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West Marion messenger
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100092/00135
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Title: West Marion messenger
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Ocala, Florida
Publication Date: 01-16-2013
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00100092:00141

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INDEX Fairfield Village..2 Stone Creek........5 Dr. Snyder............6 Quail Meadow....11 VOLUME 6, NUMBER 42 WEDNESDAY, January 16, 2013 Puzzles Page 9 ClassifiedsPage 1112 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger The U.S. Department of the Treasury today reported that 5 million checks continue to be mailed to federal beneficiaries each month. With just two months remaining until the March 1, 2013, electronic payment law goes into effect, the Treasury Department is urging Social Security and other federal benefit recipients to not delay and switch now to either direct deposit or the Direct Express Debit MasterCard card. Choosing direct deposit or the Direct Express card makes it easier, safer and more convenient for beneficiaries to receive their payments. Switching to an electronic payment is not optional its the law, said David Lebryk, commissioner of the Treasury Departments Financial Management Service. If you or a loved one still receive paper checks for your benefit payments, now is the time to switch. Its free and easy just call 1-800-333-1795 or visit www.GoDirect.org. Currently, approximately 93 percent of Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments are being made electronically. Converting the remaining paper check recipients to electronic payments will save American taxpayers $1 billion over the next 10 years. The Treasury Department published a final rule in December 2010 to gradually phase out paper checks for federal benefit payments. Since May 1, 2011, all people newly applying for federal benefits, including Social Security, SSI, Veterans Affairs, Railroad Retirement Board, Office of Personnel Management benefits and other non-tax payments, have had to choose direct deposit or the Direct Express card at the time they sign up for their benefits. March 1, 2013, is the final deadline by which all reSocial Security warning: Time to go electronic Vigil for a littlevictim Ocala came together on the Downtown Square Jan. 10 to remember 6-month-old Jonah Mendoza of the Fountains in northwest Ocala, who was killed on Jan. 4 by his mother. PHOTOS BY JIM CLARKA collage of pictures from Jonahs short life were on display on a table in front of the stage at the square. Jordan Mendoza, Jonahs father, speaks to the crowd at the conclusion of the memorial. Juliauna Christensen, 3, writes a message of condolence, helped by a friend, Roxanne Garcia. Column, Page 8 Photos, Page 12 PHOTOS BY JIM CLARKRemembering JonahJordan Mendoza, flanked by family and friends, looks over displays while holding a candle in memory of his slain son, 6-month-old Jonah. The thin lights in the background were part of the citys Christmas decoration, designed to look like lights falling from the trees. One speaker called them Tears from Heaven. Jordan Mendoza gets words of consolation from a well-wisher prior to the start of the memorial on Jan. 10. BY JIM CLARK EditorMarion County Tax Collector George Albright has done what the state asked him to. In addition to his dispensing of auto tags and titles, he took on the driver license production for the state, and has gotten thing running smoothly. In fact, things run so smoothly that now some forces in the state want to remove the auto tag purchasing from his office. Albright was one of the county officials appearing before the Marion County Legislative Delegation on Jan. 8, and didnt mince words: This is a power play by the 3M company and the Department of Highway Safety. The 3M company is involved in the making of the tags. It doesnt make sense, Albright told the seven-member delegation, chaired by State Sen. Charlie Dean. If they thought enough of us to give us driver licenses, why do they want to take away tag and title? He also added, Why is there even a Department of Highway Safety? One of the things that was emphasized during the presentations was the protection of water. County Chair Kathy Bryant told the legislators, Protection of the aquifer will always be on our legislative agenda. She asked in the strongest possible terms for the county to have a seat at the table during discussions of Silver Springs. Ocala City Council member Daniel Owen asked the officials to clarify the Please see ELECTRONIC, Page 3 Albright blasts state agency over auto tags Please see ALBRIGHT, Page 3 Sheriff sworn inSheriff Chris Blair sits with his daughter Alesa and wife Sangi as Judge Hale Stancil speaks during Blairs swearing-in ceremony. Behind Stancil is County Commission Chair Kathy Bryant. Additional photo, Page 12.PHOTO BY RON RATNER BY JIM CLARK EditorArea residents armed with statements against homeowner associations and developers who they say charge excessive fees and fail to file required reports came to Tuesdays Marion County Legislative Delegation ready to do battle, but a state senators comments at the opening of the meeting quickly let them know they would get little satisfaction. The delegation gathered at the Klein Center at Central Florida Community College for the five-hour meeting as a crowd composed mostly of representatives of local agencies filled the room. Homeowners get little relief from legislators Please see RELIEF, Page 2 Deputies sworn in PHOTO BY RON RATNERWith the swearing in of new sheriff Chris Blair, all sworn officers in the Marion County department also had to take an oath. Internal Medicine Associates Of Ocala Board Certifications in Internal Medicine and Geriatrics Thomas Mohan ARNP Sharon Marques M.D. K.N. Reddy M.D. Connie L. Hartley ARNP Herma Baker FNP-BC OFFICE LOCATIONS: 4840 S U.S. Hwy. 41, Dunnellon (352) 489-5152 1623 SW 1St Ave., Ocala (352) 732-9844 9401 SW Hwy. 200, Bldg. 500 Ste. 501 & 502, Ocala (352) 854-9991 Ask About Weight Loss Programs!! High Blood Pressure Diabetes Weight Loss Womens Health All Arthritic Problems Heart Disease Lung Problems Complete Physicals Call For An Appt. Today! 352-414-5312 ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! Free Screenings! 000DRA9 000DPL T 7201 SW Hwy 200 Ocala (352) 629-0900 (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (352) 629-0900 Other locations throughout the southeast 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala GREAT FINANCING ON EZ-GO CARTS! GOLF CARS ST AR TING A T $1,995 WHAT BATTERY A RE Y OU L OOKING F OR ??? Automotive Marine Lawn Mower Golf Cart Cordless Phone Riding Toys Computer Back Up Tractor Motorcycle ATV Camcorder Cellular Phone Wheel Chairs Game Feeder Emergency Lights Security Systems Battery Packs Laptop Computers Alkaline Complete Stock Of Batteries For: CUSTOM BATTERY PACKS LAPTOP COMPUTER BATTERIES CAMCORDER BATTERIES WHEELCHAIR BATTERIES SECURITY SYSTEM BATTERIES AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES FARM TRACTOR BATTERIES JET SKI BATTERIES GAME FEED BATTERIES MARINE BATTERIES CELL PHONE BATTERIES POWER WHEELS BATTERIES WATCH BATTERIES KEY REMOTE BATTERIES TRUCK BATTERIES CORDLESS PHONE BATTERIES EMERGENCY LIGHT BATTERIES ATV BATTERIES MOTORCYCLE BATTERIES LAWNMOWER BATTERIES

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 11 2 W ednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith aName Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTALFor your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 M edical Bnet CARE ManagerThe Centers is seeking a Bachelors level Care Manager to coordinate mental health svcs for children enrolled in Behavioral Health Network. Extensive travel required in Citrus & Hernando Counties. Use of personal vehicle reqd., State mileage rate pd. Work hours dictated by caseload. Please submit salary. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/W e E-V erify. Fax or e-mail r esume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For mor e info visit www.thecenters.us TBOSS TherapistThe Centers is seeking Masters Level Therapist for TBOSS position in Citrus County. Must have min 2 yrs exp working with adults, children & adolescents providing individual, group & family therapy. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us M edical Residential SA EducatorThe Centers is seeking an Educator to provide educational services to adolescents in our 24/7 residential substance abuse treatment facility in Lecanto. Teach lesson plans according to each countys requirements, i.e., math, social studies, science, English, etc. Assist individuals with special and specific needs, interactions and goals. Bachelors in field of Edu or Human Services & exp reqd. Middle School or HS level State of FL teaching certification preferred. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/W e E-V erify Fax or e-mail r esume to HR, The Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For mor e info visit www.thecenters.us Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKSFREE TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403 Prof essional Dir ector of Clinical ServicesResponsible for directing the programs psychological and treatment services to include technical and administrative duties, testing, individual, group, and family therapeutic activities, research, and participation in overall institutional programming and administration. Education: Masters degree from an accredited college or university in the field of counseling, social work, psychology, rehabilitation, special education or in a related human services field is preferred. 5 years related experience in the field of treatment program development, implementation, & evaluation in a juvenile institution preferred. Superviory skills necessary. The right person must possess a license: (MFT, LCSW, LMHC) from the state of Florida, provide Apply In Person at: 2855 W W oodland Ridge Dr Lecanto, Florida, 34461 or Email to shar on.facto@us.g4s. com or apply online at www. usajobs.g4s.com Drug Free W orkplace / EEO Musical Instruments BUYINGGuit ars, Banjos & Mandolins,Fender Gibson & Martin any condition (443) 463-3421 W anted to Buy LIONEL T OY TRAINS W anted Any Amount Any Condition. Cash Paid Will Pick Up (352) 346-3328 Real Es t ate F or Sale PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real est ate advertising in this newsp aper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limit ation or discrimination based on race, color religion, sex, handicap, familial st atus or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limit ation or discrimination. Familial st atus includes children under the age of 18 living with p arent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newsp aper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real est ate which is in violation of the law Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newsp aper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing imp aired is 1-800-927-9275. Citrus Hills Homes HERNANDOCitrus Hills Pool Home 4/3/2+, circular drive, 1 acre lot, below $200k 352-527-7856 V ehicles W anted BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 WE BUY ANYVEHICLEIn Any Condition, T itle, No T itle, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont T rade it in. W e W ill Pay up to $25K Any Make, Any Model. 813-335-3794 813-237-1892 Call AJ Handyman Electrical, Plumbing Carpentry Sinks, Toilets Leaky Faucets Ceiling Fans Security Lighting Safety Railings Grab Bars, Ramps Drywall Repair Interior Painting Screens & Screen Doors Lanai Carpet/Tile Flooring Furniture, Cabinet Refinishing/Repairs Not Sure? -Call Me T ree Service STUMP GRINDINGCALL JIM FOR FREE ESTIMA TES (800) 478-8679 V ehicles W anted 000DMDQ Floridas Christmas tree is the big winner in D.C. This year I was able to spend several weeks in the Washington, D.C., area (specifically Springfield, Virginia) with my daughter, son-in-law, and grandchildren, Emily and Dominic. One evening, the family went downtown to see the National Christmas Tree on the Ellipse. The display, which includes the National Christmas Tree and the 56 smaller trees representing the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and all the territories, makes up the Pathway of Peace which is absolutely spectacular. All of the smaller trees are decorated by sponsoring organizations from the local areas and usually represent something unique about the region. In most cases, the decorations are enclosed in plastic globes to be protected from the weather; however, in some cases, the sponsors decided to literally decorate the globe itself. This was the case with the Florida tree which was exceptionally popular with those who came to admire the beauty and enjoy the celebration. I hate to admit my lack of knowledge about the National Christmas Trees impressive history, but I found out some interesting facts by reading the signs posted all around the display. Later, I looked up more by using my trusty new IPad and using all the resources that we now are beginning to take for granted. It still amazes this educator from the 60s through the 90s, however; and I am amazed at the enormous wealth of information when I use my favorite Google. Going back to November of 1923, First Lady Grace Coolidge gave permission for the District of Columbia Public Schools to erect a Christmas tree on the Ellipse south of the White House. The organizers called it the National Christmas Tree and thus began the tradition. On Christmas Eve, President Calvin Coolidge, walked from the White House to the Ellipse to push the button to light the 48-foot cut tree with more than 3,000 enthusiastic spectators looking on. Cut trees continued to be used until 1973 when the National Park Service transplanted live trees. The trees from the states and territories are in alphabetical order, and this years consensus favorite was Floridas tree. The decorations represent warm sun shining on our ripening oranges here in Florida while these iconic ornaments dance in the chilly Washington D.C. weather. The artist, Janeen Mason and the Jensen Beach High School AP art students, created the balls of polymer clay finished with a double waterproof clear coat. The bright orange blossoms have a purple ribbon reading Viva Florida 500 commemorating the 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leons landing in St. Augustine. Sponsoring the project was the Arts Council, Inc. serving Stuart and Martin County along with SubseaSpearguns.com. Seeing the Florida tree and noting the reactions of others who were seeing the tree for the first time was really special. Obviously, it was the crowds favorite for the 2012 celebration. On a personal note, being able to spend Christmas and New Years with my family was extra special since they are a military family, and this was my first holiday season with them in 13 years. Many of us, now Floridians, travel to other parts of our beautiful country on a regular basis. The really important thing to me is that I, along with many of my neighbors, really look forward to our return to our homes in Fairfield Village, which still remains a lively place filled with lovely people. Floridas Christmas tree is the big winner in D.C. Fairfield Village Priscilla Geissal January is off and running! The first activity was taking down the decorations (tree, etc.) at the clubhouse. This was done sy the First Friday gathering. We had about 25 residents show up to help with this project. The men really got busy and had the tree down in record time. Thanks to everyone who helped. The next event at the clubhouse is the Comfort Foods potluck dinner on Monday, the 21st. There will be a display of quilts for everyone to enjoy. If you would like to show any of your quilts please call Carol Mowrey. Dinner will begin at 6 p.m.; come join your friends and neighbors for an evening of eating and fellowship. If you have never attended one of our potluck dinners, you dont know what you are missing. The Red Hot Fillies of the Meadow will meet on Friday, the 25th, at the clubhouse for the planning meeting for the year. We will meet at 12:30 to discuss plans for the year, and also enjoy some desserts. Bring your ideas for trips/projects with you. Remember January is when the dues are paid for the year. The Red Hats group is open to all women of Quail Meadow. Come join us if you are interested in participating in our activities. The Social Committee met to formulate plans for 2013. Mark your calendars now for the following upcoming events: Feb. 11 Mardi Gras theme potluck dinner, March 16 the annual horse race, April 15 Tax Day potluck dinner, May 18 Spring Fling, June 10 Birthday dinner, and July 4 we will revive the Quail Meadow parade and cook out. Other events are also planned and they will be listed later. One big party you want to plan for is New Years Eve we will have a party with a live band! Now, lets turn our thoughts to something very important. We have many residents who need someone from time to time to give them comfort, care, and show concern for their problems. Perhaps there is a time when you need someone to go to the store for you, or maybe just come by for a visit if you or someone you know needs someone; we have a group willing to help. If you know of anyone in need, please contact Marion Gartman. Also, if you would like to assist in this on-going project, please let Marion know. Hope to see many of you at the dinner Monday night! January off and running with taking down of tree Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb Maydaline Bristol, Teresa Bachand, Mary Zdarsky, and Marlene Cigrant. Kenneson Bristol and Benny Bachand packing up the tree. Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com

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State Sen. Alan Hays, who represents Southeastern Marion, obviously had seen the several people on the agenda and their topic, and immediately let them know the facts. Hays said he was astounded at the last delegation meeting when he heard the vocal complaints. We took it on, he said of the people in Tallahassee, but we have yet to solve the problem, which he called gargantuan. It cannot be retroactive, you cant roll the calendar back and say you cant do that, Hays told the audience. We ran into brick walls, and some of them were reinforced. Hays added, Were still striving to solve the problem. It was about three hours later before the list of homeowners who had signed up to speak got to the podium. By then, State Sen. Charlie Dean, who at the start of the meeting had been elected chairman, was cracking down on the four-minute limit. First up was Don Kronen, who said he had appeared before the delegation 16 months ago. Im very disappointed to be here again. Kronen said that lives have been devastated, finances decimated of many residents of developments. The Hardwood Trails resident blamed state attorney Brad King for not enforcing the law. He said the residents were locked into a dictatorship. Janis Lentz of Cherrywood said many bills had been proposed, but action hadnt been taken on any of them. She, too, was concerned about the lack of enforcement of a state statute. I ask you to do your sworn duty, she told the seven legislators, and asked for relief for the homeowners. Attorney Dr. Will Harker of Hardwood Trails offered legal help. Jan Bergemann of Cyber Citizens for Justice said that this was the second generation of frustrated homeowners. He added, We can just hope that something is being done. Hugh Haggerty called the situation homeowner trafficking and said the people were in bondage. law that is now the subject of a conflict between the city and the Marion County School Board. At issue is whether the schools have to pay stormwater fees to the city. Newly elected Supervisor of Elections Wesley Wilcox drew praise from State Rep. Dennis Baxley for the way the county election, under Dee Brown, was conducted, as opposed to long counts in other parts of the state. By 10 or 11 (p.m.) everybody knew (the election results in the county), Baxley said. There were young people who appeared, too, including representatives from Pace Center for Girls and some students who were part of a battle against the use of tobacco. One man spoke of the need for tougher penalties for those who collide with motorcycle, bicycles and pedestrians, and also called for tough textingwhile-driving legislation. One woman spoke against the way her child was treated, saying he was denied water in a hot classroom. She criticized the school system for the way it handled the affair. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 3 10 W ednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Harvesting easy money in Washington requires hiring well-paid lobbyists who know how to create rainbows which lead to a pot of gold. How does this kind of chicanery happen right under our collective noses? Quite simple: While 90 percent of citizens disapprove of the way Congress operates, ninety-one percent of Congress people get re-elected. Nothing will change until we make more changes. FLYNNcontinued from Page 8 This weeks answers to puzzles from Page 9 We feel that the real people should get to go first. Most of the agency reports came from people who are paid to be there they can sit and wait for a while. But other folks, especially those who arent retired, might be taking time off from work to appear. More consideration should be shown to them. Finally, there were no breaks. From time to time most people, including the legislators, had to get up and leave for a minute. A 10-minute nature break in the middle of the afternoon might have been the prudent thing to do. Then everyone could comfortably listen to all the presentations. EDITORIALcontinued from Page 8 maining federal benefit check recipients must receive their money electronically. The Treasury Departments Go Direct public education campaign is working with more than 1,800 partner organizations throughout the country to spread the message about the electronic payment rule and educate federal benefit recipients about their options. The campaign has developed and shared a variety of public service announcements, educational videos, check inserts and other materials to explain how electronic payments work and how to make the switch from paper checks. The videos and materials are available on the Go Direct campaign website at www.GoDirect.org. The Treasury Department has taken great strides to support and guide check recipients through the change to electronic payments, and were increasing our efforts significantly in the final two months before the deadline, Lebryk said. We have a team of friendly, helpful agents standing by at our call center, and many financial institutions, caregivers, senior services providers and advocates for people who are homeless or have disabilities have the necessary information and resources to help federal benefit recipients make the switch. Check recipients can sign up for direct deposit or the Direct Express card by calling toll-free 1-800-333-1795, visiting www.GoDirect.org, or talking to their local federal paying agency office. The process is fast, easy and free. By taking a few minutes to gather the necessary information ahead of time, most federal benefit recipients can sign up for electronic payments with one phone call. Individuals will need their Social Security number or claim number, their 12-digital federal benefit check number and the amount of their most recent federal benefit check. If choosing direct deposit, recipients also will need their financial institutions routing transit number, (often found on a personal check) account number and account type (checking or saving). There are no sign-up fees or monthly fees to receive benefits electronically. 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SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Early Spring Specials Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2012 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $ 19 95 Call for details Expires 2/28/13 CERAMIC TILE Lawson Tile Floors Walls Tub & Shower Remodel Back Splash Reasonable Rates 34 years Experience (352) 229-5548 Licensed & Insured 000CLG8 Ocalas Only 4-Star Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations Accommodations for Your Pet for Your Pet Tour our unique Tour our unique facility and you facility and you be the judge! be the judge! 352-861-4566 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com www.palmettokennels.com 000DLAJ Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting Look for us Look for us Look for us on Facebook on Facebook on Facebook 000DOVV LANDSCAPING JAMISON LANDSCAPE & TREE SERVICE Specializing in all phases of tree work, landscape rip outs, design and installs, all around lawn maintenance. FREE ESTIMATES Jeff Jamison 352-321-0404 licensed & insured commercial & residential 10% Discount To Seniors & Military Florida Window Medics, Inc. Screen Rooms Acrylic & Glass Rooms Rescreens Broken Glass Replacement Windows Gutters Foggy Windows Cement Sliding Glass Door Repair Call & speak directly to the owner David Heath Comp. #5524 352 484-5697 WINDOW REPAIRS 000DQEA 000DPNB PLUMBING EP A Lead Certification #NA T -1 13266-1 OSHA 10 #1216933 Fla. Lic. #CFC1427666 804-9165 Associated P lumbing and Pipe F r om Ba thr oom R emodeling to Fixing Leak y F aucets, and installing Bliss W alk-in T ubs Residential and Commercial 71 1 185 DIALAPRO F o r Y o u r P r o f e s s i o n a l N e e d s For Y our Pr ofessional Needs W E S T M A R I O N M e s s e n g e r WEST MARION Messenger 0 0 0 D N 3 T J a s m i n e P l a z a 3 5 2 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6 1 6 0 S W S R 2 0 0 U n i t 1 0 4 O c a l a F l o r i d a 3 4 4 7 6 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 S T O R E H O U R S : T U E S F R I 1 0 5 S A T 1 0 2 ST ORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SA T 10-2 Readers Choice W inner Jewelry Stor e 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 www.jandjjewelersocala.com 000DR3W All r epairs done on pr emises. B A TTERIES $ 8 00 + ta x Af for dable New Af for dable New & Estate Jewelry & Estate Jewelry 000DQEH 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run352-291-7626 M o n F r i 9 a m 5 p m S a t 9 a m 2 p m Stop and visit us before you buy! We Guarantee Lowest Prices in Ocala! Service Loaner A vailable. Please Just Ask 10% Discount to V eterans labor & parts excluding batteries WE SELL TROJAN BATTERIES 6-V T605only$539 8-V T875only$639FREE pickup within 5 miles 12-V T1275only$639Best Selection In The Area! 6-V 6 PACK$479 8-V 6 PACK$529 2010 Remanufactured New Factory Body All lights & turn signals New 8 volt batteries New DOT tires Fold down wind shield Rear view mirrors Automatic chargeronly $4,995 000DP0J GOLFWEEK TOUR Recruiting Competitive Golfers Ne w Membership is No w Open for 2013 Golf Season First T our nament Jan. 26 North Central Florida Golfweek Amateur Tour J oin T oda y! 352-446-3446 www .amateurg olftour .net Wher e Amateurs Ar e T r eated Lik e Pr os 000DQM9 000DR7N Retired n ur ses to meetThe Citr us Marion Chapter of the Florida R egistered Nurses R etired (RNR) will meet at the Inverness Golf and Countr y club on Monday Jan. 28. Sign-in for the meeting starts at 11 a.m. The speaker will be Dr Attangi from the Citr us Memorial Heart and V ascular Center who will speak on V ascular Disease. Our charity will be Guardian Ad Litem. R etired nurses wishing to attend should call Mar y Jane at 352726-6882 or Gladys at 352-854-2677 by W ednesday Jan. 23.Breast cancer suppor t gr oupThe Breast Cancer SOS (Sisterhood of Sur vivors) Support Group meets the last T uesday of each month at Ocala W est United Methodist Church, 9330 S.W 105th St., Rm 235 (Multipurpose R oom) at 1 p.m. The meeting on T uesday Jan. 29 will be off -site at Stone Creek Grille, 9676 SW 62nd Loop, with lunch at noon and a trip to All About Y ou Boutique at Six Gun Plaza.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 9 4 W ednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Guess what, Lamb? Youre about to experience a new perspective on a situation you long regarded quite differently. What you learn could open more opportunities later. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) The Bold Bovine is tempted to charge into a new venture. But it might be best to take things one step at a time, so that you know just where you are at any given point. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Its a good time to go on that fun getaway youve been planning. Youll return refreshed, ready and, yes, even eager to tackle the new challenge that awaits you. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) The Moon Child loves to fantasize about magical happenings in the early part of the week. But the sensible Crab gets down to serious business by weeks end. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) What goes around comes around for those lucky Leos and Leonas whose acts of generosity could be repaid with opportunities to expand into new and exciting areas of interest. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Your concern about your job responsibilities is commendable. But you need to take some quiet time to share with someone who has really missed being with you. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Aspects favor getting out and meeting new people. And as a bonus, you might find that some of your newly made friends could offer important business contacts. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You might take pride in wanting to do everything yourself. But nows a good time to ask family members to help with a demanding personal situation. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Pay more attention to the possibilities in that workplace change. It could show the way to make that long-sought turn on your career path. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Your need to succeed might overwhelm obligations to your loved ones. Ease up on that workload and into some well-deserved time with family and friends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Love rules for amorous Aquarians who can make good use of their ability to communicate feelings. Dont be surprised if theyre reciprocated in kind. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Fishing for compliments? No doubt, you probably earned them. But its best to let others believe they uncovered the treasure you really are. BORN THIS WEEK: Your good works flow from an open, generous heart. Nothing makes you happier than to see others happy as well. 000CKU2 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS 9330 SW 105th St., Ocala, FL 34481 854-9550 www .ocalawestumc.com 100th Ave. SW 105th St SW 110th St 484 Marion Oaks Library SW 103rd St P ine Run OTOW 80th Ave. 60th Ave. 49th Ave. Oak Run 200 484 A Place for You... Rev. Alan Jefferson No matter what your age is, no matter where You come from, no matter who you are, There is a place for you at Ocala West UMC Children & Youth Ministries T r aditional W orship 8:00 & 1 1:00 A.M. Casual & Contemporary 9:30 A.M. 000DPCW 000D795 Charlie Green Pastor 351-1106 1700 NW 60th Ave. Ocala www .newlifeocala.com Sunday 10:30am Wednesday 7:00pm Christ the King The Rev Donald J. Curran, Rector Rev Matthew W alter Asst. Rector Services: Rite I 7:30 am Rite II 8:50 & 11:15 am Childrens Church 8:50 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary Anglican Chur ch 000DBZY 000D9ZT Where JESUS is LORD, and YOU are Loved. Services: Sunday School : 9:30am Morning W orship: 10:30am Thursday: 6:00pm Meeting at: 145 S.W 78th Court Ocala, Florida 352-690-7596 B I B L I C A L F O U N D A T I O N C H U R C H Located a mile west of SR 200 at 10260 SW 110th Street (turn west across from the entrance to Oak Run) Expository Bible Teaching Traditional Services Sunday Worship at 10:00 AM Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 PM 000dr33 Community Church TIMBER RIDGE Wil Clawson Pastor Teacher 000D64L St. Martins Church 950 N.W 70th Street (SR 326) Ocala, Flor ida 34475 352-351-8059 www .cac-ocala.org Service & Sunday School 10:00 a.m. V i sitors Ar e Always W elcom e The Only Church of the True 1928 Book of Common Prayer (Episcopal) is discovered through worshiping together 71 1 187 000DNMR Friday, Jan. 18 Ocala High 12 Club to m eetThe Greater Ocala High 12 Club 665 will hold its monthly meeting on Friday, Jan. 18 at 11 a.m. at the Elks Club, 702 N.E. 25th Ave., Ocala. The speaker will be Capt. Jim Burton of the Marion County Sheriffs Office. It is always exciting to hear what is going on with Marion Countys finest. As we have become accustomed to, we will once again enjoy one of the Elks Clubs fine buffet lunches. Friends are always welcome. The cost is only $12 a person. All Master Masons and guests are invited to attend. Reservations are required. Call Bob Brady at 352-8549612 for reservations or further information.Saturday, Jan. 19 Circle Sq uare Health, Wellness Ex poThe 11th annual Health and Wellness Expo will be held on Saturday, Jan. 19, at the Circle Square Cultural Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Come and see what Ocala has to offer in the field of health care and learn the latest in medical advances. This is a free event and open to the public. The Expo is sponsored by On Top of the World Communities and Munroe Regional Medical Center (MRMC) and will feature various services offered by the hospital, including information on heart health, diabetes, stroke, nutrition and more. Representatives from area health-care related agencies will also be on hand to provide information and answer questions regarding your health. Additionally, The Ranch Fitness Center and Spa and On Top of the World certified fitness instructors will offer a variety of exercise demonstrations throughout the day. Participate in the ZUMBA Fitness Jam on The Town Square at Circle Square Commons from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.; a donation of $5 per person will go toward the March of Dimes, or with a $25 donation you will receive a tie-dyed ZUMBA t-shirt. The Circle Square Cultural Center is at 8395 S.W. 80th St.. For more information, visit the website at www.CSCulturalCenter.com or call 352-854-3670.Magician at Firs t CongregationalBrian LaPalme, the award-winning, world renowned magician, is bringing his magic show to First Congregational United Church of Christ, for a fundraiser, on Saturday, Jan. 19 at 2 p.m. Ticket prices are $3 for children 12 and under; adults $5. To purchase tickets, please call 352-5986272. If available, tickets may be purchased at the door 7171 S.W. State Road 200.Lions to hos t yard s ale The Ocala 200 Lions Club is having a yard sale Saturday, Jan 19, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The sale will be in the parking lot of the Bank of the Ozarks, Friendship Plaza on State Road 200. All proceeds from the sale will go to community projects. For information contact Bob, 352-861-2730.Ocala Lions Club Helps Fa m ilies of VeteransOn Saturday, Jan. 19, the Ocala Lions Club will collect donations and personal care items to be given to the Fisher House Foundation in Tampa, Florida for families of veterans or military personnel who are being treated at a nearby military or VA medical facility. The event will be at the Big Lots store, 8600 S.W. State Road 200 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. For further information about Fisher House, call 813-910-3000 or contact Bill Thomas at 352-291-2600 about the event.Scand inavian ClubThe Scandinavian Club of Marion County invites people of Danish, Finish, Icelandic, Norwegian and Swedish decent to join us at our next meeting on Jan. 19 at 11:30 a.m. at the Ocala Hilton, 3600 S.W. 36th Ave. in Ocala. The menu will be choice of salmon or herbed chicken breast with roasted potatoes, salad, coffee and dessert. Entertainment provided by Glenn Lewis on the keyboard. The cost is $16 per person. Reservations and payment must be made in advance. Payment and meal choice must be received by Wednesday, Jan. 17, checks to be made out to Don Clauson and mailed to Don Clauson, 5901 S.W. 86th Place. Ocala, FL 34476. For further details call Jim Neate 352-687-1580, Don Clauson 352-861-1235 or Terry Rasmussen 352-3478362.Sunday, Jan 20 Dancing encouraged at Jazz f unctionThe Ocala Jazz Society will host an afternoon of music at the VFW hall on Sunday, Jan. 20 from 2 to 5 p.m. Open to everyone, organizers say the, event offers incomparable musicians featuring great tunes for everyone and dancing is encouraged. A $3 donation is requested and benefits Hospice in memory of Bea Wilson, the founder of the Ocala Jazz Society. For more info call Diana, 352-237-0234.Monday, Jan. 21 Inauguration d ance in OcalaCulminating week-long events honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Marion County residents are invited to join in the national celebration of the 57th inauguration of the president and vice president of the United States of America at a semi-formal dinner/dance to take place at the Ocala Hilton Hotel on Monday, Jan. 21. The cocktail hour begins at 6 p.m. with dinner to be served at 7. Events in our nations Capital will be simulcast and a cash bar will be available. Tickets are $50 per person with a maximum of 300 to be sold. They may be purchased by telephoning the Marion County DEC at 352-402-9494, Joyce Blake at 352-690-1740 or Sally Smith at 941-704-3494. Cash or checks should be made out to the Marion County DEC. You may also get them through Act Blue at www.MarionDems.org.Thursday, Jan. 24 Magnet s chool ex po plannedWhat is a magnet school? Whats a magnet program? Can your child attend one in Marion County? What are the qualifications? Why do they even exist? If youve ever wondered about or considered such a program or school for your child, come learn whats so attractive about these highly-competitive programs at a special Magnet Expo set for Thursday, Jan. 24, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Marion Technical Institute (MTI), 1614 S.E. Fort King St. in Ocala. No advance registration is required, and anyone from the public is invited to attend. For more information, call Expo Coordinator Julie Shealy at 352-671-7720. Happenings

