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West Marion messenger
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100092/00094
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Title: West Marion messenger
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Ocala, Florida
Publication Date: 02-15-2012
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00100092:00094

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INDEX Stone Creek........2 Ocala Palms........4 Puzzles................8 Quail Meadow....11 VOLUME 4, NUMBER 46 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY15, 2012 Happenings Page 3 Classifieds Page 11 12 Wednesday, February 15, 2012 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger GOLF SHOE STORE NARROW THRU X-WIDE Orthotic Insoles GOLF SANDALS2133 SW Hwy. 484 Ocala, FL 344739 Miles South of Ocala, 10 Miles North of Wildwood at I-75 Exit 341 Behind McDonalds 352-245-2184 All-Day Weekend Features Choose from our farm raised catfish, cut thin and tossed in a blend of cornmeal and seasonings. Or try our traditional Cod Fillets, hand dipped in our own special batter and fried to a golden brown. Served with Steak Fries and Cole Slaw. Made from scratch. Our chicken tenderloin simmered in a hearty chicken gravy and served atop a bed of seasoned rice along with two vegetables. Enjoy two chicken breast fillets dipped in fresh buttermilk and hand breaded in our kitchen. Served with choice of two vegetables.000A8IN Monday Fried Pork Chops with choice of two vegetables Tuesday Butter Baked Chicken with choice of two vegetables Wednesday Broccoli Cheddar Chicken with choice of two vegetables Thursday Turkey n Dressing with choice of two additional vegetables It will be a return to yesteryear on Feb. 18 as Ocala once again sees a herd of cattle driven down its streets. Beginning at 10 a.m., some 35 head of cattle will be driven from the 800 block of Southeast Osceola Avenue to the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion, 2200 N.E. Jacksonville Road. About 15 professional cowboys, led by Southeastern Pro Rodeo representative Ruben Lamb, will be participating. City Councilman Daniel Owen, who has helped organize the event, said he envisions the cattle drive being an annual event to coincide with the Southeastern Youth Fair and Florida High School Rodeo. In the 1940s and early 1950s this was a tradition in our community and we are hoping to re-establish it, Owen said. The event will require rolling road closures, including East Silver Springs Boulevard, Northeast 14th Street and Jacksonville Road. None of the road closures will last for more than five minutes. The best viewing locations, in addition to the livestock pavilion, will be between Southeast 5th Street and State Road 40 on Osceola Avenue and on the Watula Avenue side of Tuscawilla Park. The drive is not expected to last for more than an hour. Ocala to become cow town on Feb. 18 Heart felt thanks on Valentines DayEditors note: Phil Geissal, husband of Fairfield Village writer Priscilla Geissal, recently underwent heart surgery. This is her story about his care.----By Priscilla Geissal This year, Valentines Day has taken on a whole new meaning and significance to me and to my husband of 5 years. Though Phil is 77 and I am 71, we plan to have many loving years together even though Phil has several significant health issues to deal with, and I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia some 10 years ago. Hopefully, I will not be criticized for writing about something so personal as the past month in our lives, but my husband and I feel very strongly about the wonderful care he has received over the past month. He had a serious heart attack, some other complications, and open heart surgery at Munroe Regional Medical Center. We are, therefore, willing to accept any criticism as we say, Thank You All! to those who have been there to care for, support, and encourage us both. Ironically, or fortuitously, this is coming to print right after Valentines Day. Obviously, from the point of view of an old high school and college English instructor (40+ years) I cannot miss the symbolic use of the holiday, the heart-shaped pillows provided for the cardiac patients, and (certainly) the love that is normally associated with this time of year. This love has been given to us very generously by our wonderful (and huge) family and numerous friends here in Ocala and actually from all over the world because my husband traveled extensively with his former career. I must hasten to say, that I spent the first 65 years of my life in Rome, Ga., and taught in the same wonderful high school (Model High School) for 33 years before retiring to do some adjunct teaching at the local technical college. My world travel has been limited but my friendships have not. On to the main issue at hand, the Cardiac Care Unit and Intensive Care Unit at Munroe Regional Medical Center. I know there are other facilities that probably are just as caring and skilled as are the pros at Munroe; but, honestly, we would rather not be in a position to have to test out another. I challenge those of you who have other The drive home for Phil Geissal (in the back seat to avoid air bags) is a time when that Heart Pillow can serve as a terrific buffer between the incision and the seat belt. By Pat Wellington S PECIALTOTHEM ESSENGER Golden Hills resident Judy Perkins has always loved history. And then she fell in love with Easton Presss handsome leather-bound presidential biographies etched in 22K gold. Four were signed copies by Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, Richard Nixon, and Ronald Reagan. She ordered the set and kept adding to it. Her goal was to read a biography of every single American president. It took 10 ten years to reach that goal. Why so long? Well, she explains, the early biographies were written in wordy, stilted 19th-century style and many of the later ones like those of Franklin Roosevelt, Lyndon Johnson, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Richard Nixon were two volumes each. She was also slowed down by the considerable minutiae of George Washingtons many battles. Thomas Jefferson was also slow going, she admits. Along the way in her reading she was surprisingly impressed with the life and presidency of our littleknown 11th President, James K. Polk, dismayed by William Hardings sordid reputation, and touched by Franklin Pierces personal tragedy when on Jan. 6, 1853, barely two months before Pierces inauguration as president, the family traveled by train from Andover, Massachusetts to Concord, New Hampshire, where they had planned to attend the funeral of a family friend. Minutes Perkins library with presidential reference works. The plate on the middle shelf depicts presidents up to Lyndon Johnson, pictured in the center. Judy Perkins and Pat Wellington read a passage in one of the biographies. Ten years of reading presidents stories Golden Hills resident spends 10 years reading biographies after departure, their passenger car broke loose from the train and rolled down an embankment. The only fatality was Bennie Pierce. His sudden death worked a crushing, enduring psychological hardship on President-elect and Mrs. Pierce. Some of the overall impressions Judy came away with were that military men, in general, make terrible presidents (although she considers Eisenhower a possible exception). And she found that so many of the presidents were besmirched by scandal or addiction to alcohol. Still, all things considered, it was a worthwhile venture and one shed recommend to other history buffs. By Jim Clark E DITOR The year was 1945. It was February, and the U.S. Marines were about to embark on one of the key battles of World War II as they approached the island of Iwo Jima. Two Ocala men were members of the U.S. Navy at the time, and were in craft offshore as the Marines took to the island and eventually won control. Both men were at the Iwo Jima memorial event at Marion Woods last week. Both spoke at the gathering, and both were firm in their appreciation for the fact that the U.S., under President Harry Truman, dropped two atomic bombs on Japan. Bill Lehr, who lives in Marion Landing off State Road 200, told the guests, mostly veterans, about his time in the military. He spent his first 15 months assigned to Landing Ship Tank (LST) 807 assigned to the Pacific. On Jan. 4, 1945, we left Pearl (Harbor) and went a long way with Marines and equipment. We landed at Iwo Jima on Feb. 19 on the beach. It was dark. The Marines unloaded and took off because most of the battles were on the other side of the island. Lehr said his crafts duty was to take on wounded Marines. After five days he saw an American flag being raised on the mountains, and then later a second flag. That second flag became the iconic picture that is still associated with Iwo Jima today. At one point, he said a single Japanese kamikaze tried to attack his ship. He was shot down, and we didnt lose anybody. His craft had another dangerous situation, even after the war. We were hit by a typhoon on the way back, he said, adding that others were damaged but his LST came through OK. We had to bomb the two towns. I know it killed a lot of innocent people, but if we invaded they would have thrown everybody out to fight us. If we Two Ocala men discuss Iwo Jima experiences Above, Detroit Johnson; below, Bill Lehr. Please see IWO JIMA Page 2 Please see HEART Page 12 kudos to hand out to send word to me, and I will endeavor to pass those along as well. pbgeissal@aol.com While my husband was a patient, he spent more time in the hospital than most might because of his additional complications due to Myasthenia Gravis, a condition that is not very recognizable to most people. It is a neurological condition that affects, among other things, ones immune system and is often difficult to control. Thankfully, his is controlled well. Because of my husbands excellent care by Dr. S. Subramony at Shands Hospital and the University of Florida in Gainesville, he is given all the extra medical attention that anyone could reasonably expect. Along with this blessing, he has been cared for by many excellent physicians here in Ocala, but, specifically, by Dr. A. Nasser, a highly respected cardiologist. My husbands cardiac surgeon was the very skilled Dr. J. Galat of the Munroe Heart Group. His main hospitalist was Dr. N. Rao, who is someone we have seen several other times, and he is another excellent doctor. I do not mean to leave anyone out, but these were the main facilitators of his heart care while he was hospitalized. The caregivers (aka nursing and tech staff) in the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit and the Cardiac and Vascular Care Unit on Munroes 4th floor are superior in every respect. They are cheerful, optimistic, smiling, and totally professional. Without these magnificent ladies and gentlemen, none of the rest would be possible, and we send them all a huge Thank you!` Last, certainly not least, and maybe even most of all, we are so grateful to our family and friends for the unwavering support and love that we were blessed to have every day, all day, and all night when it was needed. One thinks I can handle this myself, but I can attest to the fact that knowing that a loving voice is just a phone call away is more than just reassuring. It honestly kept me the wife moving right along through several fairly significant scares. My neighbor who sat with me during the 3+ hour surgery (she knows who she is) was my rock that day as were my family all over the country who were on the cell phone and sending emails that were unwavering. We had asked all of our extended family to keep their families first and not come to Florida because they all have children, professions, school, and other responsibilities that have to be recognized and handled. They were here in every way that counted. How do I close this personal column? That is very easy! From the bottom of my heart and from my husbands healing heart, we say, again, Thank You and We Love You All! Happy Belated Valentines Day! As usual, I can say that it is wonderful to be a part of Fairfield Village a lively place filled with lovely people who have big and loving hearts. HEARTcontinued from Page 1 Dr. A. Nasser stands at his TimberRidge office. He is an outstanding cardiologist who is highly regarded by his many patients. Teen Volunteer transporter sounds like a young Star Trek training job. Christopher has a great smile as he helps patients for that wonderful trip to the entrance that becomes the more favored exit as one goes home. R.N. Cindy has a bubbly personality and sweet smile along with superior nursing skills. In most cases, only first names are being used at the request of hospital personnel. From the left, Phil, Lauren, and Marina all have different jobs as part of the Super Bowl Cardiac Team. The patients always win with this team on their side. From the left, Jack and David (CVT) in Dr. Nassers office. R.N. Jason was one of the caregivers.

