West Marion messenger

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West Marion messenger
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Newspaper
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English
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Citrus Pub.
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Ocala, Florida
Creation Date:
July 10, 2013
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00100092:00191


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INDEX Fairfield Village..2 Quail Meadow......3 Rev. Snyder..........3 Ocala Palms........4 VOLUME 7, NUMBER 41 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014 Puzzles Page 10 ClassifiedsPage 1112 Wednesday, January 1, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000GY27 Wednesday, January 8 11am-3pm 1801 NW Hwy 19 Crystal River, FL Helping VeteransThe Greater Ocala Womans Club and The Pioneer Garden Club jointly presented a $400 check to the Ocala Ritz Veterans Village for the purchase of a bike rack for the veterans. The idea was generated by the generosity of Nancy and Scott Hutchinson. Pictured are GFWC members, Charlene Earl, Nancy Hutchinson, Rosalie Laudando, Sandra Stipins and President Scott Hutchinson. Pioneer Garden Club members pictured include Kimbra Danielson and Eileen Ferguson. First Vice President Dolly Rodriguez, Health Services Manager of the Ocala Ritz Veterans Village, accepts the donation. Fairfield Village home decoratingFirst Place winners are Cesar and Lucila Perez. The lovely home has a bit of a Hispanic flair to coincide with the fantastic Christmas decorations. The lighted flamingo to the left of the home has a personality all its own and sends greetings from Cesar and Lucila. Congratulations to the Perez family. More, Page 2. Marion County Hospital District Trustee Chairman Jon Kurtz announced that he has been notified by Health Management Associates, Inc. (HMA) that HMA has decided to defer approval of the proposed definitive agreement for the long-term lease of Munroe Regional Medical Center to Community Health Systems, Inc. (CHS). CHS is currently pursuing a merger with HMA, which is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2014. The proposed Munroe Regional lease agreement is contingent on the successful completion of the CHS/HMA merger, and Kurtz does not expect that CHS will take formal action on the lease agreement until after the closing of the CHS/HMA merger. CHS has communicated to Kurtz that it remains committed to completing the proposed lease transaction after the close of the CHS/HMA merger, pending Board approval, and that it remains excited about the opportunity to work with the medical staff and employees of Munroe Regional in their service to the community. Kurtz also indicated that the District stands ready to consummate the proposed lease agreement as soon as it receives approval from CHS and all necessary regulatory approvals have been obtained. For the second straight year, Marion Countys graduation rate surpassed Floridas state-wide average 76.74 percent compared to 75.57 percent. Last year, the numbers were 75.25 percent and 74.47 percent for Marion and Florida, respectively. From another perspective, Marions graduation rate has been climbing for years. Just five years ago, Marions graduate rate was significantly lower at 54 percent, far below the states 62.7 rate. See the graph attached to this release for an historical perspective. In addition, the number of students dropping out of high school is dropping even more 1.7 percent compared to last years 2 percent and also below Floridas 2 percent. Both numbers are significant when considering the overall effectiveness of public school programs in Florida. The federal graduation rate, now considered the standard in all states, includes standard diplomas but excludes GEDs and special diplomas. This cohort graduation rate is based on the percentage of students who entered ninth grade four years ago and received a standard high school diploma within four years. Dropout rates are based on the percentage of students who withdrew from high school within a school year but did not enroll in another educational program. Graduation and dropout rates reflect much more than just the hard work of high schools; from Pre-K through grade 8, educators, administrators, and support personnel lay the groundwork for success as students enter high school. For details, visit www.fldoe.org/ news/2013/2013_12_11.asp. First Congregational Church of Ocala, in furtherance of its Christian mission, presents the 2014 Ocala Social Justice Film Festival, featuring six films that focus on issues of social justice. Each of these films will be hosted by a facilitator, who will introduce the film and lead a short discussion following the film. Admission is free, but goodwill offerings will be gladly accepted. The schedule is as follows: Saturday, Feb. 1, PATHS OF GLORY Kirk Douglas plays a military officer who believes in the concept of military justice. Saturday, Feb. 8, MATEWAN This is an historically accurate account of the attempts of West Virginia coal miners to organize. The cast includes James Earl Jones and Chris Cooper. Saturday, Feb. 15, BOYCOT This film documents Dr. Martin Luther Kings leadership of the Montgomery bus boycott. Saturday, Feb. 22, THE MILAGRO BEAN FIELD WAR Directed by Robert Redford, this movie depicts a conflict between developers and a local Latino population. Saturday, March 1, PHILADELPHIA Featuring Tom Hanks and Denzel Washington, this movie examines longstanding prejudices against gay people. Saturday, March 8, CAPITALISM: A LOVE STORY Michael Moores satirical look at the American economic system. This movie questions many basic assumptions. Please join us each Saturday evening, From Feb. 1 to March 8, at 7 p.m. at First Congregational Church, 7171 SW State Road 200 (352-237-3035), for the 2014 Social Justice Film Festival. Hospital lease plan delayed County graduation rate surpasses Florida average Social justice film festival scheduled PHOTO BY ERYN WORTHINGTON/CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLEOcala man wins a carLove Honda in Homosassa made one mans Christmas a little sweeter Saturday. Shelton Peddle of Ocala won a tiger-eye-pearl 2013 Accord LXS two-door car after he shot a hole-in-one 154 yards from tee No. 8 at Candler Hills Golf Club in Ocala during the 10th annual Kinsey Lynn Bogart benefit in October. Pictured with Peddle is customer relations Jim DeSanti, left, and vice-president Chad Halleen, right. The Marion County Sheriffs Citizens Academy and Partnership (CAP) program, a free 12-week educational course about the operations of the Sheriffs Office, is accepting applications for the winter course. The class will be offered at three locations. The Marion County Sheriffs Office will host a Tuesday evening class from 6 to 8:30 p.m. beginning Jan. 28. The class will be held at MCSO Central Operations, 3300 NW 10 St., Ocala in the Multipurpose Conference Room. To register for this class, e-mail Jenifer Lowe at JLowe@marionso.com or call 352-368-3598. The Belleview Public Library, 13145 SE County Road 484 in Belleview, will host a class on Wednesday afternoons from 2 to 4:30 p.m. beginning Jan. 29. To register for this class, e-mail Jenifer Lowe at JLowe@marionso.com or call 352-368-3598. On Top of the World will host a class on Thursday mornings from 9 to 11:30 a.m. beginning Jan. 30 at its Master the Possibilities learning center. Registration for the OTOW class is open to the public but must be done through Master the Possibilities by calling 352-8543699 or online at MasterThePossibilities.com. All students must complete the application form found on marionso.com. During the program, MCSO staff will highlight all units within the Sheriffs Office, giving citizens an in-depth understanding of what the agency is doing for the community. Each week will focus on a different aspect of the agency, personnel, equipment, policies, procedures and overall function. Students will have an opportunity to view specialty unit equipment, hear from experts in the field of law enforcement, investigations, corrections and prosecution. After graduation, students will be offered an exclusive chance to obtain their concealed weapons license through a firearms safety course instructed by Sheriff Chris Blair. New Sheriffs Citizens Academy now signing up local residents Church launches new Spanish ministryCrossroads Church of God launches a new Spanish ministry with new Pastors Carlos and Eileen Lopez. Spanish services will be held on Sunday at 1 p.m. and on Thursday evenings at 7 we will conduct a Bible study. Pastors Carlos and Eileen Lopez invite you to come and grow with us in the coming year. You may contact them at 352-229-3920 or at Crossroads Church Of God 352-291-2080. PHOTO BY HARRY LAMB Registration for artists workshops offered by the Ocala Art Group the Winter/Spring of 2014 is now open for all artists 18 years or older as follows: Two Days-Robin Maria Pedrero Jan. 9 and 10 materials not included. Acrylic with mixed media. $140 members / $170 non members. One day-Maria Luisa De Curtis Feb. 13 materials included. Watercolor Batik, which are Kathie George original designs. Early Bird: $120 member / $150 non-members. After Feb. 13, $140 members/$170 non-members. Two Day Gloria Betlem April 10 and 11 materials not included Expressions in Pastels Early Bird: $120 Member / $150 non member materials not included After March 14: $140 member / $170 non member. The workshops are held at the Appleton Museum of Art, Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala, in the Art Space between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. The day before each workshop there will be a demonstration in the Appleton Auditorium open to current and newly joined members. Membership is $30. Pre-payment to each workshop is required; to register identify your choice and send payment to Workshops, 8264 115th St., Road, Ocala, FL 34481 or call Sharon at 352-527-9372. For more information visit www.ocalaartgroup.com. Workshops scheduled by Ocala Art Group Habitat for Humanity of Marion County is looking for volunteers to help in construction, fundraising, our ReStore, and for our up-coming Strawberry and Craft Festival. This is a great opportunity to start the year off by helping families in need in our community. If you are in need of community service hours or have a heart for families, Habitat is the place to be! Come make new friends, and have a great time. Habitat for Humanity needs your help to make a difference in Marion County! To find out about volunteering with Habitat for Humanity of Marion County, Inc. please visit our website at http://habitatocala.org/volunteer/ or call Brittney Fish, volunteer coordinator, at 352-351-4663. Habitat for Humanity of Marion County is a donor/volunteer-driven organization. We welcome people from all walks of life to join us as we build simple, decent, affordable housing in partnership with God and families in need. Habitat for Humanity is A Hand Up Not a Hand-out. Habitat for Humanity looking for volunteers Read the classifieds

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 1, 2014 11 2 W ednesday, January 1, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000GXYA National Cremation Society Considering Cremation? REGISTER TO WIN A FREE CREMATION PLAN Come join the National Cremation Society for a FREE Meal & Informational Seminar on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation. When the time comes wouldnt you prefer your loved ones celebrate your legacy rather than stress about making arrangements? Give them the relief theyll need during a tough time. Well discuss: Affordable options and savings Veterans benefits Worldwide Away-From-Home Protection And much more... RESERVATION REQUIRED Limited seating available. CALL NOW! 1-352-319-6816 First time attendees only please. *Free cremation does not include Travel Protection Plan. 000H0LJ $200 Promotional Discount to all Attendees Oasis Restaurant 7651 SW Hwy. 200 Mon., Jan. 6, 3:30pm Pavarottis Pizza 8075 SW Hwy 200 Tues., Jan. 7, 10:00am Red Lobster 3393 SW College Rd Wed., Jan. 8, 11:00am Reds Restaurant 8411 N. SR 200 Thurs., Jan. 9, 10:00am Thurs., Jan. 23, 10:00am TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.Be sure to check your advertisement the first da it appears. We will not be responsible for mor than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments ar made only for the portion of the ad that is in erroBeware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every effort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith aName Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTALFor your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 For your convenience, mail in with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 20441 E Pennsylvania Ave, Dunnellon, FL34432 or call... Todays New Ads AUTO SWAP/ CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. JAN. 5th. 1-800-438-8559 ALL CLASSES FOR 2014 Spring Hill & New Port Richey COSMETOLOGY BARBERING NAILS SKIN MASSAGE TherapyDAY & NIGHT SCHOOLFull Time & Part Time Full Specialty & Instructor Training BENES International School of Beauty www .benes.edu (727) 848-8415 (352) 263-2744 1 (866) 724-2363 TOLL FREE STATE APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING Become an Avon Rep Today! Free Training. $10 to join. Call Chuck (352) 503-4816. Independ. Avon Rep. BRAND NEW Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress Set $150. Still in Original Plastic. (352) 484-4772 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 WE B UY ALL A UT OS with or without titles ANY CONDITION Cindy (813) 505-6939 AUTO SWAP/ CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. JAN. 5th. 1-800-438-8559 CHRYSLER2012 Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs Call Tom for more info 352-325-1306 CHRYSLER2012 Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs Call Tom for more info 352-325-1306 Clean out your closets, go through your garage, attack your attic and then use the classifieds to get rid of stuff you no longer use. And the FREE listing means you have more money left over after the sale!You can list any single item priced under $100 for sale for FREE! PUT THE POWER AND CONVENIENCE OF THE CLASSIFIEDS TO WORK FOR YOU! Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANY ITEM PRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNS FOR 2 WEEKSFREE TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403 progress has been made on State Road 200 from Pine all the way to 66th, but after that there doesnt seem to be any organization. If a place such as New York City can synchronize its thousands of lights, we should be able to also. 6. Peace on Earth for all nations, an end to dictatorships that subject the people of certain nations to unbelievable conditions, and respect for life at all levels in all countries. In the words of the late Rodney King, who was once beaten by Los Angeles police, Why cant we all just get along. EDITORIALcontinued from Page 8 Undertrained primary-care physicians and wor ried parents default much too often to the diagno sis of ADHD and to the answer of a prescription. The next frontier is adult ADHD, with the promise of a vast new pharmaceutical market made up of people deprived of ADHD diagnoses when they were children. Some of these diagnoses will be warranted and life-changing, but others will be overreach prompted by vague and dubious symptoms, like inattentive op-ed reading. Sure, you got to the end of this article. But how about the next one? Rich Lowry is editor of the National R eview.(c) 2013 by King Features Synd., Inc. LO WRYcontinued from Page 8 Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com This year the neighbors of FFV outdid themselves in decorating their homes for the holiday season. The judging committee had a very difficult time in choosing the top three winners. Because of the tight competition, three other homes were chosen for honorable mention. First Place: Cesar and Lucila Perez, 5659 SW 57th Court. Second Place: John and Bernadette Ritchie, 5853 SW 56th Place. Third Place: Bruce and Nancy Taylor, 5813 SW 56th Place. Honorable Mentions: James and Roberta Helmich, Headley Wilson and Calvin McLean, Ken and Nina Stiles. This years annual Christmas Potluck Dinner on Saturday, Dec. 21, was a big success again. Everyone enjoyed all the fantastic dishes and desserts along with the fun of the conversations with other neighbors. It was very obvious that the holiday spirit was in abundance, but that was no surprise to those of us who have lived in Fairfield V illage for a long time or for those who are relatively new in our community. W e always try to live up to our reputation as the lively place filled with lovely people, and that is true again this holiday season. From these lively lovely people come wishes for a wonderfully Happy New Year Stay safe and look forward with us to a fantastic 2014. Fa ir field Vi ll age Chr istm as dec or at ion s w in ners chos en Fairfield Village Priscilla Barnett Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Second Place was won by John and Bernadette Ritchie. The spiral Christmas trees and beautifully decorated and lighted packages catch everyone's attention. The adorable little train to the left is a visual of many of the "Christmases Past" that we all remember. Congratulations to the Ritchies for a beautifully decorated home. Third Place was awarded to Bruce and Nancy Taylor. The huge whimsical snowman and candy canes attract the inner child still there in all of us. There were also other elements that added to the theme that the Taylors presented so effectively. Congratulations to Bruce and Nancy. Lil Oliver, left, and Diane Blanchette were the consensus winners of the unofficial Christmas Attire Contest at the Christmas Potluck Dinner on Dec. 21 in the Fairfield Village Clubhouse. Beautiful smiles, ladies!

