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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100092/00135
 Material Information
Title: West Marion messenger
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Ocala, Florida
Publication Date: 04-24-2013
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00100092:00154


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INDEX Quail Meadow......5 Fairfield Village..5 Ocala Palms........5 Stone Creek........5 VOLUME 7, NUMBER 4 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 Puzzles Page 9 ClassifiedsPage 1012 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000EPV2 HOMES STARTING AT $32,900 BEST OF THE BEST 2014 J acobsen 3 BR/2 B A T his home w as built with 2 x 6 construction. Comes with China Labs sinks ceiling fan preps in all rooms 1 pc fiberglass tub and sho wer It is built b y the leg endar y J acobsen Homes with their 53 y ear tradition. T his is a limited oppor tunity Must see this home to appreciate its v alue! WE HA VE OVER 30 MODEL S ON DISPL A Y WE HAVE OVER 40 MODELS ON DISPLAY NEW HOMES STARTING AT $ 32,900 TAYLOR MADE SALE 2460 Sq. Ft. of living 4 bedroom, Playroom & Retreat. Open Great Room and Beautiful Kitchen with Upgraded Whirlpool Appliances/Fireplace and many more options. Comes with 2 x 6 walls and 2 x 8 floor joists. 11 TIME WINNER 352-621-9181 2012 2012 2012 2012 T A YL OR MADE HO MES www.taylormade-homes.com 7165 US Hwy. 19, Homosassa, FL 1 mile south of Howards Flea Market WE WANT TRADE-INS. BEST PRICES PAID! SALE PRICE Delivery & Set-up $ 48,900 OR ONLY $ 385 57 NO MONEY DOWN per mo. wac. with A/C, Stairs & Skirting. Use Land Equity. SALE PRICE Delivery & Set-up $ 98,900 OR ONLY $ 662 73 NO MONEY DOWN per mo. wac. with A/C, Stairs & Skirting. Use Land Equity. FREE WASHER & DRYER With ad. Must present coupon prior to purchase. Torch RunThe Law Enforcement Torch Run to boost Special Olympics took place in downtown Ocala last week. Above are the runners as they start out, and at the right is the entire group.PHOTOS BY RON RATNER PHOTOS BY JIM CLARKRelay for LifeThe American Cancer Society Relay for Life took place Friday, April 19, in front of West Marion Community Hospital. Above, the evening started with the Survivors Lap. They were led around the track by the West Port High School Army JROTC Color Guard. The jobless rate in March for Workforce Connections Citrus, Levy and Marion counties region was 7.8 percent, down 0.7 percent over the month and 2.4 percent lower than the same time last year. The unemployment rate for the region is the lowest since June 2008 when it was 7.7 percent. For the fourth consecutive month, the Ocala/Marion County metropolitan area led the state with the fastest jobgrowth rate at 3.3 percent, with 3,000 new jobs over the year. Floridas jobgrowth rate during the same period was 1.9 percent. According to Fridays release of the March 2013 unemployment rates by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO), Marion County posted an unemployment rate of 7.8 percent, a drop of 0.6 percent over the month and the lowest it has been since June 2008 when the rate was 7.6 percent; Citrus Countys rate fell 0.8 percentage points to 7.8 percent, the lowest since June 2008 (8.1 percent); and Levy County dropped 0.8 percentage points to 7.6 percent, the lowest since July 2008 (7.7 percent). Local rates are not seasonally adjusted. Floridas not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in March was 7.0 percent, the lowest since October 2008. The national rate was 7.6 percent in March. Rusty Skinner, Workforce ConnecCounty jobless rate falls Please see JOBLESS Page 4 Its high time for moms to be pampered. On May 9, Paddock Mall is the place to be as Simon Property Group, Inc. provides a free evening of relaxation and fun in honor of national Moms Nite Out. One hundred twenty nine Simon properties will be participating in this years event. The presenting sponsor of Simons Moms Nite Out celebration this year is Rethink Varicose Veins. At Paddock Mall, attendees will have the opportunity to participate in an exciting evening filled with refreshments, entertainment, fashion shows and beauty services, and prize giveaways all focused on rewarding Moms. The Paddock Mall event will take place Thursday, May 9, from 5 to 8 p.m. in Center Court. WOCA DJ Joe Martone will be on-hand to emcee the festivities! Moms are so incredibly deserving of a night off, said Brenda Cleary, director of marketing and business development at Paddock Mall, and it is our privilege to be the venue where they come to enjoy it. Cleary added that as an extra bonus, one lucky mom and her friend will be treated to a trip to Chicago to see Bon Jovis Because We Can tour at historic Soldier Field on Friday, July 12. Bon Jovis new release, What About Now is in stores now. Rethink Varicose Veins is an educaPrepare now for Moms Nite Out on May 9 at Paddock Mall Please see MOM Page 4 On Thursday, April 11, the residents of Stone Creek said farewell to Rick Morang, maintenance supervisor. Rick was at Stone Creek since its beginning. In a previous article I did about Rick, former Lifestyle Director Jennifer Geraldo referred to Rick as the go-to guy for any problems. Rick is the type of man who gives 110 percent to Stone Creek. Often times, he would be called back to help with an event problem and he never complained. Rick was extremely helpful to the Kitchen Committee and now the Kitchen Club as the club took on the role of custodian of the kitchen amenity. He was always there to correct a problem or gave great advice when needed. The Kitchen Club is sorry to see him leave as many others will be. The club presented Rick with a gift in appreciation for all he has done for the kitchen amenity to make it such a viable facility. Chris Johnson also presented Rick with a gift from the Stone Creek staff. Chris said, Rick was a tremendous asset to our Stone Creek community both in his job as Maintenance Supervisor, but as a friend as well. He will be greatly missed, and we wish him success in his new job. I would venture that many at Stone Creek residents agree with Chris statement. Rick will not be far from Stone Creek as he has taken over at the Fore Ranch Community. He has taken on a position as an Association Manager. The Fore Ranch Community will benefit from Ricks experience. When I asked Rick how his job at Stone Creek would prepare him for his new job, Rick said, During the past 6 years at Stone Creek has lead me into this position, by all the work that I did as Maintenance Manager and under the leadership of the Cams. I was able to be involved in many aspects of this role. Rick told me that he will miss all the friendships he has made here along with his coworkers and with the beauty of the facility. For the person who will follow in his footsteps, Rick has the following advice, Take pride in this community like its your own. When making decisions, be fair and consistent. Rick gives the following statement about the community he called home for the last six years. It has been a pleasure to work at Stone Creek and to grow with the community since its inception. The residents are fortunate to have such a wonderful and peaceful place to live. I am now looking forward to my new assignment as a community manager and will take all the great memories with me. Wishing the Stone Creek Community greatness. The Stone Creek Community wishes Rick much happiness in his new role and we will see him back on June 5 when he comes back for the weight loss challenge he has with Chris Johnson. When I first heard that Rick was leaving, I e-mailed and asked him if he was leaving because of the challenge. He told me he was going to win but I think he has some work ahead of him to beat Chris. June 5 will tell and we will all welcome Rick back at that time. I know many will have his number on speed dial because he has been such an important part of Stone Creek. Stone Creeks Go-to Guy leaves for Fore Ranch Stone Creek Patricia Gizzi Rick Morang Methodist Men serving up meatloafThe Mens group of the First United Methodist Church of Dunnellon will serve a meatloaf dinner April 26, 4 to 6 p.m. Tickets are $8 at the door. The dinner will be cooked by the churchs Master Chef Charles Scearce.The church is at 2501 W. State Road 40, Dunnellon.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 11 2 W ednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO ADVERTISECall854-3986 ADVER TISING 3 5 2 4 6 5 7 5 3 8 352-465-7538 20312 E. Pennsylvania Ave. www.bluerunbicycles.com Featuring Bikes For Every Rider! Springtime is 000ENII RIDE TIME 000EMK3 P r om/Homec oming and Quinc eaner a Dr esses 10% Off with this ad 7470 SW 60th A v enue (352) 671-1890 Monda y Satur da y 10am-5pm SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 000EM60 000EM60 Florida Window Medics, Inc. Screen Rooms Acrylic & Glass Rooms Rescreens Broken Glass Replacement Windows Gutters Foggy Windows Cement Sliding Glass Door Repair Call & speak directly to the owner David Heath Comp. #5524 352 484-5697 WINDOW REPAIRS 000EJLN GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 7 9 5 $ 7 9 5 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RA Y RAY RA YC C C C C C ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION Crayconst.com Crayconst.com Crayconst.com T rade in your old vinyl windows for acrylic or glass 1 6 x 7 S L I D I N G G A R A G E S C R E E N D O O R 1 6 x 7 S L I D I N G 16 x 7 SLIDING G A R A G E GARAGE S C R E E N SCREEN D O O R DOOR 000EIY5 L EE S P RESSURE W ASHING L OW W AT E R U SAGE 489-67 86 Licensed & Insured PRESSURE CLEANING Quality W ork For Low Prices! No Pressure Roof Cleaning! Painting Metal Scrap Pickup 000EGSJ 000EE5F IRRIGA TION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGA TION 3398 S.W 74th A ve., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 SPRING Special Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor W e will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2012 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $ 39 99 Call for details Expires 4/30/2013 10% OFF r epairs 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000DZWC CONCRETE WORK REP AIRING OLD INST ALLING NEW W e Make Y our Concrete Look Good Specializing in Repairing Concrete Driveways Pool Decks Patios Entrance Ways Advantages: Mildew & Oil Resistant Non Skid Protection Easy to Keep Clean Commercial Grade Quality RENEWED SURF ACES 000EHW9 PLUMBING EP A Lead Certification #NA T -1 13266-1 OSHA 10 #1216933 Fla. Lic. #CFC1427666 804-9165 Associated P lumbing and Pipe F r om Ba thr oom R emodeling to Fixing Leak y F aucets, and installing Bliss W alk-in T ubs Residential and Commercial 71 1 185 DIALAPRO F o r Y o u r P r o f e s s i o n a l N e e d s For Y our Pr ofessional Needs W E S T M A R I O N M e s s e n g e r WEST MARION Messenger 000EP A C NOW BUYING GOLD, PLA TINUM, SIL VER, FLA TW ARE, COINS, DIAMONDS, W A TCHES & GOLD-FILLED JEWELR Y YOUR UNW ANTED JEWELR Y COULD BE WOR TH LOTS OF MONEY! 6333 SW ST A TE ROAD 200 854-66 22 WE CAN COME TO YOU! SELL YOUR GOLD & SIL VER WHILE PRICES ARE STILL HIGH SELL YOUR GOLD & SIL VER WHILE PRICES ARE STILL HIGH Open MF 9-5 We buy large diamonds 1 CT or larger We buy all premium watches and all gold watches US & Foreign Silver Coins US & Foreign Gold Coins Stamped Sterling Flatware & Service Sets C A S H H A N D E D O U T O N T H E S P O T C A S H H A N D E D O U T O N T H E S P O T CASH HANDED OUT ON THE SPOT 8k, 10k, 14k, 18k, 22k, 2 4k, Dental Gold & Platunum W ANT TO KNOW WHA T S IN THA T OLD JEWELR Y BOX ? L ET US HELP C ALL 854-6622 T ODA Y N O A PPOINTMENT N ECESSAR Y Between Queen Of Peace & Flowers Bakery WE PAY CASH Another great night at the clubhouse! The Hobo potluck dinner and then the concert by Vincenzo Bartolomea Basile were fantastic. There were many hobos at the party. Did you recognize Pat Tobin? Many others, including Dot Roberts and Jack and Margene Sheidler, were all decked out as street people. Approximately 60 residents and guests enjoyed the concert by Mr. Basile, who is billed as a Romantic Baritone from Brooklyn, New York. His selections included Spanish Eyes, Because of You, My Way, Falling In Love With You, Ava Maria, and ended the evening by singing The Lords Prayer. At one point in the program he even serenaded Rita Carr with a song in Italian. There were many door prizes won by various residents; you guess it: fifty/fifty was won by Earle Talley! Remember the next big event is the Vegas Night with a catered dinner and entertainment by Sally Langwah. Tickets are available from Charlotte Payne, Marie Schneider, and Carol Mowrey.Ladies Lunc heonThe April Ladies Luncheon was enjoyed by 20 women from our community. We had great food and service at the new Darrells Restaurant. Next months lunch will be at the Horse and Hound on Silver Springs Boulevard. Call Marion Gartman or Pat Tobin for reservations.Mount Dora tripW ould you be interested in a trip to Mount Dora? The R ed Hot F illies are sponsoring a trip by chartered bus on May 14. If you would like to go with us, please contact Carolyn Slocumb. Cost for the bus trip is $27. Our thoughts and prayers go out to those affected by the murderous attack in Boston. God Bless America! H o b o po t l u ck dinn e r e n t e r t ain s a t Q uai l M e ad o w Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb This was the gathering of the Ladies Luncheon from Quail Meadow which took place at Darrells Diner. Jack & Margene Sheidler. Above, Pat Tobin. At left, Vincenzo Basile.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 3 10 W ednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. EMPTYTRUCK Returning to Milwaukee, Chicago, Mid West Can move 1 item or whole household (414) 520-1612 Brian Bnet CARE MANAGERThe Centers is seeking a Bachelors level Care Manager to coordinate mental health svcs for children enrolled in Behavioral Health Network. Extensive travel required in Citrus & Hernando Counties. Use of personal vehicle reqd., State mileage rate pd. Work hours dictated by caseload. Please submit salary. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us CLERICALThe Centers is seeking a clerical Program Assistant to work in a fastpaced outpatient setting in Lecanto. This position requires strong customer service skills, attention to detail, ability to work independently and multi-task. HS diploma or GED equiv & 2 yrs exp reqd. Salary is $9-10/hr.Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify Fax or e-mail resume to HR, The Centers, Inc. (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us TBOSS TherapistThe Centers is seeking Masters Level Therapist for TBOSS position in Marion and Citrus Counties. Must have Masters in a related field of Human Services and min 2 yrs exp working with adults, children & adolescents providing individual, group & family therapy. Incentive Opportunity Available. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us TRANSPORTER/GENERALISTThe Centers is seeking a Transporter/Generalist for our Lighthouse program in Inverness. This position provides members (mentally ill adults) with transportation, and participates as a Generalist in the program based on the Clubhouse model of a work ordered day.Some evening and weekend work required. Salary is $8.25-$9.00/hr. Acceptable driving record & clean background reqd. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify Fax or e-mail resume to HR, The Centers, Inc. (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us ASSIST SENIORSWe provide non-medical companionship and home help for seniors. Day, weekend and overnight shifts available. Join our special team of CAREGivers today.352-622-5936Lic. #HCS229393 ALLAUTOS WANTED with or without title. Any cond. make or model. We pay up to $10,000 and offer free towing. (813) 505-6939 OAK RUN COUNTRY CLUBWOW! 3 Bedroom Golf Course Home 2 Car garage, firepace & pool table, use of all amenities, golf course, 4 swimming pools, 1 indoor, tennis courts, jacuzzi, driving range, restarant & health clubs, all lawn, maint, included $1,100. No smoking, No Pets, Available April 15th (443) 299-2047 LET USWORK FORYOU!CALL TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403West Marion Messenger Classifieds Get Results! PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real est ate advertising in this newsp aper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limit ation or discrimination based on race, color religion, sex, handicap, familial st atus or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limit ation or discrimination. Familial st atus includes children under the age of 18 living with p arent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newsp aper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real est ate which is in violation of the law Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newsp aper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing imp aired is 1-800-927-9275. 2355 S. Ripple Path Crystal River, 34429 Great Marine Mech, Boat storage and launch site for nearby scallops plus fishing & kayaks, Lgr bldg w/ 3/18rollups office tlr & boat ramp, $169k, finance poss. call 352-634-3862 HOMOASASSA 5+ DEN BEDROOMS. 3 bath. THIS HUGE AND BEAUTIFUL TWO ST OR Y HOME WITH 3 CAR GARAGE IS OVER 3500 SQ. FT HOME BACKS UP T O A NATURE PRESER VE. HOME IS A FORECLOSURE SHOR T SALE AND THE BANK IS WORKING WITH THE SELLERS. THIS HOME W AS BUIL T IN 2005. dennis_nef f@yahoo.co m BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 STUMP GRINDINGCALL JIM FOR FREE ESTIMA TES (800) 478-8679 T rimming,Removal and Debris Clean Up. Reliable Service,Reasonable Prices. Lic/Ins 20 yrs Exp.FREE Estimates. Residential/Commercial. 352-445-7916 or 352-292-5446 Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKSFREE TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403 Somebody else wants it!Got something special you no longer use? Sell it in the Classifieds. It may be just the perfect item to fill somebody elses need.TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 000EFNB FREE T O THE PUBLIC April 27, 2013 10:30am Dunnellon Public Library Meeting Room 20351 Robinson Road, Dunnellon Friends of the Dunnellon Public Library Present: William and Sue Wills as President Franklin our 32nd President and First lady Eleanor. Presidents and Their First Ladies, dramatically speaking is the creation of the veteran acting and writing team of the Wills. The couple are now in their 16th year of bringing to life the stories of Presidential couples. The Wills are not impersonators, their costumes, dialects, and demeanors recreate these historical characters. Mr. and Mrs. Wills have performed in over 30 performances at seven of the nations Presidential Museums. William researches and creates scripts while Sue edits his work and creates the costumes. Sometimes forgotten are the young people who met, fell in love and the years of triumphs and tragedies that shaped their personalities and their relationship which led up to the 1932 election and their 12 years as First Couple. The focus will be on their private side and how that affected their public lives. For additional information contact the library at 352-438-2520 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 Readers Choice Winner Jewelry Store 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12 www.jandjjewelersocala.com Thank You For Voting Us Readers Choice #1 Jeweler For 6 Consecutive Years 000EL0I STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 000EGB4 John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000EHZ7 Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 000EN8O Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting Look for us on Facebook Look for us Look f or us on Facebook on F ace book 000EL19 The Truesdell Professional Building 200 N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Fl 34482 KELLEAN K. TRUESDELL, J.D., LLM Attorney & Counselor at Law (352) 873-4141 or KelleanTruesdell.com My Florida Estate Planning Workshop is available any day at any hour. Wills, Living Trusts, Financial and Medical Powers of Attorney, Probate, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, Asset Protection, Federal Death Tax Minimization, Trust Administration, Elder Law and Personal LifeCare Services. 352-875-7433 875-7041 Interior & Exterior 000EPDN 22 Yrs. of Excellent Local References Hi Ocala Palms Neighbors For almost a decade Ive been in this neighborhood doing interior and exterior painting, THANK YOU all very much for your support and trust. Im looking forward to continue serving you and doing my very best of high quality work. Sincerely, A L C AS T ANO P AINTING I NC P AINTING I NC brary, then there wasnt an explosion; there were 120 people hurt, then there were 70, then it was over 100 again; there were three unexploded devices found, then there were none, then there were two that were detonated by police, then it turns out they were not bombs; cell phone service was cut off to avoid remote detonation of additional bombs, then it was restored (Sprint and Verizon both said that their cell phone service was never interrupted). So now we wait for the follow-ups, possible arrests, etc. There is no doubt that the explosions were another in a long list of terrorist tragedies. There is also no doubt that, for a while, we will be inundated with rumors and unconfirmed facts. We just need to accept that there are bad people in the world, and we need to be ever vigilant to lessen their impact on society. And we dont need the networks to tell us that. EDITORIALcontinued from Page 8 them, etc. A couple hundred years ago Americans needed protection from the Native Americans, who were fighting to keep their land from being poached by invaders from Europe. Now, Americans need protection from the Native American-run casinos, so the people dont get their savings poached by those who run the gambling establishments. Just like the game of cowboys and Indians, this is a battle for survival, especially for senior citizens. But unlike those childhood games, once someone is down, they may not necessarily get up.Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger. CLARKcontinued from Page 8 Regretfully, we have been destroying our core values since the s beginning with allowing our courts to take student prayer out of our schools. We sat back and let it happen and they have been going downhill ever since. Too many now want God out of our lives and our decision making, moving the accepted norm in nearly all areas of our life, including the family. If I wanted to destroy America, I would do the following: change our value system through the destruction of our morals, removing God from our lives; destroy our capitalist system through massive debt; decimate our health care system (Obama Care); create a welfare society that is dependent on government ; fan the fires of class warfare and bite by bite, disarm our citizens. Lastly, I would take over the education of our children, from a very early age so they could be indoctrinated into my way of thinking. In other words, exactly what Obama is trying to do! Thats why I and so many others that love America and have faith in God dislike Obama. We dont need another reason, thats reason enough! Wayne Rackley Oak Run LETTERScontinued from Page 8 This Saturday between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., the Fairfield Village SAC will be sponsoring its semi-annual yard sale. Again this year, a hot dog lunch will be for sale in the Fairfield Clubhouse for a very reasonable price. Hot dogs, chips and a soft drink along with assorted sweets and desserts will enable buyers and sellers to continue through the morning and lunch time to participate in a chance for super big bargains! Everyone is invited to come to Fairfield Village (off Southwest 60th Avenue) and survey the numerous bargains that will be offered in many of the carports of the 280+ homes in Fairfield Village. Last year, there were all kinds of household items, clothing, tools, electronic equipment, decorator items, furniture, knick-knacks, and handmade items. There will be literally something for everyone so everyone should come to find their own personal treasures. Proceeds will go toward helping to sponsor Social Activities Committee activities. Those activities coming up in the next few months include: the Memorial Day picnic, the 4th of July barbecue, and the Labor Day cookout. All of the FFV community looks forward to these gatherings each year, but many of the fund-raising activities are as enjoyable as the events themselves. So, if you have any inclination toward bargains...come on down! You will be glad that you did.Saturday dinnerIn other news from Fairfield Village, the Saturday night pot luck dinner was quite successful on April 19. Granted, there were fewer people in attendance than usual, but the food and the fun was not diminished in the least. There was delicious food, interesting conversations, a 50/50 winner (Toni Belcher), and musical background by virtue of the new TV which has been installed in the main room of the Clubhouse. The number had no influence on the fun which was quite pleasant. All neighbors are reminded to check out next months pot luck dinner schedule. These are normally held on the third Saturday evening of the month. Please come and enjoy time with friends and neighbors while enjoying really good home-cooked food.HOA meetingThe regular Fairfield Village HOA meeting was held on Thursday evening, April 17 at 6 p.m. in the Clubhouse. To say that the meeting was lively would be an understatement. Those there were part of what could be described as an informative evening for sure. Some would say that it involved some differences of opinion, and that would not be wrong. However, in the final analysis, some new information was shared, some difficult decisions were made, and some new perspectives came closer to being understood. It would be incorrect to say that everyone was totally pleased with all the decisions and all the outcomes, but it would be correct to say that many compromises were made so that everyone got something that could be considered a win or a victory. Board member, Kerry Breedon, shared information about a wish list that many attendees had previously not known existed. It seems that American Land Lease asks the HOA to prepare a yearly list of things that the neighbors of FFV would like to have included as amenities for the entire community. It may have been because of lack of communication that many of those attending had not even known that there was such a thing as this wish list. As in the past, the HOA Board submitted a list to the management company for possible addition to/for the community. The deadline date this year was Friday, April 18, so adding to this years list was not the point in Kerrys presentation. However, he said that he wanted to let everyone know what was being submitted this year and to make sure that more FFV neighbors could be involved in next years submitted list. This list is for the good of the whole community, not just for those things thought of by the HOA Board. To make the submission more nearly universal, the HOA Board would like for all members of the FFV community to think seriously about things that could be purchased, improved, or added to the community and then contact an HOA Board member with those suggestions over the next months. Granted, it will be a year before the next list is submitted, but that also means that there is plenty of time for neighbors to think seriously about this and present viable options for consideration. The HOA members are available for conversations about this list or about any things that should be brought to the Boards attention. They urge FFV neighbors to feel welcome to contact them either individually or collectively. It would be a big help if these comments or wishes were also presented in written form so that they will be completely understood.Piano progressJean Chapman reports that much progress has been made toward the purchase of a piano for the main room of the FFV Clubhouse. The fund-raiser piano dance party was a success and more individual pledges and donations have been received. As more information about the options become available, they will be reported so that those interested members of the community will be kept aware of what is transpiring. Anyone with information that would be valuable for the group sponsoring the piano is urged to contact Jean Chapman, Loretta Zang, Sandy Williams, or Linda Urbonowitz. Any of these ladies will pass the information along in order to be sure that the best possible choice is made in the purchase, transporting, and appropriate set up of the piano. These people and many others are so looking forward to the time that all FFV neighbors can enjoy the piano.AgainWe hope to see many people at our yard sale on Saturday, April 27 between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Come on down and check out the bargains and meet the nice people who live in Fairfield Village...Marion Countys ...lively place filled with lovely people. Have a great week! The price is right! Come on down to Fairfields big yard sale Fairfield Village Priscilla Geissal Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com The American Cancer Societys Manto-Man Ocala group will meet on April 24 at 7 p.m. at the Urology Health Team, 3201 S.W. 34th St., Ocala. This is a prostate cancer education and support group that meets monthly, has speakers and refreshments and wives/caregivers are also welcome. There is a fledgling website http://www.mantomanocala.weebly.com April Guest Speaker: Dr. Mario R. Putzeys-Alverez Open Forum Discussion Prostate Cancer. For information contact Mickey Weller, 352-369-9486. Cancer Society Man-to-Man group to meet Read the classifieds