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had an invasion, I might not have been here. Detroit Johnson, who lives in Oak Run, also off 200, was in the Navy Seabees and followed a similar path to get to Iwo Jima. It took us some time to get there from Hawaii in a troop ship with the 3rd Marine Division. He added, One of the things our ship was used for was for Marine casualties. He said that after a time, wed have a burial at sea for those who had been killed. As the invasion progressed, part of his job was to help clean up areas. Our job was to prepare the landing strip, which had been damaged by shelling. To illustrate how times have changed, he said that one day his men heard there was a plane coming in that was built with no propellers. It was the first time we had ever seen a jet, he said, noting the turbulence and waves from the aircraft. Although he was a gunners mate, he said he could work with anything. I could operate and run any heavy equipment there was. He was also assigned as a commanders guard. At Iwo Jima, the Americans had 6,812 killed or missing, 19, 217 wounded and two captured. The Japanese, on the other hand, had 21,844 killed, but no wounded were found. The Americans captured 216 men. It was widely believed that most wounded Japanese had taken their own lives. Johnson felt that things would have been much worse had the U.S. invaded Japan. Like Lehr, he had visions of what would have happened. Every walking living person would have a gun. We could lose 40 to 50 thousand. Johnson praised the dropping of the bombs. Thanks to Harry (Truman), Im here today. That was the big thing. Thank God, Harry saved all of us. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, February 15, 2012 11 2 Wednesday, February 15, 2012 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials. Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith a Name Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTAL For your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 Employment Info Personal Assistant Needed Urgently for : shipping, organizing, graphic design, quick books, and any other misc. job requests.you will be paid $580/wk. send your resume to : laurann.doherty@aol.com General Complete stain glass tool and supply kit, excellent condition, $50 352-671-7959 Pets A gift for Valentines! 4 adorable little Jack Russell/Chihuahua pups 9 wks.w/ Health Cert.2M/2F $300 ea 352-465-1797 Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKS FREE TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 Pets DOG Butch is a wonderfully sweet lab/terrier mix, approximately 2 y/o and weighs 65#. He appears to be housebroken and is very mindful on leash. He is a strong boy, but eager to learn new things. Call 352-201-8664 Mobile Homes In Park 55 + Community 2 BD 2 BA. Florida rm completely furnished washer & dryer, handicap access. Lot rent $269 Priced to sale $5500 obo (352) 671-2866 Real Estate For Sale Inverness Highlands West Two adjoining lots for sale-3566 S. Dean $8K adjoining lot $7K. (352) 302-1940 Real Estate For Sale Floral City, 40 AC Florida Hilly vacant land, never lived on, with underground electric,excellent well water, zoned agriculture, private coded gate, updated fence, under brushed with trimmed trails, concrete cattle gap for horses or cattle. Cost $495K (352) 302-1940 trishmilton@gmail.com Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKS FREE TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 Real Estate For Sale PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Inverness Homes Large 1 Fam. Carol Terrace, Inverness. 4BR 3BA, 2700 sq ft under air, 2.8 acres fully fenced, important updates done. $220,000. Owner 352-419-7017 Crystal River Homes Plantation area Energy-wise 3 bedroom. 2 bath. Garage. Ready move in. Fenced backyard w/playhouse. 352-563-1341 Vehicles Wanted BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$200 & UP (352) 771-6191 Vehicles Wanted WE BUY ANY VEHICLE Perfect Cond. or Not Titled,No title, No problem. Paying up to $25K any make, any model Call A.J. 813-335-3794/ 531-4298 L ET U S W ORK F OR Y OU CALL TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403W EST M ARION M ESSENGERC LASSIFIEDSG ET R ESULTS! Vehicles Wanted Eyecare hours are: M T TH F 8:30 -5:00; W 1:00-6:00 Select Sat. are available United Health Care Medicare and Blue Cross Blue Shield Provider Heath Brook Commons (next to Publix) 5400 SW College Rd/Highway 200, Suite 106, Ocala, FL 34474 Dr. James A. Muse B o a r d C e r t i f i e d Board Certified O p t o m e t r i c P h y s i c i a n Optometric Physician Our commitment to personalized eyecare... Your eyes are our masterpiece. museumeyecare@live.com Need a NEW Optometrist? Transfer Prescriptions and or Records Call 352-622-3937 000AG4W MUSEUM EYECARE $ 4,995 Starting at 000AIKN 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm Thank You for your business, we strive to make our customers satisfied.Sale on all Trojan Batteries Same Day Service Guaranteed 6-V T605 only $ 529 8-V T875 only $ 629 12-V T1275 only $ 629 W E L EAD O THERS F OLLOW Free Pick-up within 10 miles Utility 4x4 and gas available COME TAKE A DRIVE!2012 Club Car Flip Back Seat only $ 399 VETERANS DISCOUNT 10% Off All year long Thank you 000AFF7 Read the classifieds IWO JIMAcontinued from Page 1 Stone Creek T his town hall meeting was not organized by one of the Republican or Democratic candidates. It was the first of quarterly town meetings that was presented by Chris Johnson, Stone Creeks Community Manager. Approximately 250 residents came to the first town hall meeting. Chris gave an opening address before he took questions from those in attendance. His purpose was to make sure that everyone was on the same piece of music and that we were all working together. Chris went through the chain of command here at Stone Creek. He works for Continental Group, the Board of Directors which has three Pulte representatives and two resident representatives, and he pointed out that three representatives is greater than two representatives, Pulte and the residents. Presently, Stone Creek is only 22 percent built out. Pulte and not the residents make the decisions. He wanted residents to know that he never steps aside from a problem and if there is a problem he is the fall guy. Chris told the residents that he sympathizes with them as construction continues, but we all purchased knowing that construction would be on going until Stone Creek is complete. If residents have a problem, they should contact Pulte and copy Chris on the e-mail. Chris put the information about contact numbers in an email the next day. He went on to say that his basic job is to protect the property value of Stone Creek and we all live by rules. He loves dogs but reminded those who have dogs of their responsibility. At present, there is no plan for a dog park. He gave praise to the fitness staff for doing an excellent job since August when they were left without a fitness director. When Chris came on board, he did not have a Lifestyle Director or Fitness Director. This problem is now resolved with the hiring of Lifestyle Director/Fitness Director in Kim Krystopa. She came on board on Feb. 6 even though she has been busy at work learning her roles. He explained the difference between a secure community and a gated community. We live in a gated community and we need to follow common sense rules about locking cars and doors. If there is a problem, call the Sheriffs Office. There have been numerous portal messages about coyotes. If a resident has an animal problem, call animal control and report the problem to them. Chris ended his message with the obvious. We live in a beautiful community with a great many activities. Take advantage of all that is offered. If we all work together, we will continue to have a great community. Chris has an open door policy. He may not agree with Town hall meeting held Patricia Gizzi you but he is always there to listen. There were about eight questions from residents ranging from card tables to safety issues. All questions seem to be resolved on the spot. Garden Club News: Lucy Bee Tobias came to speak to the Garden Club. Despite technical difficulties she gave an excellent presentation. After her talk, she signed copies of her book: Florida Gardens Gone Wild. She generously donated $2 from the sale of each book to the Reflection Garden and asked to come back when the garden is completed. As part of the Garden Clubs outreach program, many donated beans that will be given to Brothers Keeper Soup Kitchen. Rita Levy, a volunteer at the Soup Kitchen accepted the donations from the members and thanked them for their generous donations. Valentine Madness took place on Feb. 11. This event was sponsored by the Culture Vultures and it was a sold out event. The evening had a little of everything Valentine Trivia, writing of Valentine poems, writing the most English words from the word Valentine and a newly, old version of the Newlywed Game. The money from this event went toward the purchase of the piano for the Reunion Center. Lucy Tobias Chris Johnson Quail Meadow H ave you noticed the horse at our Publix? Let me introduce you to Jazzd who is now residing in the floral department. Jazzd is so named because when you look at it closely you will see several musical instruments used in jazz music: keyboard, saxophone, bass, and snare drum. The theme represents the jazz music from New Orleans. Jazzd was designed by John Tripodi in 2005, just after Katrina destroyed much of New Orleans. The year 2005 was the second year for Horse Fever in Motion. Hundreds of artists submitted drawings to be considered for the horses, however, only eight artists were selected for the horses for 2005. John Tripodis sketch was one of the eight chosen. John spent many week-ends working on Jazzd in his garage; he estimates it took about 100 hours of painting. Acrylic paint is the major paint used on this horse, but there are some oil paints used. John said his daughter, Jaden, who was only 4 years old at the time, became very attached to the horse in their garage; in fact, he let her do a little of the painting. Jaden couldnt understand why when it was completed it had to leave! The Cox family (Cox Communications) purchased Jazzd and had plans to move it to New Orleans, but that has not taken place. Jazzd has made guest appearances at several locations in the Ocala area over the years. For a period of time, it was outside the Brick City Center for the Arts building. However, vandals tried to destroy the horse; it had a broken leg and ear, along with other scratches. After the restoration, Jazzd was placed in storage at Brick City. Jazzd once again makes special appearances at various locations in Marion County. Fortunately, for us, we can just go up to our Publix and see this beautiful art work. John Tripodi, the talented artist, is a graphics designer and the owner of Neptune Ventures. He credits his creation of Jazzd with giving him the jump start he needed for his business. An interesting note is that John never knows where Jazzd will be on display. When it was delivered to Publix, Austin Stopher, who works at the customer service desk, recognized the horse as the one his Uncle John Tripodi had created. Its a small world, isnt it? In 2001, John Tripodi moved to Ocala from Massillon, Ohio. He is a graduate of Columbus College of Art and Design. Several of the ads in the West Marion Messenger were designed by him. If you would like more information on John Tripodi he can be reached by e-mail at john@themediagroup3.com or by phone 352-286-7534. The story behind the horse Carolyn Slocumb The Publix management doesnt know how long they will be privileged to have Jazzd in their store, so, if you havent stopped by to see this beautiful work of art, please make it a priority you wont be disappointed. Due to the recent assault on one of our residents in a parking lot, the QMRPOA meeting this month included a presentation by Detective Bobby Levay and Lieutenant Brian Dotten of the Marion County Sheriffs office. They stressed the importance of always being aware of your surroundings. They left brochures regarding frauds and scams. Please come by the Clubhouse and take one; they have much valuable information in them. Above, John Tripodi and Jazzd as shown at Publix. At left, Detective Bobby Levay and Lieutenant Brian Dotten of the Marion County Sheriffs Office.

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, February 15, 2012 3 10 Wednesday, February 15, 2012 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger is discovered through worshiping together 711187A Central Florida Screen Room & Window Medics, Inc. Screen Rooms Acrylic & Glass Rooms Rescreens Broken Glass Replacement Windows Gutters Foggy Windows Cement Sliding Glass Door Repair Call & speak directly to the owner David Heath Comp. #5524 352 484-5697 WINDOW REPAIR 000AI1V 000AH61 A I R C O N D I T I O N I N G AIR CONDITIONING Wilson Air service 352-208-4641 Locally Owned & Operated License # CAC1816140 WILSON AIR SERVICE Tune Up Special We Service All Brands Repairs Replacement Free Second Opinions 24-HR. 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FREE ESTIMATES Jeff Jamison 352-321-0404 licensed & insured 10% Discount To Seniors & Military 000AETV 00098Y6 IRRIGATION LLC. SPRINKLERS IRRIGATION 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala Comp #7085 Call for details 352-237-5731 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Winter Special Will waive service call with repairs. Offering freeze protection for your irrigation system and backflow preventor. Licensed Fully Insured Certified Irrigation Auditor We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation. Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Call for details! 000AHTL LAWN/HOME Roys Lawn & Home Services Full Property Maintenance Painting Sod Installations Pressure Washing F REE E STIMATES Lic/Ins 3 5 2 3 4 2 4 4 4 4 3 5 2 3 4 2 4 4 4 4 352-342-4444 0009FKZ 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS 000AI5P Residential & Restaurant Appliances 352-286-7887 Washers Dryers Microwaves Stoves Ovens Refrigerators Water Heaters Disposals Freezers APPLIANCE SERVICES Christ the King The Rev. Donald J. Curran, Rector Rev. Matthew Walter Asst. Rector Services: Rite I 7:30 am Rite II 8:50 & 11:15 am Childrens Church 8:50 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary Christ the King Anglican Church Anglican Church 000A1LU GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 000AG5C 4 6 5 4 6 2 9 4 6 5 4 6 2 9 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! C r a y c o n s t @ m s n c o m C r a y c o n s t @ m s n c o m Crayconst@msn.com 1 6 x 7 1 6 x 7 16 x 7 S L I D I N G G A R A G E S L I D I N G G A R A G E SLIDING GARAGE S C R E E N D O O R S C R E E N D O O R SCREEN DOOR $ 6 9 5 $ 6 9 5 $ 695 ONSTRUCTION RAY R A Y RAY C C C C C C O N S T R U C T I O N ONSTRUCTION CRC058138 Starting at A c r y l i c & G l a s s W i n d o w s A c r y l i c & G l a s s W i n d o w s Acrylic & Glass Windows C u s t o m M a d e F o r Y o u r C u s t o m M a d e F o r Y o u r Custom Made For Your S c r e e n R o o m S c r e e n R o o m Screen Room OPTIONAL SCREEN CHOICES. 000AJWG CARPET CARE COMPLETE CARPET CARE C ARPET & U PHOLSTERY C LEANING 352-282-1480 Free In Home Estimates Lifetime Warranty Lic & Ins Specializing in: Carpet Stretching Carpet Repair Carpet Seaming LLC DIALAPRO F o r Y o u r P r o f e s s i o n a l N e e d s For Your Professional Needs W E S T M A R I O N M e s s e n g e r WEST MARION Messenger 000AJMR Christ Anglican Church950 N.W. 70th Street (SR 326)Ocala, Florida 34475352-351-8059 www.cac-ocala.orgService & Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Visitors Are Always Welcome The Only Church of the True 1928 Book of Common Prayer (Episcopal) J a s m i n e P l a z a 3 5 2 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 Jasmine Plaza 352-401-0001 6 1 6 0 S W S R 2 0 0 U n i t 1 0 4 O c a l a F l o r i d a 3 4 4 7 6 6160 SW SR 200 Unit 104 Ocala, Florida 34476 S T O R E H O U R S : T U E S F R I 1 0 5 S A T 1 0 2 STORE HOURS: TUES.-FRI. 10-5 SAT. 10-2 Readers Choice Winner Jewelry Store 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 www.jandjjewelersocala.com Affordable New & Estate Jewelry 000AGI9 A l l r e p a i r s d o n e o n p r e m i s e s A l l r e p a i r s d o n e o n p r e m i s e s All repairs done on premises. B ATTERIES $ 8 00 + tax Ocalas Only 4-Star Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations Accommodations for Your Pet for Your Pet Tour our unique Tour our unique facility and you facility and you be the judge! be the judge! 352-861-4566 352-861-4566 B o a r d i n g G r o o m i n g Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com www.palmettokennels.com 000ACXG Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting L o o k f o r u s L o o k f o r u s Look for us o n F a c e b o o k o n F a c e b o o k on Facebook 000ACTO 732-GOLF (4653) Open to the Public $ 5 00 OFF Current Rate with coupon and Tee Time Reservation Our Low Current 18 Hole Rates $ 35 00 Before 11:00 $ 30 00 After 11:00 $ 20 00 After 2:30 Just 1 mile west of I-75 on US 27 (Exit 354) Expires 3/21/12 Expries 3/21/12 Rates subject to change. 