Title: West Marion messenger
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100092/00003
 Material Information
Title: West Marion messenger
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Ocala, Florida
Publication Date: May 12, 2010
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Lecanto
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Ocala
Coordinates: 28.848776 x -82.481087 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100092
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Joy delivers

Page 2


Fly away


Page xx


INDEX
Ocala Palms ........3
Stone Creek ........5
Quail Meadow ......8
airi cl .................


VOLUME 4, NUMBER 8
WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010


Postal Patron
U.S. Postage Paid
PRSRT STD
ECRWSS
Permit #91
Lecanto, FL


WEST MARION



Messenl or
SERVING THE COMMUNITIES & BUSINESSES BETWEEN SR 200 AND US 27





Volunteerism



Couple honored for assistance


Stan and Shelia Cohen


Michel Northsea
EDITOR
Five years ago, Stan and
Shelia Cohen hadn't
heard of the Guardian Ad
Litem program.
Last month, they were
honored as Marion
County's Guardian Ad
Litem (GAL) volunteers of
the month. They were also
honored as the fifth judi-
cial circuit's volunteers of
the year.
After moving to Fair-
field Village five years
ago, the couple started
looking around for some


volunteer opportunities.
"Neither of us likes to
play cards and I didn't
want to watch television
all day," said Stan Cohen
adding that he was used to
working seven days a
week, 50 hours a week He
retired from the Army
after 24 years and then the
Dept. of Justice after 26
years.
The couple first tried
helping at an assisted liv-
ing facility but for Shelia,
that was too similar to the
working days she had re-
tired from. Visiting with
others at a luncheon, She-


lia told a woman that she
wasn't happy with her vol-
unteer work. Turns out
the woman was a volun-
teer with the Guardian Ad
Litem program and she
suggested Stan and Shelia
volunteer.
Learning that GAL vol-
unteers served as advo-
cates for children who
were in the court system
and living in foster care
they decided to help. They
completed the mandatory
training course realizing
then that other states had
similar programs as
Florida but are known as


CASA (Court Appointed
Special Advocates.)
Since then, they have
served as advocates for 94
children and established
themselves as the "go to"
volunteers for case man-
agers, it was noted during
the presentation of their
plaques. They have com-
pleted over 200 hours in
service training to better
serve the children they
are assigned.
In one situation, Stan
was assigned a case of

Please see COUPLE, Page 4


Ocala man helps


in Chilean relief


By Air Force Staff
Sgt. Vanessa Young
When an 8.8-magnitude
earthquake struck Chile
and severely damaged the
regional hospital in Angol,
the son of an Ocala couple
stepped up to provide the
support needed to con-
tinue providing medical
aid to the local people.
Air Force Tech Sgt. Gre-
gory T McElvaney, son of
Thomas W and Judith A.
McElvaney of N.W 47th
Street, Ocala, is a part of
the 85-person team called
to build a field hospital and
provide treatment to the


L^WW- -^-_ri^B


Air Force Tech Sgt.Gregory
T. McElvaney, of Ocala,was
part of an expeditionary
medical support team who
traveled to Chile to help
support earthquake relief
efforts. The medical teams
focused on the city of
Angol, providing medical
care to more than 110,000
people in the region.


110,000 people in the re-
gion. He is an aerospace
medical service craftsman
deployed from Luke Air
Force Base in Arizona.
"I am helping by working
in the emergency room and
training the Chilean tech-
nicians and nurses," said
McElvaney, a 1991 gradu-
ate of Lake Weir High
School. "I also helped set
up the deployable hospital
that is taking the place of
the regular hospital dam-
aged by the earthquake."
McElvaney's efforts al-
lowed U.S. and Chilean
agencies to build a fully
functional hospital with
about 70 beds and two sur-
gical wards getting the
earthquake victims the
medical attention they
needed.
"By setting up the tempo-
rary hospital we have been
able to augment the local
medical system, providing
just about all of the basic
medical, surgical and den-
tal services they had be-
fore the earthquake."
Even with the devasta-
tion, the local people of
Angol were friendly and
appreciative of McElvaney
and his fellow airmen and
the help they gave the re-
covering region. While the
circumstances weren't the
best for the team, most
came away with a positive
impression of the country
and its people.
"The culture is very ac-
cepting of us. I have felt at
home with all of the

Please see EFFORTS, Page 2


-

The Yard Stop is a landscape supply now open on State Road 40. It is owned by Bill Anderson, left, and Jason
Lyons, right.


Landscaping stop covers needs


Michel Northsea
EDITOR
Want a patio tree? Want a weed
eater? Do you have a desire for a
garden bench?
There's a new place in town
where you can get all three items,
and more.
It's The Yard Stop offering
plants, power equipment and
hand tools too. The new store is at
4320 W Hwy 40, just west of 1-75.
Signs for the gardens, sod,
mulch, Florida natives and plants
designated as "water wise, are
also offered at The Yard Stop.
So are stone pottery items and
"cool" birdhouses.
Owned by cousins Jason Lyons
and Bill Anderson the store is


The store is open seven days
a week. Hours are Sunday
9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and
7 a.m. to 5 p.m Monday
through Saturday.
open seven days a week. Hours
are Sunday 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
and 7 a.m. to 5 p.m Monday
through Saturday
The two men had joint ventures
before, several in the Fort Laud-
erdale area and more recently a
tree farm in northwest Marion
County.
At the tree farm they grow
many of the trees they offer at
The Yard Stop.
In addition they offer plants;


many are annuals, as a Monrovia
distributor.
Monrovia is an acclaimed
grower of plants since 1928, said
Anderson.
Both men say their shop caters
to both those in the landscaping
business and the homeowner.
Besides the many decorative
items to use in beautifying the
outside of a home, Anderson and
Lyons are offering products made
by Echo, Shindaiwa, Toro and
Hustler. And it's not just sales ei-
ther; they're a full service dealer
offering a repair service.
All major credit cards are ac-
cepted at The Yard Stop. For
more information call 368-1005 or
just stop by seven days a weeks.






2 Wednesday, May 12, 2010


Ocala firefighters honored nationally


Firehouse Magazine, a
national fire service pub-
lication has published the
winners of this year's
Heroism and Community
Service Awards.
Included in the list of
honorees are two mem-
bers from Ocala Fire Res-
cue.


Firefighter Ed Floyd
was nominated and re-
ceived a heroism award
for his actions while off
duty to save a toddler's
life that had a complete
airway obstruction.
Battalion Chief Brian
Stoothoff is the recipient


of a community service
award for his efforts to
promote fire education
and create fire safety pro-
grams in the City of Ocala.
Just three community
service awards were given
nationally. The awards
were listed in the April
issue of the magazine.


CFCC's trees brings college honor


LMM members and spouses setting out to workfor Linda's Enchanted Florist shop to
deliver Mother's Day flowers. Ed Hobbs, John Schnitzler, Warren Erickson, Al Olsen,
Judy Olsen, Norma Erickson and Terry Couillard.


Joy delivers

flowers
Patricia A.
Woodbury
Joy Lutheran Church's
Lutheran Men in Mission
(LMM) created a fundrais-
ing project with Linda's
Enchanted Florist shop in
Dunnellon to deliver some
of the many orders of flow-
ers for Mother's Day Linda
hired the men and their
spouses to deliver flowers
on Friday, May 7 and Satur-
day, May 9 to benefit LMM
as well as the recipients of
the flowers.
Photos by
Al Olsen


Pastor Jack Reents and Ed Hobbs, members of LMM,
preparing the delivery route for distributing the
Mother's Day flowers.