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 1, 2014 3 10 W ednesday, January 1, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Its a good time to take a much-needed break from your recent hectic schedule and spend some time in quieter surroundings. Important news could arrive early next week. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) The Taurean traits of reliability and thoroughness could be well-tested when decision-makers consider your proposals and/or requests. Be prepared to answer some probing questions. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A sudden attack of boredom leaves you with some tasks undone. Its OK to take a short respite. But get back to work by weeks end so that you have time for other projects. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Avoid prejudging a situation just because it looks bad. Facts could emerge that would make your position uncomfortable, to say the least. A relative has interesting news to share with you. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) This is a good time to begin reassessing some of your recent decisions about your long-range goals to see if they still have merit. Spend more time with loved ones this weekend. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) An unsettled situation at home or on the job early in the week could drain your energy levels, making it difficult to get your work done on schedule. But things improve by midweek. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) A temporary setback could give you time to go over your plans to find weaknesses you might have overlooked before. A romantic getaway with that special person is favored this weekend. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Professional and personal situations benefit once you set a positive tone in getting things off to a good start. Honest dialogue smoothes over any display of balkiness. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) A problem with workplace colleagues or family members seems to defy even your sage counsel. But be patient. Your words will lead to a resolution. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Dont just wait out that unexpected and unexplained delay in your career move. You could gain added respect if you ask why it happened and what you can do to move things along. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Although your workplace strategies usually are accepted, you could be challenged by someone who isnt so favorably impressed. Be prepared to defend your positions. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Your friendship circle expands, with new people coming into your life at this time. Welcome them warmly. 000GZ1C VILLAGES COMPUTER & REPAIR Computer Repair Custom Building Computer Classes Free Diagnostics Data Recovery Networking In Store Service or at Your Location FREE Service Calls to your house or business with this ad 7256 SW 62nd Ave., Suite 5, Ocala, FL 34476 email: villagescomputer@yahoo.com Next to the neighborhood Storage on SR200 across from the Jasmine Plaza (352) 237-4852 (MOBILE) 352-426-1639 Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 000GYWF Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting Look for us on Facebook Look for us Look for us on Facebook on Facebook 000FYR5 The Truesdell Professional Building 200 N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Fl 34482 KELLEAN K. TRUESDELL, J.D., LLM Attorney & Counselor at Law (352) 873-4141 or KelleanTruesdell.com My Florida Estate Planning Workshop is available any day at any hour. Wills, Living Trusts, Financial and Medical Powers of Attorney, Probate, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, Asset Protection, Federal Death Tax Minimization, Trust Administration, Elder Law and Personal LifeCare Services. Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 www.jandjjewelersocala.com Store Hours: Tues-Fri. 10-5 Sat. 10-2 B UYING G OLD A ND D IAMONDS 000GZ8Z Reopening Jan. 7 Happy New Year Happy New Year Wishing you the very best in 2014. From Jeff, Jody and Judith 000GZQD Walk -Ins Welcome 854-653 1 Appointments Av ailable 61 60 SW Hwy. 200, Ocala, Suite 99 in the Ja smine Plaza There r eally is a difference in salons . JAIME SILV A Ma st er Stylist 18 Years Experience 854-653 1 by appointment please John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000GG44 Happy New Year! Now that we have adjusted to writing 2013, we get to change it to 2014! There are some big things coming our way in Quail Meadow this year. The first such event is the Mortgage Burning Party on Saturday, Jan. 11. Yes, the mortgage on the clubhouse is Paid in Full. The festivities will begin at 5 p.m. when we will raise the flag, dedicate the Clubhouse and burn the mortgage with special music by the Rowdy Boys Barber Shop Quartet. Rev. William Harrel, a QM resident, will officiate at the dedication ceremony. Following the outside activities we will go into the hall for more songs and appetizers to whet your appetite for the chicken marsala dinner catered (back by popular demand) by D & R Party Planning. Also, back by popular demand the R Music For You group will provide music for an evening of singing and dancing. The appetizer, dinner and entertainment ticket is $8 for everything. Please note: you do not need to bring table service it will be provided. For appetizer and entertainment only (no dinner) the ticket is $3. Tickets are available from Carol Sjogren and Charlotte Payne. Please get your tickets early; cut-off date is Jan. 7. Now that Christmas is over, its time to take down and put away the decorations. We will do this at the clubhouse on Thursday, Jan. 2. If you would like to help, please meet at the clubhouse at 7 p.m. Would you like to line dance? Marlene Cigrand will begin teaching line dancing at the clubhouse on Thursday, Jan. 9. If you are interested, be at the clubhouse at 7 p.m.; class will last for one hour. The January Ladies Luncheon will be on Friday, Jan. 10, at The Olive Garden. Please make your reservations with Maryanne Ellner. There is an unknown Good Samaritan, who we think lives in Ocala Palms. A few weeks ago Ralph Church, unknowingly, lost his billfold (apparently he put it on his car, forgot it, and drove off). Ralph received a call from the Ocala police that his billfold had been turned over to them by Mr. Anonymous. Nothing was missing! Ralph is most grateful to this unknown person and would like to let him know how thankful he is; so thank you Mr. Anonymous. We hope each of you have a safe, and healthy New Year! Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb Mortgage burning party scheduled for Jan. 11 During this time of the year, a certain controversy raises its ugly red-scarfed head. Year after year, this hullabaloo continues and nobody has taken the initiative to deal with this holiday wrangling. That is, until now. Normally, I am a mild-mannered person and just to be on the safe side, I stay out of telephone booths. You cannot be too careful, if you know what I mean. As a great philosopher once said, Ive stands all I can stand and I cant stands no more. This Christmas inequality has been going on for a very long time. It is about time somebody took some action in this regard. Since nobody else has the courage to take on this subject, I pick up my pen (actually its my computer keyboard) and duly attack the subject at hand. I know, as I begin, what I am going to say will not sit well with certain portions of the population. Some will even accuse me of jealousy and other foul attitudes. It just has to be said. This disparity is between Father Christmas and grandfathers. As a cardcarrying member of the grandfathers union (GFU), I feel I have the right to express my mind on this subject. In my opinion, Father Christmas is getting too much attention at the expense of Grandfathers everywhere. Sure, I give you that Father Christmas does have his place in our culture. I know children are enamored with him in his silly little red suit and funny hat. Just between you and me, no self-respecting grandfather would be caught dead dressed like Father Christmas. I will admit that some grandfathers dress rather silly and act even sillier. I believe I should set the record straight between Father Christmas and grandfathers. Let me compare these two right now and clear up this subject. Then you can be the judge. I have complete confidence in the intelligence of my readers. First, Father Christmas makes up a list of naughty and nice children. I feel, and I am speaking as a Grandfather, this is highly discriminatory. Children should not be subjected to such discrimination in this day of enlightenment. Today, children have it hard enough without this silly overweight elf from the North Pole putting undue pressure on them. Grandfathers love both naughty and nice children, especially the naughty. Grandfathers know naughty children need more attention. Second, Father Christmas only comes once a year. What I want to know is what he is doing the rest of the year. From the pictures I have seen, I am guessing it is not in the area of exercise. Grandfathers are around all the time, not just at Christmas. No matter what time of year, you can always find a grandfather, which is more than can be said of Father Christmas. Third, Father Christmas just brings toys in his huge bag. I grant you, some of these toys are terrific. I am not going to sell Father Christmas short on this aspect. I believe credit should be given where credit is due, unless it is my credit card. Grandfathers should get some recognition for other things that are just as wonderful. grandfathers, for example, are full of stories, jokes and a lot more. If the truth were known, Father Christmas does not have the time to tell a story to any child. I think this is sad. Sadder still, does he even know a story? Fourth, Father Christmas drives around in an old-fashioned sleigh powered by eight tiny reindeer, with no room to take children for rides. What is that all about? Nothing is more exciting for children than driving around with their grandfather, usually in some old pickup with an array of unidentifiable aromas. Whatever they are driving, the ride always ends with ice cream. Try getting Father Christmas to drive children for ice cream and see what he does. Fifth, Father Christmas, no matter where you see him, is always in a hurry. He never seems to have enough time to spend with children. Sure, toys are great, but no toy can equal time spent with a grandfather. One of the special things about a grandfather is he always makes time for children. God made grandfathers for children. Even though most grandfathers are hard of hearing, they always hear what is important. Sixth, Father Christmas, when his work is finished, lays his finger alongside of his nose and up the chimney he goes. Now that is fine, but it was a grandfather who invented the pull-myfinger joke. I know similarities exist between Father Christmas and Grandfathers. Both, for example, are rotund and quite jolly. Both love cookies. However, that just may be where the similarity ends. What people do not know, and I have this on good authority, Father Christmas always sends the Christmas bill to grandfathers. Of course, grandfathers do not complain about this for one moment. We are glad to help whenever we can; however, it would be nice to have a little bit of recognition during the Christmas holiday. One thing grandfathers can do Father Christmas cannot do is pray. Blessed are the grandchildren who have a grandfather who prays for them. Confess your faults one to another, and pray one for another, that ye may be healed. The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much. (James 5:16 KJV.) One righteous grandfather is worth all the Father Christmases in the world. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com. A grandfathers stand on the Father Christmas hullabaloo Out to Pastor Dr. James Snyder Enjoy a vibrant start to 2014 with the First Friday Art Walk on Jan. 3, from 6 to 9 p.m. Enjoy more than 50 individual artist displays, extended shopping hours, and live music on the downtown square. The January Art Walk is sponsored by Party Time Rentals. Unique offerings include: The 18 piece, Center Stage Band is performing Big Band Music on the Historic Downtown Square from 7 to 9 p.m. Free Childrens Art Activities on the Downtown Square presented by the Appleton Museum of Art. Dont miss one of the last opportunities to view the contemporary work of artist Peter Filzmaier in the first floor lobby of City Hall. Exhibit closes on Jan. 7. All work is for sale with 25 percent of the proceeds benefiting the City of Ocalas Art in City Spaces Program. The public may download an event map listing all artist locations at www.ocalafl.org/artwalk. First Friday Art Walk scheduled

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 1, 2014 9 4 W ednesday, January 1, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger The West Marion Messenger is a free community newspaper covering news of communities west of Ocala including Fore Ranch, Stone Creek, Fairfield Village, Ocala Palms, Timberwood, Falls of Ocala, Quail Meadow, Foxwood Farms and Golden Hills. Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala, Fla., 34477. Problems getting the Messenger: If your community is listed above and the Messenger is not delivered to you or you are having trouble getting the paper from boxes around the S.R. 40 and S.R. 27 areas, call 854-3986.CONTACT INFORMATIONOffice (352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 489-6593 20441 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34432 EditorJim Clark 390-6444 Circulation Barbara Jaggers 854-3986 Inside Sales/Office Coord. -Michel Northsea 854-3986 Advertising Sales Tom Rapplean 352-564-2957 Regional Manager John Provost 352-563-6363 Deadline for news : Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication. Member of the Community Papers of Florida I want to get news in the Messenger.Call editor Jim Clark at 352-390-6444 or send by e-mail to editor@westmarionmessenger.comCommunity news and photos must be received by Thursday the week before publication. Mail and photos must be e-mailed to editor@westmarionmessenger.com. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.Deadline for AdvertisingClassified Reader Ads 2 pm Friday Display Ads 5 pm Thursday SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 000GE74 000GE74 000FY21 IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Seasonal Special Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2013 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection FREE Service Call with repair With coupon. Expires 2/28/2014 Lanai Enclosures Glass Window Replacement Acrylic Windows Screen Room000GV9X WINDOW INSTALL 352-587-2735CERTIFIED RESIDENTIAL CONTRACTOR license # 1330701 000GVWQ AIR CONDITIONING 352-208-4641 Locally Owned & Operated License # CAC1816140 WILSON AIR SERVICE Tune Up Special We Service All Brands Repairs Replacement Free Second Opinions 24-HR. Service $ 29 95 GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 795 $ 795 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RAY RAY RAY CC C C C C ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION Crayconst.com Crayconst.com Crayconst.com 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G GA RA GE S CR EE N D OO R 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G 16 x 7 SLIDING GARAGE GARAGE SCREEN SCREEN DOOR DOOR 000H0OO $ 79 95 $ 79 95 $ 79 95 GARAGE SCREEN DOOR CHECK UP ACRYLIC vs. GLASS C a ll for d e ta i l s. 000Gyak HANDYMAN Weekend Warrior Let Me Do All Your Chores Home Maintenance/ Repair Lawn & Y ard Pressure W ashing Painting, Etc. V ery Dependable, Competent & Affordable Excellent, Local References. Reclaim Your Fr ee Time! Contact W ayne Green at 352-875-6106 711185 DIALAPRO For Your Professional Needs For Your Professional Needs WEST MARION Messenger WEST MARION Messenger Ocala Palms Ladies hold annual Christmas luncheonThe Ocala Palms Ladies Annual Christmas Luncheon was held on Monday, Dec. 9 at the beautifully decorated Ocala Hilton Hotel. There were 110 ladies in attendance and they enjoyed a lunch which featured Chicken Champagne and Pasta Primavera. Many local businesses generously donated gifts to be used as door prizes. The theme this year was Magical Christmas Memories and the program included a look back at the Top 10 Christmas movies of all time. #1 on the list was Its A Wonderful Life made in 1946. Each lady received a silver angel as a favor and a bell was rung at the end of the luncheon as a reminder that an angel had received her wings. This was a classic line from the movie. The Golden Troupers of the Ocala Civic Theatre provided the entertainment which included the singing of holiday songs and two humorous skits. It is always nice to share special times with good friends during the holidays! Co-chairwomen Sharron Albert and Diane Volko. Angie Fischetti, Marva Meredith and Judy Duby.Barbara LLeitzel and Jetta Hanover. Elaine Cerasani, Diane Volko and Sharyn Ruddick.Cindy Calcaterra, Helen Chin and Queenie Teller. Wilma Drew and Joanne Mueller. Verna Newman, Patricia Hamill and Teresa Weigel. Seated: Nancy Sennett, Carol Sullivan and Della Lastooka; standing: Pat Fetner, Kay Negron and Judy Mitton. Story and photos By Barb Dedics Tuesday, Jan. 28 Breast cancer support group meetsThe SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Breast Cancer Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 SW 105th St., Ocala, at 1 p.m. in the Chapel, Room 235. We are not meeting on Dec. 31, so our next meeting will be Jan. 28. At this meeting we will have a trainer give us a demonstration of Tai Chi as well as participation in this activity and an explanation of the benefits of Tai Chi for breast cancer survivors. Hope to see you all in the New Year. Sunday, Feb. 2 Musicale at First CongregationalThe annual Sunday Afternoon Musicale variety show will take place on Feb. 2 at 3 p.m. at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 7171 SW State Road 200. Church members and friends will sing, dance and play their way through an afternoon of music and fun. Admission is free, but an offering will be taken to help support our music program. The Choir will sing a medley of Jerome Kern songs and the Bell-Choir will perform a novelty number. There will be a variety of solos, duets and instrumentals to entertain you. Light refreshments will be served following the program.Wednesday, Feb. 5 College presents dinner theaterThe College of Central Florida Foundation will present its 16th annual Dinner Theatre production, Theres a Burglar in My Bed by Michael Parker, Feb. 5-9 in the Webber Center at the Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. College Road. Evening performances, Wednesday through Sunday, begin with dinner at 5:45 p.m. Matinee performances, Saturday and Sunday, will serve lunch at 12:15 p.m. Doors open 15 minutes prior to the scheduled meal times. A full schedule is available at www.cf.edu/foundation, then Events. Tickets range from $55 to $60 and guests can also reserve an entire table. Theres a Burglar in My Bed is a farce about the world famous Worthington necklace. The trysts, the plans and counter-plans all take place at the Worthingtons 200-acre Massachusetts estate with its 26bedroom mansion. This years production benefits CF Fine Arts programs and college educational programs through the CF Foundation. For more information or for tickets, call Laura Wright at 352-854-2322, ext. 1416. To sponsor a table, contact the CF Foundation at 352-854-2322, ext. 1689. Saturday, Feb. 15 Valentine Day Dance at St. JudeSt. Jude Marion Oaks Knights of Columbus Council 15644 are having their first Valentines Day Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15, from 6 to 11 p.m. at the St. Jude Catholic Community Parish Hall, 443 Marion Oaks Drive in Marion Oaks. There will be music, hors doeuvres and dancing. Seating is limited. Tickets are $10 per person and are available after the Sunday Masses or by calling Ron at 352-861-1373, Joe at 352307-3848 or Ed at 352-861-6720. Join us for a night of fun and dancing with your sweetheart. HAPPENINGScontinued from Page 5 Southwest Christian Churc hSunday, Jan. 5: Sunday School classes for children, youth, and adults meet at 9:30am. Worship Service begins at 10:30 a.m. with staffed nursery and childrens classes available during worship. Evening worship begins at 6 p.m. with study in the book of James taught by Alvin Gloer. Visitors are always welcome to worship with us and to attend all other scheduled services. Wednesday, Jan. 8: Adult Bible Study in the Fellowship Hall at 7 p.m.; Youth activities beginning at 7 p.m.. Monday, Jan. 20: On this day we celebrate the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Our country has truly been blessed with leaders such as Dr. King, who have been willing to give their lives in pursuit of peace, freedom and liberty for everyone. May we remember always this great leader who has helped us all to live and enjoy the kind of life our Lord God and our founders intended for us. Tuesday, Jan. 21: Christian Womens Fellowship (CWF) meets at the church from 9:30 to 11:45 a.m. Business meeting begins at 9:30 with Bible Study immediately following. Religion Friday Jan. 31: Golden Servants (seniors 55+) meet at 6 p.m. in the church Fellowship Hall for a carr y-in dinner with a program following dinner. Bring your favorite dish and enjoy an evening of fun with friends. You do not have to be a member of SWCC to attend. Guests and friends are welcome. Southwest Christian Church, 9045 SW 60th Ave. (South off State Road 200), Ocala 34476, phone 352861-9080, http//www.swccocala.com.First CongregationalBegin the new year with a refreshing look at the historical Jesus with a look at the political climate of the day. Ponder the questions of why Jesus came when he did, why the confluence of the Baptism movement of John and why the Kingdom movement of Jesus. The First Light Bible Discussion at First Congregational Church (7171 State Road 200) will be presented from Jan. 5 through Feb. 23, each Sunday at noon. This 8week DVD and group discussion program was developed by John Dominic Crossan and Marcus Borg, two of the worlds leading theological scholars. Crossan, a scholar, historian of early Christianity, and a former Catholic priest, is professor Emeritus of Biblical Studies at De Paul University, and widely regarded as the premier Jesus scholar in the world. Borg is a New Testament scholar, theologian, author and former Hundere Distinguished Professor of Religion and Culture at Oregon State University (retired 2007). Christ Churc h of Marion CountyWednesday Jan. 1, 2014: HAPPY NEW YEAR! Thursday, Jan. 2: P raise and Prayer Group, 9 a.m. Friday Jan. 3: Sharing Hope Soup Kitchen, 11:30 a.m. Friday Jan. 3: THE KINGSMEN Concert, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 5: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m., W orship Service, 10:30 a.m. P ACK THE PANTR Y SUNDA Y. Tuesday Jan. 7: Women s Crafts, 11:30 a.m. Wednesday Jan. 8: Bible Study, 7 p.m. Christs Church of Marion County, 6768 SW 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182 or http://www.ccomc.org/.St. J ude CatholicThe Bereavement Group for those grieving the loss of a loved one meet on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month. Meetings are open to anyone in the community with a need to share their feelings of grief. If you plan to attend, please call the church office at 352-347-0154 prior to the meetings. Creole Masses for the Haitians in our community are celebrated every second and fourth Sunday of the month at 5 p.m. The next dates are Jan. 12 and 26. Anthonys Attic, our venue for used items, continues to be open every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to noon and Saturdays from noon to 3 p.m. It is now located on the north side of the building for your shopping convenience.College P ark Churc hCollege Park Church is pleased to announce that on Sunday, Jan. 12, it will be going to two services. The day of worship will begin at 9:30 a.m. with a traditional style service featuring many of the great hymns that are known and loved by many. Sunday school classes will immediately follow the traditional service. Then a new casual style service will begin at 11:15 a.m. called Cross Training at College Park Church. It will feature the contemporary praise and worship songs of today lead by the College Park Church praise and worship band. The ministry staff of College Park Church includes senior pastor Dr. James L Fleming, associate pastor and youth minister Keith Mitchell, and worship leader Kelly McVey. The church is non-denominational Christian in theology and practice, but is not an independent church. The congregation is vitally connected with 2,300 other congregations whose general offices are in Anderson, Indiana. The decision was made to go to two services in an effort bring more people to Christ by offering more options for them to attend on Sunday mornings. The Cross Training service will offer a unique style with a casual atmosphere that invites people to come as they are. It has long been a mission of College Park Church to reach the students of the College of Central Florida given the churchs close proximity to the CF campus. College Park Churchs worship leader Kelly McVey (who was included as a top four finalist in the JoyFMs cellphone superstar contest this summer) is also a student at the College of Central Florida. Worship is a vital part of being a Christian and Im so thrilled that we are starting this additional worship service. I think its great for new comers or even people who have been attending the church for years to have a couple of options when choosing the worship style they prefer.(McVey) College Park Church of God is at 3140 SW 26th St., Ocala, (right across the street from the CF bookstore). The office phone number is 352-237-2247 and church website is www.collegeparkchog.org.Peace LutheranGet in Touch W ith Your F aith, a Christian information class starting at Peace Lutheran Church on Thursday, Jan. 16, at 6 p.m., might well be called Christianity 101. Pastor T erry McK ee will conduct the class for 1 hour each week, for 12 to 16 weeks, depending on the questions and desires of the group. Everyone is welcome; your level of participation is optional, and there will be no tests. Come and explore your faith, and its place in your everyday life. Y ou have questions? God has answers but do you sometimes feel that He is not listening? Join and enjoy this informal class led by Pastor McK ee. There is no fee or obligation for the class. Simply register by calling the church office at 352489-5881, and come to Peace Lutheran, 7201 S. U.S. Highway 41 (The church on the hill, 5 miles north of Dunnellon) at 6 p.m. on Jan. 16. More information is available through the church office, or visit www.P eaceLutheranOnline.com and www.TinyURL.com/P eace41-40.

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Friday, Jan. 3 The Kingsmen performBegin 2014 being encouraged and uplifted listening to The Kingsmen, Christian musics most predominate Quartet. This Christian Music Hall Of Fame award-winning group, spanning a fivedecade career as one of gospel musics most influential artists, will present their unique concert of Southern Gospel music, The message of Christ. Enjoy music loved by all. This is a free concert. A love offering will be received. The concert begins at 6:30 p.m. Christs Church of Marion County, 6768 SW 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182, http://www.ccomc.org.Take Charge of Diabetes deadlineIf you are part of the nearly 10.6 percent of Marion Countys adult population that, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has diabetes, dont ignore it take charge! The best way for people with diabetes to maintain a high quality of life is to learn about the disease and develop a healthy living plan. Marion County UF/IFAS Extension Service staff and local health professionals are ready to help you by offering the 10-class series, Take Charge of Your Diabetes. Participants will learn about everything from carbohydrate counting and blood glucose monitoring to medication and foot care. The class will give participants the understanding and knowledge to actively control their diabetes and maintain a quality, healthy lifestyle. The $45 fee covers the 10 class sessions and health screening for each participant; one support person per registrant may attend for free. Participants must register by Jan. 3 by calling 352-854-3699. Classes will be at Master the Possibilities, 8415 SW 80th St., on Tuesdays starting Jan. 7, from 10 a.m. to noon. For a flier and class schedule, visit www.marioncountyfl.org/extensionservice.htm. Monday, Jan. 6 Jewish view of afterlifeWhat happens after we die? Rabbi Zeev Harari of Temple Beth Shalom will present the Jewish view of the afterlife when he delivers the next lecture sponsored by the Interfaith Alliance of Marion County on Monday, Jan. 6 at the First Congregational United Church of Christ, 7171 SW State Road 200. The event, which is free and open to the public, begins at 7 p.m. Born in Haifa, the rabbi immigrated to the United States in 1989 serving in Racine, Wisconsin, Minneapolis, and Linderhurst, Illinois before coming to Ocala in August 2011. He first earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Hebrew and Arabic from Haifa University and a Master of Arts in Hebrew Literature from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Rabbi Harari was one of the founders of the Israel Movement for Progressive Judaism (Israeli Reform Judaism). He was the second Israeli to be ordained at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Jerusalem in 1981. For more information telephone 352629-3897, 352-629-3587 or e-mail TIAofMarionCountyFL@gmail.com. Saturday, Jan. 11 Pancake breakfast at St. JudeThe Ladies Auxiliary of the Knights of Columbus is hosting an All You Can Eat Pancake Breakfast on Saturday, Jan. 11, from 7 to 11 a.m. in the Parish Hall at 443 Marion Oaks Drive in Marion Oaks. The price is $4 for adults, $2 for children ages 3 to 12. Children age 2 and under eat free. The menu consists of pancakes, sausage, coffee, tea, juice and milk. Everyone is welcome to join us.Magic show scheduledBrian LaPalme, the award-winning, world renowned magician, is bringing his magic show to First Congregational United Church of Christ, for a fundraiser, on Saturday, Jan. 11 at 2 p.m. LaPalme has entertained thousands of children and adults during a career that spans four decades. His magic shows garner rave reviews, and this is sure to be one performance you wont want to miss. Ticket prices are $3 for children 12 and under; adults $6. Refreshments will be available at intermission. To purchase tickets, please call 352-598-6272, or 352-237-3035. If available, tickets may be purchased at the door. First Congregational Church is at 7171 SW State Road 200.Dueling Pianos at Circle SquareExperience the Dueling Pianos Interactive Dance Party at Circle Square Cultural Center on Saturday, Jan. 11, at 7 p.m. This high-energy, rock n roll sing-along dance party is a performance with an edge. It will get you out of your seat and on your feet. The Rockin Piano players perform popular hits from every era imaginable. From Elvis to Lady Gaga and Neil Diamond to AC/DC, they have it covered. Other popular selections are Billy Joel, Blink 182, Journey, Elton John, Bon Jovi and much more. Not only can the Rockin Piano players perform thousands of songs at the drop of a hat, but they also possess comedic timing and have the personality to engage and influence audience participation. The Rockin Piano players act includes a state of the art light show and with an open dance floor the party will start and the energy level will be up for the entire show. Remember to wear your dancing shoes and get out of your seat and enjoy a night filled with dancing, singing and having fun. Refreshments will be available for purchase. Tickets are $14. For more information on the 2014 Entertainment Series including dates, performers and ticket prices, visit our website at www.CSCulturalCenter.com or call 352-854-3670.Sunday, Jan. 12 Jews in the Civil WarCongregation Beth Israel of Ocala invites the community to a special program entitled Jews in the Civil War to be held on Sunday, Jan. 12, at 3 p.m. at the First Congregational Church, 7171 State Road 200 in Ocala. This fascinating topic will be presented by Channah Zimmerman who will relate, dramatize and chronicle the history of the Jews during the Civil War era from both sides of the conflict. Tickets are $8 per person and also include refreshments. Tickets may be purchased from Judi (352-237-8277) Sonia (352-307-3662) or Estelle (352-8612452). This program is partially funded by the Jewish Council of North Central Florida. For further information please call Judi (352-237-8277) or visit our Website bethisraelocala.org. Congregation Beth Israel is a Reconstructionist Community in association with the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College. We are a liberal, progressive, inclusive Jewish community serving the needs of Marion County and surrounding areas. Saturday, Jan. 18 Party in the ParkOur Redeemer Lutheran Church will