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tions chief executive officer, said the data supports past movements in the region. We are seeing continued positive signs with employment growth from last month in all three counties, certainly in terms of the drops in the number of unemployed and increases in the number of those with jobs, Skinner said. The labor force showed slight expansion in Citrus and Levy counties and remained virtually unchanged in Marion County. There have also been a number of employers hiring in the area, Skinner said, including R & L Trucking, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Ocala and Lockheed Martin. In March, a total of 481 employers posted 1,583 jobs with Workforce Connection, up from 1,443 jobs in February and a 22 percent increase over the year. Skinner said that news of the positive trend was not unexpected, noting that last week the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the Ocala Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) had the second largest overthe-year unemployment rate decrease in February (-2.4 percent) among the nations 372 metropolitan areas, just behind Yuba City, Calif., (-2.5 percent). Out of a slightly expanded regional labor force of 205,721, there were 16,013 unemployed, down 1,415 over the month and down 5,058 since March 2012. Here is how the employment numbers break down for each county in the Workforce Connection region: Marion Countys labor force also remained relatively stable, dropping by four to 133,116, the number of those with jobs rose by 862 to 122,749 and those who were unemployed fell by 866 to 10,367. That represents an over-the-year increase of 3,440 of those with jobs and a decrease of 3,432 in the number of unemployed when the unemployment rate was 10.4 percent. Two years ago, the unemployment rate of 12.8 percent two years ago when 17,002 were without jobs. While the Ocala MSA continued to hold the fifth highest unemployment rate among Floridas metro areas, total nonagricultural employment was 94,600, up 3.3 percent or 3,000 over the year. For the fourth month in a row, the Ocala metro area had the highest job-growth rate at 3.3 percent, followed by Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (+3.1 percent), and Jacksonville (+2.8 percent). The Ocala MSA also led the state in job growth-rate gains in financial activities (+7.5 percent) and had the second-highest in education and health services (+6.3 percent) for all metro areas in Florida. Eight major industries gained jobs over the year, led by education and health services (+900 jobs); trade, transportation and utilities (+700 jobs); leisure and hospitality (+500 jobs); financial activities and professional and business services (+300 jobs each); and mining, logging and construction, manufacturing and government (+100 jobs each). Information and other services remained unchanged over the year. Among Floridas 67 counties, Marion Countys unemployment rate was the 13th highest, Citrus County remained 11th highest and Levy County dropped from 15th to 17th. Workforce Connection is the local, business-led organization that strives to connect qualified workers with local employers in Citrus, Levy and Marion counties through cost-effective, high quality employment, training and education services in partnership with businesses, community-based organizations, educational institutions and governmental agencies. On average, more than 36,000 career seekers and 1,500 businesses receive services each year. To obtain full copies of the March 2013 unemployment reports or to find out more about upcoming events and services, visit www.WorkforceConnectionFL.com or call 1-800434-JOBS, ext. 1234. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 9 4 W ednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO ADVERTISECall854-3986 ADVER TISING 000E1IT Where JESUS is LORD, and YOU are Loved. Services: Sunday School : 9:30am Morning W orship: 10:30am Thursday: 6:00pm Meeting at: 145 S.W 78th Court Ocala, Florida 352-690-7596 B I B L I C A L F O U N D A T I O N C H U R C H 000EF6C 8070 SW 60th Ave. Ocala, FL 34476 352-291-2080 SERVICES HOURS Sunday 9am, 11am, 6pm 1:30 Spanish Service Tuesday 7pm Spanish Service Wednesday Night 7pm Youth 7pm Thursday Bible Study 6:30 to 7:30 Friday 7pm Spanish Service Nursery available www.crossroads.cog.net WE WELCOME ALL! Bishop Paul W oosley 000E79U St. Martins Church 950 N.W 70th Street (SR 326) Ocala, Flor ida 34475 352-351-8059 www .cac-ocala.org Service & Sunday School 10:00 a.m. V isitors Ar e Always W elcom e The Only Church of the True 1928 Book of Common Prayer (Episcopal) Christ the King Anglican Church 000EPL Y Christ the King The Rev Donald J. Curran, Rector Services: Rite I 7:30 am Rite II 8:50 & 11:15 am Childrens Church 8:50 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary Anglican Chur ch 000DOX6 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www .ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS is discovered through worshiping together 71 1 187 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Dont waste your time and energy fretting over remarks you consider unnecessary or unkind. Best advice: Ignore them, and just keep doing your usual good job. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Getting that new perspective on a workplace situation could lead to a solution everyone will accept. Meanwhile, make time to keep up with your creative pursuits. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Those changes you planned to implement in early summer might need to be reassessed. But dont make any moves until youve discussed this with someone you trust. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Your aspects favor harmony, making this a good time to work out problems in relationships whether personal or professional. An old friend comes back. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) While youre still riding that high-powered beam, you might begin to lose focus by weeks end. Could be youll need to do a little cat-napping to restore your spent energies. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) An unexpected development creates a lot of excitement. Where it takes you is your decision. Check out the possibilities, then decide if you want to go with it or not. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Although your supporters help you squash an unfair claim against you, dont let this go unchallenged. You need to learn more about the motives of those behind it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) There are some tasks to clear up by midweek. Then you can welcome the new month on a high note. A friend brings surprising but very welcome news. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You might want to change your plans before theyre set in cement. Consider advice from colleagues. But remember that, ultimately, its your choice. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) A difficult situation is working itself out. Lingering problems should be resolved by weeks end, allowing the Goat to enjoy a calmer, less stressful period. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Be careful not to move so quickly that you miss possible warning signs that could upset your plans. Slow down. Your supporters will continue to stand by you. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Your generosity in sharing your time and wisdom with others leads to an intriguing development that could have you considering some interesting choices. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way of influencing people to be and do their best. You would make an excellent teacher. JO BLESScontinued from Page 1 tional campaign encouraging the more than 30 million Americans who suffer from venous disease, including varicose veins and chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), to rethink their condition and recognize it as a serious health concern. The campaign, led by a coalition of medical societies and sponsored by Covidien, encourages those with venous disease to learn more about their condition, find a vein specialist, and make informed decisions about the best, and often minimally-invasive treatment option for them. As part of the campaign, Olympic Gold Medalist Summer Sanders shares her personal story about the impact venous disease had on her life and the improvements she experienced following treatment. The Rethink Varicose Veins team will be at Moms Nite Out dispelling the myths about varicose veins and encouraging attendees to take a quick self-assessment to determine their risk for varicose veins and CVI. Taking the selfassessment will automatically enter attendees for an opportunity to win a spa getaway weekend at the Miraval Arizona Resort & Spa, Nov. 14-17. Or visit www.RethinkVV.com/escape for a chance to win. Originally organized by Maria Bailey, CEO of BSM Media, author and Mom Talk Radio host, National Moms Nite Out unites social media groups, companies, local playgroups, mom bloggers and networks in giving moms a well-deserved night off. Bailey brought the first National Moms Nite Out to life after watching moms take care of everyone else on Mothers Day, but never themselves. National Moms Nite Out is one of the largest cooperative efforts of Mommy groups, Mom-focused organizations and corporations, bloggers and vloggers all coming together for one great night in support of motherhood, Bailey said. MOMcontinued from Page 1 Thursday, April 25 Learn w hy its di fferent in FloridaLeague of Women Voters of Marion County presents Why don't they do things the way we did them back home?" It will be on April 25 at 4 p.m. at Cypress Hall, On Top of the World Communities, 8415 S.W. 80th St., Ocala. The event is free and open to the public. "Why don't they do things the way we did them back home?" It is a question asked every day by newcomers and notso-new folks, too. A city council, the county commission, the legislature or the governor's office regularly make decisions and take actions that affect our future. Come learn why Florida is different and find out who and what is responsible....and how it can be changed. Presenter: Judy Johnson, league member, attorney, former county commissioner in Marion County and a former school board member in Alachua County. She has been president of the Florida League of Women Voters and has a long standing interest in public policy at the local, state and national levels. Join us!Saturday, April 27 Concert band 2-day perf orm ancePlease join the Kingdom of the Sun Concert Band Swing into Spring concert series on Saturday, April 27 at 2 p.m. or Sunday, April 28 at 3 p.m., at the Marion Technical Institute (MTI), 1614 S.E. Fort King St., Ocala. All performances are free and open to the public donations are accepted.All church golf outingEveryone is invited to 'hit the links' Saturday morning, 11 a.m., at Royal Oaks Golf Club, Oak Run Country Club, to play 18 holes of golf, with cart, and share lunch. Enjoy a fun day of golf, Christian Fellowship and who knows: a hole in one? Prizes to be awarded. Those interested in lunch only are welcome. sFee per person includes 18 holes of golf, cart, lunch, tip and prizes. For reservations and additional information contact Bob Parizek at 352-8739149, Ray Westman at 352-208-9023 or Christ's Church of Marion County, 6768 S.W. 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182, www.ccomc.org/. Happenings

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Saturday, April 27 African Violet Club meetsThe African Violet Club of Ocala will meet Saturday, April 27, at 10:30 a.m. at the Marion County Sheriffs Office Brian Litz Substation, 9048 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. The program will be African Violet Growing Basics. There are many tips and tricks to African Violet growing and care. We made many new friends over the weekend at our African Violet show and sale including old pros and enthusiasts new to the hobby. This meeting is especially designed for newer or novice growers. However, everyone always discovers something new. More experienced growers will also explain some of their tips for success. Delicious light refreshments are served. Guests are always welcome. Check the website for more information at http://www.africanvioletclubofOcala.org.Sunday, April 28 Master Choir to performThe Central Florida Master Choir, conducted by Dr. Harold W. McSwain, Jr., will perform a concert on Sunday, April 28, at 3 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 1126 E. Silver Springs Blvd. across the street from the old Ritz Hotel in Ocala. Admission to the concert is free but an offering will be taken to benefit the Tuesday Morning Outreach Ministry to help the homeless, jobless, and others in need. For further information about the concert, call 352-537-0207.Youth Symphony concertThe Ocala Youth Symphony is presenting a free concert on Sunday, April 28 at 3 p.m. at the Appleton Museum, 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala. Come and enjoy the musical presentations of these amazing musicians ranging in age from 8 to 18. Works selected range from the classics to contemporary, something for everyone's musical taste. All concerts are free and open to the public. For information call 352-3513002.Tuesday, April 30 Breast cancer support group meetsThe SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Breast Cancer Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 S.W. 105th St. at 1 p.m. in Room 235 (Multipurpose Room). The meeting on April 30 will be a discussion by Mary Williams with the American Cancer Office on the many services available and volunteers needed for the Reach To Recovery Program and Road to Recovery. If you have any questions please call Gail Tirpak at 352-291-6904.Saturday, May 4 AUCE pancakes at CrossroadsA pancake breakfast for the community is planned for May 8, 8 to 11 a.m. by members of Crossroads Church of God. All you can eat pancakes, sausage and drink is $5. Crossroads is at 8070 S.W. 60th Ave, Ocala. The church office phone is 352-291-2080.Yard sale at First CongregationalA huge yard sale will take place on Saturday, May 4 at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 7171 S.W. State Road 200, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Enrichment Center. Sunday, May 5 Civic Chorale to performOn Sunday, May 5, at 3 p.m., the Marion Civic Chorale, conducted by Matthew Bumbach, will perform a concert titled Give My Regards to Broadway at First United Methodist Church, 1126 E. Silver Springs Blvd. diagonally across the street from the old Ritz Hotel in Ocala. The program will include A Sentimental Journey Thru the 40s and medleys from Les Miserables, My Fair Lady, and The Phantom of the Opera. Admission is free but a free-will offering will be taken to benefit the churchs Tuesday Morning Outreach Ministry to help the homeless, jobless, and others in need. For further information about the concert, contact us at 352-537-0207 or www.fumcocala.org or wayne@fumcocala.org. Friday, May 10 Victorian Tea Party scheduledA Victorian Tea Party will be held on Friday, May 10, at the Grand Ballroom, 108 N.E. Magnolia Ave. starting at 11:30 a.m. Tickets are $18 per person and include buffet, music, a dramatic presentation from Father Knows Best, raffle items and a silent auction. Wear your tea party hat and bring your mother or daughter for Mothers Day. Seating is limited, so call 352-8734700 for tickets.messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 5 8 W ednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000EL0Q 000EMEV 7201 SW Hwy 200 Ocala (352) 629-0900 (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (352) 629-0900 Other locations throughout the southeast 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala GREAT FINANCING ON EZ-GO CARTS! GOLF CARS ST AR TING A T $1,995 WHAT BATTERY A RE Y OU L OOKING F OR ??? CUSTOM BATTERY PACKS LAPTOP COMPUTER BATTERIES CAMCORDER BATTERIES WHEELCHAIR BATTERIES SECURITY SYSTEM BATTERIES AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES FARM TRACTOR BATTERIES JET SKI BATTERIES GAME FEED BATTERIES MARINE BATTERIES CELL PHONE BATTERIES POWER WHEELS BATTERIES WATCH BATTERIES KEY REMOTE BATTERIES TRUCK BATTERIES CORDLESS PHONE BATTERIES EMERGENCY LIGHT BATTERIES ATV BATTERIES MOTORCYCLE BATTERIES LAWNMOWER BATTERIES Automotive Batteries 50 Bronze $ 79 95 each 60 Bronze $ 89 95 each 72 Gold $ 99 95 each 84 Platinum $ 109 95 each (Price may vary according to your vehicle) FREE 10-Minute Installation (Most Models) W est Marion Messenger 8810 W State R oad 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger .com Opinion Aid and comfort to the enemy? The images were seen all Monday afternoon and evening the bombs exploding, the man falling in the middle of the street, the anguished looks on the faces of witnesses, the blood on people being led into ambulances, the boy being wheeled away with a bandage on his leg, etc., etc., etc. When you woke up Tuesday morning, there they were again, the same images, repeated over and over. You know, somewhere, some terrorist or terrorists were sitting back watching all this unfold, enjoying the handiwork of their comrades, enjoying the suffering of Americans. Dont the networks realize this? Do they have to show the grief again and again? Isnt this giving aid and comfort to the enemy? Yes, the news has to be reported. But for how long, and how repetitively? Evidently the time of day played a part. Networks were quick to jump into local stations time and pre-empt talk shows, quiz shows, local news, etc. But once you got to prime time, you know, where the money is made, shows like Dancing With The Stars and The Voice went on as scheduled. Go back a couple of weeks to the gruesome leg injury of Kevin Ware, basketball player for the University of Louisville. After the initial showing of what happened, nearly every report we saw put a blurry circle over his leg so that the actual injury, a compound fracture where the bone was sticking out, couldnt be seen. Networks said they were being sensitive about the injury in respect to Ware and his relatives, and because the injury was so terrible. So is a bombing less terrible? Showing the faces of people with blood streaming from injuries doesnt deserve the same sensitivity as a broken leg? Showing a man turning slowly and then collapsing in the middle of the street isnt painful to his family? The networks also were guilty of providing misinformation on the fly. They always use the disclaimer, Weve been told but we cant confirm that. Still, they put the unsubstantiated rumors out there, which does a disservice to all. For example, there was an explosion at a nearby liOur Message PUBLIS HER: GERRY MULLIGANREGIONALMANAGER: JOHN PROVOSTEDITOR: JIM CLARK MessengerWEST MARION Editorial Your Letters Airport towerI was recently advised of your editorial regarding the FAAs proposal to close 149 control towers, including the one at the Ocala Airport. Having read the editorial, I was compelled to provide some additional background information for your readers, as well as to correct a few of your assumptions. Flightaware.com is a fantastic tool to predict arrival and departure traffic, however it does not provide the entire picture. Aircraft owners who do not wish to have their information made available have their aircraft flights blocked from view. Additionally, Flightaware.com only shows aircraft that have filed flight plans citing Ocala as a destination or origination. It does not include the thousands of recreational flyers that do not file flight plans. The FAAs methodology to determine the closure list lacked depth or an individual airport operational assessment. They drew a line and determined any tower with annual operations of less than 150,000 will close. Our view is it isnt as simple as a numbers assessment; each airport is different. For instance, in Ocala there is such a diverse fleet mix of aircraft you see large air carrier aircraft such as Boeing 757s or fast business jets operating in the same airspace as many small slower training aircraft. The difference in these operating speeds combined with our total annual operations are the main reasons the FAA justified this control tower just four years ago, but now they want to close it based on an arbitrary number, and without specific research. For Ocala, the control tower provides a step to the next stage of growth for the airport. It, along with the other infrastructure improvements on and around the airport, combines to provide a catalyst of opportunity for new or expanding business for our community. We are working with other affected airports, our congressional representatives, and industry leaders on saving the contract tower system. However, it appears that Ocalas control tower will cease operations on June 15. From June 16 and beyond, airplanes will still land and take off at the Ocala International Airport. Although the absence of a tower diminishes operational effectiveness, it does not make the airport unsafe. The airport successfully operated as a non-towered airport for 48 years (from 1962 to 2010), and it can successfully operate as a non-towered airport in the future. I encourage citizens to contact their respective Congressional representatives and urge them to find sensible cuts that do not impact our Nations infrastructure. Matthew G row Airport D irectorTolerance, then acceptanceOne bite at a time is how we describe how to eat an elephant, the same applies to how to bring about the destruction of America, little by little, one bite at a time. What one generation tolerates, the next accepts. This did not start with Obama, although he is pushing hard to fundamentally change America as stated in his campaign. I still question why no one pressed him on just what he had in mind, just what needs drastic changing? Why did Michelle state this is the first time she has been proud of America? No one asked for answers! Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. Many of you, Im sure, played cowboys and Indians when you were kids. Its now considered politically incorrect to call it that because, first, the cowboys usually won, and second, the Indians were called that because Christopher Columbus didnt know where he was when he landed. Now theyre called, probably rightly so, Native Americans. About 1 million out of 2.5 million Native Americans live in areas called reservations. These were not created out of the goodness of the heart of the colonists and their descendants; rather, they wanted to contain the Indians and put them where they felt they belonged, even though they were here first. Peace treaties were signed and ratified, and sovereignty was given to the reservations. That meant that our laws didnt apply there; each reservation could set up its own laws. No one in those days could envision that in the future this would cause major problems in the rest of the country, a lot of it associated with gambling. States that have anti-gambling laws have no say in the building of casinos on the reservations. Non-Native Americans flock by the thousands to the reservations to play the games, including some here in Florida. Last week we pointed out some inconsistency in gambling regulation. This is just another one. Now, I dont want to start a range war or anything like that, but Im thinking that it might be time to revisit these treaties that created these reservations. Basically, are they really needed? Native Americans have been absorbed into the population. They have Native Americans and the casinos Among Friends Jim Clark opportunities that were not even remotely available 200 years ago. Many of them go to colleges and universities, earn advance degrees and work in the business world of the United States. They do not need the protection of the reservation they are educated, talented and self-sufficient. But because of that, shouldnt they also be subject to laws of the country and state in which they live? That gets us back to gambling. Sometime back, some smart individual figured out that the anti-gambling laws of a state wouldnt apply on a reservation. So the casinos started sprouting up all over, including in Florida. If just the Native Americans gambled in their casinos, that would be fine. But as I said before, non-Native Americans provide the bulk of the customers. I wonder how many of those who visit the casinos declare their winnings on their income tax. Just from what Ive been reading recently, it seems that gambling establishments, especially here in Florida, prey on the senior citizens. Just watch who goes in and out of the Internet cafes, if they are allowed to reopen. Our federal government needs to take a long look at these establishments on the reservations, see who bankrolls Please see LETTERS, Page 10 Please see EDITORIAL, Page 10 Please see CLARK, Page 10