Central Florida Commu-
nity College Ocala Campus
has been recognized as a
2009 Tree Campus USA insti-
tution by the Arbor Day
Foundation for promoting
healthy urban forest man-
agement and engaging the
campus community in envi-
ronmental stewardship.
"This honor demonstrates
the commitment of CFCC to
sustainability at our cam-
puses and in the community,"
said Dr. Charles Dassance,
CFCC president.
CFCC is one of 74 cam-
puses in the U.S. and one of
only three in Florida to re-
ceive the honor. Florida Gulf
Coast University and Florida
International University are
the other Florida campuses
to be recognized.
"This is an accomplish-
ment that shows your true
dedication to environmental
stewardship on campus and
assures your students and
administration greater op-
portunities than they may yet
realize," said Arbor Day
Foundation Chief Executive
John Rosenow in a letter an-
nouncing the honor. "We cel-
ebrate your diligence in


improving the quality of life
for the students and adminis-
tration of Central Florida
Community College and
thank you for creating a
healthier, more sustainable
world for all of us."
In order to be considered
for the designation, CFCC es-
tablished a Campus Tree Ad-
visory Committee, showed
evidence of a Campus Tree
Care Plan and engaged stu-
dents in an Arbor Day obser-
vance and service learning
project. In April 2009, stu-
dents and community mem-
bers shared their
sustainability knowledge and
provided free tree saplings
for visitors.
The Campus Tree Care
Plan was prepared by the
Sustainability Task Force
with the assistance of Phil
Howell of Arbor Plan Con-
sulting Inc. The CFCC Dis-
trict Board of Trustees
recognized contributors to
the project at its Tuesday,
April 27, meeting.
Within the last decade the
college has planted more
than 1,000 trees collegewide
with the knowledge that they
are a vital component in the


infrastructure of campus
landscaping. Trees reduce
the heat island effect caused
by pavement and buildings,
and their leaves filter dust
and other particles from the
air we breathe, according to
the Arbor Day Foundation.
Trees also create a welcom-
ing environment. Tree Cam-
pus USA is a project of the
Arbor Day Foundation and
Toyota.

EFFORTS

continued from Page 1

Chileans I have met," said
McElvaney. "The weather
conditions here are almost
like they are back at my
home station in Phoenix.
As for living conditions,
we're staying in an open
bay dormitory for approxi-
mately 60 people."
Whenever disaster
strikes, McElvaney, and air-
men like him, will be pre-
pared to provide whatever
support is needed to help
the people of Chile return
to a normal life.


Mandatory lawn watering restrictions specify the days when you may
water. These days depend on whether you have an address that ends
in an odd or even number, and on the time of year. So unless your day
and number are up, please make sure those sprinklers stay down.


know your days


** ** *** 0 "*
Homes 0 -with addresses H ith addresses onreidenti
Ti^ ^ B ^ ^me o y ar th t nd i n a n od n m b er h at ndi n a n e v e n p rop eri esu~ n~ i i
^^I (or ':^^B~i havenoii address)iiMl BiM -)number.':j^ B^ M M MM I^


Additional restrictions include:
* Water only when needed and not between 10 a.m. and
4p.m.
* Water for no more than one hour per zone.
* Restrictions apply to private wells and pumps, ground or
surface water and water from public and private utilities.
* Some exceptions apply.

Learn more at floridaswater.com
Information provided by the St. Johns River Water
Management District.


Daylight Saving
Time


Eastern Standard
Time


Wednesday/Saturday


Thursday/Sunday


Tuesday/Friday


i 4 4


Saturday


Sunday


Tuesday


* Daylight Saving Time is the second Sunday in March until the first Sunday in November.
* Eastern Standard Time is the first Sunday in November until the second Sunday in March.


florida's water
it's worth saving

800-725-5922
floridaswater.com
marioncountyfl.org


8


MESSENGER






Wednesday, May 12, 2010 3


Michel Northsea
EDITOR

There's an open invitation
to fly the wide blue yonder in
the first ever Learn to Fly
Day on Saturday, May 15.
Flight schools across the
country, including Ocala Avi-
ation Services Inc., will offer
informational sessions on
learning to fly and the differ-
ences between the different
license types.
With just 20 hours of flight
time a person can qualify for
a "sport license" designation.
The sport license allows the
pilot to carry one passenger.
For those able to pass the
medical exams required for
the "private" pilot license,
Ron Towater, owner of Ocala
Aviation Services, Inc., en-
courages going for that li-
cense.
Experience has taught him
that most people need 30
hours of flight time to
achieve the sport license.


"Another 10 hours and you
have a private license with
fewer restrictions," he said.
Towater is planning two
sessions, one at 10 a.m. and 2
p.m. to talk to those wanting
to learn more. In addition the
opportunity to fly on a dis-
covery flight may be
arranged if desired.
The discovery flight allows
want-to-be-pilots the oppor-
tunity to fly
Ocala Aviation Services
was recently approved as a
Part 141 school by the Fed-
eral Aviation Authority an
advantage to veterans. The
designation allows the school
to accept GI bill money for up
to 60 percent of the cost of
learning to fly, Towater said.
To learn more about flying
at Ocala Aviation call 861-
7484.
The Experimental Aircraft
Association (EAA), which orig-
inally announced this special
aviation day at EAA AirVen-
ture Oshkosh 2009, and the


Aircraft Owners and Pilots As-
sociation (AOPA) are teaming
up with other leading aviation
organizations to support com-
munity events aimed at get-
ting future pilots up in the sky
for their first flight.
"We created this day to in-
crease awareness of per-
sonal flying," EAA President
Tom Poberezny said. "Our
goal is to grow general avia-
tion and do it in a collabora-
tive way."
"It's incredible to see pilots'
enthusiasm for inspiring oth-
ers to learn to fly," said Craig
Fuller, president of AOPA.
"The international aviation
community is coming to-
gether to introduce people
around the world to the ex-
citement of general aviation."
The official website,
www.learntoflyday.org, lists a
searchable database of
events. In the United States
and Canada alone, over 400
events are currently sched-
uled with more being added


Planning for 2035

Meeting Thursday at Golden Hills


Marion County's Growth
Management Department
(Planning Division) wants
citizens to let them know
how they want Marion
County to look in 2035.
County officials are updat-
ing their comprehensive
plan, which will detail how
and where Marion County
will grow and expand in the
future. Citizen feedback
will help Marion County
leaders establish long-term
growth management objec-
tives and policies as part of
Marion County's Compre-
hensive Plan and Evalua-
tion and Appraisal Report
process, known as EAR.
The department is now
hosting comprehensive
plan meetings in different
commission districts in ad-
dition to the meetings that
are held in the Growth
Management Department.
Upcoming district meeting
dates and locations in the
area are:
May 13, from 6 to 9 p.m. at
Golden Hills Golf and Turf
Club, 4782 N.W. 80th Ave.,
Ocala
May 20, from 6 to 9 p.m. at
Freedom Library, 5870 S.W
95th St., Ocala
Residents are also wel-
come to attend the regu-
larly scheduled Growth
Management Department
Training Room sessions
(2710 E. Silver Springs
Blvd., Ocala). These meet-
ings will be held at 6 p.m. on
April 28, May 5, May 12 and
May 19.
Marion County staff pre-
pares an EAR every seven
to 10 years that evaluates
the county's ability to ad-
dress significant growth is-
sues. After receiving
feedback from citizens and
state and local agencies,
staff has identified five core
topics, including urban
sprawl, adequate public fa-
cilities, economic develop-
ment, intergovernmental
coordination and water re-
sources.
The EAR process allows
staff to revise and update
the comprehensive plan as


well as collect data and
seek public input. "Most
people only think about to-
morrow," Senior Planner
Chris Rison said. "But we
have to think about the next
generation and the genera-
tion beyond that."


For more information, visit
www.marioncountyfl.org/Plan
ning/EAR aboutaspx, or con-
tact Bill Kinser or Natalia Cox
at 352-438-2600 or at
bill.kinsler@marioncoun-
tyfl.org or natalia.cox@mari-
oncountyfl.org


Free Tickets in Your Area!
Learn To Fly Day


The watercolor works of Ocala Palms resident Joyce Murer is on display at the
downtown Bank of American Gallery, across from the square.The exhibit is on
display through Monday, May 17 and is open Monday through Friday-9 a.m. until
4 p.m.