hold Party in the Park on Saturday, Jan. 18, from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall and grounds. There will be free admission, a live band, free food and games and is open to the public. There will be hot dogs, macaroni and cheese, drinks, chips, desserts, face painting, a bounce house and games for adults and children. Our Redeemer is at 5200 S.W. College Road (State Road 200). Phone is 352237-2233.Sunday, Jan. 19 Chamber Music Society concertThe Marion Chamber Music Society is pleased to welcome Collision, a saxophone quartet from the University of Florida, on Jan. 19, at 3 p.m. at Ocalas Queen of Peace Church, 6645 SW State Road 200 in Ocala. The group will be playing original music for saxophone as well as more traditional chamber music arranged specifically for saxophone. The immense popularity of the saxophone group is due largely to the variety of sound capabilities of the saxophone; from sweet, gentle, or bold to soulful and playful. Marion Chamber Music Concerts are always free of charge. For more information call 352867-1340 or visit the website: marionchambermusic.com. Saturday, Jan. 25 Flea Market at St. JudeSt. Jude Catholic Community will be having another open flea market on Saturday, Jan. 25, from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. We will start receiving donations for the sale immediately. Please clean out your closets and bring items that are clean and in good/excellent condition to the church hall. We cannot accept TVs as donations. Space rentals are available for an 8 x 8 space to sell your own items. Inside space is $20; outside is $15. St. Jude is at 443 Marion Oaks Drive in Marion Oaks. For more information please call Midge at 352-203-7182 or Linda at 352209-4724. Please join us for a fun day.Monday, Jan. 27 School referendum discussionThe League of Women Voters of Marion County will conduct a meeting concerning The School Referendum on Monday, Jan. 27, at 6:30 p.m. at the Ocala Police Dept. Community Room, 402 S. Pine Ave., Ocala. Speakers will be Ray Seaman and Nancy Noonan, co-founders of Marions United for Education. The event is free and open to the public. More on Page 10 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 1, 2014 5 8 W ednesday, January 1, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Our top wishes for the new year Its time for New Years resolutions, if you go in for such things, so in the spirit of todays holiday we bring you our wishes for resolutions by the officials, both elected and non-elected, who run our government, whether local, state or national. Theyre listed in the order of what we consider important, except for No. 6, which really should be at the top of everyones list. 1. Play ball. We havent changed our wish for a stadium, and were not particular about how it gets done. If the politicians are able to come up with a plan that doesnt include a tax, well all be better for it. In a little over two years, however, we hope to be sitting in the stadium taking in a Minor League Baseball game. 0 2. Protection for our water. Our water districts seem to have a funny way of protecting our water supply they let people take what they want. Its time to clamp down and make sure we have enough natural water here for us, before we allow bottling companies to take it and sell it. Water is not an unlimited resource. We need controls before our supply dries up. 3. A crackdown on armed robbers who are making store clerks their victims. At this time of year there is usually a spike in robberies, and this year was no different. Our store clerks, who are there for our convenience, shouldnt be subjected to constant fear of being robbed by some gun-toting hoodlums, some of whom come from outside the area. More patrols, especially at night, and more sophisticated alarm systems should be planned. Lets make it safer for our local workers. 4. More law enforcement presence on certain roads that have become racetracks. We think mainly of the 31st Street corridor, with the new four-lane road where hardly anyone observes the 40 mph limit. Yes, that limit is low for that road, but its the law and should be strongly enforced with citations handed out every day. And there shouldnt be any favoritism just because the offenders are students headed for a local high school. Teach them now to obey the law, and we may be saving their lives later. 5. Better traffic flow plans and synchronized lights on all the major arteries off the Interstate. Good Our Message PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGANREGIONALMANAGER: JOHN PROVOSTEDITOR: JIM CLARK MessengerWEST MARION Editorial Guest column ADHD: Is the epidemic manufacturedBY RICH LOWRY Special to the MessengerIf at any time while reading this article your attention wanders, you may have ADHD. If you pause to check your email sometime during the next three paragraphs, you should consult a doctor. If you fail to read this article all the way to the end, you should get on Adderall, Ritalin or some other drug to treat your condition as soon as possible. This isnt quite the standard for diagnosing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, but its close. The New York Times ran a long expose on how the drug industry has stoked the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD that had a revelatory quote from Keith Conners, a doctor who has long advocated for the recognition of the disorder. Conners called the overdiagnosis of ADHD a national disaster of dangerous proportions, telling the Times that the rising number of cases is a concoction to justify the giving out of medication at unprecedented and unjustifiable levels. This isnt bombthrowing from an outsider, but a critique from the namesake of the Conners ratings scale widely used to evaluate kids for ADHD. There is no doubt that ADHD is a legitimate neurological condition that makes kids (and those around them) miserable, that blights their potential and that can be alleviated by prescription stimulants like Adderall and Ritalin. There also is no doubt that diagnosis and treatment of the disorder has run wildly out of control. According to the forthcoming book The ADHD Explosion, 19 percent of high-school-aged males have received a diagnosis. The numbers differ from state to state. In North Carolina, an astounding 30 percent of boys over age 9 are supposedly suffering from ADHD. Overall, 6 percent of children and adolescents in the United States are on drugs to treat ADHD. Its a wonder more kids arent diagnosed with it, given the overlap between the description of the disorder and failings to which we are all prone. The New York Times points out that the American Psychiatric Association criteria for ADHD include often has difficulty waiting his or her turn and makes careless mistakes, hardly rare childhood behaviors. The drug companies for whom ADHD is a $9 billion-a-year business target mothers with alluring ads suggesting their children will become little angels through the wonders of risk-free stimulants. Their kids will get better grades, spend more quality time with the family and remember to take out the trash. Who wouldnt want their child thus magically transformed? According to the Times report, the Food and Drug Administration has constantly rebuked the companies for going beyond the evidence in selling visions of childhood Valhalla secured through the right drug. Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. The Feds want you to see traffic signs, including street signs, better when you drive at night. The debate is whether this will cost local governments money that they dont have. The government, in the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices, issued reflectivity guidelines a few years ago, and all entities, whether state, county or local, must meet those guidelines. When they first came out there was a lot of discussion about the cost. One change particularly caught the eye of some journalists, including me. It said that using all capital letters in street signs was no longer permitted. The signs must be upper and lower case. At first many considered this a mandate, and there were stories popping up about how many dollars were going to have to be spent. A New York City newspaper said the city would have to spend more than a million dollars to replace all its street signs. Even though I had the new regulations, I put off writing about it, figuring that this assessment might not be accurate. Turns out I was probably right, that its not going to be a great financial burden. If I read the new directions properly (I warn you, they are written in government-speak), city and counties can replace signs with the new lettering, but dont have to go out and change every sign right away, only those that have become old and hard to see and if they dont meet the reflectivity rules. Theres something else that needs to be emphasized by regulation, and that is that the county and city must keep the street signs visible. A few months ago, a lady speaking at a county meeting brought up the lack of maintenance in Rolling Hills, an area west of State Road 200 and north of County Road 484. She had a picture showing weeds so high they reached the top of a street Re ad the s tr eet s ig ns, sp en d the m on ey Among Friends Jim Clark sign. There are many locations where signs are partially hidden by trees and bushes or even other signs. Thats something that needs to be discussed. As for the lettering, I kind of agree that the signs need to be upper and lower case. Most newspapers dont run news copy in all capital letters for the same reason it can be hard to read. Here in our county there are many signs that are all capital letters. While they may be a little hard to read, according to the Feds, we really havent heard anyone complain. As is so often the case, although not too burdensome, this is an unfunded mandate from the federal government, which must have thousands of employees just sitting around looking for things to do, so they come up with ideas like this. So if you want to read something when you have insomnia, this excerpt from the manual is available online. Just go to https://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R43042. pdf and read. If any hyphens appear in the web address, ignore them. Thats just our computer breaking the copy from line to line. If you come up with a different conclusion than I have outlined, please feel free to writer a letter to the editor. When it comes to government language, if you can clean it up, more power to you.Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger. Please see LOWRY, Page 11 Please see EDITORIAL, Page 11 000GCZ8 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS Christ the King The Rev. Donald J. Curran, Rector Services: Rite I 8:00 am Rite II 10:15 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary 352-351-9727 www.ctkaocala.org Anglican Church 000FYNA is discovered through worshiping together 711187 000GXJI Read the classifieds Happenings

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 1, 2014 7 6 W ednesday, January 1, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger The Sleekline Yamahas 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run 352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm OCALA GOLF CART OCALA GOLF CART OCALA GOLF CART AUTHORIZED Trojan/Electro DEALER 6-V 6-V T605 T605 only $ 539 only $ 539 8-V 8-V T875 T875 only $ 649 only $ 649 12-V 12-V T1275 T1275 only $ 649 only $ 649 6-V 6-V 6 PACK 6 P ACK $ 449 $ 449 8-V 8-V 6 PACK 6 P ACK $ 549 $ 549 WEEKLY SPECIAL: 2002 EZ-GO TXT $ 1,995 Roll into 2014 with a New Golf Cart! Now Of fering: $ 4,995 $ 5,995 2011 EZ-GO RXV 2011 Club Car Precedent Same Day Service (most jobs) 10% Discount to V eterans l abor & parts excluding batteries BUY, SELL, TRADE & SERVICE FREE pickup within 5 miles Thank Y ou for your continued support. Looking forward to seeing you in 2014! 000GZ7C FAMILY FEATURES Strawberries are a quick and easy snack for adults and children. Its no wonder why theyre a top fruit juice in kitchens and lunchboxes everywhere. Plus, these tasty fruits are packed with almost 140 percent of immune system boosting vitamin C. Strawberries always put a smile on my face, says Chef Justin Timineri, execu tive chef and culinary ambas sa dor, Florida Department of Agricul ture and Consumer Services. My favorite recipe for them is to simply Rinse, eat and repeat. You can find more snack ideas and recipes at http://bit.ly/floridaberries.Fluffy Stuffed StrawberriesYield: 16 servings 1 pound Florida strawberries 8 ounces low-fat cream cheese, softened 3 ounces low-fat yogurt 1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract Cut stems off strawberries and carefully scoop out 2/3 of inside with knife or spoon, creating a cup. Be careful not to make any holes. Cut piece off bottom tip of strawberries to allow them to stand up. Beat cream cheese and yogurt until fluffy. Fold in vanilla extract. Working in batches, place cheese mix ture into pastry or sealable bag with small corner cut off. Fill strawberries with cheese mixture. Garnish with mint and serve. Kids Can: Place cheese mixture into pastry bag and fill strawberries. Grown Up Alert: Adults should stem the strawberries. How to buyChoose strawberries that are plump, fragrant and firm, with no signs of bruising or leaking.How to storeIts best to eat strawberries on the day of purchase. You can freeze strawberries by hulling, lightly wash ing and drying them. Arrange in a single layer before placing in the freezer.Hulling tipsNever hull strawberries until after they have been washed or they will absorb too much water and become mushy. Sign-up to receive a FREE copy of theKids in the Kitchen cookbook at: http://bit.ly/flfffkids. Chef Justin TimineriStrawberry Dessert PizzaYield: 2 to 3 servings Crust: 1/2 pound butter, two sticks 2/3 cup sugar 1 egg 1/4 teaspoon baking powder 1/8 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract 2 1/3 cups all-purpose flour Topping: 1 8-ounce package cream cheese 1 tablespoon honey 2 tablespoons sugar 3 pints Florida strawberries Glaze: 1 tablespoon honey 1 teaspoon water Tomakecrust,creamtogetherbutterand sugarwithmixeruntilfluffy.Addegg,bak ingpowder,saltandvanillaextractuntil mix tureissmooth.Addflourandmixuntil smoothdoughisformed.Placefinished doughinbetweentwosheetsofwaxpaper andrefrigeratefor20minutes.Removefrom refrigeratorandrolldoughoutto1/4-inch thicknessandinroundshape.Placedough ingreased12-inchpizzapanandbakein preheated350Fovenfor25min utesoruntil crustislightbrown.Coolcompletely. To make topping, combine cream cheese, honey and sugar until smooth. Spread evenly over cooled cookie crust, leaving 1/2-inch border uncovered. Place sliced strawberries around outside border; fill in middle of pizza. To make glaze, combine honey and water; brush over top of finished pizza. Kids Can: Glaze top of finished pizza. Place sliced strawberries on top of pizza. Grown Up Alert: Adults should help with oven.Strawberry-Mango MilkshakeYield: 3 servings 3 tablespoons sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1/2 cup low-fat milk 6 ice cubes 1/3 cup plain yogurt 10 Florida strawberries, hulled 1 mango, peeled and sliced Garnish: 1 dollop whipped cream 1 Florida strawberry 1 slice of mango Put everything but fruit into blender; blend on low, gradually increasing speed. Once smooth, add fruit and finish blending until completely smooth. Pour into tall glass and enjoy.Strawberry MuffinsYield: 12 servings 1 1/2 cups Florida strawberries, chopped 3/4 cup sugar 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour, unsifted 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 eggs, beaten 1/4 cup butter, melted 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Combine strawberries and 1/2 cup sugar in small bowl. Set aside for 1 hour. Drain and reserve liquid and straw berries separately. Preheat oven to 425F. Combine flour, baking soda, nutmeg and salt. Set aside. Mix eggs, butter, vanilla extract, remaining sugar and liquid from strawberries in medium bowl. Add flour mixture. Stir until combined. Fold in reserved straw berries. Spoon into 12 greased muffin cups. Bake for approximately 20 minutes. Serve warm. Kids Can: Spoon mixture into muffin cups. Grown Up Alert: Adults should help with oven.