18 Hole Championship Course Dress Code: Collared Shirt Required NO Jeans GOLF OUTINGS WELCOME! prison. The title is a hint to the books contents but the facts on the amount of money, the number of participants and the number of schemes involved is astonishing. Schweizer identifies our elected officials as permanent political classes who have transformed our Capitol into a gold mine for get rich quick entrepreneurs. Members of both the Congressional and Executive branches are involved in these activities and the techniques they use show the utter disregard they and their selected friends hold for our country. Schweizer notes that industrial leaders have learned that investing in congressional and executive campaign activities will provide very large returns on their investments. Influencing who the government buys from, who it loans money to and who it grants money to, has become a very big business. Schweizers book is in the Marion County Library and its a good read to prepare for the upcoming elections. The leaders and members of both of our political parties are all involved in these schemes. They are more interested in helping themselves than in helping our country. That makes a bumper sticker seen in Ocala last week very relevant. The sticker read; Re-elect no one. Bill Farthing, Ocala LETTERcontinued from Page 6 If you are a Marion County student in grades 6-12 and have a knack with a camera, you are eligible to enter the It Starts in Parks Student Photography Contest. The free contest, which runs March 1-May 15, is designed to expose youth to both nature and photography, and to develop in them an appreciation for the important role that parks play in our community. The contest includes a free workshop that will be 9:30-11:30 a.m., March 3, at the Discovery Center, 701 N.E. Sanchez Ave. All images must be captured in a city, county, state or nationally managed park within Marion County. Students are divided into two groups grades 6-8 and grades 9-12. Winning entries will be professionally framed and exhibited at the Discovery Center for six months. There will be gift certificates and other prizes presented to the top entries in each age group. The first place packages will include a photo shoot with Emmy Award winner Mark Emery. A judges critique and awards ceremony will be 6-7 p.m., June 1 at the Discovery Center. For entry forms and information, go to http://mydiscoverycenter.org and click photography contest. Photo contest planned for Marion County students Wednesday, Feb. 15 Wo rl d H a s T al e nt a ud iti o n s se t Auditions for the Circle Square Cultural Centers third annual The World Has Talent 55+ talent show will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 15. Active adults age 55+ are invited on stage where the top chosen acts will perform at The World Has Talent 55+ Talent Show at the Circle Square Cultural Center on Saturday, May 5. The chosen contestants will compete for a chance to win the $500 first place, $250 second place and $150 third place prizes! Auditions will be held on Feb. 15 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Circle Square Cultural Center, 8395 S.W. 80th St., Ocala. For more information visit: www.CSCulturalCenter.com, call 352-854-3670 or e-mail ticketsales@cscultrualcenter.com.B e r e a veme nt p r o gra m se t The Widowed Persons Service of Marion County will be giving a six-week support group program beginning on Wednesday, Feb. 15 at the First Congregational Church, 7171 S.W. State Road 200. The hours are from 10 to 11:30 a.m. The group is open to all those who have recently lost a spouse. For questions, please call Marianne at 352-854-2872. Moose b ing o ope n t o th e pub lic Each week in February beginning at 12:45 p.m. bingo is played with opportunities to win big. Try your luck while support the Lodge and its charitable endeavors. Everyone is welcome with a variety of lunch selections available. The lodge is at 10411 S.W. 110th St., one mile north of the State Road 200 main entrance to Oak Run. Phone is 352-854-2200. Thursday, Feb. 16 A ir F o rc e Asso ciati o n mee ting The Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association will hold our monthly meeting on Feb. 16 at 7 p.m. at the Ocala Regional Airport Administration Building 750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Jason Teaman, from U. S. Congressman Cliff Stearns staff, will be presenting a program on how high school students apply to the U.S. Military Academies. Everyone is welcome. For information call Mike Emig 352-854-8328. Friday, Feb. 17 V F W L a d i es p lan f a s hi o n s h ow The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 4781 will have their annual Fashion Show on Feb. 17 at noon. The theme is Let Freedom Spring. The luncheon will be prepared by Margie with the help of dedicated members. Lots of gifts have been collected. Marilyn French is the chairperson. For tickets and more information, call Regina at 352873-3631. Tickets are available for tables of eight or more. This is a sellout event. Saturday, Feb. 18 B e th Is ra e l h os t s ga mes Congregation Beth Israel of Ocala warmly invites the community to a social evening of games and fun on Feb. 18 at 6:30 p.m. at the Collins Center, 9401 State Road 200 in Ocala. The program will feature a short Havdalah service followed by a light dinner of bagels and cream cheese and other delicious fare. Bring your own board games such as dominoes, ma jong, Monopoly, etc. or just come for the fun! The cost is $6 per person and reservations must made by calling Shirley at 352-873-6186 or by email: thegottfrieds@aol.com. Congregation Beth Israel is a progressive, liberal, inclusive Jewish community under the guidance of the Jewish Reconstructionist Federation.A rt s cra f t s at Quee n of Pe ac e The Council of Catholic Women of Queen of Peace Church will sponsor an Art and Craft Show in the Parish Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, on Saturday, Feb. 18, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Be sure to mark your calendars, you won't want to miss the work of these local talented Artists and Crafters. Hot dog lunch will be available to purchase. S can d ina v ian C l ub of M ari o n Cou nt y: The Scandinavian Club of Marion County invites people of Danish, Finish, Icelandic, Norwegian and Swedish decent to join us at our next meeting on Feb. 18. We will meet at 11:30 a.m. at the Ocala Hilton, 3600 S.W. 36th Ave. in Ocala. The menu will be Roast Beef Au Jus, mashed potatoes, vegetables, salad, coffee and dessert. The entertainment will be Bob Maas and his accordion. The cost is $16 per person. Reservations and payment must be made in advance. Payment must be received by Wednesday the 15th of February. Checks to be made out to Don Clauson and mailed to Don Clauson, 5901 S.W. 86th Place, Ocala, FL 34476. For further details call Don Clauson at 352-861-1235 or Terry Rasmussen at 352 3478362. Am at eu r R a d i o C la ss t o be gin A Technician Amateur Radio Class will start Saturday, Feb. 18 from 9 to 11 a.m. for seven weeks at the Marion County Sheriffs Office, Emergency Management Center, 692 N.W. 30th Ave., Ocala. The FCC test will be given on March 31, 2012 with a test fee of $15.00, collected on the test day. Manuals will be available to loan to students. This class should prepare you to pass the FCC test and obtain an Amateur Radio Technician License. For more information contact Charles Hensley at 352732-3795 or e-mail KC4Q@arrl.net.Hosp ic e trail ri de Hospice of Marion County, Inc. will hold its 12th annual Horses for Hospice Trail Ride on Sat., Feb. 18, on the Central Florida Greenway at the Florida Horse Park in Ocala. This years ride is in memory of Wayne Vaught, former Cross Florida Greenway enthusiast and Trail Ride chairman. Registration begins at 8 a.m. and the first ride leaves at 9:15 a.m. Riders travel from as far as Jacksonville and Tampa to spend 2-3 hours on the trail. Following the ride, participants can enjoy lunch by Tommys BBQ, live entertainment by Bordertown, and door prizes. Proceeds from this event will benefit Patient Care Programs. The minimum donation to ride is $30. Wagons are welcome; $30 for driver and $10 per passenger. Horse lovers who are unable to ride may purchase a $10 ticket to enjoy lunch and entertainment. For more information or to register, call 352-854-5218. Sunday, Feb. 19 Ge r m an Ame rican C l ub eve nt The German American Club of Marion County will host a Fasching Party on Sunday, Feb. 19, from 2 to 6 p.m. at the Marion Oaks Community Center. Wear a costume, bring beads and join in the fun for $10 per member or $15 per non-member. Music provided by Alpine Express. Bring your own snacks and beverages. Attire is either a costume or dressy casual. For tickets, call Liz or Joe at 352-732-6368. Tuesday, Feb. 21 Bahia Oa ks t o mee t Bahia Oaks Mobile Homeowners Association holds their monthly meetings on the 3rd Tuesday of each month at the Freedom Library beginning at 6:30 p.m. This months meeting will be on Feb. 21. All Bahia Oaks Homeowners are invited to attend. S hr ove Tuesd a y p anca ke suppe r Holy Faith Episcopal Church in Blue Cove, Dunnellon will host a delicious, complete pancake supper on Feb. 21 from 5 to 7 p.m. Everyone is welcome. $6 donation. Call the church office at 352-489-2685 for more information. Thursday, Feb. 23 Gospe l gr oup t o a ppe ar A top gospel group, The Chuck Wagon Gang, will perform at Christs Church of Marion County on Thursday, Feb. 23, at 6 p.m. Over 75 years as history's best record selling gospel quartet (over 39 million records sold at one record company alone) you will see an example of a style that has remained consistent thoughout all those years due to advice always followed: "Sing the old songs and sing 'em the way they should be sung." Among familiar favorites you will hear "Echoes from the Burning Bush", The Church In The Wildwood" and "I'll Fly Away. Enjoy an evening of family entertainment and be transported to a time and place where life was a bit simpler and time seemed to move at a slower pace. There is no admission charge; a freewill offering will be received. Christ's Church of Marion County is at 6768 S.W. 80th St., off State Road 200, Ocala, 352-861-6182, www.ccomc.orgSaturday, Feb. 25 K ing dom of th e Su n Co nc e rt Ban d The Kingdom of the Sun Concert Band will present A Musical Potpourri concert series on Saturday, Feb. 25 at 2 p.m. and Sunday, Feb. 26 at 3 p.m. at the Marion Technical Institute (formerly Forest High School), 1614 S.E. Fort King St., Ocala. Musical selections include Highlights from CATS, Jericho, More Than You Know, Slippery Gentlemen (featuring the trombone section) and others. All performances are free and open to the public. For more information, call 352-624-9291 or check out the bands website at www.kingdomofthesunband.org.I nt e rnati o nal F oods F es ti v al Join us for the 18th annual International Foods Festival on Saturday, Feb. 25 at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 7171 S.W. State Road 200, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Enrichment Center. Enjoy food specialties from Italy, Germany, Spain, England, Ireland, Sweden, Poland Jamaica, Greece, Mexico and many more. Generous food samples are priced at $1 and $2. For more information, call the church office at 352-2373035. Monday, Feb. 27 Re tir ed n u r ses t o mee t The Citrus Marion Chapter of the Registered Nurses Retired (RNR) will meet at the Inverness Golf and Country Club on Monday, Feb. 27. Sign in for the meeting starts at 11 a.m., lunch at 11:30 and the speaker follows a noon. Our speaker will be Karen Strouse of the Guardian Ad Litem Program. Our charity will be the Guardian Ad Litem Program and a cash donation is appreciated. Retired RN's wishing to attend should contact Mary Jane at 352-726-6882 or Gladys at 352-854-2677 by Wednesday, Feb. 22. Happenings

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, February 15, 2012 9 4 Wednesday, February 15, 2012 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger The West Marion Messenger is a free community newspaper covering news of communities west of Ocala including Fore Ranch, Stone Creek, Fairfield Village, Ocala Palms, Timberwood, Falls of Ocala, Quail Meadow, Foxwood Farms and Golden Hills. Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala, Fla., 34477. Problems getting the Messenger: If your community is listed above and the Messenger is not delivered to you or you are having trouble getting the paper from boxes around the S.R. 40 and SR 27 areas, call 854-3986.CONTACT INFORMATION(352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 854-9277 8810 S.W. State Road 200, Suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481 Editor Jim Clark Circulation Barbara Jaggers Inside Sales/Office Coordinator -Michel Northsea Advertising Sales Tom Rapplean and Susie Mirabile Regional Manager John Provost Deadline for news : Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication. Member of the Community Papers of Florida I want to get news in the Messenger. Call editor Jim Clark at 352-854-3986 or send by e-mail to editor@westmarionmessenger.comCommunity news and photos must be received by Friday the week before publication. Mail and photos may be left at the Messenger office in Kingsland Plaza. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.Deadline for AdvertisingClassified Reader Ads 4 pm Friday Display Ads 5 pm Thursday EARS is a Non-Profit Organization Federal ID#59-3741622 EARS Endangered Animal Rescue Society One Day Membership Drive & Animal TourSee Lions, Tigers, Bears and More! LOCATED NEAR OCALA Must R.S.V.P. for tour. Contact Steffie at 407-647-6328 or Email skb255@aol.comwww.earsinc.netSATURDAY, MARCH 3 12:30-2:30pmKids Tour Limited Space AvailableCost: Kids 2-10 $10 10 and over $15 SATURDAY, MARCH 17 12:30-2:30pmLarge Group Tour Cost: 15 per person Must be 10 or older to attend this tour.REGISTRATION FOR EACH TOUR BEGINS AT 12:30PM CANADIAN MEDS 000AHR2 Quality Medications, Low Prices Viagra 100mg $4.00 ea. Plavix 75mg 100 ct. $77.00 Nexium 40mg 100 ct. $88.00 Boniva 3 pills $69.00WE SHIP ANYWHERE IN THE U.S.A. Call for a FREE quote today 7380 SW 60th Ave., Ste #1, Ocala237-0021 Locally Owned and Operated NEW CUSTOMERS PRESENT THIS AD AND GET $10 OFF! On RX Drugs 000AF8L John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000A6WT 000AJCN 0 0 0 A I P U 000A9HZ By Gary ShepardS PECIALTOTHEM ESSENGER On Jan. 28, residents of Ocala Palms were treated to an evening of foot stomping, good old down home music by the Ocala Band, Backwater. Renditions of many old familiar tunes, played in their Bluegrass Style, kept the record crowd jumping in their seats. While we have enjoyed their music and humor on several previous occasions, the enthusiasm demonstrated by the attendees was electric. Their up-beat, Contemporary Bluegrass music continues to excite our Community. Those in attendance, who were new to the group, voiced high praise for the event. Several folks requested that they be brought back for a repeat concert soon. Enjoyment of their music was further verified by the brisk sales of their newly released C D, Its About Time. Backwater is one of Ocalas oldest continuous performing bands. Over the years they have performed at many private venues like Ocala Palms, as well as various venues along Silver Springs Boulevard, at The Silver Springs Concert Series, and on the City Square. They also have played at many area festivals. Participating on the Concert Committee were Sharron and Lee Albert, Eunice and Hank Davis, Barb and Joe Dedics, Marilyn and Tom Hinds, Mary Laske, Judy and John Mitton, Sharon Pressey, Bonnie and Dick Rowland, Gary Shepard, Gail and Ken Sims, and Barb and Gardner Spencer. The community wishes to thank them for their efforts to coordinate this event. Backwater entertains Ocala Palms residents Tom and Marilyn Hinds Mary Hahn, Nancy Myron, Janice Lambui, Rita and Ron Neff Bill Negron, Marcia Shelton, Kay Negron and Jack Shelton Simpson and Bette ScottSharon Pressey and Gary Shepard Ralph and Norma Marble More photos on Page 5 Ginger Cossar, Carol Ann Belcher, Pat Andrews and Mitz Maclay Brian Smith, Doug and Diane Lindeman Judy Mitton, Barb Spencer and Gary Shepard Barb Caprice Kenneth Drews Carol and Frank Farfalla Desmond and Dorothy Larsen EVANGELIST TIM LEE RETURNING TO OCALA February 19 10:45 a.m. & 6:00 pm February 22 7:00 pm FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 9510 SW 105TH STREET OCALA, FL 237-2640 ~SW ON HWY 200 ~ One mile past Top of the World One of Americas premiere Evangelists will be speaking at the Friendship Baptist Church, 9510 SW 105th Street, Ocala, Florida. Tim Lee has preached not only across the country, but around the world. After losing his legs to a Vietnamese land mine in 1971, Tim has dedicated his life to preaching the Gospel. His message is timely as well as needed during the uncertain times in which we live. Special Music provided by Grace Plus Four. (Linda Brown, Tina Mineo, Vicki Helbert & Randa Blackley)