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 7 6 W ednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000ELV6 FREE APPETIZER Hwy. 27 & Dunnellon $ 1 OFF ANY SANDWICH Coupon required. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Expires 5/10/13. $ 3 OFF With Purchase of 2 Entres Not valid with NY Strip Special or sandwiches. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Expires 5/10/13. Hwy. 27 & Dunnellon Hwy. 27 & Dunnellon HAPPY HOUR & DAILY DRINK SPECIALS $ 13.99 30 PC. SHRIMP DINNER EVERY TUESDAY NO COUPONS TWO FOR $ 20 10 OZ. NY STRIPS EVERY WEDNESDAY NO COUPONS 197 7 3 E. PENNSYL V ANIA A VE. D U N N E L L O N DUNNELL ON 5 4 7 4 7 7 7 54 7-4 7 7 7 ON THE RAINBOW RIVER 3821 NW HW Y 27 O C A L A OCAL A 2 3 7 1 7 7 7 2 3 7 1 777 OFF I-75 ANY T WO ENTRES Not valid with NY Strip Special, sandwiches or burgers. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Expires 5/10/13. 000EPPK Outdoor A r t & Cr af t Mark et 4/27/13 10 am to 1:30 pm Vendors Wanted! 10% Off with this ad 7470 SW 60th A v enue (352) 671-1890 Monda y Satur da y 10am-5pm 000EPAF 12084 S. Williams St., Dunnellon (Old Dinner Bell Restaurant) 352-465-2881 www.gruffsontheriver.com GRUFFS T AP & G RILLE $ 1 00 Bud Select Drafts $ 2 00 W ell Liquor Drinks $ 1 50 OFF Call Drinks $ 1 00 Coor Lt. Bud Lt. Drafts During NASCAR Sprint Cup Race Only HAPPY HOUR EVER YDA Y 4PM 7PM MON B1G1 Margaritas, Spaghetti & Meatballs . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 4 99 TUES B1G1 Martinis, Half Rack Rib Plate w/Slaw Beans, Garlic T oast . . $ 9 99 WED 49 W ings Hot, Medium, Mild (Dine In Only) THURS Build a Burger Up to 3 FREE T oppings . . . . . . . $ 8 99 FRI 1/2 Price W ine by the Glass Red Fish Dinner w/2 Sides . $ 10 99 SA T Steak Night Steaks except Sirloin . . $ 2 00 OFF SUN Fajita Night Fajitas for T wo . . . . . . . $ 2 00 OFF T a s t e T h e B e s t Taste The Best Taste The Best WEST MARION 711186 000EMUQ Open to the Public Rate with this coupon and Tee Time Reservation 732-GOLF (4653) Just 1 mile west of I-75 on US 27 (Exit 354) Expires 4/30/13 Rates subject to change. 18 Hole Championship Course Dress Code: Collared Shirt Required NO Jeans GOLF OUTINGS WELCOME! www.ocalapalmsgolf.com Our Low Current 18 Hole Rate With This Coupon $ 32 00 Before 11:00 $ 27 00 After 11:00 000EHTB Best of the Best four years in a row HOURS: Mon. Fri. 10am 5pm Hearing Aid Centers A NAME YOU CAN TRUST WITH OVER 1500 LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE FREE HEARING AIDS FOR ALL FEDERAL WORKERS & RETIREES *No Co-Pay or Exam Fee Inside Walmart Hwy. 200 & Corner 484, Ocala 352-291-1467 000EIHD Inside Crystal River Mall Across from K-Mart 352-795-1484 Inside Sears Paddock Mall 352-237-1665 Federal Government Insurance Code #104, #105, #111, or #112 CHECK YOUR QUALIFICATIONS CALL 352-291-1467 BC/BS LIMIT 1 COUPON PER VISIT. LIMIT 2 PACKS PER VISIT. One More Week! BATTERIES PREMIUM ZINC BATTERIES 99 FREE HEARING TEST FREE REPAIRS (IN OFFICE ONLY) HEARING AID Fits 30 DB Loss Full Shell #ME200 $ 695 .00 000EOCK 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run 352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm Stop and visit us before you buy! We Guarantee Lowest Prices in Ocala! O CALA G OLF C ART S UPERCENTER O CALA G OLF C ART S UPERCENTER O CALA G OLF C ART S UPERCENTER 10% Discount to Veterans labor & parts (excluding batteries) FREE pickup within 5 miles Largest Selection In Ocala! 6-V T605 only $ 539 8-V T875 only $ 619 6-V 6 PACK $ 459 8-V 6 PACK $ 529 BATTERY SALE BATTERY SALE BATTERY SALE 2010 Club Car Remanufactured New Factory Body All lights & turn signals New 8 volt batteries New DOT tires Fold down wind shield Rear view mirrors Automatic charger only $ 4,995 E-Z-GO RXV Remanufactured Fully Loaded Ready to go Golfing $ 5,495 12-V T1275 only $ 659 We Sell Trojan Batteries 000EKPA Read the classifieds On March 25, the Ernie Read Monday golf group held its fifth annual Lukey Tournament at the Ocala Palms golf course More than 70 golfers participated in the golf outing and over 100 folks were at the cookout following a great day on the links. The Lukey Tournament is named in honor of young Luke Mete, the 9-year-old grandson of Ocala Palms residents Rich and Carol Mete. The purpose of the tournament is to raise money for The Lukey Foundation and to increase public awareness of Cooleys Anemia, the most severe form of Thalassemia. Young Luke is afflicted with this genetic blood disorder and has undergone blood transfusions every 2 to 4 weeks and had a bone marrow transplant from his older sister who does not carry the genetic trait in 2009. He recently had his 4 year post transplant testing and at this time everything is checking out perfectly. A total of $1,085 was raised at the tournament and was donated to The Lukey Foundation. The trophies were donated by BJ Trophies and Awards. Kudos to the volunteers who cooked the wonderful hamburgers and hot dogs and particularly to Rick Braun who prepared his world famous bratwurst and sauerkraut before leaving town to see Bill Cosby perform live. The winners of this years tournament were Claude Roy with a net score of 60 in the mens division and Maggie Mahar with a net of 62 in the womens division. Claude and Maggie are not only next door neighbors in Ocala Palms but they are also brother and sister. Good golf must run in the family. More info on Cooleys Anemia may found at the following websites: www.thelukeyfoundation.com and www.cooleysanemia.org Lukey Tournament held at Ocala Palms Claude Roy and Maggie Mahar with their trophies. Richard Ethier and Dennis Lord with Vern Wolfe in the background. More on Page 7 More photos from Lukey event at Ocala Palms Lukeys grandparents, Rich and Carol Mete. Tournament host, Ernie Read. Brian and Kati Browne. Always smiling Don Warne. Don Sturgal smiling for the camera.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 7 6 W ednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000ELV6 FREE APPETIZER Hwy. 27 & Dunnellon $ 1 OFF ANY SANDWICH Coupon required. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Expires 5/10/13. $ 3 OFF With Purchase of 2 Entres Not valid with NY Strip Special or sandwiches. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Expires 5/10/13. Hwy. 27 & Dunnellon Hwy. 27 & Dunnellon HAPPY HOUR & DAILY DRINK SPECIALS $ 13.99 30 PC. SHRIMP DINNER EVERY TUESDAY NO COUPONS TWO FOR $ 20 10 OZ. NY STRIPS EVERY WEDNESDAY NO COUPONS 197 7 3 E. PENNSYL V ANIA A VE. D U N N E L L O N DUNNELL ON 5 4 7 4 7 7 7 54 7-4 7 7 7 ON THE RAINBOW RIVER 3821 NW HW Y 27 O C A L A OCAL A 2 3 7 1 7 7 7 2 3 7 1 777 OFF I-75 ANY T WO ENTRES Not valid with NY Strip Special, sandwiches or burgers. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Expires 5/10/13. 000EPPK Outdoor A r t & Cr af t Mark et 4/27/13 10 am to 1:30 pm Vendors Wanted! 10% Off with this ad 7470 SW 60th A v enue (352) 671-1890 Monda y Satur da y 10am-5pm 000EPAF 12084 S. Williams St., Dunnellon (Old Dinner Bell Restaurant) 352-465-2881 www.gruffsontheriver.com GRUFFS T AP & G RILLE $ 1 00 Bud Select Drafts $ 2 00 W ell Liquor Drinks $ 1 50 OFF Call Drinks $ 1 00 Coor Lt. Bud Lt. Drafts During NASCAR Sprint Cup Race Only HAPPY HOUR EVER YDA Y 4PM 7PM MON B1G1 Margaritas, Spaghetti & Meatballs . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 4 99 TUES B1G1 Martinis, Half Rack Rib Plate w/Slaw Beans, Garlic T oast . . $ 9 99 WED 49 W ings Hot, Medium, Mild (Dine In Only) THURS Build a Burger Up to 3 FREE T oppings . . . . . . . $ 8 99 FRI 1/2 Price W ine by the Glass Red Fish Dinner w/2 Sides . $ 10 99 SA T Steak Night Steaks except Sirloin . . $ 2 00 OFF SUN Fajita Night Fajitas for T wo . . . . . . . $ 2 00 OFF T a s t e T h e B e s t Taste The Best Taste The Best WEST MARION 711186 000EMUQ Open to the Public Rate with this coupon and Tee Time Reservation 732-GOLF (4653) Just 1 mile west of I-75 on US 27 (Exit 354) Expires 4/30/13 Rates subject to change. 18 Hole Championship Course Dress Code: Collared Shirt Required NO Jeans GOLF OUTINGS WELCOME! www.ocalapalmsgolf.com Our Low Current 18 Hole Rate With This Coupon $ 32 00 Before 11:00 $ 27 00 After 11:00 000EHTB Best of the Best four years in a row HOURS: Mon. Fri. 10am 5pm Hearing Aid Centers A NAME YOU CAN TRUST WITH OVER 1500 LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE FREE HEARING AIDS FOR ALL FEDERAL WORKERS & RETIREES *No Co-Pay or Exam Fee Inside Walmart Hwy. 200 & Corner 484, Ocala 352-291-1467 000EIHD Inside Crystal River Mall Across from K-Mart 352-795-1484 Inside Sears Paddock Mall 352-237-1665 Federal Government Insurance Code #104, #105, #111, or #112 CHECK YOUR QUALIFICATIONS CALL 352-291-1467 BC/BS LIMIT 1 COUPON PER VISIT. LIMIT 2 PACKS PER VISIT. One More Week! BATTERIES PREMIUM ZINC BATTERIES 99 FREE HEARING TEST FREE REPAIRS (IN OFFICE ONLY) HEARING AID Fits 30 DB Loss Full Shell #ME200 $ 695 .00 000EOCK 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run 352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm Stop and visit us before you buy! We Guarantee Lowest Prices in Ocala! O CALA G OLF C ART S UPERCENTER O CALA G OLF C ART S UPERCENTER O CALA G OLF C ART S UPERCENTER 10% Discount to Veterans labor & parts (excluding batteries) FREE pickup within 5 miles Largest Selection In Ocala! 6-V T605 only $ 539 8-V T875 only $ 619 6-V 6 PACK $ 459 8-V 6 PACK $ 529 BATTERY SALE BATTERY SALE BATTERY SALE 2010 Club Car Remanufactured New Factory Body All lights & turn signals New 8 volt batteries New DOT tires Fold down wind shield Rear view mirrors Automatic charger only $ 4,995 E-Z-GO RXV Remanufactured Fully Loaded Ready to go Golfing $ 5,495 12-V T1275 only $ 659 We Sell Trojan Batteries 000EKPA Read the classifieds On March 25, the Ernie Read Monday golf group held its fifth annual Lukey Tournament at the Ocala Palms golf course More than 70 golfers participated in the golf outing and over 100 folks were at the cookout following a great day on the links. The Lukey Tournament is named in honor of young Luke Mete, the 9-year-old grandson of Ocala Palms residents Rich and Carol Mete. The purpose of the tournament is to raise money for The Lukey Foundation and to increase public awareness of Cooleys Anemia, the most severe form of Thalassemia. Young Luke is afflicted with this genetic blood disorder and has undergone blood transfusions every 2 to 4 weeks and had a bone marrow transplant from his older sister who does not carry the genetic trait in 2009. He recently had his 4 year post transplant testing and at this time everything is checking out perfectly. A total of $1,085 was raised at the tournament and was donated to The Lukey Foundation. The trophies were donated by BJ Trophies and Awards. Kudos to the volunteers who cooked the wonderful hamburgers and hot dogs and particularly to Rick Braun who prepared his world famous bratwurst and sauerkraut before leaving town to see Bill Cosby perform live. The winners of this years tournament were Claude Roy with a net score of 60 in the mens division and Maggie Mahar with a net of 62 in the womens division. Claude and Maggie are not only next door neighbors in Ocala Palms but they are also brother and sister. Good golf must run in the family. More info on Cooleys Anemia may found at the following websites: www.thelukeyfoundation.com and www.cooleysanemia.org Lukey Tournament held at Ocala Palms Claude Roy and Maggie Mahar with their trophies. Richard Ethier and Dennis Lord with Vern Wolfe in the background. More on Page 7 More photos from Lukey event at Ocala Palms Lukeys grandparents, Rich and Carol Mete. Tournament host, Ernie Read. Brian and Kati Browne. Always smiling Don Warne. Don Sturgal smiling for the camera.

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Saturday, April 27 African Violet Club meetsThe African Violet Club of Ocala will meet Saturday, April 27, at 10:30 a.m. at the Marion County Sheriffs Office Brian Litz Substation, 9048 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. The program will be African Violet Growing Basics. There are many tips and tricks to African Violet growing and care. We made many new friends over the weekend at our African Violet show and sale including old pros and enthusiasts new to the hobby. This meeting is especially designed for newer or novice growers. However, everyone always discovers something new. More experienced growers will also explain some of their tips for success. Delicious light refreshments are served. Guests are always welcome. Check the website for more information at http://www.africanvioletclubofOcala.org.Sunday, April 28 Master Choir to performThe Central Florida Master Choir, conducted by Dr. Harold W. McSwain, Jr., will perform a concert on Sunday, April 28, at 3 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 1126 E. Silver Springs Blvd. across the street from the old Ritz Hotel in Ocala. Admission to the concert is free but an offering will be taken to benefit the Tuesday Morning Outreach Ministry to help the homeless, jobless, and others in need. For further information about the concert, call 352-537-0207.Youth Symphony concertThe Ocala Youth Symphony is presenting a free concert on Sunday, April 28 at 3 p.m. at the Appleton Museum, 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala. Come and enjoy the musical presentations of these amazing musicians ranging in age from 8 to 18. Works selected range from the classics to contemporary, something for everyone's musical taste. All concerts are free and open to the public. For information call 352-3513002.Tuesday, April 30 Breast cancer support group meetsThe SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Breast Cancer Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 S.W. 105th St. at 1 p.m. in Room 235 (Multipurpose Room). The meeting on April 30 will be a discussion by Mary Williams with the American Cancer Office on the many services available and volunteers needed for the Reach To Recovery Program and Road to Recovery. If you have any questions please call Gail Tirpak at 352-291-6904.Saturday, May 4 AUCE pancakes at CrossroadsA pancake breakfast for the community is planned for May 8, 8 to 11 a.m. by members of Crossroads Church of God. All you can eat pancakes, sausage and drink is $5. Crossroads is at 8070 S.W. 60th Ave, Ocala. The church office phone is 352-291-2080.Yard sale at First CongregationalA huge yard sale will take place on Saturday, May 4 at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 7171 S.W. State Road 200, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Enrichment Center. Sunday, May 5 Civic Chorale to performOn Sunday, May 5, at 3 p.m., the Marion Civic Chorale, conducted by Matthew Bumbach, will perform a concert titled Give My Regards to Broadway at First United Methodist Church, 1126 E. Silver Springs Blvd. diagonally across the street from the old Ritz Hotel in Ocala. The program will include A Sentimental Journey Thru the 40s and medleys from Les Miserables, My Fair Lady, and The Phantom of the Opera. Admission is free but a free-will offering will be taken to benefit the churchs Tuesday Morning Outreach Ministry to help the homeless, jobless, and others in need. For further information about the concert, contact us at 352-537-0207 or www.fumcocala.org or wayne@fumcocala.org. Friday, May 10 Victorian Tea Party scheduledA Victorian Tea Party will be held on Friday, May 10, at the Grand Ballroom, 108 N.E. Magnolia Ave. starting at 11:30 a.m. Tickets are $18 per person and include buffet, music, a dramatic presentation from Father Knows Best, raffle items and a silent auction. Wear your tea party hat and bring your mother or daughter for Mothers Day. Seating is limited, so call 352-8734700 for tickets.messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 5 8 W ednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000EL0Q 000EMEV 7201 SW Hwy 200 Ocala (352) 629-0900 (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (352) 629-0900 Other locations throughout the southeast 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala GREAT FINANCING ON EZ-GO CARTS! GOLF CARS ST AR TING A T $1,995 WHAT BATTERY A RE Y OU L OOKING F OR ??? CUSTOM BATTERY PACKS LAPTOP COMPUTER BATTERIES CAMCORDER BATTERIES WHEELCHAIR BATTERIES SECURITY SYSTEM BATTERIES AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES FARM TRACTOR BATTERIES JET SKI BATTERIES GAME FEED BATTERIES MARINE BATTERIES CELL PHONE BATTERIES POWER WHEELS BATTERIES WATCH BATTERIES KEY REMOTE BATTERIES TRUCK BATTERIES CORDLESS PHONE BATTERIES EMERGENCY LIGHT BATTERIES ATV BATTERIES MOTORCYCLE BATTERIES LAWNMOWER BATTERIES Automotive Batteries 50 Bronze $ 79 95 each 60 Bronze $ 89 95 each 72 Gold $ 99 95 each 84 Platinum $ 109 95 each (Price may vary according to your vehicle) FREE 10-Minute Installation (Most Models) W est Marion Messenger 8810 W State R oad 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger .com Opinion Aid and comfort to the enemy? The images were seen all Monday afternoon and evening the bombs exploding, the man falling in the middle of the street, the anguished looks on the faces of witnesses, the blood on people being led into ambulances, the boy being wheeled away with a bandage on his leg, etc., etc., etc. When you woke up Tuesday morning, there they were again, the same images, repeated over and over. You know, somewhere, some terrorist or terrorists were sitting back watching all this unfold, enjoying the handiwork of their comrades, enjoying the suffering of Americans. Dont the networks realize this? Do they have to show the grief again and again? Isnt this giving aid and comfort to the enemy? Yes, the news has to be reported. But for how long, and how repetitively? Evidently the time of day played a part. Networks were quick to jump into local stations time and pre-empt talk shows, quiz shows, local news, etc. But once you got to prime time, you know, where the money is made, shows like Dancing With The Stars and The Voice went on as scheduled. Go back a couple of weeks to the gruesome leg injury of Kevin Ware, basketball player for the University of Louisville. After the initial showing of what happened, nearly every report we saw put a blurry circle over his leg so that the actual injury, a compound fracture where the bone was sticking out, couldnt be seen. Networks said they were being sensitive about the injury in respect to Ware and his relatives, and because the injury was so terrible. So is a bombing less terrible? Showing the faces of people with blood streaming from injuries doesnt deserve the same sensitivity as a broken leg? Showing a man turning slowly and then collapsing in the middle of the street isnt painful to his family? The networks also were guilty of providing misinformation on the fly. They always use the disclaimer, Weve been told but we cant confirm that. Still, they put the unsubstantiated rumors out there, which does a disservice to all. For example, there was an explosion at a nearby liOur Message PUBLIS HER: GERRY MULLIGANREGIONALMANAGER: JOHN PROVOSTEDITOR: JIM CLARK MessengerWEST MARION Editorial Your Letters Airport towerI was recently advised of your editorial regarding the FAAs proposal to close 149 control towers, including the one at the Ocala Airport. Having read the editorial, I was compelled to provide some additional background information for your readers, as well as to correct a few of your assumptions. Flightaware.com is a fantastic tool to predict arrival and departure traffic, however it does not provide the entire picture. Aircraft owners who do not wish to have their information made available have their aircraft flights blocked from view. Additionally, Flightaware.com only shows aircraft that have filed flight plans citing Ocala as a destination or origination. It does not include the thousands of recreational flyers that do not file flight plans. The FAAs methodology to determine the closure list lacked depth or an individual airport operational assessment. They drew a line and determined any tower with annual operations of less than 150,000 will close. Our view is it isnt as simple as a numbers assessment; each airport is different. For instance, in Ocala there is such a diverse fleet mix of aircraft you see large air carrier aircraft such as Boeing 757s or fast business jets operating in the same airspace as many small slower training aircraft. The difference in these operating speeds combined with our total annual operations are the main reasons the FAA justified this control tower just four years ago, but now they want to close it based on an arbitrary number, and without specific research. For Ocala, the control tower provides a step to the next stage of growth for the airport. It, along with the other infrastructure improvements on and around the airport, combines to provide a catalyst of opportunity for new or expanding business for our community. We are working with other affected airports, our congressional representatives, and industry leaders on saving the contract tower system. However, it appears that Ocalas control tower will cease operations on June 15. From June 16 and beyond, airplanes will still land and take off at the Ocala International Airport. Although the absence of a tower diminishes operational effectiveness, it does not make the airport unsafe. The airport successfully operated as a non-towered airport for 48 years (from 1962 to 2010), and it can successfully operate as a non-towered airport in the future. I encourage citizens to contact their respective Congressional representatives and urge them to find sensible cuts that do not impact our Nations infrastructure. Matthew G row Airport D irectorTolerance, then acceptanceOne bite at a time is how we describe how to eat an elephant, the same applies to how to bring about the destruction of America, little by little, one bite at a time. What one generation tolerates, the next accepts. This did not start with Obama, although he is pushing hard to fundamentally change America as stated in his campaign. I still question why no one pressed him on just what he had in mind, just what needs drastic changing? Why did Michelle state this is the first time she has been proud of America? No one asked for answers! Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. Many of you, Im sure, played cowboys and Indians when you were kids. Its now considered politically incorrect to call it that because, first, the cowboys usually won, and second, the Indians were called that because Christopher Columbus didnt know where he was when he landed. Now theyre called, probably rightly so, Native Americans. About 1 million out of 2.5 million Native Americans live in areas called reservations. These were not created out of the goodness of the heart of the colonists and their descendants; rather, they wanted to contain the Indians and put them where they felt they belonged, even though they were here first. Peace treaties were signed and ratified, and sovereignty was given to the reservations. That meant that our laws didnt apply there; each reservation could set up its own laws. No one in those days could envision that in the future this would cause major problems in the rest of the country, a lot of it associated with gambling. States that have anti-gambling laws have no say in the building of casinos on the reservations. Non-Native Americans flock by the thousands to the reservations to play the games, including some here in Florida. Last week we pointed out some inconsistency in gambling regulation. This is just another one. Now, I dont want to start a range war or anything like that, but Im thinking that it might be time to revisit these treaties that created these reservations. Basically, are they really needed? Native Americans have been absorbed into the population. They have Native Americans and the casinos Among Friends Jim Clark opportunities that were not even remotely available 200 years ago. Many of them go to colleges and universities, earn advance degrees and work in the business world of the United States. They do not need the protection of the reservation they are educated, talented and self-sufficient. But because of that, shouldnt they also be subject to laws of the country and state in which they live? That gets us back to gambling. Sometime back, some smart individual figured out that the anti-gambling laws of a state wouldnt apply on a reservation. So the casinos started sprouting up all over, including in Florida. If just the Native Americans gambled in their casinos, that would be fine. But as I said before, non-Native Americans provide the bulk of the customers. I wonder how many of those who visit the casinos declare their winnings on their income tax. Just from what Ive been reading recently, it seems that gambling establishments, especially here in Florida, prey on the senior citizens. Just watch who goes in and out of the Internet cafes, if they are allowed to reopen. Our federal government needs to take a long look at these establishments on the reservations, see who bankrolls Please see LETTERS, Page 10 Please see EDITORIAL, Page 10 Please see CLARK, Page 10

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tions chief executive officer, said the data supports past movements in the region. We are seeing continued positive signs with employment growth from last month in all three counties, certainly in terms of the drops in the number of unemployed and increases in the number of those with jobs, Skinner said. The labor force showed slight expansion in Citrus and Levy counties and remained virtually unchanged in Marion County. There have also been a number of employers hiring in the area, Skinner said, including R & L Trucking, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Ocala and Lockheed Martin. In March, a total of 481 employers posted 1,583 jobs with Workforce Connection, up from 1,443 jobs in February and a 22 percent increase over the year. Skinner said that news of the positive trend was not unexpected, noting that last week the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the Ocala Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) had the second largest overthe-year unemployment rate decrease in February (-2.4 percent) among the nations 372 metropolitan areas, just behind Yuba City, Calif., (-2.5 percent). Out of a slightly expanded regional labor force of 205,721, there were 16,013 unemployed, down 1,415 over the month and down 5,058 since March 2012. Here is how the employment numbers break down for each county in the Workforce Connection region: Marion Countys labor force also remained relatively stable, dropping by four to 133,116, the number of those with jobs rose by 862 to 122,749 and those who were unemployed fell by 866 to 10,367. That represents an over-the-year increase of 3,440 of those with jobs and a decrease of 3,432 in the number of unemployed when the unemployment rate was 10.4 percent. Two years ago, the unemployment rate of 12.8 percent two years ago when 17,002 were without jobs. While the Ocala MSA continued to hold the fifth highest unemployment rate among Floridas metro areas, total nonagricultural employment was 94,600, up 3.3 percent or 3,000 over the year. For the fourth month in a row, the Ocala metro area had the highest job-growth rate at 3.3 percent, followed by Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (+3.1 percent), and Jacksonville (+2.8 percent). The Ocala MSA also led the state in job growth-rate gains in financial activities (+7.5 percent) and had the second-highest in education and health services (+6.3 percent) for all metro areas in Florida. Eight major industries gained jobs over the year, led by education and health services (+900 jobs); trade, transportation and utilities (+700 jobs); leisure and hospitality (+500 jobs); financial activities and professional and business services (+300 jobs each); and mining, logging and construction, manufacturing and government (+100 jobs each). Information and other services remained unchanged over the year. Among Floridas 67 counties, Marion Countys unemployment rate was the 13th highest, Citrus County remained 11th highest and Levy County dropped from 15th to 17th. Workforce Connection is the local, business-led organization that strives to connect qualified workers with local employers in Citrus, Levy and Marion counties through cost-effective, high quality employment, training and education services in partnership with businesses, community-based organizations, educational institutions and governmental agencies. On average, more than 36,000 career seekers and 1,500 businesses receive services each year. To obtain full copies of the March 2013 unemployment reports or to find out more about upcoming events and services, visit www.WorkforceConnectionFL.com or call 1-800434-JOBS, ext. 1234. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 9 4 W ednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO ADVERTISECall854-3986 ADVER TISING 000E1IT Where JESUS is LORD, and YOU are Loved. Services: Sunday School : 9:30am Morning W orship: 10:30am Thursday: 6:00pm Meeting at: 145 S.W 78th Court Ocala, Florida 352-690-7596 B I B L I C A L F O U N D A T I O N C H U R C H 000EF6C 8070 SW 60th Ave. Ocala, FL 34476 352-291-2080 SERVICES HOURS Sunday 9am, 11am, 6pm 1:30 Spanish Service Tuesday 7pm Spanish Service Wednesday Night 7pm Youth 7pm Thursday Bible Study 6:30 to 7:30 Friday 7pm Spanish Service Nursery available www.crossroads.cog.net WE WELCOME ALL! Bishop Paul W oosley 000E79U St. Martins Church 950 N.W 70th Street (SR 326) Ocala, Flor ida 34475 352-351-8059 www .cac-ocala.org Service & Sunday School 10:00 a.m. V isitors Ar e Always W elcom e The Only Church of the True 1928 Book of Common Prayer (Episcopal) Christ the King Anglican Church 000EPL Y Christ the King The Rev Donald J. Curran, Rector Services: Rite I 7:30 am Rite II 8:50 & 11:15 am Childrens Church 8:50 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary Anglican Chur ch 000DOX6 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www .ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS is discovered through worshiping together 71 1 187 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Dont waste your time and energy fretting over remarks you consider unnecessary or unkind. Best advice: Ignore them, and just keep doing your usual good job. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Getting that new perspective on a workplace situation could lead to a solution everyone will accept. Meanwhile, make time to keep up with your creative pursuits. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Those changes you planned to implement in early summer might need to be reassessed. But dont make any moves until youve discussed this with someone you trust. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Your aspects favor harmony, making this a good time to work out problems in relationships whether personal or professional. An old friend comes back. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) While youre still riding that high-powered beam, you might begin to lose focus by weeks end. Could be youll need to do a little cat-napping to restore your spent energies. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) An unexpected development creates a lot of excitement. Where it takes you is your decision. Check out the possibilities, then decide if you want to go with it or not. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Although your supporters help you squash an unfair claim against you, dont let this go unchallenged. You need to learn more about the motives of those behind it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) There are some tasks to clear up by midweek. Then you can welcome the new month on a high note. A friend brings surprising but very welcome news. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You might want to change your plans before theyre set in cement. Consider advice from colleagues. But remember that, ultimately, its your choice. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) A difficult situation is working itself out. Lingering problems should be resolved by weeks end, allowing the Goat to enjoy a calmer, less stressful period. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Be careful not to move so quickly that you miss possible warning signs that could upset your plans. Slow down. Your supporters will continue to stand by you. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Your generosity in sharing your time and wisdom with others leads to an intriguing development that could have you considering some interesting choices. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way of influencing people to be and do their best. You would make an excellent teacher. JO BLESScontinued from Page 1 tional campaign encouraging the more than 30 million Americans who suffer from venous disease, including varicose veins and chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), to rethink their condition and recognize it as a serious health concern. The campaign, led by a coalition of medical societies and sponsored by Covidien, encourages those with venous disease to learn more about their condition, find a vein specialist, and make informed decisions about the best, and often minimally-invasive treatment option for them. As part of the campaign, Olympic Gold Medalist Summer Sanders shares her personal story about the impact venous disease had on her life and the improvements she experienced following treatment. The Rethink Varicose Veins team will be at Moms Nite Out dispelling the myths about varicose veins and encouraging attendees to take a quick self-assessment to determine their risk for varicose veins and CVI. Taking the selfassessment will automatically enter attendees for an opportunity to win a spa getaway weekend at the Miraval Arizona Resort & Spa, Nov. 14-17. Or visit www.RethinkVV.com/escape for a chance to win. Originally organized by Maria Bailey, CEO of BSM Media, author and Mom Talk Radio host, National Moms Nite Out unites social media groups, companies, local playgroups, mom bloggers and networks in giving moms a well-deserved night off. Bailey brought the first National Moms Nite Out to life after watching moms take care of everyone else on Mothers Day, but never themselves. National Moms Nite Out is one of the largest cooperative efforts of Mommy groups, Mom-focused organizations and corporations, bloggers and vloggers all coming together for one great night in support of motherhood, Bailey said. MOMcontinued from Page 1 Thursday, April 25 Learn w hy its di fferent in FloridaLeague of Women Voters of Marion County presents Why don't they do things the way we did them back home?" It will be on April 25 at 4 p.m. at Cypress Hall, On Top of the World Communities, 8415 S.W. 80th St., Ocala. The event is free and open to the public. "Why don't they do things the way we did them back home?" It is a question asked every day by newcomers and notso-new folks, too. A city council, the county commission, the legislature or the governor's office regularly make decisions and take actions that affect our future. Come learn why Florida is different and find out who and what is responsible....and how it can be changed. Presenter: Judy Johnson, league member, attorney, former county commissioner in Marion County and a former school board member in Alachua County. She has been president of the Florida League of Women Voters and has a long standing interest in public policy at the local, state and national levels. Join us!Saturday, April 27 Concert band 2-day perf orm ancePlease join the Kingdom of the Sun Concert Band Swing into Spring concert series on Saturday, April 27 at 2 p.m. or Sunday, April 28 at 3 p.m., at the Marion Technical Institute (MTI), 1614 S.E. Fort King St., Ocala. All performances are free and open to the public donations are accepted.All church golf outingEveryone is invited to 'hit the links' Saturday morning, 11 a.m., at Royal Oaks Golf Club, Oak Run Country Club, to play 18 holes of golf, with cart, and share lunch. Enjoy a fun day of golf, Christian Fellowship and who knows: a hole in one? Prizes to be awarded. Those interested in lunch only are welcome. sFee per person includes 18 holes of golf, cart, lunch, tip and prizes. For reservations and additional information contact Bob Parizek at 352-8739149, Ray Westman at 352-208-9023 or Christ's Church of Marion County, 6768 S.W. 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182, www.ccomc.org/. Happenings