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 1, 2014 7 6 W ednesday, January 1, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger The Sleekline Yamahas 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run 352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm OCALA GOLF CART OCALA GOLF CART OCALA GOLF CART AUTHORIZED Trojan/Electro DEALER 6-V 6-V T605 T605 only $ 539 only $ 539 8-V 8-V T875 T875 only $ 649 only $ 649 12-V 12-V T1275 T1275 only $ 649 only $ 649 6-V 6-V 6 PACK 6 P ACK $ 449 $ 449 8-V 8-V 6 PACK 6 P ACK $ 549 $ 549 WEEKLY SPECIAL: 2002 EZ-GO TXT $ 1,995 Roll into 2014 with a New Golf Cart! Now Of fering: $ 4,995 $ 5,995 2011 EZ-GO RXV 2011 Club Car Precedent Same Day Service (most jobs) 10% Discount to V eterans l abor & parts excluding batteries BUY, SELL, TRADE & SERVICE FREE pickup within 5 miles Thank Y ou for your continued support. Looking forward to seeing you in 2014! 000GZ7C FAMILY FEATURES Strawberries are a quick and easy snack for adults and children. Its no wonder why theyre a top fruit juice in kitchens and lunchboxes everywhere. Plus, these tasty fruits are packed with almost 140 percent of immune system boosting vitamin C. Strawberries always put a smile on my face, says Chef Justin Timineri, execu tive chef and culinary ambas sa dor, Florida Department of Agricul ture and Consumer Services. My favorite recipe for them is to simply Rinse, eat and repeat. You can find more snack ideas and recipes at http://bit.ly/floridaberries.Fluffy Stuffed StrawberriesYield: 16 servings 1 pound Florida strawberries 8 ounces low-fat cream cheese, softened 3 ounces low-fat yogurt 1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract Cut stems off strawberries and carefully scoop out 2/3 of inside with knife or spoon, creating a cup. Be careful not to make any holes. Cut piece off bottom tip of strawberries to allow them to stand up. Beat cream cheese and yogurt until fluffy. Fold in vanilla extract. Working in batches, place cheese mix ture into pastry or sealable bag with small corner cut off. Fill strawberries with cheese mixture. Garnish with mint and serve. Kids Can: Place cheese mixture into pastry bag and fill strawberries. Grown Up Alert: Adults should stem the strawberries. How to buyChoose strawberries that are plump, fragrant and firm, with no signs of bruising or leaking.How to storeIts best to eat strawberries on the day of purchase. You can freeze strawberries by hulling, lightly wash ing and drying them. Arrange in a single layer before placing in the freezer.Hulling tipsNever hull strawberries until after they have been washed or they will absorb too much water and become mushy. Sign-up to receive a FREE copy of theKids in the Kitchen cookbook at: http://bit.ly/flfffkids. Chef Justin TimineriStrawberry Dessert PizzaYield: 2 to 3 servings Crust: 1/2 pound butter, two sticks 2/3 cup sugar 1 egg 1/4 teaspoon baking powder 1/8 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract 2 1/3 cups all-purpose flour Topping: 1 8-ounce package cream cheese 1 tablespoon honey 2 tablespoons sugar 3 pints Florida strawberries Glaze: 1 tablespoon honey 1 teaspoon water Tomakecrust,creamtogetherbutterand sugarwithmixeruntilfluffy.Addegg,bak ingpowder,saltandvanillaextractuntil mix tureissmooth.Addflourandmixuntil smoothdoughisformed.Placefinished doughinbetweentwosheetsofwaxpaper andrefrigeratefor20minutes.Removefrom refrigeratorandrolldoughoutto1/4-inch thicknessandinroundshape.Placedough ingreased12-inchpizzapanandbakein preheated350Fovenfor25min utesoruntil crustislightbrown.Coolcompletely. To make topping, combine cream cheese, honey and sugar until smooth. Spread evenly over cooled cookie crust, leaving 1/2-inch border uncovered. Place sliced strawberries around outside border; fill in middle of pizza. To make glaze, combine honey and water; brush over top of finished pizza. Kids Can: Glaze top of finished pizza. Place sliced strawberries on top of pizza. Grown Up Alert: Adults should help with oven.Strawberry-Mango MilkshakeYield: 3 servings 3 tablespoons sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1/2 cup low-fat milk 6 ice cubes 1/3 cup plain yogurt 10 Florida strawberries, hulled 1 mango, peeled and sliced Garnish: 1 dollop whipped cream 1 Florida strawberry 1 slice of mango Put everything but fruit into blender; blend on low, gradually increasing speed. Once smooth, add fruit and finish blending until completely smooth. Pour into tall glass and enjoy.Strawberry MuffinsYield: 12 servings 1 1/2 cups Florida strawberries, chopped 3/4 cup sugar 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour, unsifted 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 eggs, beaten 1/4 cup butter, melted 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Combine strawberries and 1/2 cup sugar in small bowl. Set aside for 1 hour. Drain and reserve liquid and straw berries separately. Preheat oven to 425F. Combine flour, baking soda, nutmeg and salt. Set aside. Mix eggs, butter, vanilla extract, remaining sugar and liquid from strawberries in medium bowl. Add flour mixture. Stir until combined. Fold in reserved straw berries. Spoon into 12 greased muffin cups. Bake for approximately 20 minutes. Serve warm. Kids Can: Spoon mixture into muffin cups. Grown Up Alert: Adults should help with oven.

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Friday, Jan. 3 The Kingsmen performBegin 2014 being encouraged and uplifted listening to The Kingsmen, Christian musics most predominate Quartet. This Christian Music Hall Of Fame award-winning group, spanning a fivedecade career as one of gospel musics most influential artists, will present their unique concert of Southern Gospel music, The message of Christ. Enjoy music loved by all. This is a free concert. A love offering will be received. The concert begins at 6:30 p.m. Christs Church of Marion County, 6768 SW 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182, http://www.ccomc.org.Take Charge of Diabetes deadlineIf you are part of the nearly 10.6 percent of Marion Countys adult population that, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has diabetes, dont ignore it take charge! The best way for people with diabetes to maintain a high quality of life is to learn about the disease and develop a healthy living plan. Marion County UF/IFAS Extension Service staff and local health professionals are ready to help you by offering the 10-class series, Take Charge of Your Diabetes. Participants will learn about everything from carbohydrate counting and blood glucose monitoring to medication and foot care. The class will give participants the understanding and knowledge to actively control their diabetes and maintain a quality, healthy lifestyle. The $45 fee covers the 10 class sessions and health screening for each participant; one support person per registrant may attend for free. Participants must register by Jan. 3 by calling 352-854-3699. Classes will be at Master the Possibilities, 8415 SW 80th St., on Tuesdays starting Jan. 7, from 10 a.m. to noon. For a flier and class schedule, visit www.marioncountyfl.org/extensionservice.htm. Monday, Jan. 6 Jewish view of afterlifeWhat happens after we die? Rabbi Zeev Harari of Temple Beth Shalom will present the Jewish view of the afterlife when he delivers the next lecture sponsored by the Interfaith Alliance of Marion County on Monday, Jan. 6 at the First Congregational United Church of Christ, 7171 SW State Road 200. The event, which is free and open to the public, begins at 7 p.m. Born in Haifa, the rabbi immigrated to the United States in 1989 serving in Racine, Wisconsin, Minneapolis, and Linderhurst, Illinois before coming to Ocala in August 2011. He first earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Hebrew and Arabic from Haifa University and a Master of Arts in Hebrew Literature from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Rabbi Harari was one of the founders of the Israel Movement for Progressive Judaism (Israeli Reform Judaism). He was the second Israeli to be ordained at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Jerusalem in 1981. For more information telephone 352629-3897, 352-629-3587 or e-mail TIAofMarionCountyFL@gmail.com. Saturday, Jan. 11 Pancake breakfast at St. JudeThe Ladies Auxiliary of the Knights of Columbus is hosting an All You Can Eat Pancake Breakfast on Saturday, Jan. 11, from 7 to 11 a.m. in the Parish Hall at 443 Marion Oaks Drive in Marion Oaks. The price is $4 for adults, $2 for children ages 3 to 12. Children age 2 and under eat free. The menu consists of pancakes, sausage, coffee, tea, juice and milk. Everyone is welcome to join us.Magic show scheduledBrian LaPalme, the award-winning, world renowned magician, is bringing his magic show to First Congregational United Church of Christ, for a fundraiser, on Saturday, Jan. 11 at 2 p.m. LaPalme has entertained thousands of children and adults during a career that spans four decades. His magic shows garner rave reviews, and this is sure to be one performance you wont want to miss. Ticket prices are $3 for children 12 and under; adults $6. Refreshments will be available at intermission. To purchase tickets, please call 352-598-6272, or 352-237-3035. If available, tickets may be purchased at the door. First Congregational Church is at 7171 SW State Road 200.Dueling Pianos at Circle SquareExperience the Dueling Pianos Interactive Dance Party at Circle Square Cultural Center on Saturday, Jan. 11, at 7 p.m. This high-energy, rock n roll sing-along dance party is a performance with an edge. It will get you out of your seat and on your feet. The Rockin Piano players perform popular hits from every era imaginable. From Elvis to Lady Gaga and Neil Diamond to AC/DC, they have it covered. Other popular selections are Billy Joel, Blink 182, Journey, Elton John, Bon Jovi and much more. Not only can the Rockin Piano players perform thousands of songs at the drop of a hat, but they also possess comedic timing and have the personality to engage and influence audience participation. The Rockin Piano players act includes a state of the art light show and with an open dance floor the party will start and the energy level will be up for the entire show. Remember to wear your dancing shoes and get out of your seat and enjoy a night filled with dancing, singing and having fun. Refreshments will be available for purchase. Tickets are $14. For more information on the 2014 Entertainment Series including dates, performers and ticket prices, visit our website at www.CSCulturalCenter.com or call 352-854-3670.Sunday, Jan. 12 Jews in the Civil WarCongregation Beth Israel of Ocala invites the community to a special program entitled Jews in the Civil War to be held on Sunday, Jan. 12, at 3 p.m. at the First Congregational Church, 7171 State Road 200 in Ocala. This fascinating topic will be presented by Channah Zimmerman who will relate, dramatize and chronicle the history of the Jews during the Civil War era from both sides of the conflict. Tickets are $8 per person and also include refreshments. Tickets may be purchased from Judi (352-237-8277) Sonia (352-307-3662) or Estelle (352-8612452). This program is partially funded by the Jewish Council of North Central Florida. For further information please call Judi (352-237-8277) or visit our Website bethisraelocala.org. Congregation Beth Israel is a Reconstructionist Community in association with the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College. We are a liberal, progressive, inclusive Jewish community serving the needs of Marion County and surrounding areas. Saturday, Jan. 18 Party in the ParkOur Redeemer Lutheran Church will hold Party in the Park on Saturday, Jan. 18, from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall and grounds. There will be free admission, a live band, free food and games and is open to the public. There will be hot dogs, macaroni and cheese, drinks, chips, desserts, face painting, a bounce house and games for adults and children. Our Redeemer is at 5200 S.W. College Road (State Road 200). Phone is 352237-2233.Sunday, Jan. 19 Chamber Music Society concertThe Marion Chamber Music Society is pleased to welcome Collision, a saxophone quartet from the University of Florida, on Jan. 19, at 3 p.m. at Ocalas Queen of Peace Church, 6645 SW State Road 200 in Ocala. The group will be playing original music for saxophone as well as more traditional chamber music arranged specifically for saxophone. The immense popularity of the saxophone group is due largely to the variety of sound capabilities of the saxophone; from sweet, gentle, or bold to soulful and playful. Marion Chamber Music Concerts are always free of charge. For more information call 352867-1340 or visit the website: marionchambermusic.com. Saturday, Jan. 25 Flea Market at St. JudeSt. Jude Catholic Community will be having another open flea market on Saturday, Jan. 25, from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. We will start receiving donations for the sale immediately. Please clean out your closets and bring items that are clean and in good/excellent condition to the church hall. We cannot accept TVs as donations. Space rentals are available for an 8 x 8 space to sell your own items. Inside space is $20; outside is $15. St. Jude is at 443 Marion Oaks Drive in Marion Oaks. For more information please call Midge at 352-203-7182 or Linda at 352209-4724. Please join us for a fun day.Monday, Jan. 27 School referendum discussionThe League of Women Voters of Marion County will conduct a meeting concerning The School Referendum on Monday, Jan. 27, at 6:30 p.m. at the Ocala Police Dept. Community Room, 402 S. Pine Ave., Ocala. Speakers will be Ray Seaman and Nancy Noonan, co-founders of Marions United for Education. The event is free and open to the public. More on Page 10 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 1, 2014 5 8 W ednesday, January 1, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Our top wishes for the new year Its time for New Years resolutions, if you go in for such things, so in the spirit of todays holiday we bring you our wishes for resolutions by the officials, both elected and non-elected, who run our government, whether local, state or national. Theyre listed in the order of what we consider important, except for No. 6, which really should be at the top of everyones list. 1. Play ball. We havent changed our wish for a stadium, and were not particular about how it gets done. If the politicians are able to come up with a plan that doesnt include a tax, well all be better for it. In a little over two years, however, we hope to be sitting in the stadium taking in a Minor League Baseball game. 0 2. Protection for our water. Our water districts seem to have a funny way of protecting our water supply they let people take what they want. Its time to clamp down and make sure we have enough natural water here for us, before we allow bottling companies to take it and sell it. Water is not an unlimited resource. We need controls before our supply dries up. 3. A crackdown on armed robbers who are making store clerks their victims. At this time of year there is usually a spike in robberies, and this year was no different. Our store clerks, who are there for our convenience, shouldnt be subjected to constant fear of being robbed by some gun-toting hoodlums, some of whom come from outside the area. More patrols, especially at night, and more sophisticated alarm systems should be planned. Lets make it safer for our local workers. 4. More law enforcement presence on certain roads that have become racetracks. We think mainly of the 31st Street corridor, with the new four-lane road where hardly anyone observes the 40 mph limit. Yes, that limit is low for that road, but its the law and should be strongly enforced with citations handed out every day. And there shouldnt be any favoritism just because the offenders are students headed for a local high school. Teach them now to obey the law, and we may be saving their lives later. 