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, February 15, 2012 5 8 Wednesday, February 15, 2012 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger RENEWED SURFACES We Specialize In Repairing Your Concrete Not Just Coloring Over It!! WE MAKE YOUR CONCRETE LOOK GOOD! By Re-Surfacing Your Concrete! Driveways Pool Decks Patios Garages Entrance Ways Non Skid Protection Many Colors! Easy to Keep Clean Mildew & Oil Resistant Commercial Grade Quality NEW CONCRETE 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable We Install New or Replace Old Slabs Driveways Drive Extensions Patios Walkways Total Concrete Service A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000A93F 00075X7 Clip and Save Clip and Save Clip and Save Clip and Save Grandfather Clock 352-873-7587 GRANDFATHER CLOCK REPAIR Service and repairs 43 years full time experience Specializing in floor clocks. In Florida Jan., Feb., Mar., April (In Pennsylvania the other months) 0 0 0 A I 4 1 0009RZK 352-347-9198 STEVE GRINDLES R ETRACTABLE G ARAGE D OOR S CREENS Operates in conjunction with your garage door. Motorized with remote control Gives privacy, heat reduction and air circulation 80% protection from UV rays Can be operated in a power failure Keeps pests & bugs out Will fit arched doorways High quality PVC screen available in 6 attractive colors. G ARAGE D OOR R EPAIR 8 Years Experience ~ Licensed and Insured www.RetractScreen.com T R A N S F O R M Y O U R G A R A G E T R A N S F O R M Y O U R G A R A G E TRANSFORM YOUR GARAGE 000AFU4 Door to Door Airport ServiceSeaports too Great Price No Ride Share EVER (352) 641-0651 R AMUNNO L AW F IRM P A Lorenzo Ramunno, Esq. Member of Florida Bar and New York Bar Wills and Estate Planning Probate Law Trusts and Trust Administration Real Estate Contracts Powers of Attorney Pre-Marital Agreements We offer free consultations for Estate Planning Serving clients in Florida for 23 years. Call to schedule an appointment. 000AG7D 352-854-5570 www.flprobate.net Ramunno Law Firm MAIN OFFICE OFF HWY. 200 Jasmine Professional Park 7500 SW 61st Ave., #100 Ocala, FL 34476 000AE8E EXPIRES 3/4/12 WMM SMC Must have 4 players. Not valid with any other offer. Valid All Day All inclusive: 18 holes of golf & golf carts, hotdog lunch special. Including tax. Book Tee Times Online www.pineoaksocala.com $ 9 9 0 0 $ 99 00 WEEKEND 4 SOME SPECIAL Saturday & Sunday ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your ideas are finally reaching those who can appreciate them. But dont expect any immediate reactions. That will come later. Meanwhile, a personal matter needs your attention. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Your energy levels are rising, and youre feeling restless and eager to get into some activity, whether its for profit or just for fun. In either case, the aspects are highly favorable, so go for it. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A relationship seems to be winding down from passionate to passive. Its up to you to decide what the next step will be. But dont wait too long to take the initiative. Delay could create more problems. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A decision looms. But be very sure that this is what you really want before you sign or say anything. Once you act, therell be little or no wiggle room for any adjustments. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) Money matters improve, but you still need to be cautious with your spending. Also, set aside that Leonine pride for a bit and apologize for contributing to that misunderstanding. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) A tempting financial situation could make the usually unflappable Virgo rush in before checking things out. Be alert to possible hidden problems. Get the facts before you act. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Its nice to know that youre finally getting due credit for your efforts. You also should know that new opportunities will follow. A family member brings important news. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Any uncertainty that begins to cloud an impending decision could signal a need to re-examine your reasons for wanting to take on this commitment. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You benefit from taking time out of your currently hectic schedule to do more contemplation or meditation. This will help re-energize you, both in body and soul. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Nursing hurt feelings can zap the energies of even the usually self-confident Sea Goat. Best advice: Move forward. Success is the best balm for a painful ego. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) A display of temperament surprises you, as well as those around you. It could be all that pressure youre under. Consider letting someone help you see it through. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Some things dont seem to be working out as youd hoped. Dont fret. Instead, take some time out to reassess your plans and see where changes could be made. BORN THIS WEEK: You enjoy traveling and meeting people. You are especially good with children and would make an excellent teacher. 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Leisure Mary Lou and Craig Cotton Marie and Tom Murphy Lee and Sharron Albert Kay and Lou Rossi Karen and Brian Smith Jamie and Melinda Jones James and Arlene Young Jack and Donna Neal Gary and Sandy Nelson Gail and Ken Sims More on Page 9

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, February 15, 2012 7 6 Wednesday, February 15, 2012 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Among Friends On Point Entertainers shouldnt be our idols Driver crackdown shouldnt be limited T he Florida Highway Patrol has announced a crackdown on aggressive driving. That includes speeding, tailgating, changing lanes without signals, which amounts to weaving in and out of traffic, and so forth. This emphasis is coming Feb. 27-29. Heres the question: Shouldnt this be done all the time? Why do we need special crackdowns to enforce traffic laws? We come to the same conclusion when we hear about DUI crackdowns. Shouldnt we be cracking down on these people all the time? We used to get upset when we got news releases that there was going to be a DUI checkpoint in a couple of days in a certain location. Why warn the public? Just do it. Turns out theres a state law, which seems silly to us, that law enforcement has to notify the public about an upcoming checkpoint. Maybe there was once a state legislator who was caught in one of these, and he wanted to make sure he wasnt surprised again. Would we tolerate a law that required law enforcement to say, Were staking out a convenience store on such and such a date? That would be tantamount to telling the bad guys to go somewhere else that night. Why should it be different with safety checkpoints? So we call on the Legislature to repeal this notification law, and let traffic enforcers do their job. But we also call for a crackdown on aggressive driving all 365 (or this year, 366) days of the year. And dont give the public any warning. Just be there, and calm down some of these drivers. O ur M essage PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGAN REGIONALMANAGER: JOHN PROVOST EDITOR: JIM CLARK Messenger WEST MARION Editorial Guest column Y our L etters Living off the fat of the landBy Jim Flynn M any of us wonder why there arent any stop buttons for federal spending, deficits, and debt. One reason is that there are thousands of government employees working diligently to preserve and expand federal programs. Coincidentally their efforts ensure tenured employment and opportunities for promotions as more employees are hired to administer their agencys essential services. In 1996, after considerable political controversy, President Clinton announced Today we are ending welfare as we know it. His choice of words was intentionally glib as we know it. Federal welfare didnt end. It was transferred to state governments, which receive federal funding grants. For times like our protracted current recession, basic and necessary welfare is in better hands close to people in temporary need of child care, financial help, and housing assistance. Relieved of responsibility for welfare as they knew it, the federal government might have breathed a sigh of relief and closed down its assistance windows, but thats not how things work in Washington. With 45 members, Agriculture is one of the most popular House committees. Seems like every member of congress whose district has dirt, grass, and a few cows would like to have a seat on the Agriculture Committee. The Department of Agriculture (USDA) has become a stealth welfare agency, which administers many social and subsidy programs. A new-name agriculture program was established by the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. It created funding and policy for administration of USDAs nutrition programs: The National School Lunch Program, the National School Breakfast Program, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, the Summer Food Services Program, and the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Before the Hunger-Free Kids Act was adopted, our curiosity had been drawn to first lady Michelle Obamas White House garden, which was planted in 2009 and expanded in 2010, Her war on obesity was announced soon after her successful second crop. In a column at the time we wondered whether the garden was a publicity prelude to the obesity campaign. A recent news report from the New Ulm Minnesota Journal referred to Michelle Obamas pet Healthy, HungerFree Kids Act, as a commendable cause. The report said: For the first time in years the U.S. Department of Agriculture has reworked nutrition rules for school meals fewer calories, more fruits and vegetables. At the behest of suppliers, pizza and French fries will be considered vegetables. Politics and patronage in Washington are usually accompanied by leverage. Thus an important new federal initiative emerged from a humble beginning in the White House vegetable garden. In the Federal Register, under Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services, the Obama obesity program is titled: Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. With obesity, pizza, and fries in the mix, the Hunger-Free Kids Act is now an essential service which will be belching out food regulations for all reasons and seasons. No distinguishing name has been attached to the new initiative. We suggest the diligent group of nutrition administrators be referred Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per week. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 104, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. Jim Clark Editor I n the mid 1990s, while coaching a youth baseball team, I used to dread lining up for the national anthem. Most leagues were then playing the version that was in vogue, Whitney Houstons rendition in 1991 at the Super Bowl, shortly after the Gulf War started. To be sure, it was a great and heartfelt performance which helped send the nation into a patriotic frenzy at a time when we needed it. The problem is that it was long and slow. And if youve ever tried to keep a line of 12-year-olds quiet and attentive for that amount of time, when theyre about to play a baseball game, well, you know what I mean. Eventually the fad ended, and we went back to the good old military band version of the Star Spangled Banner. That was the first thing I thought of when I heard of Whitney Houstons death over the weekend. When you realized her age, and the problems she had in her life, somehow you shouldnt have been surprised that it ended that way. I see all the adulation being bestowed on her in the past few days, and I wonder how many people paid attention to her struggles. How many of these same people offered to help her overcome her problems. Personally, while I hope for recovery for all these people, I find it hard to feel like I should praise them. To be sure, she was a great singer with a great voice. But like so many others, she strayed into the land of addiction. For those parents who push their children into the entertainment field, whether they enjoy it or not, it comes as a lesson that maybe living the ordinary life, without that much fame and money, is a better thing to teach. I thought the same thing when Michael Jackson died. With all the things he was accused of, I didnt understand how so many people could idolize him. And after the trial last year of his doctor revealed the drugs he was taking, I still dont. Houstons death comes on the heels of another death, this time of a little known singer, Leslie Carter. She died on Jan. 31. The Tampa native was perhaps best known as the sister of one of the Backstreet Boys. Although no official cause of death has yet been released, it was widely believed to be an overdose of prescription medication. The problem is that deaths of entertainers have become so commonplace that the American public doesnt get excited unless its a big-name star. So folks, when youre picking someone to idolize, make sure that person has earned it by the type of person they are, not because of what or how they sing, dance or act. There are many good people in the world who may be known only to a few, but who deserve the attention far more than some of our entertainers. Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger. He can be reached at editor@westmarionmessenger.com or at 352-854-3986. Re-elect no one Last week the U. S. House and Senate began creation of a law to limit their members ability to conduct insider trading in the stock markets. Their action on this matter may have been prompted by a November 2011 top selling book from Peter Schweizer. Schweizer is a Fellow at the Hoover Institute at Stanford University, and his latest work is a revealing look at how these politicians use their power and position to enrich both themselves and a selected group of friends. Insider trading is only one of their money making schemes. The book is titled; Throw Them All Out: How politicians and their friends get rich off insider stock tips, land deals, and cronyism that would send the rest of us to Please see LETTER Page 10 FAMILY FEATURES C hickenisapopularchoiceforfamilydinnersbutnomatterhowmuchyourfamilyenjoys it,servingitthesamewayoverandoveragaincanstirupcravingsforsomethingnew. Chef Tim Love knows all about finding new ways to enjoy familiar foods. Hes teaming up with the Hellmanns Brand to let home cooks know about a little secret to spice up their everyday chicken dishes. Even with our busy schedules, I enjoy cooking for my family with go-to ingredients that I know everyone will love, says Love. One of my familys favorite recipes is Parmesan Crusted Chicken. Its chicken done right tender, juicy and delicious thanks to a secret ingredient Hellmanns Real Mayonnaise. Dishes like Parmesan Crusted Chicken are easy and tasty ways to break menu monotony. Following are four more favorites, each with only four steps so theyre simple to prepare and can be on the table in just 30 minutes or less. Visit www.Hellmanns.com for quick and easy meal ideas and vote for your favorite recipe.Parmesan Crusted Chicken4 servings Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes 1/2 cup Hellmanns or Best Foods Real Mayonnaise 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese 4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 1 1/4 pounds) 4 teaspoons Italian seasoned dry bread crumbs Preheat oven to 425F. 1.Combine mayonnaise with cheese in medium bowl. 2.Arrange chicken on baking sheet. Evenly top with mayonnaise mixture. 3.Sprinkle with bread crumbs. 4.Bake 20 minutes or until chicken is thoroughly cooked. Nutrition information per serving: Calories 370, Calories From Fat 210, Saturated Fat 4g, Trans Fat 0g, Total Fat 23g, Cholesterol 100mg, Sodium 390mg, Total Carbohydrate 2g, Sugars 1g, Dietary Fiber 0g, Protein 35g, Vitamin A 2%, Vitamin C 2%, Calcium 8%, Iron 6% Asian Crusted Chicken4 servings Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes 1/2 cup Hellmanns or Best Foods Real Mayonnaise 1 green onion, chopped 1 teaspoon reduced sodium soy sauce 1/2 teaspoon finely grated fresh ginger or 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 1 1/4 pounds) 1/4 cup plain dry bread crumbs or panko bread crumbs Preheat oven to 425F. 1.Combine mayonnaise, green onion, soy sauce and ginger in medium bowl. 2.Arrange chicken on baking sheet. Evenly top with mayonnaise mixture. 3.Sprinkle with bread crumbs and sesame seeds. 4.Bake 20 minutes or until chicken is thoroughly cooked. Tip: For an extra layer of flavor, combine breadcrumbs with 1 tablespoon sesame seeds before sprinkling over chicken. Nutrition information per serving: Calories 370, Calories From Fat 210, SaturatedFat3.5g,TransFat0g,TotalFat24g, Cholesterol 100mg, Sodium 440mg, Total Carbohydrate 6g, Sugars 1g, Dietary Fiber 0g, Protein 31g, Vitamin A 2%, Vitamin C 4%, Calcium 2%, Iron 6% Spinach and Almond-Topped Chicken 4 servings Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes 1 1/2 tablespoons Hellmanns or Best Foods Real Mayonnaise 1 cup loosely packed baby spinach leaves, chopped 1 tablespoon chopped almonds 2 teaspoons grated Parmesan cheese 1 teaspoon plain dry bread crumbs 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (about 1 pound) Preheat oven to 425F. 1.In medium bowl, combine all ingredients except chicken. 2.On baking sheet, arrange chicken. 3.Evenly top with mayonnaise mixture. 4.Bake 15 minutes or until chicken is thoroughly cooked. Nutrition information per serving: Calories 180, Calories From Fat 60, Saturated Fat 1g, Trans Fat 0g, Total Fat 6g, Cholesterol 10mg, Sodium 140mg, Total Carbohydrate 2g, Sugars 0g, Dietary Fiber 0g, Protein 27g, Vitamin A 4%, Vitamin C 4%, Calcium 4%, Iron 6% Tuscan Glazed Chicken6 servings Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes 1/3 cup Hellmanns or Best Foods Real Mayonnaise 3 tablespoons finely chopped roasted red pepper 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar 6 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 2 pounds) Preheat oven to 425F. 1.Combine all ingredients except chicken in medium bowl. 2.Arrange chicken on baking sheet. 3.Evenly top with mayonnaise mixture. 4.Bake 20 minutes or until chicken is thoroughly cooked. Nutrition information per serving: Calories 240, Calories From Fat 70, Saturated Fat 1g, Trans Fat 0g, Total Fat 8g, Cholesterol 90mg, Sodium 270mg, Total Carbohydrate 2g, Sugars 0g, Dietary Fiber 0g, Protein 35g, Vitamin A 2%, Vitamin C 4%, Calcium 2%, Iron 8% Tuscan Glazed Chicken Asian Crusted Chicken Spinach and Almond-Topped Chicken Parmesan Crusted Chicken

