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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100091/00126
 Material Information
Title: South Marion citizen
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Ocala, Florida
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00100091:00149

Full Text



IFIDAY, MAR


a


SO U T H


I v1


M A R


I O N


Serving S.R. 200 Communities & Businesses


Public invited
to Business Expo Friday
Don't miss the annual
West Marion Business
Association Business
Expo this Friday, March
15 noon to 6 p.m. at the
Circle Square Cultural
Center
Meet with more than
40 business owners or
their representatives and
see how they can help
you.
Doors prizes and draw-
ings for gift cards
throughout the afternoon
will give everyone the
opportunity go home
with extra gifts.
Zumba demonstrations
are planned for 2, 3 and 4
p.m. for an opportunity to
see if that type of exer-
cise would work for you.
Circle Square Cultural
Center is at 8395 S.W
80th St., Ocala.
Shell art on display
at Freedom Library
On Top of the World
resident Genevieve Pis-
tori has been collecting
and turning shells into
hand-crafted flowers and
animals since 1970.
Now through the rest
of March, many pieces
she has designed are on
display at the Freedom
Library The shells were
collected from South
Florida beaches
Meals on Wheels needs
drivers in Oak Run
There is a great need
for volunteer drivers for
Meals on Wheels site in
the Ocala area, particu-
larly in Oak Run.
Drivers help deliver
meals to homebound sen-
iors. For more informa-
tion, call Stan Magen at
352-873-3433.



ROTARY CLUB


Recommendation: Refrain from burning


The Multi-agency Wildland Task
Force met on March 11, and while
it has not recommended a manda-
tory burn ban, officials are en-
couraging residents to refrain
from outside burning.
Weeks of extremely dry condi-
tions and high fire activity made a
mandatory burn ban a considera-
tion at Monday's meeting. How-
ever, the task force instead opted
for a voluntary burn ban, hoping
that Tuesday's forecasted rain
might improve conditions.
As of March 11, some areas
within the county bordered the
drought index's severe drought
range. On a scale of 0-800, 62 per-
cent of the county fell within the
400-500 range with the average at
476; some areas registered as high
as 617. Officials also noted burn
piles that got out of control have


caused many of the county's re-
cent brush fires.
Due to the current dry condi-
tions, the task force encourages
residents to postpone burning and
instead take yard debris to the
Marion County Landfill (5601 S.E.
66th St., Ocala) or one of the
county's other 17 recycling cen-
ters. Locations and hours of oper-
ation for these centers are
available online at
http://www.marioncountyfl.org/soli
dwaste.htm.
To help protect against wild-
fires, officials recommend resi-
dents keep 30 feet of defensible
space around their homes and
adopt other National Fire Protec-
tion Agency Firewise practices,
such as:
n Keep flammables, including
mulch, pine needles and dead veg-


etation, away from the home,
fence and deck.
Opt for low-growing, fire-re-
sistant plants.
Store fire wood at least 30 feet
from the home.
Make wildfire preparedness a
family project
Residents who choose to burn
must follow all Marion County
Fire Rescue regulations, as these
guidelines help protect both peo-
ple and property. The county's
guidelines for safe and legal back-
yard burning are available at:
http://marioncountyfl.org/FireRes-
cue/burnregulation.aspx.
During Monday's meeting, the
task force also confirmed that the
Hopkins Prairie Fire is now 100
percent contained. The blaze en-
compassed approximately 2,025
acres bordered to the north by


Dive, Dive!
A replica of the submarine Nautilus was on display at the Cherrywood Veterans Club meeting last
week. For details, see the Cherrywood column on Page 24.


Too much green beer? Use AAA's Tow to Go


AAA and Bud Light will help
protect motorists for St. Patrick's
Day weekend with the Tow to Go
program. The Auto Club Group
has provided the Tow to Go serv-
ice for more than 15 years be-
cause it allows AAA to protect
the freedom and mobility of mo-


tourists on our roadways.
The program's mission is to
discourage an intoxicated driver
from getting behind the wheel
and risking the lives and safety
of other motorists. Anyone, AAA
member or not, can call for a
Tow to Go ride, March 15-17.


Call 855-286-9246 for the serv-
ice.
Nearly two in 5 (41 percent)
consumers think people are
more likely to use a designated
driver on St. Patrick's Day week-

PLEASE SEE AAA, PAGE 3


Southwest Rotary Club inducted
two new members recently.
Page 22


Bookm ark..............................35
Cherrywood.........................24
Judi's Journal .......................13
Marion Landing ..................17
Oak Run ................................27
OTOW.....................................30
Out to Pastor.........................13
Paws and Claws ..................34
Pun Alley ....................... 31
Puzzles ............................. 33
Puzzles............33


County's top law officials

At the start of the Sheriff's Citizens Academy, county law enforcement was well represented. From
the left, Greg Graham, Ocala Chief; Bill Gladson, State Attorney's Office; Joanne Black, Dunnellon
chief; Chris Blair, Sheriff; Lee Strickland, Belleview chief; and Carl Zalak, County Commissioner. For
more photos, see Page 3.


Forest Road 54, to the south by
Forest Road 50, to the west by
Hopkins Prairie and to the east by
Northeast 310th Avenue/Lake
George. This wildfire resulted in
the loss of 10 homes, two aban-
doned buildings and 12 out-struc-
tures (such as garages and sheds).
The task force will continue to
meet regularly to monitor and
plan for what is expected to be an
active wildfire season. The next
meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. on
June 4 at MCFR's Headquarters
(2631 S.E. Third St., Ocala). The
Multi-agency Wildland Task Force
was formed following the 1998
wildfire season and meets fre-
quently during peak wildfire dan-
gers to ensure affected agencies
stay informed. The task force
serves as a model for other agen-
cies across the state.


ACS wants

people to

turn purple

Take a few minutes to imagine
what the town would look like if
every single business would turn
purple for one day just one
day? There would be balloons
and signs all in purple employ-
ees would be wearing purple in
their hair on their clothes some
may even paint their nails pur-
ple. All different shades of pur-
ple everywhere!
Now imagine, for a few min-
utes, what the world would look
like without cancer- think of the
increased laughter the lives
that would be changed- the fam-
ilies and friends who would not
have to say good bye too soon.
Imagine!
On March 19, the American
Cancer Society is asking local
businesses to go purple! Encour-
age your employees to wear pur-
ple decorate your stores in
purple compete with neighbor-
ing stores. It is a purple day!
You can do it as a fundraiser
for the West Marion Relay for
Life you can do it to increase
awareness about the tragedy of
cancer
As a fundraiser you can donate
part of your proceeds to the West
Marion Relay, You can sell spe-
cial items sell "Relay Feet"
(The American Cancer Society
will provide them) or place a can
out for donations.
Do it for awareness Do it for
research- Do it assist in paying
for programs.
Do it for a family member -Do
it for a neighbor- Do it for an em-
ployee Do it for yourself
Just do it!
A panel from the West Marion
Relay Committee will judge all
businesses that enter for 1st, 2nd
and 3rd place. All participating
businesses will receive a certifi-
cate of appreciation!
For information on how you
can get involved, call John at 352-
207-0755.


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2 Friday, March 15, 2013


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I FULL DETAIL SPECIAL S92 00
cComplete Interior/Exterior Cleaning Service. allow4 hours to complete) Reg Price $159 95 OFF
these specials and coupons cannot be used or combined with any other discounts or coupons. Must present coupon at time of write up. Synthetics and diesel extra. Some models higher. Tax, shop supplies & hazardous waste extra. See dealer for details. Offer Expires 3/31/13
iL- i i ---- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- I


Help prevent costly transmission repairs with our A,
: AUTOMATIC FLUID FLUSH 00
Our quality technicians will power flush the old-diryOFF
fluid, and renew with fresh fluid and conditioners. REGULAR PRICE $179.95
S These spedils and coupons cannot e used or combined with ny other dicount or coupons Must present coupon at
time of write up. Synhetics and diesel extra. Some models higher. Tax, shop supplies & hazardous waste extra. See dealer for details. Offer Expires 3/31/13.

'TIRE ROTATE AND
BRAKE INSPECTION R E E
S Our quality technicians will rotate your tires, set pressure, check tread ITH ANY SERVICE
epth, reset tire monitor system and carefully check 4 whel b kesr expires 3/31/13
L 0 - ---

I FREE CAR WASH
W/ANY SERVICE


QUALITY PAD $0
REPLACEMENT L
PER AXLE MAXIMUM
These specials and coupons cannot be used or combined with any otler discounts or coupons. Must present coupon
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lry Uur lieps to Mainain oodfuel Lonomy and a o ootlh Kunni i Lingine 5i
FUEL SAVER PACKAGE an !i0
Our quality technicians will clean the throttle unit and O FF
induction system, as well as clean the fuel injectors. REGULAR PRICE $229.95
These specials and coupons cannot be used or combined with any other discounts or coupons. Must present coupon
at time of write up. Synthetcs and diesel extra. Some models higher. Tax, shop supplies & hazardous waste extra. See dealer for details. Offer Expires 3/31/13.
Keep Your Engine (ool and Trouble Free with our 0
COOLANTlSYSTIEMSERVICE
Our quality ,tecnans will flush the old coolant and renewwith fresh dexcoo O FF
or equivalent. We also check for leaks, and check belts and hoses too! REGULAR PRICE $119.95
These specials and coupons cannot be used or combined with any other discounts or coupons. Must present
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Friday, March 15, 2013 3


AAA
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
end, with a majority (56
percent) reporting that
they think people tend to
drink more alcohol when
compared to other holi-
days.
"This program is in-
valuable because it brings
attention to the dangers of
drinking and driving be-
yond just giving an intoxi-
cated driver a safe ride
home on the holiday
weekend," said Gerry
Gutowski, Sr. Vice Presi-
dent, Automotive Serv-
ices, The Auto Club
Group.
"St. Patrick's Day is on
a Sunday this year so peo-
ple may be inclined to
celebrate throughout the
weekend and they need to
have a plan for a desig-
nated driver before they
have their first drink"
"The Tow to Go pro-
gram is an effective way
to promote the use of des-
ignated drivers and help
prevent drunk driving,"
said Kathy Casso, vice
president of Corporate
Social Responsibility for
Anheuser-Busch. "We're
pleased to partner with
AAA and their emergency
roadside service drivers
to help keep our roads
safe."
Since its inception in
1998, Tow to Go has safely
removed more than
22,000 intoxicated drivers
from the roads.
The service is designed
to be used as a last resort.
It is offered based on
availability of AAA driv-
ers and tow trucks during
times of high call volume.
Tow to Go Services:
The AAA tow truck
takes the vehicle and the
driver home
Confidential local ride
within a 10-mile radius to
a safe location
Free and available to
both AAA members and
non-members
Anheuser-Busch
Wholesalers have been a
cosponsor of the program
since its inception in
1998.
Not only has the com-
pany provided funding for
the service, it has also
worked with local bars
and restaurants through-
out Florida, Georgia and
Tennessee to help edu-
cate servers on the im-
portance of not over
serving their customers.

Read the
classified















Market Street
Across From Barnes & Noble
4414 SW College Rd., Ocala
Mon.-Sat. 10-7
Sun. 12-5


PHOTOS BY RON RATNER
Sheriff's Citizens Academy
The Sheriff's Citizens Academy began last week at On Top of the World. Above,
Sheriff Chris Blair addresses the crowd, as seen below. At the right, some people
sign in as the event starts.


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Stair Salon

Fl Certified Goldwedl Color Salon


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Pedicures basic


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L _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ J


8296 SW 103rd


St. Rd.


