Title: West Marion messenger
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 Material Information
Title: West Marion messenger
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Ocala, Florida
Publication Date: July 14, 2010
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Lecanto
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Ocala
Coordinates: 28.848776 x -82.481087 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100092
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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New operation

Page 8


The search


Page 4


INDEX
Pastor's arrest...... 2
Opinion .............. 6
Cay fun ..............10
Sudtloku ..............11


VOLUME 4, NUMBER 17
WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010


Postal Patron
U.S. Postage Paid
PRSRT STD
ECRWSS
Permit #91
Lecanto, FL


WEST MARION



SERVING THE COMMUNITIES & BUSINESSES BETWEEN SR 200 US
SERVING THE COMMUNITIES & BUSINESSES BETWEEN SR 200 AND US 27


Registration deadline July 26 for

Michel Northsea vote in the non-partisan go on the November gen


EDITOR


Those wishing to vote
in the Aug. 24 primary
election and aren't al-
ready registered to vote
must do so before July 26.
For those needing to up-
date their records to re-
flect a current address or
name that too needs to be
completed before July 26.
Since Florida is a
closed primary state, vot-
ers are allowed to only


races and for candidates
representing their regis-
tered party.
Marion County's 87,729
Republicans will have the
opportunity to choose be-
tween five different candi-
dates seeking the District 2
seat on the County Commis-
sion, now held by Commis-
sioner Jim Payton. Payton is
not seeking re-election.
Those vying to move
onto the general election


Since Florida is a closed primary state,
voters are allowed to only vote in the
non-partisan races and for candidates
representing their registered party.


include: Republicans,
Kathy Bryant, Christine
Dobkowski, Tony Men-
dola, Elicia Sanders, and
Les Smith.
In a partisan race, such
as county commissioner,


the candidates receiving
the most votes go on to the
general election, ex-
plained Dee Brown, su-
pervisor of elections.
The Republican winner
of the District 2 race will


eral election ballot along
with Democratic chal-
lenger Ken Nadeau and
Florida Whig Party candi-
date Douglas Shearer.
Neither Nadeau nor
Shearer has another chal-
lenger from their respec-
tive parties so they won't
be on the ballot in August.
Also on the ballot for the
primary election will be
two School Board seats.
Vying for School Board
Seat 4 are Dean


Compassionily "

Alliance Daily exercise

honored by

governor
SPECIAL TO THE
MESSENGER
A local Ocala faith-based
organization, Compassion
Alliance, was recognized
by Governor Crist as the re-
cipient of the 2010 Human-
itarian of the Year Award at
the recent Governor's Hur- ..
ricane Conference.
Compassion Alliance
reaches out locally and r
globally providing relief
such as supplies, food and
volunteers during hurri-
canes, earthquakes, torna-
does and other natural
disasters. Specifically, the
award recognizes their ef-
forts, spanning their 5-year
history, in providing more
than $50 million in aid dur-
ing such events as Hurri-
cane Wilma, Hurricane
Katrina, the 2007 Ground-
hog Day Tornadoes, Tropi- .
cal Storm Fay, and the 2009 .
Spring Floods. Also, their .
current response to the
earthquake disaster in .
Haiti has established them .. ,:.
as one of the largest dona- S: .
tors in the world giving aid ... ".
to that country "'. *.:--* :.
In addition to disaster re- -7 ."M1,.4,.: w,..
Numerous Quail Meadow residents start their day with a walk around the community. Early morning walkers
Please see HONOR, Page 2 include, left to right, Bill Sjogren, Hilde Tweet, and Carol Sjogren.The trio walks about two miles on each walk.


'Operation: Stuff The Bus' kicks off ninth season


More than 1700 needy students in
Marion County will benefit from the
ninth annual "Operation: Stuff the
Bus" campaign, an outreach pro-
gram co-sponsored by Marion
County Public Schools, the Military
Officers Association, Kingdom of the
Sun Chapter and other veterans or-
ganizations.
"Operation: Stuff the Bus" affords
local residents the opportunity to
make a true difference in a home-
less child's life by donating new


school supplies, children and teen
clothing, sneakers, personal hygiene
items, and financial contributions.
To date, the campaign has collected
nearly $340,000 in donations and
merchandise, which has been dis-
tributed through the school district's
Homeless Student program.
A decorated school bus with
ample room to "stuff" donations in-
side will sit at local retail stores
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. according to the
following schedule:


Saturday, July 10, Kmart S.W
27th Avenue and Hwy 200
Saturday, July 17, Kmart East
Silver Springs Blvd.
Saturday, July 24, K-Mart Belle-
view on U. S. 441
Saturday, July 31, Walmart- State
Road 200 (On Top of the World)
Saturday, August 8, Meadowbrook
Church 4741 S.W 20th Street
Saturday, August 17, Super Tues-
day (local government participation
day) Call Suzanne McGuire 352-


671-6847 for location.
Checks benefitting "Operation:
Stuff the Bus" should be indicated
as such and made payable to Opera-
tion: Stuff the Bus, c/o Homeless
Children Program, Marion County
Public Schools, 1517 S.E. 30 Ave. No.
5, Ocala, FL, 34471.
For more information, contact the
school district's Homeless Children
Program at 352.671.6847 or via
email at Suzanne.McGuire@mar-
ion.kl2.fl.us.


voting

Blinkhorn, Angie Boyn-
ton, Thomas Patrick, and
Nancy Thrower
Three candidates are
seeking the School Board
Seat 5. They are incum-
bent Ron Crawford,
Sharon Hagen and Mary
F Williams.
In each School Board
race, if one candidate
doesn't get 50 percent of
the vote, plus one vote,

Please see VOTE, Page 2

Man accused

of bilking

elderly
SPECIAL TO THE
MESSENGER


Terry Scott Hyder


Last week, Orange County
Sheriff's Office deputies ar-
rested 49-year-old Terry Scott
Hyder in connection to a fi-
nancial fraud case, investi-
gated by the Marion County
Sheriff's Office, Florida De-
partment of Law Enforce-
ment and the FBI. Hyder was
taken into custody at the
Vista de Sol night club inside
the Marriot Grande Vista
hotel in Orlando.
On April 5, 2010, a Marion
County resident reported to
the Sheriff's Office that a fi-
nancial transaction with
Hyder had recently gone bad.
Hyder reportedly sold the
victim tax certificates that he
alleged would benefit the vic-
tim with the interest earned.
Detectives began investigat-
ing Hyder and found he was
using the alias Ryan Hyder.
He also listed erroneous ad-
dresses linking him to a PO.
Box in Orlando and was con-
nected to a fraud case in
North Carolina, investigated
by FBI Agent Craig Sidwell.
Marion County Sheriff's
detectives joined efforts with
FDLE Agent Don Maines and

Please see HYDER, Page 2


1-






2 Wednesday, July 14, 2010 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger


Methodist pastor arrested for sex crimes


Marion County Sheriff's
Office detectives, assisting
the Orange County Sher-
iff's Office Sex Offender
Squad (S.O.S), arrested the
Reverend Dr. Ken Kleck-
ner III on five counts of
transmitting harmful ma-
terials to a minor and one
count of soliciting a minor
for sex.
Both law enforcement
agencies are members of
the Internet Crimes
Against Children Task
Force. "It is cooperation


HYDER

continued from Page 1

the FBI to investigate
Hyder for financial fraud.
Officials determined
Hyder was operating
fraudulent businesses
known as "Sterling and
Stratford LLC" and "Bella
Street Enterprises LLC"
out of a UPS post office box


among members of ICAC,
which helps in making
cases like this," said Lieu-
tenant Chris Vorisek of the
Marion County Sheriff's
Office Youth Internet
Crimes Unit.
Orange County Sheriff's
Office detectives contacted
MCSO back on May 6,2010.
It was at that time, Marion
County Sheriff's Office de-
tectives started surveil-
lance of the suspect, who
later was identified as
Kleckner.

listed as Hyder's address.
With the help of Assistant
State Attorney Mark Simp-
son and Marion County
Judge Stancil, a warrant
was issued for Hyder's ar-
rest.
Hyder was reportedly at-
tending Alzheimer's sup-
port groups and targeting
elderly persons with
spouses in medical facili-
ties. Law enforcement has
identified victims living in
Marion County and Orange


MCSO was able to assist
in developing the case. De-
tectives from both agen-
cies generated enough
evidence for search war-
rants for Ocala West
United Methodist Church,
where Kleckner worked,
and for his home. Law en-
forcement teams from both
agencies served the war-
rants. Kleckner was ar-
rested at the church.
Computer related evi-
dence was collected from
both locations. Also, ele-

County, Florida, as well as
Polk County, North Car-
olina. Hyder swindled
more than $300,000 from
the Marion County victim
alone. Orange County,
Florida and Polk County,
North Carolina victims ac-
count for roughly another
$200,000.
Hyder is being held in
the Orange County Jail
with no bond. He will be
extradited to Marion
County in the near future.


ments of the evidence in-
clude webcam video of
Kleckner performing a
lewd act for the minor. "Mr.
Kleckner had an online re-
lationship with what he
thought was a juvenile fe-
male," said Jeff
Williamson, Media Spe-
cialist/Public Information
Officer, Orange County
Sheriff's Office. "In reality,
the juvenile female was an
S.O.S. detective."
Kleckner's bond was set
at $55,000.