PAGE 7

messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, February 15, 2012 7 6 Wednesday, February 15, 2012 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger West Marion Messenger 8810 W. State Road 200, suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com Opinion Among Friends On Point Entertainers shouldnt be our idols Driver crackdown shouldnt be limited T he Florida Highway Patrol has announced a crackdown on aggressive driving. That includes speeding, tailgating, changing lanes without signals, which amounts to weaving in and out of traffic, and so forth. This emphasis is coming Feb. 27-29. Heres the question: Shouldnt this be done all the time? Why do we need special crackdowns to enforce traffic laws? We come to the same conclusion when we hear about DUI crackdowns. Shouldnt we be cracking down on these people all the time? We used to get upset when we got news releases that there was going to be a DUI checkpoint in a couple of days in a certain location. Why warn the public? Just do it. Turns out theres a state law, which seems silly to us, that law enforcement has to notify the public about an upcoming checkpoint. Maybe there was once a state legislator who was caught in one of these, and he wanted to make sure he wasnt surprised again. Would we tolerate a law that required law enforcement to say, Were staking out a convenience store on such and such a date? That would be tantamount to telling the bad guys to go somewhere else that night. Why should it be different with safety checkpoints? So we call on the Legislature to repeal this notification law, and let traffic enforcers do their job. But we also call for a crackdown on aggressive driving all 365 (or this year, 366) days of the year. And dont give the public any warning. Just be there, and calm down some of these drivers. O ur M essage PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGAN REGIONALMANAGER: JOHN PROVOST EDITOR: JIM CLARK Messenger WEST MARION Editorial Guest column Y our L etters Living off the fat of the landBy Jim Flynn M any of us wonder why there arent any stop buttons for federal spending, deficits, and debt. One reason is that there are thousands of government employees working diligently to preserve and expand federal programs. Coincidentally their efforts ensure tenured employment and opportunities for promotions as more employees are hired to administer their agencys essential services. In 1996, after considerable political controversy, President Clinton announced Today we are ending welfare as we know it. His choice of words was intentionally glib as we know it. Federal welfare didnt end. It was transferred to state governments, which receive federal funding grants. For times like our protracted current recession, basic and necessary welfare is in better hands close to people in temporary need of child care, financial help, and housing assistance. Relieved of responsibility for welfare as they knew it, the federal government might have breathed a sigh of relief and closed down its assistance windows, but thats not how things work in Washington. With 45 members, Agriculture is one of the most popular House committees. Seems like every member of congress whose district has dirt, grass, and a few cows would like to have a seat on the Agriculture Committee. The Department of Agriculture (USDA) has become a stealth welfare agency, which administers many social and subsidy programs. A new-name agriculture program was established by the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. It created funding and policy for administration of USDAs nutrition programs: The National School Lunch Program, the National School Breakfast Program, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, the Summer Food Services Program, and the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Before the Hunger-Free Kids Act was adopted, our curiosity had been drawn to first lady Michelle Obamas White House garden, which was planted in 2009 and expanded in 2010, Her war on obesity was announced soon after her successful second crop. In a column at the time we wondered whether the garden was a publicity prelude to the obesity campaign. A recent news report from the New Ulm Minnesota Journal referred to Michelle Obamas pet Healthy, HungerFree Kids Act, as a commendable cause. The report said: For the first time in years the U.S. Department of Agriculture has reworked nutrition rules for school meals fewer calories, more fruits and vegetables. At the behest of suppliers, pizza and French fries will be considered vegetables. Politics and patronage in Washington are usually accompanied by leverage. Thus an important new federal initiative emerged from a humble beginning in the White House vegetable garden. In the Federal Register, under Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services, the Obama obesity program is titled: Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. With obesity, pizza, and fries in the mix, the Hunger-Free Kids Act is now an essential service which will be belching out food regulations for all reasons and seasons. No distinguishing name has been attached to the new initiative. We suggest the diligent group of nutrition administrators be referred Reader Opinions Invited The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the newspaper. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 854-3986. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name, including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Not all contributons are printed. Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per week. The deadline is one week prior to each Wednesdays issue. Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 104, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com. Jim Clark Editor I n the mid 1990s, while coaching a youth baseball team, I used to dread lining up for the national anthem. Most leagues were then playing the version that was in vogue, Whitney Houstons rendition in 1991 at the Super Bowl, shortly after the Gulf War started. To be sure, it was a great and heartfelt performance which helped send the nation into a patriotic frenzy at a time when we needed it. The problem is that it was long and slow. And if youve ever tried to keep a line of 12-year-olds quiet and attentive for that amount of time, when theyre about to play a baseball game, well, you know what I mean. Eventually the fad ended, and we went back to the good old military band version of the Star Spangled Banner. That was the first thing I thought of when I heard of Whitney Houstons death over the weekend. When you realized her age, and the problems she had in her life, somehow you shouldnt have been surprised that it ended that way. I see all the adulation being bestowed on her in the past few days, and I wonder how many people paid attention to her struggles. How many of these same people offered to help her overcome her problems. Personally, while I hope for recovery for all these people, I find it hard to feel like I should praise them. To be sure, she was a great singer with a great voice. But like so many others, she strayed into the land of addiction. For those parents who push their children into the entertainment field, whether they enjoy it or not, it comes as a lesson that maybe living the ordinary life, without that much fame and money, is a better thing to teach. I thought the same thing when Michael Jackson died. With all the things he was accused of, I didnt understand how so many people could idolize him. And after the trial last year of his doctor revealed the drugs he was taking, I still dont. Houstons death comes on the heels of another death, this time of a little known singer, Leslie Carter. She died on Jan. 31. The Tampa native was perhaps best known as the sister of one of the Backstreet Boys. Although no official cause of death has yet been released, it was widely believed to be an overdose of prescription medication. The problem is that deaths of entertainers have become so commonplace that the American public doesnt get excited unless its a big-name star. So folks, when youre picking someone to idolize, make sure that person has earned it by the type of person they are, not because of what or how they sing, dance or act. There are many good people in the world who may be known only to a few, but who deserve the attention far more than some of our entertainers. Jim Clark is the editor of the West Marion Messenger. He can be reached at editor@westmarionmessenger.com or at 352-854-3986. Re-elect no one Last week the U. S. House and Senate began creation of a law to limit their members ability to conduct insider trading in the stock markets. Their action on this matter may have been prompted by a November 2011 top selling book from Peter Schweizer. Schweizer is a Fellow at the Hoover Institute at Stanford University, and his latest work is a revealing look at how these politicians use their power and position to enrich both themselves and a selected group of friends. Insider trading is only one of their money making schemes. The book is titled; Throw Them All Out: How politicians and their friends get rich off insider stock tips, land deals, and cronyism that would send the rest of us to Please see LETTER Page 10 FAMILY FEATURES C hickenisapopularchoiceforfamilydinnersbutnomatterhowmuchyourfamilyenjoys it,servingitthesamewayoverandoveragaincanstirupcravingsforsomethingnew. Chef Tim Love knows all about finding new ways to enjoy familiar foods. Hes teaming up with the Hellmanns Brand to let home cooks know about a little secret to spice up their everyday chicken dishes. Even with our busy schedules, I enjoy cooking for my family with go-to ingredients that I know everyone will love, says Love. One of my familys favorite recipes is Parmesan Crusted Chicken. Its chicken done right tender, juicy and delicious thanks to a secret ingredient Hellmanns Real Mayonnaise. Dishes like Parmesan Crusted Chicken are easy and tasty ways to break menu monotony. Following are four more favorites, each with only four steps so theyre simple to prepare and can be on the table in just 30 minutes or less. Visit www.Hellmanns.com for quick and easy meal ideas and vote for your favorite recipe.Parmesan Crusted Chicken4 servings Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes 1/2 cup Hellmanns or Best Foods Real Mayonnaise 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese 4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 1 1/4 pounds) 4 teaspoons Italian seasoned dry bread crumbs Preheat oven to 425F. 1.Combine mayonnaise with cheese in medium bowl. 2.Arrange chicken on baking sheet. Evenly top with mayonnaise mixture. 3.Sprinkle with bread crumbs. 4.Bake 20 minutes or until chicken is thoroughly cooked. Nutrition information per serving: Calories 370, Calories From Fat 210, Saturated Fat 4g, Trans Fat 0g, Total Fat 23g, Cholesterol 100mg, Sodium 390mg, Total Carbohydrate 2g, Sugars 1g, Dietary Fiber 0g, Protein 35g, Vitamin A 2%, Vitamin C 2%, Calcium 8%, Iron 6% Asian Crusted Chicken4 servings Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes 1/2 cup Hellmanns or Best Foods Real Mayonnaise 1 green onion, chopped 1 teaspoon reduced sodium soy sauce 1/2 teaspoon finely grated fresh ginger or 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 1 1/4 pounds) 1/4 cup plain dry bread crumbs or panko bread crumbs Preheat oven to 425F. 1.Combine mayonnaise, green onion, soy sauce and ginger in medium bowl. 2.Arrange chicken on baking sheet. Evenly top with mayonnaise mixture. 3.Sprinkle with bread crumbs and sesame seeds. 4.Bake 20 minutes or until chicken is thoroughly cooked. Tip: For an extra layer of flavor, combine breadcrumbs with 1 tablespoon sesame seeds before sprinkling over chicken. Nutrition information per serving: Calories 370, Calories From Fat 210, SaturatedFat3.5g,TransFat0g,TotalFat24g, Cholesterol 100mg, Sodium 440mg, Total Carbohydrate 6g, Sugars 1g, Dietary Fiber 0g, Protein 31g, Vitamin A 2%, Vitamin C 4%, Calcium 2%, Iron 6% Spinach and Almond-Topped Chicken 4 servings Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes 1 1/2 tablespoons Hellmanns or Best Foods Real Mayonnaise 1 cup loosely packed baby spinach leaves, chopped 1 tablespoon chopped almonds 2 teaspoons grated Parmesan cheese 1 teaspoon plain dry bread crumbs 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (about 1 pound) Preheat oven to 425F. 1.In medium bowl, combine all ingredients except chicken. 2.On baking sheet, arrange chicken. 3.Evenly top with mayonnaise mixture. 4.Bake 15 minutes or until chicken is thoroughly cooked. Nutrition information per serving: Calories 180, Calories From Fat 60, Saturated Fat 1g, Trans Fat 0g, Total Fat 6g, Cholesterol 10mg, Sodium 140mg, Total Carbohydrate 2g, Sugars 0g, Dietary Fiber 0g, Protein 27g, Vitamin A 4%, Vitamin C 4%, Calcium 4%, Iron 6% Tuscan Glazed Chicken6 servings Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes 1/3 cup Hellmanns or Best Foods Real Mayonnaise 3 tablespoons finely chopped roasted red pepper 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar 6 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 2 pounds) Preheat oven to 425F. 1.Combine all ingredients except chicken in medium bowl. 2.Arrange chicken on baking sheet. 3.Evenly top with mayonnaise mixture. 4.Bake 20 minutes or until chicken is thoroughly cooked. Nutrition information per serving: Calories 240, Calories From Fat 70, Saturated Fat 1g, Trans Fat 0g, Total Fat 8g, Cholesterol 90mg, Sodium 270mg, Total Carbohydrate 2g, Sugars 0g, Dietary Fiber 0g, Protein 35g, Vitamin A 2%, Vitamin C 4%, Calcium 2%, Iron 8% Tuscan Glazed Chicken Asian Crusted Chicken Spinach and Almond-Topped Chicken Parmesan Crusted Chicken

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, February 15, 2012 5 8 Wednesday, February 15, 2012 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger RENEWED SURFACES We Specialize In Repairing Your Concrete Not Just Coloring Over It!! WE MAKE YOUR CONCRETE LOOK GOOD! By Re-Surfacing Your Concrete! Driveways Pool Decks Patios Garages Entrance Ways Non Skid Protection Many Colors! Easy to Keep Clean Mildew & Oil Resistant Commercial Grade Quality NEW CONCRETE 352-237-2796 Family Owned & Operated Since 1972 Licensed & Insured #3803 Dependable We Install New or Replace Old Slabs Driveways Drive Extensions Patios Walkways Total Concrete Service A Division of R.C. Cohn Construction 000A93F 00075X7 Clip and Save Clip and Save Clip and Save Clip and Save Grandfather Clock 352-873-7587 GRANDFATHER CLOCK REPAIR Service and repairs 43 years full time experience Specializing in floor clocks. In Florida Jan., Feb., Mar., April (In Pennsylvania the other months) 0 0 0 A I 4 1 0009RZK 352-347-9198 STEVE GRINDLES R ETRACTABLE G ARAGE D OOR S CREENS Operates in conjunction with your garage door. Motorized with remote control Gives privacy, heat reduction and air circulation 80% protection from UV rays Can be operated in a power failure Keeps pests & bugs out Will fit arched doorways High quality PVC screen available in 6 attractive colors. G ARAGE D OOR R EPAIR 8 Years Experience ~ Licensed and Insured www.RetractScreen.com T R A N S F O R M Y O U R G A R A G E T R A N S F O R M Y O U R G A R A G E TRANSFORM YOUR GARAGE 000AFU4 Door to Door Airport ServiceSeaports too Great Price No Ride Share EVER (352) 641-0651 R AMUNNO L AW F IRM P A Lorenzo Ramunno, Esq. Member of Florida Bar and New York Bar Wills and Estate Planning Probate Law Trusts and Trust Administration Real Estate Contracts Powers of Attorney Pre-Marital Agreements We offer free consultations for Estate Planning Serving clients in Florida for 23 years. Call to schedule an appointment. 000AG7D 352-854-5570 www.flprobate.net Ramunno Law Firm MAIN OFFICE OFF HWY. 200 Jasmine Professional Park 7500 SW 61st Ave., #100 Ocala, FL 34476 000AE8E EXPIRES 3/4/12 WMM SMC Must have 4 players. Not valid with any other offer. Valid All Day All inclusive: 18 holes of golf & golf carts, hotdog lunch special. Including tax. Book Tee Times Online www.pineoaksocala.com $ 9 9 0 0 $ 99 00 WEEKEND 4 SOME SPECIAL Saturday & Sunday ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your ideas are finally reaching those who can appreciate them. But dont expect any immediate reactions. That will come later. Meanwhile, a personal matter needs your attention. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Your energy levels are rising, and youre feeling restless and eager to get into some activity, whether its for profit or just for fun. In either case, the aspects are highly favorable, so go for it. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A relationship seems to be winding down from passionate to passive. Its up to you to decide what the next step will be. But dont wait too long to take the initiative. Delay could create more problems. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A decision looms. But be very sure that this is what you really want before you sign or say anything. Once you act, therell be little or no wiggle room for any adjustments. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) Money matters improve, but you still need to be cautious with your spending. Also, set aside that Leonine pride for a bit and apologize for contributing to that misunderstanding. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) A tempting financial situation could make the usually unflappable Virgo rush in before checking things out. Be alert to possible hidden problems. Get the facts before you act. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Its nice to know that youre finally getting due credit for your efforts. You also should know that new opportunities will follow. A family member brings important news. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Any uncertainty that begins to cloud an impending decision could signal a need to re-examine your reasons for wanting to take on this commitment. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You benefit from taking time out of your currently hectic schedule to do more contemplation or meditation. This will help re-energize you, both in body and soul. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Nursing hurt feelings can zap the energies of even the usually self-confident Sea Goat. Best advice: Move forward. Success is the best balm for a painful ego. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) A display of temperament surprises you, as well as those around you. It could be all that pressure youre under. Consider letting someone help you see it through. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Some things dont seem to be working out as youd hoped. Dont fret. Instead, take some time out to reassess your plans and see where changes could be made. BORN THIS WEEK: You enjoy traveling and meeting people. You are especially good with children and would make an excellent teacher. 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Leisure Mary Lou and Craig Cotton Marie and Tom Murphy Lee and Sharron Albert Kay and Lou Rossi Karen and Brian Smith Jamie and Melinda Jones James and Arlene Young Jack and Donna Neal Gary and Sandy Nelson Gail and Ken Sims More on Page 9