352-237-3676
Monday friday 9-5. Saturday 9-4 Walk-Ins Welcome


Staying at the beautiful 5 Star Beau Rivage
En route we have refreshments: Champagne & Danish-Morning
Wine & Cheese in the Afternoon. Movies,games and prizes on the bus

Includes all Tips. $25.00 Freeplay per person & 2 Breakfast Buffets per person
@ The Beau Rivage, Free lunch and $5.00 Freeplay at Boomtown.
Future dates are: July 2 5, October 15 18,
December 23 -26, 2013.

Ao f f


Swinson Chiropra tic
& Total Health Center

840-0444 e
Located on SR 200 2 rrmei *el o I-7S' 1d ciily
across from PuOilx H-'eir Brook C'onrrron,
Dr. D. L. Swinson
Chiropractic Physician Mec:. -- : :
* Neck & Back Pain Low Back & Leg Pain-!
* Shoulder & Arm Pain Disc Problems '
* Pinched Nerves/ Joint Pain
Numbness Dizziness
* Migraines/Headaches Auto Injuries
School & Sports Physicals
*Massage Therapy Available MM13191
*Decompression Therapy Available
- - Must present at first visit .
Exam & X-Ray for only $19.9
$110 value
YOUR EVALUATION INCLUDES: Consultation with the Doctor, Con
examination, X-Rays (if necessary), Report of all the Doctor's fin
I(OUR NO RSKPOLC Th patient & any person responsib e for payments, has a right t ref to pay, cni payment or
be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination ortreatmentwhich is performed as a result of within 72 hours
of responding to he advertisements orthe free, discounted fee, or reduced ee service examination rtan r t N only
Not valid for PI or WC May not be applied toward existing accounts Expires 4//13
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4 Friday, March 15, 2013


Community calendar


riday March 15

3-day Woods and Meadow sale
Woods and Meadows will have its community sale
(there are 155 homes in the community) on Friday,
Saturday and Sunday, March 15-17, starting at 8 a.m.
For information, call 352-509-4141.
Woods and Meadows is off 103rd Street Road, east
of 80th Avenue. Follow the signs ...each house will
have signs posted.

The Circle of French Friends

Le Cercle Des Amis Franqais meets on the third Fri-
day of every month from 11 a.m. to noon at Marion
County Sheriff's Office Community Conference Room
located at 9048 S.W State Road 200, about V4 mile from
Walmart.
The club promotes all things French: language, cul-
ture and fun. You do not have to be a fluent speaker to
join the group.
Guests are welcome at any meeting. Call Marie Mc-
Neil at 352-509-4940 for more information.
Our next meeting is March 15.

Saturday March 16

O'Cala St Patrick's Day event

The 1lth annual O'Cala's St. Patrick's Day will take
place on the downtown Square on Saturday, March 16,
from 4 to 9 p.m.
Entertainment this year will include many great
Irish dance groups and two great bands! An Triur will
perform a very traditional Irish sound that will make
you feel like you are feeling the breeze just atop the
Emerald Isle. The main performers for the evening,
the band that will get your Irish blood flowing is Seven
Nations!
There will be plenty of food to enjoy including corn
beef sandwiches and corn beef and cabbage!
There will be arts and crafts vendors providing all
kinds of unique items of your interest.
Fun games and activities for children and adults in-
cluding the face painting, arts and crafts, dunk tank,
jousting stands and Bounce House!
The dunk tank will be held as a charitable attrac-
tion, so make sure to make someone get soaked!

Celtic Celebration at OTOW

Come join the party as the Circle Square Commons
Town Square gets green..for a Celtic Celebration!
Enjoy live entertainment by The Blarney Stones as
they perform traditional songs from Ireland, nostal-
gic banter and hilarious jokes. Also performing will
be the talented Hogan School of Irish Dance who will
"wow!" you with contemporary and traditional dance
performances. Participate with Jessica Pinkowski
and her dance party for a lesson on how to dance the
Irish Jig. Plus, enjoy a St. Patrick's Day tribute per-


formed by the Sexton Sisters, Victoria and Alexandra.
Enjoy delicious Irish cuisine and "green" beer pro-
vided by Friendship Catering. Hamburgers and hot
dogs will also be available for purchase by Mr. B's Big
Scoop.
Join us for this free event on Saturday, March 16
from 5 to 9 p.m. at the Circle Square Commons Town
Square, 8409 S.W 80th St., Ocala. For more informa-
tion call 352-854-3670 or visit our website: www.Circ-
leSquareCommons.com

Brown Bag Bunny Brunch

Springtime fun for the little ones will hop into town
next week as Marion County Parks and Recreation
hosts its annual "Brown Bag Bunny Brunch." Chil-
dren ages 3-5 and their caregivers may participate in
a basketful of activities including: arts and crafts,
games, cookie decorating, pizza lunch and a meet-
and-greet and egg hunt with "Mr. Bunny"
Programs will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the following
locations:
March 15: Freedom Library (5870 S.W 95th St.,
Ocala).
March 18: Brick City Adventure Park (1211 S.E.
22nd Road, Ocala).
A participation fee of $11 per child with caregiver
and $4 per additional family member is required. Pre-
registration is required and maybe completed online
by visiting http://marioncountyfl.org/parks.htm and
clicking on the "Online Services" tab, or in person at
the main office (111 S.E. 25th Ave., Ocala). For more
information, call 352-671-8560 or email cathynor-
ris@marioncountyfl.org.

Dunnellon Knights hold dance

The Knights of Columbus, Council 8510 will host its
annual St. Patrick's Day Dinner Dance on March 16.
The dance is open to all of Irish descent and those
who wish to be Irish for just an evening of fun and
frolic.
The dance will be held in the parish hall of St. John
the Baptist Catholic Church located at 7525 U.S. High-
way 41 in Dunnellon.
It will feature corned beef and cabbage, potato and
carrots, Irish soda bread and an awesome dessert
table and cash bar. Happy hour begins at 5:30 p.m.
with dinner served at 6:30. Music will be provided by
Joe Koos with dancing until 10.
Tickets are $15 per person and can be purchased
from any Knight or the church office.
To reserve a table for parties of 8 to 10, purchase
tickets by mail or for additional information call 352-
489-6221. Proceeds from this event will go to local
charities.

Scandinavian Club of Marion County:

The Scandinavian Club of Marion County invites
people of Danish, Finish, Icelandic, Norwegian and
Swedish decent to join us at our next meeting on


March 16 at 11:30 a.m. at the Ocala Hilton, 3600 S.W
36th Ave. in Ocala.
The menu will be chicken cordon blue with wild
rice, salad, coffee and dessert.
Entertainment provided by The Doug Oxford Men's
Barbershop Quartet. The cost is $16 per person.
Reservations and payment must be made in advance.
Payment must be received by Wednesday the 13th of
March. Checks to be made out to Don Clauson and
mailed to Don Clauson, 5901 S.W 86th Place, Ocala,
FL 34476.
For further details call Jim Neate at 352-687-1580,
Don Clauson at 352-861-1235 or Terry Rasmussen at
352-347-8362.

Run, walk for United Way

United Way of Marion County's high school youth
program is hosting a St. Patrick's Day 5K run/walk on
Saturday, March 16, at 8 a.m. downtown at Ocala City
Hall to benefit the United Way
Entry fee is $20 before Monday, March 11 and $25
afterward.
Race forms can be downloaded at www.uwmc.org
or participants can register atActive.com.
Sponsorships are still available. For more informa-
tion, call Tina Banner at 352-732-9696.

Woman's Club fashion show, luncheon
The GFWC Greater Ocala Woman's Club will hold
its spring fashion show and luncheon on Saturday,
March 16, from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Druid Hills
United Methodist Church, Southeast 17th Street and
Lake Weir Road, Ocala. Donation is $20. Proceeds go
toward local charities.
Fashions are provided by Belk.
There is limited seating, so RSVP by March 8 to
Charlene at 352-6224-2175 or Rosalie at 352-237-9509.

Metro Crime Prevention of Florida

Metro Crime Prevention is a non-profit community
service organization whose mission is to achieve
more awareness by the public of the criminal threat
facing everyone in today's society and show effective
measures to counter that threat.
Their speakers offer up-to-date information on all
aspects of the current crime problem, and recom-
mend tested procedures to enhance person safety
Topics included are: identity theft, purse snatching,
hurricane safety, fraud and scams, guns and alterna-
tive weapons, carjackings, and much more.
They will appear at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, March
16.
Reservations requested. No charge. Donation for a
pizza, salad, dessert and drink lunch.
Christ's Church of Marion County, 6768 S.W 80th St.
(off State Road 200), Ocala, 352-861-6182,
http://www.ccomc.org.


2
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We Are Rolling Back the Cost of a

Spring Break

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From March 20 to April 25


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KAREN LEECH: 207-522-4792 ROBIN KILEY 352-369-4357
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6290 SWSR 200, #101 OCALA


Facials also available
Call 239-848-7973
for an appointment .....


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CS U T H M A R I O N


Citizen
The South Marion Citizen is a free community newspaper covering
news of communities in southwest Marion County including Oak Run,
Pine Run, Palm Cay, On Top of the World, Kingsland Country Estates,
Countryside Farms, Marion Landing, Majestic Oaks, Hidden Lake,
Woods and Meadows Estates, Paddock Farms, Saddle Oak Club, Deer
Creek, Cherrywood Estates, Hardwood Trails, Candler Hills, Country
Oaks, and Harvest Meadows, among others.
Postmaster: Entered asThird Class Matter at the post office in Ocala,
Fla., 34477.
Problems getting the Citizen: If your community is listed above and
the Citizen is not delivered to your home and you are having trouble get-
ting the paper from boxes around the S.R. 200 Corridor, call 854-3986
CONTACT INFORMATION
(352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 854-9277
8810 S.W. State Road 200, Suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481
*Editor- Jim Clark
*Circulation- Barbara Jaggers
Inside Sales/Office Coordinator- Michel Northsea
*Advertising Sales -Tom Rapplean and Kristy Kaigan
SGeneral Manager- John Provost
Deadline for news:
Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication.
Deadline for classified ads: Deadline for display advertising:
Tuesday 4 p.m. before publication Monday 5 p.m. before publication
"tPF Member of the Community Papers of Florida


I want to get news in the Citizen.
Call editor Jim Clark at
352-854-3986 or send by e-mail to
editor@smcitizen.com
Community news and photos must be received by Friday the week before
publication. Mail and photos may be left at the Citizen office in Kingsland
Plaza. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.


II **


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(.CUTS COLORS PERM RELAXiERH







Friday, March 15, 2013 5


Sunday. March 17

Rose Society to meet

Marion County Rose Society meets at 2:30 p.m. Sun-
day at the Marion County Ag Center Auditorium, 2232
N.E. Jacksonville Road (CR200A), Ocala. Meetings are
open to all who want to have fun learning about and
sharing their love of roses. Visit www.marioncounty-
roses.org or call Howard Johnson at 352-751-0355.

Monday March 18

American Legion to meet

The Ralph J. Green American Legion Post 354 will
hold its monthly meeting on Monday, Marchl8 at 1
p.m. in the community room of the Sheriff's Brian Litz
Building. 9048 S.W State Road 200. Try to arrive early
to enjoy light refreshments and comradeship with fel-
low veterans. For more information, telephone Com-
mander Fred Pulis at 352-854-9976.