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 3 10 W ednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. EMPTYTRUCK Returning to Milwaukee, Chicago, Mid West Can move 1 item or whole household (414) 520-1612 Brian Bnet CARE MANAGERThe Centers is seeking a Bachelors level Care Manager to coordinate mental health svcs for children enrolled in Behavioral Health Network. Extensive travel required in Citrus & Hernando Counties. Use of personal vehicle reqd., State mileage rate pd. Work hours dictated by caseload. Please submit salary. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us CLERICALThe Centers is seeking a clerical Program Assistant to work in a fastpaced outpatient setting in Lecanto. This position requires strong customer service skills, attention to detail, ability to work independently and multi-task. HS diploma or GED equiv & 2 yrs exp reqd. Salary is $9-10/hr.Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify Fax or e-mail resume to HR, The Centers, Inc. (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us TBOSS TherapistThe Centers is seeking Masters Level Therapist for TBOSS position in Marion and Citrus Counties. Must have Masters in a related field of Human Services and min 2 yrs exp working with adults, children & adolescents providing individual, group & family therapy. Incentive Opportunity Available. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us TRANSPORTER/GENERALISTThe Centers is seeking a Transporter/Generalist for our Lighthouse program in Inverness. This position provides members (mentally ill adults) with transportation, and participates as a Generalist in the program based on the Clubhouse model of a work ordered day.Some evening and weekend work required. Salary is $8.25-$9.00/hr. Acceptable driving record & clean background reqd. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify Fax or e-mail resume to HR, The Centers, Inc. (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us ASSIST SENIORSWe provide non-medical companionship and home help for seniors. Day, weekend and overnight shifts available. Join our special team of CAREGivers today.352-622-5936Lic. #HCS229393 ALLAUTOS WANTED with or without title. Any cond. make or model. We pay up to $10,000 and offer free towing. (813) 505-6939 OAK RUN COUNTRY CLUBWOW! 3 Bedroom Golf Course Home 2 Car garage, firepace & pool table, use of all amenities, golf course, 4 swimming pools, 1 indoor, tennis courts, jacuzzi, driving range, restarant & health clubs, all lawn, maint, included $1,100. No smoking, No Pets, Available April 15th (443) 299-2047 LET USWORK FORYOU!CALL TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403West Marion Messenger Classifieds Get Results! PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real est ate advertising in this newsp aper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limit ation or discrimination based on race, color religion, sex, handicap, familial st atus or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limit ation or discrimination. Familial st atus includes children under the age of 18 living with p arent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newsp aper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real est ate which is in violation of the law Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newsp aper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing imp aired is 1-800-927-9275. 2355 S. Ripple Path Crystal River, 34429 Great Marine Mech, Boat storage and launch site for nearby scallops plus fishing & kayaks, Lgr bldg w/ 3/18rollups office tlr & boat ramp, $169k, finance poss. call 352-634-3862 HOMOASASSA 5+ DEN BEDROOMS. 3 bath. THIS HUGE AND BEAUTIFUL TWO ST OR Y HOME WITH 3 CAR GARAGE IS OVER 3500 SQ. FT HOME BACKS UP T O A NATURE PRESER VE. HOME IS A FORECLOSURE SHOR T SALE AND THE BANK IS WORKING WITH THE SELLERS. THIS HOME W AS BUIL T IN 2005. dennis_nef f@yahoo.co m BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 STUMP GRINDINGCALL JIM FOR FREE ESTIMA TES (800) 478-8679 T rimming,Removal and Debris Clean Up. Reliable Service,Reasonable Prices. Lic/Ins 20 yrs Exp.FREE Estimates. Residential/Commercial. 352-445-7916 or 352-292-5446 Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKSFREE TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403 Somebody else wants it!Got something special you no longer use? Sell it in the Classifieds. It may be just the perfect item to fill somebody elses need.TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 000EFNB FREE T O THE PUBLIC April 27, 2013 10:30am Dunnellon Public Library Meeting Room 20351 Robinson Road, Dunnellon Friends of the Dunnellon Public Library Present: William and Sue Wills as President Franklin our 32nd President and First lady Eleanor. Presidents and Their First Ladies, dramatically speaking is the creation of the veteran acting and writing team of the Wills. The couple are now in their 16th year of bringing to life the stories of Presidential couples. The Wills are not impersonators, their costumes, dialects, and demeanors recreate these historical characters. Mr. and Mrs. Wills have performed in over 30 performances at seven of the nations Presidential Museums. William researches and creates scripts while Sue edits his work and creates the costumes. Sometimes forgotten are the young people who met, fell in love and the years of triumphs and tragedies that shaped their personalities and their relationship which led up to the 1932 election and their 12 years as First Couple. The focus will be on their private side and how that affected their public lives. For additional information contact the library at 352-438-2520 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 Readers Choice Winner Jewelry Store 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12 www.jandjjewelersocala.com Thank You For Voting Us Readers Choice #1 Jeweler For 6 Consecutive Years 000EL0I STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 000EGB4 John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000EHZ7 Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 000EN8O Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting Look for us on Facebook Look for us Look f or us on Facebook on F ace book 000EL19 The Truesdell Professional Building 200 N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Fl 34482 KELLEAN K. TRUESDELL, J.D., LLM Attorney & Counselor at Law (352) 873-4141 or KelleanTruesdell.com My Florida Estate Planning Workshop is available any day at any hour. Wills, Living Trusts, Financial and Medical Powers of Attorney, Probate, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, Asset Protection, Federal Death Tax Minimization, Trust Administration, Elder Law and Personal LifeCare Services. 352-875-7433 875-7041 Interior & Exterior 000EPDN 22 Yrs. of Excellent Local References Hi Ocala Palms Neighbors For almost a decade Ive been in this neighborhood doing interior and exterior painting, THANK YOU all very much for your support and trust. Im looking forward to continue serving you and doing my very best of high quality work. Sincerely, A L C AS T ANO P AINTING I NC P AINTING I NC brary, then there wasnt an explosion; there were 120 people hurt, then there were 70, then it was over 100 again; there were three unexploded devices found, then there were none, then there were two that were detonated by police, then it turns out they were not bombs; cell phone service was cut off to avoid remote detonation of additional bombs, then it was restored (Sprint and Verizon both said that their cell phone service was never interrupted). So now we wait for the follow-ups, possible arrests, etc. There is no doubt that the explosions were another in a long list of terrorist tragedies. There is also no doubt that, for a while, we will be inundated with rumors and unconfirmed facts. We just need to accept that there are bad people in the world, and we need to be ever vigilant to lessen their impact on society. And we dont need the networks to tell us that. EDITORIALcontinued from Page 8 them, etc. A couple hundred years ago Americans needed protection from the Native Americans, who were fighting to keep their land from being poached by invaders from Europe. Now, Americans need protection from the Native American-run casinos, so the people dont get their savings poached by those who run the gambling establishments. Just like the game of cowboys and Indians, this is a battle for survival, especially for senior citizens. But unlike those childhood games, once someone is down, they may not necessarily get up.Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger. CLARKcontinued from Page 8 Regretfully, we have been destroying our core values since the s beginning with allowing our courts to take student prayer out of our schools. We sat back and let it happen and they have been going downhill ever since. Too many now want God out of our lives and our decision making, moving the accepted norm in nearly all areas of our life, including the family. If I wanted to destroy America, I would do the following: change our value system through the destruction of our morals, removing God from our lives; destroy our capitalist system through massive debt; decimate our health care system (Obama Care); create a welfare society that is dependent on government ; fan the fires of class warfare and bite by bite, disarm our citizens. Lastly, I would take over the education of our children, from a very early age so they could be indoctrinated into my way of thinking. In other words, exactly what Obama is trying to do! Thats why I and so many others that love America and have faith in God dislike Obama. We dont need another reason, thats reason enough! Wayne Rackley Oak Run LETTERScontinued from Page 8 This Saturday between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., the Fairfield Village SAC will be sponsoring its semi-annual yard sale. Again this year, a hot dog lunch will be for sale in the Fairfield Clubhouse for a very reasonable price. Hot dogs, chips and a soft drink along with assorted sweets and desserts will enable buyers and sellers to continue through the morning and lunch time to participate in a chance for super big bargains! Everyone is invited to come to Fairfield Village (off Southwest 60th Avenue) and survey the numerous bargains that will be offered in many of the carports of the 280+ homes in Fairfield Village. Last year, there were all kinds of household items, clothing, tools, electronic equipment, decorator items, furniture, knick-knacks, and handmade items. There will be literally something for everyone so everyone should come to find their own personal treasures. Proceeds will go toward helping to sponsor Social Activities Committee activities. Those activities coming up in the next few months include: the Memorial Day picnic, the 4th of July barbecue, and the Labor Day cookout. All of the FFV community looks forward to these gatherings each year, but many of the fund-raising activities are as enjoyable as the events themselves. So, if you have any inclination toward bargains...come on down! You will be glad that you did.Saturday dinnerIn other news from Fairfield Village, the Saturday night pot luck dinner was quite successful on April 19. Granted, there were fewer people in attendance than usual, but the food and the fun was not diminished in the least. There was delicious food, interesting conversations, a 50/50 winner (Toni Belcher), and musical background by virtue of the new TV which has been installed in the main room of the Clubhouse. The number had no influence on the fun which was quite pleasant. All neighbors are reminded to check out next months pot luck dinner schedule. These are normally held on the third Saturday evening of the month. Please come and enjoy time with friends and neighbors while enjoying really good home-cooked food.HOA meetingThe regular Fairfield Village HOA meeting was held on Thursday evening, April 17 at 6 p.m. in the Clubhouse. To say that the meeting was lively would be an understatement. Those there were part of what could be described as an informative evening for sure. Some would say that it involved some differences of opinion, and that would not be wrong. However, in the final analysis, some new information was shared, some difficult decisions were made, and some new perspectives came closer to being understood. It would be incorrect to say that everyone was totally pleased with all the decisions and all the outcomes, but it would be correct to say that many compromises were made so that everyone got something that could be considered a win or a victory. Board member, Kerry Breedon, shared information about a wish list that many attendees had previously not known existed. It seems that American Land Lease asks the HOA to prepare a yearly list of things that the neighbors of FFV would like to have included as amenities for the entire community. It may have been because of lack of communication that many of those attending had not even known that there was such a thing as this wish list. As in the past, the HOA Board submitted a list to the management company for possible addition to/for the community. The deadline date this year was Friday, April 18, so adding to this years list was not the point in Kerrys presentation. However, he said that he wanted to let everyone know what was being submitted this year and to make sure that more FFV neighbors could be involved in next years submitted list. This list is for the good of the whole community, not just for those things thought of by the HOA Board. To make the submission more nearly universal, the HOA Board would like for all members of the FFV community to think seriously about things that could be purchased, improved, or added to the community and then contact an HOA Board member with those suggestions over the next months. Granted, it will be a year before the next list is submitted, but that also means that there is plenty of time for neighbors to think seriously about this and present viable options for consideration. The HOA members are available for conversations about this list or about any things that should be brought to the Boards attention. They urge FFV neighbors to feel welcome to contact them either individually or collectively. It would be a big help if these comments or wishes were also presented in written form so that they will be completely understood.Piano progressJean Chapman reports that much progress has been made toward the purchase of a piano for the main room of the FFV Clubhouse. The fund-raiser piano dance party was a success and more individual pledges and donations have been received. As more information about the options become available, they will be reported so that those interested members of the community will be kept aware of what is transpiring. Anyone with information that would be valuable for the group sponsoring the piano is urged to contact Jean Chapman, Loretta Zang, Sandy Williams, or Linda Urbonowitz. Any of these ladies will pass the information along in order to be sure that the best possible choice is made in the purchase, transporting, and appropriate set up of the piano. These people and many others are so looking forward to the time that all FFV neighbors can enjoy the piano.AgainWe hope to see many people at our yard sale on Saturday, April 27 between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Come on down and check out the bargains and meet the nice people who live in Fairfield Village...Marion Countys ...lively place filled with lovely people. Have a great week! The price is right! Come on down to Fairfields big yard sale Fairfield Village Priscilla Geissal Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com The American Cancer Societys Manto-Man Ocala group will meet on April 24 at 7 p.m. at the Urology Health Team, 3201 S.W. 34th St., Ocala. This is a prostate cancer education and support group that meets monthly, has speakers and refreshments and wives/caregivers are also welcome. There is a fledgling website http://www.mantomanocala.weebly.com April Guest Speaker: Dr. Mario R. Putzeys-Alverez Open Forum Discussion Prostate Cancer. For information contact Mickey Weller, 352-369-9486. Cancer Society Man-to-Man group to meet Read the classifieds

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 11 2 W ednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO ADVERTISECall854-3986 ADVER TISING 3 5 2 4 6 5 7 5 3 8 352-465-7538 20312 E. Pennsylvania Ave. www.bluerunbicycles.com Featuring Bikes For Every Rider! Springtime is 000ENII RIDE TIME 000EMK3 P r om/Homec oming and Quinc eaner a Dr esses 10% Off with this ad 7470 SW 60th A v enue (352) 671-1890 Monda y Satur da y 10am-5pm SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 000EM60 000EM60 Florida Window Medics, Inc. Screen Rooms Acrylic & Glass Rooms Rescreens Broken Glass Replacement Windows Gutters Foggy Windows Cement Sliding Glass Door Repair Call & speak directly to the owner David Heath Comp. #5524 352 484-5697 WINDOW REPAIRS 000EJLN GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 7 9 5 $ 7 9 5 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RA Y RAY RA YC C C C C C ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION Crayconst.com Crayconst.com Crayconst.com T rade in your old vinyl windows for acrylic or glass 1 6 x 7 S L I D I N G G A R A G E S C R E E N D O O R 1 6 x 7 S L I D I N G 16 x 7 SLIDING G A R A G E GARAGE S C R E E N SCREEN D O O R DOOR 000EIY5 L EE S P RESSURE W ASHING L OW W AT E R U SAGE 489-67 86 Licensed & Insured PRESSURE CLEANING Quality W ork For Low Prices! No Pressure Roof Cleaning! Painting Metal Scrap Pickup 000EGSJ 000EE5F IRRIGA TION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGA TION 3398 S.W 74th A ve., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 SPRING Special Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor W e will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2012 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $ 39 99 Call for details Expires 4/30/2013 10% OFF r epairs 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000DZWC CONCRETE WORK REP AIRING OLD INST ALLING NEW W e Make Y our Concrete Look Good Specializing in Repairing Concrete Driveways Pool Decks Patios Entrance Ways Advantages: Mildew & Oil Resistant Non Skid Protection Easy to Keep Clean Commercial Grade Quality RENEWED SURF ACES 000EHW9 PLUMBING EP A Lead Certification #NA T -1 13266-1 OSHA 10 #1216933 Fla. Lic. #CFC1427666 804-9165 Associated P lumbing and Pipe F r om Ba thr oom R emodeling to Fixing Leak y F aucets, and installing Bliss W alk-in T ubs Residential and Commercial 71 1 185 DIALAPRO F o r Y o u r P r o f e s s i o n a l N e e d s For Y our Pr ofessional Needs W E S T M A R I O N M e s s e n g e r WEST MARION Messenger 000EP A C NOW BUYING GOLD, PLA TINUM, SIL VER, FLA TW ARE, COINS, DIAMONDS, W A TCHES & GOLD-FILLED JEWELR Y YOUR UNW ANTED JEWELR Y COULD BE WOR TH LOTS OF MONEY! 6333 SW ST A TE ROAD 200 854-66 22 WE CAN COME TO YOU! SELL YOUR GOLD & SIL VER WHILE PRICES ARE STILL HIGH SELL YOUR GOLD & SIL VER WHILE PRICES ARE STILL HIGH Open MF 9-5 We buy large diamonds 1 CT or larger We buy all premium watches and all gold watches US & Foreign Silver Coins US & Foreign Gold Coins Stamped Sterling Flatware & Service Sets C A S H H A N D E D O U T O N T H E S P O T C A S H H A N D E D O U T O N T H E S P O T CASH HANDED OUT ON THE SPOT 8k, 10k, 14k, 18k, 22k, 2 4k, Dental Gold & Platunum W ANT TO KNOW WHA T S IN THA T OLD JEWELR Y BOX ? L ET US HELP C ALL 854-6622 T ODA Y N O A PPOINTMENT N ECESSAR Y Between Queen Of Peace & Flowers Bakery WE PAY CASH Another great night at the clubhouse! The Hobo potluck dinner and then the concert by Vincenzo Bartolomea Basile were fantastic. There were many hobos at the party. Did you recognize Pat Tobin? Many others, including Dot Roberts and Jack and Margene Sheidler, were all decked out as street people. Approximately 60 residents and guests enjoyed the concert by Mr. Basile, who is billed as a Romantic Baritone from Brooklyn, New York. His selections included Spanish Eyes, Because of You, My Way, Falling In Love With You, Ava Maria, and ended the evening by singing The Lords Prayer. At one point in the program he even serenaded Rita Carr with a song in Italian. There were many door prizes won by various residents; you guess it: fifty/fifty was won by Earle Talley! Remember the next big event is the Vegas Night with a catered dinner and entertainment by Sally Langwah. Tickets are available from Charlotte Payne, Marie Schneider, and Carol Mowrey.Ladies Lunc heonThe April Ladies Luncheon was enjoyed by 20 women from our community. We had great food and service at the new Darrells Restaurant. Next months lunch will be at the Horse and Hound on Silver Springs Boulevard. Call Marion Gartman or Pat Tobin for reservations.Mount Dora tripW ould you be interested in a trip to Mount Dora? The R ed Hot F illies are sponsoring a trip by chartered bus on May 14. If you would like to go with us, please contact Carolyn Slocumb. Cost for the bus trip is $27. Our thoughts and prayers go out to those affected by the murderous attack in Boston. God Bless America! H o b o po t l u ck dinn e r e n t e r t ain s a t Q uai l M e ad o w Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb This was the gathering of the Ladies Luncheon from Quail Meadow which took place at Darrells Diner. Jack & Margene Sheidler. Above, Pat Tobin. At left, Vincenzo Basile.

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INDEX Quail Meadow......5 Fairfield Village..5 Ocala Palms........5 Stone Creek........5 VOLUME 7, NUMBER 4 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 Puzzles Page 9 ClassifiedsPage 1012 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000EPV2 HOMES STARTING AT $32,900 BEST OF THE BEST 2014 J acobsen 3 BR/2 B A T his home w as built with 2 x 6 construction. Comes with China Labs sinks ceiling fan preps in all rooms 1 pc fiberglass tub and sho wer It is built b y the leg endar y J acobsen Homes with their 53 y ear tradition. T his is a limited oppor tunity Must see this home to appreciate its v alue! WE HA VE OVER 30 MODEL S ON DISPL A Y WE HAVE OVER 40 MODELS ON DISPLAY NEW HOMES STARTING AT $ 32,900 TAYLOR MADE SALE 2460 Sq. Ft. of living 4 bedroom, Playroom & Retreat. Open Great Room and Beautiful Kitchen with Upgraded Whirlpool Appliances/Fireplace and many more options. Comes with 2 x 6 walls and 2 x 8 floor joists. 11 TIME WINNER 352-621-9181 2012 2012 2012 2012 T A YL OR MADE HO MES www.taylormade-homes.com 7165 US Hwy. 19, Homosassa, FL 1 mile south of Howards Flea Market WE WANT TRADE-INS. BEST PRICES PAID! SALE PRICE Delivery & Set-up $ 48,900 OR ONLY $ 385 57 NO MONEY DOWN per mo. wac. with A/C, Stairs & Skirting. Use Land Equity. SALE PRICE Delivery & Set-up $ 98,900 OR ONLY $ 662 73 NO MONEY DOWN per mo. wac. with A/C, Stairs & Skirting. Use Land Equity. FREE WASHER & DRYER With ad. Must present coupon prior to purchase. Torch RunThe Law Enforcement Torch Run to boost Special Olympics took place in downtown Ocala last week. Above are the runners as they start out, and at the right is the entire group.PHOTOS BY RON RATNER PHOTOS BY JIM CLARKRelay for LifeThe American Cancer Society Relay for Life took place Friday, April 19, in front of West Marion Community Hospital. Above, the evening started with the Survivors Lap. They were led around the track by the West Port High School Army JROTC Color Guard. The jobless rate in March for Workforce Connections Citrus, Levy and Marion counties region was 7.8 percent, down 0.7 percent over the month and 2.4 percent lower than the same time last year. The unemployment rate for the region is the lowest since June 2008 when it was 7.7 percent. For the fourth consecutive month, the Ocala/Marion County metropolitan area led the state with the fastest jobgrowth rate at 3.3 percent, with 3,000 new jobs over the year. Floridas jobgrowth rate during the same period was 1.9 percent. According to Fridays release of the March 2013 unemployment rates by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO), Marion County posted an unemployment rate of 7.8 percent, a drop of 0.6 percent over the month and the lowest it has been since June 2008 when the rate was 7.6 percent; Citrus Countys rate fell 0.8 percentage points to 7.8 percent, the lowest since June 2008 (8.1 percent); and Levy County dropped 0.8 percentage points to 7.6 percent, the lowest since July 2008 (7.7 percent). Local rates are not seasonally adjusted. Floridas not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in March was 7.0 percent, the lowest since October 2008. The national rate was 7.6 percent in March. Rusty Skinner, Workforce ConnecCounty jobless rate falls Please see JOBLESS Page 4 Its high time for moms to be pampered. On May 9, Paddock Mall is the place to be as Simon Property Group, Inc. provides a free evening of relaxation and fun in honor of national Moms Nite Out. One hundred twenty nine Simon properties will be participating in this years event. The presenting sponsor of Simons Moms Nite Out celebration this year is Rethink Varicose Veins. At Paddock Mall, attendees will have the opportunity to participate in an exciting evening filled with refreshments, entertainment, fashion shows and beauty services, and prize giveaways all focused on rewarding Moms. The Paddock Mall event will take place Thursday, May 9, from 5 to 8 p.m. in Center Court. WOCA DJ Joe Martone will be on-hand to emcee the festivities! Moms are so incredibly deserving of a night off, said Brenda Cleary, director of marketing and business development at Paddock Mall, and it is our privilege to be the venue where they come to enjoy it. Cleary added that as an extra bonus, one lucky mom and her friend will be treated to a trip to Chicago to see Bon Jovis Because We Can tour at historic Soldier Field on Friday, July 12. Bon Jovis new release, What About Now is in stores now. Rethink Varicose Veins is an educaPrepare now for Moms Nite Out on May 9 at Paddock Mall Please see MOM Page 4 On Thursday, April 11, the residents of Stone Creek said farewell to Rick Morang, maintenance supervisor. Rick was at Stone Creek since its beginning. In a previous article I did about Rick, former Lifestyle Director Jennifer Geraldo referred to Rick as the go-to guy for any problems. Rick is the type of man who gives 110 percent to Stone Creek. Often times, he would be called back to help with an event problem and he never complained. Rick was extremely helpful to the Kitchen Committee and now the Kitchen Club as the club took on the role of custodian of the kitchen amenity. He was always there to correct a problem or gave great advice when needed. The Kitchen Club is sorry to see him leave as many others will be. The club presented Rick with a gift in appreciation for all he has done for the kitchen amenity to make it such a viable facility. Chris Johnson also presented Rick with a gift from the Stone Creek staff. Chris said, Rick was a tremendous asset to our Stone Creek community both in his job as Maintenance Supervisor, but as a friend as well. He will be greatly missed, and we wish him success in his new job. I would venture that many at Stone Creek residents agree with Chris statement. Rick will not be far from Stone Creek as he has taken over at the Fore Ranch Community. He has taken on a position as an Association Manager. The Fore Ranch Community will benefit from Ricks experience. When I asked Rick how his job at Stone Creek would prepare him for his new job, Rick said, During the past 6 years at Stone Creek has lead me into this position, by all the work that I did as Maintenance Manager and under the leadership of the Cams. I was able to be involved in many aspects of this role. Rick told me that he will miss all the friendships he has made here along with his coworkers and with the beauty of the facility. For the person who will follow in his footsteps, Rick has the following advice, Take pride in this community like its your own. When making decisions, be fair and consistent. Rick gives the following statement about the community he called home for the last six years. It has been a pleasure to work at Stone Creek and to grow with the community since its inception. The residents are fortunate to have such a wonderful and peaceful place to live. I am now looking forward to my new assignment as a community manager and will take all the great memories with me. Wishing the Stone Creek Community greatness. The Stone Creek Community wishes Rick much happiness in his new role and we will see him back on June 5 when he comes back for the weight loss challenge he has with Chris Johnson. When I first heard that Rick was leaving, I e-mailed and asked him if he was leaving because of the challenge. He told me he was going to win but I think he has some work ahead of him to beat Chris. June 5 will tell and we will all welcome Rick back at that time. I know many will have his number on speed dial because he has been such an important part of Stone Creek. Stone Creeks Go-to Guy leaves for Fore Ranch Stone Creek Patricia Gizzi Rick Morang Methodist Men serving up meatloafThe Mens group of the First United Methodist Church of Dunnellon will serve a meatloaf dinner April 26, 4 to 6 p.m. Tickets are $8 at the door. The dinner will be cooked by the churchs Master Chef Charles Scearce.The church is at 2501 W. State Road 40, Dunnellon.