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, February 15, 2012 9 4 Wednesday, February 15, 2012 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger The West Marion Messenger is a free community newspaper covering news of communities west of Ocala including Fore Ranch, Stone Creek, Fairfield Village, Ocala Palms, Timberwood, Falls of Ocala, Quail Meadow, Foxwood Farms and Golden Hills. Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala, Fla., 34477. Problems getting the Messenger: If your community is listed above and the Messenger is not delivered to you or you are having trouble getting the paper from boxes around the S.R. 40 and SR 27 areas, call 854-3986.CONTACT INFORMATION(352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 854-9277 8810 S.W. State Road 200, Suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481 Editor Jim Clark Circulation Barbara Jaggers Inside Sales/Office Coordinator -Michel Northsea Advertising Sales Tom Rapplean and Susie Mirabile Regional Manager John Provost Deadline for news : Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication. Member of the Community Papers of Florida I want to get news in the Messenger. Call editor Jim Clark at 352-854-3986 or send by e-mail to editor@westmarionmessenger.comCommunity news and photos must be received by Friday the week before publication. Mail and photos may be left at the Messenger office in Kingsland Plaza. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.Deadline for AdvertisingClassified Reader Ads 4 pm Friday Display Ads 5 pm Thursday EARS is a Non-Profit Organization Federal ID#59-3741622 EARS Endangered Animal Rescue Society One Day Membership Drive & Animal TourSee Lions, Tigers, Bears and More! LOCATED NEAR OCALA Must R.S.V.P. for tour. Contact Steffie at 407-647-6328 or Email skb255@aol.comwww.earsinc.netSATURDAY, MARCH 3 12:30-2:30pmKids Tour Limited Space AvailableCost: Kids 2-10 $10 10 and over $15 SATURDAY, MARCH 17 12:30-2:30pmLarge Group Tour Cost: 15 per person Must be 10 or older to attend this tour.REGISTRATION FOR EACH TOUR BEGINS AT 12:30PM CANADIAN MEDS 000AHR2 Quality Medications, Low Prices Viagra 100mg $4.00 ea. Plavix 75mg 100 ct. $77.00 Nexium 40mg 100 ct. $88.00 Boniva 3 pills $69.00WE SHIP ANYWHERE IN THE U.S.A. Call for a FREE quote today 7380 SW 60th Ave., Ste #1, Ocala237-0021 Locally Owned and Operated NEW CUSTOMERS PRESENT THIS AD AND GET $10 OFF! On RX Drugs 000AF8L John M. Boyett, Jr. Financial Advisor Free Investment Reviews 352-237-2008 800-757-3129 8441 SW Hwy. 200, Ste. 119 Ocala Fl 34481 www.edwardjones.com Member SIP C 000A6WT 000AJCN 0 0 0 A I P U 000A9HZ By Gary ShepardS PECIALTOTHEM ESSENGER On Jan. 28, residents of Ocala Palms were treated to an evening of foot stomping, good old down home music by the Ocala Band, Backwater. Renditions of many old familiar tunes, played in their Bluegrass Style, kept the record crowd jumping in their seats. While we have enjoyed their music and humor on several previous occasions, the enthusiasm demonstrated by the attendees was electric. Their up-beat, Contemporary Bluegrass music continues to excite our Community. Those in attendance, who were new to the group, voiced high praise for the event. Several folks requested that they be brought back for a repeat concert soon. Enjoyment of their music was further verified by the brisk sales of their newly released C D, Its About Time. Backwater is one of Ocalas oldest continuous performing bands. Over the years they have performed at many private venues like Ocala Palms, as well as various venues along Silver Springs Boulevard, at The Silver Springs Concert Series, and on the City Square. They also have played at many area festivals. Participating on the Concert Committee were Sharron and Lee Albert, Eunice and Hank Davis, Barb and Joe Dedics, Marilyn and Tom Hinds, Mary Laske, Judy and John Mitton, Sharon Pressey, Bonnie and Dick Rowland, Gary Shepard, Gail and Ken Sims, and Barb and Gardner Spencer. The community wishes to thank them for their efforts to coordinate this event. Backwater entertains Ocala Palms residents Tom and Marilyn Hinds Mary Hahn, Nancy Myron, Janice Lambui, Rita and Ron Neff Bill Negron, Marcia Shelton, Kay Negron and Jack Shelton Simpson and Bette ScottSharon Pressey and Gary Shepard Ralph and Norma Marble More photos on Page 5 Ginger Cossar, Carol Ann Belcher, Pat Andrews and Mitz Maclay Brian Smith, Doug and Diane Lindeman Judy Mitton, Barb Spencer and Gary Shepard Barb Caprice Kenneth Drews Carol and Frank Farfalla Desmond and Dorothy Larsen EVANGELIST TIM LEE RETURNING TO OCALA February 19 10:45 a.m. & 6:00 pm February 22 7:00 pm FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 9510 SW 105TH STREET OCALA, FL 237-2640 ~SW ON HWY 200 ~ One mile past Top of the World One of Americas premiere Evangelists will be speaking at the Friendship Baptist Church, 9510 SW 105th Street, Ocala, Florida. Tim Lee has preached not only across the country, but around the world. After losing his legs to a Vietnamese land mine in 1971, Tim has dedicated his life to preaching the Gospel. His message is timely as well as needed during the uncertain times in which we live. Special Music provided by Grace Plus Four. (Linda Brown, Tina Mineo, Vicki Helbert & Randa Blackley)

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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, February 15, 2012 3 10 Wednesday, February 15, 2012 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger is discovered through worshiping together 711187A Central Florida Screen Room & Window Medics, Inc. Screen Rooms Acrylic & Glass Rooms Rescreens Broken Glass Replacement Windows Gutters Foggy Windows Cement Sliding Glass Door Repair Call & speak directly to the owner David Heath Comp. #5524 352 484-5697 WINDOW REPAIR 000AI1V 000AH61 A I R C O N D I T I O N I N G AIR CONDITIONING Wilson Air service 352-208-4641 Locally Owned & Operated License # CAC1816140 WILSON AIR SERVICE Tune Up Special We Service All Brands Repairs Replacement Free Second Opinions 24-HR. 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Member of Florida Irrigation Society WINNER 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 Call for details! 000AHTL LAWN/HOME Roys Lawn & Home Services Full Property Maintenance Painting Sod Installations Pressure Washing F REE E STIMATES Lic/Ins 3 5 2 3 4 2 4 4 4 4 3 5 2 3 4 2 4 4 4 4 352-342-4444 0009FKZ 6768 SW 80th Street Ocala 34476 352-861-6182 www.ccomc.org S UNDAY S ERVICES Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 am Worship Service . . . . . . 10:30 am Weekly Activities Wednesday Bible Study . 7:00 pm S ENIOR P ASTOR D AVID B ELLOWS 000AI5P Residential & Restaurant Appliances 352-286-7887 Washers Dryers Microwaves Stoves Ovens Refrigerators Water Heaters Disposals Freezers APPLIANCE SERVICES Christ the King The Rev. Donald J. Curran, Rector Rev. Matthew Walter Asst. Rector Services: Rite I 7:30 am Rite II 8:50 & 11:15 am Childrens Church 8:50 am 3801 US N. Hwy 441 in Living Waters Worship Centers South Sanctuary Christ the King Anglican Church Anglican Church 000A1LU GARAGE SCREEN DOORS 000AG5C 4 6 5 4 6 2 9 4 6 5 4 6 2 9 465-4629 Call us today for a free estimate! 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B ATTERIES $ 8 00 + tax Ocalas Only 4-Star Ocalas Only 4-Star Accommodations Accommodations for Your Pet for Your Pet Tour our unique Tour our unique facility and you facility and you be the judge! be the judge! 352-861-4566 352-861-4566 B o a r d i n g G r o o m i n g Boarding Grooming 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala 10411 SW 105th Street Ocala www.palmettokennels.com www.palmettokennels.com 000ACXG Kennel Pet Sitting Kennel Grooming Pet Sitting L o o k f o r u s L o o k f o r u s Look for us o n F a c e b o o k o n F a c e b o o k on Facebook 000ACTO 732-GOLF (4653) Open to the Public $ 5 00 OFF Current Rate with coupon and Tee Time Reservation Our Low Current 18 Hole Rates $ 35 00 Before 11:00 $ 30 00 After 11:00 $ 20 00 After 2:30 Just 1 mile west of I-75 on US 27 (Exit 354) Expires 3/21/12 Expries 3/21/12 Rates subject to change. 18 Hole Championship Course Dress Code: Collared Shirt Required NO Jeans GOLF OUTINGS WELCOME! prison. The title is a hint to the books contents but the facts on the amount of money, the number of participants and the number of schemes involved is astonishing. Schweizer identifies our elected officials as permanent political classes who have transformed our Capitol into a gold mine for get rich quick entrepreneurs. Members of both the Congressional and Executive branches are involved in these activities and the techniques they use show the utter disregard they and their selected friends hold for our country. Schweizer notes that industrial leaders have learned that investing in congressional and executive campaign activities will provide very large returns on their investments. Influencing who the government buys from, who it loans money to and who it grants money to, has become a very big business. Schweizers book is in the Marion County Library and its a good read to prepare for the upcoming elections. The leaders and members of both of our political parties are all involved in these schemes. They are more interested in helping themselves than in helping our country. That makes a bumper sticker seen in Ocala last week very relevant. The sticker read; Re-elect no one. Bill Farthing, Ocala LETTERcontinued from Page 6 If you are a Marion County student in grades 6-12 and have a knack with a camera, you are eligible to enter the It Starts in Parks Student Photography Contest. The free contest, which runs March 1-May 15, is designed to expose youth to both nature and photography, and to develop in them an appreciation for the important role that parks play in our community. The contest includes a free workshop that will be 9:30-11:30 a.m., March 3, at the Discovery Center, 701 N.E. Sanchez Ave. All images must be captured in a city, county, state or nationally managed park within Marion County. Students are divided into two groups grades 6-8 and grades 9-12. Winning entries will be professionally framed and exhibited at the Discovery Center for six months. There will be gift certificates and other prizes presented to the top entries in each age group. The first place packages will include a photo shoot with Emmy Award winner Mark Emery. A judges critique and awards ceremony will be 6-7 p.m., June 1 at the Discovery Center. For entry forms and information, go to http://mydiscoverycenter.org and click photography contest. Photo contest planned for Marion County students Wednesday, Feb. 15 Wo rl d H a s T al e nt a ud iti o n s se t Auditions for the Circle Square Cultural Centers third annual The World Has Talent 55+ talent show will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 15. Active adults age 55+ are invited on stage where the top chosen acts will perform at The World Has Talent 55+ Talent Show at the Circle Square Cultural Center on Saturday, May 5. The chosen contestants will compete for a chance to win the $500 first place, $250 second place and $150 third place prizes! Auditions will be held on Feb. 15 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Circle Square Cultural Center, 8395 S.W. 80th St., Ocala. For more information visit: www.CSCulturalCenter.com, call 352-854-3670 or e-mail ticketsales@cscultrualcenter.com.B e r e a veme nt p r o gra m se t The Widowed Persons Service of Marion County will be giving a six-week support group program beginning on Wednesday, Feb. 15 at the First Congregational Church, 7171 S.W. State Road 200. The hours are from 10 to 11:30 a.m. The group is open to all those who have recently lost a spouse. For questions, please call Marianne at 352-854-2872. Moose b ing o ope n t o th e pub lic Each week in February beginning at 12:45 p.m. bingo is played with opportunities to win big. Try your luck while support the Lodge and its charitable endeavors. Everyone is welcome with a variety of lunch selections available. The lodge is at 10411 S.W. 110th St., one mile north of the State Road 200 main entrance to Oak Run. Phone is 352-854-2200. Thursday, Feb. 16 A ir F o rc e Asso ciati o n mee ting The Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association will hold our monthly meeting on Feb. 16 at 7 p.m. at the Ocala Regional Airport Administration Building 750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Jason Teaman, from U. S. Congressman Cliff Stearns staff, will be presenting a program on how high school students apply to the U.S. Military Academies. Everyone is welcome. For information call Mike Emig 352-854-8328. Friday, Feb. 17 V F W L a d i es p lan f a s hi o n s h ow The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 4781 will have their annual Fashion Show on Feb. 17 at noon. The theme is Let Freedom Spring. The luncheon will be prepared by Margie with the help of dedicated members. Lots of gifts have been collected. Marilyn French is the chairperson. For tickets and more information, call Regina at 352873-3631. Tickets are available for tables of eight or more. This is a sellout event. Saturday, Feb. 18 B e th Is ra e l h os t s ga mes Congregation Beth Israel of Ocala warmly invites the community to a social evening of games and fun on Feb. 18 at 6:30 p.m. at the Collins Center, 9401 State Road 200 in Ocala. The program will feature a short Havdalah service followed by a light dinner of bagels and cream cheese and other delicious fare. Bring your own board games such as dominoes, ma jong, Monopoly, etc. or just come for the fun! The cost is $6 per person and reservations must made by calling Shirley at 352-873-6186 or by email: thegottfrieds@aol.com. Congregation Beth Israel is a progressive, liberal, inclusive Jewish community under the guidance of the Jewish Reconstructionist Federation.A rt s cra f t s at Quee n of Pe ac e The Council of Catholic Women of Queen of Peace Church will sponsor an Art and Craft Show in the Parish Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, on Saturday, Feb. 18, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Be sure to mark your calendars, you won't want to miss the work of these local talented Artists and Crafters. Hot dog lunch will be available to purchase. S can d ina v ian C l ub of M ari o n Cou nt y: The Scandinavian Club of Marion County invites people of Danish, Finish, Icelandic, Norwegian and Swedish decent to join us at our next meeting on Feb. 18. We will meet at 11:30 a.m. at the Ocala Hilton, 3600 S.W. 36th Ave. in Ocala. The menu will be Roast Beef Au Jus, mashed potatoes, vegetables, salad, coffee and dessert. The entertainment will be Bob Maas and his accordion. The cost is $16 per person. Reservations and payment must be made in advance. Payment must be received by Wednesday the 15th of February. Checks to be made out to Don Clauson and mailed to Don Clauson, 5901 S.W. 86th Place, Ocala, FL 34476. For further details call Don Clauson at 352-861-1235 or Terry Rasmussen at 352 3478362. Am at eu r R a d i o C la ss t o be gin A Technician Amateur Radio Class will start Saturday, Feb. 18 from 9 to 11 a.m. for seven weeks at the Marion County Sheriffs Office, Emergency Management Center, 692 N.W. 30th Ave., Ocala. The FCC test will be given on March 31, 2012 with a test fee of $15.00, collected on the test day. Manuals will be available to loan to students. This class should prepare you to pass the FCC test and obtain an Amateur Radio Technician License. For more information contact Charles Hensley at 352732-3795 or e-mail KC4Q@arrl.net.Hosp ic e trail ri de Hospice of Marion County, Inc. will hold its 12th annual Horses for Hospice Trail Ride on Sat., Feb. 18, on the Central Florida Greenway at the Florida Horse Park in Ocala. This years