Wednesday March 20

Interfaith women to meet

"Empathy is it hardwired in humans or can it be
developed?" Rev Peggy Hostetler, newly elected pres-
ident of The Interfaith Alliance of Marion County, will
examine the capacity of pre-schoolers to develop em-
pathy for others when she addresses the organiza-
tion's next potluck luncheon "women's gathering"
which will take place Wednesday, March 20 at the
Unity Church, 101 Cedar Road, in Silver Springs
Shores. Doors at the church will open at 11:30 a.m.
with the formal program concluding at 1 p.m.
Rev Hostetler has selected her topic as a facet of
The Charter for Compassion, the organization's theme
for 2013. Development of this document was spear-
headed by Karen Armstrong and other leading
thinkers in an effort to activate adherence to the
Golden Rule in cultures and religions throughout the
world.
The pastor of the Oakbrook Center for Spiritual Liv-
ing wants to encourage children to become altruistic
adults who buy shoes for a homeless man on a freez-
ing night, or rush to lift a commuter pushed onto the
subway tracks as the train nears rather than those
whose callous behavior leads to the bullying and dis-
dain for the "other" which afflicts so many raised only
to be princes and princesses of all they survey


Betty Jean Wochinski, secretary-treasurer of The
Interfaith Alliance and member of the Unity Church,
is hostess for the event. Please telephone her at 352-
680-9296 or visit www.TIAMarionCountyFL.org to
RSVP or for more information.

Thursday, March 21

Air Force group to meet

The March meeting of the Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Association (AFA) will be held
on Thursday, March 21 at 7 p.m. at the Ocala Regional
Airport Administration Building, 750 S.W 60th Ave.,
Ocala.
Guests are always welcome.
For more information contact Mike Emig at 352-854-
8328.

Friday March 22

Lions Club offers casino trip

The Ocala 200 Lions Club is having a Seminole
Hard Rock Casino trip on Friday, March 22.
The bus will leave at 8 a.m. from the Winn-Dixie, old
Porter's store, parking lot on State Road 200, Ocala.
The cost is $30 per person but each person is given
a $30 casino reimbursement.
Make checks payable to the Ocala 200 Lions Club.
Reservation deadline is March 13.
For more information call Diane Melnick, 352-861-
2730 or email her at, melnick8350@aol.com

Saturday, March 23

Book sale to benefit wildlife

A book sale to benefit the Ocala Wildlife Sanctuary
will be held Saturday, March 23, from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. at Winn-Dixie, 8445 S.W State Road 200, Ocala.
Also, bring your aluminum cans for recycling.
For further information, call 352-291-1962.

Saddle Oak Club yard sale

The Saddle Oak Club will hold its annual yard sale
on Saturday, March 23, from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the de-
velopment on State Road 200 across from Heath
Brook
The yard sale will be in the clubhouse and on club-
house grounds by all the community residents.


Breakfast will be served with sandwiches and cof-
fee.
Lunch will be soup and sandwiches.
There will also be a bake sale. The event is open to
the public.

Car wash at St Jude

The St. Jude Youth Group in conjunction with the
Men's Society is sponsoring a car wash on Saturday,
March 23, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For $5 they will clean
the outside of your car. Donation for both outside and
inside is $10. Come to the St. Jude parking lot at 443
Marion Oaks Drive in Marion Oaks to have your car
cleaned for Easter.

March of Dimes golf

A golf benefit for the March of Dimes will take place
on Saturday, March 23, at Ocala Palms Golf and Coun-
try Club. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. and there will be
a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m.
Breakfast and lunch included.
There will be a Hyundai Sonata, EZGO Golf Cart
and $1 million shot for a man and a woman.
Cost is $75 for a non-member and $50 for members.
Make checks payable to March of Dimes. There will
be tickets sold for mulligans, raffles and a silent auc-
tion.
A pairing party will be held Friday, March 22, at the
Hilton from 5 to 8 p.m. Tehre will be a cash bar and
free food and a small silent auction.
For information call 352-690-1643.

More on Page 6





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6 Friday, March 15, 2013


Tesda. March 26


Breast Cancer group to meet

The SOS (Sisterhood of Survivors) Breast Cancer
Support Group meets the last Tuesday of each month
at Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 S.W
105th St., at 1 p.m. in Room 235 (Multipurpose Room).
Our meeting on March 26 will be a presentation by
Cammy Dennis, Fitness Director at On Top of the
World Communities. Her talk will be on "Brain
Health." If you have any questions please call Gail
Tirpak at 352-291-6904.

Frida. March 29

Easter eggs, plants at Hawthorne

Hawthorne Village, 4100 S.W 33rd Ave., Ocala, will
be having its semi-annual plant sale on March 29 from
8 a.m. to 3 p.m. All plants, herbs, and vegetable plants
are $1. Also on March 29 from 10 a.m. to noon we will
be holding an Easter egg hunt, free pictures with the
Easter Bunny, and face painting. It will be a day of fun
for the whole family

Saturday. March 30

Marion Landing community yard sale

The annual Marion Landing Community Yard Sale
will be held on Saturday, March 30, from 8 a.m. to
noon in the Lifestyle Center parking lot. There will be
more than 40 tables set up selling many interesting
items. The Lifestyle Center is located on Southwest
65th Avenue Road, just off State Road 200 across from
Queen of Peace church. Free and open to the public.

Easter Egg hunt at Ocala West

The Ocala West United Methodist Church, 9330 S.W
105th St., will have their children's annual Easter Egg
hunt on Saturday, March 30, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in
Stanfield Hall. This will include ages 2 6th grade and
will include egg hunting, dying eggs, storytelling,
games, food and fellowship.

Tesday April 2

Presentation on human trafficking

The United Methodist Women of Eve Circle at Ocala
West United Methodist Church, 9330 S.W 105th St.,
will be hosting a presentation on human trafficking
awareness.
This program will be presented by Sgt. J. Bivan,
Marion County Sheriff's Office,, on Tuesday, April 2
at 7 p.m. in Room 235 (Multipurpose Room) at Ocala
West. This meeting is open to anyone interested in
this topic.

Saturday April 6

Lunch, Fashion With a Twist

On April 6, the Women's Fellowship of First Con-
gregational United Church of Christ will host a lunch-
eon and a "Fashion With A Twist" Show beginning at
noon.
Tickets are available at the church's office at a cost
of $10 per person.
Everyone is invited to attend. First Congregational
United Church of Christ is at 7171 S.W State Road 200.
For more information, call 352-237-3035 or 352-509-
4218 or email us at: uccocala.org

Swamp Fox Spring Fling

Calling all chili cooks and classic car owners! Fran-
cis Marion Military Academy is hosting The Swamp
Fox Spring Fling on April 6, at the Ocala Shrine Club
on 4301 S.E. Maricamp Road.
Please visit www.swampfoxevents.com or call Char-
lie DeMenzes at 352-843-7790 for more information to
sign up a chili team or enter a vehicle.
The Swamp Fox Fling is a family fun day that will
include voting for favorite chili, viewing and voting on


classic cars, a children's game area and more.
Get your raffle tickets at Pasteur's, Gateway Bank
locations, First Avenue Bank locations and Prestige
Auto Sales to win a car! Event starts at 10 a.m. and is
free to the public.
The proceeds of the event will benefit the Francis
Marion Military Academy

Wednesday. April 10

Four-day bonsai exhibit

The Marion Bonsai Society and Master the Possi-
bilities Education Center present the 6th Annual
"The Living Art of Bonsai" exhibit from April 10
through April 13.
The exhibit will feature several trees that transform
Master the Possibilities' education center into a "for-
est of art."
Register for associated classes, presentations and
demonstrations available through Master the Possi-
bilities at www.masterthepossibilities.com. The four-
day display is free and open to the public.
Master the Possibilities is at 8415 S.W 80th St, Ocala.
Exhibit hours: April 10, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., April 11 and
12, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and April 13, 9 a.m. to noon. For
more details on this and other presentations visit us
online or call 352-861-9751.

Saturday April 13

All church yard and bake sale

A huge yard and bake sale will take place on Satur-
day, April 13, from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the parking
lot of Christ's Church of Marion County, 6768 S.W 80th
St.
Vendors' sites will be provided and reservations for
vendors will be accepted March 23 through April 12.
The fee is $10 per space. Contact Jim Hines at 352-873-
3199.

Saturday April 20

Two-day flower show

Pioneer Garden Club presents "Pascua Florida," a
flower show celebrating 500 years since Ponce De
Leon discovered Florida, on April 20-21, from 1:30 to
5 p.m. each day, open to the public.
Enter your prized rose, bromeliad, orchid, annual,
perennial, flowering branch, violet, houseplant, etc.
Call Mrs. Rosalie Laudando, Horticulture chairman,
at 352-237-9509 for entry information.
Many beautiful specimens from local gardeners and
garden club members will be on display Junior Gar-
deners from the local schools will show their hard
work planting on the school grounds, potting plants,
growing seeds and making floral designs depicting the
Ponce de Leon theme.
Beautiful designs will showcase the talents of the
club members and the lobby will feature exquisite de-
signs from noted floral design judges from through-
out the state.
An educational display will inform on local issues of
water, ecology and the environment.
The event is free to the public. Donations are ap-
preciated.
The Club is at 4331 E. Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala (in
the Appleton Museum complex).

Helping Hands race, walk, fun run

Helping Hands is having its inaugural 5K race, a 1
mile walk, and a Kid's Fun Run, on April 20th at the
Baseline Road Trailhead (Florida Greenway). It's a
family event featuring complimentary food, snacks,
drinks, music, exhibits, and raffle prizes. Individual
and group awards will be given out to winners. The
cost for adults is $20 for pre-registration, youth $15,
and the children's Fun Run (10 years or younger) is
free. Top quality event shirts are free to the first 200
registrants. All the proceeds go to helping local men,
women, and children in need. Registration, sponsor-
ships, and detailed information is available on our
website at www.helpinghandsocala.org or call Holly
Miley at 352-732-4464.


Sunday April 28

Master Choir to perform

The Central Florida Master Choir, conducted by Dr.
Harold W McSwain, Jr, will perform a concert on
Sunday, April 28, at 3 p.m. at First United Methodist
Church, 1126 E. Silver Springs Blvd. across the street
from the old Ritz Hotel in Ocala.
The program, titled TO THE MOON AND BACH,
will include Walking on the Moon, Claire de Lune,
Africa, American Folk Songs, Bach's Easter Cantata
Christ Lag in Todesbanden others works.
Admission to the concert is free but an offering will
be taken to benefit the Tuesday Morning Outreach
Ministry to help the homeless, jobless, and others in
need.
For further information about the concert, call 352-
537-0207.

Sunday May 5

Civic Chorale to perform

On Sunday, May 5, at 3 p.m., the Marion Civic
Chorale, conducted by Matthew Bumbach, will per-
form a concert titled Give My Regards to Broadway at
First United Methodist Church, 1126 E. Silver Springs
Blvd. diagonally across the street from the old Ritz
Hotel in Ocala.
The program will include A Sentimental Journey
Thru the 40s and medleys from Les Miserables, My
Fair Lady, and The Phantom of the Opera.
Admission is free but a free-will offering will be
taken to benefit the church's Tuesday Morning Out-
reach Ministry to help the homeless, jobless, and oth-
ers in need.
For further information about the concert, contact
us at 352-537-0207 or www.fumcocala.org or
wayne@fumcocala.org.

Ongoing

Civic Chorale offers scholarship

The Marion Civic Chorale is offering the Grat L.
Rosazza Scholarship to an area student with musical
talent.
The $ 500 scholarship is open to high school and
community college students who are continuing their
education in vocal music, music education or musical
theatre.
The winner will perform with the chorale during
one of the spring concerts and will be awarded the
scholarship at that time. Application deadline is April
2.
For further information, visit the chorale's web site
at marioncivicchorale@tripod.com or contact Judy
Crooks at 352-812-0666, or e-mail Jillvw50@gmail.com.