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West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Delegation hearing needs some work The effort of the Marion County Legislative Delegation to hear from the residents of the area about needs in state government is, on its face, a good idea. People get to present all sorts of items to the seven legislators. However, the process of holding this hearing is seriously flawed and needs work. There are two major problems, as we see it. One is the location, the other is the agenda. The location has recently been the Klein Center at the College of Central Florida. The facility itself is adequate, although there were some problems with the speaker system at last weeks hearing. Getting there is another issue. The hearing is scheduled in the middle of a school day, when parking is at a premium. One of two things happens: Either the people attending have to park a great distance away and walk to the meeting hall, or the people attending get lucky and find a good place to park, thereby displacing some students who are looking for a space to leave their vehicles when they go to class. There are two possible solutions. One is to hold the event when classes are not in full session, say, on a Saturday. Yes, we know, working on Saturday is probably not what our legislators want to do, but it should be for the convenience of the people. The other solution would be to find another site, such as the Cultural Center at On Top of the World. That would have just as much, if not more, room for everyone to park and attend. As to the agenda, we feel its backward. The meeting starts with representatives of local governments and agencies that already receive some state funds telling the legislators how good theyve been in the past and please keep the money coming. Many of them go over the allotted time, in last weeks case four minutes. Last week, it was nearly three hours before the first regular people who were there privately to appear. Their four minutes was strictly enforced, to a point where one said, when told to stop, No, I timed it, its only three minutes, and she kept on going. Our Message PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGANREGIONALMANAGER: JOHN PROVOSTEDITOR: JIM CLARK MessengerWEST MARION Editorial Guest column Rainbow over the fiscal cliffBY JIM FLYNN Congress demonstrated finesse by hiding a pot of gold for friends and supporters in the 2012 fiscal cliff rescue bill. The objective of the bailout was more spending money for our purportedly tax-starved federal government. The fiscal cliff legislation increases income taxes on the wealthy and continues lower taxes for middle-income taxpayers. The comforting misnomer of the legislation is The American taxpayer relief act, Lobbyists would characterize the notax and low-tax exemptions hidden in the bill as insignificant a few billion dollars, more or less. Congress can rationalize hiding such goodies as shielding sensitive taxpayers from unnecessary concern over business as usual. Having secured sought-after additional revenue, the White House made no complaint about allowing multinational companies to continue not paying taxes on income of their overseas subsidiaries. The bill includes extension of a taxexemption for financing banks and builders of offices and apartments in the Manhattan 9/11 recovery zone. The exemption was intended to aid small businesses. Congress and the White House decided banks and brokers are just as needy as coffee shops and newspaper stands. Off-shore lending by banks and businesses also received an extension of tax exceptions, so they can continue not paying taxes on interest income from lending. Film and television producers are also considered needy. Their expense exemptions were extended, because reduction of their tax obligation is a mere $150 million loss of government revenue. Railroads were found deserving of tax credits for track maintenance. The cost is only $100 million. Isnt track maintenance a routine cost of railroading? To be fair to other forms of transportation, a seven-year recovery period for the costs of building motorsports facilities was also extended. Is NASCAR transportation? Out of concern for mine workers, government will continue tax incentives for safety equipment and safety training. Arent those also ordinary costs of doing business? Other deserving recipients of rainbow support were rum distillers of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, electric scooter and electric vehicle manufacturers, and energy efficient appliance makers. Rounding out the hodgepodge of government kindness are credits for wind energy expenses, development credits for American Samoa, support for coal mining on tribal lands, and extension of milk subsidy programs. Its all there in black and white. From time to time hustlers publish magazines offering secrets for getting easy money from the federal government -legally and without work. Ourhyper sensitive fraud antenna dismisses such hustles. People who discover oil in their back yard arent likely to encourage neighbors to dig holes. Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com.messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 5 8 W ednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger It was a very emotional evening last Thursday on the Ocala Downtown Square. More than 300 people gathered to remember a little boy who was taken from this life by an act of violence. Six-month-old Jonah Mendoza was killed on Jan. 4 when his mother, Melanie Reyes, shot him in their home in the Fountains development in northwest Ocala. Reyes then shot herself. Initial reports said she was expected to survive, but she was put on life support and then died the following Tuesday morning. The boys father, Jordan Mendoza, did not live in the same house. Friends and relatives put together the service on the square, which started with people just visiting and talking in the area, continued with various folks making short statements, and ended with six minutes of silence, one for each month of his life, as people held candles. The phrase most often heard was directed at Jordan: I cant even begin to understand what youre going through. During one point when a poem was being read, Jordan left the stage in front, walked to the back of the gazebo and just stared out toward the Boulevard. He came back shortly after and, when the ceremony was about to end, gave a little talk, thanking everyone, saying he was thankful that so many people care. He said the incident cut me deep. He added that he loved my son so much, and said Jonah remained somewhere in his heart. Some of the other phrases that people used during their short talks included May the angels protect him in heaven, and were happy we live in a commuEmotions run high remembering Jonah Among Friends Jim Clark nity where the people can come together. The event included a pair of tables filled with two collages of photos of Jonah, and also had another table where people could write messages of condolence. At the urging of parents, even some tiny children took pen in hand to leave a note. There were also jars for donations to help with the funeral, which was to be Saturday at Wyomina Park Baptist Church, with burial in Good Shepherd Cemetery. Reyes name was only mentioned once, by one speaker who said she was also remembered in prayers. Although the giant Christmas tree was not lit and was being taken down, all the other holiday lights were still on, illuminating the square during the ceremony. Included in those decorations were the thin lights that give the appearance of falling from the trees. One speaker called those lights tears from heaven. But artificial tears werent needed. There were plenty of real ones to go around.Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger. Please see FLYNN, Page 10 Please see EDITORIAL, Page 10 000DOOX 000DR7U Best of the Best four years in a row HOURS: Mon. Fri. 10am 5pm Hearing Aid Centers A NAME YOU CAN TRUST WITH OVER 1500 LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE FREE HEARING AIDS FOR ALL FEDERAL WORKERS & RETIREES *No Co-Pay or Exam Fee Inside Walmart Hwy. 200 & Corner 484, Ocala 352-291-1467 000DNMN Inside Crystal River Mall Across from K-Mart 352-795-1484 Inside Sears Paddock Mall 352-237-1665 Federal Government Insurance Code #104, #105, #111, or #112 CHECK YOUR QUALIFICATIONS CALL 352-291-1467 BC/BS LIMIT 1 COUPON PER VISIT. LIMIT 2 PACKS PER VISIT. One More Week! BATTERIES PREMIUM ZINC BATTERIES 99 FREE HEARING TEST FREE REPAIRS (IN OFFICE ONLY) HEARING AID Fits 30 DB Loss Full Shell #ME200 $ 695 .00 Read the classifieds Some people make New Year Resolutions but most never get past the first month. Most resolutions have to do with weight loss but Judy Helfin, fitness director for Stone Creek, had a better idea a weight-loss challenge. She met with Chris Johnson, Stone Creeks community manager, and Rick Morang, Stone Creeks maintenance man or the go to man when things need to be fixed, and made them a challenge. Each man wanted to lose weight so they took on the challenge lose 30 pounds by June 3, 2013. That is 30 pounds for each man. To make the challenge more fun and to encourage Chris and Rick, Judy decided to make this a charity event. The money raised will go to Brothers Keeper Soup Kitchen where many Stone Creek residents volunteer. Rick and Chris took the challenge because they wanted to lose weight. They both believe that they can achieve their goal of loosing 30 pounds by June 3. Rick said, Absolutely, with the resident support we are receiving we cant fail. When asked what would be the hardest part of the challenge, Chris commented, Getting started is always the hardest for me... and I officially got started this weekend. I know that both men personally like sweets and have tasted many that have been cooked in the SC kitchen. So now, all they can do is limit those sweets or just enjoy the delicious smells. Since this challenge is for charity both were asked if they have a prediction on how much can be raised for the Soup Kitchen. Rick said, My hope is for at least $1,000 but my prayer is for $3,000. Chris had no prediction but added, Its all up to the community to make pledges, and our hope is that they are as generous as they are in all their support of similar causes. So, if you have not yet made your pledge, consider making one. The winner will be announced on June 5. At that time, there will be another article with the before and after pictures and the amount going to Brothers Keeper Soup Kitchen. Judy has started a walking group and both Chris and Rick will be a part of the group. The new program began on Tuesday, Jan. 15 at 7:30 a.m. and will also be offered on Fridays at 7:30 a.m. Judy also has small group training for weight loss. Remember to check the portal for the other interesting events that Judy has planned. Spa Day will be back on Jan. 30. Chris Johnson Rick Morang The challenge is on Stone Creek Patricia Gizzi The SECO Board of Trustees has voted to continue SECOs scholarship program for 2013. In fact, the board has authorized an increase in the scholarship amount taking it from $2,500 up to $3,000 per student in recognition of the ever increasing cost of higher education. Up to 12 high school seniors from the cooperatives service territory will receive assistance to go on to a college or technical school following their graduation. SECOs scholarship program has proven very popular with SECO members and, over the years, has helped many deserving students attain higher learning when that might have been difficult otherwise. SECO Director of Corporate Communications Barry Bowman said, The selection of those students who will receive scholarships will be based on each individuals past and present activities in school and the community, financial need and scholastic record. All applicants will be evaluated by an independent panel of educators from around the SECO service territory. He noted that to qualify, graduates must reside in a home being served by SECO and be enrolled in an accredited college, university or vocational/technical school by the end of 2013. Applications are available at area high school guidance offices and at any of SECOs customer service centers in Marion, Lake, Citrus, and Sumter counties. They must be returned no later than March 29. The SECO scholarship program reaffirms the Co-ops commitment to the future of our young people, and while the program has no impact on the cost of electricity, it is a significant benefit for those awardees struggling to fund their higher education, concluded Bowman. SECO votes to continue scholarship program Please read our classified ads

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 7 6 W ednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger FAMILY FEATURES Once the feast is over, many home cooks are left with a plethora of leftovers and a challenge: how to make the most of what remains. While its hard to live up to that original holiday meal, theres a lot more that you can do with leftover ham rather than just reheating. This year, give leftovers new life with a weeks worth of versatile meals that can be enjoyed through out the day. Start with a fully-cooked, naturally hickory smoked Smithfield Spiral Sliced Ham with a pecan praline glaze, and follow these simple steps to turn it into a potato-crusted ham quiche for brunch, a Monte Cristo sand wich for lunch, and a savory soup for dinner. Youll leave friends and family asking for leftovers more often. For more leftover recipes youll love, visit www.smithfield.com and www.facebook.com/ CookingwithSmithfield. Potato-Crusted Ham QuicheServes: 8 Cook Time: 45 minutes 2 cups of potatoes, raw and shredded 1/4 cup onion, minced 1/2 cup red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tablespoon chives, finely chopped 3 eggs, divided Salt and pepper to taste 3/4 cup sharp cheddar cheese, grated 3/4 cup smoked Gouda cheese, grated 1 cup Smithfield Spiral Ham, fully cooked and chopped 1 cup evaporated milk 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/2 teaspoon salt (optional) 1/4 teaspoon pepper Preheat the oven to 375F. Spray quiche pan with non-stick cooking spray. In medium bowl mix potatoes, onion, pepper, chives, 1 beaten egg and salt and pepper to taste. Press potato mixture evenly into crust shape up the side and on the bottom of the pan and spray again. Bake for 15 minutes or until lightly browned on edges. In a mixing bowl, combine cheeses. Remove crust from oven and layer the following: ham first, and then cheese mixture on top. In a bowl, beat together evaporated milk, remaining eggs, paprika, salt and pepper. Pour mix ture on top of cheese and return to oven. Bake about 25 to 30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into middle of pie comes out clean. Allow to cool at least five minutes. Serving Suggestions: Serve alongside sliced fresh fruit or a small fresh garden salad. Serves: 4 Cook Time: 10 minutes 3 eggs 1/3 cup milk 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 1 teaspoon sugar Pinch nutmeg 1/2 cup whole cranberry sauce 8 slices bread (potato bread, challah, egg bread or any other sweet soft bread) 8 slices Smithfield Spiral Ham 2 cups cheddar cheese, shredded 1 cup baby arugula leaves 4 tablespoons butter Confectioners sugar for garnish In shallow casserole dish, whisk eggs together with milk, vanilla, sugar and nutmeg. Spread equal amounts of cran berry sauce on one side of four slices of bread. Top cranberry sauce with two slices of ham, 1/2 cup cheese and 1/4 cup arugula. Top each stacked bread slice with the remaining four slices of bread. Gently press together. In large skillet, melt butter over medium/low heat. Dip each sand wich into milk mixture. Turn and dip the other side. Place in the hot pan and cook until each sandwich is golden brown and the cheese has melted. Remove from pan and drain on paper towels. Dust with confectioners sugar and serve warm. Good Luck SoupServes: 8 Cook Time: 80 minutes 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 2 cloves garlic 1 tablespoon ham base 5 dashes hot sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 pound black eyed peas, rinsed and soaked over night 64 ounces vegetable stock (or chicken stock) 1 cup water 2 cups Smithfield Spiral Ham roughly chopped 1/2 pound collards, cut into thin ribbons Pepper to taste In large stock pot add olive oil. Stir in onions, garlic, ham base, hot sauce, thyme and oregano. Saut until onions are translucent. Add drained black eyed peas, vegetable stock, water and chopped ham. Simmer until peas are tender, approximately 40 to 50 minutes. Add collards and simmer an additional 20 to 30 minutes. Pepper to taste. Serve hot. Ham and Cranberry Monte Cristo HolidaySpiralSlicedHamwithPecanPralineGlazeServes: 14 Cook Time: 10 to 12 minutes per pound 1 SmithfieldSpiralSlicedHamwithPecanPralineGlaze Preheat oven to 325F. Remove packaging; reserve liquid. Place ham cut-side down on large sheet of foil in roasting pan, pour reserved liquid over ham and wrap completely with foil. Warm ham in oven for 10 to 12 minutes per pound. Do not overheat. After removing ham from oven, let ham sit for 5 minutes before glazing. Heat glaze packet for 15 seconds in microwave. Glaze is hot, so be careful when opening packet. Holding packet with a towel or oven mitt, cut corner off packet and pour glaze into a bowl. Stir well and spoon over ham. Let glazed ham sit for 5 minutes before serving to allow glaze to melt over ham. 000DOP0 T he F r iends O f T he Dunnellon P ublic Libr ar y Presents Shari Blissett-Clark Shari Blissett-Clark sits on the boar d of Bat Belfr ys Inc ., a non-pr ofit or ganization dedicat ed t o c onser ving F loridas bats thr ough public education and habitat r est or ation. She ser v es on the boar ds of the F l orida Nativ e Plant Societ y and Br ev ar d Botanical G ar den. Shari, a child of a globetr otting militar y family mo v ed t o F lorida in 1984. She became int er est ed in bats when while sailing she whipped the c o v er off the mainsail of her boat and was star tled b y bats bursting out of the sail causing Shari t o leap int o M a tanzas Ba y! A f t er the par amedics lef t Shari did some soul sear ching and decided t o find out mor e about bats She joined the Bat C onser v a tion Int ernationals bat house r esear cher pr ogr am t o quick ly learn that her f ear of bats was based on m yth and misc onc eption...not fac ts Shari disc o v er ed her passion f or these fascinating little mammals and has been a bat adv ocat e ev er sinc e T his pr ogr am discusses bat fac ts species div ersit y en vir onmental and ec onomic benefits of bats and the o v erstat ed disease risks I t is a 1 hour pr ogr am including Q&A F r ee T o The P ublic P r ogr am S a tur da y Januar y 19th -10:30am Libr ar y Meeting Room 20351 Robinson Road Dunnellon, F lorida 34431 (352) 438-2520 000DLTI VILLAGES COMPUTER & REPAIR (352) 237-4852 email: villagescomputer@yahoo.com Next to the neighborhood Storage on SR200 across from the Jasmine Plaza Computer Repair Custom Building Computer Classes Free Diagnostics Data Recovery Networking In Store Service or at Your Location FREE Service Calls to your house or business with this ad 7256 SW 62nd Ave., Suite 5, Ocala, FL 34476 00075X7 Clip and Save Clip and Save Clip and Save Clip and Save Grandfather Clock 352-873-7587 GRANDFATHER CLOCK REPAIR Service and repairs 43 years full time experience Specializing in floor clocks. In Florida Jan., Feb., Mar., April (In Pennsylvania the other months) 000DP6G 000DM1L John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000DMNB It was just before New Years and the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were relaxing after a busy week of toil and labor. Not paying much attention to my surroundings, I had immersed myself in a favorite book. As far as I am concerned, nothing compares to a favorite book when you are trying to relax and unwind. I turned the page and happened to notice on the other side of the room my wife was all a twitchy. I have seen this behavior before and I knew she was anxious to say something. I pretended not to notice. Finally, it was as if she exploded. I cant wait for the New Year. Arent you excited? I answered in the affirmative to try to keep the conversation as minimal as possible. No, I mean arent you really excited about the New Year? I knew if I was going to get back to my book I would have to let her say, what was on her mind. According to her, the approaching New Year was going to be spectacular. Everything old, she explained to me, would be new again. We have been in this New Year for a couple of weeks now and, I will not contradict my wife, at least aloud, but this New Year looks suspiciously like the Old Year. I am not quite sure what she thought would be different this year, but to me it is just the old year run through again. And, that is good with me. I am not one of these persons who needs the latest flash in the pan. I quite prefer the tried and true. It was about two weeks after the New Year and my wife said, Ill be back in an hour or two, Im going shopping. It did not dawn on me at the time but about 10 minutes later, it did. The reason my wife was so excited about the New Year was that she was going to go out and buy some new clothes. After all, according to her calculations, the New Year deserves new clothing. I smiled as I thought about her going to the store trying on dresses, seeking one that would fit her both in size and in fancy. As for me, I am quite comfortable in my old clothes. They fit me just fine, thank you. Women have to look fine all the time. Men, on the other hand are not that particular about what they wear. I can wear the same shirt for days on end and feel just as comfortable as the first day I put it on. My clothing does not make me feel any younger. I go along with the saying that says you are only as old as you feel. Of course, I do have some of those Methuselah moments. Everything old was once new and if new last very long it ends up being old. Therefore, whatever is old was once new and whatever is new will one day be old. This is where most people make their mistake. They fail to see the relationship between old and new. For example, as much as our culture pretends to be youth oriented, it does everything to get old while looking young. I often have this conversation with my wife. I am not old, I am just getting older and my plans are to get older and older and older. The great object in life is to get as old as you possibly can while looking and feeling new. Nothing to me is sillier than a 40 year old trying to act 20. The mind may say 20, but the body really knows it is 40. If people would put the money they spend to look young in a 401(k) their golden years would truly be golden. How much money is spent each year on plastic surgery? What I want to know is, who in the world do they think they are fooling? Their mirror? Everything old becomes new again as the new year starts Right after the New Years celebration, I got up one morning feeling terrific. There was a bounce in my step, a giggle on my tongue; I was feeling like I was 20 something. I had not felt this good since I cannot remember how long. Then it happened. No matter how good you might feel some day, there is always something or someone who can undermine that and put you in your proper place. My mistake was going into the bathroom. There in the bathroom for all the world to see, especially me is this ghastly object called a mirror. When I looked into the mirror, I was shocked to see I was not alone. I thought I had come into the bathroom by myself but there in the mirror was this old guy I hardly recognized. My first reaction was to ask him to leave the bathroom and then I noticed something. That person in the mirror was me! All of those exhilarating feelings dissipated as reality grabbed hold of my soul and soundly shook me. In my Bible reading that morning, I read what the apostle Paul said. And be renewed in the spirit of your minds; and that she put on the new man, which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness (Ephesians 4:23-24 KJV). Only God, in His wisdom, can create in me something that is truly new.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com. Out to Pastor Dr. James Snyder Southwest ChristianThe churchs seniors ministry, the Golden Servants will meet on Friday, Jan 25 at 6 p.m. The public is invited to the carry-in dinner and a showing of a video by humorist Jeanne Robertson. Southwest Christian Church is at 9045 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. For more information call 352-236-6023.Christs Church of Marion CountyWednesday, Jan. 16: Bible Study, 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 17: Prayer and Praise Group, 9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 19: Mens Prayer Group, 8 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 20: Sunday School, 9:30 am. Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 22: Womens Crafts and Fellowship, 9 a.m. Christs Church of Marion County is at 6768 S.W. 80th St., off State Road 200, Ocala. Phone is 352-861-6182, website is www.ccomc.org.Free English classesCollege Road Baptist Church, 5010 S.W. College Road, continues teaching ESL (English as Second Language) each Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. Classes are free, as is child care, and youth programs. Assistance with applying for citizenship is also offered. Enroll any Wednesday evening. Call 352-854-6981, or 352-237-5641 for more information.Community CongregationalCommunity Congregational church will be having an Imposition of Ashes service to begin Lent. The service will be at noon on Feb. 13. A new Bible study titled a Serendipity Study is being presented at our church. Come and enjoy our service and refreshments and then the bible study will be presented by Pastor David Wild. The study comes from the Gospel of Mark. Our church service begins at 10 a.m., followed by refreshments in our fellowship hall and then bible study at 11:30. Our sermon series for January continues to be Vintage Christianity and is based on the Book of James. This sermon series is very interesting and informative. Pastor Dave brings the gospel to life for us. We are very fortunate to have such a leader and would gladly share him with you. Just join us on any Sunday. We are The Little church with a Big heart and would love to see you. We wish you all a happy, healthy and prosperous 2013.For more information or directions, contact Theresa Grenier at 352-307-0584. Religion Air Force group to meetThe Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association will hold its first meeting of the new year on Thursday, Jan. 17 at 7 p.m. at the Ocala Regional Airport Administration Building, 750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Members who wish to donate items for the Workforce Connection Homeless Veterans Stand Down are asked to bring them to this meeting. Everyone is welcome. Please read the classifieds