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INDEX Quail Meadow......5 Fairfield Village..5 Ocala Palms........5 Stone Creek........5 VOLUME 7, NUMBER 4 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 Puzzles Page 9 Classifieds Page 10 12 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000EPV2 HOMES STARTING AT $32,900 BEST OF THE BEST 2014 Jacobsen 3 BR/2 BA This home was built with 2 x 6 construction. Comes with China Labs sinks, ceiling fan preps in all rooms, 1 pc fiberglass tub and shower. It is built by the legendary Jacobsen Homes with their 53 year tradition. This is a limited opportunity. Must see this home to appreciate its value! WE HAVE OVER 30 MODELS ON DISPLAY WE HAVE OVER 40 MODELS ON DISPLAY NEW HOMES STARTING AT $ 32,900 TAYLOR MADE SALE 2460 Sq. Ft. of living 4 bedroom, Playroom & Retreat. Open Great Room and Beautiful Kitchen with Upgraded Whirlpool Appliances/Fireplace and many more options. Comes with 2 x 6 walls and 2 x 8 floor joists. 11 TIME WINNER 352-621-9181 2012 2012 2012 2012 TAYLOR MADE HOMES www.taylormade-homes.com 7165 US Hwy. 19, Homosassa, FL 1 mile south of Howards Flea Market WE WANT TRADE-INS. BEST PRICES PAID! SALE PRICE Delivery & Set-up $ 48,900 OR ONLY $ 385 57 NO MONEY DOWN per mo. wac. with A/C, Stairs & Skirting. Use Land Equity. SALE PRICE Delivery & Set-up $ 98,900 OR ONLY $ 662 73 NO MONEY DOWN per mo. wac. with A/C, Stairs & Skirting. Use Land Equity. FREE WASHER & DRYER With ad. Must present coupon prior to purchase. Torch RunThe Law Enforcement Torch Run to boost Special Olympics took place in downtown Ocala last week. Above are the runners as they start out, and at the right is the entire group.PHOTOS BY RON RATNER PHOTOS BY JIM CLARKRelay for Life The American Cancer Society Relay for Life took place Friday, April 19, in front of West Marion Community Hospital. Above, the evening started with the Survivors Lap. They were led around the track by the West Port High School Army JROTC Color Guard. The jobless rate in March for Workforce Connections Citrus, Levy and Marion counties region was 7.8 percent, down 0.7 percent over the month and 2.4 percent lower than the same time last year. The unemployment rate for the region is the lowest since June 2008 when it was 7.7 percent. For the fourth consecutive month, the Ocala/Marion County metropolitan area led the state with the fastest jobgrowth rate at 3.3 percent, with 3,000 new jobs over the year. Floridas jobgrowth rate during the same period was 1.9 percent. According to Fridays release of the March 2013 unemployment rates by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO), Marion County posted an unemployment rate of 7.8 percent, a drop of 0.6 percent over the month and the lowest it has been since June 2008 when the rate was 7.6 percent; Citrus Countys rate fell 0.8 percentage points to 7.8 percent, the lowest since June 2008 (8.1 percent); and Levy County dropped 0.8 percentage points to 7.6 percent, the lowest since July 2008 (7.7 percent). Local rates are not seasonally adjusted. Floridas not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in March was 7.0 percent, the lowest since October 2008. The national rate was 7.6 percent in March. Rusty Skinner, Workforce ConnecCounty jobless rate falls Please see JOBLESS Page 4 Its high time for moms to be pampered. On May 9, Paddock Mall is the place to be as Simon Property Group, Inc. provides a free evening of relaxation and fun in honor of national Moms Nite Out. One hundred twenty nine Simon properties will be participating in this years event. The presenting sponsor of Simons Moms Nite Out celebration this year is Rethink Varicose Veins. At Paddock Mall, attendees will have the opportunity to participate in an exciting evening filled with refreshments, entertainment, fashion shows and beauty services, and prize giveaways all focused on rewarding Moms. The Paddock Mall event will take place Thursday, May 9, from 5 to 8 p.m. in Center Court. WOCA DJ Joe Martone will be on-hand to emcee the festivities! Moms are so incredibly deserving of a night off, said Brenda Cleary, director of marketing and business development at Paddock Mall, and it is our privilege to be the venue where they come to enjoy it. Cleary added that as an extra bonus, one lucky mom and her friend will be treated to a trip to Chicago to see Bon Jovis Because We Can tour at historic Soldier Field on Friday, July 12. Bon Jovis new release, What About Now is in stores now. Rethink Varicose Veins is an educaPrepare now for Moms Nite Out on May 9 at Paddock Mall Please see MOM Page 4 O n Thursday, April 11, the residents of Stone Creek said farewell to Rick Morang, maintenance supervisor. Rick was at Stone Creek since its beginning. In a previous article I did about Rick, former Lifestyle Director Jennifer Geraldo referred to Rick as the go-to guy for any problems. Rick is the type of man who gives 110 percent to Stone Creek. Often times, he would be called back to help with an event problem and he never complained. Rick was extremely helpful to the Kitchen Committee and now the Kitchen Club as the club took on the role of custodian of the kitchen amenity. He was always there to correct a problem or gave great advice when needed. The Kitchen Club is sorry to see him leave as many others will be. The club presented Rick with a gift in appreciation for all he has done for the kitchen amenity to make it such a viable facility. Chris Johnson also presented Rick with a gift from the Stone Creek staff. Chris said, Rick was a tremendous asset to our Stone Creek community both in his job as Maintenance Supervisor, but as a friend as well. He will be greatly missed, and we wish him success in his new job. I would venture that many at Stone Creek residents agree with Chris statement. Rick will not be far from Stone Creek as he has taken over at the Fore Ranch Community. He has taken on a position as an Association Manager. The Fore Ranch Community will benefit from Ricks experience. When I asked Rick how his job at Stone Creek would prepare him for his new job, Rick said, During the past 6 years at Stone Creek has lead me into this position, by all the work that I did as Maintenance Manager and under the leadership of the Cams. I was able to be involved in many aspects of this role. Rick told me that he will miss all the friendships he has made here along with his coworkers and with the beauty of the facility. For the person who will follow in his footsteps, Rick has the following advice, Take pride in this community like its your own. When making decisions, be fair and consistent. Rick gives the following statement about the community he called home for the last six years. It has been a pleasure to work at Stone Creek and to grow with the community since its inception. The residents are fortunate to have such a wonderful and peaceful place to live. I am now looking forward to my new assignment as a community manager and will take all the great memories with me. Wishing the Stone Creek Community greatness. The Stone Creek Community wishes Rick much happiness in his new role and we will see him back on June 5 when he comes back for the weight loss challenge he has with Chris Johnson. When I first heard that Rick was leaving, I e-mailed and asked him if he was leaving because of the challenge. He told me he was going to win but I think he has some work ahead of him to beat Chris. June 5 will tell and we will all welcome Rick back at that time. I know many will have his number on speed dial because he has been such an important part of Stone Creek. Stone Creeks Go-to Guy leaves for Fore Ranch Stone Creek Patricia Gizzi Rick Morang Methodist Men serving up meatloaf The Mens group of the First United Methodist Church of Dunnellon will serve a meatloaf dinner April 26, 4 to 6 p.m. Tickets are $8 at the door. The dinner will be cooked by the churchs Master Chef Charles Scearce.The church is at 2501 W. State Road 40, Dunnellon.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 11 2 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO ADVERTISE Call 854-3986 ADVERTISING 3 5 2 4 6 5 7 5 3 8 352-465-7538 20312 E. Pennsylvania Ave. www.bluerunbicycles.com Featuring Bikes For Every Rider! Springtime is 000ENII RIDE TIME 000EMK3 Prom/Homecoming and Quinceanera Dresses 10% Off with this ad 7470 SW 60th Avenue (352) 671-1890 Monday Saturday 10am-5pm SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 0 0 0 E M 6 0 000EM60 Florida Window Medics, Inc. Screen Rooms Acrylic & Glass Rooms Rescreens Broken Glass Replacement Windows Gutters Foggy Windows Cement Sliding Glass Door Repair Call & speak directly to the owner David Heath Comp. #5524 352 484-5697 WINDOW REPAIRS 000EJLN GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 7 9 5 $ 7 9 5 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RAY R A Y RAY C C C C C C ONSTRUCTION O N S T R U C T I O N ONSTRUCTION C r a y c o n s t c o m C r a y c o n s t c o m Crayconst.com T rade in your old vinyl windows for acrylic or glass 1 6 x 7 S L I D I N G G A R A G E S C R E E N D O O R 1 6 x 7 S L I D I N G 16 x 7 SLIDING G A R A G E GARAGE S C R E E N SCREEN D O O R DOOR 000EIY5 L EE S P RESSURE W ASHING L OW W ATER U SAGE 489-6786 Licensed & Insured PRESSURE CLEANING Quality Work For Low Prices! No Pressure Roof Cleaning! Painting Metal Scrap Pickup 000EGSJ 000EE5F IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 SPRING Special Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2012 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $ 39 99 Call for details Expires 4/30/2013 10% OFF repairs 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000DZWC CONCRETE WORK REPAIRING OLD INSTALLING NEW We Make Your Concrete Look Good Specializing in Repairing Concrete Driveways Pool Decks Patios Entrance Ways Advantages: Mildew & Oil Resistant Non Skid Protection Easy to Keep Clean Commercial Grade Quality RENEWED SURFACES 000EHW9 PLUMBING EPA Lead Certification #NAT-113266-1 OSHA 10 #1216933 Fla. Lic. #CFC1427666 804-9165 Associated Plumbing and Pipe From Bathroom Remodeling to Fixing Leaky Faucets, and installing Bliss Walk-in Tubs Residential and Commercial 711185 DIALAPRO F o r Y o u r P r o f e s s i o n a l N e e d s For Your Professional Needs W E S T M A R I O N M e s s e n g e r WEST MARION Messenger 000EPAC NOW BUYING GOLD, PLATINUM, SILVER, FLATWARE, COINS, DIAMONDS, WATCHES & GOLD-FILLED JEWELRY YOUR UNWANTED JEWELRY COULD BE WORTH LOTS OF MONEY! 6333 SW STATE ROAD 200 854-6622 WE CAN COME TO YOU! SELL YOUR GOLD & SILVER WHILE PRICES ARE STILL HIGH SELL YOUR GOLD & SILVER WHILE PRICES ARE STILL HIGH Open MF 9-5 We buy large diamonds 1 CT or larger We buy all premium watches and all gold watches US & Foreign Silver Coins US & Foreign Gold Coins Stamped Sterling Flatware & Service Sets C A S H H A N D E D O U T O N T H E S P O T C A S H H A N D E D O U T O N T H E S P O T CASH HANDED OUT ON THE SPOT 8k, 10k, 14k, 18k, 22k, 24k, Dental Gold & Platunum W ANT TO KNOW WHAT S IN THAT OLD JEWELR Y BOX ? L ET US HELP C ALL 854-6622 T ODAY N O A PPOINTMENT N ECESSAR Y Between Queen Of Peace & Flowers Bakery WE PAY CASH A nother great night at the clubhouse! The Hobo potluck dinner and then the concert by Vincenzo Bartolomea Basile were fantastic. There were many hobos at the party. Did you recognize Pat Tobin? Many others, including Dot Roberts and Jack and Margene Sheidler, were all decked out as street people. Approximately 60 residents and guests enjoyed the concert by Mr. Basile, who is billed as a Romantic Baritone from Brooklyn, New York. His selections included Spanish Eyes, Because of You, My Way, Falling In Love With You, Ava Maria, and ended the evening by singing The Lords Prayer. At one point in the program he even serenaded Rita Carr with a song in Italian. There were many door prizes won by various residents; you guess it: fifty/fifty was won by Earle Talley! Remember the next big event is the Vegas Night with a catered dinner and entertainment by Sally Langwah. Tickets are available from Charlotte Payne, Marie Schneider, and Carol Mowrey.Ladies LuncheonThe April Ladies Luncheon was enjoyed by 20 women from our community. We had great food and service at the new Darrells Restaurant. Next months lunch will be at the Horse and Hound on Silver Springs Boulevard. Call Marion Gartman or Pat Tobin for reservations.Mount Dora trip Would you be interested in a trip to Mount Dora? The Red Hot Fillies are sponsoring a trip by chartered bus on May 14. If you would like to go with us, please contact Carolyn Slocumb. Cost for the bus trip is $27. Our thoughts and prayers go out to those affected by the murderous attack in Boston. God Bless America! Hobo pot luck dinner entertains at Quail Meadow Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb This was the gathering of the Ladies Luncheon from Quail Meadow which took place at Darrells Diner. Jack & Margene Sheidler. Above, Pat Tobin. At left, Vincenzo Basile.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 3 10 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials. Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. EMPTYTRUCK Returning to Milwaukee, Chicago, Mid West Can move 1 item or whole household (414) 520-1612 Brian Bnet CARE MANAGER The Centers is seeking a Bachelors level Care Manager to coordinate mental health svcs for children enrolled in Behavioral Health Network. Extensive travel required in Citrus & Hernando Counties. Use of personal vehicle reqd., State mileage rate pd. Work hours dictated by caseload. Please submit salary. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us CLERICAL The Centers is seeking a clerical Program Assistant to work in a fastpaced outpatient setting in Lecanto. This position requires strong customer service skills, attention to detail, ability to work independently and multi-task. HS diploma or GED equiv & 2 yrs exp reqd. Salary is $9-10/hr.Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify Fax or e-mail resume to HR, The Centers, Inc. (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us TBOSS Therapist The Centers is seeking Masters Level Therapist for TBOSS position in Marion and Citrus Counties. Must have Masters in a related field of Human Services and min 2 yrs exp working with adults, children & adolescents providing individual, group & family therapy. Incentive Opportunity Available. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us TRANSPORTER/GENERALIST The Centers is seeking a Transporter/Generalist for our Lighthouse program in Inverness. This position provides members (mentally ill adults) with transportation, and participates as a Generalist in the program based on the Clubhouse model of a work ordered day.Some evening and weekend work required. Salary is $8.25-$9.00/hr. Acceptable driving record & clean background reqd. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify Fax or e-mail resume to HR, The Centers, Inc. (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us ASSIST SENIORS We provide non-medical companionship and home help for seniors. Day, weekend and overnight shifts available. Join our special team of CAREGivers today. 352-622-5936 Lic. #HCS229393 ALLAUTOS WANTED with or without title. Any cond. make or model. We pay up to $10,000 and offer free towing. (813) 505-6939 OAK RUN COUNTRY CLUBWOW! 3 Bedroom Golf Course Home 2 Car garage, firepace & pool table, use of all amenities, golf course, 4 swimming pools, 1 indoor, tennis courts, jacuzzi, driving range, restarant & health clubs, all lawn, maint, included $1,100. No smoking, No Pets, Available April 15th (443) 299-2047 L ET U S W ORK F OR Y OU CALL TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403West Marion Messenger Classifieds Get Results! PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 2355 S. Ripple Path Crystal River, 34429 Great Marine Mech, Boat storage and launch site for nearby scallops plus fishing & kayaks, Lgr bldg w/ 3/18rollups office tlr & boat ramp, $169k, finance poss. call 352-634-3862 HOMOASASSA5+ DEN BEDROOMS. 3 bath. THIS HUGE AND BEAUTIFUL TWO STORYHOME WITH 3 CAR GARAGE IS OVER 3500 SQ. FT. HOME BACKS UPTO ANATURE PRESERVE. HOME IS AFORECLOSURE SHORT SALE AND THE BANK IS WORKING WITH THE SELLERS. THIS HOME WAS BUILTIN 2005. dennis_neff@yahoo.co m BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 STUMP GRINDING CALLJIM FOR FREE ESTIMATES (800) 478-8679 Trimming,Removal and Debris Clean Up. Reliable Service,Reasonable Prices. Lic/Ins 20 yrs Exp.FREE Estimates. Residential/Commercial. 352-445-7916 or 352-292-5446 Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKS FREE TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 Somebody else wants it! Got something special you no longer use? Sell it in the Classifieds. It may be just the perfect item to fill somebody elses need. TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 000EFNB FREE TO THE PUBLIC April 27, 2013 10:30am Dunnellon Public Library Meeting Room 20351 Robinson Road, Dunnellon Friends of the Dunnellon Public Library Present: William and Sue Wills as President Franklin our 32nd President and First lady Eleanor. Presidents and Their First Ladies, dramatically speaking is the creation of the veteran acting and writing team of the Wills. The couple are now in their 16th year of bringing to life the stories of Presidential couples. The Wills are not impersonators, their costumes, dialects, and demeanors recreate these historical characters. Mr. and Mrs. Wills have performed in over 30 performances at seven of the nations Presidential Museums. William researches and creates scripts while Sue edits his work and creates the costumes. Sometimes forgotten are the young people who met, fell in love and the years of triumphs and tragedies that shaped their personalities and their relationship which led up to the 1932 election and their 12 years as First Couple. The focus will be on their private side and how that affected their public lives. For additional information contact the library at 352-438-2520 J a s m i n e P l a z a 3 5 2 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6 1 6 0 S W S R 2 0 0 U n i t 1 0 4 O c a l a F l o r i d a 3 4 4 7 6 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 Readers Choice Winner Jewelry Store 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12 www.jandjjewelersocala.com Thank You For Voting Us Readers Choice #1 Jeweler For 6 Consecutive Years 000EL0I S T O R E H O U R S : T U E S F R I 1 0 5 S A T 1 0 2 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 000EGB4 John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000EHZ7 Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 000EN8O Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting L o o k f o r u s o n F a c e b o o k L o o k f o r u s Look for us o n F a c e b o o k on Facebook 000EL19 The Truesdell Professional Building 200 N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Fl 34482 KELLEAN K. TRUESDELL, J.D., LLM Attorney & Counselor at Law (352) 873-4141 or KelleanTruesdell.com My Florida Estate Planning Workshop is available any day at any hour. Wills, Living Trusts, Financial and Medical Powers of Attorney, Probate, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, Asset Protection, Federal Death Tax Minimization, Trust Administration, Elder Law and Personal LifeCare Services. 352-875-7433 875-7041 Interior & Exterior 000EPDN 22 Yrs. of Excellent Local References Hi Ocala Palms Neighbors For almost a decade Ive been in this neighborhood doing interior and exterior painting, THANK YOU all very much for your support and trust. Im looking forward to continue serving you and doing my very best of high quality work. Sincerely, A L C AS T ANO P A I N T I N G I N C P AINTING I NC brary, then there wasnt an explosion; there were 120 people hurt, then there were 70, then it was over 100 again; there were three unexploded devices found, then there were none, then there were two that were detonated by police, then it turns out they were not bombs; cell phone service was cut off to avoid remote detonation of additional bombs, then it was restored (Sprint and Verizon both said that their cell phone service was never interrupted). So now we wait for the follow-ups, possible arrests, etc. There is no doubt that the explosions were another in a long list of terrorist tragedies. There is also no doubt that, for a while, we will be inundated with rumors and unconfirmed facts. We just need to accept that there are bad people in the world, and we need to be ever vigilant to lessen their impact on society. And we dont need the networks to tell us that. EDITORIALcontinued from Page 8 them, etc. A couple hundred years ago Americans needed protection from the Native Americans, who were fighting to keep their land from being poached by invaders from Europe. Now, Americans need protection from the Native American-run casinos, so the people dont get their savings poached by those who run the gambling establishments. Just like the game of cowboys and Indians, this is a battle for survival, especially for senior citizens. But unlike those childhood games, once someone is down, they may not necessarily get up. Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger. CLARK continued from Page 8 Regretfully, we have been destroying our core values since the s beginning with allowing our courts to take student prayer out of our schools. We sat back and let it happen and they have been going downhill ever since. Too many now want God out of our lives and our decision making, moving the accepted norm in nearly all areas of our life, including the family. If I wanted to destroy America, I would do the following: change our value system through the destruction of our morals, removing God from our lives; destroy our capitalist system through massive debt; decimate our health care system (Obama Care); create a welfare society that is dependent on government ; fan the fires of class warfare and bite by bite, disarm our citizens. Lastly, I would take over the education of our children, from a very early age so they could be indoctrinated into my way of thinking. In other words, exactly what Obama is trying to do! Thats why I and so many others that love America and have faith in God dislike Obama. We dont need another reason, thats reason enough! Wayne Rackley Oak Run LETTERScontinued from Page 8 T his Saturday between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., the Fairfield Village SAC will be sponsoring its semi-annual yard sale. Again this year, a hot dog lunch will be for sale in the Fairfield Clubhouse for a very reasonable price. Hot dogs, chips and a soft drink along with assorted sweets and desserts will enable buyers and sellers to continue through the morning and lunch time to participate in a chance for super big bargains! Everyone is invited to come to Fairfield Village (off Southwest 60th Avenue) and survey the numerous bargains that will be offered in many of the carports of the 280+ homes in Fairfield Village. Last year, there were all kinds of household items, clothing, tools, electronic equipment, decorator items, furniture, knick-knacks, and handmade items. There will be literally something for everyone so everyone should come to find their own personal treasures. Proceeds will go toward helping to sponsor Social Activities Committee activities. Those activities coming up in the next few months include: the Memorial Day picnic, the 4th of July barbecue, and the Labor Day cookout. All of the FFV community looks forward to these gatherings each year, but many of the fund-raising activities are as enjoyable as the events themselves. So, if you have any inclination toward bargains...come on down! You will be glad that you did. Saturday dinnerIn other news from Fairfield Village, the Saturday night pot luck dinner was quite successful on April 19. Granted, there were fewer people in attendance than usual, but the food and the fun was not diminished in the least. There was delicious food, interesting conversations, a 50/50 winner (Toni Belcher), and musical background by virtue of the new TV which has been installed in the main room of the Clubhouse. The number had no influence on the fun which was quite pleasant. All neighbors are reminded to check out next months pot luck dinner schedule. These are normally held on the third Saturday evening of the month. Please come and enjoy time with friends and neighbors while enjoying really good home-cooked food. HOA meetingThe regular Fairfield Village HOA meeting was held on Thursday evening, April 17 at 6 p.m. in the Clubhouse. To say that the meeting was lively would be an understatement. Those there were part of what could be described as an informative evening for sure. Some would say that it involved some differences of opinion, and that would not be wrong. However, in the final analysis, some new information was shared, some difficult decisions were made, and some new perspectives came closer to being understood. It would be incorrect to say that everyone was totally pleased with all the decisions and all the outcomes, but it would be correct to say that many compromises were made so that everyone got something that could be considered a win or a victory. Board member, Kerry Breedon, shared information about a wish list that many attendees had previously not known existed. It seems that American Land Lease asks the HOA to prepare a yearly list of things that the neighbors of FFV would like to have included as amenities for the entire community. It may have been because of lack of communication that many of those attending had not even known that there was such a thing as this wish list. As in the past, the HOA Board submitted a list to the management company for possible addition to/for the community. The deadline date this year was Friday, April 18, so adding to this years list was not the point in Kerrys presentation. However, he said that he wanted to let everyone know what was being submitted this year and to make sure that more FFV neighbors could be involved in next years submitted list. This list is for the good of the whole community, not just for those things thought of by the HOA Board. To make the submission more nearly universal, the HOA Board would like for all members of the FFV community to think seriously about things that could be purchased, improved, or added to the community and then contact an HOA Board member with those suggestions over the next months. Granted, it will be a year before the next list is submitted, but that also means that there is plenty of time for neighbors to think seriously about this and present viable options for consideration. The HOA members are available for conversations about this list or about any things that should be brought to the Boards attention. They urge FFV neighbors to feel welcome to contact them either individually or collectively. It would be a big help if these comments or wishes were also presented in written form so that they will be completely understood. Piano progressJean Chapman reports that much progress has been made toward the purchase of a piano for the main room of the FFV Clubhouse. The fund-raiser piano dance party was a success and more individual pledges and donations have been received. As more information about the options become available, they will be reported so that those interested members of the community will be kept aware of what is transpiring. Anyone with information that would be valuable for the group sponsoring the piano is urged to contact Jean Chapman, Loretta Zang, Sandy Williams, or Linda Urbonowitz. Any of these ladies will pass the information along in order to be sure that the best possible choice is made in the purchase, transporting, and appropriate set up of the piano. These people and many others are so looking forward to the time that all FFV neighbors can enjoy the piano. Again We hope to see many people at our yard sale on Saturday, April 27 between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Come on down and check out the bargains and meet the nice people who live in Fairfield Village...Marion Countys ...lively place filled with lovely people. Have a great week! The price is right! Come on down to Fairfields big yard sale Fairfield Village Priscilla Geissal Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com The American Cancer Societys Manto-Man Ocala group will meet on April 24 at 7 p.m. at the Urology Health Team, 3201 S.W. 34th St., Ocala. This is a prostate cancer education and support group that meets monthly, has speakers and refreshments and wives/caregivers are also welcome. There is a fledgling website http://www.mantomanocala.weebly.com April Guest Speaker: Dr. Mario R. Putzeys-Alverez Open Forum Discussion Prostate Cancer. For information contact Mickey Weller, 352-369-9486. Cancer Society Man-to-Man group to meet Read the classifieds