Reading Volunteer Group

Love to read?
Love kids?
Our Reading Volunteer Group is looking for enthu-
siastic people to visit two of our local elementary
schools and read to the lower grades. It would only
take up about an hour of your time, six mornings a
year each (Tuesdays and Wednesdays) at Sunrise and
Marion Oaks Elementary schools.
The books are selected by the teacher at the grade
level you want, and you are escorted by two of the
children to their classroom.
Having the children around you engaged and an-
ticipating the next page, discussing the book, sharing
the pictures, and just being with them is a truly re-
warding experience. Through our efforts we hope to
instill in them a love of reading while opening up new
horizons and adventures in the wonderful world of
books.
Call Addie Bambridge at 352-533-8666 to sign up or
for more information.


Please use our e-mail

editor@smcitizen.com


3 3 3
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Friday, March 15, 2013 7


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8 Friday, March 15, 2013


Opinion


COMMENTARY


Don't treat juveniles with kid gloves


C OU T H M A R I O N

Cit izen
PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGAN
REGIONAL MANAGER: JOHN PROVOST
EDITOR: JIM CLARK
"In afree society a community newspaper must be a forum
for community opinion."

OUR VIEW



If you clean it up,


tourists will come

Marion County officials are holding a series of
meetings this week to get public input on
tourism. Since we're part of the public, we
thought we'd chime in.
First, the county's built-in major tourist attraction is
Silver Springs. The state hopes to make it viable for
tourists again. There are some changes planned, but
some of them, such as getting rid of the Jungle Cruise,
are a little bit questionable.
The key is a drop in admission prices, which are a lit-
tle steep right now.
A functioning Silver Springs State Park would be a
step in the right direction, provided it has what tourists
want. That remains to be seen.
Second, the city needs to keep its baseball talks with
the New York Yankees alive. After the fanfare of the an-
nouncement last fall that the Yankees were consider-
ing moving their Minor League Florida State League
team here, there has been precious little public activ-
ity. Bringing in baseball could attract some people to
the area.
Third, and possibly most important, the city of Ocala
needs to clean itself up, and that's not in reference to
planting trees and sweeping the gutters.
The crime in the streets is a blight on Marion County.
The totally inadequate hooker sweeps are a waste of
time.
They either just move somewhere else, or they pay
their fines and are right back on the streets. There
needs to be stiffer jail sentences to force them out of
Ocala.
Hardly a day goes by that there's not a story about a
drug-related crime. That, too, is the type of publicity
that an area that wishes to attract tourists doesn't need.
The panhandlers are a problem that everyone wishes
would go away, but no one seems capable of finding a
solution. We wonder how many people get off the In-
terstate, see the panhandlers at the exits, and immedi-
ately get back on the highway and get out of the area.
We even saw one man with a sign that said something
like "I won't lie to you, I want money for a beer." Amaz-
ingly, people were giving him money
Then there's traffic. Negotiating the streets of Ocala
and neighboring areas is not an easy chore. Try to ex-
plain streets, street circles, avenues, avenue roads, ter-
races, courts, lanes, etc. to a stranger and they look at
you as if you're speaking a foreign language.
Add to that the fact that two of the major thorough-
fares in the county, State Road 200 and Silver Springs
Boulevard, don't follow a straight grid system and are
built at an angle, and it's easy for a visitor to get lost.
So if we want tourists to come, and not everyone does,
the county and city have to take some action. We have
a feeling that will be a long time coming.



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


Money problem solved
We are told government
needs more money, even
though we are taking in more
taxes than ever before. This
fact supports our not raising
taxes on any individual or
business. It does mean we
have to face the reality that we
are spending too much, so the
only answer is to cut spending.
We don't even have to cut


worthwhile programs, we can
save billions by getting rid of
the following:
No more benefits for any il-
legal, period! No more food
stamps, free housing, free
medical care, or tax refunds
(how can anyone by definition
get a refund when they don't
pay in anything?).
This also applies to anyone
PLEASE SEE LETTERS, PAGE 10


Watching TV on Sunday
morning for me consists
mainly of some sports
shows and a CNN media show. If
I'm not home because of church, I
record them for viewing later.
So it was late Sunday morning
when I started the recorder to
watch ESPN's "Outside the
Lines." It turned out to be a dis-
gusting story about the rape of a
drunk teenager, the arrest of two
football players in Steubenville,
Ohio, a town crazy for the "Big
Red" football team, and the trial
of the two that was due to be held
Wednesday of this week.
The two were a quarterback
and wide receiver, both of whom
probably had aspirations to play
at the next level.
There was one thing that really
surprised me. The question was
asked, "What punishment do
these teenagers, age 16 and 17,
face if convicted by the judge (it's
in Juvenile Court and not a jury
trial)?"
The answer? If convicted, they
could be incarcerated in a juve-
nile facility until they are 21, then
released. It was also stated that
they would likely have to register
as sex offenders.
My immediate thought was,
"Let's move this case to Florida."
Down here, these boys would
probably both be charged as
adults and tried before a jury in
an adult court. They could be sen-


BY GRACE BOATRIGHT
Rarely do federal lawmakers
come upon a policy that can ex-
pand access to critical health
care services and simultane-
ously save taxpayers money
But according to a new report
from the Congressional Budget
Office, a tweak in the way
Medicare pays for certain kid-
ney disease drugs could do just
that preserving the availability
of crucial treatments to rural
patients and saving the pro-
gram billions.
At issue is Medicare's han-
dling of a few "oral-only" dialy-
sis medications designed for
end-stage renal disease, the
most severe version of chronic
kidney disease.
In 2011, Medicare switched to
a payment system that reim-
bursed for all dialysis-related
treatments in one "bundled"
rate. Instead of paying prevail-
ing market prices, the govern-
ment opted to compensate
health care providers according
to a formula.
But the Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services the
government agency that over-
sees the program decided to
exempt certain oral dialysis
medications from the bundle
through 2014. January's fiscal
cliff deal extended the exemp-


Jim Clark
Editor


tenced to a long period of hard
time, probably not life, since our
Supreme Court liberals have
frowned on life sentences for "ju-
veniles," but a good many years
before they could be out on the
streets.
In Ohio, they can be out on the
streets in four or five years.
There were some other things
in the report, including three
teens who failed to report the
crime, but have not been arrested.
The report stated that they would
probably take the Fifth Amend-
ment, then be given immunity so
their testimony could be offered.
However, there was a ruling,
probably after the report was
recorded, that the trio didn't have
to testify. It seems they live in West
Virginia, and the crime was com-
mitted in Ohio (Steubenville is
just across the river). A judge in
West Virginia ruled Friday that
the trio couldn't be subpoenaed.
There has been a lot of criticism
that the three weren't arrested.
Now it appears that an arrest war-
rant is the only way to get them


tion through 2016.
Instead, those drugs will con-
tinue to be dispensed by local
pharmacies through Medicare
Part D, the prescription drug
benefit.
That's the right call. Setting
appropriate compensation is a
particularly time-consuming
and complicated task. It re-
quires a remarkable volume of
medical data. If officials had
simply thrown the oral dialysis
treatment into the price-control
bundle, they almost certainly
would have set compensation
too low.
Indeed, the Government Ac-
countability Office explicitly
warned of"a potential underes-
timate of the total cost" and said
that there were still "questions
about payment adequacy begin-
ning in 2014."
If policymakers had pro-
ceeded with bundling the oral
dialysis medications, patients
could have lost access to them.
Health care providers serving
the Medicare population would
have started losing money when
dispensing these drugs. Many
would have been forced to stop
offering them leaving patients
in the lurch.
Patients suffering from end-
stage renal failure are some of
the most vulnerable in the en-


into Ohio to testify.
There was also a video of one
teen laughing and joking about
the rape, but it was stated that his
video was shot at another location
after the crime, so he couldn't be
charged.
I don't like laws, or the people
who support them, that protect
the perpetrators of violent crimes
because of their age. If you're old
enough to rape, you're old enough
to be tried as an adult.
To its credit, the "Outside the
Lines" report named the pair.
ABC News, the parent company of
ESPN, did not name them in a
story on its Web site, but other
media outlets did.
I have one proposal that needs
to gain some steam. Let's lower
the age of juveniles from 18 to 16,
and make it a federal law that
can't be superseded by the states.
If you're 16, you are automatically
tried as an adult. That way, what
are now juvenile offenders, par-
ticularly violent ones, would know
that if they were caught commit-
ting a crime, it would mean hard
time "up the river."
I submit that 16 and 17-year-
olds are not children when it
comes to the ability to commit a vi-
olent crime. Let's not treat them
that way.

Jim Clark is the editor of the
South Marion Citizen.


tire Medicare population. They
typically require at least three
rounds of treatment every
week. Even minor disruptions
to their health care regimens
can lead to serious deteriora-
tion of their already fragile con-
dition.
Those in rural areas would
have been hit particularly hard.
Many communities outside
urban centers depend on just
one or two health clinics to
meet their medical needs. A
single clinic may serve patients
coming from 50 miles away or
more. These clinics typically
run on very thin profit margins
and depend heavily on
Medicare payments to stay
afloat.
Aware of the potential ad-
verse consequences in rural
communities, legislators re-
sponded by maintaining these
oral medicines under the Part
D prescription drug benefit.
This move helped to maintain
the viability of small clinics
servicing rural communities.
This was good for patient ac-
cess but, according to the gov-
ernment budget accountants,
also good for the Medicare pro-
gram and taxpayers because it
saves money The CBO projects
PLEASE SEE BOATRIGHT, PAGE 10


READER OPINIONS INVITED

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GUEST COLUMN

Fiscal cliff and rural health care policies


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Friday, March 15, 2013 9







10 Friday, March 15, 2013


LETTERS
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8

who gets these "refunds" with-
out paying taxes. We have to
stop making it so attractive to
live off others, and insist on in-
dividual responsibility This ob-
viously doesn't apply to the
truly needy, it applies to those
who "work" the system so suc-
cessfully they are often better
off than the average worker.
Stop paying for unwed moth-
ers' doctor and hospital bills!
Demand she give the name of
the father and hold him and his
family responsible. Not only
will this save tax dollars, it will
cut down on illegitimate births.
Too many young men are walk-
ing away from these new born
babies, so don't allow it to hap-
pen. It simply means, you play,
you pay
Don't expect others to pay
your way. I don't ask you to pay
for me, don't force me to pay for
you. That's not charity, it's
theft! It is easy to support gov-
ernment "freebees" when
using someone else's money
For example, if you want some-
one to have free health care,


you pay for it and deduct it as a
charitable deduction. That is
charity!
As I said last month, we will
go bankrupt if we don't stop
spending money we don't have,
and I admitted I don't know
how bad it will be when this
happens. Today's America is
not the land I grew up in, we
wanted freedom more than se-
curity, and we believed in indi-
vidual responsibility. I do
believe we have gone so far
that only God can save America
as we know it. Pray he will do
just that.
Wayne Rackley
Ocala

Who said this?
Who said the following?
"This year will go down in
history For the first time, a civ-
ilized nation has full gun regis-
tration. Our streets will be
safer, our police more efficient,
and the world will follow our
lead into the future."
Answer:
Adolf Hitler, in 1935, after he


signed "The Weapons Act of
Nazi Germany"
We have the Second Amend-
ment because tyrants love gun
banning and restrictions.
Al Shumard
Pine Run

Weighing in on guns
OK, so I'll weigh in on guns.
First let me say not only don't I
own a gun but I have never
fired one that didn't begin with
the words cap or water. In fact I
have passed on the opportunity
to hunt because hunting should
be left those with experience.
I grew up in Brooklyn and
worked in midtown Manhattan
from 1957 to 1980. I do not re-
call ever hearing a shot being
fired in those 40 years. I did
have several bombs go off
within earshot. The anti-war
and anti-oil people at work.
These events were so common
that they were rarely reported
in the news. Then there were
the many events where whole
neighborhoods were burned to
the ground by race rioters.
Those neighborhoods were al-
lowed to burn because the po-
lice and fire responders were
under attack from rooftops by


anything that wasn't nailed
down. Guns need not apply
Next I lived in the Chicago
area. Nothing has changed in
the 30 plus years since then.
Ten people a week are mur-
dered in Chicago. I doubt any
are killed by legally owned
guns. The only thing that will
stop the killing is for the police
to wade in with guns blazing.
That, of course is not an option.
It pleases me that many of my
current neighbors are profi-
cient in the use of handguns. I
hope prospective felons are


paying attention.