VOTE

continued from Page 1

then the top two candi-
dates goes on to the Nov. 2
general election, Brown
said.
Also on the Aug. 24 pri-
mary election are the
races for United State


Pastor Dr. Ken Kleckner III was arrested at his church by
deputies last Friday.


Senator, governor and at-
torney general.
In the primary, Republi-
cans voters will also select
a candidate for state rep-
resentative District 22.
Those candidates are
John Deakins, Keith Perry
and Remzey L. Paul
Samarrai. The winner of
the primary will face
Democratic challenger
Jon Paugh in November.
Marion County has


211,760 registered voters
close to 41,000 are regis-
tered as Independents
and more than 83,000 are
Democrats.
Voter's registration
must be updated on an of-
ficial voter registration
application. The form may
be requested by phone,
642-6679, or mail and is
available on the website,
VoteMarion.com.


Israeli Scouts

The Friendship Caravan
is coming to Ocala! This tal-
ented group of Israeli
Scouts cum Good Will Am-
bassadors from Israel bring
to the stage singing, danc-
ing, and humor that is ap-
propriate for the whole
family. The troupe will be
in Ocala on Monday July
26,2010 and the show starts
at 7pm. Tickets are $8.00.
Call Estelle at 352.861-2542
or Shirley at 352.873-6186
for further information.


3rd Annual Island Festival at


Circle Square Commons

Join the fun and get that tropical feeling from the Pacific and Caribbean islands
on Saturday, August 7th when The Town Square at Circle Square Commons hosts
the exciting 3rd annual Island Festival.
The excitement begins with the pulsating drum beats of Tahiti and beautiful Is-
land dancers dressed in authentic and colorful costumes. The diverse Latin band
Grupo Salsarengue will play Merengue, Bachata, Bolero, and other rhythms to get
you up and dancing. Plus enjoy a special performance by Extensions Dance Studio
dancers.
Bring the whole family to the Island Festival on Saturday, August 7th from 5 pm
- 10 pm on The Town Square located at 8409 SW 80th 5Street, Ocala. For more in-
formation visit: www.CircleSquareCommons.com


O l health, Ocala Health a
Se of ree:classes addressing your health needs and concerns. At Ocala Health System, weare-
not just focused on your health, we are focused on you.
Managing Your Diabetes
July 20 2:00pm
Are you confused about which blood glucose monitor to use for
managing your diabetes? Due to the many available monitors, Ryan
Borger, Medical Representative, Abbott Diabetes Care, will discuss
the various monitors, review techniques for testing and methods of
coding to help achieve better diabetes control.


HONOR

continued from Page 1

lief, Compassion Alliance
works to raise people
above the cycle of poverty
by providing training, min-
istry and other resources
to help them help them-
selves.
Partnerships with com-
munities have resulted in
the building of orphanages,
churches and schools
throughout the world. In-


ternationally, containers of
supplies have been
shipped to Ethiopia, Haiti,
Honduras, the Dominican
Republic, Zambia, Timor,
Sudan, Malawi, Niger, In-
donesia, the Philippines,
Swaziland, Kenya,
Rwanda, Uganda Zim-
babwe and Albania.
Part of the State Emer-
gency Response Team
(SERT), the organization
has an outstanding reputa-
tion among its partner or-
ganizations for donating its
transportation services to
bring life-saving relief sup-


plies to disaster areas and
has authorization to enter
areas even before such
groups as The National
Guard and FEMA.
The awards committee
was composed of represen-
tatives from Florida Divi-
sion of Emergency
Management (FEMA),
Florida Emergency Pre-
paredness Association,
American Red Cross and
the National Weather Serv-
ice and selects award re-
cipients based on their
activities and accomplish-
ments.


Health Screening
July 22 2:00pm
H2U, Health 2 You, is an organization that focuses on the unique
health needs of adults and their families. Free heart health, balance,
memory, and diabetic foot screenings will be offered at West Marion
Community Hospital, Medical Office Building Corridor, 4600 SW
46th Court.



Management of Hypertension
July 23 2:00pm
According to the American Heart Association, 74.5 million people in the U.S.
have high blood pressure. Hypertension can cause serious problems such as
stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure. Learn about causes,
symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention and natural ways to manage
blood pressure. Presented by Rajnikant Patel, MD, Family Practice Physician
for the Senior Healthcare Center.


OCALA HEALTH SYSTEM a
SENIOR HEALTHCARE CENTER
A service of Ocala Regional Medical Center


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messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, July 14, 2010


Quail Meadow


Day trip plans in motion


^^C^^arolyn
Slocumb

approximately 60 resi-
dents celebrated In-
dependence Day at
the clubhouse. The "indoor"
bar-b-que was very good. The
clubhouse looked very patri-
otic with all the red, white,
and blue decorations. The
social committee did a very
nice job, as usual, decorating
for the occasion. The food -
pulled pork, huge hot dogs,
and all the trimmings, was
very good. Champion Bar-B-
Q supplied the pulled pork
and Paul Cigrand and Frank
Christopher "grilled" the hot
dogs. Special recognition
was given to all who had
served in the military We
had representatives from all
branches of service Army,
Navy, Marines, Air Force,
Coast Guard, and Merchant
Marines. We are grateful for
all who have served and
those who are serving to pro-
tect our freedom.
Have you ever thought
about the 56 men who signed
the Declaration of Inde-
pendence and what kind of
lives they led? Twenty-four


A crowd of about 60 residents gathered at the clubhouse in Quail Meadow to celebrate the Fourth.


of these men were lawyers
and jurists, eleven were
merchants, and nine were
farmers or plantation own-
ers. They were all well-edu-
cated and knew the risks
they were taking by signing
this document. They also
knew that if captured, their
penalty would be death.
Five of the men were cap-
tured by the British and tor-
tured, twelve had their


homes ransacked and
burned, two lost their sons
who were serving in the
Revolutionary Army, an-
other had his two sons cap-
tured. Thomas McKeam
served in Congress without
pay, and his family was kept
in hiding. He lost all his pos-
sessions. Many others had
their homes looted. Several
died bankrupt. John Hart
lived in the forests and caves
for over a year; when he re-
turned home his wife had
died and his 13 children had
vanished. Let's each take a
moment to reflect on what
these men did and the sacri-


fices they paid in order for
us to have our freedom
today. When was the last
time you read the Declara-
tion of Independence?
The new Publix is very
nice. It will take some time
to become familiar with it.
One item of note: remember
the box that was available to
drop in your electric bill
payment at the "old" Pub-
lix? The new location is at
the Service Desk of the new
store. We can still save
postage by dropping our
payments in this box.
Monday, July 19, is the
next day for the bloodmo-


bile. The Big Red Bus will
be at the clubhouse between
12 and 2:30 p.m. A photo ID
is required for all first time
donors. Call Charlotte Payne
if you have any questions.
The July 8 trip to Hard
Rock was cancelled due to
lack of participation. There
will be a bus going on July
20. If you are interested, con-
tact the Jettsetters at 401-


1850.
Urgent Request: The In-
terfaith pantry is very low.
Donations are desperately
needed. There is a box in the
clubhouse for donations.
They are also very low on
personal hygiene items -
soap, toothpaste, deodorant,
etc. The little bottles you get
in hotel rooms are always
welcome.