'r i ON







Thursday, May 13
Served 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Enjoy some fun in the sun with savory grilled
Florida cuisine, Jimmy Buffett music and
themed specialty drinks! Dress in your favorite
Caribbean outfit and participate in Parrot
Head trivia with prizes.

$ 12.95 PLUS TAX & GRATUITY


Caner CHANDLER HILLS RESTAURANT

Restaurant 8139 SW 90th Terrace Rd., Ocala (352) 861-9720
Hours: Mon -Thur: 11 a.m.- 7 p.m., Fri & Sat: 11 a.m.- 8 p.m., Sun: 8 a.m.- 6 p.m.


t Ahew. "ten av...

NEW! Breakfast Anytime
* Steak Breakfast Burrito
* Bacon, Egg and Cheese Panini

Appetizers & Pizzas
* Portobello Mushroom Fritters
* "Bagel with Lox" Pizza...and more

Specialty Entrees
* Jack Daniels Steak
* Penne alla Calabrese...and many more

Sandwiches
* Candler Pretzel Hot Dog
* Grilled Vegetable Panini...
and many more
View the new menu at
www.candlerhillsrestaurant.com

-4. -
cFs C:


Dinner Specials $9.95

Served daily from 4 6 pm
Includes Soup or Salad and Chefs Choice
Dessert

Bistro Steak
Grilled tender bistro steak served with
mashed potatoes, mushroom
demiglaze and choice of vegetable
Grilled Chicken Penne Primavera
Penne pasta tossed with grilled
chicken, julienne peppers, red onions,
zucchini and yellow squash in
a parmesan cream sauce
Pecan Crusted Salmon
Oven baked wild salmon served with pine-
apple bourbon sauce,
rice pilaf and choice of vegetable
Greg s Famous Meatloaf
Homemade meatloaf with tomato
sauce, mashed potatoes
and choice of vegetable
Blackened Shrimp Alfredo
Cajun shrimp skewer served over
linguine pasta with Alfredo sauce

'All prices are plus tax and gratui


<.__________..jE P


~Ld


MESSENGER


i: ..





~e~n&k/


acJ~


=- tTT






4 Wednesday, May 12, 2010


Tournament to benefit education


AMERICAN TRAVEL & MORE
3341 E. Silver Springs Boulevard Ocala, FL 34470
Day Trips- Cruises* Tours* Air* Vacations* Groups- Rail
June 4 Joel Osteen...A Night of Hope...in Tampa.............$77.00
Includes dinner, tickets and motor coach

Seminole Hard Rock Casino May 20, 2010
Round trip motorcoach, $25.00 in slot Free Play, and $5.00 food voucher.
Pickup: Quail Meadows 8:00 am

RCCL Monarch of the Seas
4 Night Bahamas Cruise Sept. 20, 2010
Ocean View $328.00 Inside $274.00
Includes all port charges and government fees.

Biloxi Imperial Palace June 21-24, 2010 $169.00
With visits to 2 casinos. Two breakfasts and one lunch. $45 in Free Play
Celebrity Cruise Line Solstice December 12, 2010
7 Night Eastern Caribbean Cruise 2B Balcony only! $1137.60 pp/do
Includes all port charges, government fees,
travel insurance and r/t cruise port transfers.
$250.00 per person deposit at time of booking.
Final balance October 1, 2010
A . . . . A


There is an opportunity
to win an EZ Go Golf Car or
a Toyota Corolla from
Frank DeLuca Toyota dur-
ing the seventh annual
Free Enterprise Open 4-
person scramble golf tour-


S
m


S


mm F

I


Fore Ranch
Community


Tard




Sat. May 15

7am lpm

Off ST. RD. 200
turn at SW 48 St.
Follow Signs
_ 0004u4x ____________


Ocala H W system Presents

SSpring Seminar::eies



As a partner in helping you live a life of good health, Ocala Health System offers a variety of free
classes addressing your health needs and concerns. At Ocala Health System, we are not lust focused
on your health, we are focused on you.


Tai Chi: Discover the
Many Possible Benefits
May 10 12:30pm
The ancient art of Tai Chi uses gentle
flowing movements to reduce the
stress of today's busy lifestyles and to improve health,
balance and flexibility. Come and learn how to get
started! Presented by H2U Tai Chi instructor, David
Garcia.


Acupuncture and
Massage Therapy
May 21 2:00pm
Acupuncture has been effectively used for
the treatment of back pain, headache,
migraine, and sports injuries. However, acupuncture provides
more than pain relief. It is helpful in treating anxiety, insomnia,
digestive problems, abdominal and menstrual cramps, weight
control, infertility and much, much more. Come learn the many
benefits of acupuncture along with massage therapy. Presented
by Robin Raftis, Acupuncture Physician and Meryl Lowell,
Licensed Massage Therapist with the Health and Healing Center
of Ocala.


STaking Control of
Your Diabetes
May 18 2:00pm
This monthly interactive
educational class provides
information to assist with improving diabetes
control. Our guest lecturer, Thomas L. Croley,
MD, Board Certified Ophthalmologist, Central
Florida Eye Institute will discuss diabetic eye care.

HAlzheimer's Disease and
Delirium Treatment
Options
May 28 2:00pm
Alzheimer's Disease and other
dementias are becoming more prevalent
as our population ages, and are even now a major
component of end-of-life care. This presentation will focus
on the types, incidence, and current therapies for the most
common dementias. We will also look at the often related
condition of delirium, and treatment and preventive options
will be discussed. Presented by Michael S. Sever, RPh,
Pharmacy Manager for Hospice of Marion County.


OCALA HEALTH SYSTEM -
SENIOR HEALTHCARE CENTER
A service of Ocala Regional Medical Center


Pleae rgiser y cllng 98SO SW: 8 4thCort Sute50

1:805308 Trieds


nament.
The May 15 tournament
at Ocala Palms is a benefit
for the Florida Council on
Economic Education.
Besides supporting the
financial literacy program



COUPLE

continued from Page 1

sexual abuse involving a
teenager. The case re-
quired additional train-
ing, so Stan made
arrangements to get the
training DVDs and watch
them in the evening, said
Shelia.
It was also noted during
the presentation that the
couple recruited their
neighbors in Fairfield Vil-
lage when help was
needed to provide for the
needs of three children at
Christmas time. Neigh-
bors provided monetary
donations, clothes and
furniture to help the chil-
dren.
Currently, Shelia has
seven cases assigned to
her and Stan has three
cases he watches over to


aimed at students in
grades kindergarten
through 12, golfers have
the opportunity to win
great door prizes, a free
round of golf at Ocala
Palms on another day in


insure the child's voice is
heard by those making de-
cisions about their wel-
fare. Since Shelia doesn't
like to drive, Stan drives
her to wherever she needs
to go, which could be a far
as Spring Hill.
The Guardian Ad Litem
isn't the only volunteer
work Stan has. Twice a
month, he drives Ocala
area veterans to VA hospi-
tal in Gainesville. He is
also active in the home-
owner's association in
Fairfield Village and a
Jewish veteran associa-
tion.
When it comes time for
the Cohens to seek cooler
temperatures for the sum-
mer months or visiting
family in Georgia, they
load up their cell phones
and laptop so they can
stay on top of all their
cases.
They wouldn't have it
any other way.


Lorenzo Ramunno, Esq.
Member of Florida Bar and New York Bar
Wills and Estate Planning
Probate Law and Litigation
How to avoid probate
without a living trust!
11 Years in Ocala, over 20 Years in Florida


7500 SW 61st Ave., Suite 100 Ocala, FL 34476 Hours
Located in Jasmine Professional Park oFriT 9 6
www.Flprobate net Saturday by appointment


S. A WEST MARION



The West Marion Messenger is a free community newspaper covering
news of communities west of Ocala including Fore Ranch, Stone Creek,
Fairfield Village, Ocala Palms, Timberwood, Falls of Ocala, Foxwood Farms
and Golden Hills.
Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala, Fla.,
34477.
Problems getting the Messenger: If your community is listed above and
the Messenger is not delivered to you or you are having trouble getting the
paper from boxes around the S.R. 40 and SR 27 areas, call 854-3986.