Abortions won't stop
Arkansas recently
the most restrictive
law in the United Sta
banning the procedu
weeks of pregnancy
If the Supreme C
ever to overturn Roe
if anti-abortion force
to successfully chise
woman's access to
tion, many women
choose abortion b
hands. Leeches, lye
ish fly are still among


tools available to the self-abor-
tionist. So are knitting needles,
with predictable, disastrous
consequences. There is no law
that will end the practice of
abortion, only laws that can
protect a woman's right to
choose it, or not, and to keep it
the safe and private procedure
still available to women in
2013, 40 years after the
Supreme Court made it legal.
Gerard Chapdelaine
Oak Run

Shared sacrifice


Congress must be made to
Bill Riola share the sacrifices that the
Oak Run American worker must accept
because of the actions of our
elected representatives. If
y adopted Americans must receive cuts in
e abortion pay and benefits for our coun-
ites, mostly try to survive, than Congress
ire after 12 must also accept the same cuts.
I am not sure how many of
ourt were you are aware that our elected
v Wade, or members of Congress passed a
s continue law about 8 or 9 years ago stat-
1 away at a ing that their pay and benefits
safe abor- can not be reduced for any rea-
will still son.
ytheirown How's that for serving the
and Span- public?


g the many


Jerry Segovis, Ocala


BOATRIGHT
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8


that extending the exemption through
2018 would save taxpayers approxi-
mately $1.3 billion.
Sens. Max Baucus, D-Mont., and
Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, played particu-
larly important roles in marshalling
support for the extension of the exemp-
tion through 2016, as part of the fiscal
cliff deal earlier this year. They should
be commended for championing the in-


terests of rural Americans.
Because Congress acted in the best
interests of rural patients, Medicare en-
rollees suffering from renal disease can
now rest assured that they will retain
access to treatments they need.
Grace Boatright is the legislative di-
rector for the National Grange, an or-
ganization that advocates for rural
America.


dcm






Friday, March 15, 2013 11


GUEST COMMENTARY

The United States must find a way to crawl out of debt


BY GLENN MOLLETTE
Our nation must crawl out of debt. If
our outgo continues to exceed our in-
come then our upkeep will be our
downfall. Our fiscal house is out of
order. Therefore there is urgency in our
government for more and more money
Where is this money coming from? The
money will come from you, your family
and friends. We will never be out of debt
by enacting more and more taxes on any
group in America whether it's the two
percent who are considered rich or the
large population of the poor or middle
class. We can only do this by eliminat-
ing wasteful spending.
A man may have a good income. If his
house payment is $4,000 a month, his
credit card bi takes their share of his
taxes he won't have much left to survive
on. The worst thing he can do is get an-
other credit card, blowing the $5,000
limit on a weekend spending spree and
incurring more debt.
As a nation we have gone crazy with
debt. We are a poor example for our
own citizens and the rest of the world.
People in America are drowning in
debt. American people are losing their
homes every day, filing for bankruptcy
and suffering the pain of debt. The an-
swer to the American dilemma is not


more debt; more loans and more maxed
out credit cards. Families are desperate
to get out from underneath the hardship
of debt.
America continues to build cities and
nations around the world while we con-
tinue to increase our debt more and
more. This is a huge burden on the
American people. We are taxed to pay
for roads, bridges and rebuilding cities
in other nations that we cannot afford.
In the process our nation is crum-
bling because we cannot fix our own
bridges and roads. Our Social Security
and Medicare systems are struggling
because our government continues to
indebt us and rob the Social Security
system to pay for foreign projects that
are beyond our means. Therefore our
seniors are becoming poorer, the poor
are becoming poorer, our young people
cannot find jobs and the middle class is
becoming the poor class.
Congress should never raise taxes on
any group of people in America. The
percentages are high enough. The day
will come when someone will try to lead
Congress to tax our income by 50 per-
cent. It won't just be the rich. We must
turn this tide around. The attitude of
"why work?" is growing in our nation.
At one time people wanted to work


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Today people sigh and say, "If I make
more it will just all go to the government
for taxes." Why would we want to im-
pose more taxes on any group in Amer-
ica? The only hope is to cut back on our
wasteful spending.
We must eliminate foreign projects
that we cannot afford until we have our
own house in order. I am not opposed to
helping people when we can afford it.
We cannot afford it at this juncture in
our history Possibly in a few years we
can be more generous. But now we are
starving our own children while we give
money to other countries in the world
that hate us. Let me hasten to say I do
not think we can buy friends. Giving
money to Pakistan or Libya does not
buy friendship with these people. We
need to cut out every dime given to Mid-
dle Eastern nations with the exception
of Israel.
We must eliminate unnecessary wars
that drain each of us in our country Iraq
and Afghanistan have cost us between
four and five trillion dollars! The aver-
age citizen is being taxed more and


more to pay for these long and drawn
out unnecessary wars. Thousands of
lives have been lost in Iraq and
Afghanistan. What was accomplished?
Those people do not like us any more
today than they did before the wars.
The mindset of the people has not
changed. They still have the same ha-
tred toward America and even toward
each other in their own nation.
We can no longer go into greater debt
as a nation in order to bale out big
banks and Wall Street who pay millions
of dollars to executives while Ameri-
cans are struggling to pay their utility
bills. Big bankers and Wall Street exec-
utives make millions of dollars each
year and live in luxury while middle
class Americans are being kicked out of
their homes by the very bankers who
have been rescued with taxpayer
money! Allowing the Federal Reserve
to print more money to bale out these
greedy millionaires while passing the
bill on to a struggling American public
is appalling.
PLEASE SEE MOLLETTE, PAGE 12


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12 Friday, March 15, 2013


GUEST COMMENTARY

Affordable Care Act and Medicare, Part D


BY DOUGLAS SCHOEN
As it becomes clear the President Obama is making
Medicare a key topic for discussion within the
broader context of federal spending, Democrats and
Republicans have an opportunity to pursue common-
sense reforms that preserve the program while
achieving bipartisan support for fixing what isn't
working.
Despite ongoing reservations, I believe that some
parts of the Affordable Care Act can conceivably be
implemented with minimal dislocation, but only if the
right policies are embraced by the administration.
And that's why I think that the president is making a
mistake in proposing potentially damaging changes to
arguably the most effective part of Medicare, instead
of building on its progress and finding a way to drive
long-term cost savings by keeping seniors healthy
The Medicare program component in question is


the Part D drug benefit that George W Bush signed in
2003 (later implemented in 2006). Part D was created
to cover the drug coverage gap that that once existed
in the Medicare's plan for older and disabled Ameri-
cans. Under Part D, seniors choose from a wide vari-
ety of privately run drug plans that negotiate
individually with drug makers: seniors pay far less
than they used to for coverage.
According to a recent survey, the program has a 90
percent approval rating and, unique among major
federal programs enacted in recent years, will actu-
ally cost less-$334 billion less- than original estimates.
Even better, improved access to drugs appears to be
saving costs elsewhere: The Congressional Budget Of-
fice found every one percent increase in prescrip-
tions filled results in a .20 percent decrease in
spending in Medicare.
Part D works so well because it recognizes both the


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virtues-and the limits-offree, competitive markets. On
one hand, the very existence of the program ac-
knowledges that Americans have a collective respon-
sibility to help older and disabled individuals afford
the medicines they need. On the other, by prohibiting
government bureaucrats from trying to set prices, it
leaves dozens of individual market players free to fig-
ure out the best way to meet consumer needs.
In fact, the process works so well that the Congres-
sional Budget Office says the government-run negoti-
ations some in the Democratic party want wouldn't
save taxpayers a single penny
Likewise, the misguided "rebate" proposal that
President Obama referenced in his State of the Union
Address would alter the program unnecessarily
Clearly the president means well, but the record
shows that it just won't work. Indeed, the govern-
ment's most significant experience with trying to sin-
gle-handedly run a prescription drug program, the
Department of Veterans' Affairs' health system, has so
many gaps and omissions that more than 40 percent of
its enrollees end up electing to pay for Part D or other
privately provided coverage.
This is why President Obama and my fellow De-
mocrats should capitalize on the important lessons
we've learned from Part D and make the program
their own. Even with the recent success in holding
down Medicare costs (the rate of cost increase has
dropped by nearly 300 percent), everyone who looks at
the program overall agrees that its current antici-
pated spending path can't be sustained much longer.
Put simply, both Democrats and Republicans have
an opportunity to drive bipartisan cooperation and re-
duce health care spending through a proven govern-
ment program. Seniors will welcome it and Medicare
will be in better shape as a result.
Douglas Schoen is a political strategist and author
of Hopelessly Divided: The New Crisis in American
Politics and What it Means for 2012 and Beyond, pub-
lished by Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

West Marion Moose activities
for the upcoming week
Friday, March 15: fish or shrimp dinner, 5-7 p.m.,
Dave Hurlbert karaoke Entertainment 6-10 p.m.
Saturday, March 16: Hamburger Deluxe with fries
and beans. 5-7 p.m. Randy Stanley karaoke 6-10.
Sunday, March 17: St. Patrick's day with Elmer
O'Zwier and friend's corn beef and cabbage from 1-6
p.m. and Rick O'Holland starting at 2p.m.
Bar Bingo cancelled this week only
Monday, March 18: Coney Dogs noon-3 p.m. Moose
Legion meat loaf dinner 5-7 p.m. Moose Music at 5.
Tuesday, March 19: Dart League 5:45 9 p.m., food
specials 5-7 p.m.
Wednesday, March 20: 1st Fashion Jewelry show as
seen on QVC with lunch starting at noon.
Thursday, March 21: Open darts 5 p.m.-shuffleboard
7p.m.
Friday, March 22: fish or shrimp dinner, 5-7 p.m., En-
tertainment by Rick Holland "Blast from the Past" 6-
10 p.m.
West Marion Moose Lodge 2356, is open for mem-
bers and qualified guests, 10411 S.W 110th St., one
mile north of State Road 200 across from Oak Run en-
trance. Phone 352-854-2200.

MOLLETTE
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11
America can return to being the strongest financial
nation in the world but it's not going to happen at the
current pace. Life for Americans will only become
worse unless we all join hands and turn this nation
around. I believe we can. We can become a nation
with a surplus and not a deficit. We can once again
lead the world in employment. We should not become
satisfied watching China, Japan, India and other na-
tions steal our manufacturing out from under our
noses while our families lose their own homes and
our homeless Veterans walk the streets of America.
I am dreaming of a day when once again families
can put some money in the bank because the govern-
ment is not taking it all and misusing so much of it
while our nation goes further and further into debt.
Glenn Mollette is the author of American Issues:
Every American Has An Opinion and nine other
books.