The hot dog "chefs"for the Fourth of July bar-b-que were
Paul Cigrand and Frank Christopher.


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8441 SW Hwy.200,Ste. 119 Ocala F1 34481
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4 Wednesday, July 14, 2010 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger


Health department alerts community

of increase in EEE activity


Mosquito-borne
diseases have
affected 25 of 67
counties in Florida
The Marion County
Health Department is alert-
ing citizens of increased
mosquito-borne disease ac-
tivity in Florida and is urg-
ing citizens to take
precaution as they partici-
pate in any outdoor recre-
ation.
"Recent weather condi-
tions have made Marion
County ripe for an increase
in mosquito activity," said
Dr. Nathan Grossman, di-
rector of the Marion County
Health Department. "Over
the past month, mosquito-
borne diseases have af-
fected 25 of 67 counties in
Florida so citizens should
take every precaution to
protect themselves."


h2U
HEALTH TO YOU


Mosquito-borne diseases
such as West Nile virus
(WNV), Eastern equine en-
cephalitis (EEE), St. Louis
encephalitis (SLE), High-
lands J virus (HJV), Califor-
nia encephalitis (CEV), and
Dengue virus (DENV) have
been detected in Florida;
however, must of the cases
have been from EEE in
horses. Last week 15 cases
of EEE in horses were re-
ported.
While there is no treat-
ment to protect humans
from EEE, the disease can
be prevented in horses with
the use of vaccinations.
The health department is
urging citizens to be diligent
in their personal mosquito
protection efforts. These ef-
forts should include the "5
D's" for prevention:
Dusk and Dawn Avoid
being outdoors when mos-
quitoes are seeking blood.


For many species, this is
during the dusk and dawn
hours.
Dress -Wear clothing that
covers most of your skin.
DEET When the poten-
tial exists for exposure to
mosquitoes, repellents con-
taining DEET (N,N-diethyl-
meta-toluamide, or
N, N-diethyl-3-
methylbenzamide) are rec-
ommended. Picaridin and
oil of lemon eucalyptus are
other repellent options.
Drainage Check around
your home to rid the area of
standing water, which is
where mosquitoes can lay
their eggs.
For more information on
prevention of Eastern
Equine Encephalitis and
other mosquito-borne dis-
eases, contact the Marion
County Health Department
at (352) 629-0137.


OCALA HEALTH SYSTEM
WEST MARION COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

WILL HOST


MICHEL NORTHSEA
Ralph (Bud) Archacki introduces himself around the table during the recent Fourth of
July picnic at Fairfield Village.

First total ankle replacement performed


Last week Dr. Robert Linn,
a foot and ankle surgeon at
Munroe Regional Medical
Center in Ocala, began per-
forming the first total ankle
replacement procedure in
North Central Florida, which
includes Alachua, Marion,
and Citrus County. Dr. Linn is
being assisted during the
procedure by his partner, Dr.
Scott Goldstein. Dr. Linn and
Dr. Goldstein operate the
Foot and Ankle Center of
Ocala.
"The INBONET" Total
Ankle Replacement proce-
dure is ideal for patients who
suffer from debilitating end-
stage ankle arthritis, do not
participate in high-impact
activities and are between
the ages of 30 and 70," said
Dr. Linn. "These patients
find it difficult to walk and
stand-up and are no longer
finding any type of relief
from anti-inflammatory med-
ications. After recovery, a pa-
tient can return to their
normal, everyday activities."
The INBONE Total Ankle
Replacement consists of an
anchoring system to secure it
in place to reduce the likeli-


hood of it loosening over
time. INBONE can also be
customized by length and di-
ameter to give the patient the
most precise fit with minimal
bone removal. The device is
implanted into the patient's
body piece-by-piece in order
to place the least amount of
stress on the patient's body A
patented surgical technique
enables the surgeon to accu-
rately place the device.
Patients who receive an
INBONE Total Ankle Re-
placement normally spend
one to three nights in the
hospital. The patient's cast
will be removed sometime
between four and six weeks
post surgery Full recovery
takes anywhere from two to
six months. An individual
who receives a total ankle re-
placement should have very
little or very minimal pain
after surgery
The ankle is a small joint
that supports about four to
five times a person's body
weight when they walk. For
patients suffering from ankle
arthritis every step that they
take is extremely painful. As
the hip and knee replace-


WEST MARION


RVING THE COMMUNIfES & BUSINESSES BETWEEN SR 200 AND US 27

The West Marion Messenger is a free community newspaper covering
news of communities west of Ocala including Fore Ranch, Stone Creek,
Fairfield Village, Ocala Palms, Timberwood, Falls of Ocala, Foxwood Farms
and Golden Hills.
Postmaster: Entered asThird Class Matter at the post office in Ocala, Fla.,
34477.
Problems getting the Messenger: If your community is listed above and
the Messenger is not delivered to you or you are having trouble getting the
paper from boxes around the S.R. 40 and SR 27 areas, call 854-3986.
CONTACT INFORMATION
(352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 854-9277
8810 S.W. State Road 200, Suite 104, Ocala, FL 34481
*Editor- Michel Northsea
Circulation Barbara Jaggers
inside Sales/Office Coordinator- Pauline Moore
*Advertising Sales-Tom Rapplean and Susie Mirabile
Regional Manager- John Provost
Deadline for news:
Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication.
"TPF Member of the Community Papers of Florida
I want to get news Deadline for
in the Messenger. Advertising
Call editor Michel Northsea at
352-854-3986 or send by e-mail to
editor@westmarionmessenger.com Classified Reader Ads
Community news and photos must be received by 4 pm Friday
Friday the week before publication. Mail and photos
may be left at the Messenger office in Kingsland Display Ads
Plaza. All contributions are subject to editing for 5 pm Thursday
clarity, taste, and style.


ment technology advanced
during the last several
decades, ankle replacement
technology lagged far behind.
Many patients underwent
ankle fusion surgery that
pins the two ankle bones to-
gether, so that the joint forms
one mass. Patients lose
range-of-motion during that
procedure, but didn't have
any other viable options to
eliminate the excruciating
pain from their lives until re-
cently The INBONE Total
Ankle Replacement by
Wright Medical is revolution-
izing the way end-stage ankle
arthritis is treated.
According to the Centers
for Disease Control, approx-
imately 46 million Americans
(one in five) suffer from some
form of doctor diagnosed
arthritis. It is estimated that
as the U.S. population ages,
that the number of people di-
agnosed with arthritis will
increase to 67 million by the
year 2030 approximately
one in every three Ameri-
cans will be diagnosed with
the condition. Arthritis is a
degenerative condition that
causes the cartilage to erode
between the joints. Symp-
toms include pain, aching
and swelling in or around the
joint. For patients who suffer
from arthritis of the hip and
knee, a joint replacement
has relieved them of the pain
and suffering caused by
arthritis and allowed them to
return to an active lifestyle.
However, patients suffering
from arthritis of the ankle
didn't have many options
until recently and were often
forced to live in excruciating
pain.
"Munroe Regional is
proud to partner with Dr.
Linn and Dr. Goldstein to
bring this revolutionary new
procedure to North Central
Florida," said Dr. Lon
McPherson, senior vice pres-
ident of Medical Affairs and
chief quality officer. "The
total ankle replacement pro-
cedure will enable those who
suffer from end-stage ankle
arthritis to seek total joint re-
placement similar to those
who have been treated for
many years with hip and
knee arthritis. This will allow
patients to improve their
quality of life and return to
an active lifestyle."
An animation video of the
INBONE Total Ankle Re-
placement procedure can be
viewed at www.Munroe-
Orthopedics.com.


Health



Screenings


Thursday, July zznd 4 p.m.


West Marion Community Hospital

Medical Office Building Corridor

4600 SW 46th Court

Free Heart Health, Balance, Memory and

Diabetic Foot Screenings will be offered.

To register for a screening, please

call 800-530-1188.