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 7 6 W ednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger FAMILY FEATURES Once the feast is over, many home cooks are left with a plethora of leftovers and a challenge: how to make the most of what remains. While its hard to live up to that original holiday meal, theres a lot more that you can do with leftover ham rather than just reheating. This year, give leftovers new life with a weeks worth of versatile meals that can be enjoyed through out the day. Start with a fully-cooked, naturally hickory smoked Smithfield Spiral Sliced Ham with a pecan praline glaze, and follow these simple steps to turn it into a potato-crusted ham quiche for brunch, a Monte Cristo sand wich for lunch, and a savory soup for dinner. Youll leave friends and family asking for leftovers more often. For more leftover recipes youll love, visit www.smithfield.com and www.facebook.com/ CookingwithSmithfield. Potato-Crusted Ham QuicheServes: 8 Cook Time: 45 minutes 2 cups of potatoes, raw and shredded 1/4 cup onion, minced 1/2 cup red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tablespoon chives, finely chopped 3 eggs, divided Salt and pepper to taste 3/4 cup sharp cheddar cheese, grated 3/4 cup smoked Gouda cheese, grated 1 cup Smithfield Spiral Ham, fully cooked and chopped 1 cup evaporated milk 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/2 teaspoon salt (optional) 1/4 teaspoon pepper Preheat the oven to 375F. Spray quiche pan with non-stick cooking spray. In medium bowl mix potatoes, onion, pepper, chives, 1 beaten egg and salt and pepper to taste. Press potato mixture evenly into crust shape up the side and on the bottom of the pan and spray again. Bake for 15 minutes or until lightly browned on edges. In a mixing bowl, combine cheeses. Remove crust from oven and layer the following: ham first, and then cheese mixture on top. In a bowl, beat together evaporated milk, remaining eggs, paprika, salt and pepper. Pour mix ture on top of cheese and return to oven. Bake about 25 to 30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into middle of pie comes out clean. Allow to cool at least five minutes. Serving Suggestions: Serve alongside sliced fresh fruit or a small fresh garden salad. Serves: 4 Cook Time: 10 minutes 3 eggs 1/3 cup milk 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 1 teaspoon sugar Pinch nutmeg 1/2 cup whole cranberry sauce 8 slices bread (potato bread, challah, egg bread or any other sweet soft bread) 8 slices Smithfield Spiral Ham 2 cups cheddar cheese, shredded 1 cup baby arugula leaves 4 tablespoons butter Confectioners sugar for garnish In shallow casserole dish, whisk eggs together with milk, vanilla, sugar and nutmeg. Spread equal amounts of cran berry sauce on one side of four slices of bread. Top cranberry sauce with two slices of ham, 1/2 cup cheese and 1/4 cup arugula. Top each stacked bread slice with the remaining four slices of bread. Gently press together. In large skillet, melt butter over medium/low heat. Dip each sand wich into milk mixture. Turn and dip the other side. Place in the hot pan and cook until each sandwich is golden brown and the cheese has melted. Remove from pan and drain on paper towels. Dust with confectioners sugar and serve warm. Good Luck SoupServes: 8 Cook Time: 80 minutes 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 2 cloves garlic 1 tablespoon ham base 5 dashes hot sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 pound black eyed peas, rinsed and soaked over night 64 ounces vegetable stock (or chicken stock) 1 cup water 2 cups Smithfield Spiral Ham roughly chopped 1/2 pound collards, cut into thin ribbons Pepper to taste In large stock pot add olive oil. Stir in onions, garlic, ham base, hot sauce, thyme and oregano. Saut until onions are translucent. Add drained black eyed peas, vegetable stock, water and chopped ham. Simmer until peas are tender, approximately 40 to 50 minutes. Add collards and simmer an additional 20 to 30 minutes. Pepper to taste. Serve hot. Ham and Cranberry Monte Cristo HolidaySpiralSlicedHamwithPecanPralineGlazeServes: 14 Cook Time: 10 to 12 minutes per pound 1 SmithfieldSpiralSlicedHamwithPecanPralineGlaze Preheat oven to 325F. Remove packaging; reserve liquid. Place ham cut-side down on large sheet of foil in roasting pan, pour reserved liquid over ham and wrap completely with foil. Warm ham in oven for 10 to 12 minutes per pound. Do not overheat. After removing ham from oven, let ham sit for 5 minutes before glazing. Heat glaze packet for 15 seconds in microwave. Glaze is hot, so be careful when opening packet. Holding packet with a towel or oven mitt, cut corner off packet and pour glaze into a bowl. Stir well and spoon over ham. Let glazed ham sit for 5 minutes before serving to allow glaze to melt over ham. 000DOP0 T he F r iends O f T he Dunnellon P ublic Libr ar y Presents Shari Blissett-Clark Shari Blissett-Clark sits on the boar d of Bat Belfr ys Inc ., a non-pr ofit or ganization dedicat ed t o c onser ving F loridas bats thr ough public education and habitat r est or ation. She ser v es on the boar ds of the F l orida Nativ e Plant Societ y and Br ev ar d Botanical G ar den. Shari, a child of a globetr otting militar y family mo v ed t o F lorida in 1984. She became int er est ed in bats when while sailing she whipped the c o v er off the mainsail of her boat and was star tled b y bats bursting out of the sail causing Shari t o leap int o M a tanzas Ba y! A f t er the par amedics lef t Shari did some soul sear ching and decided t o find out mor e about bats She joined the Bat C onser v a tion Int ernationals bat house r esear cher pr ogr am t o quick ly learn that her f ear of bats was based on m yth and misc onc eption...not fac ts Shari disc o v er ed her passion f or these fascinating little mammals and has been a bat adv ocat e ev er sinc e T his pr ogr am discusses bat fac ts species div ersit y en vir onmental and ec onomic benefits of bats and the o v erstat ed disease risks I t is a 1 hour pr ogr am including Q&A F r ee T o The P ublic P r ogr am S a tur da y Januar y 19th -10:30am Libr ar y Meeting Room 20351 Robinson Road Dunnellon, F lorida 34431 (352) 438-2520 000DLTI VILLAGES COMPUTER & REPAIR (352) 237-4852 email: villagescomputer@yahoo.com Next to the neighborhood Storage on SR200 across from the Jasmine Plaza Computer Repair Custom Building Computer Classes Free Diagnostics Data Recovery Networking In Store Service or at Your Location FREE Service Calls to your house or business with this ad 7256 SW 62nd Ave., Suite 5, Ocala, FL 34476 00075X7 Clip and Save Clip and Save Clip and Save Clip and Save Grandfather Clock 352-873-7587 GRANDFATHER CLOCK REPAIR Service and repairs 43 years full time experience Specializing in floor clocks. In Florida Jan., Feb., Mar., April (In Pennsylvania the other months) 000DP6G 000DM1L John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000DMNB It was just before New Years and the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were relaxing after a busy week of toil and labor. Not paying much attention to my surroundings, I had immersed myself in a favorite book. As far as I am concerned, nothing compares to a favorite book when you are trying to relax and unwind. I turned the page and happened to notice on the other side of the room my wife was all a twitchy. I have seen this behavior before and I knew she was anxious to say something. I pretended not to notice. Finally, it was as if she exploded. I cant wait for the New Year. Arent you excited? I answered in the affirmative to try to keep the conversation as minimal as possible. No, I mean arent you really excited about the New Year? I knew if I was going to get back to my book I would have to let her say, what was on her mind. According to her, the approaching New Year was going to be spectacular. Everything old, she explained to me, would be new again. We have been in this New Year for a couple of weeks now and, I will not contradict my wife, at least aloud, but this New Year looks suspiciously like the Old Year. I am not quite sure what she thought would be different this year, but to me it is just the old year run through again. And, that is good with me. I am not one of these persons who needs the latest flash in the pan. I quite prefer the tried and true. It was about two weeks after the New Year and my wife said, Ill be back in an hour or two, Im going shopping. It did not dawn on me at the time but about 10 minutes later, it did. The reason my wife was so excited about the New Year was that she was going to go out and buy some new clothes. After all, according to her calculations, the New Year deserves new clothing. I smiled as I thought about her going to the store trying on dresses, seeking one that would fit her both in size and in fancy. As for me, I am quite comfortable in my old clothes. They fit me just fine, thank you. Women have to look fine all the time. Men, on the other hand are not that particular about what they wear. I can wear the same shirt for days on end and feel just as comfortable as the first day I put it on. My clothing does not make me feel any younger. I go along with the saying that says you are only as old as you feel. Of course, I do have some of those Methuselah moments. Everything old was once new and if new last very long it ends up being old. Therefore, whatever is old was once new and whatever is new will one day be old. This is where most people make their mistake. They fail to see the relationship between old and new. For example, as much as our culture pretends to be youth oriented, it does everything to get old while looking young. I often have this conversation with my wife. I am not old, I am just getting older and my plans are to get older and older and older. The great object in life is to get as old as you possibly can while looking and feeling new. Nothing to me is sillier than a 40 year old trying to act 20. The mind may say 20, but the body really knows it is 40. If people would put the money they spend to look young in a 401(k) their golden years would truly be golden. How much money is spent each year on plastic surgery? What I want to know is, who in the world do they think they are fooling? Their mirror? Everything old becomes new again as the new year starts Right after the New Years celebration, I got up one morning feeling terrific. There was a bounce in my step, a giggle on my tongue; I was feeling like I was 20 something. I had not felt this good since I cannot remember how long. Then it happened. No matter how good you might feel some day, there is always something or someone who can undermine that and put you in your proper place. My mistake was going into the bathroom. There in the bathroom for all the world to see, especially me is this ghastly object called a mirror. When I looked into the mirror, I was shocked to see I was not alone. I thought I had come into the bathroom by myself but there in the mirror was this old guy I hardly recognized. My first reaction was to ask him to leave the bathroom and then I noticed something. That person in the mirror was me! All of those exhilarating feelings dissipated as reality grabbed hold of my soul and soundly shook me. In my Bible reading that morning, I read what the apostle Paul said. And be renewed in the spirit of your minds; and that she put on the new man, which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness (Ephesians 4:23-24 KJV). Only God, in His wisdom, can create in me something that is truly new.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com. Out to Pastor Dr. James Snyder Southwest ChristianThe churchs seniors ministry, the Golden Servants will meet on Friday, Jan 25 at 6 p.m. The public is invited to the carry-in dinner and a showing of a video by humorist Jeanne Robertson. Southwest Christian Church is at 9045 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. For more information call 352-236-6023.Christs Church of Marion CountyWednesday, Jan. 16: Bible Study, 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 17: Prayer and Praise Group, 9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 19: Mens Prayer Group, 8 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 20: Sunday School, 9:30 am. Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 22: Womens Crafts and Fellowship, 9 a.m. Christs Church of Marion County is at 6768 S.W. 80th St., off State Road 200, Ocala. Phone is 352-861-6182, website is www.ccomc.org.Free English classesCollege Road Baptist Church, 5010 S.W. College Road, continues teaching ESL (English as Second Language) each Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. Classes are free, as is child care, and youth programs. Assistance with applying for citizenship is also offered. Enroll any Wednesday evening. Call 352-854-6981, or 352-237-5641 for more information.Community CongregationalCommunity Congregational church will be having an Imposition of Ashes service to begin Lent. The service will be at noon on Feb. 13. A new Bible study titled a Serendipity Study is being presented at our church. Come and enjoy our service and refreshments and then the bible study will be presented by Pastor David Wild. The study comes from the Gospel of Mark. Our church service begins at 10 a.m., followed by refreshments in our fellowship hall and then bible study at 11:30. Our sermon series for January continues to be Vintage Christianity and is based on the Book of James. This sermon series is very interesting and informative. Pastor Dave brings the gospel to life for us. We are very fortunate to have such a leader and would gladly share him with you. Just join us on any Sunday. We are The Little church with a Big heart and would love to see you. We wish you all a happy, healthy and prosperous 2013.For more information or directions, contact Theresa Grenier at 352-307-0584. Religion Air Force group to meetThe Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association will hold its first meeting of the new year on Thursday, Jan. 17 at 7 p.m. at the Ocala Regional Airport Administration Building, 750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Members who wish to donate items for the Workforce Connection Homeless Veterans Stand Down are asked to bring them to this meeting. Everyone is welcome. Please read the classifieds

PAGE 8

West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Delegation hearing needs some work The effort of the Marion County Legislative Delegation to hear from the residents of the area about needs in state government is, on its face, a good idea. People get to present all sorts of items to the seven legislators. However, the process of holding this hearing is seriously flawed and needs work. There are two major problems, as we see it. One is the location, the other is the agenda. The location has recently been the Klein Center at the College of Central Florida. The facility itself is adequate, although there were some problems with the speaker system at last weeks hearing. Getting there is another issue. The hearing is scheduled in the middle of a school day, when parking is at a premium. One of two things happens: Either the people attending have to park a great distance away and walk to the meeting hall, or the people attending get lucky and find a good place to park, thereby displacing some students who are looking for a space to leave their vehicles when they go to class. There are two possible solutions. One is to hold the event when classes are not in full session, say, on a Saturday. Yes, we know, working on Saturday is probably not what our legislators want to do, but it should be for the convenience of the people. The other solution would be to find another site, such as the Cultural Center at On Top of the World. That would have just as much, if not more, room for everyone to park and attend. As to the agenda, we feel its backward. The meeting starts with representatives of local governments and agencies that already receive some state funds telling the legislators how good theyve been in the past and please keep the money coming. Many of them go over the allotted time, in last weeks case four minutes. Last week, it was nearly three hours before the first regular people who were there privately to appear. Their four minutes was strictly enforced, to a point where one said, when told to stop, No, I timed it, its only three minutes, and she kept on going. Our Message PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGANREGIONALMANAGER: JOHN PROVOSTEDITOR: JIM CLARK MessengerWEST MARION Editorial Guest column Rainbow over the fiscal cliffBY JIM FLYNN Congress demonstrated finesse by hiding a pot of gold for friends and supporters in the 2012 fiscal cliff rescue bill. The objective of the bailout was more spending money for our purportedly tax-starved federal government. The fiscal cliff legislation increases income taxes on the wealthy and continues lower taxes for middle-income taxpayers. The comforting misnomer of the legislation is The American taxpayer relief act, Lobbyists would characterize the notax and low-tax exemptions hidden in the bill as insignificant a few billion dollars, more or less. Congress can rationalize hiding such goodies as shielding sensitive taxpayers from unnecessary concern over business as usual. Having secured sought-after additional revenue, the White House made no complaint about allowing multinational companies to continue not paying taxes on income of their overseas subsidiaries. The bill includes extension of a taxexemption for financing banks and builders of offices and apartments in the Manhattan 9/11 recovery zone. The exemption was intended to aid small businesses. Congress and the White House decided banks and brokers are just as needy as coffee shops and newspaper stands. Off-shore lending by banks and businesses also received an extension of tax exceptions, so they can continue not paying taxes on interest income from lending. Film and television producers are also considered needy. Their expense exemptions were extended, because reduction of their tax obligation is a mere $150 million loss of government revenue. Railroads were found deserving of tax credits for track maintenance. The cost is only $100 million. Isnt track maintenance a routine cost of railroading? To be fair to other forms of transportation, a seven-year recovery period for the costs of building motorsports facilities was also extended. Is NASCAR transportation? Out of concern for mine workers, government will continue tax incentives for safety equipment and safety training. Arent those also ordinary costs of doing business? Other deserving recipients of rainbow support were rum distillers of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, electric scooter and electric vehicle manufacturers, and energy efficient appliance makers. Rounding out the hodgepodge of government kindness are credits for wind energy expenses, development credits for American Samoa, support for coal mining on tribal lands, and extension of milk subsidy programs. Its all there in black and white. From time to time hustlers publish magazines offering secrets for getting easy money from the federal government -legally and without work. Ourhyper sensitive fraud antenna dismisses such hustles. People who discover oil in their back yard arent likely to encourage neighbors to dig holes. Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com.messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 5 8 W ednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger It was a very emotional evening last Thursday on the Ocala Downtown Square. More than 300 people gathered to remember a little boy who was taken from this life by an act of violence. Six-month-old Jonah Mendoza was killed on Jan. 4 when his mother, Melanie Reyes, shot him in their home in the Fountains development in northwest Ocala. Reyes then shot herself. Initial reports said she was expected to survive, but she was put on life support and then died the following Tuesday morning. The boys father, Jordan Mendoza, did not live in the same house. Friends and relatives put together the service on the square, which started with people just visiting and talking in the area, continued with various folks making short statements, and ended with six minutes of silence, one for each month of his life, as people held candles. The phrase most often heard was directed at Jordan: I cant even begin to understand what youre going through. During one point when a poem was being read, Jordan left the stage in front, walked to the back of the gazebo and just stared out toward the Boulevard. He came back shortly after and, when the ceremony was about to end, gave a little talk, thanking everyone, saying he was thankful that so many people care. He said the incident cut me deep. He added that he loved my son so much, and said Jonah remained somewhere in his heart. Some of the other phrases that people used during their short talks included May the angels protect him in heaven, and were happy we live in a commuEmotions run high remembering Jonah Among Friends Jim Clark nity where the people can come together. The event included a pair of tables filled with two collages of photos of Jonah, and also had another table where people could write messages of condolence. At the urging of parents, even some tiny children took pen in hand to leave a note. There were also jars for donations to help with the funeral, which was to be Saturday at Wyomina Park Baptist Church, with burial in Good Shepherd Cemetery. Reyes name was only mentioned once, by one speaker who said she was also remembered in prayers. Although the giant Christmas tree was not lit and was being taken down, all the other holiday lights were still on, illuminating the square during the ceremony. Included in those decorations were the thin lights that give the appearance of falling from the trees. One speaker called those lights tears from heaven. But artificial tears werent needed. There were plenty of real ones to go around.Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger. Please see FLYNN, Page 10 Please see EDITORIAL, Page 10 000DOOX 000DR7U Best of the Best four years in a row HOURS: Mon. Fri. 10am 5pm Hearing Aid Centers A NAME YOU CAN TRUST WITH OVER 1500 LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE FREE HEARING AIDS FOR ALL FEDERAL WORKERS & RETIREES *No Co-Pay or Exam Fee Inside Walmart Hwy. 200 & Corner 484, Ocala 352-291-1467 000DNMN Inside Crystal River Mall Across from K-Mart 352-795-1484 Inside Sears Paddock Mall 352-237-1665 Federal Government Insurance Code #104, #105, #111, or #112 CHECK YOUR QUALIFICATIONS CALL 352-291-1467 BC/BS LIMIT 1 COUPON PER VISIT. LIMIT 2 PACKS PER VISIT. One More Week! BATTERIES PREMIUM ZINC BATTERIES 99 FREE HEARING TEST FREE REPAIRS (IN OFFICE ONLY) HEARING AID Fits 30 DB Loss Full Shell #ME200 $ 695 .00 Read the classifieds Some people make New Year Resolutions but most never get past the first month. Most resolutions have to do with weight loss but Judy Helfin, fitness director for Stone Creek, had a better idea a weight-loss challenge. She met with Chris Johnson, Stone Creeks community manager, and Rick Morang, Stone Creeks maintenance man or the go to man when things need to be fixed, and made them a challenge. Each man wanted to lose weight so they took on the challenge lose 30 pounds by June 3, 2013. That is 30 pounds for each man. To make the challenge more fun and to encourage Chris and Rick, Judy decided to make this a charity event. The money raised will go to Brothers Keeper Soup Kitchen where many Stone Creek residents volunteer. Rick and Chris took the challenge because they wanted to lose weight. They both believe that they can achieve their goal of loosing 30 pounds by June 3. Rick said, Absolutely, with the resident support we are receiving we cant fail. When asked what would be the hardest part of the challenge, Chris commented, Getting started is always the hardest for me... and I officially got started this weekend. I know that both men personally like sweets and have tasted many that have been cooked in the SC kitchen. So now, all they can do is limit those sweets or just enjoy the delicious smells. Since this challenge is for charity both were asked if they have a prediction on how much can be raised for the Soup Kitchen. Rick said, My hope is for at least $1,000 but my prayer is for $3,000. Chris had no prediction but added, Its all up to the community to make pledges, and our hope is that they are as generous as they are in all their support of similar causes. So, if you have not yet made your pledge, consider making one. The winner will be announced on June 5. At that time, there will be another article with the before and after pictures and the amount going to Brothers Keeper Soup Kitchen. Judy has started a walking group and both Chris and Rick will be a part of the group. The new program began on Tuesday, Jan. 15 at 7:30 a.m. and will also be offered on Fridays at 7:30 a.m. Judy also has small group training for weight loss. Remember to check the portal for the other interesting events that Judy has planned. Spa Day will be back on Jan. 30. Chris Johnson Rick Morang The challenge is on Stone Creek Patricia Gizzi The SECO Board of Trustees has voted to continue SECOs scholarship program for 2013. In fact, the board has authorized an increase in the scholarship amount taking it from $2,500 up to $3,000 per student in recognition of the ever increasing cost of higher education. Up to 12 high school seniors from the cooperatives service territory will receive assistance to go on to a college or technical school following their graduation. SECOs scholarship program has proven very popular with SECO members and, over the years, has helped many deserving students attain higher learning when that might have been difficult otherwise. SECO Director of Corporate Communications Barry Bowman said, The selection of those students who will receive scholarships will be based on each individuals past and present activities in school and the community, financial need and scholastic record. All applicants will be evaluated by an independent panel of educators from around the SECO service territory. He noted that to qualify, graduates must reside in a home being served by SECO and be enrolled in an accredited college, university or vocational/technical school by the end of 2013. Applications are available at area high school guidance offices and at any of SECOs customer service centers in Marion, Lake, Citrus, and Sumter counties. They must be returned no later than March 29. The SECO scholarship program reaffirms the Co-ops commitment to the future of our young people, and while the program has no impact on the cost of electricity, it is a significant benefit for those awardees struggling to fund their higher education, concluded Bowman. SECO votes to continue scholarship program Please read our classified ads

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 9 4 W ednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Guess what, Lamb? Youre about to experience a new perspective on a situation you long regarded quite differently. What you learn could open more opportunities later. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) The Bold Bovine is tempted to charge into a new venture. But it might be best to take things one step at a time, so that you know just where you are at any given point. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Its a good time to go on that fun getaway youve been planning. Youll return refreshed, ready and, yes, even eager to tackle the new challenge that awaits you. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) The Moon Child loves to fantasize about magical happenings in the early part of the week. But the sensible Crab gets down to serious business by weeks end. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) What goes around comes around for those lucky Leos and Leonas whose acts of generosity could be repaid with opportunities to expand into new and exciting areas of interest. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Your concern about your job responsibilities is commendable. But you need to take some quiet time to share with someone who has really missed being with you. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Aspects favor getting out and meeting new people. And as a bonus, you might find that some of your newly made friends could offer important business contacts. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You might take pride in wanting to do everything yourself. But nows a good time to ask family members to help with a demanding personal situation. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Pay more attention to the possibilities in that workplace change. It could show the way to make that long-sought turn on your career path. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Your need to succeed might overwhelm obligations to your loved ones. Ease up on that workload and into some well-deserved time with family and friends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Love rules for amorous Aquarians who can make good use of their ability to communicate feelings. Dont be surprised if theyre reciprocated in kind. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Fishing for compliments? No doubt, you probably earned them. But its best to let others believe they uncovered the treasure you really are. BORN THIS WEEK: Your good works flow from an open, generous heart. Nothing makes you happier than to see others happy as well. 000CKU2 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS 9330 SW 105th St., Ocala, FL 34481 854-9550 www .ocalawestumc.com 100th Ave. SW 105th St SW 110th St 484 Marion Oaks Library SW 103rd St P ine Run OTOW 80th Ave. 60th Ave. 49th Ave. Oak Run 200 484 A Place for You... Rev. Alan Jefferson No matter what your age is, no matter where You come from, no matter who you are, There is a place for you at Ocala West UMC Children & Youth Ministries T r aditional W orship 8:00 & 1 1:00 A.M. Casual & Contemporary 9:30 A.M. 000DPCW 000D795 Charlie Green Pastor 351-1106 1700 NW 60th Ave. Ocala www .newlifeocala.com Sunday 10:30am Wednesday 7:00pm Christ the King The Rev Donald J. Curran, Rector Rev Matthew W alter Asst. Rector Services: Rite I 7:30 am Rite II 8:50 & 11:15 am Childrens Church 8:50 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary Anglican Chur ch 000DBZY 000D9ZT Where JESUS is LORD, and YOU are Loved. Services: Sunday School : 9:30am Morning W orship: 10:30am Thursday: 6:00pm Meeting at: 145 S.W 78th Court Ocala, Florida 352-690-7596 B I B L I C A L F O U N D A T I O N C H U R C H Located a mile west of SR 200 at 10260 SW 110th Street (turn west across from the entrance to Oak Run) Expository Bible Teaching Traditional Services Sunday Worship at 10:00 AM Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 PM 000dr33 Community Church TIMBER RIDGE Wil Clawson Pastor Teacher 000D64L St. Martins Church 950 N.W 70th Street (SR 326) Ocala, Flor ida 34475 352-351-8059 www .cac-ocala.org Service & Sunday School 10:00 a.m. V i sitors Ar e Always W elcom e The Only Church of the True 1928 Book of Common Prayer (Episcopal) is discovered through worshiping together 71 1 187 000DNMR Friday, Jan. 18 Ocala High 12 Club to m eetThe Greater Ocala High 12 Club 665 will hold its monthly meeting on Friday, Jan. 18 at 11 a.m. at the Elks Club, 702 N.E. 25th Ave., Ocala. The speaker will be Capt. Jim Burton of the Marion County Sheriffs Office. It is always exciting to hear what is going on with Marion Countys finest. As we have become accustomed to, we will once again enjoy one of the Elks Clubs fine buffet lunches. Friends are always welcome. The cost is only $12 a person. All Master Masons and guests are invited to attend. Reservations are required. Call Bob Brady at 352-8549612 for reservations or further information.Saturday, Jan. 19 Circle Sq uare Health, Wellness Ex poThe 11th annual Health and Wellness Expo will be held on Saturday, Jan. 19, at the Circle Square Cultural Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Come and see what Ocala has to offer in the field of health care and learn the latest in medical advances. This is a free event and open to the public. The Expo is sponsored by On Top of the World Communities and Munroe Regional Medical Center (MRMC) and will feature various services offered by the hospital, including information on heart health, diabetes, stroke, nutrition and more. Representatives from area health-care related agencies will also be on hand to provide information and answer questions regarding your health. Additionally, The Ranch Fitness Center and Spa and On Top of the World certified fitness instructors will offer a variety of exercise demonstrations throughout the day. Participate in the ZUMBA Fitness Jam on The Town Square at Circle Square Commons from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.; a donation of $5 per person will go toward the March of Dimes, or with a $25 donation you will receive a tie-dyed ZUMBA t-shirt. The Circle Square Cultural Center is at 8395 S.W. 80th St.. For more information, visit the website at www.CSCulturalCenter.com or call 352-854-3670.Magician at Firs t CongregationalBrian LaPalme, the award-winning, world renowned magician, is bringing his magic show to First Congregational United Church of Christ, for a fundraiser, on Saturday, Jan. 19 at 2 p.m. Ticket prices are $3 for children 12 and under; adults $5. To purchase tickets, please call 352-5986272. If available, tickets may be purchased at the door 7171 S.W. State Road 200.Lions to hos t yard s ale The Ocala 200 Lions Club is having a yard sale Saturday, Jan 19, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The sale will be in the parking lot of the Bank of the Ozarks, Friendship Plaza on State Road 200. All proceeds from the sale will go to community projects. For information contact Bob, 352-861-2730.Ocala Lions Club Helps Fa m ilies of VeteransOn Saturday, Jan. 19, the Ocala Lions Club will collect donations and personal care items to be given to the Fisher House Foundation in Tampa, Florida for families of veterans or military personnel who are being treated at a nearby military or VA medical facility. The event will be at the Big Lots store, 8600 S.W. State Road 200 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. For further information about Fisher House, call 813-910-3000 or contact Bill Thomas at 352-291-2600 about the event.Scand inavian ClubThe Scandinavian Club of Marion County invites people of Danish, Finish, Icelandic, Norwegian and Swedish decent to join us at our next meeting on Jan. 19 at 11:30 a.m. at the Ocala Hilton, 3600 S.W. 36th Ave. in Ocala. The menu will be choice of salmon or herbed chicken breast with roasted potatoes, salad, coffee and dessert. Entertainment provided by Glenn Lewis on the keyboard. The cost is $16 per person. Reservations and payment must be made in advance. Payment and meal choice must be received by Wednesday, Jan. 17, checks to be made out to Don Clauson and mailed to Don Clauson, 5901 S.W. 86th Place. Ocala, FL 34476. For further details call Jim Neate 352-687-1580, Don Clauson 352-861-1235 or Terry Rasmussen 352-3478362.Sunday, Jan 20 Dancing encouraged at Jazz f unctionThe Ocala Jazz Society will host an afternoon of music at the VFW hall on Sunday, Jan. 20 from 2 to 5 p.m. Open to everyone, organizers say the, event offers incomparable musicians featuring great tunes for everyone and dancing is encouraged. A $3 donation is requested and benefits Hospice in memory of Bea Wilson, the founder of the Ocala Jazz Society. For more info call Diana, 352-237-0234.Monday, Jan. 21 Inauguration d ance in OcalaCulminating week-long events honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Marion County residents are invited to join in the national celebration of the 57th inauguration of the president and vice president of the United States of America at a semi-formal dinner/dance to take place at the Ocala Hilton Hotel on Monday, Jan. 21. The cocktail hour begins at 6 p.m. with dinner to be served at 7. Events in our nations Capital will be simulcast and a cash bar will be available. Tickets are $50 per person with a maximum of 300 to be sold. They may be purchased by telephoning the Marion County DEC at 352-402-9494, Joyce Blake at 352-690-1740 or Sally Smith at 941-704-3494. Cash or checks should be made out to the Marion County DEC. You may also get them through Act Blue at www.MarionDems.org.Thursday, Jan. 24 Magnet s chool ex po plannedWhat is a magnet school? Whats a magnet program? Can your child attend one in Marion County? What are the qualifications? Why do they even exist? If youve ever wondered about or considered such a program or school for your child, come learn whats so attractive about these highly-competitive programs at a special Magnet Expo set for Thursday, Jan. 24, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Marion Technical Institute (MTI), 1614 S.E. Fort King St. in Ocala. No advance registration is required, and anyone from the public is invited to attend. For more information, call Expo Coordinator Julie Shealy at 352-671-7720. Happenings