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dcm






Friday, March 15, 2013 13


Please excuse me, but I just gotta be me


I refuse to answer for anybody else
because it is a full-time job trying to
answer for myself. I must confess
though, I sometimes cannot give a good
answer for myself. I can give an answer,
but not a good one, and when it comes
to answers, the Gracious Mistress of the
Parsonage demands good ones.
How do you explain yourself to some-
one when you cannot even explain
yourself to yourself? I do not pretend to
be a man of mystery, but many things
about Yours Truly I certainly do not un-
derstand.
For one, I am not an actor. I want to
make that very plain to all and sundry
Within the confines of my presence, are
absolutely no acting skills.
I have some friends who are always
acting like a fool. I am assuming they
are acting and give them the benefit of
the doubt.
Another friend of mine at certain
times acts dumb. I have known him for
a very long time and I can usually tell
when he is acting. By the way, he is a
very good actor. Many of my friends are
excellent actors and if they ever were
competing for some Oscar or Emmy
award, they would come pretty close to
winning.
I am another story It is very difficult
for me in the area of acting. With me,
what you see is what you get.
I suppose when you boil it all down, I
am just not smart enough to be a good
actor. I am not even smart enough to be


Out to Pastor
Dr. James Snyder


a bad actor.
Putting all of this in context, I must
confess that my wife believes I am a
great actor. I have tried to dissuade her
from this opinion, but up to this point, I
have not been successful. When she
thinks of me she always says, "And the
Emmy goes to..."
How she came to this point, I'm not
quite sure. No matter what I do, she still
holds to this personal opinion of me. I
keep telling her that I am not that good
of an actor, which she keeps smiling and
nodding her head in my direction.
Some examples need to be given here
to show my point.
Just the other night we were at a
restaurant with some friends, having a
good time, or so I thought. I must say
when I'm on a roll, I'm on a roll. But all
during my "roll," I kept feeling some-
body under the table kicking me. I ig-
nored it thinking perhaps our friends
did not quite know what they were
doing. Never once did I suspicion my
companion with this action. I kept
rolling on.


z
r .




dal


Finally, both of them excused them-
selves to take a break and when they
were out of listening distance, my wife
said to me, "Will you stop acting so fool-
ish?"
I looked at her, not quite knowing
what she was referring to, and said
quite innocently, "But, my Precious, (it's
a name I use when I'm in trouble but
don't know why) I'm not acting."
She gave me one of "those looks" and
said, "Stop acting foolish."
This is what I admire about my wife.
She has the highest opinion of my abil-
ities particularly in the area of the thes-
pian arts. Our friends were coming to
the table when I was about to tell her I
was not acting foolish, it just came nat-
ural.
Another example comes to mind.
I remember she was trying to explain
something to me one time. I do not
know what it was now. It was something
to do with something in the garage, a
place I have not been for years, and I
was not connecting the dots, as they say
She was going into a long dissertation
on what needed to be done and I was
just standing there staring at her. I was
trying to understand what she was say-
ing, but nothing was clicking upstairs, if
you know what I mean.
In the middle of her dissertation she
stopped, looked at me intensely, placed
both hands on her hips and said, "Don't
act so dumb."
Smiling broadly I whispered, "My


Music and songs of the Passover celebration


When I was growing up, the part
of the Seder I looked forward
to after chowing down my fa-
vorite chicken soup with matza balls
and the candy raspberry chocolate cov-
ered ring jells was singing the Passover
songs. In those days, I would pull out my
guitar and accompany my family as we
wended our way through the seder with
music and song.
The Passover seder is the ritual meal
that Jews observe to celebrate their
freedom in ancient days from the tyrant
Pharaoh of Egypt. According to the
Torah, God sends Moses to tell Pharaoh
to let His people go, a reference to the
slavery the Israelites were experienc-
ing. After 10 plagues, the Pharaoh re-
lents and the Israelites make their way


Judi's Journal
Judi Siegal



to freedom. In celebration of this event,
each year, Jews sit down to this ritual
meal and tell the ancient story of their
redemption.
As with many holidays, music and
song make the rituals come alive and
lift the spirit. The seder is filled with
music from the songs of praise of the


Hallel to the allegorical Chad Gadya.
Some of the songs are musical rendi-
tions of the text; others are composed
melodies of Middle Ages origin or even
recently composed ones such as those
by the late Debbie Friedman whose
song about Miriam is a favorite with my
congregation.
The seder opens with the chanting of
the individual steps to the service. The
blessings of sanctification over wine
and candles also have a distinct chant.
The opening lines of welcome for all to
participate in the seder have a lovely
syncopated melody and is sung in Ara-
maic, the language of ancient Israel of
2,000 years ago when the seder ritual
was standardized. The famous Four
Questions that the youngest child asks


about the seder has two chants: One
that is Sephardic in origin and one that
is a traditional Talmudic chant.
The mentioning of the Ten Plagues
has an interesting musical component
also. Drops of wine are taken with a fin-
gertip at each mention of a plague and
the name of the plague is chanted in a
mournful drone. A diminished cup sym-
bolizes sadness; the drone reminds us
that the Egyptians suffered so that the
Israelites could gain freedom.
The antithesis of the plague chant is
the famous Dayenu. This portion lists
the numerous miracles and blessings
that were given to the Israelites. The
word means, "it is enough for us." This

PLEASE SEE JUDI, PAGE 14


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Precious, I'm not acting."
With a glare that could have intimi-
dated good old Goliath, she quipped,
"I'm coming to believe you're right. You
are not acting. You're just naturally
dumb."
Somebody once sang a song called, "I
gotta be me" which has become my
theme song. What you see is what you
get, when you are dealing with me. I am
not smart enough to act and I am too old
to play Therefore, it all boils down to
this one thing, I am what I am, like it or
lump it.
I do not like it when people pretend
to be something they are not. I want
people to be real with me. This is dou-
bly true with my relationship with God.
He is honest with me and I want to be
absolutely honest with him.
"If a man say, I love God, and hateth
his brother, he is a liar: for he that
loveth not his brother whom he has
seen, how can he love God whom he has
not seen?" (1 John 4:20 KJV).
Many people say they love God and
yet it is all an act. It is easy to love some-
body you cannot see but hard to love a
brother right in front of you.

Rev James L. Snyder is pastor of the
Family of God Fellowship, PO Box
831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with
his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs
Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-
mail jamessnyder2@att.net. His web
site is www.jamessnyderministries.com.






14 Friday, March 15, 2013


Religion


Temple B'nai Darom
Temple B'nai Darom will hold a tra-
ditional first seder on Monday evening,
March 25 at Silver Springs Restaurant,
5300 E. Silver Springs Blvd. The seder
will be conducted by Rabbi Sherman
Stein. The cost is $28.50 per person
which includes a full seder dinner with
choice of brisket or salmon. All reser-
vations must be received by Friday,
March 15. For reservations or addi-
tional information please contact Micki
Hirsch at 352-624-9563.
Christ's Church of Marion County
Saturday, March 16: Men's Prayer
Group, 8 a.m.
Saturday, March 16: Metro Crime Pre-
vention of Florida, 11:30 a.m.
Sunday, March 17: Sunday School,
9:30 a.m. Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.
Monday, March 18: Bible Study, 10
a.m.
Tuesday, March 19: Women's Crafts
and Fellowship, 9 a.m.
Wednesday, March 20: Bible Study, 7
p.m.
Thursday, March 21: Prayer and


Praise Group, 9 a.m.
Sunday, March 31: It is Easter! The
Worship Service, at 10:30 a.m., will be
our choir's presentation of "Eyes of
Faith" an Easter Musical featuring the
resurrection ofJesus Christ. The day be-
gins with Easter Breakfast at 9 a.m. fol-
lowed by Easter Sunday School Classes
at 9:30 a.m.
Christ's Church of Marion County,
6768 S.W 80th St. (off State Road 200),
Ocala, 352-861-6182,
http://www.ccomc.org.
Our Redeemer Lutheran
Join us for Casual with Christ every
Saturday at 5 p.m., beginning March 9.
This will be a casual service with mod-
ern music. Youth bible study follows.
Free English classes
College Road Baptist Church, 5010
S.W College Road, continues teaching
ESL
(English as Second Language) each
Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m.
Classes are free, as is child care, and
youth programs. Assistance with apply-
ing for citizenship is also offered. Enroll


any Wednesday evening.
Call 352-854-6981, or 352-237-5641 for
more information.
Congregation Beth Israel of Ocala
Congregation Beth Israel of Ocala is
now accepting reservations for its
Passover seder to be held on the second
night of Passover, Tuesday March 26, at
6 p.m. at the Stone Creek Country Club
and Grille in Ocala. The seder will fea-
ture a complete meal with rituals with a
liberal, contemporary feel. Most of the
seder will be done in English. The serv-
ice will be facilitated byJudi Siegal and
Sonia Peterson with those in atten-
dance as participants. The cost is $30
for members, $35 for non-members and
guests. For reservations and further in-
formation contact Estelle at 352-861-
2542 or Sonia at 352-307-3662 by March
21. Congregation Beth Israel is a liberal,
inclusive, contemporary congregation
affiliated with the Jewish Reconstruc-
tionist Movement.
Countryside Presbyterian Church
Palm Sunday
Countryside Presbyterian Church


will hold a special communion service
with palm processional lead by Rev
Gary Marshall for Palm Sunday on
March 24 at 10:30 a.m.
Maundy Thursday
Countryside Presbyterian Church
will hold a Tenebrae Service "service of
shadows" with communion at 7:00 p.m
on March 28 led by the Rev Gary Mar-
shall.
Good Friday
Countryside Presbyterian Church
will hold a noon service on Good Friday,
March 29 recalling Jesus' crucifixion
with the Rev Gary Marshall officiating.
Easter Sunday
Celebratory Worship Service with
communion at 10:30 a.m. on March 31 at
Countryside Presbyterian Church, 7768
S.W State Road 200, Ocala with Pastor
Gary Marshall officiating.
The Chancel and Handbell choirs
will perform.
For further information, please call
the church office at 352-237-4633.


PLEASE SEE RELIGION, PAGE 15


JUDI
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13
lively tune crops up at Jewish gather-
ings all during the year and is a catchy
melody to sing. It is a favorite with wed-
ding and dance bands all over the
world.
Debbie Friedman's famous song
about Miriam at the Reed Sea is an ex-
ample of a modern composed song. It
celebrates Miriam and the women who
danced and praised God with song as
soon as the Israelites reached free-
dom's shores. This lively tune is a paean
to the involvement of the women in the


path to freedom.
One of the most famous seder songs
comes at the end of the seder. It is sung
in Aramaic and is entitled: Chad Gadya,
One Kid.
The form is similar to the rhyme
"This is the house that Jack built or the
Twelve Days of Christmas where the
stanza before is repeated and added to
the additional verses. The allegorical
nature of the song makes for an inter-
esting story In the song a little goat
bought by a father for two coins is as-
saulted by a cat, dog, stick, fire, water,
ox, ritual butcher, and Angel of Death.
Each of these devours or destroys the
object before it. The various objects and


animals have special meaning. The fa-
ther stands for God, the coins Moses
and Aaron, the ensuing items are the
nations that conquered Israel: the cat,
Assyria, the dog, Babylon, the stick, Per-
sia, the fire, Macedonia, the water,
Rome, the ox, the Saracens, the butcher,
The Crusaders and the Angel of Death
the Turks who ruled Palestine. The
song ends on a hopeful note and wish
for a messianic age when the Holy One
will destroy the foreign rulers of the
Holy Land and will vindicate Israel as
the lawful ruler of its land and destiny
Other interpretations are accepted but
most would accept the interpretation I
have presented.


There are many other songs such as
Adir Hu (God is Great) that were added
during the Middle Ages and Eliyahu
HaNavi, Elijah the Prophet, a song of
redemption.
Many people sing the Israeli national
anthem, Hatikvah, or Ani Ma'amin, a
song to honor those killed in the Holo-
caust, just to mention a few.
May the song of freedom wend its way
into the hearts of us all and may it burst
out in joyful melody with the promise of
redemption for all those oppressed.
Happy Passover!
(Passover begins on the eve ofMarch
25 and continues for eight days.)