HzU, Health zYou, is an organization that focuses on
the unique health needs of adults and their families
and provides them with valuable health information,
resources, activities and experiences.

ft refreshments will be served.






messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger


Retirement allows time for hobby


le tricia
11HI i izzi

We are taught that
each of us has a
unique gift and
sometimes it takes years
before we find that gift. Re-
cently, I was introduced to
two Stone Creek residents
that have picked up a pas-
sion that they started years
ago.
I was introduced to
Karen Chapman where we
take water aerobic classes
three times a week. She is
a painter and I asked her if
I could do an article on her
and her paintings. She
agreed but told me she did
not consider herself an
artist.
Karen began attending
classes at Nassau Commu-
nity College after she re-
tired. She did this for three
years and loved what she
was learning. She also has
taken classes at OTOW
which was a pen and ink
class. She took classes in
her home town of Denton,
Texas where she did draw-
ing, oil and acrylic paint-
ing. She said, "I would
come home, eat lunch and
then practice my craft for
the rest of the day One day
I actually forgot to eat din-
ner." This is dedication!
Karen says that since she
is still learning, she will
paint in any medium but
she enjoys working with
colored pencils. These
pencils are not like the
ones kids use. They have a
wide range of color
choices. Most of Karen's
work has either an animal
or people in them. She told
me, "I do this to push my-
self as I got a late start in
my art studies." She has not













"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


sold any of her art. It is ba-
sically for her own enjoy-
ment and her children and
grandchildren. She has
done dinosaurs for a
grandson in Texas; another
grandson's pet dog and lots
of birds for another grand-
son. She said, "I could
spend the rest of my days
painting pictures for him
as he never seems to run
out of birds he likes me to
paint. My granddaughters
have shown less of an in-
terest. One has a picture of
flowers on her wall that I
painted and the other has
an elephant." Karen has
also done work for her
children. Currently, she is
working on a large painting
of a construction worker
for her son who is in the
construction business. Her
son has made it known that
the crane is not right
Karen says, "He's turned
into some kind of technical
advisor. Of course, he
knows I don't care if it is
technically perfect. To me
it is just background for the
subject, but I will try to im-
prove the visual for him or
be teased the rest of the
time."


Each of us would like to
say that we have left our
children with something.
For Karen, her paintings
are her legacy to her chil-
dren and grandchildren.
Karen received her love of
the arts from her mom. Ac-
cording to Karen, "My mom
seemed to be able to do
anything. She designed
and built a piece of furni-
ture, almost all of the
paintings and drawing in
our house. She even did
the brick work outside our
home, an entire patio be-
cause she wanted a pattern
a certain way" Karen's
mother left her a wonder-
ful legacy her mom told
her there is no mistake in
art that you can't find a so-
lution for. What a powerful
message!
I was invited to Karen's
home which is like a small
gallery She said that she
and her husband started to
collect art when they first
got married. They buy
pieces from new artists
starting out and pieces that
take on meaning for them.
Karen showed me many of
the pieces she has done
that now grace the rooms
of grandchildren or her


Karen Chapman paints for her family and her own enjoyment.


children's home. These
were carefully docu-
mented by her husband
Lee on the computer. I not
only got to see her work but
I was given lessons on how
she learned different tech-
niques. She told me she is
continually challenging
herself.
Karen ended the inter-


view with the following: "It
is never too late to find the
artist within. You actually
don't even need to be able
to draw. Having a good
sense of color and seeing a
relationship to the shapes
you are putting down is
more important in my
opinion. You can sense a
feeling of balance and


beauty and that's when
you're done and you put
down your brush."
Next week, I will intro-
duce you to Grace Fleury
and her work.
If you are still searching
for your inner talentss, the
Leisure Arts Club offers
many classes. It is never
too late.......


Get more for your money
this summer when you buy
a gift card from Candler Hills
Restaurant between now and
September 30, 2010.


Martinis & Tapas cM7ixer

Thursday, July 22, 2010
4:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.
$9.95 plus tax
Includes 2 drinks and appetizers


Purchase a gift card in
any amount $50 or more and
receive 10% off the cost.
(i.e. Purchase a $50 gift card for only $45.)


Reservations Recommended


Dinner Specials
$9.95

Served daily from 4 6 pm

Includes Soup or Salad and
Chefs Choice Dessert

Bistro Steak Mornay
Grilled tender steak served with
potato wedges, havarti,horseradish
sauce and choice of vegetable

Panko Crusted Chicken
Chicken breast lightly breaded with
Japanese bread crumbs and served
with rice pilaf, stir-fry vegetables
and shoyu sauce

Plank Roasted Salmon Tzatziki
Plank roasted wild salmon
served with tzatziki sauce,
rice pilaf and choice of vegetable

Honey Garlic St. Louis Ribs
Slow braised pork spare ribs served
with honey garlic sauce,
potato wedges and baked beans

Fried Shrimp and Fish Platter
Panko crusted pangasius fish,
popcorn shrimp, French fries,
coleslaw and tartar sauce
*All prices are plus tax and gratuity
7/10


andler Hill. CHANDLER HILLS RESTAURANT
Restaurant 8139 SW 90th Terrace Rd., Ocala (352) 861-9720

]Hours: Mon Thur: 11 a.m. 7 p.m., Fri & Sat: 11 a.m. 8 p.m., Sun: 8 a.m. 6 p.m.


Wednesday, July 14, 2010 5


~*%-: dl~u~k


IA I






6 Wednesday, July 14, 2010 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger


Opinion


1 7We t Marion Messenger
8 0
810 W State Road 200, suite 104,
0 0 I -mail
st 1
cala, FL 34481; or e
St
red itor(*westmarionmessenger com


__J Among Friends _y
Our Message s ss Out to Pastor


What were they GPlease pass te altGood intentions only


thinking?


Wrong message sent
When the Southwest Florida
Water Management District
lifted its one-day-a-week wa-
tering restrictions that have been in
place since 2007 they were not using
their best management practices.
Yes, we have had better than aver-
age rainfalls in recent months and
that has made a significant improve-
ment in aquifer and river levels but it
doesn't mean that conservation of our
water supply should end.
For residents of Marion County, the
announcement from SWFWMD does-
n't change the rules. Marion County
officials had already worked out
agreements with the two water dis-
tricts running through our county for
consistency across the county.
In addition, other communities, On
Top of the World and The Villages,
worked out
agreements with
the county to fit Editoral
their community
needs. Some-
times, water pressure is a concern for
those communities it's not that those
residents get to water more than oth-
ers their watering is just done on
different days.
Because of that interlocal agree-
ment between the two water agen-
cies, Marion County homeowners
were able to water twice a year dur-
ing daylight savings and once a year
during eastern standard time.
Even that watering schedule does-
n't encourage much conservation.
With lawn watering accounting for
about half of the water used by resi-
dences and much more than half
for residents with large lawns lim-
iting the amount of water used in wa-
tering lawns is the easiest
conservation measure of all.
Conservation of our resources is
important everywhere.
Over the years, guidelines for new
developments and golf courses have
been put into place that makes better
use of our resources than we have in
the past. These "best management
practices," as they are often referred
to as, help conserve water by making
drought tolerant Florida friendly
landscaping and taking out require-
ments of maintaining a "green" lawn.
Once-a-week watering sent the
same message to everyone living
under Swiftmud guidelines.

Please see OPINION, Page 7

SW E S T M A K I 0 N

Memsenger
PUBLISHER:
GERRY MULLIGAN
REGIONAL MANAGER:
JOHN PROVOST
EDITOR:
MICHEL NORTHSEA


Mrthsea
You get to be a certain age and some
things start to go down, as in sag, and
other things start to go up.
It's a sad fact of life.
Blood pressure, an increased chance of
some dreaded disease and our weight in-
crease as we get older, eat more and perhaps
have a tendency to exercise less because of
achy joints and weary bones.
Let's talk about blood pressure.
For more of us, the normal range for our sys-
tolic blood pressure, the top number, is under
120. The diastolic number, the bottom number,
should be less than 80 to make the normal
range and keep the doctor from lecturing.
A new study indicates those numbers
might not be right for everyone.
Conducted by University of Florida re-
searchers, the International Verapamil SR-
Trandolapril study, known as INVEST,
suggests that higher figures may be better if
you suffer from the combination of diabetes
and heart disease.
According to Rhonda Cooper-DeHoff, an
associate professor of pharmacy and medi-
cine at UF, for those with both heart prob-


lems and diabetes it is now thought systolic
blood pressure levels, should be between 130
and 140.
It seems efforts to reduce blood pressure
below 130 for those with heart/diabetics
problems did not give a patient any more
benefit that having it between the 130-140
range, according to the INVEST study
To get to these results, researchers ana-
lyzed data of 6,400 people over 50 years of
age, at 850 sites in 14 countries. The study
went from the fall of 1997 to the spring 2003.
Since that time, Cooper-DeHoff spoke to
the American College of Cardiology's 59th
annual scientific session and a report on the
study appeared in the Journal of the Ameri-
can Medical Association.
Fifty-nine years isn't a long-time compared
to the history of mankind but it does go to
show how long heart disease has been a con-
cern. I remember my grandmother offering
the reason someone in her family had died
as their "heart gave out."
With the many studies and strides we have
made in fighting heart disease that reason
can't be used so much. Still, all the studies in
the world don't exclude the responsibility we
each have for our own good health.
Last week, I drove around Quail Meadows
in search of photos for this week's paper, I
noticed many people walking.
They're on the right tract.
Exercising daily, eating healthy and in
moderation will go a long way in keeping us
healthy Regular check-ins with the doctors
can aid in keeping us healthy and living a
healthier life.
On second thought, don't pass up the salt. I
have to lace up my walking shoes and hit the
street. Are you coming?