ride is in memory of Wayne Vaught, former Cross Florida Greenway enthusiast and Trail Ride chairman. Registration begins at 8 a.m. and the first ride leaves at 9:15 a.m. Riders travel from as far as Jacksonville and Tampa to spend 2-3 hours on the trail. Following the ride, participants can enjoy lunch by Tommys BBQ, live entertainment by Bordertown, and door prizes. Proceeds from this event will benefit Patient Care Programs. The minimum donation to ride is $30. Wagons are welcome; $30 for driver and $10 per passenger. Horse lovers who are unable to ride may purchase a $10 ticket to enjoy lunch and entertainment. For more information or to register, call 352-854-5218. Sunday, Feb. 19 Ge r m an Ame rican C l ub eve nt The German American Club of Marion County will host a Fasching Party on Sunday, Feb. 19, from 2 to 6 p.m. at the Marion Oaks Community Center. Wear a costume, bring beads and join in the fun for $10 per member or $15 per non-member. Music provided by Alpine Express. Bring your own snacks and beverages. Attire is either a costume or dressy casual. For tickets, call Liz or Joe at 352-732-6368. Tuesday, Feb. 21 Bahia Oa ks t o mee t Bahia Oaks Mobile Homeowners Association holds their monthly meetings on the 3rd Tuesday of each month at the Freedom Library beginning at 6:30 p.m. This months meeting will be on Feb. 21. All Bahia Oaks Homeowners are invited to attend. S hr ove Tuesd a y p anca ke suppe r Holy Faith Episcopal Church in Blue Cove, Dunnellon will host a delicious, complete pancake supper on Feb. 21 from 5 to 7 p.m. Everyone is welcome. $6 donation. Call the church office at 352-489-2685 for more information. Thursday, Feb. 23 Gospe l gr oup t o a ppe ar A top gospel group, The Chuck Wagon Gang, will perform at Christs Church of Marion County on Thursday, Feb. 23, at 6 p.m. Over 75 years as history's best record selling gospel quartet (over 39 million records sold at one record company alone) you will see an example of a style that has remained consistent thoughout all those years due to advice always followed: "Sing the old songs and sing 'em the way they should be sung." Among familiar favorites you will hear "Echoes from the Burning Bush", The Church In The Wildwood" and "I'll Fly Away. Enjoy an evening of family entertainment and be transported to a time and place where life was a bit simpler and time seemed to move at a slower pace. There is no admission charge; a freewill offering will be received. Christ's Church of Marion County is at 6768 S.W. 80th St., off State Road 200, Ocala, 352-861-6182, www.ccomc.orgSaturday, Feb. 25 K ing dom of th e Su n Co nc e rt Ban d The Kingdom of the Sun Concert Band will present A Musical Potpourri concert series on Saturday, Feb. 25 at 2 p.m. and Sunday, Feb. 26 at 3 p.m. at the Marion Technical Institute (formerly Forest High School), 1614 S.E. Fort King St., Ocala. Musical selections include Highlights from CATS, Jericho, More Than You Know, Slippery Gentlemen (featuring the trombone section) and others. All performances are free and open to the public. For more information, call 352-624-9291 or check out the bands website at www.kingdomofthesunband.org.I nt e rnati o nal F oods F es ti v al Join us for the 18th annual International Foods Festival on Saturday, Feb. 25 at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 7171 S.W. State Road 200, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Enrichment Center. Enjoy food specialties from Italy, Germany, Spain, England, Ireland, Sweden, Poland Jamaica, Greece, Mexico and many more. Generous food samples are priced at $1 and $2. For more information, call the church office at 352-2373035. Monday, Feb. 27 Re tir ed n u r ses t o mee t The Citrus Marion Chapter of the Registered Nurses Retired (RNR) will meet at the Inverness Golf and Country Club on Monday, Feb. 27. Sign in for the meeting starts at 11 a.m., lunch at 11:30 and the speaker follows a noon. Our speaker will be Karen Strouse of the Guardian Ad Litem Program. Our charity will be the Guardian Ad Litem Program and a cash donation is appreciated. Retired RN's wishing to attend should contact Mary Jane at 352-726-6882 or Gladys at 352-854-2677 by Wednesday, Feb. 22. Happenings

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had an invasion, I might not have been here. Detroit Johnson, who lives in Oak Run, also off 200, was in the Navy Seabees and followed a similar path to get to Iwo Jima. It took us some time to get there from Hawaii in a troop ship with the 3rd Marine Division. He added, One of the things our ship was used for was for Marine casualties. He said that after a time, wed have a burial at sea for those who had been killed. As the invasion progressed, part of his job was to help clean up areas. Our job was to prepare the landing strip, which had been damaged by shelling. To illustrate how times have changed, he said that one day his men heard there was a plane coming in that was built with no propellers. It was the first time we had ever seen a jet, he said, noting the turbulence and waves from the aircraft. Although he was a gunners mate, he said he could work with anything. I could operate and run any heavy equipment there was. He was also assigned as a commanders guard. At Iwo Jima, the Americans had 6,812 killed or missing, 19, 217 wounded and two captured. The Japanese, on the other hand, had 21,844 killed, but no wounded were found. The Americans captured 216 men. It was widely believed that most wounded Japanese had taken their own lives. Johnson felt that things would have been much worse had the U.S. invaded Japan. Like Lehr, he had visions of what would have happened. Every walking living person would have a gun. We could lose 40 to 50 thousand. Johnson praised the dropping of the bombs. Thanks to Harry (Truman), Im here today. That was the big thing. Thank God, Harry saved all of us. messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, February 15, 2012 11 2 Wednesday, February 15, 2012 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger TO PLACE ACLASSIFIED AD, CALLToll Free 1-877-676-1403 MONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified reader ads. DEADLINES CANCELLATIONSAll ads require prepayment. We accept: CHARGE IT!! ERRORS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as results are obtained. You will be billed only for the dates the ad actually appears in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for placing ads, except for specials. Be sure to check your advertisement the first day it appears. We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every ef fort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate. However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information. Add Up TheSAVINGSwith a Name Address City State Zip Phone 10 Words $5.12 Per Week 44 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online All Ads Must Be Prepaid All Credit Card s Accepted 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 10WORDS$5.12+44AWORD(IncludesOnline)=TOTAL For your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call... CallTollFree1-877-676-1403 CLASSIFIEDAD WMM_CLASS_AD_FORM_3_9_11 Employment Info Personal Assistant Needed Urgently for : shipping, organizing, graphic design, quick books, and any other misc. job requests.you will be paid $580/wk. send your resume to : laurann.doherty@aol.com General Complete stain glass tool and supply kit, excellent condition, $50 352-671-7959 Pets A gift for Valentines! 4 adorable little Jack Russell/Chihuahua pups 9 wks.w/ Health Cert.2M/2F $300 ea 352-465-1797 Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKS FREE TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 Pets DOG Butch is a wonderfully sweet lab/terrier mix, approximately 2 y/o and weighs 65#. He appears to be housebroken and is very mindful on leash. He is a strong boy, but eager to learn new things. Call 352-201-8664 Mobile Homes In Park 55 + Community 2 BD 2 BA. Florida rm completely furnished washer & dryer, handicap access. Lot rent $269 Priced to sale $5500 obo (352) 671-2866 Real Estate For Sale Inverness Highlands West Two adjoining lots for sale-3566 S. Dean $8K adjoining lot $7K. (352) 302-1940 Real Estate For Sale Floral City, 40 AC Florida Hilly vacant land, never lived on, with underground electric,excellent well water, zoned agriculture, private coded gate, updated fence, under brushed with trimmed trails, concrete cattle gap for horses or cattle. Cost $495K (352) 302-1940 trishmilton@gmail.com Just call and see how easy it is to make money with the classifieds. ANYITEMPRICEDUNDER $100MAXIMUM 10 WORDS RUNSFOR 2 WEEKS FREE TOLL FREE 1-877-676-1403 Real Estate For Sale PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Inverness Homes Large 1 Fam. Carol Terrace, Inverness. 4BR 3BA, 2700 sq ft under air, 2.8 acres fully fenced, important updates done. $220,000. Owner 352-419-7017 Crystal River Homes Plantation area Energy-wise 3 bedroom. 2 bath. Garage. Ready move in. Fenced backyard w/playhouse. 352-563-1341 Vehicles Wanted BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$200 & UP (352) 771-6191 Vehicles Wanted WE BUY ANY VEHICLE Perfect Cond. or Not Titled,No title, No problem. Paying up to $25K any make, any model Call A.J. 813-335-3794/ 531-4298 L ET U S W ORK F OR Y OU CALL TOLL FREE1-877-676-1403W EST M ARION M ESSENGERC LASSIFIEDSG ET R ESULTS! Vehicles Wanted Eyecare hours are: M T TH F 8:30 -5:00; W 1:00-6:00 Select Sat. are available United Health Care Medicare and Blue Cross Blue Shield Provider Heath Brook Commons (next to Publix) 5400 SW College Rd/Highway 200, Suite 106, Ocala, FL 34474 Dr. James A. Muse B o a r d C e r t i f i e d Board Certified O p t o m e t r i c P h y s i c i a n Optometric Physician Our commitment to personalized eyecare... Your eyes are our masterpiece. museumeyecare@live.com Need a NEW Optometrist? Transfer Prescriptions and or Records Call 352-622-3937 000AG4W MUSEUM EYECARE $ 4,995 Starting at 000AIKN 8810 SW SR 200 Suite 107, Kingsland Plaza Across from Pine Run352-291-7626 Mon. Fri. 9am-5pm, Sat. 9am 2pm Thank You for your business, we strive to make our customers satisfied.Sale on all Trojan Batteries Same Day Service Guaranteed 6-V T605 only $ 529 8-V T875 only $ 629 12-V T1275 only $ 629 W E L EAD O THERS F OLLOW Free Pick-up within 10 miles Utility 4x4 and gas available COME TAKE A DRIVE!2012 Club Car Flip Back Seat only $ 399 VETERANS DISCOUNT 10% Off All year long Thank you 000AFF7 Read the classifieds IWO JIMAcontinued from Page 1 Stone Creek T his town hall meeting was not organized by one of the Republican or Democratic candidates. It was the first of quarterly town meetings that was presented by Chris Johnson, Stone Creeks Community Manager. Approximately 250 residents came to the first town hall meeting. Chris gave an opening address before he took questions from those in attendance. His purpose was to make sure that everyone was on the same piece of music and that we were all working together. Chris went through the chain of command here at Stone Creek. He works for Continental Group, the Board of Directors which has three Pulte representatives and two resident representatives, and he pointed out that three representatives is greater than two representatives, Pulte and the residents. Presently, Stone Creek is only 22 percent built out. Pulte and not the residents make the decisions. He wanted residents to know that he never steps aside from a problem and if there is a problem he is the fall guy. Chris told the residents that he sympathizes with them as construction continues, but we all purchased knowing that construction would be on going until Stone Creek is complete. If residents have a problem, they should contact Pulte and copy Chris on the e-mail. Chris put the information about contact numbers in an email the next day. He went on to say that his basic job is to protect the property value of Stone Creek and we all live by rules. He loves dogs but reminded those who have dogs of their responsibility. At present, there is no plan for a dog park. He gave praise to the fitness staff for doing an excellent job since August when they were left without a fitness director. When Chris came on board, he did not have a Lifestyle Director or Fitness Director. This problem is now resolved with the hiring of Lifestyle Director/Fitness Director in Kim Krystopa. She came on board on Feb. 6 even though she has been busy at work learning her roles. He explained the difference between a secure community and a gated community. We live in a gated community and we need to follow common sense rules about locking cars and doors. If there is a problem, call the Sheriffs Office. There have been numerous portal messages about coyotes. If a resident has an animal problem, call animal control and report the problem to them. Chris ended his message with the obvious. We live in a beautiful community with a great many activities. Take advantage of all that is offered. If we all work together, we will continue to have a great community. Chris has an open door policy. He may not agree with Town hall meeting held Patricia Gizzi you but he is always there to listen. There were about eight questions from residents ranging from card tables to safety issues. All questions seem to be resolved on the spot. Garden Club News: Lucy Bee Tobias came to speak to the Garden Club. Despite technical difficulties she gave an excellent presentation. After her talk, she signed copies of her book: Florida Gardens Gone Wild. She generously donated $2 from the sale of each book to the Reflection Garden and asked to come back when the garden is completed. As part of the Garden Clubs outreach program, many donated beans that will be given to Brothers Keeper Soup Kitchen. Rita Levy, a volunteer at the Soup Kitchen accepted the donations from the members and thanked them for their generous donations. Valentine Madness took place on Feb. 11. This event was sponsored by the Culture Vultures and it was a sold out event. The evening had a little of everything Valentine Trivia, writing of Valentine poems, writing the most English words from the word Valentine and a newly, old version of the Newlywed Game. The money from this event went toward the purchase of the piano for the Reunion Center. Lucy Tobias Chris Johnson Quail Meadow H ave you noticed the horse at our Publix? Let me introduce you to Jazzd who is now residing in the floral department. Jazzd is so named because when you look at it closely you will see several musical instruments used in jazz music: keyboard, saxophone, bass, and snare drum. The theme represents the jazz music from New Orleans. Jazzd was designed by John Tripodi in 2005, just after Katrina destroyed much of New Orleans. The year 2005 was the second year for Horse Fever in Motion. Hundreds of artists submitted drawings to be considered for the horses, however, only eight artists were selected for the horses for 2005. John Tripodis sketch was one of the eight chosen. John spent many week-ends working on Jazzd in his garage; he estimates it took about 100 hours of painting. Acrylic paint is the major paint used on this horse, but there are some oil paints used. John said his daughter, Jaden, who was only 4 years old at the time, became very attached to the horse in their garage; in fact, he let her do a little of the painting. Jaden couldnt understand why when it was completed it had to leave! The Cox family (Cox Communications) purchased Jazzd and had plans to move it to New Orleans, but that has not taken place. Jazzd has made guest appearances at several locations in the Ocala area over the years. For a period of time, it was outside the Brick City Center for the Arts building. However, vandals tried to destroy the horse; it had a broken leg and ear, along with other scratches. After the restoration, Jazzd was placed in storage at Brick City. Jazzd once again makes special appearances at various locations in Marion County. Fortunately, for us, we can just go up to our Publix and see this beautiful art work. John Tripodi, the talented artist, is a graphics designer and the owner of Neptune Ventures. He credits his creation of Jazzd with giving him the jump start he needed for his business. An interesting note is that John never knows where Jazzd will be on display. When it was delivered to Publix, Austin Stopher, who works at the customer service desk, recognized the horse as the one his Uncle John Tripodi had created. Its a small world, isnt it? In 2001, John Tripodi moved to Ocala from Massillon, Ohio. He is a graduate of Columbus College of Art and Design. Several of the ads in the West Marion Messenger were designed by him. If you would like more information on John Tripodi he can be reached by e-mail at john@themediagroup3.com or by phone 352-286-7534. The story behind the horse Carolyn Slocumb The Publix management doesnt know how long they will be privileged to have Jazzd in their store, so, if you havent stopped by to see this beautiful work of art, please make it a priority you wont be disappointed. Due to the recent assault on one of our residents in a parking lot, the QMRPOA meeting this month included a presentation by Detective Bobby Levay and Lieutenant Brian Dotten of the Marion County Sheriffs office. They stressed the importance of always being aware of your surroundings. They left brochures regarding frauds and scams. Please come by the Clubhouse and take one; they have much valuable information in them. Above, John Tripodi and Jazzd as shown at Publix. At left, Detective Bobby Levay and Lieutenant Brian Dotten of the Marion County Sheriffs Office.

