60th Ave., Ocala. All are welcome. For more information contact Mike Emig at 352-854-8328.Friday, March 21 Perrys in concertThe Perrys have proven that they have what it takes to rise to the top of Southern Gospel music, and what a journey it has been for them. 40 years ago, gathered around a piano, the music began talented vocalists and musicians singing the moving lyrics of traditionally based songs and today they are some of the most recognizable voices in Southern Gospel. Blessed, with musical abilities and communication with others, this team reaches audiences with Christ at the heart of their ministry. Enjoy The Perrys In Concert on Friday, March 21 at 6:30 p.m., and be touched deeply by their music. This is a free concert. A Love Offering will be taken. Christs Church Of Marion County, 6768 SW 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182 or http://www.ccomc.org/.The Circle of French FriendsLe Cercle Des Amis Franais meets on the third Friday of every month from 11 a.m. to noon at Marion County Sheriffs Office Community Conference Room located at 9048 Highway 200, about mile from Walmart.Saturday, March 22 Saddle Oak Club yard saleThe annual Saddle Oak yard sale will be Saturday, March 22, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saddle Oak is on State Road 200, across from Heathbrook Publix. The yard sale will be in the clubhouse and on clubhouse grounds by all the community residents. Breakfast will be served with sandwiches and coffee. Lunch will be soup and sandwiches. There will also be a great bake sale.Worship at TimberRidgeWorship Service at TimberRidge Nursing and Rehabilitation Center will be hel on Saturday, March 22 at 10:15 a.m. Countryside Presbyterian Church provides Christian Ministry to residents of TimberRidge Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, 9848 SW 110th St., Ocala and holds bimonthly worship services. If you have a loved one, or friend at the TimberRidge Center you are invited to attend our next service. For further information, please call the church office at 352-237-4633. M ore on Page 4 Three Ocala Palms residents were awarded the Presidents Award last month for their service to the Ocala Palms community. Don Schultz was one of the recipients. It was noted that Schultz was instrumental in acquiring a portable sound system for the community and designed and built several addition to the golf shop. Besides serving on the OPRAI Board in various capacities, including secretary and treasurer, he is president of the Republican Club this year. Jean Marra was honored for service in the communitys library. She has served as resident librarian for the last five years. She survives and regulates the hundreds of books and magazines coming through the overstocked library each week. Nick Keller was the financial secretary for the worship committee from 2006 to 2012. In addition he was involved with the sound system set-up for Sunday services. Keller also serves as the Republican Club membership chairman and is always willing to lend a hand with the spring show. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, March 19, 2014 3 10 W ednesday, March 19, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 000H64C 000H64C 000HJDG IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Seasonal Special Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2013 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $39 95 with 10% off repair With coupon. Expires 4/30/2014 000 HI0D COMPUTER REPAIR COMPUTER PROBLEMS SOLVED Your home or business 7 days a week. Microsoft certified engineer. 30+ years experience. PC Repairs/Upgrades Virus Removal Router/Network Setup New PC Installs Se habla espaol Tech Solutions of Ocala 352-207-4435 Mardi Gras Homosassa Style Saturday March 22 Y ulee Dr., Old Homosassa, FL 9 AM 6 PM Parade Starts at 10 AM Shrimp, Food, Beer & W ine, V endors, Kids Zone, Arts & Crafts Rotar y Club of Homosassa Springs Supported by: 000HJWB Ameriprise Financial Fresh from Florida Crystal Automotive The Freezer Gildans The Shed Neon Leons DiscoverCitrusCounty.com FDS Disposal Suncoast Plumbing Citrus 95.3/The Fox 96.7 Homosassa Printing Homosassa Wildlife Park Live Music Cash Prizes Info call 352-201-2520 or go to www.shrimpapalooza.com 000HLKB AIR CONDITIONING 352-208-4641 Locally Owned & Operated License # CAC1816140 WILSON AIR SERVICE Tune Up Special We Service All Brands Repairs Replacement Free Second Opinions 24-HR. Service $ 29 95 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000H0PY CONCRETE WORK REPAIRING OLD We Make Your Concrete Look Good Specializing in Repairing Concrete Driveways Pool Decks Patios Entrance Ways Advantages: Mildew & Oil Resistant Non Skid Protection Easy to Keep Clean Commercial Grade Quality RENEWED SURFACES 000HHHV PEST CONTROL SERVICES Hasta La Bye Bye. Tri-County Services, Inc. Pest Control, T ermite & Lawn Care Licensed and Insured Serving Central Florida for over 20 years Family owned and operated Toll Free 1-888-352-9290 or call Rick 352-266-4613 000HG5U Lanai Enclosures Glass Window Replacement Acrylic Windows Screen Room000HMPE WINDOW INSTALL 352-587-2735CERTIFIED RESIDENTIAL CONTRACTOR license # 1330701 GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 795 $ 795 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RAY RAY RAY CC C C C C ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION Crayconst.com Crayconst.com Crayconst.com 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G GA RA GE S CR EE N D OO R 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G 16 x 7 SLIDING GARAGE GARAGE SCREEN SCREEN DOOR DOOR 000HJZR We also install custom acrylic & glass windows. Beat The Love Bugs 000HMMC HANDYMAN Weekend Warrior Let Me Do All Your Chores Home Maintenance/ Repair Lawn & Y ard Pressure W ashing Painting, Etc. V ery Dependable, Competent & Affordable Excellent, Local References. Reclaim Your Fr ee Time! Contact W ayne Green at 352-875-6106 711185 DIALAPRO For Your Professional Needs For Your Professional Needs WEST MARION Messenger WEST MARION Messenger 000HNMB R&L Auto Detailing $ 29 95 Call for A pp t. 875-6486 6895 SW Hwy. 200 4 Miles West of I-75 ... because your car deserves better. Reg. $ 39 95 SPRING SPECIAL: HAND WASH & WAX Includes Windows, Vacuum Carpets, Wheel Treatment, Tire Shine & Door Jams WORLD CLASS SERVICE SINCE GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your P et Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 000HN7A Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting Look for us on Facebook Look for us Look for us on Facebook on Facebook 000HMN3 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run 352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm O CALA G OLF C ART 2010 EZ-GO RXV Reconditioned Garage Floor Mat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 49 High Speed Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 549 Sunbrella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 549 Windshield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 119 Mag Wheels 10in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 349 Stop and visit us before you buy! We Guarantee the Lowest Prices in Ocala! 10% Discount to Veterans labor & parts excluding batteries $4,995 2010 Club Car Precedent Reconditioned $4,995 Now Offering Sleekline Yamaha Great Prices, Best Selection 6-V 6 PACK $399 8-V 6 PACK $499 6-V T605 only $539 8-V T875 only $599 000HEPV All repairs done on premises. 14-k Gold Jewelry Fashion Jewelry Sterling Silver Diamonds 14-k Gold Jewelry Fashion Jewelry Sterling Silver Diamonds B ATTERIES $ 8 00 + tax Fine Jewelry For All Occasions Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 www.jandjjewelersocala.com Stor e Hours: T ues-Fri. 10-5 Sat. 10-2 B UYING G OLD A ND D IAMONDS Goats Milk Bath Pr oducts 000HKUM Carol Meissner won the 50/50 drawing. Perhaps Carols good fortune was aided by the bright green wig that she was wearing or, as some suggested, by her husband, Jim who was dressed as the largest Lucky Leprechaun any of us had ever seen. Announcements were made that there will be a Koffee Klatch Saturday morning, March 22 at 10 a.m. in the Clubhouse. All FFV neighbors are invited to come and socialize for an hour and enjoy morning coffee and snacks. The spring yard sale will be the following weekend on Saturday, March 29. There will be a special sale in the clubhouse itself to benefit the new Social Club and its functions. Each person who is participating in the yard sale will be donating items for the benefit of future social activities. All of Fairfield Village seems to be coming to life with the beautiful springtime flowers and the great weather that we have been enjoying. Even those gusty breezes of March are welcomed as the beautiful time of year returns. From FFV, the lively place filled with lovely people we send wishes for a fabulous springtime to all of Central Florida. Enjoy! FAIRFIELDcontinued from Page 6 support. Our Own Games began 34 years ago when school therapists and teachers in Alachua and Marion counties organized the new kind of athletic competition. The Games have grown over the years and now involve Marion County students exclusively. Maplewood Elementary has hosted the event since its inception and is located at 4751 SE 24th Street near Ocala. For more information, contact Julie Crowley at 352-671-6832 or Julie.Crowley@marion.k1 2.fl.us. GAMEScontinued from Page 1 Ocala Palms residents given the 2013 Presidents Award were, from left, Don Schultz, Jean Marra, and Nick Keller. Ocal a Pa lms b oar d ho no rs re si de nts Read the classifieds Happenings Read the classifieds

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, March 19, 2014 11 2 W ednesday, March 19, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith aName Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTAL For your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 For your convenience, mail in with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 20441 E Pennsylvania Ave, Dunnellon, FL34432 or call... Todays New Ads CREATION ELECTRIC full service contractor Residential and Commercial Specialist. Lg or small repairs. Lic/Ins. EC13001722352-427-4216 Mention this ad for a 5% discount Be Creative Express yourself through water colors. Classes begin 4/2/14. Call Jackie 352-547-9110 RNSeeks Room to rent W/Bath. 352-359-2122 BRAND NEW Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress Set $150. Still in Original Plastic. (352) 484-4772 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. ATTN Homebuyers 100% financing avail. Government Program. You do not need perfect credit. Call or email to get qualified. Ph: (813) 470-8313 rickgbf@gmail.com Rick Kedzierski lic. loan originator.NLMS #267854, FL#9096 NLMS ID 76856 WE BUYR VS, TRAVEL TRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 WE BUY ANY VEHICLE In Any Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make, Any Model 813-335-3794 813-458-0584 Call AJ CHRYSLER2012 Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs Call T om for more info 352-325-1306 Caregiver/Aide/ Companion/Errands /Transportation Beth 352-861-9548 CREATION ELECTRIC full service contractor Residential and Commercial Specialist. Lg or small repairs. Lic/Ins. EC13001722352-427-4216 Mention this ad for a 5% discount Full Service Lawn Care Residential/Commercial Hot/Cold Pressure Washing Free Estimates 352-316-2629 BAKERS TREES 30 yrs. exper ience, trim & remo val. Free Estimates Palm T ree Exper ts! (352)425-5642 STUMP GRINDINGCALL JIM FOR FREE ESTIMATES (800) 478-8679 000HBDD westmarionmessenger.com Land/Home Financing FHA Loans VA Loans Buy For Loans Home Only Loans USDA Loans Equity Financing Alternative Income Financing 352-622-6324 or 1-800-313-6324 Prestige Home Centers, Inc. 4300 SOUTH PINE AVE. (441) OCALA Just one block north of Ocalas Drive-In Theater 2014 CONVERTIBLE!! We Also Have BANK-OWNED REPOSSESSED HOMES! Repos Available With Land or Without! SOUTH OCALA I-75 SR40 SR200 441 Prestige Home Centers, Inc. N NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY!! 000HD2J WE ARE THE BUILDER NOW $58,500 Financing Available YOUR CHOICE 3BR + DEN or 4 BRs 3BR + DEN or 4 BRs SAME PRICE SAME PRICE ONLY $508.00 Per Month stakes focus on standardized testing may be encouraging the drilllike drudgery of teaching to the test rather than innovative instruction that inspires student learning. Various polls also affirm that only one in four teachers consider standardized tests an accurate measurement of student learning. Whether one is pro or con, standardized tests are here to stay. However, their excessive use has swung the pendulum so far that a greater balance between testing and learning is needed. Standardized tests, therefore, should be one among several assessments for teacher accountability and student progress rather than the alpha and omega. Continuing to do otherwise promises to take the joy of teaching and learning out of the classroom to the detriment of both teachers and students.Citrus County Chronicle EDITORIALcontinued from Page 8 stays too low, the gap between companies like mine that are trying to do the right thing and the larger companies that are paying as low as they can, gets greater and greater. A growing gap makes it harder for businesses like mine to compete. Theres no reason for businesses to be paying a minimum wage of just $7.25 an hour $15,080 a year for full-time work. After all, thats the same minimum wage that businesses paid in 1950, adjusted for inflation. This is 2014, not 1950! Between 1950 and 1968, the minimum wage increased in real inflation-adjusted value, giving us stronger ground to anchor our income ladder to the middle class. But since 1968, the minimum wage has been allowed to lose about a third of its value, leaving even full-time workers in poverty and the rungs of the middle class further out of reach for a growing number of working families. We need to raise the minimum wage so full-time workers can get out of poverty and we can rebuild the consumer demand that drives our economy. As a business owner, I support the proposal to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016, and then adjust it annually to keep up with the cost of living. Indexing the minimum wage to the Consumer Price Index will make wages much more predictable for businesses. Better wages at the bottom helped my business succeed. A better minimum wage will help our nation succeed.Gina Schaefer is the owner of A Few Cool Hardware Stores, a group of nine Ace Hardware stores in Washington, D.C. and Maryland. COLUMNcontinued from Page 8 Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Ihave long ago given up trying to keep up with the Joneses, and not just because they have moved away. I have a hard enough time trying to keep up with myself, let alone trying to figure out what somebody else is doing so I can top them at it. One aspect of trying to keep up with the Joneses is being on top of what is referred to as being Politically Correct. As far as I know, I do not have a political bone in my body. I do have a bone to pick with some politicians, but that is another story. Everybody is so afraid they are going to break some PC rule and offend somebody. Most people today are so easily offended that it is virtually impossible not to offend somebody. I do not want to intentionally offend anybody and I try my best not to. However, for the life of me, I am not able to keep up with all of this political correctness that seems to be domineering in our country today. Because, as soon as you figure it out somebody changes the rules and another word or phrase has been deemed not politically correct. What was politically correct yesterday may be politically incorrect today. If you get your days mixed up and confused, you are not going to know what is politically correct. I think a book should be published every year listing all of the things that are politically correct and politically incorrect. Nobody is allowed to change any, at least for a year. Then, when they come to change it there has to be a national election