CONTACT INFORMATION
(352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 854-9277
8810 S.W. State Road 200, Suite 104, Ocala, FL 34481

*Editor- Michel Northsea
Circulation Barbara Jaggers
SInside Sales/Office Coordinator- Pauline Moore
*Advertising Sales-Tom Rapplean and Susie Mirabile
General Manager-Tricia Marks

Deadline for news:
Friday 1 p.m.the week before publication.
-IPF Member of the Community Papers of Florida
I want to get news Deadline for
in the Messenger. Advertising
Call editor Michel Northsea at
352-854-3986 or send by e-mail to
editor@westmarionmessenger.com Classified Reader Ads
Community news and photos must be received by 4 pm Friday
Friday the week before publication. Mail and photos
may be left at the Messenger office in Kingsland Display Ads
Plaza. All contributions are subject to editing for 5 pm Thursday
clarity, taste, and style.


9lB
S; 0


' Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers
son-*


addition to May 15, enjoy a
pancake breakfast and
lunch.
The entry is $70, credit
cards accepted.
Call the pro shop, 732-
4653(Golf) to participate.


"We have too much time
and work invested in our
cases," Shelia said.
If a case goes to court
while they are gone, a staff
member fills in for the Co-
hens.
Many times appearing
in court means the par-
ent's parental rights may
be terminated.
Over the course of time,
the couple has seen many
children adopted into per-
manent homes.
In one incident Shelia
was working with two sets
of young twins. For sev-
eral years, Sheila and
Stan visited the children
in several different homes
always recommending
adoption. Despite the feel-
ings of staff, Shelia in-
sisted the children should
be permanently adopted.
Eventually her dedica-
tion to the children paid
off when they were
adopted.
These qualities did not
go unnoticed by those who
selected the couple for the
honor.
"The Cohens communi-
cate with the parties on
their cases using empathy
and most important are
non-judgmental. They
have been there to sup-
port and champion not
only the children but also
the parents when they are
on the right tract and are
working on their case
plans. They have attended
drug treatment programs
and graduation cere-
monies," it was noted dur-
ing the presentation.



Always a

need

for more

volunteers
Currently there are 648
children in Marion County
in the care of the courts.
Each child should have a
Guardian Ad Litem, GAL,
volunteer but there are
only 259 volunteers. A
trained, compassionate
volunteer from GAL is only
assigned to 578 of those
children. The rest have a
staff member assigned as
their advocate.
Amy Robertson, GAL co-
ordinator for Marion
County, said many of the
volunteers take vacations
during the summer months
increasing the need for ad-
ditional people. Volunteers
complete four days of train-
ing, watch court proce-
dures and are assigned
some outside reading as
part of their training.
The next training session
is in Oxford in June and
then Ocala in August.
For more information
about the program call
Robertson at 369-2525.


MESSENGER






Wednesday, May 12, 2010 5


c, Among Friends c,


The column you've been waiting on


Potpourri of events...


I triciu.


Many of the Snow-
birds have left
Stone Creek but
the events planned for SC
residents are plentiful.
Here is a sampling of some
upcoming events.
The Garden Club hosted
an Antique Roses event
right before Mother's Day
Rose Lady, Pam Gree-
newald, presented her
wonderful world of An-
tique/Old Garden Roses.
She brought a variety of
rose plants for sale. These
Old Garden Roses are di-
rect descendants of the
original roses which
graced the gardens of his-

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toric icons such as
Josephine Bonaparte and
Louis Philippe. Stone
Creek residents were able
to smell the scent of the
Old Roses and I am sure
they brought back wonder-
ful memories.
Linda Man, fitness direc-
tor, is sponsoring a hot air
balloon ride on Wednesday,
May 19. Look for two bal-
loons flying high above
Stone Creek on that morn-
ing weather permitting.
I plan on being aboard one
of those balloons so a story
will follow.
The HOA is sponsoring a
Dancing with the Stars on
Saturday, May 15. This
should be an interesting
event with a story to follow
the SC Dancing Stars....
The Buckhead Commu-
nity is having their annual
picnic on Sunday, May 23,


at the Grille. This year
everyone can enjoy the
event as the workers of the
Grille are providing the
food. For the last three
years this picnic was
spearheaded by Sandy
Hastline and her volun-
teers who spent hours
planning, buying, setting
up and cleaning up for this
event.
On May 21, the Lifestyle
Office is sponsoring a
Spring Fling; a consign-
ment store bus tour on
June 4; and a celebrate
America show featuring a
special tribute to our vet-
erans on July 1. In August
there will be the end of the
summer pool party but
who wants summer to end
when it has not started.
Check the portal for more
information on these many
events.


Michel
Northsea

Waiting should be a four-
letter word. Wait a second!
"Wait" is a four-letter word
until you add the "ing."
Without checking the
dictionary, I would suggest
that "theft of time" would
be an appropriate defini-
tion.
But whether you want to
or not, you just can't seem


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to avoid waiting. During
much of our day, we race
though green lights, dead-
lines, conversations with
loved ones, dinner only
to end up waiting some
other place or at some
other time within the same
day This theory holds true
in driving. Notice how
someone blows past you
somewhere and then at the
traffic light you're sitting
next to each other all
that rushing but nothing
gained.
There are ways to avoid
waiting. Just arrive late to
everything. Such behavior
has a tendency to annoy
those left waiting. But then
that's their problem.
Observing people wait-
ing is an interesting way to
pass your own waiting
time.
At a traffic light, phone


numbers are dialed, hair is
combed and something is
retrieved from the back
seat.
In line at the grocery
store, we empty our carts,
scan the headlines of the
gossip tabloids and strike
up a conversation with the
stranger behind us.
At a doctor's office, there
are old magazine to
browse. I've learned the
best way to shorten your
waiting time in the "wait-
ing room" is to start to
write down a recipe. Half-
way into the job your name
is called. I have many in-
complete recipes because
of this phenomenon.
More organized people
come with their own pro-
ductive way to kill the wait.

Please see AMONG, Page 7


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MESSENGER






6 Wednesday, May 12, 2010


' *s tM rinM ssne
8813 WStaeRa 0,sie14
OclS L348;o emi


Opinion


Our Message



There's a lesson


in deep water

Living in the middle of the state
here in Ocala we are situated
between two coastlines.
Those coastlines attract thousands
of thousands of tourists to the Sun-
shine state each year and with those
visitors come money for Florida's cof-
fers.
The explosion of the Deepwater
Horizon an offshore oil drilling rig in
the Gulf of Mexico threatens at least
one of our coasts.
All along our Gulf Coast towns, gov-
ernment officials are keeping watch
on the location of the oil spilled from
the leaking vessel. Since the April 22
accident, which killed 11 workers, 3.4-
million gallons of oil-water mix has
been collected from coastal waters.
Even with the millions and billions
of dollars being
spent on clean-
up efforts, the Editorial
environmental
ramifications are
disastrous especially for Louisiana
- taking out productive fishing wa-
ters, destroying wildlife and threat-
ening other bodies of water.
This disaster puts a face on the po-
tential dangers of off-shore oil
drilling. In the past, disasters have
forced the development of the Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency and the
passage of the Clean Water Act as well
as other environmental-type bills at
the federal and state level.
It seems pollution and disasters
must be highly visible before they get
the attention they deserve.
As the price tag climbs on the clean-
up efforts, it should temporarily cease
the cries of the 'drill, baby, drill'
crowd. More and more residents
should question the feasibility of
more off-shore oil drilling.
As a country, we have continued to
rely on unsustainable resources, oil
and coal, as our main fuel sources. We
can't continue riding down this road.
It's high time a long-term energy
policy is written that forces us to stop
depending on fossil fuels. We must
look to other resources. Wind and
solar are options to fuel our needs in
the future.
We've heard those words or similar
words in the past -the widening and
moving oil slick in the Gulf paints a
vivid picture of why its uncon-
scionable to keep doing what we have
been doing.