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State Sen. Alan Hays, who represents Southeastern Marion, obviously had seen the several people on the agenda and their topic, and immediately let them know the facts. Hays said he was astounded at the last delegation meeting when he heard the vocal complaints. We took it on, he said of the people in Tallahassee, but we have yet to solve the problem, which he called gargantuan. It cannot be retroactive, you cant roll the calendar back and say you cant do that, Hays told the audience. We ran into brick walls, and some of them were reinforced. Hays added, Were still striving to solve the problem. It was about three hours later before the list of homeowners who had signed up to speak got to the podium. By then, State Sen. Charlie Dean, who at the start of the meeting had been elected chairman, was cracking down on the four-minute limit. First up was Don Kronen, who said he had appeared before the delegation 16 months ago. Im very disappointed to be here again. Kronen said that lives have been devastated, finances decimated of many residents of developments. The Hardwood Trails resident blamed state attorney Brad King for not enforcing the law. He said the residents were locked into a dictatorship. Janis Lentz of Cherrywood said many bills had been proposed, but action hadnt been taken on any of them. She, too, was concerned about the lack of enforcement of a state statute. I ask you to do your sworn duty, she told the seven legislators, and asked for relief for the homeowners. Attorney Dr. Will Harker of Hardwood Trails offered legal help. Jan Bergemann of Cyber Citizens for Justice said that this was the second generation of frustrated homeowners. He added, We can just hope that something is being done. Hugh Haggerty called the situation homeowner trafficking and said the people were in bondage. law that is now the subject of a conflict between the city and the Marion County School Board. At issue is whether the schools have to pay stormwater fees to the city. Newly elected Supervisor of Elections Wesley Wilcox drew praise from State Rep. Dennis Baxley for the way the county election, under Dee Brown, was conducted, as opposed to long counts in other parts of the state. By 10 or 11 (p.m.) everybody knew (the election results in the county), Baxley said. There were young people who appeared, too, including representatives from Pace Center for Girls and some students who were part of a battle against the use of tobacco. One man spoke of the need for tougher penalties for those who collide with motorcycle, bicycles and pedestrians, and also called for tough textingwhile-driving legislation. One woman spoke against the way her child was treated, saying he was denied water in a hot classroom. She criticized the school system for the way it handled the affair. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 3 10 W ednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Harvesting easy money in Washington requires hiring well-paid lobbyists who know how to create rainbows which lead to a pot of gold. How does this kind of chicanery happen right under our collective noses? Quite simple: While 90 percent of citizens disapprove of the way Congress operates, ninety-one percent of Congress people get re-elected. Nothing will change until we make more changes. FLYNNcontinued from Page 8 This weeks answers to puzzles from Page 9 We feel that the real people should get to go first. Most of the agency reports came from people who are paid to be there they can sit and wait for a while. But other folks, especially those who arent retired, might be taking time off from work to appear. More consideration should be shown to them. Finally, there were no breaks. From time to time most people, including the legislators, had to get up and leave for a minute. A 10-minute nature break in the middle of the afternoon might have been the prudent thing to do. Then everyone could comfortably listen to all the presentations. EDITORIALcontinued from Page 8 maining federal benefit check recipients must receive their money electronically. The Treasury Departments Go Direct public education campaign is working with more than 1,800 partner organizations throughout the country to spread the message about the electronic payment rule and educate federal benefit recipients about their options. The campaign has developed and shared a variety of public service announcements, educational videos, check inserts and other materials to explain how electronic payments work and how to make the switch from paper checks. The videos and materials are available on the Go Direct campaign website at www.GoDirect.org. The Treasury Department has taken great strides to support and guide check recipients through the change to electronic payments, and were increasing our efforts significantly in the final two months before the deadline, Lebryk said. We have a team of friendly, helpful agents standing by at our call center, and many financial institutions, caregivers, senior services providers and advocates for people who are homeless or have disabilities have the necessary information and resources to help federal benefit recipients make the switch. Check recipients can sign up for direct deposit or the Direct Express card by calling toll-free 1-800-333-1795, visiting www.GoDirect.org, or talking to their local federal paying agency office. The process is fast, easy and free. By taking a few minutes to gather the necessary information ahead of time, most federal benefit recipients can sign up for electronic payments with one phone call. Individuals will need their Social Security number or claim number, their 12-digital federal benefit check number and the amount of their most recent federal benefit check. If choosing direct deposit, recipients also will need their financial institutions routing transit number, (often found on a personal check) account number and account type (checking or saving). There are no sign-up fees or monthly fees to receive benefits electronically. ELECTRONICcontinued from Page 1 ALBRIGHTcontinued from Page 1 Read the classifieds RELIEFcontinued from Page 1 Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 795 $ 795 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RAY RAY RAY C C C C C C ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION ONSTRUCTION Crayconst.com Crayconst.com Crayconst.com Trade in your old vinyl windows for acrylic or glass 16 x 7 SLIDING 16 x 7 SLIDING 16 x 7 SLIDING GARAGE GARAGE GARAGE SCREEN SCREEN SCREEN DOOR DOOR DOOR 000DN3D 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000DJHY CONCRETE WORK REPAIRING OLD INSTALLING NEW We Make Your Concrete Look Good Specializing in Repairing Concrete Driveways Pool Decks Patios Entrance Ways Advantages: Mildew & Oil Resistant Non Skid Protection Easy to Keep Clean Commercial Grade Quality RENEWED SURFACES 732-GOLF (4653) Open to the Public Rate with this coupon and Tee Time Reservation Our Low Current 18 Hole Rate With This Coupon $ 32 00 Before 11:00 $ 27 00 After 11:00 Just 1 mile west of I-75 on US 27 (Exit 354) Expires 2/20/13 Rates subject to change. 18 Hole Championship Course Dress Code: Collared Shirt Required NO Jeans GOLF OUTINGS WELCOME! 000DL3G SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 000DN2Q 000DN2Q 000CLCO IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Early Spring Specials Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2012 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $ 19 95 Call for details Expires 2/28/13 CERAMIC TILE Lawson Tile Floors Walls Tub & Shower Remodel Back Splash Reasonable Rates 34 years Experience (352) 229-5548 Licensed & Insured 000CLG8 Ocalas Only 4-Star Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations Accommodations for Your Pet for Your Pet Tour our unique Tour our unique facility and you facility and you be the judge! be the judge! 352-861-4566 352-861-4566 Boarding Grooming Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com www.palmettokennels.com 000DLAJ Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting Look for us Look for us Look for us on Facebook on Facebook on Facebook 000DOVV LANDSCAPING JAMISON LANDSCAPE & TREE SERVICE Specializing in all phases of tree work, landscape rip outs, design and installs, all around lawn maintenance. FREE ESTIMATES Jeff Jamison 352-321-0404 licensed & insured commercial & residential 10% Discount To Seniors & Military Florida Window Medics, Inc. Screen Rooms Acrylic & Glass Rooms Rescreens Broken Glass Replacement Windows Gutters Foggy Windows Cement Sliding Glass Door Repair Call & speak directly to the owner David Heath Comp. #5524 352 484-5697 WINDOW REPAIRS 000DQEA 000DPNB PLUMBING EP A Lead Certification #NA T -1 13266-1 OSHA 10 #1216933 Fla. Lic. #CFC1427666 804-9165 Associated P lumbing and Pipe F r om Ba thr oom R emodeling to Fixing Leak y F aucets, and installing Bliss W alk-in T ubs Residential and Commercial 71 1 185 DIALAPRO F o r Y o u r P r o f e s s i o n a l N e e d s For Y our Pr ofessional Needs W E S T M A R I O N M e s s e n g e r WEST MARION Messenger 0 0 0 D N 3 T J a s m i n e P l a z a 3 5 2 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6 1 6 0 S W S R 2 0 0 U n i t 1 0 4 O c a l a F l o r i d a 3 4 4 7 6 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 S T O R E H O U R S : T U E S F R I 1 0 5 S A T 1 0 2 ST ORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SA T 10-2 Readers Choice W inner Jewelry Stor e 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 www.jandjjewelersocala.com 000DR3W All r epairs done on pr emises. B A TTERIES $ 8 00 + ta x Af for dable New Af for dable New & Estate Jewelry & Estate Jewelry 000DQEH 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run352-291-7626 M o n F r i 9 a m 5 p m S a t 9 a m 2 p m Stop and visit us before you buy! We Guarantee Lowest Prices in Ocala! Service Loaner A vailable. Please Just Ask 10% Discount to V eterans labor & parts excluding batteries WE SELL TROJAN BATTERIES 6-V T605only$539 8-V T875only$639FREE pickup within 5 miles 12-V T1275only$639Best Selection In The Area! 6-V 6 PACK$479 8-V 6 PACK$529 2010 Remanufactured New Factory Body All lights & turn signals New 8 volt batteries New DOT tires Fold down wind shield Rear view mirrors Automatic chargeronly $4,995 000DP0J GOLFWEEK TOUR Recruiting Competitive Golfers Ne w Membership is No w Open for 2013 Golf Season First T our nament Jan. 26 North Central Florida Golfweek Amateur Tour J oin T oda y! 352-446-3446 www .amateurg olftour .net Wher e Amateurs Ar e T r eated Lik e Pr os 000DQM9 000DR7N Retired n ur ses to meetThe Citr us Marion Chapter of the Florida R egistered Nurses R etired (RNR) will meet at the Inverness Golf and Countr y club on Monday Jan. 28. Sign-in for the meeting starts at 11 a.m. The speaker will be Dr Attangi from the Citr us Memorial Heart and V ascular Center who will speak on V ascular Disease. Our charity will be Guardian Ad Litem. R etired nurses wishing to attend should call Mar y Jane at 352726-6882 or Gladys at 352-854-2677 by W ednesday Jan. 23.Breast cancer suppor t gr oupThe Breast Cancer SOS (Sisterhood of Sur vivors) Support Group meets the last T uesday of each month at Ocala W est United Methodist Church, 9330 S.W 105th St., Rm 235 (Multipurpose R oom) at 1 p.m. The meeting on T uesday Jan. 29 will be off -site at Stone Creek Grille, 9676 SW 62nd Loop, with lunch at noon and a trip to All About Y ou Boutique at Six Gun Plaza.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 11 2 W ednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith aName Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTALFor your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 M edical Bnet CARE ManagerThe Centers is seeking a Bachelors level Care Manager to coordinate mental health svcs for children enrolled in Behavioral Health Network. Extensive travel required in Citrus & Hernando Counties. Use of personal vehicle reqd., State mileage rate pd. Work hours dictated by caseload. Please submit salary. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/W e E-V erify. Fax or e-mail r esume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For mor e info visit www.thecenters.us TBOSS TherapistThe Centers is seeking Masters Level Therapist for TBOSS position in Citrus County. Must have min 2 yrs exp working with adults, children & adolescents providing individual, group & family therapy. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us M edical Residential SA EducatorThe Centers is seeking an Educator to provide educational services to adolescents in our 24/7 residential substance abuse treatment facility in Lecanto. Teach lesson plans according to each countys requirements, i.e., math, social studies, science, English, etc. Assist individuals with special and specific needs, interactions and goals. Bachelors in field of Edu or Human Services & exp reqd. Middle School or HS level State of FL teaching certification preferred. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/W e E-V erify Fax or e-mail r esume to HR, The Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For mor e info visit www.thecenters.us Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKSFREE TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403 Prof essional Dir ector of Clinical ServicesResponsible for directing the programs psychological and treatment services to include technical and administrative duties, testing, individual, group, and family therapeutic activities, research, and participation in overall institutional programming and administration. Education: Masters degree from an accredited college or university in the field of counseling, social work, psychology, rehabilitation, special education or in a related human services field is preferred. 5 years related experience in the field of treatment program development, implementation, & evaluation in a juvenile institution preferred. Superviory skills necessary. The right person must possess a license: (MFT, LCSW, LMHC) from the state of Florida, provide Apply In Person at: 2855 W W oodland Ridge Dr Lecanto, Florida, 34461 or Email to shar on.facto@us.g4s. com or apply online at www. usajobs.g4s.com Drug Free W orkplace / EEO Musical Instruments BUYINGGuit ars, Banjos & Mandolins,Fender Gibson & Martin any condition (443) 463-3421 W anted to Buy LIONEL T OY TRAINS W anted Any Amount Any Condition. Cash Paid Will Pick Up (352) 346-3328 Real Es t ate F or Sale PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real est ate advertising in this newsp aper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limit ation or discrimination based on race, color religion, sex, handicap, familial st atus or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limit ation or discrimination. Familial st atus includes children under the age of 18 living with p arent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newsp aper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real est ate which is in violation of the law Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newsp aper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing imp aired is 1-800-927-9275. Citrus Hills Homes HERNANDOCitrus Hills Pool Home 4/3/2+, circular drive, 1 acre lot, below $200k 352-527-7856 V ehicles W anted BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 WE BUY ANYVEHICLEIn Any Condition, T itle, No T itle, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont T rade it in. W e W ill Pay up to $25K Any Make, Any Model. 813-335-3794 813-237-1892 Call AJ Handyman Electrical, Plumbing Carpentry Sinks, Toilets Leaky Faucets Ceiling Fans Security Lighting Safety Railings Grab Bars, Ramps Drywall Repair Interior Painting Screens & Screen Doors Lanai Carpet/Tile Flooring Furniture, Cabinet Refinishing/Repairs Not Sure? -Call Me T ree Service STUMP GRINDINGCALL JIM FOR FREE ESTIMA TES (800) 478-8679 V ehicles W anted 000DMDQ Floridas Christmas tree is the big winner in D.C. This year I was able to spend several weeks in the Washington, D.C., area (specifically Springfield, Virginia) with my daughter, son-in-law, and grandchildren, Emily and Dominic. One evening, the family went downtown to see the National Christmas Tree on the Ellipse. The display, which includes the National Christmas Tree and the 56 smaller trees representing the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and all the territories, makes up the Pathway of Peace which is absolutely spectacular. All of the smaller trees are decorated by sponsoring organizations from the local areas and usually represent something unique about the region. In most cases, the decorations are enclosed in plastic globes to be protected from the weather; however, in some cases, the sponsors decided to literally decorate the globe itself. This was the case with the Florida tree which was exceptionally popular with those who came to admire the beauty and enjoy the celebration. I hate to admit my lack of knowledge about the National Christmas Trees impressive history, but I found out some interesting facts by reading the signs posted all around the display. Later, I looked up more by using my trusty new IPad and using all the resources that we now are beginning to take for granted. It still amazes this educator from the 60s through the 90s, however; and I am amazed at the enormous wealth of information when I use my favorite Google. Going back to November of 1923, First Lady Grace Coolidge gave permission for the District of Columbia Public Schools to erect a Christmas tree on the Ellipse south of the White House. The organizers called it the National Christmas Tree and thus began the tradition. On Christmas Eve, President Calvin Coolidge, walked from the White House to the Ellipse to push the button to light the 48-foot cut tree with more than 3,000 enthusiastic spectators looking on. Cut trees continued to be used until 1973 when the National Park Service transplanted live trees. The trees from the states and territories are in alphabetical order, and this years consensus favorite was Floridas tree. The decorations represent warm sun shining on our ripening oranges here in Florida while these iconic ornaments dance in the chilly Washington D.C. weather. The artist, Janeen Mason and the Jensen Beach High School AP art students, created the balls of polymer clay finished with a double waterproof clear coat. The bright orange blossoms have a purple ribbon reading Viva Florida 500 commemorating the 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leons landing in St. Augustine. Sponsoring the project was the Arts Council, Inc. serving Stuart and Martin County along with SubseaSpearguns.com. Seeing the Florida tree and noting the reactions of others who were seeing the tree for the first time was really special. Obviously, it was the crowds favorite for the 2012 celebration. On a personal note, being able to spend Christmas and New Years with my family was extra special since they are a military family, and this was my first holiday season with them in 13 years. Many of us, now Floridians, travel to other parts of our beautiful country on a regular basis. The really important thing to me is that I, along with many of my neighbors, really look forward to our return to our homes in Fairfield Village, which still remains a lively place filled with lovely people. Floridas Christmas tree is the big winner in D.C. Fairfield Village Priscilla Geissal January is off and running! The first activity was taking down the decorations (tree, etc.) at the clubhouse. This was done sy the First Friday gathering. We had about 25 residents show up to help with this project. The men really got busy and had the tree down in record time. Thanks to everyone who helped. The next event at the clubhouse is the Comfort Foods potluck dinner on Monday, the 21st. There will be a display of quilts for everyone to enjoy. If you would like to show any of your quilts please call Carol Mowrey. Dinner will begin at 6 p.m.; come join your friends and neighbors for an evening of eating and fellowship. If you have never attended one of our potluck dinners, you dont know what you are missing. The Red Hot Fillies of the Meadow will meet on Friday, the 25th, at the clubhouse for the planning meeting for the year. We will meet at 12:30 to discuss plans for the year, and also enjoy some desserts. Bring your ideas for trips/projects with you. Remember January is when the dues are paid for the year. The Red Hats group is open to all women of Quail Meadow. Come join us if you are interested in participating in our activities. The Social Committee met to formulate plans for 2013. Mark your calendars now for the following upcoming events: Feb. 11 Mardi Gras theme potluck dinner, March 16 the annual horse race, April 15 Tax Day potluck dinner, May 18 Spring Fling, June 10 Birthday dinner, and July 4 we will revive the Quail Meadow parade and cook out. Other events are also planned and they will be listed later. One big party you want to plan for is New Years Eve we will have a party with a live band! Now, lets turn our thoughts to something very important. We have many residents who need someone from time to time to give them comfort, care, and show concern for their problems. Perhaps there is a time when you need someone to go to the store for you, or maybe just come by for a visit if you or someone you know needs someone; we have a group willing to help. If you know of anyone in need, please contact Marion Gartman. Also, if you would like to assist in this on-going project, please let Marion know. Hope to see many of you at the dinner Monday night! January off and running with taking down of tree Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb Maydaline Bristol, Teresa Bachand, Mary Zdarsky, and Marlene Cigrant. Kenneson Bristol and Benny Bachand packing up the tree. Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com

PAGE 12

INDEX Fairfield Village..2 Stone Creek........5 Dr. Snyder............6 Quail Meadow....11 VOLUME 6, NUMBER 42 WEDNESDAY, January 16, 2013 Puzzles Page 9 ClassifiedsPage 1112 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger The U.S. Department of the Treasury today reported that 5 million checks continue to be mailed to federal beneficiaries each month. With just two months remaining until the March 1, 2013, electronic payment law goes into effect, the Treasury Department is urging Social Security and other federal benefit recipients to not delay and switch now to either direct deposit or the Direct Express Debit MasterCard card. Choosing direct deposit or the Direct Express card makes it easier, safer and more convenient for beneficiaries to receive their payments. Switching to an electronic payment is not optional its the law, said David Lebryk, commissioner of the Treasury Departments Financial Management Service. If you or a loved one still receive paper checks for your benefit payments, now is the time to switch. Its free and easy just call 1-800-333-1795 or visit www.GoDirect.org. Currently, approximately 93 percent of Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments are being made electronically. Converting the remaining paper check recipients to electronic payments will save American taxpayers $1 billion over the next 10 years. The Treasury Department published a final rule in December 2010 to gradually phase out paper checks for federal benefit payments. Since May 1, 2011, all people newly applying for federal benefits, including Social Security, SSI, Veterans Affairs, Railroad Retirement Board, Office of Personnel Management benefits and other non-tax payments, have had to choose direct deposit or the Direct Express card at the time they sign up for their benefits. March 1, 2013, is the final deadline by which all reSocial Security warning: Time to go electronic Vigil for a littlevictim Ocala came together on the Downtown Square Jan. 10 to remember 6-month-old Jonah Mendoza of the Fountains in northwest Ocala, who was killed on Jan. 4 by his mother. PHOTOS BY JIM CLARKA collage of pictures from Jonahs short life were on display on a table in front of the stage at the square. Jordan Mendoza, Jonahs father, speaks to the crowd at the conclusion of the memorial. Juliauna Christensen, 3, writes a message of condolence, helped by a friend, Roxanne Garcia. Column, Page 8 Photos, Page 12 PHOTOS BY JIM CLARKRemembering JonahJordan Mendoza, flanked by family and friends, looks over displays while holding a candle in memory of his slain son, 6-month-old Jonah. The thin lights in the background were part of the citys Christmas decoration, designed to look like lights falling from the trees. One speaker called them Tears from Heaven. Jordan Mendoza gets words of consolation from a well-wisher prior to the start of the memorial on Jan. 10. BY JIM CLARK EditorMarion County Tax Collector George Albright has done what the state asked him to. In addition to his dispensing of auto tags and titles, he took on the driver license production for the state, and has gotten thing running smoothly. In fact, things run so smoothly that now some forces in the state want to remove the auto tag purchasing from his office. Albright was one of the county officials appearing before the Marion County Legislative Delegation on Jan. 8, and didnt mince words: This is a power play by the 3M company and the Department of Highway Safety. The 3M company is involved in the making of the tags. It doesnt make sense, Albright told the seven-member delegation, chaired by State Sen. Charlie Dean. If they thought enough of us to give us driver licenses, why do they want to take away tag and title? He also added, Why is there even a Department of Highway Safety? One of the things that was emphasized during the presentations was the protection of water. County Chair Kathy Bryant told the legislators, Protection of the aquifer will always be on our legislative agenda. She asked in the strongest possible terms for the county to have a seat at the table during discussions of Silver Springs. Ocala City Council member Daniel Owen asked the officials to clarify the Please see ELECTRONIC, Page 3 Albright blasts state agency over auto tags Please see ALBRIGHT, Page 3 Sheriff sworn inSheriff Chris Blair sits with his daughter Alesa and wife Sangi as Judge Hale Stancil speaks during Blairs swearing-in ceremony. Behind Stancil is County Commission Chair Kathy Bryant. Additional photo, Page 12.PHOTO BY RON RATNER BY JIM CLARK EditorArea residents armed with statements against homeowner associations and developers who they say charge excessive fees and fail to file required reports came to Tuesdays Marion County Legislative Delegation ready to do battle, but a state senators comments at the opening of the meeting quickly let them know they would get little satisfaction. The delegation gathered at the Klein Center at Central Florida Community College for the five-hour meeting as a crowd composed mostly of representatives of local agencies filled the room. Homeowners get little relief from legislators Please see RELIEF, Page 2 Deputies sworn in PHOTO BY RON RATNERWith the swearing in of new sheriff Chris Blair, all sworn officers in the Marion County department also had to take an oath. Internal Medicine Associates Of Ocala Board Certifications in Internal Medicine and Geriatrics Thomas Mohan ARNP Sharon Marques M.D. K.N. Reddy M.D. Connie L. Hartley ARNP Herma Baker FNP-BC OFFICE LOCATIONS: 4840 S U.S. Hwy. 41, Dunnellon (352) 489-5152 1623 SW 1St Ave., Ocala (352) 732-9844 9401 SW Hwy. 200, Bldg. 500 Ste. 501 & 502, Ocala (352) 854-9991 Ask About Weight Loss Programs!! High Blood Pressure Diabetes Weight Loss Womens Health All Arthritic Problems Heart Disease Lung Problems Complete Physicals Call For An Appt. Today! 352-414-5312 ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! Free Screenings! 000DRA9 000DPL T 7201 SW Hwy 200 Ocala (352) 629-0900 (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (352) 629-0900 Other locations throughout the southeast 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala GREAT FINANCING ON EZ-GO CARTS! GOLF CARS ST AR TING A T $1,995 WHAT BATTERY A RE Y OU L OOKING F OR ??? Automotive Marine Lawn Mower Golf Cart Cordless Phone Riding Toys Computer Back Up Tractor Motorcycle ATV Camcorder Cellular Phone Wheel Chairs Game Feeder Emergency Lights Security Systems Battery Packs Laptop Computers Alkaline Complete Stock Of Batteries For: CUSTOM BATTERY PACKS LAPTOP COMPUTER BATTERIES CAMCORDER BATTERIES WHEELCHAIR BATTERIES SECURITY SYSTEM BATTERIES AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES FARM TRACTOR BATTERIES JET SKI BATTERIES GAME FEED BATTERIES MARINE BATTERIES CELL PHONE BATTERIES POWER WHEELS BATTERIES WATCH BATTERIES KEY REMOTE BATTERIES TRUCK BATTERIES CORDLESS PHONE BATTERIES EMERGENCY LIGHT BATTERIES ATV BATTERIES MOTORCYCLE BATTERIES LAWNMOWER BATTERIES