to vote the political correctness in. Some people believe it to be unAmerican to use phrases that are politically incorrect. I for one, have a hard time keeping a list of all of these politically correct and incorrect words and phrases. I had some business with an attorney and once we finished our business, we had a few moments and were chatting together. I could tell from his chatting that he was rather politically correct in everything he does. I guess that is what comes to being an attorney. Somebody once said that sticks and stones may To be PC or not to be PC, that is the confusion break your bones, but words can never hurt you. Whoever said that was so wrong we need to take that phrase and make it politically incorrect. This is America, he pontificated with me, and we have freedom of speech. Everybody is free to have their opinion and to express it. That is what Americas all about. He went on and on about this matter of freedom of speech. Then, I am not quite sure how it happened, but we got on some rather indelicate subject that was positively politically incorrect. With the majority of people, freedom of speech does not really mean that the other person is free to speak. It simply means I have the freedom to speak. So, I said rather delicately trying to feel my way through this subject, you believe everybody has the freedom to express their opinion? Yes, sir, he said very emphatically. Then he went off on another pontificating spree asserting the rights of all Americans to express their opinion. I knew which side of the issue, he was on and so I broached it this way. You then believe, I said weighing each and every word and syllable, that you have the right to say a certain thing is right. I mentioned what the thing was but I do not need to include it here. Not only do I believe it, he said on another pontificating spree, but I practice it every day of my life. Nobody has the right to tell me what I can and cannot believe! Let me get this right, you have the freedom to say that this, and I mentioned what it was, is perfectly right. He nodded and smiled very broadly and then I continued my thought. Do I have any rights in this area? He nodded and indicated I could continue speaking. You have the right to believe that this certain thing is right, but do I have the right to believe that it is wrong? Well, you might have hit him with a double-barreled shotgun. He never thought of it that way. All he thought of was what his opinion was and that he had the complete freedom to express that opinion. Anybody who had a different opinion did not have the same right as he did to express it. I never thought of it that way, he stammered as he stared at me. Im going to have to give that some more thought. Somebody who believes something is right has the complete freedom to say so. On the other side of the track, the person who believes it is wrong has just as much right to think and say that it is wrong. It is hard to keep up with a world that is constantly changing, especially in this area. That is why I love the Bible so much. That is why I am a follower of Jesus Christ because neither one ever changes. I take great refuge in what the Bible says. Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever, (Hebrews 13:8). Today I rest in the unchanging grace and character of the God who loves me and provided for my salvation. And, tomorrow will be the same.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com. Out to Pastor Dr. James Snyder Letty Towles Dog Park (formerly Millennium Dog Park) has been chosen to be the recipient of funds raised by Macys Heart Your Park program. The program was recently introduced as part of Macys Secret Garden Campaign and is in partnership with the National Recreation & Parks Association (NPRA). The goal of this effort is to raise awareness of and dollars for community parks across the country. Beginning March 7 and ending March 31, customers at Macys Paddock Mall location may donate $1 or more during checkout at the register. One hundred percent of the proceeds will benefit Letty Towles Dog Park. In addition, Macys will match the total customer donation in each of its stores, dollar for dollar, up to $250,000. The Citys Recreation and Parks Department is thrilled to partner with Macys and NRPA, says Julie Johnson, the citys parks operations manager. We encourage our community to visit our local Macys during the month of March to support Letty Towles Dog Park. NRPA is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of community parks, recreation and conservation. Nationwide, Macys stores have selected 550 community parks or green spaces to support through the Heart Your Park program. For more information, contact Julie Johnson at 352-368-5517 or visit www.macys.com/parks. Macys helps raise dog park funds