5. Better traffic flow plans and synchronized lights on all the major arteries off the Interstate. Good Our Message PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGANREGIONALMANAGER: JOHN PROVOSTEDITOR: JIM CLARK MessengerWEST MARION Editorial Guest column ADHD: Is the epidemic manufacturedBY RICH LOWRY Special to the MessengerIf at any time while reading this article your attention wanders, you may have ADHD. If you pause to check your email sometime during the next three paragraphs, you should consult a doctor. If you fail to read this article all the way to the end, you should get on Adderall, Ritalin or some other drug to treat your condition as soon as possible. This isnt quite the standard for diagnosing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, but its close. The New York Times ran a long expose on how the drug industry has stoked the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD that had a revelatory quote from Keith Conners, a doctor who has long advocated for the recognition of the disorder. Conners called the overdiagnosis of ADHD a national disaster of dangerous proportions, telling the Times that the rising number of cases is a concoction to justify the giving out of medication at unprecedented and unjustifiable levels. This isnt bombthrowing from an outsider, but a critique from the namesake of the Conners ratings scale widely used to evaluate kids for ADHD. There is no doubt that ADHD is a legitimate neurological condition that makes kids (and those around them) miserable, that blights their potential and that can be alleviated by prescription stimulants like Adderall and Ritalin. There also is no doubt that diagnosis and treatment of the disorder has run wildly out of control. According to the forthcoming book The ADHD Explosion, 19 percent of high-school-aged males have received a diagnosis. The numbers differ from state to state. In North Carolina, an astounding 30 percent of boys over age 9 are supposedly suffering from ADHD. Overall, 6 percent of children and adolescents in the United States are on drugs to treat ADHD. Its a wonder more kids arent diagnosed with it, given the overlap between the description of the disorder and failings to which we are all prone. The New York Times points out that the American Psychiatric Association criteria for ADHD include often has difficulty waiting his or her turn and makes careless mistakes, hardly rare childhood behaviors. The drug companies for whom ADHD is a $9 billion-a-year business target mothers with alluring ads suggesting their children will become little angels through the wonders of risk-free stimulants. Their kids will get better grades, spend more quality time with the family and remember to take out the trash. Who wouldnt want their child thus magically transformed? According to the Times report, the Food and Drug Administration has constantly rebuked the companies for going beyond the evidence in selling visions of childhood Valhalla secured through the right drug. Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. The Feds want you to see traffic signs, including street signs, better when you drive at night. The debate is whether this will cost local governments money that they dont have. The government, in the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices, issued reflectivity guidelines a few years ago, and all entities, whether state, county or local, must meet those guidelines. When they first came out there was a lot of discussion about the cost. One change particularly caught the eye of some journalists, including me. It said that using all capital letters in street signs was no longer permitted. The signs must be upper and lower case. At first many considered this a mandate, and there were stories popping up about how many dollars were going to have to be spent. A New York City newspaper said the city would have to spend more than a million dollars to replace all its street signs. Even though I had the new regulations, I put off writing about it, figuring that this assessment might not be accurate. Turns out I was probably right, that its not going to be a great financial burden. If I read the new directions properly (I warn you, they are written in government-speak), city and counties can replace signs with the new lettering, but dont have to go out and change every sign right away, only those that have become old and hard to see and if they dont meet the reflectivity rules. Theres something else that needs to be emphasized by regulation, and that is that the county and city must keep the street signs visible. A few months ago, a lady speaking at a county meeting brought up the lack of maintenance in Rolling Hills, an area west of State Road 200 and north of County Road 484. She had a picture showing weeds so high they reached the top of a street Re ad the s tr eet s ig ns, sp en d the m on ey Among Friends Jim Clark sign. There are many locations where signs are partially hidden by trees and bushes or even other signs. Thats something that needs to be discussed. As for the lettering, I kind of agree that the signs need to be upper and lower case. Most newspapers dont run news copy in all capital letters for the same reason it can be hard to read. Here in our county there are many signs that are all capital letters. While they may be a little hard to read, according to the Feds, we really havent heard anyone complain. As is so often the case, although not too burdensome, this is an unfunded mandate from the federal government, which must have thousands of employees just sitting around looking for things to do, so they come up with ideas like this. So if you want to read something when you have insomnia, this excerpt from the manual is available online. Just go to https://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R43042. pdf and read. If any hyphens appear in the web address, ignore them. Thats just our computer breaking the copy from line to line. If you come up with a different conclusion than I have outlined, please feel free to writer a letter to the editor. When it comes to government language, if you can clean it up, more power to you.Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger. Please see LOWRY, Page 11 Please see EDITORIAL, Page 11 000GCZ8 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS Christ the King The Rev. Donald J. Curran, Rector Services: Rite I 8:00 am Rite II 10:15 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary 352-351-9727 www.ctkaocala.org Anglican Church 000FYNA is discovered through worshiping together 711187 000GXJI Read the classifieds Happenings

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 1, 2014 9 4 W ednesday, January 1, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger The West Marion Messenger is a free community newspaper covering news of communities west of Ocala including Fore Ranch, Stone Creek, Fairfield Village, Ocala Palms, Timberwood, Falls of Ocala, Quail Meadow, Foxwood Farms and Golden Hills. Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala, Fla., 34477. Problems getting the Messenger: If your community is listed above and the Messenger is not delivered to you or you are having trouble getting the paper from boxes around the S.R. 40 and S.R. 27 areas, call 854-3986.CONTACT INFORMATIONOffice (352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 489-6593 20441 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34432 EditorJim Clark 390-6444 Circulation Barbara Jaggers 854-3986 Inside Sales/Office Coord. -Michel Northsea 854-3986 Advertising Sales Tom Rapplean 352-564-2957 Regional Manager John Provost 352-563-6363 Deadline for news : Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication. Member of the Community Papers of Florida I want to get news in the Messenger.Call editor Jim Clark at 352-390-6444 or send by e-mail to editor@westmarionmessenger.comCommunity news and photos must be received by Thursday the week before publication. Mail and photos must be e-mailed to editor@westmarionmessenger.com. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.Deadline for AdvertisingClassified Reader Ads 2 pm Friday Display Ads 5 pm Thursday SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 000GE74 000GE74 000FY21 IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Seasonal Special Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2013 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection FREE Service Call with repair With coupon. Expires 2/28/2014 Lanai Enclosures Glass Window Replacement Acrylic Windows Screen Room000GV9X WINDOW INSTALL 352-587-2735CERTIFIED RESIDENTIAL CONTRACTOR license # 1330701 000GVWQ AIR CONDITIONING 352-208-4641 Locally Owned & Operated License # CAC1816140 WILSON AIR SERVICE Tune Up Special We Service All Brands Repairs Replacement Free Second Opinions 24-HR. Service $ 29 95 GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 795 $ 795 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RAY RAY RAY CC C C C C ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION Crayconst.com Crayconst.com Crayconst.com 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G GA RA GE S CR EE N D OO R 1 6 x 7 SL ID IN G 16 x 7 SLIDING GARAGE GARAGE SCREEN SCREEN DOOR DOOR 000H0OO $ 79 95 $ 79 95 $ 79 95 GARAGE SCREEN DOOR CHECK UP ACRYLIC vs. GLASS C a ll for d e ta i l s. 000Gyak HANDYMAN Weekend Warrior Let Me Do All Your Chores Home Maintenance/ Repair Lawn & Y ard Pressure W ashing Painting, Etc. V ery Dependable, Competent & Affordable Excellent, Local References. Reclaim Your Fr ee Time! Contact W ayne Green at 352-875-6106 711185 DIALAPRO For Your Professional Needs For Your Professional Needs WEST MARION Messenger WEST MARION Messenger Ocala Palms Ladies hold annual Christmas luncheonThe Ocala Palms Ladies Annual Christmas Luncheon was held on Monday, Dec. 9 at the beautifully decorated Ocala Hilton Hotel. There were 110 ladies in attendance and they enjoyed a lunch which featured Chicken Champagne and Pasta Primavera. Many local businesses generously donated gifts to be used as door prizes. The theme this year was Magical Christmas Memories and the program included a look back at the Top 10 Christmas movies of all time. #1 on the list was Its A Wonderful Life made in 1946. Each lady received a silver angel as a favor and a bell was rung at the end of the luncheon as a reminder that an angel had received her wings. This was a classic line from the movie. The Golden Troupers of the Ocala Civic Theatre provided the entertainment which included the singing of holiday songs and two humorous skits. It is always nice to share special times with good friends during the holidays! Co-chairwomen Sharron Albert and Diane Volko. Angie Fischetti, Marva Meredith and Judy Duby.Barbara LLeitzel and Jetta Hanover. Elaine Cerasani, Diane Volko and Sharyn Ruddick.Cindy Calcaterra, Helen Chin and Queenie Teller. Wilma Drew and Joanne Mueller. Verna Newman, Patricia Hamill and Teresa Weigel. Seated: Nancy Sennett, Carol Sullivan and Della Lastooka; standing: Pat Fetner, Kay Negron and Judy Mitton. Story and photos By Barb Dedics Tuesday, Jan. 28 Breast cancer support group meetsThe SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Breast Cancer Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 SW 105th St., Ocala, at 1 p.m. in the Chapel, Room 235. We are not meeting on Dec. 31, so our next meeting will be Jan. 28. At this meeting we will have a trainer give us a demonstration of Tai Chi as well as participation in this activity and an explanation of the benefits of Tai Chi for breast cancer survivors. Hope to see you all in the New Year. Sunday, Feb. 2 Musicale at First CongregationalThe annual Sunday Afternoon Musicale variety show will take place on Feb. 2 at 3 p.m. at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 7171 SW State Road 200. Church members and friends will sing, dance and play their way through an afternoon of music and fun. Admission is free, but an offering will be taken to help support our music program. The Choir will sing a medley of Jerome Kern songs and the Bell-Choir will perform a novelty number. There will be a variety of solos, duets and instrumentals to entertain you. Light refreshments will be served following the program.Wednesday, Feb. 5 College presents dinner theaterThe College of Central Florida Foundation will present its 16th annual Dinner Theatre production, Theres a Burglar in My Bed by Michael Parker, Feb. 5-9 in the Webber Center at the Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. College Road. Evening performances, Wednesday through Sunday, begin with dinner at 5:45 p.m. Matinee performances, Saturday and Sunday, will serve lunch at 12:15 p.m. Doors open 15 minutes prior to the scheduled meal times. A full schedule is available at www.cf.edu/foundation, then Events. Tickets range from $55 to $60 and guests can also reserve an entire table. Theres a Burglar in My Bed is a farce about the world famous Worthington necklace. The trysts, the plans and counter-plans all take place at the Worthingtons 200-acre Massachusetts estate with its 26bedroom mansion. This years production benefits CF Fine Arts programs and college educational programs through the CF Foundation. For more information or for tickets, call Laura Wright at 352-854-2322, ext. 1416. To sponsor a table, contact the CF Foundation at 352-854-2322, ext. 1689. Saturday, Feb. 15 Valentine Day Dance at St. JudeSt. Jude Marion Oaks Knights of Columbus Council 15644 are having their first Valentines Day Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15, from 6 to 11 p.m. at the St. Jude Catholic Community Parish Hall, 443 Marion Oaks Drive in Marion Oaks. There will be music, hors doeuvres and dancing. Seating is limited. Tickets are $10 per person and are available after the Sunday Masses or by calling Ron at 352-861-1373, Joe at 352307-3848 or Ed at 352-861-6720. Join us for a night of fun and dancing with your sweetheart. HAPPENINGScontinued from Page 5 Southwest Christian Churc hSunday, Jan. 5: Sunday School classes for children, youth, and adults meet at 9:30am. Worship Service begins at 10:30 a.m. with staffed nursery and childrens classes available during worship. Evening worship begins at 6 p.m. with study in the book of James taught by Alvin Gloer. Visitors are always welcome to worship with us and to attend all other scheduled services. Wednesday, Jan. 8: Adult Bible Study in the Fellowship Hall at 7 p.m.; Youth activities beginning at 7 p.m.. Monday, Jan. 20: On this day we celebrate the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Our country has truly been blessed with leaders such as Dr. King, who have been willing to give their lives in pursuit of peace, freedom and liberty for everyone. May we remember always this great leader who has helped us all to live and enjoy the kind of life our Lord God and our founders intended for us. Tuesday, Jan. 21: Christian Womens Fellowship (CWF) meets at the church from 9:30 to 11:45 a.m. Business meeting begins at 9:30 with Bible Study immediately following. Religion Friday Jan. 31: Golden Servants (seniors 55+) meet at 6 p.m. in the church Fellowship Hall for a carr y-in dinner with a program following dinner. Bring your favorite dish and enjoy an evening of fun with friends. You do not have to be a member of SWCC to attend. Guests and friends are welcome. Southwest Christian Church, 9045 SW 60th Ave. (South off State Road 200), Ocala 34476, phone 352861-9080, http//www.swccocala.com.First CongregationalBegin the new year with a refreshing look at the historical Jesus with a look at the political climate of the day. Ponder the questions of why Jesus came when he did, why the confluence of the Baptism movement of John and why the Kingdom movement of Jesus. The First Light Bible Discussion at First Congregational Church (7171 State Road 200) will be presented from Jan. 5 through Feb. 23, each Sunday at noon. This 8week DVD and group discussion program was developed by John Dominic Crossan and Marcus Borg, two of the worlds leading theological scholars. Crossan, a scholar, historian of early Christianity, and a former Catholic priest, is professor Emeritus of Biblical Studies at De Paul University, and widely regarded as the premier Jesus scholar in the world. Borg is a New Testament scholar, theologian, author and former Hundere Distinguished Professor of Religion and Culture at Oregon State University (retired 2007). Christ Churc h of Marion CountyWednesday Jan. 1, 2014: HAPPY NEW YEAR! Thursday, Jan. 2: P raise and Prayer Group, 9 a.m. Friday Jan. 3: Sharing Hope Soup Kitchen, 11:30 a.m. Friday Jan. 3: THE KINGSMEN Concert, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 5: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m., W orship Service, 10:30 a.m. P ACK THE PANTR Y SUNDA Y. Tuesday Jan. 7: Women s Crafts, 11:30 a.m. Wednesday Jan. 8: Bible Study, 7 p.m. Christs Church of Marion County, 6768 SW 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182 or http://www.ccomc.org/.St. J ude CatholicThe Bereavement Group for those grieving the loss of a loved one meet on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month. Meetings are open to anyone in the community with a need to share their feelings of grief. If you plan to attend, please call the church office at 352-347-0154 prior to the meetings. Creole Masses for the Haitians in our community are celebrated every second and fourth Sunday of the month at 5 p.m. The next dates are Jan. 12 and 26. Anthonys Attic, our venue for used items, continues to be open every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to noon and Saturdays from noon to 3 p.m. It is now located on the north side of the building for your shopping convenience.College P ark Churc hCollege Park Church is pleased to announce that on Sunday, Jan. 12, it will be going to two services. The day of worship will begin at 9:30 a.m. with a traditional style service featuring many of the great hymns that are known and loved by many. Sunday school classes will immediately follow the traditional service. Then a new casual style service will begin at 11:15 a.m. called Cross Training at College Park Church. It will feature the contemporary praise and worship songs of today lead by the College Park Church praise and worship band. The ministry staff of College Park Church includes senior pastor Dr. James L Fleming, associate pastor and youth minister Keith Mitchell, and worship leader Kelly McVey. The church is non-denominational Christian in theology and practice, but is not an independent church. The congregation is vitally connected with 2,300 other congregations whose general offices are in Anderson, Indiana. The decision was made to go to two services in an effort bring more people to Christ by offering more options for them to attend on Sunday mornings. The Cross Training service will offer a unique style with a casual atmosphere that invites people to come as they are. It has long been a mission of College Park Church to reach the students of the College of Central Florida given the churchs close proximity to the CF campus. College Park Churchs worship leader Kelly McVey (who was included as a top four finalist in the JoyFMs cellphone superstar contest this summer) is also a student at the College of Central Florida. Worship is a vital part of being a Christian and Im so thrilled that we are starting this additional worship service. I think its great for new comers or even people who have been attending the church for years to have a couple of options when choosing the worship style they prefer.