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INDEX Stone Creek........2 Ocala Palms........4 Puzzles................8 Quail Meadow....11 VOLUME 4, NUMBER 46 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY15, 2012 Happenings Page 3 Classifieds Page 11 12 Wednesday, February 15, 2012 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger GOLF SHOE STORE NARROW THRU X-WIDE Orthotic Insoles GOLF SANDALS2133 SW Hwy. 484 Ocala, FL 344739 Miles South of Ocala, 10 Miles North of Wildwood at I-75 Exit 341 Behind McDonalds 352-245-2184 All-Day Weekend Features Choose from our farm raised catfish, cut thin and tossed in a blend of cornmeal and seasonings. Or try our traditional Cod Fillets, hand dipped in our own special batter and fried to a golden brown. Served with Steak Fries and Cole Slaw. Made from scratch. Our chicken tenderloin simmered in a hearty chicken gravy and served atop a bed of seasoned rice along with two vegetables. Enjoy two chicken breast fillets dipped in fresh buttermilk and hand breaded in our kitchen. Served with choice of two vegetables.000A8IN Monday Fried Pork Chops with choice of two vegetables Tuesday Butter Baked Chicken with choice of two vegetables Wednesday Broccoli Cheddar Chicken with choice of two vegetables Thursday Turkey n Dressing with choice of two additional vegetables It will be a return to yesteryear on Feb. 18 as Ocala once again sees a herd of cattle driven down its streets. Beginning at 10 a.m., some 35 head of cattle will be driven from the 800 block of Southeast Osceola Avenue to the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion, 2200 N.E. Jacksonville Road. About 15 professional cowboys, led by Southeastern Pro Rodeo representative Ruben Lamb, will be participating. City Councilman Daniel Owen, who has helped organize the event, said he envisions the cattle drive being an annual event to coincide with the Southeastern Youth Fair and Florida High School Rodeo. In the 1940s and early 1950s this was a tradition in our community and we are hoping to re-establish it, Owen said. The event will require rolling road closures, including East Silver Springs Boulevard, Northeast 14th Street and Jacksonville Road. None of the road closures will last for more than five minutes. The best viewing locations, in addition to the livestock pavilion, will be between Southeast 5th Street and State Road 40 on Osceola Avenue and on the Watula Avenue side of Tuscawilla Park. The drive is not expected to last for more than an hour. Ocala to become cow town on Feb. 18 Heart felt thanks on Valentines DayEditors note: Phil Geissal, husband of Fairfield Village writer Priscilla Geissal, recently underwent heart surgery. This is her story about his care.----By Priscilla Geissal This year, Valentines Day has taken on a whole new meaning and significance to me and to my husband of 5 years. Though Phil is 77 and I am 71, we plan to have many loving years together even though Phil has several significant health issues to deal with, and I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia some 10 years ago. Hopefully, I will not be criticized for writing about something so personal as the past month in our lives, but my husband and I feel very strongly about the wonderful care he has received over the past month. He had a serious heart attack, some other complications, and open heart surgery at Munroe Regional Medical Center. We are, therefore, willing to accept any criticism as we say, Thank You All! to those who have been there to care for, support, and encourage us both. Ironically, or fortuitously, this is coming to print right after Valentines Day. Obviously, from the point of view of an old high school and college English instructor (40+ years) I cannot miss the symbolic use of the holiday, the heart-shaped pillows provided for the cardiac patients, and (certainly) the love that is normally associated with this time of year. This love has been given to us very generously by our wonderful (and huge) family and numerous friends here in Ocala and actually from all over the world because my husband traveled extensively with his former career. I must hasten to say, that I spent the first 65 years of my life in Rome, Ga., and taught in the same wonderful high school (Model High School) for 33 years before retiring to do some adjunct teaching at the local technical college. My world travel has been limited but my friendships have not. On to the main issue at hand, the Cardiac Care Unit and Intensive Care Unit at Munroe Regional Medical Center. I know there are other facilities that probably are just as caring and skilled as are the pros at Munroe; but, honestly, we would rather not be in a position to have to test out another. I challenge those of you who have other The drive home for Phil Geissal (in the back seat to avoid air bags) is a time when that Heart Pillow can serve as a terrific buffer between the incision and the seat belt. By Pat Wellington S PECIALTOTHEM ESSENGER Golden Hills resident Judy Perkins has always loved history. And then she fell in love with Easton Presss handsome leather-bound presidential biographies etched in 22K gold. Four were signed copies by Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, Richard Nixon, and Ronald Reagan. She ordered the set and kept adding to it. Her goal was to read a biography of every single American president. It took 10 ten years to reach that goal. Why so long? Well, she explains, the early biographies were written in wordy, stilted 19th-century style and many of the later ones like those of Franklin Roosevelt, Lyndon Johnson, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Richard Nixon were two volumes each. She was also slowed down by the considerable minutiae of George Washingtons many battles. Thomas Jefferson was also slow going, she admits. Along the way in her reading she was surprisingly impressed with the life and presidency of our littleknown 11th President, James K. Polk, dismayed by William Hardings sordid reputation, and touched by Franklin Pierces personal tragedy when on Jan. 6, 1853, barely two months before Pierces inauguration as president, the family traveled by train from Andover, Massachusetts to Concord, New Hampshire, where they had planned to attend the funeral of a family friend. Minutes Perkins library with presidential reference works. The plate on the middle shelf depicts presidents up to Lyndon Johnson, pictured in the center. Judy Perkins and Pat Wellington read a passage in one of the biographies. Ten years of reading presidents stories Golden Hills resident spends 10 years reading biographies after departure, their passenger car broke loose from the train and rolled down an embankment. The only fatality was Bennie Pierce. His sudden death worked a crushing, enduring psychological hardship on President-elect and Mrs. Pierce. Some of the overall impressions Judy came away with were that military men, in general, make terrible presidents (although she considers Eisenhower a possible exception). And she found that so many of the presidents were besmirched by scandal or addiction to alcohol. Still, all things considered, it was a worthwhile venture and one shed recommend to other history buffs. By Jim Clark E DITOR The year was 1945. It was February, and the U.S. Marines were about to embark on one of the key battles of World War II as they approached the island of Iwo Jima. Two Ocala men were members of the U.S. Navy at the time, and were in craft offshore as the Marines took to the island and eventually won control. Both men were at the Iwo Jima memorial event at Marion Woods last week. Both spoke at the gathering, and both were firm in their appreciation for the fact that the U.S., under President Harry Truman, dropped two atomic bombs on Japan. Bill Lehr, who lives in Marion Landing off State Road 200, told the guests, mostly veterans, about his time in the military. He spent his first 15 months assigned to Landing Ship Tank (LST) 807 assigned to the Pacific. On Jan. 4, 1945, we left Pearl (Harbor) and went a long way with Marines and equipment. We landed at Iwo Jima on Feb. 19 on the beach. It was dark. The Marines unloaded and took off because most of the battles were on the other side of the island. Lehr said his crafts duty was to take on wounded Marines. After five days he saw an American flag being raised on the mountains, and then later a second flag. That second flag became the iconic picture that is still associated with Iwo Jima today. At one point, he said a single Japanese kamikaze tried to attack his ship. He was shot down, and we didnt lose anybody. His craft had another dangerous situation, even after the war. We were hit by a typhoon on the way back, he said, adding that others were damaged but his LST came through OK. We had to bomb the two towns. I know it killed a lot of innocent people, but if we invaded they would have thrown everybody out to fight us. If we Two Ocala men discuss Iwo Jima experiences Above, Detroit Johnson; below, Bill Lehr. Please see IWO JIMA Page 2 Please see HEART Page 12 kudos to hand out to send word to me, and I will endeavor to pass those along as well. pbgeissal@aol.com While my husband was a patient, he spent more time in the hospital than most might because of his additional complications due to Myasthenia Gravis, a condition that is not very recognizable to most people. It is a neurological condition that affects, among other things, ones immune system and is often difficult to control. Thankfully, his is controlled well. Because of my husbands excellent care by Dr. S. Subramony at Shands Hospital and the University of Florida in Gainesville, he is given all the extra medical attention that anyone could reasonably expect. Along with this blessing, he has been cared for by many excellent physicians here in Ocala, but, specifically, by Dr. A. Nasser, a highly respected cardiologist. My husbands cardiac surgeon was the very skilled Dr. J. Galat of the Munroe Heart Group. His main hospitalist was Dr. N. Rao, who is someone we have seen several other times, and he is another excellent doctor. I do not mean to leave anyone out, but these were the main facilitators of his heart care while he was hospitalized. The caregivers (aka nursing and tech staff) in the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit and the Cardiac and Vascular Care Unit on Munroes 4th floor are superior in every respect. They are cheerful, optimistic, smiling, and totally professional. Without these magnificent ladies and gentlemen, none of the rest would be possible, and we send them all a huge Thank you!` Last, certainly not least, and maybe even most of all, we are so grateful to our family and friends for the unwavering support and love that we were blessed to have every day, all day, and all night when it was needed. One thinks I can handle this myself, but I can attest to the fact that knowing that a loving voice is just a phone call away is more than just reassuring. It honestly kept me the wife moving right along through several fairly significant scares. My neighbor who sat with me during the 3+ hour surgery (she knows who she is) was my rock that day as were my family all over the country who were on the cell phone and sending emails that were unwavering. We had asked all of our extended family to keep their families first and not come to Florida because they all have children, professions, school, and other responsibilities that have to be recognized and handled. They were here in every way that counted. How do I close this personal column? That is very easy! From the bottom of my heart and from my husbands healing heart, we say, again, Thank You and We Love You All! Happy Belated Valentines Day! As usual, I can say that it is wonderful to be a part of Fairfield Village a lively place filled with lovely people who have big and loving hearts. HEARTcontinued from Page 1 Dr. A. Nasser stands at his TimberRidge office. He is an outstanding cardiologist who is highly regarded by his many patients. Teen Volunteer transporter sounds like a young Star Trek training job. Christopher has a great smile as he helps patients for that wonderful trip to the entrance that becomes the more favored exit as one goes home. R.N. Cindy has a bubbly personality and sweet smile along with superior nursing skills. In most cases, only first names are being used at the request of hospital personnel. From the left, Phil, Lauren, and Marina all have different jobs as part of the Super Bowl Cardiac Team. The patients always win with this team on their side. From the left, Jack and David (CVT) in Dr. Nassers office. R.N. Jason was one of the caregivers.