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INDEX Rev. Snyder..........2 Fairfield Village..6 Quail Meadow......7 Ocala Palms......10 VOLUME 7, NUMBER 52 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 2014 Puzzles Page 9 ClassifiedsPage 1112 Wednesday, March 19, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000HHF0 Celebrating St. Patricks DayCarol Meissner won the 50/50 drawing at the Fairfield Village St. Patricks Day celebration. Maybe the green wig or her happy Leprechaun hubby, Jim, helped her to have the "Luck of the Irish" for the evening. More on Page 6. WASHINGTON, DC A new study shows that Americans nearing retirement age are ill-informed about their Social Security options, according to Dan Weber, president of the Association of Mature American Citizens. He said that AMACs establishment of a dedicated Social Security Web site, www.socialsecurityreport.org, was designed to provide a comprehensive source of answers to top-of-mind retirement issues. The study Weber cited was conducted by the retirement consulting firm, Financial Engines, and it showed confusion over the optimal age to begin collecting benefits is widespread. It also revealed that, as a result, many retirees apply at too early an age resulting in significant long-term losses. Many retirees and near-retirees are simply unaware of their Social Security claiming options. And this lack of knowledge means they could be leaving significant money on the table to the tune of as much as $100,000 or more for individuals and $250,000 or more for married couples, the consulting firm noted in a news release last week. Weber pointed out that theres a tendency to opt for early retirement and begin collecting benefits at age 62. But the experts will tell you that the longer you wait, the more youll get in monthly payments-25% more at age 66 and 76% more at age 70. The AMAC chief noted that medical breakthroughs and better living standards have been increasing the longevity of Americans consistently over the last several decades. The Social Security Administration figures that a 65 year old today will live, on average, until his or her mid-80s, he said, making it well worth the waiting for most individuals. But, he added, selecting the right age at which to retire is an important decision that should be made on an individual basis. There is no one-size-fits-all option. Weber said that the study points out that most people are uninformed about how Social Security works. More important, it shows that all of us need to get involved in ensuring the preservation of Social Security for we older Americans and for our children and grandchildren. Our socialsecurityreport.org Web site presents AMACs views on what can and what must be done to fix the problems evident in Social Security as it stands today. It also provides links to analyses of alternate proposals aimed at maintaining Social Security solvency. Study shows Social Security knowledge lacking by many PHOTO BY JIM CLARKVisiting the CoalitionThe State Road 200 Coalition was visited by Capt. James Pogue, public information officer for the Marion County Sheriffs Office, at the groups meeting last week. He spoke on access to crime information, noting the availability of the office on Facebook (www.facebook.com/marioncounty sheriffs); Twitter (www.twitter.com/SheriffMarionCo); and Pinterest (http://pinterest.com/marionso). From the left are Pogue, Cindy Congdon of the Coalition, Lt. Dennis Joiner of the Southwest District Office and Pat Gabriel of the Coalition. The Marion County Sheriffs Office held the fourth annual JROTC Bad to the Bone challenge March 15 on the main campus of the sheriffs office at the SWAT and physical agility courses. The event featured 11 high schools from five counties and hundreds of high school students. The students arrived just before sunrise from Duval, Levy, Citrus, Alachua and Marion Counties. Some student-teams competed on a course designed for members of SWAT. Other student-teams ran an agility course that is designed to help law enforcement professionals become better combat ready. The teams featured all boys, all girls and co-ed arrangements. Push-ups, sit-ups, pull-ups and flex arm hang challenges were available for a student who wanted to compete as an individual. The finale of the day came with the tug of war. Francis Marion Military Academy (FMMA) earned the title champions this year of the tug of war. An exhibition tug of war was held featuring FMMA taking on former SWAT professionals that included Sheriff Chris Blair. The final overall standings held Forest High School as top team. Forest High School students had the highest point score and that achievement allowed them to win this years coveted CommanBad to the Bone: JROTCs compete Above, the tug of war competition. At left, no fear of heights in this competition. Hundreds of student athletes and supporters join forces Thursday, March 20, to take part in Our Own Games at Maplewood Elementary from 10:30 a.m. to 12:39 p.m. These games give children with physical challenges the chance to compete against their peers and extend themselves beyond their perceived limits. Inspired by the Special Olympics, most participants in Our Own Games are not emotionally or mentally impaired. Instead, they take part in events demonstrating skills learned in physical therapy, occupational therapy and adaptive physical education. Nearly 50 students are participating from a dozen local schools. Following opening ceremonies, competitive events include wheelchair and bike races, walk and run races, ramp bowling, T-ball, accuracy and distance throws and a competition by students involved in the innovative M.O.V.E. (Mobility Opportunities Via Education) program. Student volunteers from Forest High Schools HOSA (Health Occupations Students of America) Club assist the students with encouragement and Physically-challenged students to hold games Please see GAMES, Page 10