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tions chief executive officer, said the data supports past movements in the region. We are seeing continued positive signs with employment growth from last month in all three counties, certainly in terms of the drops in the number of unemployed and increases in the number of those with jobs, Skinner said. The labor force showed slight expansion in Citrus and Levy counties and remained virtually unchanged in Marion County. There have also been a number of employers hiring in the area, Skinner said, including R & L Trucking, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Ocala and Lockheed Martin. In March, a total of 481 employers posted 1,583 jobs with Workforce Connection, up from 1,443 jobs in February and a 22 percent increase over the year. Skinner said that news of the positive trend was not unexpected, noting that last week the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the Ocala Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) had the second largest overthe-year unemployment rate decrease in February (-2.4 percent) among the nations 372 metropolitan areas, just behind Yuba City, Calif., (-2.5 percent). Out of a slightly expanded regional labor force of 205,721, there were 16,013 unemployed, down 1,415 over the month and down 5,058 since March 2012. Here is how the employment numbers break down for each county in the Workforce Connection region: Marion Countys labor force also remained relatively stable, dropping by four to 133,116, the number of those with jobs rose by 862 to 122,749 and those who were unemployed fell by 866 to 10,367. That represents an over-the-year increase of 3,440 of those with jobs and a decrease of 3,432 in the number of unemployed when the unemployment rate was 10.4 percent. Two years ago, the unemployment rate of 12.8 percent two years ago when 17,002 were without jobs. While the Ocala MSA continued to hold the fifth highest unemployment rate among Floridas metro areas, total nonagricultural employment was 94,600, up 3.3 percent or 3,000 over the year. For the fourth month in a row, the Ocala metro area had the highest job-growth rate at 3.3 percent, followed by Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (+3.1 percent), and Jacksonville (+2.8 percent). The Ocala MSA also led the state in job growth-rate gains in financial activities (+7.5 percent) and had the second-highest in education and health services (+6.3 percent) for all metro areas in Florida. Eight major industries gained jobs over the year, led by education and health services (+900 jobs); trade, transportation and utilities (+700 jobs); leisure and hospitality (+500 jobs); financial activities and professional and business services (+300 jobs each); and mining, logging and construction, manufacturing and government (+100 jobs each). Information and other services remained unchanged over the year. Among Floridas 67 counties, Marion Countys unemployment rate was the 13th highest, Citrus County remained 11th highest and Levy County dropped from 15th to 17th. Workforce Connection is the local, business-led organization that strives to connect qualified workers with local employers in Citrus, Levy and Marion counties through cost-effective, high quality employment, training and education services in partnership with businesses, community-based organizations, educational institutions and governmental agencies. On average, more than 36,000 career seekers and 1,500 businesses receive services each year. To obtain full copies of the March 2013 unemployment reports or to find out more about upcoming events and services, visit www.WorkforceConnectionFL.com or call 1-800434-JOBS, ext. 1234. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 9 4 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO ADVERTISE Call 854-3986 ADVERTISING 000E1IT Where JESUS is LORD, and YOU are Loved. Services: Sunday School : 9:30am Morning Worship: 10:30am Thursday: 6:00pm Meeting at: 145 S.W. 78th Court Ocala, Florida 352-690-7596 B I B L I C A L F O U N D A T I O N C H U R C H 000EF6C 8070 SW 60th Ave. Ocala, FL 34476 352-291-2080 SERVICES HOURS Sunday 9am, 11am, 6pm 1:30 Spanish Service Tuesday 7pm Spanish Service Wednesday Night 7pm Youth 7pm Thursday Bible Study 6:30 to 7:30 Friday 7pm Spanish Service Nursery available www.crossroads.cog.net WE WELCOME ALL! Bishop Paul Woosley 000E79U St. Martins Church 950 N.W. 70th Street (SR 326) Ocala, Florida 34475 352-351-8059 www.cac-ocala.org Service & Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Visitors Are Always Welcom e The Only Church of the True 1928 Book of Common Prayer (Episcopal) Christ the King Anglican Church 000EPLY Christ the King The Rev. Donald J. Curran, Rector Services: Rite I 7:30 am Rite II 8:50 & 11:15 am Childrens Church 8:50 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary Anglican Church 000DOX6 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS is discovered through worshiping together 711187 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Dont waste your time and energy fretting over remarks you consider unnecessary or unkind. Best advice: Ignore them, and just keep doing your usual good job. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Getting that new perspective on a workplace situation could lead to a solution everyone will accept. Meanwhile, make time to keep up with your creative pursuits. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Those changes you planned to implement in early summer might need to be reassessed. But dont make any moves until youve discussed this with someone you trust. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Your aspects favor harmony, making this a good time to work out problems in relationships whether personal or professional. An old friend comes back. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) While youre still riding that high-powered beam, you might begin to lose focus by weeks end. Could be youll need to do a little cat-napping to restore your spent energies. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) An unexpected development creates a lot of excitement. Where it takes you is your decision. Check out the possibilities, then decide if you want to go with it or not. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Although your supporters help you squash an unfair claim against you, dont let this go unchallenged. You need to learn more about the motives of those behind it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) There are some tasks to clear up by midweek. Then you can welcome the new month on a high note. A friend brings surprising but very welcome news. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You might want to change your plans before theyre set in cement. Consider advice from colleagues. But remember that, ultimately, its your choice. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) A difficult situation is working itself out. Lingering problems should be resolved by weeks end, allowing the Goat to enjoy a calmer, less stressful period. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Be careful not to move so quickly that you miss possible warning signs that could upset your plans. Slow down. Your supporters will continue to stand by you. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Your generosity in sharing your time and wisdom with others leads to an intriguing development that could have you considering some interesting choices. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way of influencing people to be and do their best. You would make an excellent teacher. JOBLESScontinued from Page 1 tional campaign encouraging the more than 30 million Americans who suffer from venous disease, including varicose veins and chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), to rethink their condition and recognize it as a serious health concern. The campaign, led by a coalition of medical societies and sponsored by Covidien, encourages those with venous disease to learn more about their condition, find a vein specialist, and make informed decisions about the best, and often minimally-invasive treatment option for them. As part of the campaign, Olympic Gold Medalist Summer Sanders shares her personal story about the impact venous disease had on her life and the improvements she experienced following treatment. The Rethink Varicose Veins team will be at Moms Nite Out dispelling the myths about varicose veins and encouraging attendees to take a quick self-assessment to determine their risk for varicose veins and CVI. Taking the selfassessment will automatically enter attendees for an opportunity to win a spa getaway weekend at the Miraval Arizona Resort & Spa, Nov. 14-17. Or visit www.RethinkVV.com/escape for a chance to win. Originally organized by Maria Bailey, CEO of BSM Media, author and Mom Talk Radio host, National Moms Nite Out unites social media groups, companies, local playgroups, mom bloggers and networks in giving moms a well-deserved night off. Bailey brought the first National Moms Nite Out to life after watching moms take care of everyone else on Mothers Day, but never themselves. National Moms Nite Out is one of the largest cooperative efforts of Mommy groups, Mom-focused organizations and corporations, bloggers and vloggers all coming together for one great night in support of motherhood, Bailey said. MOM continued from Page 1 Thursday, April 25 Learn w hy it s d i ff erent in Flori d a League of Women Voters of Marion County presents Why don't they do things the way we did them back home?" It will be on April 25 at 4 p.m. at Cypress Hall, On Top of the World Communities, 8415 S.W. 80th St., Ocala. The event is free and open to the public. "Why don't they do things the way we did them back home?" It is a question asked every day by newcomers and notso-new folks, too. A city council, the county commission, the legislature or the governor's office regularly make decisions and take actions that affect our future. Come learn why Florida is different and find out who and what is responsible....and how it can be changed. Presenter: Judy Johnson, league member, attorney, former county commissioner in Marion County and a former school board member in Alachua County. She has been president of the Florida League of Women Voters and has a long standing interest in public policy at the local, state and national levels. Join us! Saturday, April 27 Concert ban d 2 -d ay per f or m ance Please join the Kingdom of the Sun Concert Band Swing into Spring concert series on Saturday, April 27 at 2 p.m. or Sunday, April 28 at 3 p.m., at the Marion Technical Institute (MTI), 1614 S.E. Fort King St., Ocala. All performances are free and open to the public donations are accepted. All church gol f outing Everyone is invited to 'hit the links' Saturday morning, 11 a.m., at Royal Oaks Golf Club, Oak Run Country Club, to play 18 holes of golf, with cart, and share lunch. Enjoy a fun day of golf, Christian Fellowship and who knows: a hole in one? Prizes to be awarded. Those interested in lunch only are welcome. sFee per person includes 18 holes of golf, cart, lunch, tip and prizes. For reservations and additional information contact Bob Parizek at 352-8739149, Ray Westman at 352-208-9023 or Christ's Church of Marion County, 6768 S.W. 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182, www.ccomc.org/. Happenings

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Saturday, April 27 African Violet Club meetsThe African Violet Club of Ocala will meet Saturday, April 27, at 10:30 a.m. at the Marion County Sheriffs Office Brian Litz Substation, 9048 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. The program will be African Violet Growing Basics. There are many tips and tricks to African Violet growing and care. We made many new friends over the weekend at our African Violet show and sale including old pros and enthusiasts new to the hobby. This meeting is especially designed for newer or novice growers. However, everyone always discovers something new. More experienced growers will also explain some of their tips for success. Delicious light refreshments are served. Guests are always welcome. Check the website for more information at http://www.africanvioletclubofOcala.org. Sunday, April 28 Master Choir to perform The Central Florida Master Choir, conducted by Dr. Harold W. McSwain, Jr., will perform a concert on Sunday, April 28, at 3 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 1126 E. Silver Springs Blvd. across the street from the old Ritz Hotel in Ocala. Admission to the concert is free but an offering will be taken to benefit the Tuesday Morning Outreach Ministry to help the homeless, jobless, and others in need. For further information about the concert, call 352-537-0207. Youth Symphony concertThe Ocala Youth Symphony is presenting a free concert on Sunday, April 28 at 3 p.m. at the Appleton Museum, 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala. Come and enjoy the musical presentations of these amazing musicians ranging in age from 8 to 18. Works selected range from the classics to contemporary, something for everyone's musical taste. All concerts are free and open to the public. For information call 352-3513002. Tuesday, April 30 Breast cancer support group meets The SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Breast Cancer Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 S.W. 105th St. at 1 p.m. in Room 235 (Multipurpose Room). The meeting on April 30 will be a discussion by Mary Williams with the American Cancer Office on the many services available and volunteers needed for the Reach To Recovery Program and Road to Recovery. If you have any questions please call Gail Tirpak at 352-291-6904. Saturday, May 4 AUCE pancakes at CrossroadsA pancake breakfast for the community is planned for May 8, 8 to 11 a.m. by members of Crossroads Church of God. All you can eat pancakes, sausage and drink is $5. Crossroads is at 8070 S.W. 60th Ave, Ocala. The church office phone is 352-291-2080. Yard sale at First CongregationalA huge yard sale will take place on Saturday, May 4 at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 7171 S.W. State Road 200, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Enrichment Center. Sunday, May 5 Civic Chorale to perform On Sunday, May 5, at 3 p.m., the Marion Civic Chorale, conducted by Matthew Bumbach, will perform a concert titled Give My Regards to Broadway at First United Methodist Church, 1126 E. Silver Springs Blvd. diagonally across the street from the old Ritz Hotel in Ocala. The program will include A Sentimental Journey Thru the 40s and medleys from Les Miserables, My Fair Lady, and The Phantom of the Opera. Admission is free but a free-will offering will be taken to benefit the churchs Tuesday Morning Outreach Ministry to help the homeless, jobless, and others in need. For further information about the concert, contact us at 352-537-0207 or www.fumcocala.org or wayne@fumcocala.org. Friday, May 10 Victorian Tea Party scheduledA Victorian Tea Party will be held on Friday, May 10, at the Grand Ballroom, 108 N.E. Magnolia Ave. starting at 11:30 a.m. Tickets are $18 per person and include buffet, music, a dramatic presentation from Father Knows Best, raffle items and a silent auction. Wear your tea party hat and bring your mother or daughter for Mothers Day. Seating is limited, so call 352-8734700 for tickets. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 5 8 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000EL0Q 000EMEV 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala (352) 629-0900 (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (352) 629-0900 Other locations throughout the southeast 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala GREAT FINANCING ON EZ-GO CARTS! GOLF CARS STARTING AT $1,995 WHAT BATTERY A RE Y OU L OOKING F OR ??? CUSTOM BATTERY PACKS LAPTOP COMPUTER BATTERIES CAMCORDER BATTERIES WHEELCHAIR BATTERIES SECURITY SYSTEM BATTERIES AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES FARM TRACTOR BATTERIES JET SKI BATTERIES GAME FEED BATTERIES MARINE BATTERIES CELL PHONE BATTERIES POWER WHEELS BATTERIES WATCH BATTERIES KEY REMOTE BATTERIES TRUCK BATTERIES CORDLESS PHONE BATTERIES EMERGENCY LIGHT BATTERIES ATV BATTERIES MOTORCYCLE BATTERIES LAWNMOWER BATTERIES Automotive Batteries 50 Bronze $ 79 95 each 60 Bronze $ 89 95 each 72 Gold $ 99 95 each 84 Platinum $ 109 95 each (Price may vary according to your vehicle) FREE 10-Minute Installation (Most Models) West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Aid and comfort to the enemy? T he images were seen all Monday afternoon and evening the bombs exploding, the man falling in the middle of the street, the anguished looks on the faces of witnesses, the blood on people being led into ambulances, the boy being wheeled away with a bandage on his leg, etc., etc., etc. When you woke up Tuesday morning, there they were again, the same images, repeated over and over. You know, somewhere, some terrorist or terrorists were sitting back watching all this unfold, enjoying the handiwork of their comrades, enjoying the suffering of Americans. Dont the networks realize this? Do they have to show the grief again and again? Isnt this giving aid and comfort to the enemy? Yes, the news has to be reported. But for how long, and how repetitively? Evidently the time of day played a part. Networks were quick to jump into local stations time and pre-empt talk shows, quiz shows, local news, etc. But once you got to prime time, you know, where the money is made, shows like Dancing With The Stars and The Voice went on as scheduled. Go back a couple of weeks to the gruesome leg injury of Kevin Ware, basketball player for the University of Louisville. After the initial showing of what happened, nearly every report we saw put a blurry circle over his leg so that the actual injury, a compound fracture where the bone was sticking out, couldnt be seen. Networks said they were being sensitive about the injury in respect to Ware and his relatives, and because the injury was so terrible. So is a bombing less terrible? Showing the faces of people with blood streaming from injuries doesnt deserve the same sensitivity as a broken leg? Showing a man turning slowly and then collapsing in the middle of the street isnt painful to his family? The networks also were guilty of providing misinformation on the fly. They always use the disclaimer, Weve been told but we cant confirm that. Still, they put the unsubstantiated rumors out there, which does a disservice to all. For example, there was an explosion at a nearby liO ur M essage PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGAN REGIONALMANAGER: JOHN PROVOST EDITOR: JIM CLARK Messenger WEST MARION Editorial Your Letters Airport towerI was recently advised of your editorial regarding the FAAs proposal to close 149 control towers, including the one at the Ocala Airport. Having read the editorial, I was compelled to provide some additional background information for your readers, as well as to correct a few of your assumptions. Flightaware.com is a fantastic tool to predict arrival and departure traffic, however it does not provide the entire picture. Aircraft owners who do not wish to have their information made available have their aircraft flights blocked from view. Additionally, Flightaware.com only shows aircraft that have filed flight plans citing Ocala as a destination or origination. It does not include the thousands of recreational flyers that do not file flight plans. The FAAs methodology to determine the closure list lacked depth or an individual airport operational assessment. They drew a line and determined any tower with annual operations of less than 150,000 will close. Our view is it isnt as simple as a numbers assessment; each airport is different. For instance, in Ocala there is such a diverse fleet mix of aircraft you see large air carrier aircraft such as Boeing 757s or fast business jets operating in the same airspace as many small slower training aircraft. The difference in these operating speeds combined with our total annual operations are the main reasons the FAA justified this control tower just four years ago, but now they want to close it based on an arbitrary number, and without specific research. For Ocala, the control tower provides a step to the next stage of growth for the airport. It, along with the other infrastructure improvements on and around the airport, combines to provide a catalyst of opportunity for new or expanding business for our community. We are working with other affected airports, our congressional representatives, and industry leaders on saving the contract tower system. However, it appears that Ocalas control tower will cease operations on June 15. From June 16 and beyond, airplanes will still land and take off at the Ocala International Airport. Although the absence of a tower diminishes operational effectiveness, it does not make the airport unsafe. The airport successfully operated as a non-towered airport for 48 years (from 1962 to 2010), and it can successfully operate as a non-towered airport in the future. I encourage citizens to contact their respective Congressional representatives and urge them to find sensible cuts that do not impact our Nations infrastructure. Matthe w G ro w Airport D irector Tolerance, then acceptanceOne bite at a time is how we describe how to eat an elephant, the same applies to how to bring about the destruction of America, little by little, one bite at a time. What one generation tolerates, the next accepts. This did not start with Obama, although he is pushing hard to fundamentally change America as stated in his campaign. I still question why no one pressed him on just what he had in mind, just what needs drastic changing? Why did Michelle state this is the first time she has been proud of America? No one asked for answers! Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. M any of you, Im sure, played cowboys and Indians when you were kids. Its now considered politically incorrect to call it that because, first, the cowboys usually won, and second, the Indians were called that because Christopher Columbus didnt know where he was when he landed. Now theyre called, probably rightly so, Native Americans. About 1 million out of 2.5 million Native Americans live in areas called reservations. These were not created out of the goodness of the heart of the colonists and their descendants; rather, they wanted to contain the Indians and put them where they felt they belonged, even though they were here first. Peace treaties were signed and ratified, and sovereignty was given to the reservations. That meant that our laws didnt apply there; each reservation could set up its own laws. No one in those days could envision that in the future this would cause major problems in the rest of the country, a lot of it associated with gambling. States that have anti-gambling laws have no say in the building of casinos on the reservations. Non-Native Americans flock by the thousands to the reservations to play the games, including some here in Florida. Last week we pointed out some inconsistency in gambling regulation. This is just another one. Now, I dont want to start a range war or anything like that, but Im thinking that it might be time to revisit these treaties that created these reservations. Basically, are they really needed? Native Americans have been absorbed into the population. They have Native Americans and the casinos Among Friends Jim Clark opportunities that were not even remotely available 200 years ago. Many of them go to colleges and universities, earn advance degrees and work in the business world of the United States. They do not need the protection of the reservation they are educated, talented and self-sufficient. But because of that, shouldnt they also be subject to laws of the country and state in which they live? That gets us back to gambling. Sometime back, some smart individual figured out that the anti-gambling laws of a state wouldnt apply on a reservation. So the casinos started sprouting up all over, including in Florida. If just the Native Americans gambled in their casinos, that would be fine. But as I said before, non-Native Americans provide the bulk of the customers. I wonder how many of those who visit the casinos declare their winnings on their income tax. Just from what Ive been reading recently, it seems that gambling establishments, especially here in Florida, prey on the senior citizens. Just watch who goes in and out of the Internet cafes, if they are allowed to reopen. Our federal government needs to take a long look at these establishments on the reservations, see who bankrolls Please see LETTERS Page 10 Please see EDITORIAL Page 10 Please see CLARK Page 10