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Friday, March 15, 2013 15


RELIGION
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14


Joy Lutheran Church
On Maundy Thursday, March 28, at
6:45 p.m. the worship service begins the
three days of Christ's Passion. Holy
Communion will be offered in memory
of the Last Supper The altar will be
stripped in honor of Christ's death and
at the end of service; the sanctuary
lights will be dimmed and the wor-
shipers will quietly leave.
The Seven Last Words of Christ from
the Cross will be presented on Good
Friday from noon to 2 p.m. There will be
readings, music and meditation.
The joy of Easter Sunday (March 31)
will begin at 6:30 a.m. outdoors in the
Memorial Garden (weather permitting).
The message will be "Amazed Where
the Road Leads" (Luke 24:1-12). Two
services will follow in the church sanc-
tuary At 8:30 a.m. the message will be
"A Twist in the Road" (John 20:1-10), and
at 10:30 a.m. the message will be 'Jesus
Leads ME on the Road" (John 20:11-18).
The church will be decorated with
spring flowers and the Bell and Vocal
Choirs will perform at the last two serv-
ices.
These Holy Week services are open to
the public and all are welcome.
Joy Lutheran Church is at 7045 S.W
83rd Place at State Road 200, Ocala. For
more information call 352-854-4509 ext.
221.
Countryside at TimberRidge
Countryside Presbyterian Church
provides Christian Ministry to residents
of TimberRidge Nursing and Rehabili-
tation Center, 9848 S.W 110th St., Ocala,
and holds bimonthly worship services.
If you have a loved one, or friend at
the TimberRidge Center, you are in-
vited to attend our next service on Sat-
urday, March 23, at 10:15 a.m.
For further information, please call
the church office at 352-237-4633.
Chabad-Lubavitch Jewish Center
The Chabad-Lubavitch Jewish Center
of Marion County and The Villages
plans to distribute hand-made Shmu-
rah Matzah this year to help local Jews
participate in the upcoming Passover
holiday The Matzahs will be distributed
to doctors, lawyers members of the com-
munity or upon request.
Passover, celebrated this year from


Monday Night, March 25, until after
nightfall on Tuesday, April 2, the exodus
of the Jews from Egypt some 3,000 years
ago. Directed by God to leave Egypt
hastily, the people of Israel could not
wait for their dough to rise, and thus ate
unleavened crackers called "Matzah."
To celebrate the Exodus, Jews gather
for festive "Seder" dinners on March 25
and 26, and abstain from eating, or even
owning or benefiting from, any leav-
ened substance such as bread and
pasta.
"Shmurah" literally means
"watched" Matzah. From the moment
the wheat is harvested, until the time it
is baked, the ingredients are carefully
watched to ensure that they do not
come into contact with anything that
could cause them to become leavened,
which would be prohibited on Passover
Shmurah Matzahs are round, kneaded
and shaped by hand, similar to the
Matzahs that the Jews ate when leaving
Egypt over 3,000 years ago. It is there-
fore appropriate to use Shmurah
Matzah during Passover, at least on
each of the two Seder nights.
The local effort is part of a global
campaign by the Chabad-Lubavitch
movement to increase holiday aware-
ness and participation. According to es-
timates provided by Lubavitch World
Headquarters in Brooklyn, New York,
over four million hand-baked Shmurah
Matzahs will be distributed by the
Chabad movement this year In addi-
tion, millions of Passover guides in 17
languages will educate people on the
meaning and practices of the holiday
"The Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Men-
achem M. Schneerson, of righteous
memory, taught that no solitary Jewish
person ought to be left out. Every Jew,
regardless of their background, affilia-
tion or even location, should have ac-
cess to the provisions they need to
celebrate Passover," said Rabbi Yossi
Hecht from the Chabad-Lubavitch Jew-
ish Center of Marion County "There are
Chabad emissaries across the globe are
working feverishly to provide Jews with
Matzahs, holiday guides and much
more,"
To learn more about Passover, make
reservations for the seder, or for further
information, please contact Rabbi Yossi
or Chanie at 352-291-2218 or email
info@jewishmarion.org or visit our


website at www.JewishMarion.org.
Friendship Baptist Church
Sunday services at Friendship Bap-
tist Church on March 10 begin with Sun-
day School at 9:30 a.m. Studying
through the Book of Acts, the Adult
classes are taught by Bill Wallett in the
Auditorium and the Ladies Class, in the
Fellowship Hall, taught by Linda
Brown. At the 10:45 a.m. Morning Wor-
ship Service the FBC choir will be
singing, "The Blood Will Never Lose Its
Power". Through the month of March
the Choir will be singing music prepar-
ing the heart for Resurrection Sunday
Pastor Randall Brown will be bringing
the Bible Message from the Word of God
to the hearts of the people. The Sunday
Evening Worship and Bible Study be-
gins at 6 p.m. FBC also meets on
Wednesday at 7 p.m. for Bible Study and
Prayer. All are welcome to attend.
Friendship Baptist Church is at 9510
S.W 105th St., off State Road 200. The
church phone is 352-237-2640 or you can
find us on the web: wwwfriendship-
baptistocala.org. Looking ahead: March
22 at 6 p.m. we will be hosting a presen-
tation by the Marion County Sheriff's
Office on "Fraud and Scams In Our
Area." Please mark your calendar and
join us!
Reflections Church
We at Reflections Church are looking
forward to seeing new friends and
neighbors, along with our current ones,
at our March 24 Family Fun Day
There will be the worship service at
10:17 am, where child care, kid's church
and nursery will be available.
Starting at noon and going until 2 p.m.
is when the fun and games will take
place.
An Easter Egg Hunt, along with
games and concession stands, will also
be available. Proceeds from the con-
cessions will help fund the "Reflex Stu-
dents" trip to camp this summer
Hop on over to the Citrus Springs
Middle School on Sunday, March 24 to
join in the fun. There might even be
some other surprises!
Episcopal Church of the Advent
The Episcopal Church of the Advent
on County Road 484 in Dunnellon (by
the Firehouse) is happy to report that


we have again an active Episcopal
Church Women (ECW) group at our
church. Our role is to help support the
ministries of Advent Church, both with
our time (actual hands-on volunteering)
and talent (each one of us has a special
God-given skill that we are challenged
to put to His purposes).
The projects/events we plan and un-
dertake provide us with wonderful op-
portunities for good fellowship among
us as well as the opportunity to gener-
ate income for Advent's ministries and
special fund-raising needs. For exam-
ple on Friday, April 12, we are sponsor-
ing and producing a Murder Mystery
Dinner Theater More details about this
will appear in a subsequent issue of this
publication.
All are always welcome to visit our
church, attend one of our services or an
ECW meeting to see what we're all
about.
If you would like particular informa-
tion about the Church of the Advent,
call the office at 352-465-7272 or go to
our website: adventepiscopal.net. If you
would like particular information about
our Episcopal Church Women, feel free
to call Mary Lamp, Publicity, at 352-854-
9378.
St. Jude Catholic
Creole Masses for the Haitians in our
community are celebrated every sec-
ond and fourth Sunday of the month at
5 p.m. The next date is March 24.
Classes for Spanish as a second lan-
guage continue to be offered every
Thursday starting at 3:30 p.m. for be-
ginners.
Stations of the Cross continue every
Friday during Lent at 8:30 a.m. in Eng-
lish through March 22 and at 7 p.m. in
Spanish through March 29.
As we continue through Lent, those in
need of healing in body and spirit may
avail themselves of the Healing Mass on
Saturday, March 16, at 10:30 a.m. A
lunch will follow in the Parish Hall for
all those in attendance.
A special Lenten Penance Service is
scheduled for Thursday, March 21, at 7
p.m. Those wishing to avail themselves
of the Sacrament of Reconciliation are
invited to attend. Several priests from
neighboring parishes will participate in

PLEASE SEE RELIGION, PAGE 16


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16 Friday, March 15, 2013


RELIGION
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15


the service.
Holy Week begins with Palm Sunday,
March 24. Blessed palms will be distrib-
uted at all of the weekend Masses. On
Thursday March 28 we commemorate the
Last Supper at 7 p.m. The ceremony of
washing the feet of 12 parishioners repre-
senting the apostles will also take place at
this Mass. Following the Mass there will be
Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament in
the Parish Hall until midnight. We are in-
vited to spend time in prayer with our
Lord. On Good Friday, March 29, the read-
ing of the Passion and Veneration of the
Cross will take place at 3 p.m.
The Easter Vigil Mass begins with light-
ing of the new fire ceremony on Saturday,


March 30, at 7 p.m. Masses on Easter Sun-
day will follow the regular schedule of 8
and 10 a.m. in English and 12:30 p.m. in
Spanish.
Every Friday fish dinners
The fish dinners sponsored by the St.
Jude Men's Society continue to be served
every Friday through March 22 from 4:30
to 6 p.m. Ticket cost is $7 for adults and
$3.50 for children under the age of 12 and
may be purchased at the door. Takeouts
are available as usual. All are invited to
come and enjoy a good meal and fellow-
ship. St. Jude Catholic Community is lo-
cated at 443 Marion Oaks Drive in Marion
Oaks.


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on Florida's Joshua Abbott Organ
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more than 117,000 men, women and
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_^^^-^^^^^ ^^^^^


fIT ,,S/hil, baptst
Church
"A fLce Aof We r/itu ," ,"
9524 S.W. 105th St., Ocala
237-2640
Sunday
Sunday School...........9:30 am.
Morning Worship.....10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship.............6 p.m.
Wednesday
Bible Study ....................7 p.m .
Youth Alive.....................7 p.m .


HRSSROrDS
CHURCH
Bishop Paul Woosley
8070 SW 60th Ave.
Ocala, FL 34476
352-291-2080
SERVICES HOURS
Sunday
9am, 11am, 6pm
1:30 Spanish Service
Tuesday
7pm Spanish Service
Wednesday
Night 7pm Youth 7pm
Thursday
Bible Study 6:30 to 7:30
Friday
7pm Spanish Service
Nursery available
www.crossroads.cog.net
I'fl 'f Y IK I D Ia


A Place for You...
matter where
r who you are, __
ryouat '"
Ocala West UMC
Traditional Worship 8:00 & 11:00 AM.
Casual & Contemporary 9:30 AM.
Children & Youth Ministries

A Ocala West
SW 20 United Methodist Church
sw I st. St Rev. Alan Jefferson
4 aaio O.k. 9330 SW 105th St., Ocala,FL 34481
wwwocalawestumc aom 854-9550





Christ's Church
Mlarion County
_An Independent Christian Church

SUNDAY SERVICES
Sunday School................................. 9:30 am
Worship Service............................. 10:30 am
WEEKLY ACTIVITIES
Wednesday Bible Study...................7:00 pm
SENIOR PASTOR DAVID BELLOWS
6768 SW 80th Street 352-861-6182
Ocala, FI 34476 www.ccomc.org


S Welcome to
Countryside
SPresbyterian
Church (USA)
Inspiring Traditional Worship
Sunday Worship 10:30 am
Sunday Bible Study 9:00 am
Tuesday Bible Study 2:00 pm
Pastor Gary 0. Marshall
7768 SW Hwy. 200,
Ocala
(352) 237-4633
www.countrysideocala.org


~iakwood
Baptist Church
(Independent)
6158 SW Hwy. 200
Jasmine Plaza
Ocala, FL 34476
873-4705
Pastor:
SMatt Hunt
Assoc.
SPastor Kevin Hunt
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Worship Service
10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
7:00 p.m.