M W E 8 T M A I 0 N

Messenger

PUBLISHER:
GERRY MULLIGAN
EDITOR:
MICHEL NORTHSEA


Wo Guest column c-,



I am not a show dog


Jim Kimes
OCALA PALMS
My mistress brings me to these events
because she's a "dog person," thank heav-
ens for me. As you can no doubt ascertain
from my expression I am rather agog by
all the pomp and glitter of today's show.
I don't aspire to be a show dog. I admire
them but I harbor no envy I am just a pet.
But I shouldn't use the
word "just" because it's
too connotative. Please
don't misconstrue my
shrug as ingratitude. I'm
well fed, timely groomed
and I'm never left at home
when my beloved mistress
goes places. I'm not a vic-
tim of benign neglect like "
some pets. I have ample
opportunity to enjoy var-
ied experiences and to
make new acquaintances, both human
and canine. My unconditional love is ade-
quately requited.
I would find the life of a show dog much
too stressful. I mean, how restful can their
naps be, never knowing when one of the
programmers will give the signal and then
suddenly you're up next? I could never
deal with the travel schedule regimen. Yet
they all seem to rise to the occasion time
after time with uncanny elegance and
equanimity That's also true of their own-
ers and handlers, who are often one and
the same.
Nor could I cope with the inevitable
"also ran" outcomes. True, we can't all be
the Michael Phelps or the Rachel Alexan-
dra of our respective world. And, of
course, there couldn't be champions if
there were no runners-up. It's the "ever-
lasting contrast" that makes the universe
work so well.


Believe me, in my short life I've seen
enough, and I'm content. As I cogitate on
my own role in life, I'm reminded of what
John Milton wrote: "They also serve who
only stand and wait," or in my case, ob-
serve.
Show dogs support an industry- and a
wholesome one to boot. And it doesn't get
any better than the Westminster Kennel
Classic. But beyond the shows, we do ther-
apy work, K-9 Corp service
and get involved in
searches of all kinds. We
even serve in the military
We're also TV stars, like
Moose who played Eddie,
or Buck, the lovable ca-
nine on Married..with
Children.
Yes, we're a force as a
whole but far too many of
our population are not so
fortunate, as they languish in rescue shel-
ters, looking and longing for homes, living
one day at a time. It's almost like being on
death row for a crime you not only didn't
commit, but was in another state at the
time it was committed. We're no different
from most humans; we just want to make
a difference in someone's life. We want to
make life more meaningful for someone
who needs companionship and affection
as badly as we do. And we ask so little in
return.
Moreover, today when many folks are
looking for a good investment, we obvi-
ously think we're the best they can find.
Footnote: I took this picture at the
Ocala Dog Show in November2009. I don't
know the dog's name; she preferred to re-
main anonymous. Sometimes names are
not important. What's important is that
she spoke to me and I'm only acting as in-
terpreter


Paper seeks editorial board volunteers


The West Marion Messenger seeks three
community-minded people to discuss issues
in the area, Marion County and state.
From comments in those discussions, the
editorial board will develop editorials for
publication in future issues of the news
paper
"The community columnists we have rep-
resenting our communities do a fine job of
letting our readers know what is going in
their particular community Yet we need to
do more," said Michel Northsea, editor ofthe
West Marion Messenger. "Developing an ed-
itorial board makes sense."
The editorial board would meet monthly to
discuss local issues, upcoming events, com-
munity projects, etc. then determine what is-
sues should be considered for editorial
comment.


The board would then work together to
rank the importance of each issue and work
on creating editorials as a group. The editor
will compile the comments and discussion
points and produce content on the subject
matter
"The concept is to provide a more diverse
voice for the paper as a whole and that di-
versity would be reflected in our editorial
page," Northsea said.
It is important people serving on the edi-
torial board have interest in local issues but
not personal investments, she said.
In April, the newspaper started its fourth
year serving the communities along U.S. 27
and State Road 40 from Southwest 80th Av-
enue to just west of 1-75.
To volunteer your service on the editorial
board, contact Northsea at 854-3986.


Reader Opinions Invited
c- The opinions expressed in West Marion Messenger editorials are the opinions
of the editorial board of the newspaper
c- Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessar-
ily represent the opinion of the editorial board.
c- Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in letters to the
editor and guest columns.
Persons wishing to contact the editor should call 854-3986.
c- All letters must be signed and include a phone number and community name,
including letters sent via e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone
numbers will not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.
Not all contributions are printed.
c- Letters longer than 350 words may be regarded as columns and printed on a
space-available basis, and writers will be limited to one contribution per week. The
deadline is one week prior to each Wednesday's issue.
Send letters to: The West Marion Messenger Editor, 8810 S.W State Road 200,
suite 104, Ocala, FL 34481; or e-mail editor@westmarionmessengercom.


The mysterious

wizardry of gadgetry


t


When it
comes
to gadg-
ets just call me
Mr. How-in-the-
World-Does-
This-Work. I
fully understand
that our world
runs on gadgets.
According to
some, we owe a
great deal to the
gadgets of this
world whatever


they maybe. I just hope my credit is good.
That being so, let me just say how much
I dislike and distrust and am filled with
disgust at gadgets of all kinds. Primarily,
because I have no idea of how they work
Of course, I have no idea of how I work...
or even if I do work
Occasionally the Gracious Mistress of
the Parsonage will come upon Yours
Truly and ask a simple question. "What
are you doing right now?"
It's really not the question so much as
how she asks the question that bothers
me. Whenever I tell her I am working, she
sarcastically tosses her hair to one side
and simply says, "Ha," and walks away
Unfortunately, I have no hair to toss to
one side. I think she does it just to exac-
erbate me.
But getting back to the mysterious
world of gadgetry, it is very hard to go
without running into some kind of a
gadget. The overwhelming assumption is
that everybody knows what a particular
gadget is, how it works and what it is sup-
posed to do. I think that is too much to as-
sume.
Whatever happened to the good old
days when you did not need a gadget to do
anything? Oh, how I long for that utopia
of yesteryear Reading my Bible thor-
oughly I have found nothing resembling a
gadget of any description to be found in
heaven. Amen.
Drive down a busy street in any town
and you will find the driver in the car op-
posite to you fiddling with some gadget in
his hand called a cell phone. Drivers are
always texting or talking or whatever else
you can do on a cell phone. I have all I can
do to navigate my car away from those
people focused on some kind of a gadget.
Where will it ever stop?
Not only in cars, but walking in the
shopping mall has become quite a haz-
ardous venture. Nobody is paying atten-
tion to where they are going because
everybody is on a cell phone. I have run
into several people, none of which
stopped to say, "I'm sorry," but kept right
on walking and talking as though nothing
ever happened. They are absolute slaves
to that cell phone.
Just the other day I was driving during
rush hour downtown and happened to
look at the car next to me. Driving the car
was a woman with a cigarette in one hand
and a cell phone in the other hand talk-
ing to beat the band. And boy, would I like
to beat that band. It is a good thing she
had only two hands, goodness knows what
else she would be doing. I had a momen-
tary panic attack, not knowing what was
going to happen or if she would swerve
into my lane without knowing what she
was doing.
But cell phones are just one of the many
gadgets that have infiltrated into the


Please see PASTOR, Page 7


MESSENGER






Wednesday, May 12, 2010 7


AMONG

continued from Page 5

Some come with a book, a
journal or some form of
handiwork. Men have a ten-
dency to simply sit in a chair
and wait. No multi-tasking
for them. They just sit there
in their own little world.
Waiting is a situation most
of us don't tolerate well. Even


those busy with busy work
start squirming after 20 min-
utes or so of waiting. After
that, we start fidgeting and
checking our watches every
30 seconds or so. Eyes start to
glaze over.
There's probably a lesson
for all of us in a waiting room.
It's time to catch our own
breath, to step off the merry-
go-round for a minute or two.
During those times, we
should strive to simply be in
that moment, not worrying


about tomorrow or yesterday,
just the present. Sometimes,
in the quiet, can come a solu-
tion to a problem we've tried
to solve.
Perhaps waiting really
isn't the thiefto time but little
snippets of renewal, a time
when we are forced to calm
our soul and make the best of
a few minutes of down time.
Michel Northsea, editor,
penned this column while
waiting for a doctor's ap-
pointment.