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 7 6 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000ELV6 FREE APPETIZER Hwy. 27 & Dunnellon $ 1 OFF ANY SANDWICH Coupon required. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Expires 5/10/13. $ 3 OFF With Purchase of 2 Entres Not valid with NY Strip Special or sandwiches. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Expires 5/10/13. Hwy. 27 & Dunnellon Hwy. 27 & Dunnellon HAPPY HOUR & DAILY DRINK SPECIALS $ 13.99 30 PC. SHRIMP DINNER EVERY TUESDAY NO COUPONS TWO FOR $ 20 10 OZ. NY STRIPS EVERY WEDNESDAY NO COUPONS 19773 E. PENNSYLVANIA AVE. D U N N E L L O N DUNNELLON 5 4 7 4 7 7 7 547-4777 ON THE RAINBOW RIVER 3821 NW HWY. 27 O C A L A OCALA 2 3 7 1 7 7 7 237-1777 OFF I-75 ANY TWO ENTRES Not valid with NY Strip Special, sandwiches or burgers. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Expires 5/10/13. 000EPPK Outdoor Art & Craft Market 4/27/13 10 am to 1:30 pm Vendors Wanted! 10% Off with this ad 7470 SW 60th Avenue (352) 671-1890 Monday Saturday 10am-5pm 000EPAF 12084 S. Williams St., Dunnellon (Old Dinner Bell Restaurant) 352-465-2881 www.gruffsontheriver.com GRUFFS T AP & G RILLE $ 1 00 Bud Select Drafts $ 2 00 Well Liquor Drinks $ 1 50 OFF Call Drinks $ 1 00 Coor Lt. Bud Lt. Drafts During NASCAR Sprint Cup Race Only HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY 4PM 7PM MON B1G1 Margaritas, Spaghetti & Meatballs . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 4 99 TUES B1G1 Martinis, Half Rack Rib Plate w/Slaw, Beans, Garlic Toast . . $ 9 99 WED 49 Wings Hot, Medium, Mild (Dine In Only) THURS Build a Burger Up to 3 FREE Toppings . . . . . . . $ 8 99 FRI 1/2 Price Wine by the Glass Red Fish Dinner w/2 Sides . $ 10 99 SAT Steak Night Steaks except Sirloin . . $ 2 00 OFF SUN Fajita Night Fajitas for Two . . . . . . . $ 2 00 OFF T a s t e T h e B e s t T a s t e T h e B e s t Taste The Best WEST MARION 711186 000EMUQ Open to the Public Rate with this coupon and Tee Time Reservation 732-GOLF (4653) Just 1 mile west of I-75 on US 27 (Exit 354) Expires 4/30/13 Rates subject to change. 18 Hole Championship Course Dress Code: Collared Shirt Required NO Jeans GOLF OUTINGS WELCOME! www.ocalapalmsgolf.com Our Low Current 18 Hole Rate With This Coupon $ 32 00 Before 11:00 $ 27 00 After 11:00 000EHTB Best of the Best four years in a row HOURS: Mon. Fri. 10am 5pm Hearing Aid Centers A NAME YOU CAN TRUST WITH OVER 1500 LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE FREE HEARING AIDS FOR ALL FEDERAL WORKERS & RETIREES *No Co-Pay or Exam Fee Inside Walmart Hwy. 200 & Corner 484, Ocala 352-291-1467 000EIHD Inside Crystal River Mall Across from K-Mart 352-795-1484 Inside Sears Paddock Mall 352-237-1665 F e d e r a l G o v e r n m e n t I n s u r a n c e C o d e # 1 0 4 # 1 0 5 # 1 1 1 o r # 1 1 2 C H E C K Y O U R Q U A L I F I C A T I O N S C A L L 3 5 2 2 9 1 1 4 6 7 BC/BS LIMIT 1 COUPON PER VISIT. LIMIT 2 PACKS PER VISIT. One More Week! BATTERIES PREMIUM ZINC BATTERIES 99 FREE HEARING TEST FREE REPAIRS (IN OFFICE ONLY) HEARING AID Fits 30 DB Loss Full Shell #ME200 $ 695 .00 000EOCK 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run 352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm Stop and visit us before you buy! We Guarantee Lowest Prices in Ocala! O C A L A G O L F C A R T S U P E R C E N T E R O C A L A G O L F C A R T S U P E R C E N T E R O CALA G OLF C ART S UPERCENTER 10% Discount to Veterans labor & parts (excluding batteries) FREE pickup within 5 miles Largest Selection In Ocala! 6-V T605 only $ 539 8-V T875 only $ 619 6-V 6 PACK $ 459 8-V 6 PACK $ 529 B A T T E R Y S A L E B A T T E R Y S A L E BATTERY SALE 2010 Club Car Remanufactured New Factory Body All lights & turn signals New 8 volt batteries New DOT tires Fold down wind shield Rear view mirrors Automatic charger only $ 4,995 E-Z-GO RXV Remanufactured Fully Loaded Ready to go Golfing $ 5,495 12-V T1275 only $ 659 We Sell Trojan Batteries 000EKPA Read the classifieds On March 25, the Ernie Read Monday golf group held its fifth annual Lukey Tournament at the Ocala Palms golf course More than 70 golfers participated in the golf outing and over 100 folks were at the cookout following a great day on the links. The Lukey Tournament is named in honor of young Luke Mete, the 9-year-old grandson of Ocala Palms residents Rich and Carol Mete. The purpose of the tournament is to raise money for The Lukey Foundation and to increase public awareness of Cooleys Anemia, the most severe form of Thalassemia. Young Luke is afflicted with this genetic blood disorder and has undergone blood transfusions every 2 to 4 weeks and had a bone marrow transplant from his older sister who does not carry the genetic trait in 2009. He recently had his 4 year post transplant testing and at this time everything is checking out perfectly. A total of $1,085 was raised at the tournament and was donated to The Lukey Foundation. The trophies were donated by BJ Trophies and Awards. Kudos to the volunteers who cooked the wonderful hamburgers and hot dogs and particularly to Rick Braun who prepared his world famous bratwurst and sauerkraut before leaving town to see Bill Cosby perform live. The winners of this years tournament were Claude Roy with a net score of 60 in the mens division and Maggie Mahar with a net of 62 in the womens division. Claude and Maggie are not only next door neighbors in Ocala Palms but they are also brother and sister. Good golf must run in the family. More info on Cooleys Anemia may found at the following websites: www.thelukeyfoundation.com and www.cooleysanemia.org Lukey Tournament held at Ocala Palms Claude Roy and Maggie Mahar with their trophies. Richard Ethier and Dennis Lord with Vern Wolfe in the background. More on Page 7 More photos from Lukey event at Ocala Palms Lukeys grandparents, Rich and Carol Mete. Tournament host, Ernie Read. Brian and Kati Browne. Always smiling Don Warne. Don Sturgal smiling for the camera.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 7 6 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000ELV6 FREE APPETIZER Hwy. 27 & Dunnellon $ 1 OFF ANY SANDWICH Coupon required. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Expires 5/10/13. $ 3 OFF With Purchase of 2 Entres Not valid with NY Strip Special or sandwiches. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Expires 5/10/13. Hwy. 27 & Dunnellon Hwy. 27 & Dunnellon HAPPY HOUR & DAILY DRINK SPECIALS $ 13.99 30 PC. SHRIMP DINNER EVERY TUESDAY NO COUPONS TWO FOR $ 20 10 OZ. NY STRIPS EVERY WEDNESDAY NO COUPONS 19773 E. PENNSYLVANIA AVE. D U N N E L L O N DUNNELLON 5 4 7 4 7 7 7 547-4777 ON THE RAINBOW RIVER 3821 NW HWY. 27 O C A L A OCALA 2 3 7 1 7 7 7 237-1777 OFF I-75 ANY TWO ENTRES Not valid with NY Strip Special, sandwiches or burgers. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Expires 5/10/13. 000EPPK Outdoor Art & Craft Market 4/27/13 10 am to 1:30 pm Vendors Wanted! 10% Off with this ad 7470 SW 60th Avenue (352) 671-1890 Monday Saturday 10am-5pm 000EPAF 12084 S. Williams St., Dunnellon (Old Dinner Bell Restaurant) 352-465-2881 www.gruffsontheriver.com GRUFFS T AP & G RILLE $ 1 00 Bud Select Drafts $ 2 00 Well Liquor Drinks $ 1 50 OFF Call Drinks $ 1 00 Coor Lt. Bud Lt. Drafts During NASCAR Sprint Cup Race Only HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY 4PM 7PM MON B1G1 Margaritas, Spaghetti & Meatballs . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 4 99 TUES B1G1 Martinis, Half Rack Rib Plate w/Slaw, Beans, Garlic Toast . . $ 9 99 WED 49 Wings Hot, Medium, Mild (Dine In Only) THURS Build a Burger Up to 3 FREE Toppings . . . . . . . $ 8 99 FRI 1/2 Price Wine by the Glass Red Fish Dinner w/2 Sides . $ 10 99 SAT Steak Night Steaks except Sirloin . . $ 2 00 OFF SUN Fajita Night Fajitas for Two . . . . . . . $ 2 00 OFF T a s t e T h e B e s t T a s t e T h e B e s t Taste The Best WEST MARION 711186 000EMUQ Open to the Public Rate with this coupon and Tee Time Reservation 732-GOLF (4653) Just 1 mile west of I-75 on US 27 (Exit 354) Expires 4/30/13 Rates subject to change. 18 Hole Championship Course Dress Code: Collared Shirt Required NO Jeans GOLF OUTINGS WELCOME! www.ocalapalmsgolf.com Our Low Current 18 Hole Rate With This Coupon $ 32 00 Before 11:00 $ 27 00 After 11:00 000EHTB Best of the Best four years in a row HOURS: Mon. Fri. 10am 5pm Hearing Aid Centers A NAME YOU CAN TRUST WITH OVER 1500 LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE FREE HEARING AIDS FOR ALL FEDERAL WORKERS & RETIREES *No Co-Pay or Exam Fee Inside Walmart Hwy. 200 & Corner 484, Ocala 352-291-1467 000EIHD Inside Crystal River Mall Across from K-Mart 352-795-1484 Inside Sears Paddock Mall 352-237-1665 F e d e r a l G o v e r n m e n t I n s u r a n c e C o d e # 1 0 4 # 1 0 5 # 1 1 1 o r # 1 1 2 C H E C K Y O U R Q U A L I F I C A T I O N S C A L L 3 5 2 2 9 1 1 4 6 7 BC/BS LIMIT 1 COUPON PER VISIT. LIMIT 2 PACKS PER VISIT. One More Week! BATTERIES PREMIUM ZINC BATTERIES 99 FREE HEARING TEST FREE REPAIRS (IN OFFICE ONLY) HEARING AID Fits 30 DB Loss Full Shell #ME200 $ 695 .00 000EOCK 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run 352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm Stop and visit us before you buy! We Guarantee Lowest Prices in Ocala! O C A L A G O L F C A R T S U P E R C E N T E R O C A L A G O L F C A R T S U P E R C E N T E R O CALA G OLF C ART S UPERCENTER 10% Discount to Veterans labor & parts (excluding batteries) FREE pickup within 5 miles Largest Selection In Ocala! 6-V T605 only $ 539 8-V T875 only $ 619 6-V 6 PACK $ 459 8-V 6 PACK $ 529 B A T T E R Y S A L E B A T T E R Y S A L E BATTERY SALE 2010 Club Car Remanufactured New Factory Body All lights & turn signals New 8 volt batteries New DOT tires Fold down wind shield Rear view mirrors Automatic charger only $ 4,995 E-Z-GO RXV Remanufactured Fully Loaded Ready to go Golfing $ 5,495 12-V T1275 only $ 659 We Sell Trojan Batteries 000EKPA Read the classifieds On March 25, the Ernie Read Monday golf group held its fifth annual Lukey Tournament at the Ocala Palms golf course More than 70 golfers participated in the golf outing and over 100 folks were at the cookout following a great day on the links. The Lukey Tournament is named in honor of young Luke Mete, the 9-year-old grandson of Ocala Palms residents Rich and Carol Mete. The purpose of the tournament is to raise money for The Lukey Foundation and to increase public awareness of Cooleys Anemia, the most severe form of Thalassemia. Young Luke is afflicted with this genetic blood disorder and has undergone blood transfusions every 2 to 4 weeks and had a bone marrow transplant from his older sister who does not carry the genetic trait in 2009. He recently had his 4 year post transplant testing and at this time everything is checking out perfectly. A total of $1,085 was raised at the tournament and was donated to The Lukey Foundation. The trophies were donated by BJ Trophies and Awards. Kudos to the volunteers who cooked the wonderful hamburgers and hot dogs and particularly to Rick Braun who prepared his world famous bratwurst and sauerkraut before leaving town to see Bill Cosby perform live. The winners of this years tournament were Claude Roy with a net score of 60 in the mens division and Maggie Mahar with a net of 62 in the womens division. Claude and Maggie are not only next door neighbors in Ocala Palms but they are also brother and sister. Good golf must run in the family. More info on Cooleys Anemia may found at the following websites: www.thelukeyfoundation.com and www.cooleysanemia.org Lukey Tournament held at Ocala Palms Claude Roy and Maggie Mahar with their trophies. Richard Ethier and Dennis Lord with Vern Wolfe in the background. More on Page 7 More photos from Lukey event at Ocala Palms Lukeys grandparents, Rich and Carol Mete. Tournament host, Ernie Read. Brian and Kati Browne. Always smiling Don Warne. Don Sturgal smiling for the camera.

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Saturday, April 27 African Violet Club meetsThe African Violet Club of Ocala will meet Saturday, April 27, at 10:30 a.m. at the Marion County Sheriffs Office Brian Litz Substation, 9048 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. The program will be African Violet Growing Basics. There are many tips and tricks to African Violet growing and care. We made many new friends over the weekend at our African Violet show and sale including old pros and enthusiasts new to the hobby. This meeting is especially designed for newer or novice growers. However, everyone always discovers something new. More experienced growers will also explain some of their tips for success. Delicious light refreshments are served. Guests are always welcome. Check the website for more information at http://www.africanvioletclubofOcala.org. Sunday, April 28 Master Choir to perform The Central Florida Master Choir, conducted by Dr. Harold W. McSwain, Jr., will perform a concert on Sunday, April 28, at 3 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 1126 E. Silver Springs Blvd. across the street from the old Ritz Hotel in Ocala. Admission to the concert is free but an offering will be taken to benefit the Tuesday Morning Outreach Ministry to help the homeless, jobless, and others in need. For further information about the concert, call 352-537-0207. Youth Symphony concertThe Ocala Youth Symphony is presenting a free concert on Sunday, April 28 at 3 p.m. at the Appleton Museum, 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala. Come and enjoy the musical presentations of these amazing musicians ranging in age from 8 to 18. Works selected range from the classics to contemporary, something for everyone's musical taste. All concerts are free and open to the public. For information call 352-3513002. Tuesday, April 30 Breast cancer support group meets The SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Breast Cancer Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 S.W. 105th St. at 1 p.m. in Room 235 (Multipurpose Room). The meeting on April 30 will be a discussion by Mary Williams with the American Cancer Office on the many services available and volunteers needed for the Reach To Recovery Program and Road to Recovery. If you have any questions please call Gail Tirpak at 352-291-6904. Saturday, May 4 AUCE pancakes at CrossroadsA pancake breakfast for the community is planned for May 8, 8 to 11 a.m. by members of Crossroads Church of God. All you can eat pancakes, sausage and drink is $5. Crossroads is at 8070 S.W. 60th Ave, Ocala. The church office phone is 352-291-2080. Yard sale at First CongregationalA huge yard sale will take place on Saturday, May 4 at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 7171 S.W. State Road 200, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Enrichment Center. Sunday, May 5 Civic Chorale to perform On Sunday, May 5, at 3 p.m., the Marion Civic Chorale, conducted by Matthew Bumbach, will perform a concert titled Give My Regards to Broadway at First United Methodist Church, 1126 E. Silver Springs Blvd. diagonally across the street from the old Ritz Hotel in Ocala. The program will include A Sentimental Journey Thru the 40s and medleys from Les Miserables, My Fair Lady, and The Phantom of the Opera. Admission is free but a free-will offering will be taken to benefit the churchs Tuesday Morning Outreach Ministry to help the homeless, jobless, and others in need. For further information about the concert, contact us at 352-537-0207 or www.fumcocala.org or wayne@fumcocala.org. Friday, May 10 Victorian Tea Party scheduledA Victorian Tea Party will be held on Friday, May 10, at the Grand Ballroom, 108 N.E. Magnolia Ave. starting at 11:30 a.m. Tickets are $18 per person and include buffet, music, a dramatic presentation from Father Knows Best, raffle items and a silent auction. Wear your tea party hat and bring your mother or daughter for Mothers Day. Seating is limited, so call 352-8734700 for tickets. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 5 8 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000EL0Q 000EMEV 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala (352) 629-0900 (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (352) 629-0900 Other locations throughout the southeast 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala GREAT FINANCING ON EZ-GO CARTS! GOLF CARS STARTING AT $1,995 WHAT BATTERY A RE Y OU L OOKING F OR ??? CUSTOM BATTERY PACKS LAPTOP COMPUTER BATTERIES CAMCORDER BATTERIES WHEELCHAIR BATTERIES SECURITY SYSTEM BATTERIES AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES FARM TRACTOR BATTERIES JET SKI BATTERIES GAME FEED BATTERIES MARINE BATTERIES CELL PHONE BATTERIES POWER WHEELS BATTERIES WATCH BATTERIES KEY REMOTE BATTERIES TRUCK BATTERIES CORDLESS PHONE BATTERIES EMERGENCY LIGHT BATTERIES ATV BATTERIES MOTORCYCLE BATTERIES LAWNMOWER BATTERIES Automotive Batteries 50 Bronze $ 79 95 each 60 Bronze $ 89 95 each 72 Gold $ 99 95 each 84 Platinum $ 109 95 each (Price may vary according to your vehicle) FREE 10-Minute Installation (Most Models) West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Aid and comfort to the enemy? T he images were seen all Monday afternoon and evening the bombs exploding, the man falling in the middle of the street, the anguished looks on the faces of witnesses, the blood on people being led into ambulances, the boy being wheeled away with a bandage on his leg, etc., etc., etc. When you woke up Tuesday morning, there they were again, the same images, repeated over and over. You know, somewhere, some terrorist or terrorists were sitting back watching all this unfold, enjoying the handiwork of their comrades, enjoying the suffering of Americans. Dont the networks realize this? Do they have to show the grief again and again? Isnt this giving aid and comfort to the enemy? Yes, the news has to be reported. But for how long, and how repetitively? Evidently the time of day played a part. Networks were quick to jump into local stations time and pre-empt talk shows, quiz shows, local news, etc. But once you got to prime time, you know, where the money is made, shows like Dancing With The Stars and The Voice went on as scheduled. Go back a couple of weeks to the gruesome leg injury of Kevin Ware, basketball player for the University of Louisville. After the initial showing of what happened, nearly every report we saw put a blurry circle over his leg so that the actual injury, a compound fracture where the bone was sticking out, couldnt be seen. Networks said they were being sensitive about the injury in respect to Ware and his relatives, and because the injury was so terrible. So is a bombing less terrible? Showing the faces of people with blood streaming from injuries doesnt deserve the same sensitivity as a broken leg? Showing a man turning slowly and then collapsing in the middle of the street isnt painful to his family? The networks also were guilty of providing misinformation on the fly. They always use the disclaimer, Weve been told but we cant confirm that. Still, they put the unsubstantiated rumors out there, which does a disservice to all. For example, there was an explosion at a nearby liO ur M essage PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGAN REGIONALMANAGER: JOHN PROVOST EDITOR: JIM CLARK Messenger WEST MARION Editorial Your Letters Airport towerI was recently advised of your editorial regarding the FAAs proposal to close 149 control towers, including the one at the Ocala Airport. Having read the editorial, I was compelled to provide some additional background information for your readers, as well as to correct a few of your assumptions. Flightaware.com is a fantastic tool to predict arrival and departure traffic, however it does not provide the entire picture. Aircraft owners who do not wish to have their information made available have their aircraft flights blocked from view. Additionally, Flightaware.com only shows aircraft that have filed flight plans citing Ocala as a destination or origination. It does not include the thousands of recreational flyers that do not file flight plans. The FAAs methodology to determine the closure list lacked depth or an individual airport operational assessment. They drew a line and determined any tower with annual operations of less than 150,000 will close. Our view is it isnt as simple as a numbers assessment; each airport is different. For instance, in Ocala there is such a diverse fleet mix of aircraft you see large air carrier aircraft such as Boeing 757s or fast business jets operating in the same airspace as many small slower training aircraft. The difference in these operating speeds combined with our total annual operations are the main reasons the FAA justified this control tower just four years ago, but now they want to close it based on an arbitrary number, and without specific research. For Ocala, the control tower provides a step to the next stage of growth for the airport. It, along with the other infrastructure improvements on and around the airport, combines to provide a catalyst of opportunity for new or expanding business for our community. We are working with other affected airports, our congressional representatives, and industry leaders on saving the contract tower system. However, it appears that Ocalas control tower will cease operations on June 15. From June 16 and beyond, airplanes will still land and take off at the Ocala International Airport. Although the absence of a tower diminishes operational effectiveness, it does not make the airport unsafe. The airport successfully operated as a non-towered airport for 48 years (from 1962 to 2010), and it can successfully operate as a non-towered airport in the future. I encourage citizens to contact their respective Congressional representatives and urge them to find sensible cuts that do not impact our Nations infrastructure. Matthe w G ro w Airport D irector Tolerance, then acceptanceOne bite at a time is how we describe how to eat an elephant, the same applies to how to bring about the destruction of America, little by little, one bite at a time. What one generation tolerates, the next accepts. This did not start with Obama, although he is pushing hard to fundamentally change America as stated in his campaign. I still question why no one pressed him on just what he had in mind, just what needs drastic changing? Why did Michelle state this is the first time she has been proud of America? No one asked for answers! Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. M any of you, Im sure, played cowboys and Indians when you were kids. Its now considered politically incorrect to call it that because, first, the cowboys usually won, and second, the Indians were called that because Christopher Columbus didnt know where he was when he landed. Now theyre called, probably rightly so, Native Americans. About 1 million out of 2.5 million Native Americans live in areas called reservations. These were not created out of the goodness of the heart of the colonists and their descendants; rather, they wanted to contain the Indians and put them where they felt they belonged, even though they were here first. Peace treaties were signed and ratified, and sovereignty was given to the reservations. That meant that our laws didnt apply there; each reservation could set up its own laws. No one in those days could envision that in the future this would cause major problems in the rest of the country, a lot of it associated with gambling. States that have anti-gambling laws have no say in the building of casinos on the reservations. Non-Native Americans flock by the thousands to the reservations to play the games, including some here in Florida. Last week we pointed out some inconsistency in gambling regulation. This is just another one. Now, I dont want to start a range war or anything like that, but Im thinking that it might be time to revisit these treaties that created these reservations. Basically, are they really needed? Native Americans have been absorbed into the population. They have Native Americans and the casinos Among Friends Jim Clark opportunities that were not even remotely available 200 years ago. Many of them go to colleges and universities, earn advance degrees and work in the business world of the United States. They do not need the protection of the reservation they are educated, talented and self-sufficient. But because of that, shouldnt they also be subject to laws of the country and state in which they live? That gets us back to gambling. Sometime back, some smart individual figured out that the anti-gambling laws of a state wouldnt apply on a reservation. So the casinos started sprouting up all over, including in Florida. If just the Native Americans gambled in their casinos, that would be fine. But as I said before, non-Native Americans provide the bulk of the customers. I wonder how many of those who visit the casinos declare their winnings on their income tax. Just from what Ive been reading recently, it seems that gambling establishments, especially here in Florida, prey on the senior citizens. Just watch who goes in and out of the Internet cafes, if they are allowed to reopen. Our federal government needs to take a long look at these establishments on the reservations, see who bankrolls Please see LETTERS Page 10 Please see EDITORIAL Page 10 Please see CLARK Page 10

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tions chief executive officer, said the data supports past movements in the region. We are seeing continued positive signs with employment growth from last month in all three counties, certainly in terms of the drops in the number of unemployed and increases in the number of those with jobs, Skinner said. The labor force showed slight expansion in Citrus and Levy counties and remained virtually unchanged in Marion County. There have also been a number of employers hiring in the area, Skinner said, including R & L Trucking, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Ocala and Lockheed Martin. In March, a total of 481 employers posted 1,583 jobs with Workforce Connection, up from 1,443 jobs in February and a 22 percent increase over the year. Skinner said that news of the positive trend was not unexpected, noting that last week the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the Ocala Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) had the second largest overthe-year unemployment rate decrease in February (-2.4 percent) among the nations 372 metropolitan areas, just behind Yuba City, Calif., (-2.5 percent). Out of a slightly expanded regional labor force of 205,721, there were 16,013 unemployed, down 1,415 over the month and down 5,058 since March 2012. Here is how the employment numbers break down for each county in the Workforce Connection region: Marion Countys labor force also remained relatively stable, dropping by four to 133,116, the number of those with jobs rose by 862 to 122,749 and those who were unemployed fell by 866 to 10,367. That represents an over-the-year increase of 3,440 of those with jobs and a decrease of 3,432 in the number of unemployed when the unemployment rate was 10.4 percent. Two years ago, the unemployment rate of 12.8 percent two years ago when 17,002 were without jobs. While the Ocala MSA continued to hold the fifth highest unemployment rate among Floridas metro areas, total nonagricultural employment was 94,600, up 3.3 percent or 3,000 over the year. For the fourth month in a row, the Ocala metro area had the highest job-growth rate at 3.3 percent, followed by Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (+3.1 percent), and Jacksonville (+2.8 percent). The Ocala MSA also led the state in job growth-rate gains in financial activities (+7.5 percent) and had the second-highest in education and health services (+6.3 percent) for all metro areas in Florida. Eight major industries gained jobs over the year, led by education and health services (+900 jobs); trade, transportation and utilities (+700 jobs); leisure and hospitality (+500 jobs); financial activities and professional and business services (+300 jobs each); and mining, logging and construction, manufacturing and government (+100 jobs each). Information and other services remained unchanged over the year. Among Floridas 67 counties, Marion Countys unemployment rate was the 13th highest, Citrus County remained 11th highest and Levy County dropped from 15th to 17th. Workforce Connection is the local, business-led organization that strives to connect qualified workers with local employers in Citrus, Levy and Marion counties through cost-effective, high quality employment, training and education services in partnership with businesses, community-based organizations, educational institutions and governmental agencies. On average, more than 36,000 career seekers and 1,500 businesses receive services each year. To obtain full copies of the March 2013 unemployment reports or to find out more about upcoming events and services, visit www.WorkforceConnectionFL.com or call 1-800434-JOBS, ext. 1234. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 9 4 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO ADVERTISE Call 854-3986 ADVERTISING 000E1IT Where JESUS is LORD, and YOU are Loved. Services: Sunday School : 9:30am Morning Worship: 10:30am Thursday: 6:00pm Meeting at: 145 S.W. 78th Court Ocala, Florida 352-690-7596 B I B L I C A L F O U N D A T I O N C H U R C H 000EF6C 8070 SW 60th Ave. Ocala, FL 34476 352-291-2080 SERVICES HOURS Sunday 9am, 11am, 6pm 1:30 Spanish Service Tuesday 7pm Spanish Service Wednesday Night 7pm Youth 7pm Thursday Bible Study 6:30 to 7:30 Friday 7pm Spanish Service Nursery available www.crossroads.cog.net WE WELCOME ALL! Bishop Paul Woosley 000E79U St. Martins Church 950 N.W. 70th Street (SR 326) Ocala, Florida 34475 352-351-8059 www.cac-ocala.org Service & Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Visitors Are Always Welcom e The Only Church of the True 1928 Book of Common Prayer (Episcopal) Christ the King Anglican Church 000EPLY Christ the King The Rev. Donald J. Curran, Rector Services: Rite I 7:30 am Rite II 8:50 & 11:15 am Childrens Church 8:50 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary Anglican Church 000DOX6 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS is discovered through worshiping together 711187 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Dont waste your time and energy fretting over remarks you consider unnecessary or unkind. Best advice: Ignore them, and just keep doing your usual good job. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Getting that new perspective on a workplace situation could lead to a solution everyone will accept. Meanwhile, make time to keep up with your creative pursuits. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Those changes you planned to implement in early summer might need to be reassessed. But dont make any moves until youve discussed this with someone you trust. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Your aspects favor harmony, making this a good time to work out problems in relationships whether personal or professional. An old friend comes back. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) While youre still riding that high-powered beam, you might begin to lose focus by weeks end. Could be youll need to do a little cat-napping to restore your spent energies. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) An unexpected development creates a lot of excitement. Where it takes you is your decision. Check out the possibilities, then decide if you want to go with it or not. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Although your supporters help you squash an unfair claim against you, dont let this go unchallenged. You need to learn more about the motives of those behind it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) There are some tasks to clear up by midweek. Then you can welcome the new month on a high note. A friend brings surprising but very welcome news. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You might want to change your plans before theyre set in cement. Consider advice from colleagues. But remember that, ultimately, its your choice. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) A difficult situation is working itself out. Lingering problems should be resolved by weeks end, allowing the Goat to enjoy a calmer, less stressful period. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Be careful not to move so quickly that you miss possible warning signs that could upset your plans. Slow down. Your supporters will continue to stand by you. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Your generosity in sharing your time and wisdom with others leads to an intriguing development that could have you considering some interesting choices. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way of influencing people to be and do their best. You would make an excellent teacher. JOBLESScontinued from Page 1 tional campaign encouraging the more than 30 million Americans who suffer from venous disease, including varicose veins and chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), to rethink their condition and recognize it as a serious health concern. The campaign, led by a coalition of medical societies and sponsored by Covidien, encourages those with venous disease to learn more about their condition, find a vein specialist, and make informed decisions about the best, and often minimally-invasive treatment option for them. As part of the campaign, Olympic Gold Medalist Summer Sanders shares her personal story about the impact venous disease had on her life and the improvements she experienced following treatment. The Rethink Varicose Veins team will be at Moms Nite Out dispelling the myths about varicose veins and encouraging attendees to take a quick self-assessment to determine their risk for varicose veins and CVI. Taking the selfassessment will automatically enter attendees for an opportunity to win a spa getaway weekend at the Miraval Arizona Resort & Spa, Nov. 14-17. Or visit www.RethinkVV.com/escape for a chance to win. Originally organized by Maria Bailey, CEO of BSM Media, author and Mom Talk Radio host, National Moms Nite Out unites social media groups, companies, local playgroups, mom bloggers and networks in giving moms a well-deserved night off. Bailey brought the first National Moms Nite Out to life after watching moms take care of everyone else on Mothers Day, but never themselves. National Moms Nite Out is one of the largest cooperative efforts of Mommy groups, Mom-focused organizations and corporations, bloggers and vloggers all coming together for one great night in support of motherhood, Bailey said. MOM continued from Page 1 Thursday, April 25 Learn w hy it s d i ff erent in Flori d a League of Women Voters of Marion County presents Why don't they do things the way we did them back home?" It will be on April 25 at 4 p.m. at Cypress Hall, On Top of the World Communities, 8415 S.W. 80th St., Ocala. The event is free and open to the public. "Why don't they do things the way we did them back home?" It is a question asked every day by newcomers and notso-new folks, too. A city council, the county commission, the legislature or the governor's office regularly make decisions and take actions that affect our future. Come learn why Florida is different and find out who and what is responsible....and how it can be changed. Presenter: Judy Johnson, league member, attorney, former county commissioner in Marion County and a former school board member in Alachua County. She has been president of the Florida League of Women Voters and has a long standing interest in public policy at the local, state and national levels. Join us! Saturday, April 27 Concert ban d 2 -d ay per f or m ance Please join the Kingdom of the Sun Concert Band Swing into Spring concert series on Saturday, April 27 at 2 p.m. or Sunday, April 28 at 3 p.m., at the Marion Technical Institute (MTI), 1614 S.E. Fort King St., Ocala. All performances are free and open to the public donations are accepted. All church gol f outing Everyone is invited to 'hit the links' Saturday morning, 11 a.m., at Royal Oaks Golf Club, Oak Run Country Club, to play 18 holes of golf, with cart, and share lunch. Enjoy a fun day of golf, Christian Fellowship and who knows: a hole in one? Prizes to be awarded. Those interested in lunch only are welcome. sFee per person includes 18 holes of golf, cart, lunch, tip and prizes. For reservations and additional information contact Bob Parizek at 352-8739149, Ray Westman at 352-208-9023 or Christ's Church of Marion County, 6768 S.W. 80th St. (off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182, www.ccomc.org/. Happenings