t. "Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"




'4

/



Reader Opinions Invited
The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions
of the editorial board of the newspaper.
Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessar-
ily represent the opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the
editor and guest columns.
c Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 854-3986.
c- All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name,
including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone
numbers will not be published or given out.
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Not all contributions are printed.
c- Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a
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deadline is one week prior to each Wednesday's issue.
c- Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W State Road 200,
suite 104, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessenger.com.


as good as intended





^\^" i!


Ces
'12t^ yder

f awards were given to people who
have the best of intentions, I would be
working on my acceptance speech
right now. However, I know that inten-
tions are only as good as the one who
crafts the intention.
Recently, the Gracious Mistress of the
Parsonage needed to go and visit her par-
ents. This necessitated her being away for
five days. In her absence, I was in charge.
As they say, I was the chief cook and bot-
tle washer. Unfortunately, I did not know
the proper way of cooking a chief or if it
was legal, and there were no bottles
around for me to wash. In her absence, I
would have to do a lot of improvising but
I did not think I needed to bother her with
such trivial information while she was
packing.
Finally, she was off and I, as they say,
was on.
The first thing I did was evaluate my sit-
uation and formulate a game plan. After
all, I was in charge. I wanted to make sure
I got the most out of every hour. I hate
waste, and I hate wasting time. I fully in-
tended to use the time at my disposal for
my greatest pleasure.
After several moments of this, I was ex-
hausted, got a soda from the refrigerator,
went to the back porch and reclined on
my lounge chair. I would unwind and
think through the things I wanted to do in
her absence.
I was finding out that this being in
charge is rather hard work Therefore, a
nap was in order. I smiled as I leaned
back and allowed my body to relax. It felt
wonderful. A nap before lunchtime was
something unheard of when You Know
Who was in charge. Now that I am in
charge, a nap is whenever I want to take
it. This being in charge has real advan-
tage.
I made it through the first day Looking
back, I am not quite sure how I did it.
Late in the afternoon, I had come up
with an excellent plan for my evening
arrangements. I plan to party the evening
away until the wee hours of the morning.
No curfew tonight. I would let down my
hair, what hair I had, and throw caution
to the wind. Look out wind. Tonight would
be the beginning of my free-for-all. The
refrigerator was well stocked with good-
ies, and I had a plan. I love it when a plan
comes together.
My intentions were to stay up until the
wee hours of the morning. Along about 11
o'clock my eyes became so heavy I could
hardly keep them open. I grabbed a soda
and another apple fritter and went to bed.
I would do something not permitted
under normal circumstances; I would
have a snack in bed while watching tele-
vision.
I do not know what happened. Maybe it
was all the apple fritters I had, but the
next thing I knew the sun was coming
through the window and it was morning.


Please see PASTOR, Page 7


C~a Among FriEnds C~






Wednesday, July 14, 2010 7


OPINION

continued from Page 6

One of these years, our
legislators need to ask
our water district lead-
ers to have consistency
throughout the state. It
never makes sense for
one area of the state to
have the right to water
more than another area
of the state.
Weather patterns are
cyclical. This means we
could have another
drought at any time,
groundwater levels
could drop, and the
agency could reinstate



PASTOR

continued from Page 6

Whatever happened to my
all night party?
There on my nightstand
was a half-empty can of
soda and a partially eaten
apple fritter I then smelled
something I have never
smelled before. I sniffed,
but I could not identify the
strange odor. I sniffed
again, but no better luck.
No matter how much I
sniffed, it was always the
same.
Every morning when I
get up I smell freshly
brewed coffee floating in
from the kitchen area.
Now, for some strange rea-
son, I smelled no such
smell. The morning air was
bankrupt of any delicious
aroma that I could identify
I walked into the kitchen
and there was the coffee
pot where it was supposed
to be, but to my chagrin, no
coffee was brewing. I can-
not understand that be-
cause every morning I
wake up to the smell of
fresh brewed coffee. There
is no better way to get up in
the morning than that. The
best way to start every
morning is with a nice hot
cup of coffee.
For as long as I can re-
member, I have always en-
joyed the morning
fragrance of freshly
brewed coffee. Why should
today be any different?
It then dawned upon me.
I did not fix the coffee pot
the night before, like my
wife always does. That was


once-a-week restric-
tions. For this reason, it
seems the water man-
agement agency could
have considered leaving
the once-a-week water-
ing limit in place and
offer alternatives such
as more flexible water-
ing schedules or ex-
tended watering hours.
Leaving more strin-
gent restrictions in
place would have con-
tinued to underscore the
message that while
more water is currently
available, clean fresh
water is a limited re-
source and we all need
to conserve to assure an
adequate supply of
water at all times.

just the beginning. Where
were my eggs over easy,
bacon, fresh biscuits and
gravy? I always have that
for breakfast. I looked in
the refrigerator and saw
them in their natural habi-
tat, which was raw.
I sighed deeply and said
to myself, "Where in the
world is my breakfast?"
And myself replied, "Silly,
you have to make it your-
self."
Well, I had a real good
talking to myself Then, I
do not know how it hap-
pened, but I heard my wife
talking. Out of my mouth
came her words that I have
heard a thousand times be-
fore, "Breakfast does not
make itself." In that brief
moment, I had become my
wife, which was not my in-
tention.
The only area where per-
sonal work does not count
is in salvation. The apostle
Paul writes, "For by grace
are ye saved through faith;
and that not of yourselves:
it is the gift of God: Not of
works, lest any man should
boast" (Ephesians 2:8-9
KJV).
God does not intend for
us to save ourselves. His
full attention is our com-
plete salvation, and God is
always as good as His
Word.
The Rev James L. Sny-
der is pastor of the Family
of God Fellowship, 1471
Pine Road, Ocala, FL
34472. He lives with his
wife, Martha, in Silver
Springs Shores. Call him at
352-687-4240 or e-mail
jam essnyder2@a tt. n e t.
The church website is
www.whatafellowship. com.


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.Newspapers Have
--pp


The Answers

I Do you need to know?
IKeep up with your world with the West Marion
newspaper found at the following locations:

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Cracker Barrel Foxwood
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." -- WEST MARION



854-3986 8810 SW St. Rd. 200, Suite 104
854-3986Ocala, FL 34481


Lorenzo Ramunno, Esq.
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Neighbors of Mike and
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golf cart parade in Ocala
Palms go by.


Last but not least in the
Ocala Palms golf cart pa-
rade for the Fourth of July
was Cliff Brinkley.


LLM.elenKa Tusdl, .DLLM


MESSENGER


k ros"roacJ I\t1[ N Ii II


I ree t IaIn






8 Wednesday, July 14, 2010 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger



What do you know about your ancestors?