PASTOR

continued from Page 6

sphere of human activity.
In an office supply store
recently I happened to no-
tice one of those new iPads.
I must confess that curiosity
got the best of me. I had
heard a lot about this
gadget and I wanted to see
how it worked. Supposedly,
and I do not believe every-
thing I'm told, this iPad had
thousands of books loaded
onto it. I held it in my hand
and I could hardly believe
that it contained so much
material. But, who am I to
question the latest sales
gimmick.
Looking at it I tried to
find the on and off switch.
There has to be some way
to turn this blasted thing on.
Finally, a salesperson come
up and said quite cheer-
fully, "Can I help you?"
"I can't seem to find the
on switch," I said.
"There isn't any," he said
with a rather smirk on his


map.
I looked at him quizzi-
cally and he just smiled.
"All you do," he said like
some stuck up Ivy League
college professor, "is touch
the screen."
I looked at him as though
he had lost all his marbles
to a first-grade champion
marble shooter. Everybody,
and I mean everybody,
knows to turn something on
you need to have a switch,
some kind of button you
push to get the gadget run-
ning.
I looked at the iPad and
then looked back to him
and then I touched the
screen just to show the
salesperson that he did not
have a clue as to what time
of day it was. To my con-
sternation as soon as I
touched the screen the
blasted thing came on. I did
not look at the salesperson
but I knew, deep down in
my soul, I knew he was
laughing rather sarcasti-
cally at me.
Between cell phones and
iPads, I am not faring too
well in this gadget crazy


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world. Sometimes it is
rather frustrating.
Fortunately, God is not
impressed with gadgets.
The simplicity of the gospel
message is found in what
Paul says. "For by grace are
ye saved through faith; and
that not of yourselves: it is
the gift of God: Not of
works, lest any man should
boast." (Ephesians 2:8-9
KJV).
Preoccupied with works,
a person runs a great risk of
missing the amazing grace
of God.
The Rev James L. Snyder
is pastor of the Family of
God Fellowship, 1471 Pine
Road, Ocala, FL 34472. He
lives with his wife, Martha,
in Silver Springs Shores.
Call him at 352-687-4240 or
e-mail jamessny-
der2@att.net. The church
website is ww.whatafellow-
ship.com.


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MESSENGER


4&
adfas *






8 Wednesday, May 12, 2010


o- Quail Meadow


Events slow as summer approaches


) ILIrolyn
Slocumb
4
his is the last re-
minder of the bus
trip to the Seminole
Hard Rock Casino on May


20. Several of you have had
trouble reaching Jetta to
make reservations she
has been out of town, but is
back now. It's not too late to
reserve your seat on the
bus.
Monday, the 17th is the
next "potluck" dinner at
the clubhouse. We will eat
at 6 p.m. Come sample the
good cooking of your
neighbors. Remember to


bring your own place set-
tings. No reservations
needed for this event.
June 5 is the Quail
Meadow Birthday Celebra-
tion. The party will begin
at 5 p.m. with a "wine tast-
ing," followed by dinner.
Reservations must be
made by June 1. Tickets
can be purchased from Pat
Talley, Charlotte Payne,
and Marie Schneider.


illARON K.N.
MARQUES REDDY





PATRICIA CONNIE HERMA
INTERNAL MEDICINr ASSOCIATES JONES HARTLEY BAKER
OF OCALA,R.A \iNi, \RNP


Water aerobics classes
have begun. They are held
at the pool every Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday at 9
a.m. The Tuesday, Thurs-
day, Saturday classes will
begin later a notice will
be posted in the clubhouse.
Now that summer is here
some of the activities are
taking a "vacation." There
will be no QMPOA or QM-
RPOA evening meetings in
June, July, or August. Ce-
ramics will also close down
for the summer. The last
bingo game is scheduled
for June 8. Also, the last
Ladies Luncheon is Friday,
the 14th. The water color
group will not meet in July
and August. There are still
events planned at the club-
house during the summer
- check the Reporter for
more information.
Did you celebrate Cinco
de Mayo on the 5th? This
day commemorates the
Mexican army's victory
over the French forces at
the Battle of Puebla on
May 5, 1862. This is not
Mexican Independence


Day-that is Sept. 15. This
is not a national holiday,
but rather a day to cele-
brate Mexican heritage,
freedom, and liberty; it's
also a good excuse to enjoy
some good Mexican food
and a Margarita.
Armed Forces Day is Sat-
urday, May 15. On Aug. 31,
1949, Secretary of Defense
Louis Johnson announced
the creation of Armed
Forces Day This day re-
placed the separate Army,
Navy, and Air Force Days.
This came after the mili-
tary services were placed
under one department -
the Department of De-
fense. Each military group
was asked to drop their in-
dividual days and unite in
one day to be designated
"Armed Forces Day" The
Marine Corps League de-
clined to drop Marine
Corps Day, but did support
the new Armed Forces Day
President Harry Truman
declared that Saturday,
May 20, 1950, would mark
the first observance of
Armed Forces Day We now


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celebrate this day the third
Saturday of May Armed
Forces Week begins on the
second Saturday of May
and ends on the third Sun-
day of May Due to their
unique training schedules,
the National Guard and
Reserve units may cele-
brate Armed Forces
Day/Week over any period
in May
We just celebrated
Mother's Day In 1912, West
Virginia was the first state
to officially adopt Mother's
Day as a day to honor all
mothers. Then in 1914,
President Woodrow Wilson
signed a joint Congres-
sional resolution establish-
ing a national Mother's
Day Anna Jarvis is cred-
ited with the success of
designating a day to honor
all mothers. Ironically, she
never had children of her
own. She often expressed
dismay over the commer-
cialization of the day She
once said, "I wanted it to
be a day of sentiment, not
profit."




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Every Thursday
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LIVE cooking
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Did you


Know? 9
Joseph Waddington

REMEMBERING FREEDOM'S HEROES
Part of what we do every day is finding unique ways to honor
those who have made a difference.
This Memorial Day, we would like to give you the opportunity
to HONOR YOUR HERO. Submit a story (250 words or less)
along with a photograph of a Veteran family member that you
would like to give honor to. Entries will be published in a special
booklet that highlights Freedom's Heroes. As our gift to you,
those who participate will receive a complimentary keepsake
copy. Submitted photos will also be posted online via our Hiers-
Baxley Facebook page.
Thank you for honoring and remembering Freedom's Heroes...

ALSO, PLEASEJOIN US on MEMORIAL DAY, May 31st to
Remember Local Heroes &
Celebrate the Freedom of our Great Country
For more on this great event visit...
www.HighlandMemorialDay.com


Hiers-Baxley
FUNERAL SERVICES
"When Trust Matters Most"'"m


Have a Question or Topic idea? Drop us a line!
Include your name, number & question, mail to:
1515 NE Third ST
1515 NE Third ST FREE Planning Guide
Ocala 34470 Phone: 369.1020 n Cremation Information
Email: Info@Hiers-Baxlev.com Checfor or information.