PAGE 1

INDEX Fairfield Village..2 Stone Creek........5 Dr. Snyder............6 Quail Meadow....11 VOLUME 6, NUMBER 42 WEDNESDAY, January 16, 2013 Puzzles Page 9 Classifieds Page 11 12 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger The U.S. Department of the Treasury today reported that 5 million checks continue to be mailed to federal beneficiaries each month. With just two months remaining until the March 1, 2013, electronic payment law goes into effect, the Treasury Department is urging Social Security and other federal benefit recipients to not delay and switch now to either direct deposit or the Direct Express Debit MasterCard card. Choosing direct deposit or the Direct Express card makes it easier, safer and more convenient for beneficiaries to receive their payments. Switching to an electronic payment is not optional its the law, said David Lebryk, commissioner of the Treasury Departments Financial Management Service. If you or a loved one still receive paper checks for your benefit payments, now is the time to switch. Its free and easy just call 1-800-333-1795 or visit www.GoDirect.org. Currently, approximately 93 percent of Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments are being made electronically. Converting the remaining paper check recipients to electronic payments will save American taxpayers $1 billion over the next 10 years. The Treasury Department published a final rule in December 2010 to gradually phase out paper checks for federal benefit payments. Since May 1, 2011, all people newly applying for federal benefits, including Social Security, SSI, Veterans Affairs, Railroad Retirement Board, Office of Personnel Management benefits and other non-tax payments, have had to choose direct deposit or the Direct Express card at the time they sign up for their benefits. March 1, 2013, is the final deadline by which all reSocial Security warning: Time to go electronic Vigil for a littlevictim Ocala came together on the Downtown Square Jan. 10 to remember 6-month-old Jonah Mendoza of the Fountains in northwest Ocala, who was killed on Jan. 4 by his mother. PHOTOS BY JIM CLARKA collage of pictures from Jonahs short life were on display on a table in front of the stage at the square. Jordan Mendoza, Jonahs father, speaks to the crowd at the conclusion of the memorial. Juliauna Christensen, 3, writes a message of condolence, helped by a friend, Roxanne Garcia. Column, Page 8 Photos, Page 12 PHOTOS BY JIM CLARKRemembering Jonah Jordan Mendoza, flanked by family and friends, looks over displays while holding a candle in memory of his slain son, 6-month-old Jonah. The thin lights in the background were part of the citys Christmas decoration, designed to look like lights falling from the trees. One speaker called them Tears from Heaven. Jordan Mendoza gets words of consolation from a well-wisher prior to the start of the memorial on Jan. 10. BY JIM CLARK Editor Marion County Tax Collector George Albright has done what the state asked him to. In addition to his dispensing of auto tags and titles, he took on the driver license production for the state, and has gotten thing running smoothly. In fact, things run so smoothly that now some forces in the state want to remove the auto tag purchasing from his office. Albright was one of the county officials appearing before the Marion County Legislative Delegation on Jan. 8, and didnt mince words: This is a power play by the 3M company and the Department of Highway Safety. The 3M company is involved in the making of the tags. It doesnt make sense, Albright told the seven-member delegation, chaired by State Sen. Charlie Dean. If they thought enough of us to give us driver licenses, why do they want to take away tag and title? He also added, Why is there even a Department of Highway Safety? One of the things that was emphasized during the presentations was the protection of water. County Chair Kathy Bryant told the legislators, Protection of the aquifer will always be on our legislative agenda. She asked in the strongest possible terms for the county to have a seat at the table during discussions of Silver Springs. Ocala City Council member Daniel Owen asked the officials to clarify the Please see ELECTRONIC Page 3 Albright blasts state agency over auto tags Please see ALBRIGHT Page 3 Sheriff sworn in Sheriff Chris Blair sits with his daughter Alesa and wife Sangi as Judge Hale Stancil speaks during Blairs swearing-in ceremony. Behind Stancil is County Commission Chair Kathy Bryant. Additional photo, Page 12.PHOTO BY RON RATNER BY JIM CLARK Editor Area residents armed with statements against homeowner associations and developers who they say charge excessive fees and fail to file required reports came to Tuesdays Marion County Legislative Delegation ready to do battle, but a state senators comments at the opening of the meeting quickly let them know they would get little satisfaction. The delegation gathered at the Klein Center at Central Florida Community College for the five-hour meeting as a crowd composed mostly of representatives of local agencies filled the room. Homeowners get little relief from legislators Please see RELIEF Page 2 Deputies sworn in PHOTO BY RON RATNERWith the swearing in of new sheriff Chris Blair, all sworn officers in the Marion County department also had to take an oath. Internal Medicine Associates Of Ocala Board Certifications in Internal Medicine and Geriatrics Thomas Mohan ARNP Sharon Marques M.D. K.N. Reddy M.D. Connie L. Hartley ARNP Herma Baker FNP-BC OFFICE LOCATIONS: 4840 S U.S. Hwy. 41, Dunnellon (352) 489-5152 1623 SW 1St Ave., Ocala (352) 732-9844 9401 SW Hwy. 200, Bldg. 500 Ste. 501 & 502, Ocala (352) 854-9991 Ask About Weight Loss Programs!! High Blood Pressure Diabetes Weight Loss Womens Health All Arthritic Problems Heart Disease Lung Problems Complete Physicals Call For An Appt. Today! 352-414-5312 ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! Free Screenings! 000DRA9 000DPLT 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala (352) 629-0900 (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (352) 629-0900 Other locations throughout the southeast 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala GREAT FINANCING ON EZ-GO CARTS! GOLF CARS STARTING AT $1,995 WHAT BATTERY A RE Y OU L OOKING F OR ??? Automotive Marine Lawn Mower Golf Cart Cordless Phone Riding Toys Computer Back Up Tractor Motorcycle ATV Camcorder Cellular Phone Wheel Chairs Game Feeder Emergency Lights Security Systems Battery Packs Laptop Computers Alkaline Complete Stock Of Batteries For: CUSTOM BATTERY PACKS LAPTOP COMPUTER BATTERIES CAMCORDER BATTERIES WHEELCHAIR BATTERIES SECURITY SYSTEM BATTERIES AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES FARM TRACTOR BATTERIES JET SKI BATTERIES GAME FEED BATTERIES MARINE BATTERIES CELL PHONE BATTERIES POWER WHEELS BATTERIES WATCH BATTERIES KEY REMOTE BATTERIES TRUCK BATTERIES CORDLESS PHONE BATTERIES EMERGENCY LIGHT BATTERIES ATV BATTERIES MOTORCYCLE BATTERIES LAWNMOWER BATTERIES

PAGE 2

messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 11 2 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials. Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith a Name Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTAL For your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 Medical Bnet CARE Manager The Centers is seeking a Bachelors level Care Manager to coordinate mental health svcs for children enrolled in Behavioral Health Network. Extensive travel required in Citrus & Hernando Counties. Use of personal vehicle reqd., State mileage rate pd. Work hours dictated by caseload. Please submit salary. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us TBOSS Therapist The Centers is seeking Masters Level Therapist for TBOSS position in Citrus County. Must have min 2 yrs exp working with adults, children & adolescents providing individual, group & family therapy. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us Medical Residential SA Educator The Centers is seeking an Educator to provide educational services to adolescents in our 24/7 residential substance abuse treatment facility in Lecanto. Teach lesson plans according to each countys requirements, i.e., math, social studies, science, English, etc. Assist individuals with special and specific needs, interactions and goals. Bachelors in field of Edu or Human Services & exp reqd. Middle School or HS level State of FL teaching certification preferred. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify Fax or e-mail resume to HR, The Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKS FREE TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 Professional Director of Clinical Services Responsible for directing the programs psychological and treatment services to include technical and administrative duties, testing, individual, group, and family therapeutic activities, research, and participation in overall institutional programming and administration. Education: Masters degree from an accredited college or university in the field of counseling, social work, psychology, rehabilitation, special education or in a related human services field is preferred. 5 years related experience in the field of treatment program development, implementation, & evaluation in a juvenile institution preferred. Superviory skills necessary. The right person must possess a license: (MFT, LCSW, LMHC) from the state of Florida, provide Apply In Person at: 2855 W. Woodland Ridge Dr. Lecanto, Florida, 34461 or Email to shar on.facto@us.g4s. com or apply online at www. usajobs.g4s.com Drug Free Workplace / EEO Musical Instruments BUYING Guitars, Banjos & Mandolins,Fender, Gibson & Martin any condition (443) 463-3421 Wanted to Buy LIONELTOYTRAINS WantedAny Amount Any Condition. Cash Paid Will Pick Up (352) 346-3328 Real Estate For Sale PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Citrus Hills Homes HERNANDO Citrus Hills Pool Home 4/3/2+, circular drive, 1 acre lot, below $200k 352-527-7856 Vehicles Wanted BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 WE BUY ANYVEHICLEIn Any Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make, Any Model. 813-335-3794 813-237-1892 Call AJ Handyman Electrical, Plumbing Carpentry Sinks, Toilets Leaky Faucets Ceiling Fans Security Lighting Safety Railings Grab Bars, Ramps Drywall Repair Interior Painting Screens & Screen Doors Lanai Carpet/Tile Flooring Furniture, Cabinet Refinishing/Repairs Not Sure? -Call Me Tree Service STUMPGRINDINGCALLJIM FOR FREE ESTIMATES (800) 478-8679 Vehicles Wanted 000DMDQ F loridas Christmas tree is the big winner in D.C. This year I was able to spend several weeks in the Washington, D.C., area (specifically Springfield, Virginia) with my daughter, son-in-law, and grandchildren, Emily and Dominic. One evening, the family went downtown to see the National Christmas Tree on the Ellipse. The display, which includes the National Christmas Tree and the 56 smaller trees representing the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and all the territories, makes up the Pathway of Peace which is absolutely spectacular. All of the smaller trees are decorated by sponsoring organizations from the local areas and usually represent something unique about the region. In most cases, the decorations are enclosed in plastic globes to be protected from the weather; however, in some cases, the sponsors decided to literally decorate the globe itself. This was the case with the Florida tree which was exceptionally popular with those who came to admire the beauty and enjoy the celebration. I hate to admit my lack of knowledge about the National Christmas Trees impressive history, but I found out some interesting facts by reading the signs posted all around the display. Later, I looked up more by using my trusty new IPad and using all the resources that we now are beginning to take for granted. It still amazes this educator from the 60s through the 90s, however; and I am amazed at the enormous wealth of information when I use my favorite Google. Going back to November of 1923, First Lady Grace Coolidge gave permission for the District of Columbia Public Schools to erect a Christmas tree on the Ellipse south of the White House. The organizers called it the National Christmas Tree and thus began the tradition. On Christmas Eve, President Calvin Coolidge, walked from the White House to the Ellipse to push the button to light the 48-foot cut tree with more than 3,000 enthusiastic spectators looking on. Cut trees continued to be used until 1973 when the National Park Service transplanted live trees. The trees from the states and territories are in alphabetical order, and this years consensus favorite was Floridas tree. The decorations represent warm sun shining on our ripening oranges here in Florida while these iconic ornaments dance in the chilly Washington D.C. weather. The artist, Janeen Mason and the Jensen Beach High School AP art students, created the balls of polymer clay finished with a double waterproof clear coat. The bright orange blossoms have a purple ribbon reading Viva Florida 500 commemorating the 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leons landing in St. Augustine. Sponsoring the project was the Arts Council, Inc. serving Stuart and Martin County along with SubseaSpearguns.com. Seeing the Florida tree and noting the reactions of others who were seeing the tree for the first time was really special. Obviously, it was the crowds favorite for the 2012 celebration. On a personal note, being able to spend Christmas and New Years with my family was extra special since they are a military family, and this was my first holiday season with them in 13 years. Many of us, now Floridians, travel to other parts of our beautiful country on a regular basis. The really important thing to me is that I, along with many of my neighbors, really look forward to our return to our homes in Fairfield Village, which still remains a lively place filled with lovely people. Floridas Christmas tree is the big winner in D.C. Fairfield Village Priscilla Geissal J anuary is off and running! The first activity was taking down the decorations (tree, etc.) at the clubhouse. This was done sy the First Friday gathering. We had about 25 residents show up to help with this project. The men really got busy and had the tree down in record time. Thanks to everyone who helped. The next event at the clubhouse is the Comfort Foods potluck dinner on Monday, the 21st. There will be a display of quilts for everyone to enjoy. If you would like to show any of your quilts please call Carol Mowrey. Dinner will begin at 6 p.m.; come join your friends and neighbors for an evening of eating and fellowship. If you have never attended one of our potluck dinners, you dont know what you are missing. The Red Hot Fillies of the Meadow will meet on Friday, the 25th, at the clubhouse for the planning meeting for the year. We will meet at 12:30 to discuss plans for the year, and also enjoy some desserts. Bring your ideas for trips/projects with you. Remember January is when the dues are paid for the year. The Red Hats group is open to all women of Quail Meadow. Come join us if you are interested in participating in our activities. The Social Committee met to formulate plans for 2013. Mark your calendars now for the following upcoming events: Feb. 11 Mardi Gras theme potluck dinner, March 16 the annual horse race, April 15 Tax Day potluck dinner, May 18 Spring Fling, June 10 Birthday dinner, and July 4 we will revive the Quail Meadow parade and cook out. Other events are also planned and they will be listed later. One big party you want to plan for is New Years Eve we will have a party with a live band! Now, lets turn our thoughts to something very important. We have many residents who need someone from time to time to give them comfort, care, and show concern for their problems. Perhaps there is a time when you need someone to go to the store for you, or maybe just come by for a visit if you or someone you know needs someone; we have a group willing to help. If you know of anyone in need, please contact Marion Gartman. Also, if you would like to assist in this on-going project, please let Marion know. Hope to see many of you at the dinner Monday night! January off and running with taking down of tree Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb Maydaline Bristol, Teresa Bachand, Mary Zdarsky, and Marlene Cigrant. Kenneson Bristol and Benny Bachand packing up the tree. Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com

PAGE 3

State Sen. Alan Hays, who represents Southeastern Marion, obviously had seen the several people on the agenda and their topic, and immediately let them know the facts. Hays said he was astounded at the last delegation meeting when he heard the vocal complaints. We took it on, he said of the people in Tallahassee, but we have yet to solve the problem, which he called gargantuan. It cannot be retroactive, you cant roll the calendar back and say you cant do that, Hays told the audience. We ran into brick walls, and some of them were reinforced. Hays added, Were still striving to solve the problem. It was about three hours later before the list of homeowners who had signed up to speak got to the podium. By then, State Sen. Charlie Dean, who at the start of the meeting had been elected chairman, was cracking down on the four-minute limit. First up was Don Kronen, who said he had appeared before the delegation 16 months ago. Im very disappointed to be here again. Kronen said that lives have been devastated, finances decimated of many residents of developments. The Hardwood Trails resident blamed state attorney Brad King for not enforcing the law. He said the residents were locked into a dictatorship. Janis Lentz of Cherrywood said many bills had been proposed, but action hadnt been taken on any of them. She, too, was concerned about the lack of enforcement of a state statute. I ask you to do your sworn duty, she told the seven legislators, and asked for relief for the homeowners. Attorney Dr. Will Harker of Hardwood Trails offered legal help. Jan Bergemann of Cyber Citizens for Justice said that this was the second generation of frustrated homeowners. He added, We can just hope that something is being done. Hugh Haggerty called the situation homeowner trafficking and said the people were in bondage. law that is now the subject of a conflict between the city and the Marion County School Board. At issue is whether the schools have to pay stormwater fees to the city. Newly elected Supervisor of Elections Wesley Wilcox drew praise from State Rep. Dennis Baxley for the way the county election, under Dee Brown, was conducted, as opposed to long counts in other parts of the state. By 10 or 11 (p.m.) everybody knew (the election results in the county), Baxley said. There were young people who appeared, too, including representatives from Pace Center for Girls and some students who were part of a battle against the use of tobacco. One man spoke of the need for tougher penalties for those who collide with motorcycle, bicycles and pedestrians, and also called for tough textingwhile-driving legislation. One woman spoke against the way her child was treated, saying he was denied water in a hot classroom. She criticized the school system for the way it handled the affair. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 3 10 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Harvesting easy money in Washington requires hiring well-paid lobbyists who know how to create rainbows which lead to a pot of gold. How does this kind of chicanery happen right under our collective noses? Quite simple: While 90 percent of citizens disapprove of the way Congress operates, ninety-one percent of Congress people get re-elected. Nothing will change until we make more changes. FLYNNcontinued from Page 8 This weeks answers to puzzles from Page 9 We feel that the real people should get to go first. Most of the agency reports came from people who are paid to be there they can sit and wait for a while. But other folks, especially those who arent retired, might be taking time off from work to appear. More consideration should be shown to them. Finally, there were no breaks. From time to time most people, including the legislators, had to get up and leave for a minute. A 10-minute nature break in the middle of the afternoon might have been the prudent thing to do. Then everyone could comfortably listen to all the presentations. EDITORIALcontinued from Page 8 maining federal benefit check recipients must receive their money electronically. The Treasury Departments Go Direct public education campaign is working with more than 1,800 partner organizations throughout the country to spread the message about the electronic payment rule and educate federal benefit recipients about their options. The campaign has developed and shared a variety of public service announcements, educational videos, check inserts and other materials to explain how electronic payments work and how to make the switch from paper checks. The videos and materials are available on the Go Direct campaign website at www.GoDirect.org. The Treasury Department has taken great strides to support and guide check recipients through the change to electronic payments, and were increasing our efforts significantly in the final two months before the deadline, Lebryk said. We have a team of friendly, helpful agents standing by at our call center, and many financial institutions, caregivers, senior services providers and advocates for people who are homeless or have disabilities have the necessary information and resources to help federal benefit recipients make the switch. Check recipients can sign up for direct deposit or the Direct Express card by calling toll-free 1-800-333-1795, visiting www.GoDirect.org, or talking to their local federal paying agency office. The process is fast, easy and free. By taking a few minutes to gather the necessary information ahead of time, most federal benefit recipients can sign up for electronic payments with one phone call. Individuals will need their Social Security number or claim number, their 12-digital federal benefit check number and the amount of their most recent federal benefit check. If choosing direct deposit, recipients also will need their financial institutions routing transit number, (often found on a personal check) account number and account type (checking or saving). There are no sign-up fees or monthly fees to receive benefits electronically. 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Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2012 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $ 19 95 Call for details Expires 2/28/13 CERAMIC TILE Lawson Tile Floors Walls Tub & Shower Remodel Back Splash Reasonable Rates 34 years Experience (352) 229-5548 Licensed & Insured 000CLG8 Ocalas Only 4-Star Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations Accommodations for Your Pet for Your Pet Tour our unique Tour our unique facility and you facility and you be the judge! be the judge! 352-861-4566 352-861-4566 B o a r d i n g G r o o m i n g Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com www.palmettokennels.com 000DLAJ Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting L o o k f o r u s L o o k f o r u s Look for us o n F a c e b o o k o n F a c e b o o k on Facebook 000DOVV LANDSCAPING JAMISON LANDSCAPE & TREE SERVICE Specializing in all phases of tree work, landscape rip outs, design and installs, all around lawn maintenance. FREE ESTIMATES Jeff Jamison 352-321-0404 licensed & insured commercial & residential 10% Discount To Seniors & Military Florida Window Medics, Inc. Screen Rooms Acrylic & Glass Rooms Rescreens Broken Glass Replacement Windows Gutters Foggy Windows Cement Sliding Glass Door Repair Call & speak directly to the owner David Heath Comp. #5524 352 484-5697 WINDOW REPAIRS 000DQEA 000DPNB PLUMBING EPA Lead Certification #NAT-113266-1 OSHA 10 #1216933 Fla. Lic. #CFC1427666 804-9165 Associated Plumbing and Pipe From Bathroom Remodeling to Fixing Leaky Faucets, and installing Bliss Walk-in Tubs Residential and Commercial 711185 DIALAPRO F o r Y o u r P r o f e s s i o n a l N e e d s For Your Professional Needs W E S T M A R I O N M e s s e n g e r WEST MARION Messenger 0 0 0 D N 3 T J a s m i n e P l a z a 3 5 2 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6 1 6 0 S W S R 2 0 0 U n i t 1 0 4 O c a l a F l o r i d a 3 4 4 7 6 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 S T O R E H O U R S : T U E S F R I 1 0 5 S A T 1 0 2 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 Readers Choice Winner Jewelry Store 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 www.jandjjewelersocala.com 000DR3W All repairs done on premises. B ATTERIES $ 8 00 + ta x Affordable New Affordable New & Estate Jewelry & Estate Jewelry 000DQEH 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm Stop and visit us before you buy! We Guarantee Lowest Prices in Ocala! Service Loaner Available. Please Just Ask 10% Discount to Veterans labor & parts excluding batteries WE SELL TROJAN BATTERIES 6-V T605 only $ 539 8-V T875 only $ 639 FREE pickup within 5 miles 12-V T1275 only $ 639 Best Selection In The Area! 6-V 6 PACK$ 479 8-V 6 PACK$ 529 2010 Remanufactured New Factory Body All lights & turn signals New 8 volt batteries New DOT tires Fold down wind shield Rear view mirrors Automatic charger only $ 4,995 000DP0J GOLFWEEK TOUR Recruiting Competitive Golfers New Membership is Now Open for 2013 Golf Season First Tournament Jan. 26 North Central Florida Golfweek Amateur Tour Join Today! 352-446-3446 www.amateurgolftour.net Where Amateurs Are Treated Like Pros 000DQM9 000DR7N Retired nurses to meetThe Citrus Marion Chapter of the Florida Registered Nurses Retired (RNR) will meet at the Inverness Golf and Country club on Monday, Jan. 28. Sign-in for the meeting starts at 11 a.m. The speaker will be Dr. Attangi from the Citrus Memorial Heart and Vascular Center who will speak on Vascular Disease. Our charity will be Guardian Ad Litem. Retired nurses wishing to attend should call Mary Jane at 352726-6882 or Gladys at 352-854-2677 by Wednesday Jan. 23.Breast cancer support groupThe Breast Cancer SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 S.W. 105th St., Rm 235 (Multipurpose Room) at 1 p.m. The meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 29 will be off-site at Stone Creek Grille, 9676 SW 62nd Loop, with lunch at noon and a trip to All About You Boutique at Six Gun Plaza.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 9 4 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Guess what, Lamb? Youre about to experience a new perspective on a situation you long regarded quite differently. What you learn could open more opportunities later. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) The Bold Bovine is tempted to charge into a new venture. But it might be best to take things one step at a time, so that you know just where you are at any given point. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Its a good time to go on that fun getaway youve been planning. Youll return refreshed, ready and, yes, even eager to tackle the new challenge that awaits you. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) The Moon Child loves to fantasize about magical happenings in the early part of the week. But the sensible Crab gets down to serious business by weeks end. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) What goes around comes around for those lucky Leos and Leonas whose acts of generosity could be repaid with opportunities to expand into new and exciting areas of interest. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Your concern about your job responsibilities is commendable. But you need to take some quiet time to share with someone who has really missed being with you. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Aspects favor getting out and meeting new people. And as a bonus, you might find that some of your newly made friends could offer important business contacts. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You might take pride in wanting to do everything yourself. But nows a good time to ask family members to help with a demanding personal situation. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Pay more attention to the possibilities in that workplace change. It could show the way to make that long-sought turn on your career path. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Your need to succeed might overwhelm obligations to your loved ones. Ease up on that workload and into some well-deserved time with family and friends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Love rules for amorous Aquarians who can make good use of their ability to communicate feelings. Dont be surprised if theyre reciprocated in kind. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Fishing for compliments? No doubt, you probably earned them. But its best to let others believe they uncovered the treasure you really are. BORN THIS WEEK: Your good works flow from an open, generous heart. Nothing makes you happier than to see others happy as well. 000CKU2 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS 9330 SW 105th St., Ocala, FL 34481 854-9550 www.ocalawestumc.com 100th Ave. SW 105th St SW 110th St 484 Marion Oaks Library SW 103rd St P ine Run OTOW 80th Ave. 60th Ave. 49th Ave. Oak Run 200 484 A Place for You... Rev. Alan Jefferson No matter what your age is, no matter where You come from, no matter who you are, There is a place for you at Ocala West UMC Children & Youth Ministries Traditional Worship 8:00 & 11:00 A.M. Casual & Contemporary 9:30 A.M. 000DPCW 000D795 Charlie Green Pastor 351-1106 1700 NW 60th Ave. Ocala www.newlifeocala.com Sunday 10:30am Wednesday 7:00pm Christ the King The Rev. Donald J. Curran, Rector Rev. Matthew Walter Asst. Rector Services: Rite I 7:30 am Rite II 8:50 & 11:15 am Childrens Church 8:50 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary Anglican Church 000DBZY 000D9ZT Where JESUS is LORD, and YOU are Loved. Services: Sunday School : 9:30am Morning Worship: 10:30am Thursday: 6:00pm Meeting at: 145 S.W. 78th Court Ocala, Florida 352-690-7596 B I B L I C A L F O U N D A T I O N C H U R C H Located a mile west of SR 200 at 10260 SW 110th Street (turn west across from the entrance to Oak Run) Expository Bible Teaching Traditional Services Sunday Worship at 10:00 AM Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 PM 000dr33 Community Church TIMBER RIDGE Wil Clawson Pastor Teacher 000D64L St. Martins Church 950 N.W. 70th Street (SR 326) Ocala, Florida 34475 352-351-8059 www.cac-ocala.org Service & Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Visitors Are Always Welcom e The Only Church of the True 1928 Book of Common Prayer (Episcopal) is discovered through worshiping together 711187 000DNMR Friday, Jan. 18 Ocala High 12 Club to m eet The Greater Ocala High 12 Club 665 will hold its monthly meeting on Friday, Jan. 18 at 11 a.m. at the Elks Club, 702 N.E. 25th Ave., Ocala. The speaker will be Capt. Jim Burton of the Marion County Sheriffs Office. It is always exciting to hear what is going on with Marion Countys finest. As we have become accustomed to, we will once again enjoy one of the Elks Clubs fine buffet lunches. Friends are always welcome. The cost is only $12 a person. All Master Masons and guests are invited to attend. Reservations are required. Call Bob Brady at 352-8549612 for reservations or further information.Saturday, Jan. 19 Circle S q uare Health Wellne ss E x po The 11th annual Health and Wellness Expo will be held on Saturday, Jan. 19, at the Circle Square Cultural Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Come and see what Ocala has to offer in the field of health care and learn the latest in medical advances. This is a free event and open to the public. The Expo is sponsored by On Top of the World Communities and Munroe Regional Medical Center (MRMC) and will feature various services offered by the hospital, including information on heart health, diabetes, stroke, nutrition and more. Representatives from area health-care related agencies will also be on hand to provide information and answer questions regarding your health. Additionally, The Ranch Fitness Center and Spa and On Top of the World certified fitness instructors will offer a variety of exercise demonstrations throughout the day. Participate in the ZUMBA Fitness Jam on The Town Square at Circle Square Commons from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.; a donation of $5 per person will go toward the March of Dimes, or with a $25 donation you will receive a tie-dyed ZUMBA t-shirt. The Circle Square Cultural Center is at 8395 S.W. 80th St.. For more information, visit the website at www.CSCulturalCenter.com or call 352-854-3670.Magician at Fir s t Congregational Brian LaPalme, the award-winning, world renowned magician, is bringing his magic show to First Congregational United Church of Christ, for a fundraiser, on Saturday, Jan. 19 at 2 p.m. Ticket prices are $3 for children 12 and under; adults $5. To purchase tickets, please call 352-5986272. If available, tickets may be purchased at the door 7171 S.W. State Road 200.Lion s to ho s t yar d s ale The Ocala 200 Lions Club is having a yard sale Saturday, Jan 19, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The sale will be in the parking lot of the Bank of the Ozarks, Friendship Plaza on State Road 200. All proceeds from the sale will go to community projects. For information contact Bob, 352-861-2730.Ocala Lion s Club Help s Fa m ilie s o f Veteran s On Saturday, Jan. 19, the Ocala Lions Club will collect donations and personal care items to be given to the Fisher House Foundation in Tampa, Florida for families of veterans or military personnel who are being treated at a nearby military or VA medical facility. The event will be at the Big Lots store, 8600 S.W. State Road 200 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. For further information about Fisher House, call 813-910-3000 or contact Bill Thomas at 352-291-2600 about the event. Scan d inavian Club The Scandinavian Club of Marion County invites people of Danish, Finish, Icelandic, Norwegian and Swedish decent to join us at our next meeting on Jan. 19 at 11:30 a.m. at the Ocala Hilton, 3600 S.W. 36th Ave. in Ocala. The menu will be choice of salmon or herbed chicken breast with roasted potatoes, salad, coffee and dessert. Entertainment provided by Glenn Lewis on the keyboard. The cost is $16 per person. Reservations and payment must be made in advance. Payment and meal choice must be received by Wednesday, Jan. 17, checks to be made out to Don Clauson and mailed to Don Clauson, 5901 S.W. 86th Place. Ocala, FL 34476. For further details call Jim Neate 352-687-1580, Don Clauson 352-861-1235 or Terry Rasmussen 352-3478362. Sunday, Jan 20 Dancing encourage d at Ja zz f unction The Ocala Jazz Society will host an afternoon of music at the VFW hall on Sunday, Jan. 20 from 2 to 5 p.m. Open to everyone, organizers say the, event offers incomparable musicians featuring great tunes for everyone and dancing is encouraged. A $3 donation is requested and benefits Hospice in memory of Bea Wilson, the founder of the Ocala Jazz Society. For more info call Diana, 352-237-0234.Monday, Jan. 21 Inauguration d ance in Ocala Culminating week-long events honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Marion County residents are invited to join in the national celebration of the 57th inauguration of the president and vice president of the United States of America at a semi-formal dinner/dance to take place at the Ocala Hilton Hotel on Monday, Jan. 21. The cocktail hour begins at 6 p.m. with dinner to be served at 7. Events in our nations Capital will be simulcast and a cash bar will be available. Tickets are $50 per person with a maximum of 300 to be sold. They may be purchased by telephoning the Marion County DEC at 352-402-9494, Joyce Blake at 352-690-1740 or Sally Smith at 941-704-3494. Cash or checks should be made out to the Marion County DEC. You may also get them through Act Blue at www.MarionDems.org. Thursday, Jan. 24 Magnet s chool e x po planne d What is a magnet school? Whats a magnet program? Can your child attend one in Marion County? What are the qualifications? Why do they even exist? If youve ever wondered about or considered such a program or school for your child, come learn whats so attractive about these highly-competitive programs at a special Magnet Expo set for Thursday, Jan. 24, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Marion Technical Institute (MTI), 1614 S.E. Fort King St. in Ocala. No advance registration is required, and anyone from the public is invited to attend. For more information, call Expo Coordinator Julie Shealy at 352-671-7720. Happenings