Colleen C. Wells
SPECIAL TO THE
MESSENGER

Recently there has been
an explosion of interest in
the field of family history
research (otherwise known
as genealogy). Some could
speculate that this newly
found interest was fueled
by the popular television
series "Who Do You Think
You Are?" where celebri-
ties embark on personal
journeys into their pasts to
solve their family's myster-
ies. Another reason could
be the uncertainty of to-
morrow's future, economi-
cally and metaphysically
Regardless of your back-
ground, the study of our
family's history can bring
about a feeling of stability
in our ever changing



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certain foods. Dental
implants, on the other hand,
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efficiency that is comparable
to that of natural teeth. This is
because dental implants
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We believe that a patient
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'U- IO-I


world.
We are not alone in ex-
periencing a poor economy
or high unemployment.
Throughout history, our
ancestors encountered
great depressions and ex-
treme poverty worse than
we can imagine. The
events and patterns of our
present day take on a new
appreciation for our fam-
ily's past. For others, ge-
nealogy is looked upon as
an adventure. It is exciting
and challenging; no matter
if your ancestors were
rogues or royalty, they are
descendents of your family
whether you like it or not.
Their very lives are the
reason you are here. Re-
gardless of whatever's
piqued your interest in
your past, now is the time
to take advantage of all the
wonderful genealogical re-
sources we have at our dis-
posal.
Where to begin? A good
place to begin would be in
your own home where you
will find evidence of your
family history all around
you. Begin with yourself.
Start by writing down your
full name, then your fa-
ther's and mothers full
names working as far back
as you are able. Always
work from the known to the




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unknown. Remember to
base your calculations on
facts of what you do know,
which in turn will help re-
solve the unknown. Com-
plete as much as possible
including the vital statis-
tics of you and your par-
ents. You now have two
generations. Now maybe a
good time to begin charting
your new family informa-
tion. Two simple genealog-
ical charts: the pedigree
chart and the family group
chart could be used to help
organize your family
records. Blank charts can
be found free on Cyndi's
List.
Next, check for primary
records at home. Primary
records are any records
created at the time of the
event. These would in-
clude birth, marriage, and
death certificates. Family
letters, journals, and di-
aries could be primary
sources if they are record-
ing a particular occasion
such as soldier writing
home describing his war
experiences or mid-wife
documenting the birth of a
child. A death record is a
primary source, but also a
secondary source for the
birth of the deceased.
After learning all you can
at home, the next step





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would be contacting and
interviewing older rela-
tives who could add not
only more pertinent family
information, but wonderful
stories of the past. With
their permission, an audio
or video recording would
be an excellent way to help
document your research.
Older relatives narratives
are a great way to jump
start your investigation.
They can offer limitless
clues for moving backward
into new undiscovered ter-
ritory But remember-not
all stories told are a hun-
dred percent factual.
You're Aunt Sally or
Grandma Smith may swear
up and down the family
legend is true, but until
proven, they are just that:
clues to help you move on.
Bible records are an-
other excellent source of
family information. In the
past, documenting birth,
marriage, and death
records were frequently
done by writing in the fam-
ily Bible. Before vital
records were required by
the county or state, our an-
cestors often kept their
own family records. The
value of the Bible records
depends greatly on who
wrote the records. Was he
or she a witness to a birth
or death? Or was this sec-
ond hand information
which was later added to
the Bible? Whatever may
be the case, Bible records
are truly an invaluable re-
search source to the ge-


nealogist.
After gleaning as much
information from home
and family you probably
ready to explore outside
sources such as the inter-
net, library, and the Family
History Center. The inter-
net by itself contains such
a huge treasure trove of in-
formation for the family
historian that it is hard to
know where to begin. Web-
sites such as Ancestry com
and Familysearch.org have
literally billions of records
at your disposal; in addi-
tion, they offer guidance in
the way of classes and on-
line seminars. While An-
cestrycom is a
subscriber-only site, Fam-
ilysearch.org is run by the
Church of the Latter Day
Saints and is free to the
public. Keep in mind, as
you venture into online ge-
nealogy that you will not
find everything you are
seeking to complete your
genealogical history Many
records are simply not on-
line. Another fact to con-
sider is that just because it
is online does not make it
true. Many genealogies
posted are filled with inac-
curacies. You should al-
ways do your own research
and use the information
posted only as a guide.
Most libraries are ge-
nealogy friendly Many, in-
cluding our Marion County
Library, have special
rooms dedicated to the ge-
nealogist or family histo-
rian. The main


headquarters branch has a
wonderful genealogy area
where library patrons can
utilize the internet just for
their research. The library
subscribes to several out-
standing websites includ-
ing: Ancestry.com,
HeritageQuest.com, and
Newsbank.com. In addi-
tion to access to these sites,
the library houses an ex-
tensive collection of ge-
nealogical books and
materials.
Ocala is very fortunate to
have its very own Family
History Center. The center
is located at 1831 S.E. 18th
Ave. It is sponsored by the
Church of the Latter Day
Saints (LDS.) The FHC is a
branch of the Family His-
tory Library in Salt Lake
City, Utah. It is capable of
ordering microfilm and mi-
crofiche from the main li-
brary's databases. You do
not need to be a member of
the LDS church to use the
Family History Center.
The Marion County Ge-
nealogical Society is yet
another wonderful re-
source in the area avail-
able to the burgeoning
genealogist like yourself.
The society promotes and
encourages an interest in
genealogy to its members
and the general public
with its programs and edu-
cation. Their award win-
ning publication,
Rootdigger is published
quarterly and offers many
wonderful articles and tips
for increasing your ge-
nealogical knowledge and
furthering your research.
The MCGS meets on the
3rd Thursday of the month
at the Marion County Li-
brary's main headquarters.
For further information,
check out their website at
http://mariongenealogy tri-
pod. com/information. html.
You've been warned: this
is a very addicting hobby
Once you begin and find
out the real story behind
the disappearance of great
Uncle Joe or why you're
great, great grandfather
left Ireland in such great
hurry, you will be hooked.
Like a detective you may
travel to archives, county
court houses, and cemeter-
ies trying to find that darn
lost distant cousin who
keeps evading you at every
turn. If you are seeking
only perfect ancestors,
then genealogy is probably
not for you. Like it or not,
there will no doubt be a
black sheep or two in your
family if you look long
enough.
Genealogy is for every-
one: young, old, rich or
poor. We all have a past
which is begging to be dis-
covered. What do you know
about your ancestors?
Colleen Wells is an active
genealogical researcher
based in Ocala. Her pas-
sion for genealogy stems
from discovering the past
lives ofmy ancestors, along
with encouraging family
members to join in on the
adventures of solving of
mysteries. Along with her
genealogical research, she
enjoys writing about past
family members whether
through my blog at
http://insearchofhistory.wo
rdpress.com/


museu


ZCY


w







messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, July 14, 2010 9


Fairfield Village


FFV Homeowners'Association hosts guest panel


W-U iscila
l jeissal

Thursday night, July 8,
Fairfield Village res-
idents welcomed a 4
person group from the
Kingswood community in
Riverview, Florida, near
Tampa. The group repre-
sented an ROC (Resident-
Owned Community) that
had gone through the
process of buying their
property some 10 years ago
and came to discuss what
they had experienced.
Mary and Armen Far-
manian are owner-resi-
dents; and Mary is
president of the seven
member shareholders'
group, five of which are
women she quickly
pointed out. Mary was very
enthusiastic about the ad-
vantages of ownership, and
she emphasized that own-
ers are cooperative with
those who choose to lease;
they all work well together.
Any increases are shared
equally on a percentage
basis by shareowners and
non-owners.
The 229 home commu-
nity originally had 89 own-
ers with 140 "renters."
Ironically, now, the reverse
is true with there being 140
owners and 89 "renters."
The owners pay only a


maintenance fee that is
kept as low as possible be-
cause of the Not For Profit
cooperative status. Be-
cause the costs can be kept
low, the rental fees have
been maintained at a lower
cost than in many commu-
nities as well.
The value of the shares
has increased in the 10
years of ownership. The
first shares were pur-
chased at $28,000 and
shares now sell for $40,000.
The maintenance fee has
risen only $58 in the 10
years, and even part of that
is for cable TV service
which is now included in
the fee and was not before.
Armen Farmanian en-
couraged the group by say-
ing: "If the figures come
together, do not hesitate!"
He explained that their
group first tried to pur-
chase their property in
1992 when the cost would
have been $4.1 million.
They were not successful
at that time; then by 2000
when they did succeed, the
cost was $7 million. He
said that it would obviously
have been much better had
they been able to complete
the deal the eight years
earlier.
Both Mr. and Mrs. Far-
manian cautioned that one
of the most important
things to consider is the
management team. They
said that it took several
years before they found
Dennis and Wanda Hansen
who have been their man-
agers for seven years. The
Hansens love Kingswood


so much that they plan to
retire there in the commu-
nity; but right now, they
love working there. The co-
operation with the resi-
dents is exceptional
according to Wanda who
handles the administrative
work. Dennis is responsi-
ble for any and all the
maintenance concerns.
Wanda closed her remarks
by reminding Fairfield res-
idents that ownership is
the only way to control
their own futures.
Don Ouellette, FMO
(Federation of Manufac-
tured Homeowners) repre-
sentative and Fairfield
HOA board member asked
residents for questions to
be addressed to the 4-per-
son panel. Many pertinent
questions followed with in-


formative answers being
given. The group closed by
saying that there always


are concerns but that there
are so many more positives
than negatives in owner-


ship that they would cer-
tainly advise following that
objective if at all possible.