QUAIpLM MEADOW


MESSENGER


EM ado
MAKING SENSE OF ^^^INETG






Wednesday, May 12, 2010 9


rY Fairtield


Fairfield Village


'Bathing beauties' turns'bunco beasties'


rIscilla
(icissal


When I visited our
clubhouse pool in
the early morning
this week, I encountered a
vivacious group of "bathing
beauties" enthusiastically
involved in the morning
water aerobics class. I have
not heard such laughter
coming from that pool in
all my visits there. I was
enthralled!
Several of the 11 lovely
ladies in the pool encour-
aged me to join them each
morning at 9 a.m. Toni
Belcher and Becky Weller
are the instructors and
proclaim the health bene-
fits (along with the fun) of
the daily workout. Person-
ally I enjoyed sitting in a
lounge chair and watching
the action. I did, however,
promise myself that I will
try the activity soon.
While I was still watch-
ing the "goings-on," Eilene
Yudonin who is the editor
of our community Fairfield
Villager newsletter en-
couraged me to come back
to the clubhouse around
noon to join in the bonco


game fun. What is
"Bonco?" I asked naively.
Laughing infectiously, Ei-
lene told me that she is not
sure if the game is "bonco"
or "bunco" because she
has seen and heard both
names. However, the Fair-
field group prefers to call it
"bonco" so that is what it is
on Wednesday afternoon
when the groups meet for
their weekly fun.
When I arrived at noon,
the ladies were assembling
with some of them bringing
"goodies" to enjoy during
the game. I asked Eilene to
explain something about
the game to me, and she
just laughed and said, "It's
a dopey dice game that
takes 112 seconds to learn."
She also said that they
need at least 8 players with
4 to each table, although
they have played with only
7 some creative adjust-
ing used to fill in the gap.
"We're so addicted to this
stupid game we find a way
to play"
This weekly gathering
started about five years ago
when Judy Rich and Ei-
lene Yudonin were taught
by Karen Riley (in that 11/2
seconds training period, I
guess). Ever since that ini-
tial grouping, there has
been a regular group play-
ing two sessions of 40 min-
utes each with a 10-minute
break. Eilene said that a
group of 12 is the ideal
group since there will be
three tables with four play-
ers each.


"-I


Curry Andrews reports that he raised $2,544 for the
March of Dimes during the April 24 Five Mile Walk.



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The cute little monkey
"Bonco" goes flying
through the air at irregular
intervals having something
to do with a successful play.
Now, I know that I have
reasonable intelligence,
but I have to protest that
one could learn this game
in 11/2 seconds. It seems
more complicated than
that. I will admit that there
is a fierce kind of competi-
tion that is held in check by


the friendship of the play-
ers, but the "bathing beau-
ties" of the morning water
aerobics become the
"bonco beasties" in the af-
ternoon. Amazingly, after

See FAIRFIELD, Page 10

Sandy Grossman show
off "BONCO" the aero
dynamic monkey of the
Bonco games.


*
Museu


L S


YOUR DENTAL
HEALTH


I II
by M. E. Hampton, D.D.S.
PLASMA JETS
INSTEAD OF
DRILLS?
The future of dentistry
may be more akin to science
fiction than patients might
ever have believed. In fact, it
seems that new research
involving streams of
bacteria-killing plasma may
replace today's drills in the
near future. Plasma is
formed when electrons are
emitted by energized gases.
In this case, researchers used
a relatively cool beam of
purple plasma to eliminate
oral bacteria in dental
cavities. The plasma beam
removed dentin (the material
beneath the enamel that
comprises the majority of the
tooth) more selectively than
a conventional drill. While
this research is preliminary,
researchers believe that
plasma jets can be ready for
removing tooth decay in as
few as three to five years.
This would certainly
make visits to the dentist's
office a bit less nerve-
racking. Talk to us at the
office of MARK E.
HAMPTON, DDS, about
any dental concerns. As your
dental professional, we pride
ourselves on providing the
highest quality dental care
for you and your family, in a
relaxing and comfortable
environment. A good
experience with dentistry is
based on making the right
choice in a family dentist
and in taking steps to keep
dental costs at a minimum
through self-care at home
between visits. Please call
352-489-5071 to schedule an
appointment. We're located
at 11902 Illinois Street.
We're "Dedicated to
Excellent Dentistry."
P.S. It isn't the heat of the
plasma that is thought to kill
cavity-causing bacteria, it is
the highly reactive molecules
produced by charged oxygen
molecules surrounding the
plasma jet that get the job
done.

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MESSENGER






10 Wednesday, May 12, 2010


FAIRFIELD

continued from Page 9
the tables are folded and
the ladies start to head
back to their homes, the
beautiful side of their per-
sonalities becomes domi-
nant once again. Little
"Bonco" seemed none the
worse for the air dynamics
of competition. I think I
will rejoin the group next
week to see if there is a
repetition of the same
jolly fun.
One very worthwhile
benefit of the weekly
game is the fact that sev-
eral of the ladies decided
to stop smoking and did
just that. Eilene Yudonin
told me that she has not
had a cigarette since last
July 5 and is loving being


able to breathe deeply
and have a "cigarette-
free" life. Regardless of
how long one has smoked,
he/she is blessed with new
health benefits when the
addiction is broken. I
admit to trying to learn to
smoke many years ago
when I was in college.
Never being able to enjoy
smoking was probably one
of the best "things not ac-
complished" that I can
look back upon. Some-
times there are real bene-
fits we can recognize in
our more mature years. I
have lots of other habits
(like enjoying good food)
that I wish I had not de-
veloped to such a per-
fected extent. The results
show around my middle,
and I would love to rid my-
self of those extra inches.
Wait a minute! The water
aerobics class might be


-..

Four lovely ladies pay close attention to the dice as the
competition becomes strong.


the answer. I think I will
try that and join in an-
other of the activities that
make Fairfield Village
earn its name of the lively
place filled with lovely
people.
Sad news and happy
news from Fairfield Vil-
lage
Sadly we lost one of our
original "villagers" when
Eleanor Jackson passed
away on Tuesday, May 4.
Eleanor was my "neigh-
bor" in many senses of the
word and she will be
missed by her many
friends. Eleanor's outdoor
Christmas decorations
were always just so beau-
tiful and happy and her
sense of humor was
unique.
Rest in peace, Dear
Lady.
Happily, both Carol
Kulah and Karen Riley,
who had knee surgeries,
are doing well. Both are
very well known and loved
in our community, and we
all wish each of them a
speedy recovery.
Take time to heal prop-
erly, Carol and Karen. We
want to see you "running
around" again soon.
Also, happily, Curry An-
drews reported that he
raised $2,544 for the
March of Dimes by his 5
Mile Walk on April 24.
Curry completed the full
course in 2 hours and 10
minutes which is inspira-
tional to all of us.
Way to go, Curry!


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


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MESSENGER







Wednesday, May 12, 2010 11


c< Happenings c


Professors to speak
on barge canal
The history of the Cross-
Florida Barge Canal is the
subject of a book by Steven
Noll, senior lecturer in his-
tory at the University of
Florida, and David Tegeder,
associate professor of history
at Santa Fe College.
Titled "Ditch of Dreams:
The Cross-Florida Barge
Canal, and the Struggle for
Florida's Future", the book is
the subject for a program
hosted by the Friends of the
Ocala Public Library on
Wednesday, May 12, at 2 p.m.
in Room C at the main li-
brary building on Silver
Springs Boulevard.
Both authors will be pres-
ent to discuss their book,
which has been described as
the definitive account of one
of the largest and most con-
troversial reclamation proj-
ects in American history
The program is free to the
public and refreshments will


be served by the Friends.
Early arrival is recom-
mended. Call 368-4591 for
further information.
Daily events at
Moose Lodge
For members and quali-
fied guests only of the Ocala
West Moose Lodge, 10411 SW
110 Street, includes:
Friday, May 14: Wings or
shrimp at 5 p.m.
Karaoke by Mel 7 to 11 p.m.
Sunday, May 16: Breakfast
8 to 11 a.m.
Tuesday, May 18: Big
Burger at 5 p.m.
Karaoke by David Baldwin
5 to 9 p.m.
Wednesday, May 19:
WOTM Chapter Mtg 7 p.m.
Thursday, May 20: Cards
1pm, bowling 6 p.m,
Wii and shuffleboard at 7
p.m.
Trimming hike
set for May 15
Plan your weekend with a
work/fun hike starting at the