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West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Delegation hearing needs some work T he effort of the Marion County Legislative Delegation to hear from the residents of the area about needs in state government is, on its face, a good idea. People get to present all sorts of items to the seven legislators. However, the process of holding this hearing is seriously flawed and needs work. There are two major problems, as we see it. One is the location, the other is the agenda. The location has recently been the Klein Center at the College of Central Florida. The facility itself is adequate, although there were some problems with the speaker system at last weeks hearing. Getting there is another issue. The hearing is scheduled in the middle of a school day, when parking is at a premium. One of two things happens: Either the people attending have to park a great distance away and walk to the meeting hall, or the people attending get lucky and find a good place to park, thereby displacing some students who are looking for a space to leave their vehicles when they go to class. There are two possible solutions. One is to hold the event when classes are not in full session, say, on a Saturday. Yes, we know, working on Saturday is probably not what our legislators want to do, but it should be for the convenience of the people. The other solution would be to find another site, such as the Cultural Center at On Top of the World. That would have just as much, if not more, room for everyone to park and attend. As to the agenda, we feel its backward. The meeting starts with representatives of local governments and agencies that already receive some state funds telling the legislators how good theyve been in the past and please keep the money coming. Many of them go over the allotted time, in last weeks case four minutes. Last week, it was nearly three hours before the first regular people who were there privately to appear. Their four minutes was strictly enforced, to a point where one said, when told to stop, No, I timed it, its only three minutes, and she kept on going. O ur M essage PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGAN REGIONALMANAGER: JOHN PROVOST EDITOR: JIM CLARK Messenger WEST MARION Editorial Guest column Rainbow over the fiscal cliffBY JIM FLYNN Congress demonstrated finesse by hiding a pot of gold for friends and supporters in the 2012 fiscal cliff rescue bill. The objective of the bailout was more spending money for our purportedly tax-starved federal government. The fiscal cliff legislation increases income taxes on the wealthy and continues lower taxes for middle-income taxpayers. The comforting misnomer of the legislation is The American taxpayer relief act, Lobbyists would characterize the notax and low-tax exemptions hidden in the bill as insignificant a few billion dollars, more or less. Congress can rationalize hiding such goodies as shielding sensitive taxpayers from unnecessary concern over business as usual. Having secured sought-after additional revenue, the White House made no complaint about allowing multinational companies to continue not paying taxes on income of their overseas subsidiaries. The bill includes extension of a taxexemption for financing banks and builders of offices and apartments in the Manhattan 9/11 recovery zone. The exemption was intended to aid small businesses. Congress and the White House decided banks and brokers are just as needy as coffee shops and newspaper stands. Off-shore lending by banks and businesses also received an extension of tax exceptions, so they can continue not paying taxes on interest income from lending. Film and television producers are also considered needy. Their expense exemptions were extended, because reduction of their tax obligation is a mere $150 million loss of government revenue. Railroads were found deserving of tax credits for track maintenance. The cost is only $100 million. Isnt track maintenance a routine cost of railroading? To be fair to other forms of transportation, a seven-year recovery period for the costs of building motorsports facilities was also extended. Is NASCAR transportation? Out of concern for mine workers, government will continue tax incentives for safety equipment and safety training. Arent those also ordinary costs of doing business? Other deserving recipients of rainbow support were rum distillers of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, electric scooter and electric vehicle manufacturers, and energy efficient appliance makers. Rounding out the hodgepodge of government kindness are credits for wind energy expenses, development credits for American Samoa, support for coal mining on tribal lands, and extension of milk subsidy programs. Its all there in black and white. From time to time hustlers publish magazines offering secrets for getting easy money from the federal government -legally and without work. Ourhyper sensitive fraud antenna dismisses such hustles. People who discover oil in their back yard arent likely to encourage neighbors to dig holes. Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 5 8 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger I t was a very emotional evening last Thursday on the Ocala Downtown Square. More than 300 people gathered to remember a little boy who was taken from this life by an act of violence. Six-month-old Jonah Mendoza was killed on Jan. 4 when his mother, Melanie Reyes, shot him in their home in the Fountains development in northwest Ocala. Reyes then shot herself. Initial reports said she was expected to survive, but she was put on life support and then died the following Tuesday morning. The boys father, Jordan Mendoza, did not live in the same house. Friends and relatives put together the service on the square, which started with people just visiting and talking in the area, continued with various folks making short statements, and ended with six minutes of silence, one for each month of his life, as people held candles. The phrase most often heard was directed at Jordan: I cant even begin to understand what youre going through. During one point when a poem was being read, Jordan left the stage in front, walked to the back of the gazebo and just stared out toward the Boulevard. He came back shortly after and, when the ceremony was about to end, gave a little talk, thanking everyone, saying he was thankful that so many people care. He said the incident cut me deep. He added that he loved my son so much, and said Jonah remained somewhere in his heart. Some of the other phrases that people used during their short talks included May the angels protect him in heaven, and were happy we live in a commuEmotions run high remembering Jonah Among Friends Jim Clark nity where the people can come together. The event included a pair of tables filled with two collages of photos of Jonah, and also had another table where people could write messages of condolence. At the urging of parents, even some tiny children took pen in hand to leave a note. There were also jars for donations to help with the funeral, which was to be Saturday at Wyomina Park Baptist Church, with burial in Good Shepherd Cemetery. Reyes name was only mentioned once, by one speaker who said she was also remembered in prayers. Although the giant Christmas tree was not lit and was being taken down, all the other holiday lights were still on, illuminating the square during the ceremony. Included in those decorations were the thin lights that give the appearance of falling from the trees. One speaker called those lights tears from heaven. But artificial tears werent needed. There were plenty of real ones to go around. Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger. Please see FLYNN Page 10 Please see EDITORIAL Page 10 000DOOX 000DR7U Best of the Best four years in a row HOURS: Mon. Fri. 10am 5pm Hearing Aid Centers A NAME YOU CAN TRUST WITH OVER 1500 LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE FREE HEARING AIDS FOR ALL FEDERAL WORKERS & RETIREES *No Co-Pay or Exam Fee Inside Walmart Hwy. 200 & Corner 484, Ocala 352-291-1467 000DNMN Inside Crystal River Mall Across from K-Mart 352-795-1484 Inside Sears Paddock Mall 352-237-1665 F e d e r a l G o v e r n m e n t I n s u r a n c e C o d e # 1 0 4 # 1 0 5 # 1 1 1 o r # 1 1 2 C H E C K Y O U R Q U A L I F I C A T I O N S C A L L 3 5 2 2 9 1 1 4 6 7 BC/BS LIMIT 1 COUPON PER VISIT. LIMIT 2 PACKS PER VISIT. One More Week! BATTERIES PREMIUM ZINC BATTERIES 99 FREE HEARING TEST FREE REPAIRS (IN OFFICE ONLY) HEARING AID Fits 30 DB Loss Full Shell #ME200 $ 695 .00 Read the classifieds S ome people make New Year Resolutions but most never get past the first month. Most resolutions have to do with weight loss but Judy Helfin, fitness director for Stone Creek, had a better idea a weight-loss challenge. She met with Chris Johnson, Stone Creeks community manager, and Rick Morang, Stone Creeks maintenance man or the go to man when things need to be fixed, and made them a challenge. Each man wanted to lose weight so they took on the challenge lose 30 pounds by June 3, 2013. That is 30 pounds for each man. To make the challenge more fun and to encourage Chris and Rick, Judy decided to make this a charity event. The money raised will go to Brothers Keeper Soup Kitchen where many Stone Creek residents volunteer. Rick and Chris took the challenge because they wanted to lose weight. They both believe that they can achieve their goal of loosing 30 pounds by June 3. Rick said, Absolutely, with the resident support we are receiving we cant fail. When asked what would be the hardest part of the challenge, Chris commented, Getting started is always the hardest for me... and I officially got started this weekend. I know that both men personally like sweets and have tasted many that have been cooked in the SC kitchen. So now, all they can do is limit those sweets or just enjoy the delicious smells. Since this challenge is for charity both were asked if they have a prediction on how much can be raised for the Soup Kitchen. Rick said, My hope is for at least $1,000 but my prayer is for $3,000. Chris had no prediction but added, Its all up to the community to make pledges, and our hope is that they are as generous as they are in all their support of similar causes. So, if you have not yet made your pledge, consider making one. The winner will be announced on June 5. At that time, there will be another article with the before and after pictures and the amount going to Brothers Keeper Soup Kitchen. Judy has started a walking group and both Chris and Rick will be a part of the group. The new program began on Tuesday, Jan. 15 at 7:30 a.m. and will also be offered on Fridays at 7:30 a.m. Judy also has small group training for weight loss. Remember to check the portal for the other interesting events that Judy has planned. Spa Day will be back on Jan. 30. Chris Johnson Rick Morang The challenge is on Stone Creek Patricia Gizzi The SECO Board of Trustees has voted to continue SECOs scholarship program for 2013. In fact, the board has authorized an increase in the scholarship amount taking it from $2,500 up to $3,000 per student in recognition of the ever increasing cost of higher education. Up to 12 high school seniors from the cooperatives service territory will receive assistance to go on to a college or technical school following their graduation. SECOs scholarship program has proven very popular with SECO members and, over the years, has helped many deserving students attain higher learning when that might have been difficult otherwise. SECO Director of Corporate Communications Barry Bowman said, The selection of those students who will receive scholarships will be based on each individuals past and present activities in school and the community, financial need and scholastic record. All applicants will be evaluated by an independent panel of educators from around the SECO service territory. He noted that to qualify, graduates must reside in a home being served by SECO and be enrolled in an accredited college, university or vocational/technical school by the end of 2013. Applications are available at area high school guidance offices and at any of SECOs customer service centers in Marion, Lake, Citrus, and Sumter counties. They must be returned no later than March 29. The SECO scholarship program reaffirms the Co-ops commitment to the future of our young people, and while the program has no impact on the cost of electricity, it is a significant benefit for those awardees struggling to fund their higher education, concluded Bowman. SECO votes to continue scholarship program Please read our classified ads

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 7 6 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger FAMILY FEATURES O nce the feast is over, many home cooks are left with a plethora of leftovers and a challenge: how to make the most of what remains. While its hard to live up to that original holiday meal, theres a lot more that you can do with leftover ham rather than just reheating. This year, give leftovers new life with a weeks worth of versatile meals that can be enjoyed through out the day. Start with a fully-cooked, naturally hickory smoked Smithfield Spiral Sliced Ham with a pecan praline glaze, and follow these simple steps to turn it into a potato-crusted ham quiche for brunch, a Monte Cristo sand wich for lunch, and a savory soup for dinner. Youll leave friends and family asking for leftovers more often. For more leftover recipes youll love, visit www.smithfield.com and www.facebook.com/ CookingwithSmithfield. Potato-Crusted Ham Quiche Serves: 8 Cook Time: 45 minutes 2 cups of potatoes, raw and shredded 1/4 cup onion, minced 1/2 cup red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tablespoon chives, finely chopped 3 eggs, divided Salt and pepper to taste 3/4 cup sharp cheddar cheese, grated 3/4 cup smoked Gouda cheese, grated 1 cup Smithfield Spiral Ham, fully cooked and chopped 1 cup evaporated milk 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/2 teaspoon salt (optional) 1/4 teaspoon pepper Preheat the oven to 375F. Spray quiche pan with non-stick cooking spray. In medium bowl mix potatoes, onion, pepper, chives, 1 beaten egg and salt and pepper to taste. Press potato mixture evenly into crust shape up the side and on the bottom of the pan and spray again. Bake for 15 minutes or until lightly browned on edges. In a mixing bowl, combine cheeses. Remove crust from oven and layer the following: ham first, and then cheese mixture on top. In a bowl, beat together evaporated milk, remaining eggs, paprika, salt and pepper. Pour mix ture on top of cheese and return to oven. Bake about 25 to 30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into middle of pie comes out clean. Allow to cool at least five minutes. Serving Suggestions: Serve alongside sliced fresh fruit or a small fresh garden salad. Serves: 4 Cook Time: 10 minutes 3 eggs 1/3 cup milk 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 1 teaspoon sugar Pinch nutmeg 1/2 cup whole cranberry sauce 8 slices bread (potato bread, challah, egg bread or any other sweet soft bread) 8 slices Smithfield Spiral Ham 2 cups cheddar cheese, shredded 1 cup baby arugula leaves 4 tablespoons butter Confectioners sugar for garnish In shallow casserole dish, whisk eggs together with milk, vanilla, sugar and nutmeg. Spread equal amounts of cran berry sauce on one side of four slices of bread. Top cranberry sauce with two slices of ham, 1/2 cup cheese and 1/4 cup arugula. Top each stacked bread slice with the remaining four slices of bread. Gently press together. In large skillet, melt butter over medium/low heat. Dip each sand wich into milk mixture. Turn and dip the other side. Place in the hot pan and cook until each sandwich is golden brown and the cheese has melted. Remove from pan and drain on paper towels. Dust with confectioners sugar and serve warm. Good Luck Soup Serves: 8 Cook Time: 80 minutes 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 2 cloves garlic 1 tablespoon ham base 5 dashes hot sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 pound black eyed peas, rinsed and soaked over night 64 ounces vegetable stock (or chicken stock) 1 cup water 2 cups Smithfield Spiral Ham roughly chopped 1/2 pound collards, cut into thin ribbons Pepper to taste In large stock pot add olive oil. Stir in onions, garlic, ham base, hot sauce, thyme and oregano. Saut until onions are translucent. Add drained black eyed peas, vegetable stock, water and chopped ham. Simmer until peas are tender, approximately 40 to 50 minutes. Add collards and simmer an additional 20 to 30 minutes. Pepper to taste. Serve hot. Ham and Cranberry Monte Cristo HolidaySpiralSlicedHamwithPecanPralineGlazeServes: 14 Cook Time: 10 to 12 minutes per pound 1 SmithfieldSpiralSlicedHamwithPecanPralineGlaze Preheat oven to 325F. Remove packaging; reserve liquid. Place ham cut-side down on large sheet of foil in roasting pan, pour reserved liquid over ham and wrap completely with foil. Warm ham in oven for 10 to 12 minutes per pound. Do not overheat. After removing ham from oven, let ham sit for 5 minutes before glazing. Heat glaze packet for 15 seconds in microwave. Glaze is hot, so be careful when opening packet. Holding packet with a towel or oven mitt, cut corner off packet and pour glaze into a bowl. Stir well and spoon over ham. Let glazed ham sit for 5 minutes before serving to allow glaze to melt over ham. 000DOP0 The Friends Of The Dunnellon Public Library Presents Shari Blissett-Clark Shari Blissett-Clark sits on the board of Bat Belfrys, Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to conserving Floridas bats through public education and habitat restoration. She serves on the boards of the Florida Native Plant Society and Brevard Botanical Garden. Shari, a child of a globetrotting military family moved to Florida in 1984. She became interested in bats when while sailing, she whipped the cover off the mainsail of her boat and was startled by bats bursting out of the sail causing Shari to leap into Matanzas Bay! After the paramedics left, Shari did some soul searching and decided to find out more about bats. She joined the Bat Conservation Internationals bat house researcher program to quickly learn that her fear of bats was based on myth and misconception...not facts. Shari discovered her passion for these fascinating little mammals and has been a bat advocate ever since. This program discusses bat facts, species diversity, environmental and economic benefits of bats and the overstated disease risks. It is a 1 hour program including Q&A Free To The Public Program Saturday January 19th -10:30am Library Meeting Room 20351 Robinson Road, Dunnellon, Florida 34431 (352) 438-2520 000DLTI VILLAGES COMPUTER & REPAIR (352) 237-4852 email: villagescomputer@yahoo.com Next to the neighborhood Storage on SR200 across from the Jasmine Plaza Computer Repair Custom Building Computer Classes Free Diagnostics Data Recovery Networking In Store Service or at Your Location FREE Service Calls to your house or business with this ad 7256 SW 62nd Ave., Suite 5, Ocala, FL 34476 00075X7 Clip and Save Clip and Save Clip and Save Clip and Save Grandfather Clock 352-873-7587 GRANDFATHER CLOCK REPAIR Service and repairs 43 years full time experience Specializing in floor clocks. In Florida Jan., Feb., Mar., April (In Pennsylvania the other months) 0 0 0 D P 6 G 000DM1L John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000DMNB I t was just before New Years and the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were relaxing after a busy week of toil and labor. Not paying much attention to my surroundings, I had immersed myself in a favorite book. As far as I am concerned, nothing compares to a favorite book when you are trying to relax and unwind. I turned the page and happened to notice on the other side of the room my wife was all a twitchy. I have seen this behavior before and I knew she was anxious to say something. I pretended not to notice. Finally, it was as if she exploded. I cant wait for the New Year. Arent you excited? I answered in the affirmative to try to keep the conversation as minimal as possible. No, I mean arent you really excited about the New Year? I knew if I was going to get back to my book I would have to let her say, what was on her mind. According to her, the approaching New Year was going to be spectacular. Everything old, she explained to me, would be new again. We have been in this New Year for a couple of weeks now and, I will not contradict my wife, at least aloud, but this New Year looks suspiciously like the Old Year. I am not quite sure what she thought would be different this year, but to me it is just the old year run through again. And, that is good with me. I am not one of these persons who needs the latest flash in the pan. I quite prefer the tried and true. It was about two weeks after the New Year and my wife said, Ill be back in an hour or two, Im going shopping. It did not dawn on me at the time but about 10 minutes later, it did. The reason my wife was so excited about the New Year was that she was going to go out and buy some new clothes. After all, according to her calculations, the New Year deserves new clothing. I smiled as I thought about her going to the store trying on dresses, seeking one that would fit her both in size and in fancy. As for me, I am quite comfortable in my old clothes. They fit me just fine, thank you. Women have to look fine all the time. Men, on the other hand are not that particular about what they wear. I can wear the same shirt for days on end and feel just as comfortable as the first day I put it on. My clothing does not make me feel any younger. I go along with the saying that says you are only as old as you feel. Of course, I do have some of those Methuselah moments. Everything old was once new and if new last very long it ends up being old. Therefore, whatever is old was once new and whatever is new will one day be old. This is where most people make their mistake. They fail to see the relationship between old and new. For example, as much as our culture pretends to be youth oriented, it does everything to get old while looking young. I often have this conversation with my wife. I am not old, I am just getting older and my plans are to get older and older and older. The great object in life is to get as old as you possibly can while looking and feeling new. Nothing to me is sillier than a 40 year old trying to act 20. The mind may say 20, but the body really knows it is 40. If people would put the money they spend to look young in a 401(k) their golden years would truly be golden. How much money is spent each year on plastic surgery? What I want to know is, who in the world do they think they are fooling? Their mirror? Everything old becomes new again as the new year starts Right after the New Years celebration, I got up one morning feeling terrific. There was a bounce in my step, a giggle on my tongue; I was feeling like I was 20 something. I had not felt this good since I cannot remember how long. Then it happened. No matter how good you might feel some day, there is always something or someone who can undermine that and put you in your proper place. My mistake was going into the bathroom. There in the bathroom for all the world to see, especially me is this ghastly object called a mirror. When I looked into the mirror, I was shocked to see I was not alone. I thought I had come into the bathroom by myself but there in the mirror was this old guy I hardly recognized. My first reaction was to ask him to leave the bathroom and then I noticed something. That person in the mirror was me! All of those exhilarating feelings dissipated as reality grabbed hold of my soul and soundly shook me. In my Bible reading that morning, I read what the apostle Paul said. And be renewed in the spirit of your minds; and that she put on the new man, which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness (Ephesians 4:23-24 KJV). Only God, in His wisdom, can create in me something that is truly new.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com. Out to Pastor Dr. James Snyder Southwest Christian The churchs seniors ministry, the Golden Servants will meet on Friday, Jan 25 at 6 p.m. The public is invited to the carry-in dinner and a showing of a video by humorist Jeanne Robertson. Southwest Christian Church is at 9045 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. For more information call 352-236-6023. Christs Church of Marion CountyWednesday, Jan. 16: Bible Study, 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 17: Prayer and Praise Group, 9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 19: Mens Prayer Group, 8 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 20: Sunday School, 9:30 am. Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 22: Womens Crafts and Fellowship, 9 a.m. Christs Church of Marion County is at 6768 S.W. 80th St., off State Road 200, Ocala. Phone is 352-861-6182, website is www.ccomc.org.Free English classesCollege Road Baptist Church, 5010 S.W. College Road, continues teaching ESL (English as Second Language) each Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. Classes are free, as is child care, and youth programs. Assistance with applying for citizenship is also offered. Enroll any Wednesday evening. Call 352-854-6981, or 352-237-5641 for more information. Community CongregationalCommunity Congregational church will be having an Imposition of Ashes service to begin Lent. The service will be at noon on Feb. 13. A new Bible study titled a Serendipity Study is being presented at our church. Come and enjoy our service and refreshments and then the bible study will be presented by Pastor David Wild. The study comes from the Gospel of Mark. Our church service begins at 10 a.m., followed by refreshments in our fellowship hall and then bible study at 11:30. Our sermon series for January continues to be Vintage Christianity and is based on the Book of James. This sermon series is very interesting and informative. Pastor Dave brings the gospel to life for us. We are very fortunate to have such a leader and would gladly share him with you. Just join us on any Sunday. We are The Little church with a Big heart and would love to see you. We wish you all a happy, healthy and prosperous 2013.For more information or directions, contact Theresa Grenier at 352-307-0584. Religion Air Force group to meetThe Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association will hold its first meeting of the new year on Thursday, Jan. 17 at 7 p.m. at the Ocala Regional Airport Administration Building, 750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Members who wish to donate items for the Workforce Connection Homeless Veterans Stand Down are asked to bring them to this meeting. Everyone is welcome. Please read the classifieds