5 WheOte ee 00t SleeWice iS ant epetience!
aam-------------------- a m


ZACK \
rk'mhLLI EEI-E-LI--L I-LI L L L L LLL LLLLLLLL
LLLLLL J LLLLLLLL
LLI I LLL LaLLLLLLLLLLLL r
\LLLLLLfLL^LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL L 4q.,
*LLLL L LLLLLL _LLLLLLKITCHENLLLLL DINING_LLL BEDROOM #3
NOBILITY *KLLrST LL LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL 6itL 86'"
IIOMES, INC. LI TH LLLLLLL L LL
oi i lDoneso LLLLL I S REF LLLLLLLL
nobilityhomesco-n L LLL LLLLLLLLLLL


Homes Designed, Built & Serviced
By NOBILITY HOMES


40' X 28' 3 F&R, 2 BATH 1060 SQ. FT. / 40E3H(14)


Uy W THE OVERALL LENGTH INCLUDES A HITCH OF APPROXIMATELY
FOUR FEET ON ALL HOMES.
MANUFACTURED IN ACCORDANCE WITH STANDARDS
DEVELOPED AND ENFORCED BY HUD- DUE TO OUR
CONTINUING PROGRAM OF PRODUCT IMPROVEMENT. PRICES
AND SPECIFICATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT
NOTICE. SOME ITEMS SUCH AS TIRES. RIMS. AXLES. AND
HITCHES MAY HAVE BEEN RECYCLED AFTER INSPECTION FOR
SAFETY AND APPEARANCE. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE NOMINAL.


Land Home Financing FHA VA Loans Buy For Loans -

Home Only Loans USDA Loans Equity

Financing Alternative Income Financing


Purchase tickets online*or
at the ticket office.
Shows begin at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m.
(unless noted othenidse)
8395 SW 80th Street Ocala, FL 34481 (352) 854-3670
Ticket Office Hours: Mondy Saurday: 11:00 a.m. 2:00 pm. Jimmy Beaumont &
Day of Show: 11:00 a.m. Showtime The Skyliners
*Online tickets subject to a small convenience fee. Schedule and prices Greatest hit "Since I Don't Have You"
subject to change without notice. All ticket sales final. Tickets starting at $16


PRESTIGE HOME CENTERS, INC.


4300 South Pine Ave (27 / 441)

Ocala, Florida 34480

1-800-313-6324


www.circlesquarecommonsfarmersmarket.com
II -


~le B I' II :~m Ie I






10 Wednesday, July 14, 2010 messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger


c< Happenings c


Incentives listed
for blood donors
Florida's Blood Centers in
partnership with participat-
ing Walgreen's is having
blood drives this month.
By giving blood in July
donors receive a $10 Wal-
green's Gift Card too.
Go to www.floridasblood-
centers.org for locations or
call 352-266-1020 to donate
and receive $10.00 gift card,
a Get on the Bus T-shirt, a
Sonic sundae and enter to
win a 2200 watt Generator
donated by Northern Tool
and Equipment of Ocala.
If you live here, play here,
work here- Donate here, we
are the only blood center
supplyingthe local hospitals.
Get on the Big Red Bus.
Take a class this
summer at OTOW
The summer schedule for
July, August and September
lists 178 learning opportuni-
ties for the Master the Possi-
bilities life-time learning
program at On Top of the
World.
Even though classes are of-
fered in the educational
building at On Top of the
World classes aren't limited
to OTOW residents only
Classes are open to the
public too.
Check on line at mas-
terthepossibilities.com to


find out if there's a class that
piques your interest. Follow
the "class schedule" link to
see the complete listings.
Registration for the classes is
also available on line.
Printed copies of the
schedule is available at the
Master the Possibilities
building, Circle Square Com-
mons, On Top of the World,
8409 S.W 80th St. Ocala.
For more information call
861-9751.
Congressman's challenger
to speak to OP club
The August primary elec-
tion presents a challenge to
long term incumbent, Rep.
Stearns. The challenger,
Don Browning, is the fea-
tured speaker for the Re-
publican Club of Ocala
Palms when they meet on
July 20 at 7 p.m. Mr. Brown-
ing refers to himself as a
Republican Anti-establish-
ment Candidate who be-
lieves, "Government is out
of control. Wasteful Spend-
ing is out of control. Let's
Break up the Washington
Fraternity. America needs
fresh Patriots." For your
convenience, voter regis-
tration cards will be avail-
able at the meeting; you
may register to vote for the
first time or change your
party affiliation. Light re-
freshments will be served.
All Ocala Palms residents,


club members or not, are
welcome and encouraged
to participate in the meet-
ings.
Motown Magic
to sing faves
You'll be dancing in the
streets" when Motown
Magic thrills with their
sound and electric per-
formance. Hear favorites
made famous by: Aretha
Franklin, The Four Tops,
Smokey Robinson, Otis
Redding, Dionne Warwick,
Marvin Gaye and more.
Tickets start at $18.
Don't miss this incredi-
ble night of high energy en-
tertainment on Saturday,
July 17 at 7 pm at the Circle
Square Cultural Center lo-
cated at 8395 S.W 80th St,
Ocala. For more informa-
tion visit: www.CSCultural-
Center.com, or call
352-854-3670.
Fitness spa opens
for visitors July 31
The Ranch Fitness Cen-
ter and Spa invites you to
attend an Open House for
members, guests and visi-
tors on Saturday, July 31
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. At-
tendees will tour the state-
of-the-art facility, enjoy
exciting fitness demonstra-
tions, and meet personal
trainers and spa/salon
service providers. Profes-
sional health screenings
will also be available. All
attendees will receive a
free trial guest pass.
The Ranch Fitness Cen-
ter and Spa Open House is
free and open the public.
Refreshments, healthy
snacks, giveaways and
membership specials will
be available throughout
the day!
The Ranch Fitness Cen-
ter and Spa is open daily
and is a full service fitness
facility, salon and spa lo-
cated at 8385 S.W 80th
Street, Ocala, FL 34481.
For more information, call
352-861-8180 or visit
www. TheRanchFit-
nessSpa.com.


Carol & Ernie Brandes sporting their new Corvette on a recent trip to the Ivy House in
Williston.


Ernie & Carol Brandes,Jack
& Donna Neal.


On the road

again...

The Ocala Palms

Car Club


Cathy Donohue, Raymond
DeBrauwere and Shirley
DeBrauwere.


WEST MARION MeCaSener



DIAL A* PRO

For Your Professional Needs


IERRY VfIAIRVT
IRRIGATION LLC. 3398 S.W.74thAve., Bay 101, Ocala
Seasonal Special
$: Q Reset Controller s
$4995 *Adjust Spray Heads to Correct Spray Pattern
Complete System Inspection
We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation.
Certified Irrigation Auditor Call for details. ir 7
-'" Member of Florida
IrrigationSociety 352-237-5731
SComp #7085 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Licensed Fully Insured






A D VER TISE


Call Paaulin I "e


16 Years Experience
Ins/Li5AK-C044879
WaroroGuaranteed
LESSEEBER, JRT
ROOFING
REROOFING REPAIRS
(352) 266-4935
(352) 615-0248
EsFree
Estimates

S'-~i^ ^


Serving Marion County Since 1971
Wayne "Scotty" Flynn
Vinyl Siding
Metal Roofing
Roofovers
Room Additions
Screenrooms
Classrooms
Garages
General Contractor LLC
"New Homes" 11685 SE, Hwy 301 Bellevien
352-307-1752
Cell 352-875-6470
I State License RG0023490 0005BNT


Ocala Palms Car Club-
pictured are Shirley
DeBrauwere, Jane and
Dick Ambrogi Ivy House.