(McVey) College Park Church of God is at 3140 SW 26th St., Ocala, (right across the street from the CF bookstore). The office phone number is 352-237-2247 and church website is www.collegeparkchog.org.Peace LutheranGet in Touch W ith Your F aith, a Christian information class starting at Peace Lutheran Church on Thursday, Jan. 16, at 6 p.m., might well be called Christianity 101. Pastor T erry McK ee will conduct the class for 1 hour each week, for 12 to 16 weeks, depending on the questions and desires of the group. Everyone is welcome; your level of participation is optional, and there will be no tests. Come and explore your faith, and its place in your everyday life. Y ou have questions? God has answers but do you sometimes feel that He is not listening? Join and enjoy this informal class led by Pastor McK ee. There is no fee or obligation for the class. Simply register by calling the church office at 352489-5881, and come to Peace Lutheran, 7201 S. U.S. Highway 41 (The church on the hill, 5 miles north of Dunnellon) at 6 p.m. on Jan. 16. More information is available through the church office, or visit www.P eaceLutheranOnline.com and www.TinyURL.com/P eace41-40.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 1, 2014 3 10 W ednesday, January 1, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Its a good time to take a much-needed break from your recent hectic schedule and spend some time in quieter surroundings. Important news could arrive early next week. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) The Taurean traits of reliability and thoroughness could be well-tested when decision-makers consider your proposals and/or requests. Be prepared to answer some probing questions. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A sudden attack of boredom leaves you with some tasks undone. Its OK to take a short respite. But get back to work by weeks end so that you have time for other projects. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Avoid prejudging a situation just because it looks bad. Facts could emerge that would make your position uncomfortable, to say the least. A relative has interesting news to share with you. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) This is a good time to begin reassessing some of your recent decisions about your long-range goals to see if they still have merit. Spend more time with loved ones this weekend. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) An unsettled situation at home or on the job early in the week could drain your energy levels, making it difficult to get your work done on schedule. But things improve by midweek. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) A temporary setback could give you time to go over your plans to find weaknesses you might have overlooked before. A romantic getaway with that special person is favored this weekend. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Professional and personal situations benefit once you set a positive tone in getting things off to a good start. Honest dialogue smoothes over any display of balkiness. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) A problem with workplace colleagues or family members seems to defy even your sage counsel. But be patient. Your words will lead to a resolution. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Dont just wait out that unexpected and unexplained delay in your career move. You could gain added respect if you ask why it happened and what you can do to move things along. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Although your workplace strategies usually are accepted, you could be challenged by someone who isnt so favorably impressed. Be prepared to defend your positions. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Your friendship circle expands, with new people coming into your life at this time. Welcome them warmly. 000GZ1C VILLAGES COMPUTER & REPAIR Computer Repair Custom Building Computer Classes Free Diagnostics Data Recovery Networking In Store Service or at Your Location FREE Service Calls to your house or business with this ad 7256 SW 62nd Ave., Suite 5, Ocala, FL 34476 email: villagescomputer@yahoo.com Next to the neighborhood Storage on SR200 across from the Jasmine Plaza (352) 237-4852 (MOBILE) 352-426-1639 Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 000GYWF Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting Look for us on Facebook Look for us Look for us on Facebook on Facebook 000FYR5 The Truesdell Professional Building 200 N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Fl 34482 KELLEAN K. TRUESDELL, J.D., LLM Attorney & Counselor at Law (352) 873-4141 or KelleanTruesdell.com My Florida Estate Planning Workshop is available any day at any hour. Wills, Living Trusts, Financial and Medical Powers of Attorney, Probate, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, Asset Protection, Federal Death Tax Minimization, Trust Administration, Elder Law and Personal LifeCare Services. Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 www.jandjjewelersocala.com Store Hours: Tues-Fri. 10-5 Sat. 10-2 B UYING G OLD A ND D IAMONDS 000GZ8Z Reopening Jan. 7 Happy New Year Happy New Year Wishing you the very best in 2014. From Jeff, Jody and Judith 000GZQD Walk -Ins Welcome 854-653 1 Appointments Av ailable 61 60 SW Hwy. 200, Ocala, Suite 99 in the Ja smine Plaza There r eally is a difference in salons . JAIME SILV A Ma st er Stylist 18 Years Experience 854-653 1 by appointment please John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000GG44 Happy New Year! Now that we have adjusted to writing 2013, we get to change it to 2014! There are some big things coming our way in Quail Meadow this year. The first such event is the Mortgage Burning Party on Saturday, Jan. 11. Yes, the mortgage on the clubhouse is Paid in Full. The festivities will begin at 5 p.m. when we will raise the flag, dedicate the Clubhouse and burn the mortgage with special music by the Rowdy Boys Barber Shop Quartet. Rev. William Harrel, a QM resident, will officiate at the dedication ceremony. Following the outside activities we will go into the hall for more songs and appetizers to whet your appetite for the chicken marsala dinner catered (back by popular demand) by D & R Party Planning. Also, back by popular demand the R Music For You group will provide music for an evening of singing and dancing. The appetizer, dinner and entertainment ticket is $8 for everything. Please note: you do not need to bring table service it will be provided. For appetizer and entertainment only (no dinner) the ticket is $3. Tickets are available from Carol Sjogren and Charlotte Payne. Please get your tickets early; cut-off date is Jan. 7. Now that Christmas is over, its time to take down and put away the decorations. We will do this at the clubhouse on Thursday, Jan. 2. If you would like to help, please meet at the clubhouse at 7 p.m. Would you like to line dance? Marlene Cigrand will begin teaching line dancing at the clubhouse on Thursday, Jan. 9. If you are interested, be at the clubhouse at 7 p.m.; class will last for one hour. The January Ladies Luncheon will be on Friday, Jan. 10, at The Olive Garden. Please make your reservations with Maryanne Ellner. There is an unknown Good Samaritan, who we think lives in Ocala Palms. A few weeks ago Ralph Church, unknowingly, lost his billfold (apparently he put it on his car, forgot it, and drove off). Ralph received a call from the Ocala police that his billfold had been turned over to them by Mr. Anonymous. Nothing was missing! Ralph is most grateful to this unknown person and would like to let him know how thankful he is; so thank you Mr. Anonymous. We hope each of you have a safe, and healthy New Year! Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb Mortgage burning party scheduled for Jan. 11 During this time of the year, a certain controversy raises its ugly red-scarfed head. Year after year, this hullabaloo continues and nobody has taken the initiative to deal with this holiday wrangling. That is, until now. Normally, I am a mild-mannered person and just to be on the safe side, I stay out of telephone booths. You cannot be too careful, if you know what I mean. As a great philosopher once said, Ive stands all I can stand and I cant stands no more. This Christmas inequality has been going on for a very long time. It is about time somebody took some action in this regard. Since nobody else has the courage to take on this subject, I pick up my pen (actually its my computer keyboard) and duly attack the subject at hand. I know, as I begin, what I am going to say will not sit well with certain portions of the population. Some will even accuse me of jealousy and other foul attitudes. It just has to be said. This disparity is between Father Christmas and grandfathers. As a cardcarrying member of the grandfathers union (GFU), I feel I have the right to express my mind on this subject. In my opinion, Father Christmas is getting too much attention at the expense of Grandfathers everywhere. Sure, I give you that Father Christmas does have his place in our culture. I know children are enamored with him in his silly little red suit and funny hat. Just between you and me, no self-respecting grandfather would be caught dead dressed like Father Christmas. I will admit that some grandfathers dress rather silly and act even sillier. I believe I should set the record straight between Father Christmas and grandfathers. Let me compare these two right now and clear up this subject. Then you can be the judge. I have complete confidence in the intelligence of my readers. First, Father Christmas makes up a list of naughty and nice children. I feel, and I am speaking as a Grandfather, this is highly discriminatory. Children should not be subjected to such discrimination in this day of enlightenment. Today, children have it hard enough without this silly overweight elf from the North Pole putting undue pressure on them. Grandfathers love both naughty and nice children, especially the naughty. Grandfathers know naughty children need more attention. Second, Father Christmas only comes once a year. What I want to know is what he is doing the rest of the year. From the pictures I have seen, I am guessing it is not in the area of exercise. Grandfathers are around all the time, not just at Christmas. No matter what time of year, you can always find a grandfather, which is more than can be said of Father Christmas. Third, Father Christmas just brings toys in his huge bag. I grant you, some of these toys are terrific. I am not going to sell Father Christmas short on this aspect. I believe credit should be given where credit is due, unless it is my credit card. Grandfathers should get some recognition for other things that are just as wonderful. grandfathers, for example, are full of stories, jokes and a lot more. If the truth were known, Father Christmas does not have the time to tell a story to any child. I think this is sad. Sadder still, does he even know a story? Fourth, Father Christmas drives around in an old-fashioned sleigh powered by eight tiny reindeer, with no room to take children for rides. What is that all about? Nothing is more exciting for children than driving around with their grandfather, usually in some old pickup with an array of unidentifiable aromas. Whatever they are driving, the ride always ends with ice cream. Try getting Father Christmas to drive children for ice cream and see what he does. Fifth, Father Christmas, no matter where you see him, is always in a hurry. He never seems to have enough time to spend with children. Sure, toys are great, but no toy can equal time spent with a grandfather. One of the special things about a grandfather is he always makes time for children. God made grandfathers for children. Even though most grandfathers are hard of hearing, they always hear what is important. Sixth, Father Christmas, when his work is finished, lays his finger alongside of his nose and up the chimney he goes. Now that is fine, but it was a grandfather who invented the pull-myfinger joke. I know similarities exist between Father Christmas and Grandfathers. Both, for example, are rotund and quite jolly. Both love cookies. However, that just may be where the similarity ends. What people do not know, and I have this on good authority, Father Christmas always sends the Christmas bill to grandfathers. Of course, grandfathers do not complain about this for one moment. We are glad to help whenever we can; however, it would be nice to have a little bit of recognition during the Christmas holiday. One thing grandfathers can do Father Christmas cannot do is pray. Blessed are the grandchildren who have a grandfather who prays for them. Confess your faults one to another, and pray one for another, that ye may be healed. The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much. (James 5:16 KJV.) One righteous grandfather is worth all the Father Christmases in the world. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com. A grandfathers stand on the Father Christmas hullabaloo Out to Pastor Dr. James Snyder Enjoy a vibrant start to 2014 with the First Friday Art Walk on Jan. 3, from 6 to 9 p.m. Enjoy more than 50 individual artist displays, extended shopping hours, and live music on the downtown square. The January Art Walk is sponsored by Party Time Rentals. Unique offerings include: The 18 piece, Center Stage Band is performing Big Band Music on the Historic Downtown Square from 7 to 9 p.m. Free Childrens Art Activities on the Downtown Square presented by the Appleton Museum of Art. Dont miss one of the last opportunities to view the contemporary work of artist Peter Filzmaier in the first floor lobby of City Hall. Exhibit closes on Jan. 7. All work is for sale with 25 percent of the proceeds benefiting the City of Ocalas Art in City Spaces Program. The public may download an event map listing all artist locations at www.ocalafl.org/artwalk. First Friday Art Walk scheduled