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 7 6 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger FAMILY FEATURES O nce the feast is over, many home cooks are left with a plethora of leftovers and a challenge: how to make the most of what remains. While its hard to live up to that original holiday meal, theres a lot more that you can do with leftover ham rather than just reheating. This year, give leftovers new life with a weeks worth of versatile meals that can be enjoyed through out the day. Start with a fully-cooked, naturally hickory smoked Smithfield Spiral Sliced Ham with a pecan praline glaze, and follow these simple steps to turn it into a potato-crusted ham quiche for brunch, a Monte Cristo sand wich for lunch, and a savory soup for dinner. Youll leave friends and family asking for leftovers more often. For more leftover recipes youll love, visit www.smithfield.com and www.facebook.com/ CookingwithSmithfield. Potato-Crusted Ham Quiche Serves: 8 Cook Time: 45 minutes 2 cups of potatoes, raw and shredded 1/4 cup onion, minced 1/2 cup red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tablespoon chives, finely chopped 3 eggs, divided Salt and pepper to taste 3/4 cup sharp cheddar cheese, grated 3/4 cup smoked Gouda cheese, grated 1 cup Smithfield Spiral Ham, fully cooked and chopped 1 cup evaporated milk 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/2 teaspoon salt (optional) 1/4 teaspoon pepper Preheat the oven to 375F. Spray quiche pan with non-stick cooking spray. In medium bowl mix potatoes, onion, pepper, chives, 1 beaten egg and salt and pepper to taste. Press potato mixture evenly into crust shape up the side and on the bottom of the pan and spray again. Bake for 15 minutes or until lightly browned on edges. In a mixing bowl, combine cheeses. Remove crust from oven and layer the following: ham first, and then cheese mixture on top. In a bowl, beat together evaporated milk, remaining eggs, paprika, salt and pepper. Pour mix ture on top of cheese and return to oven. Bake about 25 to 30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into middle of pie comes out clean. Allow to cool at least five minutes. Serving Suggestions: Serve alongside sliced fresh fruit or a small fresh garden salad. Serves: 4 Cook Time: 10 minutes 3 eggs 1/3 cup milk 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 1 teaspoon sugar Pinch nutmeg 1/2 cup whole cranberry sauce 8 slices bread (potato bread, challah, egg bread or any other sweet soft bread) 8 slices Smithfield Spiral Ham 2 cups cheddar cheese, shredded 1 cup baby arugula leaves 4 tablespoons butter Confectioners sugar for garnish In shallow casserole dish, whisk eggs together with milk, vanilla, sugar and nutmeg. Spread equal amounts of cran berry sauce on one side of four slices of bread. Top cranberry sauce with two slices of ham, 1/2 cup cheese and 1/4 cup arugula. Top each stacked bread slice with the remaining four slices of bread. Gently press together. In large skillet, melt butter over medium/low heat. Dip each sand wich into milk mixture. Turn and dip the other side. Place in the hot pan and cook until each sandwich is golden brown and the cheese has melted. Remove from pan and drain on paper towels. Dust with confectioners sugar and serve warm. Good Luck Soup Serves: 8 Cook Time: 80 minutes 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 2 cloves garlic 1 tablespoon ham base 5 dashes hot sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 pound black eyed peas, rinsed and soaked over night 64 ounces vegetable stock (or chicken stock) 1 cup water 2 cups Smithfield Spiral Ham roughly chopped 1/2 pound collards, cut into thin ribbons Pepper to taste In large stock pot add olive oil. Stir in onions, garlic, ham base, hot sauce, thyme and oregano. Saut until onions are translucent. Add drained black eyed peas, vegetable stock, water and chopped ham. Simmer until peas are tender, approximately 40 to 50 minutes. Add collards and simmer an additional 20 to 30 minutes. Pepper to taste. Serve hot. Ham and Cranberry Monte Cristo HolidaySpiralSlicedHamwithPecanPralineGlazeServes: 14 Cook Time: 10 to 12 minutes per pound 1 SmithfieldSpiralSlicedHamwithPecanPralineGlaze Preheat oven to 325F. Remove packaging; reserve liquid. Place ham cut-side down on large sheet of foil in roasting pan, pour reserved liquid over ham and wrap completely with foil. Warm ham in oven for 10 to 12 minutes per pound. Do not overheat. After removing ham from oven, let ham sit for 5 minutes before glazing. Heat glaze packet for 15 seconds in microwave. Glaze is hot, so be careful when opening packet. Holding packet with a towel or oven mitt, cut corner off packet and pour glaze into a bowl. Stir well and spoon over ham. Let glazed ham sit for 5 minutes before serving to allow glaze to melt over ham. 000DOP0 The Friends Of The Dunnellon Public Library Presents Shari Blissett-Clark Shari Blissett-Clark sits on the board of Bat Belfrys, Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to conserving Floridas bats through public education and habitat restoration. She serves on the boards of the Florida Native Plant Society and Brevard Botanical Garden. Shari, a child of a globetrotting military family moved to Florida in 1984. She became interested in bats when while sailing, she whipped the cover off the mainsail of her boat and was startled by bats bursting out of the sail causing Shari to leap into Matanzas Bay! After the paramedics left, Shari did some soul searching and decided to find out more about bats. She joined the Bat Conservation Internationals bat house researcher program to quickly learn that her fear of bats was based on myth and misconception...not facts. Shari discovered her passion for these fascinating little mammals and has been a bat advocate ever since. This program discusses bat facts, species diversity, environmental and economic benefits of bats and the overstated disease risks. It is a 1 hour program including Q&A Free To The Public Program Saturday January 19th -10:30am Library Meeting Room 20351 Robinson Road, Dunnellon, Florida 34431 (352) 438-2520 000DLTI VILLAGES COMPUTER & REPAIR (352) 237-4852 email: villagescomputer@yahoo.com Next to the neighborhood Storage on SR200 across from the Jasmine Plaza Computer Repair Custom Building Computer Classes Free Diagnostics Data Recovery Networking In Store Service or at Your Location FREE Service Calls to your house or business with this ad 7256 SW 62nd Ave., Suite 5, Ocala, FL 34476 00075X7 Clip and Save Clip and Save Clip and Save Clip and Save Grandfather Clock 352-873-7587 GRANDFATHER CLOCK REPAIR Service and repairs 43 years full time experience Specializing in floor clocks. In Florida Jan., Feb., Mar., April (In Pennsylvania the other months) 0 0 0 D P 6 G 000DM1L John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000DMNB I t was just before New Years and the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were relaxing after a busy week of toil and labor. Not paying much attention to my surroundings, I had immersed myself in a favorite book. As far as I am concerned, nothing compares to a favorite book when you are trying to relax and unwind. I turned the page and happened to notice on the other side of the room my wife was all a twitchy. I have seen this behavior before and I knew she was anxious to say something. I pretended not to notice. Finally, it was as if she exploded. I cant wait for the New Year. Arent you excited? I answered in the affirmative to try to keep the conversation as minimal as possible. No, I mean arent you really excited about the New Year? I knew if I was going to get back to my book I would have to let her say, what was on her mind. According to her, the approaching New Year was going to be spectacular. Everything old, she explained to me, would be new again. We have been in this New Year for a couple of weeks now and, I will not contradict my wife, at least aloud, but this New Year looks suspiciously like the Old Year. I am not quite sure what she thought would be different this year, but to me it is just the old year run through again. And, that is good with me. I am not one of these persons who needs the latest flash in the pan. I quite prefer the tried and true. It was about two weeks after the New Year and my wife said, Ill be back in an hour or two, Im going shopping. It did not dawn on me at the time but about 10 minutes later, it did. The reason my wife was so excited about the New Year was that she was going to go out and buy some new clothes. After all, according to her calculations, the New Year deserves new clothing. I smiled as I thought about her going to the store trying on dresses, seeking one that would fit her both in size and in fancy. As for me, I am quite comfortable in my old clothes. They fit me just fine, thank you. Women have to look fine all the time. Men, on the other hand are not that particular about what they wear. I can wear the same shirt for days on end and feel just as comfortable as the first day I put it on. My clothing does not make me feel any younger. I go along with the saying that says you are only as old as you feel. Of course, I do have some of those Methuselah moments. Everything old was once new and if new last very long it ends up being old. Therefore, whatever is old was once new and whatever is new will one day be old. This is where most people make their mistake. They fail to see the relationship between old and new. For example, as much as our culture pretends to be youth oriented, it does everything to get old while looking young. I often have this conversation with my wife. I am not old, I am just getting older and my plans are to get older and older and older. The great object in life is to get as old as you possibly can while looking and feeling new. Nothing to me is sillier than a 40 year old trying to act 20. The mind may say 20, but the body really knows it is 40. If people would put the money they spend to look young in a 401(k) their golden years would truly be golden. How much money is spent each year on plastic surgery? What I want to know is, who in the world do they think they are fooling? Their mirror? Everything old becomes new again as the new year starts Right after the New Years celebration, I got up one morning feeling terrific. There was a bounce in my step, a giggle on my tongue; I was feeling like I was 20 something. I had not felt this good since I cannot remember how long. Then it happened. No matter how good you might feel some day, there is always something or someone who can undermine that and put you in your proper place. My mistake was going into the bathroom. There in the bathroom for all the world to see, especially me is this ghastly object called a mirror. When I looked into the mirror, I was shocked to see I was not alone. I thought I had come into the bathroom by myself but there in the mirror was this old guy I hardly recognized. My first reaction was to ask him to leave the bathroom and then I noticed something. That person in the mirror was me! All of those exhilarating feelings dissipated as reality grabbed hold of my soul and soundly shook me. In my Bible reading that morning, I read what the apostle Paul said. And be renewed in the spirit of your minds; and that she put on the new man, which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness (Ephesians 4:23-24 KJV). Only God, in His wisdom, can create in me something that is truly new.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com. Out to Pastor Dr. James Snyder Southwest Christian The churchs seniors ministry, the Golden Servants will meet on Friday, Jan 25 at 6 p.m. The public is invited to the carry-in dinner and a showing of a video by humorist Jeanne Robertson. Southwest Christian Church is at 9045 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. For more information call 352-236-6023. Christs Church of Marion CountyWednesday, Jan. 16: Bible Study, 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 17: Prayer and Praise Group, 9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 19: Mens Prayer Group, 8 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 20: Sunday School, 9:30 am. Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 22: Womens Crafts and Fellowship, 9 a.m. Christs Church of Marion County is at 6768 S.W. 80th St., off State Road 200, Ocala. Phone is 352-861-6182, website is www.ccomc.org.Free English classesCollege Road Baptist Church, 5010 S.W. College Road, continues teaching ESL (English as Second Language) each Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. Classes are free, as is child care, and youth programs. Assistance with applying for citizenship is also offered. Enroll any Wednesday evening. Call 352-854-6981, or 352-237-5641 for more information. Community CongregationalCommunity Congregational church will be having an Imposition of Ashes service to begin Lent. The service will be at noon on Feb. 13. A new Bible study titled a Serendipity Study is being presented at our church. Come and enjoy our service and refreshments and then the bible study will be presented by Pastor David Wild. The study comes from the Gospel of Mark. Our church service begins at 10 a.m., followed by refreshments in our fellowship hall and then bible study at 11:30. Our sermon series for January continues to be Vintage Christianity and is based on the Book of James. This sermon series is very interesting and informative. Pastor Dave brings the gospel to life for us. We are very fortunate to have such a leader and would gladly share him with you. Just join us on any Sunday. We are The Little church with a Big heart and would love to see you. We wish you all a happy, healthy and prosperous 2013.For more information or directions, contact Theresa Grenier at 352-307-0584. Religion Air Force group to meetThe Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association will hold its first meeting of the new year on Thursday, Jan. 17 at 7 p.m. at the Ocala Regional Airport Administration Building, 750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Members who wish to donate items for the Workforce Connection Homeless Veterans Stand Down are asked to bring them to this meeting. Everyone is welcome. Please read the classifieds

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West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Delegation hearing needs some work T he effort of the Marion County Legislative Delegation to hear from the residents of the area about needs in state government is, on its face, a good idea. People get to present all sorts of items to the seven legislators. However, the process of holding this hearing is seriously flawed and needs work. There are two major problems, as we see it. One is the location, the other is the agenda. The location has recently been the Klein Center at the College of Central Florida. The facility itself is adequate, although there were some problems with the speaker system at last weeks hearing. Getting there is another issue. The hearing is scheduled in the middle of a school day, when parking is at a premium. One of two things happens: Either the people attending have to park a great distance away and walk to the meeting hall, or the people attending get lucky and find a good place to park, thereby displacing some students who are looking for a space to leave their vehicles when they go to class. There are two possible solutions. One is to hold the event when classes are not in full session, say, on a Saturday. Yes, we know, working on Saturday is probably not what our legislators want to do, but it should be for the convenience of the people. The other solution would be to find another site, such as the Cultural Center at On Top of the World. That would have just as much, if not more, room for everyone to park and attend. As to the agenda, we feel its backward. The meeting starts with representatives of local governments and agencies that already receive some state funds telling the legislators how good theyve been in the past and please keep the money coming. Many of them go over the allotted time, in last weeks case four minutes. Last week, it was nearly three hours before the first regular people who were there privately to appear. Their four minutes was strictly enforced, to a point where one said, when told to stop, No, I timed it, its only three minutes, and she kept on going. O ur M essage PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGAN REGIONALMANAGER: JOHN PROVOST EDITOR: JIM CLARK Messenger WEST MARION Editorial Guest column Rainbow over the fiscal cliffBY JIM FLYNN Congress demonstrated finesse by hiding a pot of gold for friends and supporters in the 2012 fiscal cliff rescue bill. The objective of the bailout was more spending money for our purportedly tax-starved federal government. The fiscal cliff legislation increases income taxes on the wealthy and continues lower taxes for middle-income taxpayers. The comforting misnomer of the legislation is The American taxpayer relief act, Lobbyists would characterize the notax and low-tax exemptions hidden in the bill as insignificant a few billion dollars, more or less. Congress can rationalize hiding such goodies as shielding sensitive taxpayers from unnecessary concern over business as usual. Having secured sought-after additional revenue, the White House made no complaint about allowing multinational companies to continue not paying taxes on income of their overseas subsidiaries. The bill includes extension of a taxexemption for financing banks and builders of offices and apartments in the Manhattan 9/11 recovery zone. The exemption was intended to aid small businesses. Congress and the White House decided banks and brokers are just as needy as coffee shops and newspaper stands. Off-shore lending by banks and businesses also received an extension of tax exceptions, so they can continue not paying taxes on interest income from lending. Film and television producers are also considered needy. Their expense exemptions were extended, because reduction of their tax obligation is a mere $150 million loss of government revenue. Railroads were found deserving of tax credits for track maintenance. The cost is only $100 million. Isnt track maintenance a routine cost of railroading? To be fair to other forms of transportation, a seven-year recovery period for the costs of building motorsports facilities was also extended. Is NASCAR transportation? Out of concern for mine workers, government will continue tax incentives for safety equipment and safety training. Arent those also ordinary costs of doing business? Other deserving recipients of rainbow support were rum distillers of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, electric scooter and electric vehicle manufacturers, and energy efficient appliance makers. Rounding out the hodgepodge of government kindness are credits for wind energy expenses, development credits for American Samoa, support for coal mining on tribal lands, and extension of milk subsidy programs. Its all there in black and white. From time to time hustlers publish magazines offering secrets for getting easy money from the federal government -legally and without work. Ourhyper sensitive fraud antenna dismisses such hustles. People who discover oil in their back yard arent likely to encourage neighbors to dig holes. Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 352-854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per month. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 5 8 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger I t was a very emotional evening last Thursday on the Ocala Downtown Square. More than 300 people gathered to remember a little boy who was taken from this life by an act of violence. Six-month-old Jonah Mendoza was killed on Jan. 4 when his mother, Melanie Reyes, shot him in their home in the Fountains development in northwest Ocala. Reyes then shot herself. Initial reports said she was expected to survive, but she was put on life support and then died the following Tuesday morning. The boys father, Jordan Mendoza, did not live in the same house. Friends and relatives put together the service on the square, which started with people just visiting and talking in the area, continued with various folks making short statements, and ended with six minutes of silence, one for each month of his life, as people held candles. The phrase most often heard was directed at Jordan: I cant even begin to understand what youre going through. During one point when a poem was being read, Jordan left the stage in front, walked to the back of the gazebo and just stared out toward the Boulevard. He came back shortly after and, when the ceremony was about to end, gave a little talk, thanking everyone, saying he was thankful that so many people care. He said the incident cut me deep. He added that he loved my son so much, and said Jonah remained somewhere in his heart. Some of the other phrases that people used during their short talks included May the angels protect him in heaven, and were happy we live in a commuEmotions run high remembering Jonah Among Friends Jim Clark nity where the people can come together. The event included a pair of tables filled with two collages of photos of Jonah, and also had another table where people could write messages of condolence. At the urging of parents, even some tiny children took pen in hand to leave a note. There were also jars for donations to help with the funeral, which was to be Saturday at Wyomina Park Baptist Church, with burial in Good Shepherd Cemetery. Reyes name was only mentioned once, by one speaker who said she was also remembered in prayers. Although the giant Christmas tree was not lit and was being taken down, all the other holiday lights were still on, illuminating the square during the ceremony. Included in those decorations were the thin lights that give the appearance of falling from the trees. One speaker called those lights tears from heaven. But artificial tears werent needed. There were plenty of real ones to go around. Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger. Please see FLYNN Page 10 Please see EDITORIAL Page 10 000DOOX 000DR7U Best of the Best four years in a row HOURS: Mon. Fri. 10am 5pm Hearing Aid Centers A NAME YOU CAN TRUST WITH OVER 1500 LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE FREE HEARING AIDS FOR ALL FEDERAL WORKERS & RETIREES *No Co-Pay or Exam Fee Inside Walmart Hwy. 200 & Corner 484, Ocala 352-291-1467 000DNMN Inside Crystal River Mall Across from K-Mart 352-795-1484 Inside Sears Paddock Mall 352-237-1665 F e d e r a l G o v e r n m e n t I n s u r a n c e C o d e # 1 0 4 # 1 0 5 # 1 1 1 o r # 1 1 2 C H E C K Y O U R Q U A L I F I C A T I O N S C A L L 3 5 2 2 9 1 1 4 6 7 BC/BS LIMIT 1 COUPON PER VISIT. LIMIT 2 PACKS PER VISIT. One More Week! BATTERIES PREMIUM ZINC BATTERIES 99 FREE HEARING TEST FREE REPAIRS (IN OFFICE ONLY) HEARING AID Fits 30 DB Loss Full Shell #ME200 $ 695 .00 Read the classifieds S ome people make New Year Resolutions but most never get past the first month. Most resolutions have to do with weight loss but Judy Helfin, fitness director for Stone Creek, had a better idea a weight-loss challenge. She met with Chris Johnson, Stone Creeks community manager, and Rick Morang, Stone Creeks maintenance man or the go to man when things need to be fixed, and made them a challenge. Each man wanted to lose weight so they took on the challenge lose 30 pounds by June 3, 2013. That is 30 pounds for each man. To make the challenge more fun and to encourage Chris and Rick, Judy decided to make this a charity event. The money raised will go to Brothers Keeper Soup Kitchen where many Stone Creek residents volunteer. Rick and Chris took the challenge because they wanted to lose weight. They both believe that they can achieve their goal of loosing 30 pounds by June 3. Rick said, Absolutely, with the resident support we are receiving we cant fail. When asked what would be the hardest part of the challenge, Chris commented, Getting started is always the hardest for me... and I officially got started this weekend. I know that both men personally like sweets and have tasted many that have been cooked in the SC kitchen. So now, all they can do is limit those sweets or just enjoy the delicious smells. Since this challenge is for charity both were asked if they have a prediction on how much can be raised for the Soup Kitchen. Rick said, My hope is for at least $1,000 but my prayer is for $3,000. Chris had no prediction but added, Its all up to the community to make pledges, and our hope is that they are as generous as they are in all their support of similar causes. So, if you have not yet made your pledge, consider making one. The winner will be announced on June 5. At that time, there will be another article with the before and after pictures and the amount going to Brothers Keeper Soup Kitchen. Judy has started a walking group and both Chris and Rick will be a part of the group. The new program began on Tuesday, Jan. 15 at 7:30 a.m. and will also be offered on Fridays at 7:30 a.m. Judy also has small group training for weight loss. Remember to check the portal for the other interesting events that Judy has planned. Spa Day will be back on Jan. 30. Chris Johnson Rick Morang The challenge is on Stone Creek Patricia Gizzi The SECO Board of Trustees has voted to continue SECOs scholarship program for 2013. In fact, the board has authorized an increase in the scholarship amount taking it from $2,500 up to $3,000 per student in recognition of the ever increasing cost of higher education. Up to 12 high school seniors from the cooperatives service territory will receive assistance to go on to a college or technical school following their graduation. SECOs scholarship program has proven very popular with SECO members and, over the years, has helped many deserving students attain higher learning when that might have been difficult otherwise. SECO Director of Corporate Communications Barry Bowman said, The selection of those students who will receive scholarships will be based on each individuals past and present activities in school and the community, financial need and scholastic record. All applicants will be evaluated by an independent panel of educators from around the SECO service territory. He noted that to qualify, graduates must reside in a home being served by SECO and be enrolled in an accredited college, university or vocational/technical school by the end of 2013. Applications are available at area high school guidance offices and at any of SECOs customer service centers in Marion, Lake, Citrus, and Sumter counties. They must be returned no later than March 29. The SECO scholarship program reaffirms the Co-ops commitment to the future of our young people, and while the program has no impact on the cost of electricity, it is a significant benefit for those awardees struggling to fund their higher education, concluded Bowman. SECO votes to continue scholarship program Please read our classified ads

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 9 4 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Guess what, Lamb? Youre about to experience a new perspective on a situation you long regarded quite differently. What you learn could open more opportunities later. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) The Bold Bovine is tempted to charge into a new venture. But it might be best to take things one step at a time, so that you know just where you are at any given point. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Its a good time to go on that fun getaway youve been planning. Youll return refreshed, ready and, yes, even eager to tackle the new challenge that awaits you. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) The Moon Child loves to fantasize about magical happenings in the early part of the week. But the sensible Crab gets down to serious business by weeks end. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) What goes around comes around for those lucky Leos and Leonas whose acts of generosity could be repaid with opportunities to expand into new and exciting areas of interest. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Your concern about your job responsibilities is commendable. But you need to take some quiet time to share with someone who has really missed being with you. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Aspects favor getting out and meeting new people. And as a bonus, you might find that some of your newly made friends could offer important business contacts. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You might take pride in wanting to do everything yourself. But nows a good time to ask family members to help with a demanding personal situation. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Pay more attention to the possibilities in that workplace change. It could show the way to make that long-sought turn on your career path. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Your need to succeed might overwhelm obligations to your loved ones. Ease up on that workload and into some well-deserved time with family and friends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Love rules for amorous Aquarians who can make good use of their ability to communicate feelings. Dont be surprised if theyre reciprocated in kind. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Fishing for compliments? No doubt, you probably earned them. But its best to let others believe they uncovered the treasure you really are. BORN THIS WEEK: Your good works flow from an open, generous heart. Nothing makes you happier than to see others happy as well. 000CKU2 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS 9330 SW 105th St., Ocala, FL 34481 854-9550 www.ocalawestumc.com 100th Ave. SW 105th St SW 110th St 484 Marion Oaks Library SW 103rd St P ine Run OTOW 80th Ave. 60th Ave. 49th Ave. Oak Run 200 484 A Place for You... Rev. Alan Jefferson No matter what your age is, no matter where You come from, no matter who you are, There is a place for you at Ocala West UMC Children & Youth Ministries Traditional Worship 8:00 & 11:00 A.M. Casual & Contemporary 9:30 A.M. 000DPCW 000D795 Charlie Green Pastor 351-1106 1700 NW 60th Ave. Ocala www.newlifeocala.com Sunday 10:30am Wednesday 7:00pm Christ the King The Rev. Donald J. Curran, Rector Rev. Matthew Walter Asst. Rector Services: Rite I 7:30 am Rite II 8:50 & 11:15 am Childrens Church 8:50 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary Anglican Church 000DBZY 000D9ZT Where JESUS is LORD, and YOU are Loved. Services: Sunday School : 9:30am Morning Worship: 10:30am Thursday: 6:00pm Meeting at: 145 S.W. 78th Court Ocala, Florida 352-690-7596 B I B L I C A L F O U N D A T I O N C H U R C H Located a mile west of SR 200 at 10260 SW 110th Street (turn west across from the entrance to Oak Run) Expository Bible Teaching Traditional Services Sunday Worship at 10:00 AM Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 PM 000dr33 Community Church TIMBER RIDGE Wil Clawson Pastor Teacher 000D64L St. Martins Church 950 N.W. 70th Street (SR 326) Ocala, Florida 34475 352-351-8059 www.cac-ocala.org Service & Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Visitors Are Always Welcom e The Only Church of the True 1928 Book of Common Prayer (Episcopal) is discovered through worshiping together 711187 000DNMR Friday, Jan. 18 Ocala High 12 Club to m eet The Greater Ocala High 12 Club 665 will hold its monthly meeting on Friday, Jan. 18 at 11 a.m. at the Elks Club, 702 N.E. 25th Ave., Ocala. The speaker will be Capt. Jim Burton of the Marion County Sheriffs Office. It is always exciting to hear what is going on with Marion Countys finest. As we have become accustomed to, we will once again enjoy one of the Elks Clubs fine buffet lunches. Friends are always welcome. The cost is only $12 a person. All Master Masons and guests are invited to attend. Reservations are required. Call Bob Brady at 352-8549612 for reservations or further information.Saturday, Jan. 19 Circle S q uare Health Wellne ss E x po The 11th annual Health and Wellness Expo will be held on Saturday, Jan. 19, at the Circle Square Cultural Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Come and see what Ocala has to offer in the field of health care and learn the latest in medical advances. This is a free event and open to the public. The Expo is sponsored by On Top of the World Communities and Munroe Regional Medical Center (MRMC) and will feature various services offered by the hospital, including information on heart health, diabetes, stroke, nutrition and more. Representatives from area health-care related agencies will also be on hand to provide information and answer questions regarding your health. Additionally, The Ranch Fitness Center and Spa and On Top of the World certified fitness instructors will offer a variety of exercise demonstrations throughout the day. Participate in the ZUMBA Fitness Jam on The Town Square at Circle Square Commons from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.; a donation of $5 per person will go toward the March of Dimes, or with a $25 donation you will receive a tie-dyed ZUMBA t-shirt. The Circle Square Cultural Center is at 8395 S.W. 80th St.. For more information, visit the website at www.CSCulturalCenter.com or call 352-854-3670.Magician at Fir s t Congregational Brian LaPalme, the award-winning, world renowned magician, is bringing his magic show to First Congregational United Church of Christ, for a fundraiser, on Saturday, Jan. 19 at 2 p.m. Ticket prices are $3 for children 12 and under; adults $5. To purchase tickets, please call 352-5986272. If available, tickets may be purchased at the door 7171 S.W. State Road 200.Lion s to ho s t yar d s ale The Ocala 200 Lions Club is having a yard sale Saturday, Jan 19, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The sale will be in the parking lot of the Bank of the Ozarks, Friendship Plaza on State Road 200. All proceeds from the sale will go to community projects. For information contact Bob, 352-861-2730.Ocala Lion s Club Help s Fa m ilie s o f Veteran s On Saturday, Jan. 19, the Ocala Lions Club will collect donations and personal care items to be given to the Fisher House Foundation in Tampa, Florida for families of veterans or military personnel who are being treated at a nearby military or VA medical facility. The event will be at the Big Lots store, 8600 S.W. State Road 200 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. For further information about Fisher House, call 813-910-3000 or contact Bill Thomas at 352-291-2600 about the event. Scan d inavian Club The Scandinavian Club of Marion County invites people of Danish, Finish, Icelandic, Norwegian and Swedish decent to join us at our next meeting on Jan. 19 at 11:30 a.m. at the Ocala Hilton, 3600 S.W. 36th Ave. in Ocala. The menu will be choice of salmon or herbed chicken breast with roasted potatoes, salad, coffee and dessert. Entertainment provided by Glenn Lewis on the keyboard. The cost is $16 per person. Reservations and payment must be made in advance. Payment and meal choice must be received by Wednesday, Jan. 17, checks to be made out to Don Clauson and mailed to Don Clauson, 5901 S.W. 86th Place. Ocala, FL 34476. For further details call Jim Neate 352-687-1580, Don Clauson 352-861-1235 or Terry Rasmussen 352-3478362. Sunday, Jan 20 Dancing encourage d at Ja zz f unction The Ocala Jazz Society will host an afternoon of music at the VFW hall on Sunday, Jan. 20 from 2 to 5 p.m. Open to everyone, organizers say the, event offers incomparable musicians featuring great tunes for everyone and dancing is encouraged. A $3 donation is requested and benefits Hospice in memory of Bea Wilson, the founder of the Ocala Jazz Society. For more info call Diana, 352-237-0234.Monday, Jan. 21 Inauguration d ance in Ocala Culminating week-long events honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Marion County residents are invited to join in the national celebration of the 57th inauguration of the president and vice president of the United States of America at a semi-formal dinner/dance to take place at the Ocala Hilton Hotel on Monday, Jan. 21. The cocktail hour begins at 6 p.m. with dinner to be served at 7. Events in our nations Capital will be simulcast and a cash bar will be available. Tickets are $50 per person with a maximum of 300 to be sold. They may be purchased by telephoning the Marion County DEC at 352-402-9494, Joyce Blake at 352-690-1740 or Sally Smith at 941-704-3494. Cash or checks should be made out to the Marion County DEC. You may also get them through Act Blue at www.MarionDems.org. Thursday, Jan. 24 Magnet s chool e x po planne d What is a magnet school? Whats a magnet program? Can your child attend one in Marion County? What are the qualifications? Why do they even exist? If youve ever wondered about or considered such a program or school for your child, come learn whats so attractive about these highly-competitive programs at a special Magnet Expo set for Thursday, Jan. 24, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Marion Technical Institute (MTI), 1614 S.E. Fort King St. in Ocala. No advance registration is required, and anyone from the public is invited to attend. For more information, call Expo Coordinator Julie Shealy at 352-671-7720. Happenings