PATH AITH

is discovered through worshiping together


Christ's Church
uMarion County
An Independent Cristian Church
SUNDAY SERVICES
Worship......................... 11:00 am
Sunday School..............10:00 am
All ages
Wednesday Bible Study..7:00 pm
Friday Youth Nights.........6:00 pm
SENIOR PASTOR DAVID BELLOWS

6768 SW 80th Street
Ocala 34476
352-861-6182
www.ccomc.org


Evangelical
Lutheran Church
joyocala@embarqmail com
Sunday Worship: 9:30 am
No Sunday School
German Language Worship
1st. Sunday of each month
3:00 pm
Wednesday Evening
Worship 6:45 pm
Nursery Provided
Edward Holloway, Pastor
7045 SW 83rd Pl., Ocala
(352) 854-4509


^^i* Christ
the King
Anglican Church
Tbe Rev. Donald J. Curran,
Rector
Rev. Matthew Walter
Asst. Rector
Services:
Rite I 7:30 am
Rite II- 8:50 & 11:15 am
Children's Church 8:50 am
3801 US N. Hwy 441
in Living Waters
Worship Center's
SSouth Sanctuary ,


I








messengermessenger MESSENGER messengermessengermessengermessengermessengermessenger Wednesday, July 14, 2010 11


Sports program starts

Believe it or not it is time
to get ready for fall football.
All boys and girls from
kindergarten through 6th
grade, in the southwestern
area of Marion County and
Ocala, are encouraged to reg-
ister for Upward Flag Foot-
ball or Cheerleading. The
deadline for registration is
Aug. 15.
A form and registration fee
may be dropped off at the
church office anytime be-
tween 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday. The
cost is $65 for football and in-
cludes a jersey, belt and flags,
car magnet and end-of-
season award.
Cheerleading costs $65 and
includes a uniform, mega-
phone, pom-poms, hair rib-
bon, car magnet and
end-of-season reward. Schol-
arships are available.
Upward is a nondenomina-
tional Christian sports min-
istry where every child plays,
learns and is a winner. So
come on out and join the fun.
For more information con-
tact Pastor Ed Holloway, 352-
8544509 ext. 223.
JOY Lutheran Church is
located at 7045 S.W 83rd
Place at S.R. 200, Ocala.


en


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ated Content'f'*


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0 0


* 4


Available from Commercial News Providers"


e -


*** *0* 0
, 6. 0 0
o


ImA ITO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD, CALL Toll Free 1-877-676-1403 T


Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, 9:00 AM 4:00UU PM
reader ads.

AN ELAI WEST MARION
Advertisements may be canceled as soon as
results are obtained. You will be billed only for
the dates the ad actually appears in the paper.
Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the SERVING THE COMMUNITIES & BUSINESSES BETWEEN SR 200 AND US 27
deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.


All ads require prepayment. We accept:





Be sure to check your advertisement the first day
it appears. We will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are
made only for the portion of the ad that is in error


Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every effort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate.
However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information.


Billing Specialist -
ES

The Centers is seeking
detail oriented Billing
Specialist for our
Emergency Services
program. Must be
available to work 2nd
or 3rd shifts, including
weekends. Duties in-
clude data entry spe-
cific to medical bill-
ing, certify financial
eligibility face to face
with mentally ill pa-
tients, enter billing
codes for services
rendered (training
provided), and per-
form various other
billing related duties.
High School diploma
or GED equiv & 1 yr
exp reqd. Salary
$9.00 to $9.91 per hr.
Full benefits pkg.
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
The Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580.
iobs@thecenters us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us
Position Closing Date
is 7/21/10

Children's Thera-
pist

The Centers is seeking
Masters Level
Children's Therapists
in Marion & Citrus
County programs
with minimum of 1 yr
exp working with
children/adolescents
in providing individ-
ual, group & family
therapy. Outpatient
& In school/home
(TBOSS) counseling
positions available.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
The Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us
Position Closing Date
is 7/21/10

LET Us WORK
FOR YOU!
WEST MARION
MESSENGER
CLASSIFIED
GET RESULTS!
CALL TOLL FREE
1-877-676-1403


Licensed
Therapist

The Centers is seeking
Florida Licensed Ther-
apists for our Marion
& Citrus County
programs. Ability to
Supervise desired.
Must have 5 yrs re-
lated exp with a
broad knowledge of
psychotherapeutic
theory & practice.
Submit Salary Req.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
The Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us
Position Closing Date
is 7/21/10

RN / HSA
Will have managerial
responsibilities(both
administrative and
clinical) for the
medical unit.
Administers and
coordinates the
medical/dental
/psychiatric services
for the unit. Is on
24-hour call to
respond to emergen-
cies. Ocassional
weekend hours.
Competitive pay rate
Benefit package
Apply in person at:
CYPRESS CREEK
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Or fax resume to
352-527-2235
Drug Free Workplace
/EEO


eas .1t 1
TOLL FREE
1-877-676-1403
M CN, Messenger


Vendors Wanted
For a CRAFT SHOW
FRIDAY, OCT. 29 and
SATURDAY, OCT. 30
1st Annual Craft show
First Presbyterian
Church, Crystal River.
For more info
Call: 795-2259




BRUNO'S
TREE SERVICE
Trimming, removal,
debris clean-up.
Reliable service,
reasonable prices.
Lic./Ins. 7 yrs. exp.
Free est.
(352) 438-4204


FRANKS TREE
SERVICE
"Guaranteed
Lowest Price"
Trimming
Removal
Hauling
FREE ESTIMATES
(352) 274-6953 Cell
Lic# 0867994




SECURE BOAT STOR-
AGE AND LAUNCH
from Ozello St. Martin's
Marina $100/mo. Fish,
Kayak or short ride to the
scallop field. Boat detail &
tune ups. 352-422-1284
Mark or 795-0505


All Wood
Cabinets

Free Design
Call Drew
352-484-5677






CHAD'S WATER
WORKS PLUMBING
Repairs, remodel,
new construction.
10% disc.for seniors.
L.C.# CFC1427646
(352) 598-2557


m-I

SIMMONS CAL. KING
MATTRESS, new with
warranty, frame. Stone
Creek $600.237-6310




Pasture & Hay Field
Spraying. Army Worm,
Weed Control. Over 5
Yrs. Exp. (352) 303-9202




CASH FOR GUNS &
GOLD, Concealed
Weapons Course
Gunslingers 341-4867


CHOW PUPPIES CKC
Registered. 3 Blue, 1
Blonde and 1 Cinnamon.
$350.00 503-3271



RIDING LESSONS
Your horse or mine.
Beginners Welcome!
$35/hr. 352-237-6310.



SW OCALA
nice 2/1 near Sam's
Club.Spacious. has
W/D hook-up. CHA.
small patio, & trash
pick up $495/mo
(352) 326-8815


PINE RUN 55+
2/2/2 Amenities fees
included. Free basic
cable, Newly painted
Inside/out. Lots of tile &
storage space. Many
upgrades. Inside laun-
dry w/washer&dryer.
Lawn care not incl.
$675 mo. 352-425-7722;
352-854-8155


RAINBOW LAKES
ESTATES
Reduced!
3/2, $750/mo.,1,600
Sq.ft. Mint condition.
Tile throughout. New
bath. Washer/dryer
Sec. 8 accepted
(813)335-9364


Add Up The WEST MARION


S A V IN G S ith a SENGCOUNESNESSWEENAND
i f.--AVIN G S SERVNG IHE COMMUNIIES & BUSNESSES BETWEEN SR 200 AND US 27 ___)________


IC ASS*FI*


Name

Address


City


State Zip


Phone

10 Words *$4.00 Per Week 250 For Each Additional Word Pricing Includes Online *All Ads Must Be Prepaid *All Credit Cards Accepted

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

11. 12. 13. 14. 15.


1W R$I4.00+I25 AWO6u s


For your convenience, mail with payments to West Marion Messenger
office at 8810 SW SR 200, Unit 104, Ocala, FL 34481 or call...

MV WEST MARION


SERVING THE COMMUNITIES & BUSINESSES BETWEEN SR 200 AND US 27 (


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPPORTUNITY



Golf Course Lot on the
Twisted Oaks 8th Hole
Public Utilities, view of
the green & pond
Asking $55,000
Call 352-249-8118



I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $150 &UP
(352) 771-6191


m


CallTollFre


14774764403





12 Wednesday, July 14, 2010


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