Landbridge Trailhead.
Meet at 9 am and be pre-
pared to do some lopping,
snipping and trimming the
trail.
Please bring small hand
tools if you have them, hard
hats and gloves will be pro-
vided.
Directions to the Land
Bridge Trailhead parking
area, take Interstate 75 to
exit 341, turn east onto 484.
Turn left onto CR 475A.
Travel on 475A for 4 miles
until you see the left lane
turnoff for the Land Bridge
Trailhead Parking.
Blackberry tasting
Part of festival
The Florigrande Black-
berry Festival at Shady
Grove Preserve is set for Sat-
urday May 15 (9 a.m. to 4 p.m.)
and Sunday May 16, (10 a.m.
to 3 p.m.).
Come and taste the biggest

See HAPPENINGS, Page 12


r" fChrist
the King
Anglican Church
The Rev. Donald J. Curran,
Rector
Rev. Matthew Walter
Asst. Rector
Services:
Rite I 7:30 am
Rite II 8:50 & 11:15 am
Children's Church 8:50 am

3801 US N. Hwy 441
in Living Waters
Worship Center's
South Sanctuary
\ /


Evangelical
Lutheran Church
joyocala@embarqmail.com
Sunday Worship
8:15 am and 11:00 am
German Language Worship
1st Sunday of each month
Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm
Nursery Provided
Edward Holloway, Pastor
s7045 SW 83rd Pl., Ocala
E (352) 854-4509


Christ's Church
LMarion County
Jan Independent Christian Churchi
SUNDAY SERVICES
Contemporary Service....9:00 am
Traditional Service........11:00 am
Sunday School..............10:10 am
All ages
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study...................... 7:00 pm
Friday Youth Nights.........6:00 pm
SENIOR PASTOR DAVID BELLOWS
6768 SW 80th Street
Ocala 34476
352-861-6182
www.ccomc.ora


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Call: 352-533-8150
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Friday at 4:00 pm is the deadline for classified
reader ads.


Advertisements may be canceled as soon as
results are obtained. You will be billed only for
the dates the ad actually appears in the paper.
Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the
deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.


TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD, CALL Toll Free 1-877-676-1403
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-. TH WEST MARION


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Be sure to check your advertisement the first day
it appears. We will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are
made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.


Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the West Marion Messenger. We make every effort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate.
However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information.


BARBER
Parttime
Mon., Fri. & Sat.
Cover vacations. Call
Sandy 352-228-7901.


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Pool Supply Store, like
new, great invest., w/or
without property. Call
Pat (813) 230-7177



BRUNO'S
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debris clean-up.
Reliable service,
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17 yrs. exp. Free est.
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For Sale i
CITRUS HILLS
TOWNHOUSE-
DRASTICALLY
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BTHS, W/D, 2 LANAIS,
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BUYING JUNK CARS
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CASH PAID $150 & UP
(352) 771-6191

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All real estate advertising in
this newspaper is subject to
Fair Housing Act which
makes it illegal to advertise
any preference, limitation
or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex,
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informed that all
dwellings advertised in this
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an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call HUD
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The toll free telephone
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I CI A> II






12 Wednesday, May 12, 2010


Above, Women of the Moose, Chapter 1929, elected officers recently. From the left
are Darlene Morgan, secretary/treasurer; Jeri Brennan,junior regent; Mary Bell, sen-
ior regent; Martha Zettle, chaplain; and Barbara Cline,junior grad. Below, Loyal
Order of Moose, Lodge 2356, elected officers recently. Seated in front are Ballard
Smith,treasurer;Thomas"Tiny" Morgan, governor; and Terry Geckler, prelate.
Standing, from left,Jerry Thompson, international deputy supreme governor, in-
stalling officer; Ron Young, sergeant at arms; David Kincaid,junior governor; Craig
Van Blarcum,acting administrator; Dennis Hoff, 1 year trustee; Perry Rhoade,2 year
trustee; Peter Pecoraro, 3 year trustee; and Don Cline, past governor.


HAPPENINGS
continued from Page 11

and best blackberries in
Florida. These giant black-
berries have been cultivated
since prehistoric times, but
were a well kept secret for
the last 50 years.
Staff will have Florida na-
tive plants and berries for
sale, as well as a sandwich
lunch, snacks and smoothies
made with our own berries.
Walking tours through the
old growth woodlands at 10:30
a.m. and 1:30 p.m. (Adults $5
each, kids free with adult)
bring bug spray and you must
wear closed shoes.
Plan on a good time in the
cool shade.
Details and map at:
http://shadygrovepreserve.com.
American Legion
to meet
The Ralph J. Green Amer-
ican Legion Post 354 will
hold its monthly meeting on
Monday, May 17 at 1 p.m. in
the community room of the
Sheriff's Brian Litz Building,
9048 S.W Hwy. 200. The
speaker Gary Marriage Jr
will explain the benefits a
Veteran and/or spouse may
receive to assist with their
activities of daily living. Try
to arrive early to enjoy light
refreshments and comrade-
ship with fellow Veterans.
For further information tele-
phone Commander Barbara
Cherbonneau at 873-1737.


All invited to Sons
of Italy barbecue
The Sons of Italy will have
a free open house barbecue
on Saturday, May 22, from
noon to 3 p.m., at the Frater-
nal Order of Police Lodge 145,
which is just east of Airport
Road (60th Avenue) at 5675 W
State Road 40 in Ocala.
The group is trying to at-
tract new members. Being of
Italian descent is not a re-
quirement; non-Italians can
become social members.
Hamburgers, hot dogs,
sodas, snacks and other items
will be served at the free bar-
becue. For information, con-
tact Vincent Cannatella at
352-236-3069.
Three to speak
at OP meeting
Following a well attended
meeting in April with dy-
namic speaker, Mary Clark,
from Tea Party Solutions, the
Club is offering a 3 for 1 night.
Florida Senator Carey
Baker has offered to share
his insight on the 2010 leg-
islative session that has just
ended. Mr. PC, Chip Morris'
sidekick, will regale us with
his thoughts on the current
state of national politics.
While these men will be a
boost to our understanding of
the political climate, their
contributions pale in compar-
ison to the U.S. Military And
so we will salute these fine
men and women who have
served or continue to serve
our country, who provide the
freedoms we use every single


day Please join us on Tues-
day, May 18, 2010 at 7 p.m. in
the Royal Palm Room to lis-
ten, to learn and to say thank
you. See you there!
Health insurance topic
for retired nurses meeting
Citrus/Marion chapter of
Registered Nurses Retired
will hear the latest of Health
Insurance for the elderly
The speaker will be Drexel
Collins from SHINE. The
meeting will be held at the
West Marion Hospital, Ocala,
room 202 of the Medical
Building. The date will be
May 24 with lunch at 11:30.
The Charity for the day will
be The Food Bank. All re-
tired RN's are welcome.
Please, call Gladys at 352-
854-2677 or Mary Jane at 352-
726-6882 before May 17th for
reservations.
The June, July and August
meetings will be held at the
Preserve Golf and Country
Club S.R. 200 Sandwedge
Restaurant and Pro Shop on
the 4th Mondays for planning
next year's programs.
The Chapter will install
the new Coordinators.
Thelma Champeau of Citrus
Springs will be the Citrus
County Coordinator and
Eleanor Matea of Ocala will
be the Marion County Coor-
dinator. Out going Coordina-
tors, are Marian Winner of
Homosassa, Citrus County
and Virginia Stamper of
Ocala, Marion County. Both
are thanked for their out-
standing leadership these
past years.


WE MAKE YOUR CONCRETE LOOK GOOD!


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