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State Sen. Alan Hays, who represents Southeastern Marion, obviously had seen the several people on the agenda and their topic, and immediately let them know the facts. Hays said he was astounded at the last delegation meeting when he heard the vocal complaints. We took it on, he said of the people in Tallahassee, but we have yet to solve the problem, which he called gargantuan. It cannot be retroactive, you cant roll the calendar back and say you cant do that, Hays told the audience. We ran into brick walls, and some of them were reinforced. Hays added, Were still striving to solve the problem. It was about three hours later before the list of homeowners who had signed up to speak got to the podium. By then, State Sen. Charlie Dean, who at the start of the meeting had been elected chairman, was cracking down on the four-minute limit. First up was Don Kronen, who said he had appeared before the delegation 16 months ago. Im very disappointed to be here again. Kronen said that lives have been devastated, finances decimated of many residents of developments. The Hardwood Trails resident blamed state attorney Brad King for not enforcing the law. He said the residents were locked into a dictatorship. Janis Lentz of Cherrywood said many bills had been proposed, but action hadnt been taken on any of them. She, too, was concerned about the lack of enforcement of a state statute. I ask you to do your sworn duty, she told the seven legislators, and asked for relief for the homeowners. Attorney Dr. Will Harker of Hardwood Trails offered legal help. Jan Bergemann of Cyber Citizens for Justice said that this was the second generation of frustrated homeowners. He added, We can just hope that something is being done. Hugh Haggerty called the situation homeowner trafficking and said the people were in bondage. law that is now the subject of a conflict between the city and the Marion County School Board. At issue is whether the schools have to pay stormwater fees to the city. Newly elected Supervisor of Elections Wesley Wilcox drew praise from State Rep. Dennis Baxley for the way the county election, under Dee Brown, was conducted, as opposed to long counts in other parts of the state. By 10 or 11 (p.m.) everybody knew (the election results in the county), Baxley said. There were young people who appeared, too, including representatives from Pace Center for Girls and some students who were part of a battle against the use of tobacco. One man spoke of the need for tougher penalties for those who collide with motorcycle, bicycles and pedestrians, and also called for tough textingwhile-driving legislation. One woman spoke against the way her child was treated, saying he was denied water in a hot classroom. She criticized the school system for the way it handled the affair. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 3 10 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Harvesting easy money in Washington requires hiring well-paid lobbyists who know how to create rainbows which lead to a pot of gold. How does this kind of chicanery happen right under our collective noses? Quite simple: While 90 percent of citizens disapprove of the way Congress operates, ninety-one percent of Congress people get re-elected. Nothing will change until we make more changes. FLYNNcontinued from Page 8 This weeks answers to puzzles from Page 9 We feel that the real people should get to go first. Most of the agency reports came from people who are paid to be there they can sit and wait for a while. But other folks, especially those who arent retired, might be taking time off from work to appear. More consideration should be shown to them. Finally, there were no breaks. From time to time most people, including the legislators, had to get up and leave for a minute. A 10-minute nature break in the middle of the afternoon might have been the prudent thing to do. Then everyone could comfortably listen to all the presentations. EDITORIALcontinued from Page 8 maining federal benefit check recipients must receive their money electronically. The Treasury Departments Go Direct public education campaign is working with more than 1,800 partner organizations throughout the country to spread the message about the electronic payment rule and educate federal benefit recipients about their options. The campaign has developed and shared a variety of public service announcements, educational videos, check inserts and other materials to explain how electronic payments work and how to make the switch from paper checks. The videos and materials are available on the Go Direct campaign website at www.GoDirect.org. The Treasury Department has taken great strides to support and guide check recipients through the change to electronic payments, and were increasing our efforts significantly in the final two months before the deadline, Lebryk said. We have a team of friendly, helpful agents standing by at our call center, and many financial institutions, caregivers, senior services providers and advocates for people who are homeless or have disabilities have the necessary information and resources to help federal benefit recipients make the switch. Check recipients can sign up for direct deposit or the Direct Express card by calling toll-free 1-800-333-1795, visiting www.GoDirect.org, or talking to their local federal paying agency office. The process is fast, easy and free. By taking a few minutes to gather the necessary information ahead of time, most federal benefit recipients can sign up for electronic payments with one phone call. Individuals will need their Social Security number or claim number, their 12-digital federal benefit check number and the amount of their most recent federal benefit check. If choosing direct deposit, recipients also will need their financial institutions routing transit number, (often found on a personal check) account number and account type (checking or saving). There are no sign-up fees or monthly fees to receive benefits electronically. ELECTRONICcontinued from Page 1 ALBRIGHTcontinued from Page 1 Read the classifieds RELIEF continued from Page 1 Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! $ 7 9 5 $ 7 9 5 $ 795 CRC058138 Starting at OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. RAY R A Y RAY C C C C C C ONSTRUCTION O N S T R U C T I O N ONSTRUCTION C r a y c o n s t c o m C r a y c o n s t c o m Crayconst.com Trade in your old vinyl windows for acrylic or glass 1 6 x 7 S L I D I N G 1 6 x 7 S L I D I N G 16 x 7 SLIDING G A R A G E G A R A G E GARAGE S C R E E N S C R E E N SCREEN D O O R D O O R DOOR 000DN3D 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000DJHY CONCRETE WORK REPAIRING OLD INSTALLING NEW We Make Your Concrete Look Good Specializing in Repairing Concrete Driveways Pool Decks Patios Entrance Ways Advantages: Mildew & Oil Resistant Non Skid Protection Easy to Keep Clean Commercial Grade Quality RENEWED SURFACES 732-GOLF (4653) Open to the Public Rate with this coupon and Tee Time Reservation Our Low Current 18 Hole Rate With This Coupon $ 32 00 Before 11:00 $ 27 00 After 11:00 Just 1 mile west of I-75 on US 27 (Exit 354) Expires 2/20/13 Rates subject to change. 18 Hole Championship Course Dress Code: Collared Shirt Required NO Jeans GOLF OUTINGS WELCOME! 000DL3G SPRINKLERS ACCURATE SPRINKLERS (352) 445-1403 Licensed #10719 & Insured C HECK -U P Complete check-up of entire sprinkler system! $ 30 0 0 0 D N 2 Q 000DN2Q 000CLCO IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Early Spring Specials Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2012 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Reset Controller Adjust Sprays & Rotors to Correct Spray Pattern Complete System Inspection $ 19 95 Call for details Expires 2/28/13 CERAMIC TILE Lawson Tile Floors Walls Tub & Shower Remodel Back Splash Reasonable Rates 34 years Experience (352) 229-5548 Licensed & Insured 000CLG8 Ocalas Only 4-Star Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations Accommodations for Your Pet for Your Pet Tour our unique Tour our unique facility and you facility and you be the judge! be the judge! 352-861-4566 352-861-4566 B o a r d i n g G r o o m i n g Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com www.palmettokennels.com 000DLAJ Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting L o o k f o r u s L o o k f o r u s Look for us o n F a c e b o o k o n F a c e b o o k on Facebook 000DOVV LANDSCAPING JAMISON LANDSCAPE & TREE SERVICE Specializing in all phases of tree work, landscape rip outs, design and installs, all around lawn maintenance. FREE ESTIMATES Jeff Jamison 352-321-0404 licensed & insured commercial & residential 10% Discount To Seniors & Military Florida Window Medics, Inc. Screen Rooms Acrylic & Glass Rooms Rescreens Broken Glass Replacement Windows Gutters Foggy Windows Cement Sliding Glass Door Repair Call & speak directly to the owner David Heath Comp. #5524 352 484-5697 WINDOW REPAIRS 000DQEA 000DPNB PLUMBING EPA Lead Certification #NAT-113266-1 OSHA 10 #1216933 Fla. Lic. #CFC1427666 804-9165 Associated Plumbing and Pipe From Bathroom Remodeling to Fixing Leaky Faucets, and installing Bliss Walk-in Tubs Residential and Commercial 711185 DIALAPRO F o r Y o u r P r o f e s s i o n a l N e e d s For Your Professional Needs W E S T M A R I O N M e s s e n g e r WEST MARION Messenger 0 0 0 D N 3 T J a s m i n e P l a z a 3 5 2 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6 1 6 0 S W S R 2 0 0 U n i t 1 0 4 O c a l a F l o r i d a 3 4 4 7 6 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 S T O R E H O U R S : T U E S F R I 1 0 5 S A T 1 0 2 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 Readers Choice Winner Jewelry Store 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 www.jandjjewelersocala.com 000DR3W All repairs done on premises. B ATTERIES $ 8 00 + ta x Affordable New Affordable New & Estate Jewelry & Estate Jewelry 000DQEH 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm Stop and visit us before you buy! We Guarantee Lowest Prices in Ocala! Service Loaner Available. Please Just Ask 10% Discount to Veterans labor & parts excluding batteries WE SELL TROJAN BATTERIES 6-V T605 only $ 539 8-V T875 only $ 639 FREE pickup within 5 miles 12-V T1275 only $ 639 Best Selection In The Area! 6-V 6 PACK$ 479 8-V 6 PACK$ 529 2010 Remanufactured New Factory Body All lights & turn signals New 8 volt batteries New DOT tires Fold down wind shield Rear view mirrors Automatic charger only $ 4,995 000DP0J GOLFWEEK TOUR Recruiting Competitive Golfers New Membership is Now Open for 2013 Golf Season First Tournament Jan. 26 North Central Florida Golfweek Amateur Tour Join Today! 352-446-3446 www.amateurgolftour.net Where Amateurs Are Treated Like Pros 000DQM9 000DR7N Retired nurses to meetThe Citrus Marion Chapter of the Florida Registered Nurses Retired (RNR) will meet at the Inverness Golf and Country club on Monday, Jan. 28. Sign-in for the meeting starts at 11 a.m. The speaker will be Dr. Attangi from the Citrus Memorial Heart and Vascular Center who will speak on Vascular Disease. Our charity will be Guardian Ad Litem. Retired nurses wishing to attend should call Mary Jane at 352726-6882 or Gladys at 352-854-2677 by Wednesday Jan. 23.Breast cancer support groupThe Breast Cancer SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 S.W. 105th St., Rm 235 (Multipurpose Room) at 1 p.m. The meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 29 will be off-site at Stone Creek Grille, 9676 SW 62nd Loop, with lunch at noon and a trip to All About You Boutique at Six Gun Plaza.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, January 16, 2013 11 2 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials. Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith a Name Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTAL For your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 Medical Bnet CARE Manager The Centers is seeking a Bachelors level Care Manager to coordinate mental health svcs for children enrolled in Behavioral Health Network. Extensive travel required in Citrus & Hernando Counties. Use of personal vehicle reqd., State mileage rate pd. Work hours dictated by caseload. Please submit salary. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us TBOSS Therapist The Centers is seeking Masters Level Therapist for TBOSS position in Citrus County. Must have min 2 yrs exp working with adults, children & adolescents providing individual, group & family therapy. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify. Fax or e-mail resume to HR, the Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us Medical Residential SA Educator The Centers is seeking an Educator to provide educational services to adolescents in our 24/7 residential substance abuse treatment facility in Lecanto. Teach lesson plans according to each countys requirements, i.e., math, social studies, science, English, etc. Assist individuals with special and specific needs, interactions and goals. Bachelors in field of Edu or Human Services & exp reqd. Middle School or HS level State of FL teaching certification preferred. Full benefits pkg DFWP/EOE/We E-Verify Fax or e-mail resume to HR, The Centers, Inc., (352) 291-5580, jobs@thecenters.us For more info visit www.thecenters.us Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKS FREE TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 Professional Director of Clinical Services Responsible for directing the programs psychological and treatment services to include technical and administrative duties, testing, individual, group, and family therapeutic activities, research, and participation in overall institutional programming and administration. Education: Masters degree from an accredited college or university in the field of counseling, social work, psychology, rehabilitation, special education or in a related human services field is preferred. 5 years related experience in the field of treatment program development, implementation, & evaluation in a juvenile institution preferred. Superviory skills necessary. The right person must possess a license: (MFT, LCSW, LMHC) from the state of Florida, provide Apply In Person at: 2855 W. Woodland Ridge Dr. Lecanto, Florida, 34461 or Email to shar on.facto@us.g4s. com or apply online at www. usajobs.g4s.com Drug Free Workplace / EEO Musical Instruments BUYING Guitars, Banjos & Mandolins,Fender, Gibson & Martin any condition (443) 463-3421 Wanted to Buy LIONELTOYTRAINS WantedAny Amount Any Condition. Cash Paid Will Pick Up (352) 346-3328 Real Estate For Sale PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Citrus Hills Homes HERNANDO Citrus Hills Pool Home 4/3/2+, circular drive, 1 acre lot, below $200k 352-527-7856 Vehicles Wanted BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 WE BUY ANYVEHICLEIn Any Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make, Any Model. 813-335-3794 813-237-1892 Call AJ Handyman Electrical, Plumbing Carpentry Sinks, Toilets Leaky Faucets Ceiling Fans Security Lighting Safety Railings Grab Bars, Ramps Drywall Repair Interior Painting Screens & Screen Doors Lanai Carpet/Tile Flooring Furniture, Cabinet Refinishing/Repairs Not Sure? -Call Me Tree Service STUMPGRINDINGCALLJIM FOR FREE ESTIMATES (800) 478-8679 Vehicles Wanted 000DMDQ F loridas Christmas tree is the big winner in D.C. This year I was able to spend several weeks in the Washington, D.C., area (specifically Springfield, Virginia) with my daughter, son-in-law, and grandchildren, Emily and Dominic. One evening, the family went downtown to see the National Christmas Tree on the Ellipse. The display, which includes the National Christmas Tree and the 56 smaller trees representing the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and all the territories, makes up the Pathway of Peace which is absolutely spectacular. All of the smaller trees are decorated by sponsoring organizations from the local areas and usually represent something unique about the region. In most cases, the decorations are enclosed in plastic globes to be protected from the weather; however, in some cases, the sponsors decided to literally decorate the globe itself. This was the case with the Florida tree which was exceptionally popular with those who came to admire the beauty and enjoy the celebration. I hate to admit my lack of knowledge about the National Christmas Trees impressive history, but I found out some interesting facts by reading the signs posted all around the display. Later, I looked up more by using my trusty new IPad and using all the resources that we now are beginning to take for granted. It still amazes this educator from the 60s through the 90s, however; and I am amazed at the enormous wealth of information when I use my favorite Google. Going back to November of 1923, First Lady Grace Coolidge gave permission for the District of Columbia Public Schools to erect a Christmas tree on the Ellipse south of the White House. The organizers called it the National Christmas Tree and thus began the tradition. On Christmas Eve, President Calvin Coolidge, walked from the White House to the Ellipse to push the button to light the 48-foot cut tree with more than 3,000 enthusiastic spectators looking on. Cut trees continued to be used until 1973 when the National Park Service transplanted live trees. The trees from the states and territories are in alphabetical order, and this years consensus favorite was Floridas tree. The decorations represent warm sun shining on our ripening oranges here in Florida while these iconic ornaments dance in the chilly Washington D.C. weather. The artist, Janeen Mason and the Jensen Beach High School AP art students, created the balls of polymer clay finished with a double waterproof clear coat. The bright orange blossoms have a purple ribbon reading Viva Florida 500 commemorating the 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leons landing in St. Augustine. Sponsoring the project was the Arts Council, Inc. serving Stuart and Martin County along with SubseaSpearguns.com. Seeing the Florida tree and noting the reactions of others who were seeing the tree for the first time was really special. Obviously, it was the crowds favorite for the 2012 celebration. On a personal note, being able to spend Christmas and New Years with my family was extra special since they are a military family, and this was my first holiday season with them in 13 years. Many of us, now Floridians, travel to other parts of our beautiful country on a regular basis. The really important thing to me is that I, along with many of my neighbors, really look forward to our return to our homes in Fairfield Village, which still remains a lively place filled with lovely people. Floridas Christmas tree is the big winner in D.C. Fairfield Village Priscilla Geissal J anuary is off and running! The first activity was taking down the decorations (tree, etc.) at the clubhouse. This was done sy the First Friday gathering. We had about 25 residents show up to help with this project. The men really got busy and had the tree down in record time. Thanks to everyone who helped. The next event at the clubhouse is the Comfort Foods potluck dinner on Monday, the 21st. There will be a display of quilts for everyone to enjoy. If you would like to show any of your quilts please call Carol Mowrey. Dinner will begin at 6 p.m.; come join your friends and neighbors for an evening of eating and fellowship. If you have never attended one of our potluck dinners, you dont know what you are missing. The Red Hot Fillies of the Meadow will meet on Friday, the 25th, at the clubhouse for the planning meeting for the year. We will meet at 12:30 to discuss plans for the year, and also enjoy some desserts. Bring your ideas for trips/projects with you. Remember January is when the dues are paid for the year. The Red Hats group is open to all women of Quail Meadow. Come join us if you are interested in participating in our activities. The Social Committee met to formulate plans for 2013. Mark your calendars now for the following upcoming events: Feb. 11 Mardi Gras theme potluck dinner, March 16 the annual horse race, April 15 Tax Day potluck dinner, May 18 Spring Fling, June 10 Birthday dinner, and July 4 we will revive the Quail Meadow parade and cook out. Other events are also planned and they will be listed later. One big party you want to plan for is New Years Eve we will have a party with a live band! Now, lets turn our thoughts to something very important. We have many residents who need someone from time to time to give them comfort, care, and show concern for their problems. Perhaps there is a time when you need someone to go to the store for you, or maybe just come by for a visit if you or someone you know needs someone; we have a group willing to help. If you know of anyone in need, please contact Marion Gartman. Also, if you would like to assist in this on-going project, please let Marion know. Hope to see many of you at the dinner Monday night! January off and running with taking down of tree Quail Meadow Carolyn Slocumb Maydaline Bristol, Teresa Bachand, Mary Zdarsky, and Marlene Cigrant. Kenneson Bristol and Benny Bachand packing up the tree. Please use our e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com

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INDEX Fairfield Village..2 Stone Creek........5 Dr. Snyder............6 Quail Meadow....11 VOLUME 6, NUMBER 42 WEDNESDAY, January 16, 2013 Puzzles Page 9 Classifieds Page 11 12 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger The U.S. Department of the Treasury today reported that 5 million checks continue to be mailed to federal beneficiaries each month. With just two months remaining until the March 1, 2013, electronic payment law goes into effect, the Treasury Department is urging Social Security and other federal benefit recipients to not delay and switch now to either direct deposit or the Direct Express Debit MasterCard card. Choosing direct deposit or the Direct Express card makes it easier, safer and more convenient for beneficiaries to receive their payments. Switching to an electronic payment is not optional its the law, said David Lebryk, commissioner of the Treasury Departments Financial Management Service. If you or a loved one still receive paper checks for your benefit payments, now is the time to switch. Its free and easy just call 1-800-333-1795 or visit www.GoDirect.org. Currently, approximately 93 percent of Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments are being made electronically. Converting the remaining paper check recipients to electronic payments will save American taxpayers $1 billion over the next 10 years. The Treasury Department published a final rule in December 2010 to gradually phase out paper checks for federal benefit payments. Since May 1, 2011, all people newly applying for federal benefits, including Social Security, SSI, Veterans Affairs, Railroad Retirement Board, Office of Personnel Management benefits and other non-tax payments, have had to choose direct deposit or the Direct Express card at the time they sign up for their benefits. March 1, 2013, is the final deadline by which all reSocial Security warning: Time to go electronic Vigil for a littlevictim Ocala came together on the Downtown Square Jan. 10 to remember 6-month-old Jonah Mendoza of the Fountains in northwest Ocala, who was killed on Jan. 4 by his mother. PHOTOS BY JIM CLARKA collage of pictures from Jonahs short life were on display on a table in front of the stage at the square. Jordan Mendoza, Jonahs father, speaks to the crowd at the conclusion of the memorial. Juliauna Christensen, 3, writes a message of condolence, helped by a friend, Roxanne Garcia. Column, Page 8 Photos, Page 12 PHOTOS BY JIM CLARKRemembering Jonah Jordan Mendoza, flanked by family and friends, looks over displays while holding a candle in memory of his slain son, 6-month-old Jonah. The thin lights in the background were part of the citys Christmas decoration, designed to look like lights falling from the trees. One speaker called them Tears from Heaven. Jordan Mendoza gets words of consolation from a well-wisher prior to the start of the memorial on Jan. 10. BY JIM CLARK Editor Marion County Tax Collector George Albright has done what the state asked him to. In addition to his dispensing of auto tags and titles, he took on the driver license production for the state, and has gotten thing running smoothly. In fact, things run so smoothly that now some forces in the state want to remove the auto tag purchasing from his office. Albright was one of the county officials appearing before the Marion County Legislative Delegation on Jan. 8, and didnt mince words: This is a power play by the 3M company and the Department of Highway Safety. The 3M company is involved in the making of the tags. It doesnt make sense, Albright told the seven-member delegation, chaired by State Sen. Charlie Dean. If they thought enough of us to give us driver licenses, why do they want to take away tag and title? He also added, Why is there even a Department of Highway Safety? One of the things that was emphasized during the presentations was the protection of water. County Chair Kathy Bryant told the legislators, Protection of the aquifer will always be on our legislative agenda. She asked in the strongest possible terms for the county to have a seat at the table during discussions of Silver Springs. Ocala City Council member Daniel Owen asked the officials to clarify the Please see ELECTRONIC Page 3 Albright blasts state agency over auto tags Please see ALBRIGHT Page 3 Sheriff sworn in Sheriff Chris Blair sits with his daughter Alesa and wife Sangi as Judge Hale Stancil speaks during Blairs swearing-in ceremony. Behind Stancil is County Commission Chair Kathy Bryant. Additional photo, Page 12.PHOTO BY RON RATNER BY JIM CLARK Editor Area residents armed with statements against homeowner associations and developers who they say charge excessive fees and fail to file required reports came to Tuesdays Marion County Legislative Delegation ready to do battle, but a state senators comments at the opening of the meeting quickly let them know they would get little satisfaction. The delegation gathered at the Klein Center at Central Florida Community College for the five-hour meeting as a crowd composed mostly of representatives of local agencies filled the room. Homeowners get little relief from legislators Please see RELIEF Page 2 Deputies sworn in PHOTO BY RON RATNERWith the swearing in of new sheriff Chris Blair, all sworn officers in the Marion County department also had to take an oath. Internal Medicine Associates Of Ocala Board Certifications in Internal Medicine and Geriatrics Thomas Mohan ARNP Sharon Marques M.D. K.N. Reddy M.D. Connie L. Hartley ARNP Herma Baker FNP-BC OFFICE LOCATIONS: 4840 S U.S. Hwy. 41, Dunnellon (352) 489-5152 1623 SW 1St Ave., Ocala (352) 732-9844 9401 SW Hwy. 200, Bldg. 500 Ste. 501 & 502, Ocala (352) 854-9991 Ask About Weight Loss Programs!! High Blood Pressure Diabetes Weight Loss Womens Health All Arthritic Problems Heart Disease Lung Problems Complete Physicals Call For An Appt. Today! 352-414-5312 ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! Free Screenings! 000DRA9 000DPLT 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala (352) 629-0900 (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (4 miles west of I-75, just before Lowes) (352) 629-0900 Other locations throughout the southeast 7201 SW Hwy. 200 Ocala GREAT FINANCING ON EZ-GO CARTS! GOLF CARS STARTING AT $1,995 WHAT BATTERY A RE Y OU L OOKING F OR ??? Automotive Marine Lawn Mower Golf Cart Cordless Phone Riding Toys Computer Back Up Tractor Motorcycle ATV Camcorder Cellular Phone Wheel Chairs Game Feeder Emergency Lights Security Systems Battery Packs Laptop Computers Alkaline Complete Stock Of Batteries For: CUSTOM BATTERY PACKS LAPTOP COMPUTER BATTERIES CAMCORDER BATTERIES WHEELCHAIR BATTERIES SECURITY SYSTEM BATTERIES AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES FARM TRACTOR BATTERIES JET SKI BATTERIES GAME FEED BATTERIES MARINE BATTERIES CELL PHONE BATTERIES POWER WHEELS BATTERIES WATCH BATTERIES KEY REMOTE BATTERIES TRUCK BATTERIES CORDLESS PHONE BATTERIES EMERGENCY LIGHT BATTERIES ATV BATTERIES MOTORCYCLE BATTERIES LAWNMOWER BATTERIES