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 1, 2014 11 2 W ednesday, January 1, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000GXYA National Cremation Society Considering Cremation? REGISTER TO WIN A FREE CREMATION PLAN Come join the National Cremation Society for a FREE Meal & Informational Seminar on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation. When the time comes wouldnt you prefer your loved ones celebrate your legacy rather than stress about making arrangements? Give them the relief theyll need during a tough time. Well discuss: Affordable options and savings Veterans benefits Worldwide Away-From-Home Protection And much more... RESERVATION REQUIRED Limited seating available. CALL NOW! 1-352-319-6816 First time attendees only please. *Free cremation does not include Travel Protection Plan. 000H0LJ $200 Promotional Discount to all Attendees Oasis Restaurant 7651 SW Hwy. 200 Mon., Jan. 6, 3:30pm Pavarottis Pizza 8075 SW Hwy 200 Tues., Jan. 7, 10:00am Red Lobster 3393 SW College Rd Wed., Jan. 8, 11:00am Reds Restaurant 8411 N. SR 200 Thurs., Jan. 9, 10:00am Thurs., Jan. 23, 10:00am TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.Be sure to check your advertisement the first da it appears. We will not be responsible for mor than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments ar made only for the portion of the ad that is in erroBeware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every effort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith aName Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTALFor your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 For your convenience, mail in with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 20441 E Pennsylvania Ave, Dunnellon, FL34432 or call... Todays New Ads AUTO SWAP/ CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. JAN. 5th. 1-800-438-8559 ALL CLASSES FOR 2014 Spring Hill & New Port Richey COSMETOLOGY BARBERING NAILS SKIN MASSAGE TherapyDAY & NIGHT SCHOOLFull Time & Part Time Full Specialty & Instructor Training BENES International School of Beauty www .benes.edu (727) 848-8415 (352) 263-2744 1 (866) 724-2363 TOLL FREE STATE APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING Become an Avon Rep Today! Free Training. $10 to join. Call Chuck (352) 503-4816. Independ. Avon Rep. BRAND NEW Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress Set $150. Still in Original Plastic. (352) 484-4772 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 WE B UY ALL A UT OS with or without titles ANY CONDITION Cindy (813) 505-6939 AUTO SWAP/ CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. JAN. 5th. 1-800-438-8559 CHRYSLER2012 Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs Call Tom for more info 352-325-1306 CHRYSLER2012 Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs Call Tom for more info 352-325-1306 Clean out your closets, go through your garage, attack your attic and then use the classifieds to get rid of stuff you no longer use. And the FREE listing means you have more money left over after the sale!You can list any single item priced under $100 for sale for FREE! PUT THE POWER AND CONVENIENCE OF THE CLASSIFIEDS TO WORK FOR YOU! Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANY ITEM PRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNS FOR 2 WEEKSFREE TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403 progress has been made on State Road 200 from Pine all the way to 66th, but after that there doesnt seem to be any organization. If a place such as New York City can synchronize its thousands of lights, we should be able to also. 6. Peace on Earth for all nations, an end to dictatorships that subject the people of certain nations to unbelievable conditions, and respect for life at all levels in all countries. In the words of the late Rodney King, who was once beaten by Los Angeles police, Why cant we all just get along. EDITORIALcontinued from Page 8 Undertrained primary-care physicians and wor ried parents default much too often to the diagno sis of ADHD and to the answer of a prescription. The next frontier is adult ADHD, with the promise of a vast new pharmaceutical market made up of people deprived of ADHD diagnoses when they were children. Some of these diagnoses will be warranted and life-changing, but others will be overreach prompted by vague and dubious symptoms, like inattentive op-ed reading. Sure, you got to the end of this article. But how about the next one? Rich Lowry is editor of the National R eview.(c) 2013 by King Features Synd., Inc. LO WRYcontinued from Page 8 Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com This year the neighbors of FFV outdid themselves in decorating their homes for the holiday season. The judging committee had a very difficult time in choosing the top three winners. Because of the tight competition, three other homes were chosen for honorable mention. First Place: Cesar and Lucila Perez, 5659 SW 57th Court. Second Place: John and Bernadette Ritchie, 5853 SW 56th Place. Third Place: Bruce and Nancy Taylor, 5813 SW 56th Place. Honorable Mentions: James and Roberta Helmich, Headley Wilson and Calvin McLean, Ken and Nina Stiles. This years annual Christmas Potluck Dinner on Saturday, Dec. 21, was a big success again. Everyone enjoyed all the fantastic dishes and desserts along with the fun of the conversations with other neighbors. It was very obvious that the holiday spirit was in abundance, but that was no surprise to those of us who have lived in Fairfield V illage for a long time or for those who are relatively new in our community. W e always try to live up to our reputation as the lively place filled with lovely people, and that is true again this holiday season. From these lively lovely people come wishes for a wonderfully Happy New Year Stay safe and look forward with us to a fantastic 2014. Fa ir field Vi ll age Chr istm as dec or at ion s w in ners chos en Fairfield Village Priscilla Barnett Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Second Place was won by John and Bernadette Ritchie. The spiral Christmas trees and beautifully decorated and lighted packages catch everyone's attention. The adorable little train to the left is a visual of many of the "Christmases Past" that we all remember. Congratulations to the Ritchies for a beautifully decorated home. Third Place was awarded to Bruce and Nancy Taylor. The huge whimsical snowman and candy canes attract the inner child still there in all of us. There were also other elements that added to the theme that the Taylors presented so effectively. Congratulations to Bruce and Nancy. Lil Oliver, left, and Diane Blanchette were the consensus winners of the unofficial Christmas Attire Contest at the Christmas Potluck Dinner on Dec. 21 in the Fairfield Village Clubhouse. Beautiful smiles, ladies!

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INDEX Fairfield Village..2 Quail Meadow......3 Rev. Snyder..........3 Ocala Palms........4 VOLUME 7, NUMBER 41 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014 Puzzles Page 10 ClassifiedsPage 1112 Wednesday, January 1, 2014 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000GY27 Wednesday, January 8 11am-3pm 1801 NW Hwy 19 Crystal River, FL Helping VeteransThe Greater Ocala Womans Club and The Pioneer Garden Club jointly presented a $400 check to the Ocala Ritz Veterans Village for the purchase of a bike rack for the veterans. The idea was generated by the generosity of Nancy and Scott Hutchinson. Pictured are GFWC members, Charlene Earl, Nancy Hutchinson, Rosalie Laudando, Sandra Stipins and President Scott Hutchinson. Pioneer Garden Club members pictured include Kimbra Danielson and Eileen Ferguson. First Vice President Dolly Rodriguez, Health Services Manager of the Ocala Ritz Veterans Village, accepts the donation. Fairfield Village home decoratingFirst Place winners are Cesar and Lucila Perez. The lovely home has a bit of a Hispanic flair to coincide with the fantastic Christmas decorations. The lighted flamingo to the left of the home has a personality all its own and sends greetings from Cesar and Lucila. Congratulations to the Perez family. More, Page 2. Marion County Hospital District Trustee Chairman Jon Kurtz announced that he has been notified by Health Management Associates, Inc. (HMA) that HMA has decided to defer approval of the proposed definitive agreement for the long-term lease of Munroe Regional Medical Center to Community Health Systems, Inc. (CHS). CHS is currently pursuing a merger with HMA, which is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2014. The proposed Munroe Regional lease agreement is contingent on the successful completion of the CHS/HMA merger, and Kurtz does not expect that CHS will take formal action on the lease agreement until after the closing of the CHS/HMA merger. CHS has communicated to Kurtz that it remains committed to completing the proposed lease transaction after the close of the CHS/HMA merger, pending Board approval, and that it remains excited about the opportunity to work with the medical staff and employees of Munroe Regional in their service to the community. Kurtz also indicated that the District stands ready to consummate the proposed lease agreement as soon as it receives approval from CHS and all necessary regulatory approvals have been obtained. For the second straight year, Marion Countys graduation rate surpassed Floridas state-wide average 76.74 percent compared to 75.57 percent. Last year, the numbers were 75.25 percent and 74.47 percent for Marion and Florida, respectively. From another perspective, Marions graduation rate has been climbing for years. Just five years ago, Marions graduate rate was significantly lower at 54 percent, far below the states 62.7 rate. See the graph attached to this release for an historical perspective. In addition, the number of students dropping out of high school is dropping even more 1.7 percent compared to last years 2 percent and also below Floridas 2 percent. Both numbers are significant when considering the overall effectiveness of public school programs in Florida. The federal graduation rate, now considered the standard in all states, includes standard diplomas but excludes GEDs and special diplomas. This cohort graduation rate is based on the percentage of students who entered ninth grade four years ago and received a standard high school diploma within four years. Dropout rates are based on the percentage of students who withdrew from high school within a school year but did not enroll in another educational program. Graduation and dropout rates reflect much more than just the hard work of high schools; from Pre-K through grade 8, educators, administrators, and support personnel lay the groundwork for success as students enter high school. For details, visit www.fldoe.org/ news/2013/2013_12_11.asp. First Congregational Church of Ocala, in furtherance of its Christian mission, presents the 2014 Ocala Social Justice Film Festival, featuring six films that focus on issues of social justice. Each of these films will be hosted by a facilitator, who will introduce the film and lead a short discussion following the film. Admission is free, but goodwill offerings will be gladly accepted. The schedule is as follows: Saturday, Feb. 1, PATHS OF GLORY Kirk Douglas plays a military officer who believes in the concept of military justice. Saturday, Feb. 8, MATEWAN This is an historically accurate account of the attempts of West Virginia coal miners to organize. The cast includes James Earl Jones and Chris Cooper. Saturday, Feb. 15, BOYCOT This film documents Dr. Martin Luther Kings leadership of the Montgomery bus boycott. Saturday, Feb. 22, THE MILAGRO BEAN FIELD WAR Directed by Robert Redford, this movie depicts a conflict between developers and a local Latino population. Saturday, March 1, PHILADELPHIA Featuring Tom Hanks and Denzel Washington, this movie examines longstanding prejudices against gay people. Saturday, March 8, CAPITALISM: A LOVE STORY Michael Moores satirical look at the American economic system. This movie questions many basic assumptions. Please join us each Saturday evening, From Feb. 1 to March 8, at 7 p.m. at First Congregational Church, 7171 SW State Road 200 (352-237-3035), for the 2014 Social Justice Film Festival. Hospital lease plan delayed County graduation rate surpasses Florida average Social justice film festival scheduled PHOTO BY ERYN WORTHINGTON/CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLEOcala man wins a carLove Honda in Homosassa made one mans Christmas a little sweeter Saturday. Shelton Peddle of Ocala won a tiger-eye-pearl 2013 Accord LXS two-door car after he shot a hole-in-one 154 yards from tee No. 8 at Candler Hills Golf Club in Ocala during the 10th annual Kinsey Lynn Bogart benefit in October. Pictured with Peddle is customer relations Jim DeSanti, left, and vice-president Chad Halleen, right. The Marion County Sheriffs Citizens Academy and Partnership (CAP) program, a free 12-week educational course about the operations of the Sheriffs Office, is accepting applications for the winter course. The class will be offered at three locations. The Marion County Sheriffs Office will host a Tuesday evening class from 6 to 8:30 p.m. beginning Jan. 28. The class will be held at MCSO Central Operations, 3300 NW 10 St., Ocala in the Multipurpose Conference Room. To register for this class, e-mail Jenifer Lowe at JLowe@marionso.com or call 352-368-3598. The Belleview Public Library, 13145 SE County Road 484 in Belleview, will host a class on Wednesday afternoons from 2 to 4:30 p.m. beginning Jan. 29. To register for this class, e-mail Jenifer Lowe at JLowe@marionso.com or call 352-368-3598. On Top of the World will host a class on Thursday mornings from 9 to 11:30 a.m. beginning Jan. 30 at its Master the Possibilities learning center. Registration for the OTOW class is open to the public but must be done through Master the Possibilities by calling 352-8543699 or online at MasterThePossibilities.com. All students must complete the application form found on marionso.com. During the program, MCSO staff will highlight all units within the Sheriffs Office, giving citizens an in-depth understanding of what the agency is doing for the community. Each week will focus on a different aspect of the agency, personnel, equipment, policies, procedures and overall function. Students will have an opportunity to view specialty unit equipment, hear from experts in the field of law enforcement, investigations, corrections and prosecution. After graduation, students will be offered an exclusive chance to obtain their concealed weapons license through a firearms safety course instructed by Sheriff Chris Blair. New Sheriffs Citizens Academy now signing up local residents Church launches new Spanish ministryCrossroads Church of God launches a new Spanish ministry with new Pastors Carlos and Eileen Lopez. Spanish services will be held on Sunday at 1 p.m. and on Thursday evenings at 7 we will conduct a Bible study. Pastors Carlos and Eileen Lopez invite you to come and grow with us in the coming year. You may contact them at 352-229-3920 or at Crossroads Church Of God 352-291-2080. PHOTO BY HARRY LAMB Registration for artists workshops offered by the Ocala Art Group the Winter/Spring of 2014 is now open for all artists 18 years or older as follows: Two Days-Robin Maria Pedrero Jan. 9 and 10 materials not included. Acrylic with mixed media. $140 members / $170 non members. One day-Maria Luisa De Curtis Feb. 13 materials included. Watercolor Batik, which are Kathie George original designs. Early Bird: $120 member / $150 non-members. After Feb. 13, $140 members/$170 non-members. Two Day Gloria Betlem April 10 and 11 materials not included Expressions in Pastels Early Bird: $120 Member / $150 non member materials not included After March 14: $140 member / $170 non member. The workshops are held at the Appleton Museum of Art, Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala, in the Art Space between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. The day before each workshop there will be a demonstration in the Appleton Auditorium open to current and newly joined members. Membership is $30. Pre-payment to each workshop is required; to register identify your choice and send payment to Workshops, 8264 115th St., Road, Ocala, FL 34481 or call Sharon at 352-527-9372. For more information visit www.ocalaartgroup.com. Workshops scheduled by Ocala Art Group Habitat for Humanity of Marion County is looking for volunteers to help in construction, fundraising, our ReStore, and for our up-coming Strawberry and Craft Festival. This is a great opportunity to start the year off by helping families in need in our community. If you are in need of community service hours or have a heart for families, Habitat is the place to be! Come make new friends, and have a great time. Habitat for Humanity needs your help to make a difference in Marion County! To find out about volunteering with Habitat for Humanity of Marion County, Inc. please visit our website at http://habitatocala.org/volunteer/ or call Brittney Fish, volunteer coordinator, at 352-351-4663. Habitat for Humanity of Marion County is a donor/volunteer-driven organization. We welcome people from all walks of life to join us as we build simple, decent, affordable housing in partnership with God and families in need. Habitat for Humanity is A Hand Up Not a Hand-out. Habitat for Humanity looking for volunteers Read the classifieds