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 3 10 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials. Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. EMPTYTRUCK Returning to Milwaukee, Chicago, Mid West Can move 1 item or whole household (414) 520-1612 Brian Bnet CARE MANAGER The Centers is seeking a Bachelors level Care Manager to coordinate mental health svcs for children enrolled in Behavioral Health Network. Extensive travel required in Citrus & Hernando Counties. Use of personal vehicle reqd., State mileage rate pd. Work hours dictated by caseload. Please submit salary. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us CLERICAL The Centers is seeking a clerical Program Assistant to work in a fastpaced outpatient setting in Lecanto. This position requires strong customer service skills, attention to detail, ability to work independently and multi-task. HS diploma or GED equiv & 2 yrs exp reqd. Salary is $9-10/hr.Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify Fax or e-mail resume to HR, The Centers, Inc. (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us TBOSS Therapist The Centers is seeking Masters Level Therapist for TBOSS position in Marion and Citrus Counties. Must have Masters in a related field of Human Services and min 2 yrs exp working with adults, children & adolescents providing individual, group & family therapy. Incentive Opportunity Available. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us TRANSPORTER/GENERALIST The Centers is seeking a Transporter/Generalist for our Lighthouse program in Inverness. This position provides members (mentally ill adults) with transportation, and participates as a Generalist in the program based on the Clubhouse model of a work ordered day.Some evening and weekend work required. Salary is $8.25-$9.00/hr. Acceptable driving record & clean background reqd. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify Fax or e-mail resume to HR, The Centers, Inc. (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us ASSIST SENIORS We provide non-medical companionship and home help for seniors. Day, weekend and overnight shifts available. Join our special team of CAREGivers today. 352-622-5936 Lic. #HCS229393 ALLAUTOS WANTED with or without title. Any cond. make or model. We pay up to $10,000 and offer free towing. (813) 505-6939 OAK RUN COUNTRY CLUBWOW! 3 Bedroom Golf Course Home 2 Car garage, firepace & pool table, use of all amenities, golf course, 4 swimming pools, 1 indoor, tennis courts, jacuzzi, driving range, restarant & health clubs, all lawn, maint, included $1,100. No smoking, No Pets, Available April 15th (443) 299-2047 L ET U S W ORK F OR Y OU CALL TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403West Marion Messenger Classifieds Get Results! PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 2355 S. Ripple Path Crystal River, 34429 Great Marine Mech, Boat storage and launch site for nearby scallops plus fishing & kayaks, Lgr bldg w/ 3/18rollups office tlr & boat ramp, $169k, finance poss. call 352-634-3862 HOMOASASSA5+ DEN BEDROOMS. 3 bath. THIS HUGE AND BEAUTIFUL TWO STORYHOME WITH 3 CAR GARAGE IS OVER 3500 SQ. FT. HOME BACKS UPTO ANATURE PRESERVE. HOME IS AFORECLOSURE SHORT SALE AND THE BANK IS WORKING WITH THE SELLERS. THIS HOME WAS BUILTIN 2005. dennis_neff@yahoo.co m BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 STUMP GRINDING CALLJIM FOR FREE ESTIMATES (800) 478-8679 Trimming,Removal and Debris Clean Up. Reliable Service,Reasonable Prices. Lic/Ins 20 yrs Exp.FREE Estimates. Residential/Commercial. 352-445-7916 or 352-292-5446 Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKS FREE TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 Somebody else wants it! Got something special you no longer use? Sell it in the Classifieds. It may be just the perfect item to fill somebody elses need. TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 000EFNB FREE TO THE PUBLIC April 27, 2013 10:30am Dunnellon Public Library Meeting Room 20351 Robinson Road, Dunnellon Friends of the Dunnellon Public Library Present: William and Sue Wills as President Franklin our 32nd President and First lady Eleanor. Presidents and Their First Ladies, dramatically speaking is the creation of the veteran acting and writing team of the Wills. The couple are now in their 16th year of bringing to life the stories of Presidential couples. The Wills are not impersonators, their costumes, dialects, and demeanors recreate these historical characters. Mr. and Mrs. Wills have performed in over 30 performances at seven of the nations Presidential Museums. William researches and creates scripts while Sue edits his work and creates the costumes. Sometimes forgotten are the young people who met, fell in love and the years of triumphs and tragedies that shaped their personalities and their relationship which led up to the 1932 election and their 12 years as First Couple. The focus will be on their private side and how that affected their public lives. For additional information contact the library at 352-438-2520 J a s m i n e P l a z a 3 5 2 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6 1 6 0 S W S R 2 0 0 U n i t 1 0 4 O c a l a F l o r i d a 3 4 4 7 6 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 Readers Choice Winner Jewelry Store 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12 www.jandjjewelersocala.com Thank You For Voting Us Readers Choice #1 Jeweler For 6 Consecutive Years 000EL0I S T O R E H O U R S : T U E S F R I 1 0 5 S A T 1 0 2 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 000EGB4 John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000EHZ7 Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations for Your Pet Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Tour our unique facility and you be the judge! 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com 000EN8O Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting L o o k f o r u s o n F a c e b o o k L o o k f o r u s Look for us o n F a c e b o o k on Facebook 000EL19 The Truesdell Professional Building 200 N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Fl 34482 KELLEAN K. TRUESDELL, J.D., LLM Attorney & Counselor at Law (352) 873-4141 or KelleanTruesdell.com My Florida Estate Planning Workshop is available any day at any hour. Wills, Living Trusts, Financial and Medical Powers of Attorney, Probate, Medicaid, Long-Term Care, Asset Protection, Federal Death Tax Minimization, Trust Administration, Elder Law and Personal LifeCare Services. 352-875-7433 875-7041 Interior & Exterior 000EPDN 22 Yrs. of Excellent Local References Hi Ocala Palms Neighbors For almost a decade Ive been in this neighborhood doing interior and exterior painting, THANK YOU all very much for your support and trust. Im looking forward to continue serving you and doing my very best of high quality work. Sincerely, A L C AS T ANO P A I N T I N G I N C P AINTING I NC brary, then there wasnt an explosion; there were 120 people hurt, then there were 70, then it was over 100 again; there were three unexploded devices found, then there were none, then there were two that were detonated by police, then it turns out they were not bombs; cell phone service was cut off to avoid remote detonation of additional bombs, then it was restored (Sprint and Verizon both said that their cell phone service was never interrupted). So now we wait for the follow-ups, possible arrests, etc. There is no doubt that the explosions were another in a long list of terrorist tragedies. There is also no doubt that, for a while, we will be inundated with rumors and unconfirmed facts. We just need to accept that there are bad people in the world, and we need to be ever vigilant to lessen their impact on society. And we dont need the networks to tell us that. EDITORIALcontinued from Page 8 them, etc. A couple hundred years ago Americans needed protection from the Native Americans, who were fighting to keep their land from being poached by invaders from Europe. Now, Americans need protection from the Native American-run casinos, so the people dont get their savings poached by those who run the gambling establishments. Just like the game of cowboys and Indians, this is a battle for survival, especially for senior citizens. But unlike those childhood games, once someone is down, they may not necessarily get up. Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger. CLARK continued from Page 8 Regretfully, we have been destroying our core values since the s beginning with allowing our courts to take student prayer out of our schools. We sat back and let it happen and they have been going downhill ever since. Too many now want God out of our lives and our decision making, moving the accepted norm in nearly all areas of our life, including the family. If I wanted to destroy America, I would do the following: change our value system through the destruction of our morals, removing God from our lives; destroy our capitalist system through massive debt; decimate our health care system (Obama Care); create a welfare society that is dependent on government ; fan the fires of class warfare and bite by bite, disarm our citizens. Lastly, I would take over the education of our children, from a very early age so they could be indoctrinated into my way of thinking. In other words, exactly what Obama is trying to do! Thats why I and so many others that love America and have faith in God dislike Obama. We dont need another reason, thats reason enough! Wayne Rackley Oak Run LETTERScontinued from Page 8 T his Saturday between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., the Fairfield Village SAC will be sponsoring its semi-annual yard sale. Again this year, a hot dog lunch will be for sale in the Fairfield Clubhouse for a very reasonable price. Hot dogs, chips and a soft drink along with assorted sweets and desserts will enable buyers and sellers to continue through the morning and lunch time to participate in a chance for super big bargains! Everyone is invited to come to Fairfield Village (off Southwest 60th Avenue) and survey the numerous bargains that will be offered in many of the carports of the 280+ homes in Fairfield Village. Last year, there were all kinds of household items, clothing, tools, electronic equipment, decorator items, furniture, knick-knacks, and handmade items. There will be literally something for everyone so everyone should come to find their own personal treasures. Proceeds will go toward helping to sponsor Social Activities Committee activities. Those activities coming up in the next few months include: the Memorial Day picnic, the 4th of July barbecue, and the Labor Day cookout. All of the FFV community looks forward to these gatherings each year, but many of the fund-raising activities are as enjoyable as the events themselves. So, if you have any inclination toward bargains...come on down! You will be glad that you did. Saturday dinnerIn other news from Fairfield Village, the Saturday night pot luck dinner was quite successful on April 19. Granted, there were fewer people in attendance than usual, but the food and the fun was not diminished in the least. There was delicious food, interesting conversations, a 50/50 winner (Toni Belcher), and musical background by virtue of the new TV which has been installed in the main room of the Clubhouse. The number had no influence on the fun which was quite pleasant. All neighbors are reminded to check out next months pot luck dinner schedule. These are normally held on the third Saturday evening of the month. Please come and enjoy time with friends and neighbors while enjoying really good home-cooked food. HOA meetingThe regular Fairfield Village HOA meeting was held on Thursday evening, April 17 at 6 p.m. in the Clubhouse. To say that the meeting was lively would be an understatement. Those there were part of what could be described as an informative evening for sure. Some would say that it involved some differences of opinion, and that would not be wrong. However, in the final analysis, some new information was shared, some difficult decisions were made, and some new perspectives came closer to being understood. It would be incorrect to say that everyone was totally pleased with all the decisions and all the outcomes, but it would be correct to say that many compromises were made so that everyone got something that could be considered a win or a victory. Board member, Kerry Breedon, shared information about a wish list that many attendees had previously not known existed. It seems that American Land Lease asks the HOA to prepare a yearly list of things that the neighbors of FFV would like to have included as amenities for the entire community. It may have been because of lack of communication that many of those attending had not even known that there was such a thing as this wish list. As in the past, the HOA Board submitted a list to the management company for possible addition to/for the community. The deadline date this year was Friday, April 18, so adding to this years list was not the point in Kerrys presentation. However, he said that he wanted to let everyone know what was being submitted this year and to make sure that more FFV neighbors could be involved in next years submitted list. This list is for the good of the whole community, not just for those things thought of by the HOA Board. To make the submission more nearly universal, the HOA Board would like for all members of the FFV community to think seriously about things that could be purchased, improved, or added to the community and then contact an HOA Board member with those suggestions over the next months. Granted, it will be a year before the next list is submitted, but that also means that there is plenty of time for neighbors to think seriously about this and present viable options for consideration. The HOA members are available for conversations about this list or about any things that should be brought to the Boards attention. They urge FFV neighbors to feel welcome to contact them either individually or collectively. It would be a big help if these comments or wishes were also presented in written form so that they will be completely understood. Piano progressJean Chapman reports that much progress has been made toward the purchase of a piano for the main room of the FFV Clubhouse. The fund-raiser piano dance party was a success and more individual pledges and donations have been received. As more information about the options become available, they will be reported so that those interested members of the community will be kept aware of what is transpiring. Anyone with information that would be valuable for the group sponsoring the piano is urged to contact Jean Chapman, Loretta Zang, Sandy Williams, or Linda Urbonowitz. Any of these ladies will pass the information along in order to be sure that the best possible choice is made in the purchase, transporting, and appropriate set up of the piano. These people and many others are so looking forward to the time that all FFV neighbors can enjoy the piano. Again We hope to see many people at our yard sale on Saturday, April 27 between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Come on down and check out the bargains and meet the nice people who live in Fairfield Village...Marion Countys ...lively place filled with lovely people. Have a great week! The price is right! Come on down to Fairfields big yard sale Fairfield Village Priscilla Geissal Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com The American Cancer Societys Manto-Man Ocala group will meet on April 24 at 7 p.m. at the Urology Health Team, 3201 S.W. 34th St., Ocala. This is a prostate cancer education and support group that meets monthly, has speakers and refreshments and wives/caregivers are also welcome. There is a fledgling website http://www.mantomanocala.weebly.com April Guest Speaker: Dr. Mario R. Putzeys-Alverez Open Forum Discussion Prostate Cancer. For information contact Mickey Weller, 352-369-9486. Cancer Society Man-to-Man group to meet Read the classifieds

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, April 24, 2013 11 2 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO ADVERTISE Call 854-3986 ADVERTISING 3 5 2 4 6 5 7 5 3 8 352-465-7538 20312 E. Pennsylvania Ave. www.bluerunbicycles.com Featuring Bikes For Every Rider! Springtime is 000ENII RIDE TIME 000EMK3 Prom/Homecoming and Quinceanera Dresses 10% Off with this ad 7470 SW 60th Avenue (352) 671-1890 Monday Saturday 10am-5pm SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 0 0 0 E M 6 0 000EM60 Florida Window Medics, Inc. Screen Rooms Acrylic & Glass Rooms Rescreens Broken Glass Replacement Windows Gutters Foggy Windows Cement Sliding Glass Door Repair Call & speak directly to the owner David Heath Comp. #5524 352 484-5697 WINDOW REPAIRS 000EJLN GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 7 9 5 $ 7 9 5 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RAY R A Y RAY C C C C C C ONSTRUCTION O N S T R U C T I O N ONSTRUCTION C r a y c o n s t c o m C r a y c o n s t c o m Crayconst.com T rade in your old vinyl windows for acrylic or glass 1 6 x 7 S L I D I N G G A R A G E S C R E E N D O O R 1 6 x 7 S L I D I N G 16 x 7 SLIDING G A R A G E GARAGE S C R E E N SCREEN D O O R DOOR 000EIY5 L EE S P RESSURE W ASHING L OW W ATER U SAGE 489-6786 Licensed & Insured PRESSURE CLEANING Quality Work For Low Prices! No Pressure Roof Cleaning! Painting Metal Scrap Pickup 000EGSJ 000EE5F IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 SPRING Special Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2012 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $ 39 99 Call for details Expires 4/30/2013 10% OFF repairs 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000DZWC CONCRETE WORK REPAIRING OLD INSTALLING NEW We Make Your Concrete Look Good Specializing in Repairing Concrete Driveways Pool Decks Patios Entrance Ways Advantages: Mildew & Oil Resistant Non Skid Protection Easy to Keep Clean Commercial Grade Quality RENEWED SURFACES 000EHW9 PLUMBING EPA Lead Certification #NAT-113266-1 OSHA 10 #1216933 Fla. Lic. #CFC1427666 804-9165 Associated Plumbing and Pipe From Bathroom Remodeling to Fixing Leaky Faucets, and installing Bliss Walk-in Tubs Residential and Commercial 711185 DIALAPRO F o r Y o u r P r o f e s s i o n a l N e e d s For Your Professional Needs W E S T M A R I O N M e s s e n g e r WEST MARION Messenger 000EPAC NOW BUYING GOLD, PLATINUM, SILVER, FLATWARE, COINS, DIAMONDS, WATCHES & GOLD-FILLED JEWELRY YOUR UNWANTED JEWELRY COULD BE WORTH LOTS OF MONEY! 6333 SW STATE ROAD 200 854-6622 WE CAN COME TO YOU! SELL YOUR GOLD & SILVER WHILE PRICES ARE STILL HIGH SELL YOUR GOLD & SILVER WHILE PRICES ARE STILL HIGH Open MF 9-5 We buy large diamonds 1 CT or larger We buy all premium watches and all gold watches US & Foreign Silver Coins US & Foreign Gold Coins Stamped Sterling Flatware & Service Sets C A S H H A N D E D O U T O N T H E S P O T C A S H H A N D E D O U T O N T H E S P O T CASH HANDED OUT ON THE SPOT 8k, 10k, 14k, 18k, 22k, 24k, Dental Gold & Platunum W ANT TO KNOW WHAT S IN THAT OLD JEWELR Y BOX ? L ET US HELP C ALL 854-6622 T ODAY N O A PPOINTMENT N ECESSAR Y Between Queen Of Peace & Flowers Bakery WE PAY CASH A nother great night at the clubhouse! The Hobo potluck dinner and then the concert by Vincenzo Bartolomea Basile were fantastic. There were many hobos at the party. Did you recognize Pat Tobin? Many others, including Dot Roberts and Jack and Margene Sheidler, were all decked out as street people. Approximately 60 residents and guests enjoyed the concert by Mr. Basile, who is billed as a Romantic Baritone from Brooklyn, New York. His selections included Spanish Eyes, Because of You, My Way, Falling In Love With You, Ava Maria, and ended the evening by singing The Lords Prayer. At one point in the program he even serenaded Rita Carr with a song in Italian. There were many door prizes won by various residents; you guess it: fifty/fifty was won by Earle Talley! Remember the next big event is the Vegas Night with a catered dinner and entertainment by Sally Langwah. Tickets are available from Charlotte Payne, Marie Schneider, and Carol Mowrey.Ladies LuncheonThe April Ladies Luncheon was enjoyed by 20 women from our community. We had great food and service at the new Darrells Restaurant. Next months lunch will be at the Horse and Hound on Silver Springs Boulevard. Call Marion Gartman or Pat Tobin for reservations.Mount Dora trip Would you be interested in a trip to Mount Dora? The Red Hot Fillies are sponsoring a trip by chartered bus on May 14. If you would like to go with us, please contact Carolyn Slocumb. Cost for the bus trip is $27. Our thoughts and prayers go out to those affected by the murderous attack in Boston. God Bless America! Hobo pot luck dinner entertains at Quail Meadow Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb This was the gathering of the Ladies Luncheon from Quail Meadow which took place at Darrells Diner. Jack & Margene Sheidler. Above, Pat Tobin. At left, Vincenzo Basile.

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INDEX Quail Meadow......5 Fairfield Village..5 Ocala Palms........5 Stone Creek........5 VOLUME 7, NUMBER 4 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 Puzzles Page 9 Classifieds Page 10 12 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger 000EPV2 HOMES STARTING AT $32,900 BEST OF THE BEST 2014 Jacobsen 3 BR/2 BA This home was built with 2 x 6 construction. Comes with China Labs sinks, ceiling fan preps in all rooms, 1 pc fiberglass tub and shower. It is built by the legendary Jacobsen Homes with their 53 year tradition. This is a limited opportunity. Must see this home to appreciate its value! WE HAVE OVER 30 MODELS ON DISPLAY WE HAVE OVER 40 MODELS ON DISPLAY NEW HOMES STARTING AT $ 32,900 TAYLOR MADE SALE 2460 Sq. Ft. of living 4 bedroom, Playroom & Retreat. Open Great Room and Beautiful Kitchen with Upgraded Whirlpool Appliances/Fireplace and many more options. Comes with 2 x 6 walls and 2 x 8 floor joists. 11 TIME WINNER 352-621-9181 2012 2012 2012 2012 TAYLOR MADE HOMES www.taylormade-homes.com 7165 US Hwy. 19, Homosassa, FL 1 mile south of Howards Flea Market WE WANT TRADE-INS. BEST PRICES PAID! SALE PRICE Delivery & Set-up $ 48,900 OR ONLY $ 385 57 NO MONEY DOWN per mo. wac. with A/C, Stairs & Skirting. Use Land Equity. SALE PRICE Delivery & Set-up $ 98,900 OR ONLY $ 662 73 NO MONEY DOWN per mo. wac. with A/C, Stairs & Skirting. Use Land Equity. FREE WASHER & DRYER With ad. Must present coupon prior to purchase. Torch RunThe Law Enforcement Torch Run to boost Special Olympics took place in downtown Ocala last week. Above are the runners as they start out, and at the right is the entire group.PHOTOS BY RON RATNER PHOTOS BY JIM CLARKRelay for Life The American Cancer Society Relay for Life took place Friday, April 19, in front of West Marion Community Hospital. Above, the evening started with the Survivors Lap. They were led around the track by the West Port High School Army JROTC Color Guard. The jobless rate in March for Workforce Connections Citrus, Levy and Marion counties region was 7.8 percent, down 0.7 percent over the month and 2.4 percent lower than the same time last year. The unemployment rate for the region is the lowest since June 2008 when it was 7.7 percent. For the fourth consecutive month, the Ocala/Marion County metropolitan area led the state with the fastest jobgrowth rate at 3.3 percent, with 3,000 new jobs over the year. Floridas jobgrowth rate during the same period was 1.9 percent. According to Fridays release of the March 2013 unemployment rates by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO), Marion County posted an unemployment rate of 7.8 percent, a drop of 0.6 percent over the month and the lowest it has been since June 2008 when the rate was 7.6 percent; Citrus Countys rate fell 0.8 percentage points to 7.8 percent, the lowest since June 2008 (8.1 percent); and Levy County dropped 0.8 percentage points to 7.6 percent, the lowest since July 2008 (7.7 percent). Local rates are not seasonally adjusted. Floridas not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in March was 7.0 percent, the lowest since October 2008. The national rate was 7.6 percent in March. Rusty Skinner, Workforce ConnecCounty jobless rate falls Please see JOBLESS Page 4 Its high time for moms to be pampered. On May 9, Paddock Mall is the place to be as Simon Property Group, Inc. provides a free evening of relaxation and fun in honor of national Moms Nite Out. One hundred twenty nine Simon properties will be participating in this years event. The presenting sponsor of Simons Moms Nite Out celebration this year is Rethink Varicose Veins. At Paddock Mall, attendees will have the opportunity to participate in an exciting evening filled with refreshments, entertainment, fashion shows and beauty services, and prize giveaways all focused on rewarding Moms. The Paddock Mall event will take place Thursday, May 9, from 5 to 8 p.m. in Center Court. WOCA DJ Joe Martone will be on-hand to emcee the festivities! Moms are so incredibly deserving of a night off, said Brenda Cleary, director of marketing and business development at Paddock Mall, and it is our privilege to be the venue where they come to enjoy it. Cleary added that as an extra bonus, one lucky mom and her friend will be treated to a trip to Chicago to see Bon Jovis Because We Can tour at historic Soldier Field on Friday, July 12. Bon Jovis new release, What About Now is in stores now. Rethink Varicose Veins is an educaPrepare now for Moms Nite Out on May 9 at Paddock Mall Please see MOM Page 4 O n Thursday, April 11, the residents of Stone Creek said farewell to Rick Morang, maintenance supervisor. Rick was at Stone Creek since its beginning. In a previous article I did about Rick, former Lifestyle Director Jennifer Geraldo referred to Rick as the go-to guy for any problems. Rick is the type of man who gives 110 percent to Stone Creek. Often times, he would be called back to help with an event problem and he never complained. Rick was extremely helpful to the Kitchen Committee and now the Kitchen Club as the club took on the role of custodian of the kitchen amenity. He was always there to correct a problem or gave great advice when needed. The Kitchen Club is sorry to see him leave as many others will be. The club presented Rick with a gift in appreciation for all he has done for the kitchen amenity to make it such a viable facility. Chris Johnson also presented Rick with a gift from the Stone Creek staff. Chris said, Rick was a tremendous asset to our Stone Creek community both in his job as Maintenance Supervisor, but as a friend as well. He will be greatly missed, and we wish him success in his new job. I would venture that many at Stone Creek residents agree with Chris statement. Rick will not be far from Stone Creek as he has taken over at the Fore Ranch Community. He has taken on a position as an Association Manager. The Fore Ranch Community will benefit from Ricks experience. When I asked Rick how his job at Stone Creek would prepare him for his new job, Rick said, During the past 6 years at Stone Creek has lead me into this position, by all the work that I did as Maintenance Manager and under the leadership of the Cams. I was able to be involved in many aspects of this role. Rick told me that he will miss all the friendships he has made here along with his coworkers and with the beauty of the facility. For the person who will follow in his footsteps, Rick has the following advice, Take pride in this community like its your own. When making decisions, be fair and consistent. Rick gives the following statement about the community he called home for the last six years. It has been a pleasure to work at Stone Creek and to grow with the community since its inception. The residents are fortunate to have such a wonderful and peaceful place to live. I am now looking forward to my new assignment as a community manager and will take all the great memories with me. Wishing the Stone Creek Community greatness. The Stone Creek Community wishes Rick much happiness in his new role and we will see him back on June 5 when he comes back for the weight loss challenge he has with Chris Johnson. When I first heard that Rick was leaving, I e-mailed and asked him if he was leaving because of the challenge. He told me he was going to win but I think he has some work ahead of him to beat Chris. June 5 will tell and we will all welcome Rick back at that time. I know many will have his number on speed dial because he has been such an important part of Stone Creek. Stone Creeks Go-to Guy leaves for Fore Ranch Stone Creek Patricia Gizzi Rick Morang Methodist Men serving up meatloaf The Mens group of the First United Methodist Church of Dunnellon will serve a meatloaf dinner April 26, 4 to 6 p.m. Tickets are $8 at the door. The dinner will be cooked by the churchs Master Chef Charles Scearce.The church is at 2501 W. State Road 40, Dunnellon.