College Road
Baptist Church
5010 SW College Road, Ocala, FL
(352) 237-5741
Rev. Ronnie Walker,Pastor
Rev. Jeff Rountree, Minister of Worship
Rev.Rob I... i, ". i i i. i,
Jason Kaminski, Children's Minister
Trina Loy, Preschool Director
Sunday
Worship Services
8:00,9:30 & 11:00 am
9:30 & 11:00 Sunday School
Wednesday
6:30 PM Children/Student
Ministries
6:30 PM MidWeek Bible Study
www.collegeroad.org
Holding Forth the Word of Life.. JESUS


Evangelical
Lutheran Church
joyocala@embarqmail.com
Sunday Worship
8:15 am & 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:45 am
Wednesday Evening
Worship 6:45 pm
German Language Worship
1st. Sunday of each month
3:00 pm
Nursery Provided
Edward Holloway, Pastor
7045 SW 83rd Pl., Ocala
S.EB3M (352) 854-4509


I CHRISTIAN LIFE ASSEMBLY
7 Proclaiming Good News
SERVICES


Sunday School


Sunday Morning Service 10:45 a.m.

Sunday Evening Service 6:00 p.m.

Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Everyone is welcome
Thomas Markham, Pastor
352-237-6950
. 9644 SW Hwy. 484, Ocala (Near State Road 200)


9:45 a.m.


FIRST CHRISTIAN

CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Worship: 10:30 AM
Sunday School: 9:15 AM
(352) 629-6485
www.firstchristianocala.org
Revs. Terry & Mary Beth Harper,
Pastors
1908 S.E. Ft. King St.
(Next to Marion
Technical Institute)
S Nursery Provided
See us on Facebook Ii

First Congregational
United Church of Christ


Jesus didn't reject people.
Neither do we.


Sunday Worship
Adult Bible Discussion


10:30 am
12:oo Noon


7171 SWSR 200, Ocala,FL
352-237-3035
uccocala.org
Dr. H.W. McSwain, Jr.,
Pastor
A Progressive
Community of Faith
in the Heart of
Central Florida


SWesleyan-Holiness Tradition
OCALA WEST CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
Teaching the Bible as God's Word to
produce Christ-followers!
Sunday:
Sunday School............. 9:15 A.M.
Morning Worship........10:30 A.M.
W orship.........................6:00 PM .
Children's Bible Quizzing 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday Evenings
Adult Bible Study..........6:00 P.M.
Pastor Curt Dowling
5884 SW 60th Ave. (Airport Rd.)
Ocala, Fl 34477
(352) 861-0755
www.ocalawestnaz.org


TIMBER
RIDGE),
Community I
Church
Wil Clawson
Pasfor Teacher
Expository Bible
Teaching
Traditional Services
Sunday Worship
af 10:00 AM
Wednesday Bible 9fudy
6:30 PM
Located a mile west of 9R 200
at 10260 9W 110th street 1
(turn west across from the
entrance to Oak Run)


"PREACHING THE TRUTH IN LOVE"
Maranatha Baptist Church
347-5683* www.maranathabaptistc.org
Sunday School........................................... 9:30 A.M.
Sunday Services.....................10:45A.M. & 6:00 P.M.
Sunday AWANA (Aug.-May).......................... 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday Bible Study/Prayer Meeting..........6:45 P.M.
525 Marion Oaks Trail, Ocala


75
I!


0 0


dcm






Friday, March 15, 2013 17


Little Theatre presents'Wedding Belles'on March 23


M arion Landing Little Theatre
will present their spring pro-
duction, "Wedding Belles," next
Saturday, March 23, at 7 p.m. in the
Lifestyle Center. "Little Theatre has
been performing for about 16 years with
basically the same residents participat-
ing," said Donna Taylor, who writes and
directs the shows. The shows are always
a favorite with our residents, and this
show is sure to be one, too. It is a light-
hearted comedy set in the early 1900s
and illustrates the ordeal one family
with five sisters endures when, tradi-
tionally, the eldest sister must be the
first to marry Tickets are only $3 each
and are available at Tuesday Socials, in
the Activities Office during regular
ticket sale hours, and at the door.
CommunityYard Sale
The Marion Landing Community
Yard Sale is scheduled for March 30
and will be held from 8 a.m. to noon in
the Lifestyle Center parking lot. The
public is welcome, and there will be lots
of items from which to choose. Resi-
dents: this is your opportunity to clean
up, clean out, and sell your unwanted


S- Marion Landing
Diane Bress
Im

items to the public. You can reserve
your parking spots/tables on Wednes-
day, March 20, beginning at 5:30 p.m. at
the Lifestyle Center; and they will be
sold to residents on a first come, first
served basis. At the end of the sale, if
you choose, Divine Providence will re-
move any unsold items. The Yard Sale
always attracts a large crowd, so this is
a prime opportunity to "sell your stuff."
Sunshine fundraiser
This year's Games Party turned out to
be a wonderful afternoon which started
with lunch and was followed by cards
and games for an afternoon of friendly
camaraderie. A successful event such
as this doesn't happen overnight and
without the involvement of many volun-


teers. In addition to the event chair,
Lois Norris, and co-chair, Janice Wood,
there were many dedicated volunteers
involved, many of whose names you will
recognize. They sold tickets and made
table reservations, manned the kitchen,
set-up the tables, decorated, and
cleaned up. They are, in no particular
order, as follows: Joan Ritter, Paula Ad-
well, Martha Nierenberg, Donna
Schmidt, Ethel Taragna, Noreen Met-
zger, Rose Peters, Val Spencer, Leta
Simmons, Dot Toneske, Mary Dwyer,
Francis Mazure, Marion Mazure, Toni
Niemeyer, Joan Dopler, Lorraine De-
Mauex, Lorraine Rusch, Ginny Dillon,
Pat Wurst, Nancy Rife, Merry Anne
Krell, Margaret Veayo, Rhea Rouquie,
Gloria Wilberg, Bobbie Shay, Pat Smith,
Mary Jo Eggers, Shirley Pohlers, Gor-
don Herrick, Larry Keables, Jim Dillon,
Duke Duquette, Joan DeWitt, Nancy
Scott and Norm Granier. As you can see,
it takes a lot of time and energy from a
lot of people to put on this type of event,
but every one of them is sure to say "It's
worth it!"
Fundraisers such as the Games Party
benefit our Sunshine fund, which sup-


ports the Marion Landing community
Our Sunshine Committee's mission is to
"respond to the needs of the Marion
Landing community at times of illness,
hospitalization and death. The Sun-
shine Committee will also recognize
other milestones of residents such as
60th and 65th anniversaries." To sup-
port these activities, the Committee
holds two fundraisers each year, as well
as the December cookie sale and 50/50s.
If you would like to be a part of the Mar-
ion Landing Sunshine Committee, they
meet on the first Tuesday of each
month, after the Tuesday morning so-
cial.
Tuesday speaker
Metro Crime Prevention will be in the
Lifestyle Center on March 19, directly
after the Tuesday morning Social, to
give us up-to-date information about
identity theft, scams and fraud. They
provide a terrific program that will
teach us how to be proactive against
crime and take simple precautions that
will enhance our personal safety
PLEASE SEE LANDING, PAGE 18


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18 Friday, March 15, 2013


LANDING
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17
Please plan on staying after the Tuesday Social on
March 19 to learn how to be a tough target instead of
an easy victim.
Quilters'projects
The Marion Landing Quilters are holding several
sewing craft classes, free to Marion Landing resi-
dents. The first class was held last month, and quil-
ters Eddie Mock and Fran Szutar taught participants
how to make fabric napkins. This month, the project is
to make fabric place mats. The one-day class will take
place on Thursday, March 28, from 11:30 a.m. to ap-
proximately 2:30 p.m. with a break for lunch. Partici-
pants select the fabric from which they will make
their place mats. For further information or to sign up,
please contact Eddie or Fran.
Resident poet
Marion Landing resident Ken Hall has written a
number of poems over the past 20 or more years, and
they are compiled in a recently-published book enti-
tled, "To Bring a Smile and Open Your Mind and
Heart." "Primarily, I believe it was the idea that if I
wrote a poem, I would not have to buy a fancy card,
(and) it would mean more if I took the time to write a
poem," said Ken. He started this habit in the early
1960s, and it was brought about by his desire to write
letters that rhyme. After his wife died on New Year's
Eve in 1999, Ken started writing more since he was
alone, and then started printing the poems out and
saving them. "I wish now that I would have saved
them all." This easy-to-read book consists of poems
that make you laugh, poems that will touch your heart,
and just poems about life in general. "A woman named


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PHOTO BY DIANE BRESS
Quilters Fran Szutar (front left) and Eddie Mock (front right) and class participants Sharon Talbert and Jan
Doudna (back left to right) display their projects.


Sharon Malik, really a stranger to me, read my poems
and told me that my poems needed to be shared; so
she worked (on it) for a year and got the book pub-
lished."
Born in 1926, Ken has lived most of his life in Green
Bay, Wisconsin, and has lived in Marion Landing for
more 10 ten years with his "soul mate" Marian Hotz.
He has a great love for music, plays the piano, and can
often be found at the Marion Landing Bowling Center
bowling with the Thursday Morning League. He and
Marian are members of the Joy Lutheran Church.
Anyone wishing to purchase a copy of Ken's book of
poems, please contact him (he will be happy to sign
your copy); you may search the title on Amazon.com;
or you can read the copy that Ken has donated to our
Marion Landing library
Sit and Be Fit
The free Sit and Be Fit video exercise class meets in
the Great Room at 10 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday and
Friday The programs are upbeat and lively, featuring
PLEASE SEE LANDING, PAGE 19


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PHOTO BY DIANE BRESS
Marion Landing resident Ken Hall has written a
book of poems, and is shown with Marian Hotz, who
designed the book's cover.


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dcm





Friday, March 15, 2013 19


LANDING
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18


a variety of fun movements and
music. You may join in at any time-
come one, two or all three days. It is sug-
gested that you bring a towel with you
to the class, light weights and a resist-
ance band if you have one, as they may
be used for various exercises. The class
is free and open to Marion Landing res-
idents and their guests only; no regis-
tration is required.


Gentle Yoga
Join our Gentle


meets each Tuesday at 11 a.m. in the
Great Room. You can improve your
physical, spiritual and mental well-
being by practicing the ancient art of
Yoga. Our instructor Mary Pat modifies
the class to accommodate the fitness
level of the participants, with some
poses done standing, seated or on a mat.
Emphasis is placed on proper breath-
ing and form. The cost is $5 per class,
payable to the instructor. Please bring a
yoga mat to class.


Yoga class which


Travel news
If you are interested in any of the
trips listed below, details are available
on the flyers posted on the Travel Board
in the Lifestyle Center, or you may call
237-7152 for more information. Trips
are open to the public if space allows.
Travel to the Sonntag Theatre at the
Ice House in Mount Dora on May 18 to
enjoy the comedy The Perfect Wedding.
Find out what happens when a man
wakes up in the bridal suite on his wed-
ding day with an attractive, naked-and


unfamiliar-girl in bed beside him. In a
few moments, here comes the bride,
and pandemonium ensues. This play is
sure to leave you laughing. The cost is
$75 and includes lunch at a local restau-
rant.
Reserve your seat now for a matinee
show at the Sleuths Mystery Dinner
Theatre on Thursday, July 25. Kim &
Scott Tie the Knot is an Italian wedding
murder mystery with audience partici-
pation. You become the detective as you
PLEASE SEE LANDING, PAGE 22


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Fri. &Sat. 11 am -9:30 pm
Closed on Sunday
MONDAY II TUESDAY

LUNCH HEESE PI
LUNCH 69
Excluding Tues., Sat., and Specials. *t
I With purchase of beverage. Exp. 3/22/13 1 I With purchase of beverage. Exp. 3/22/13
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TWO DINNERS FOR 20,00
Choice of: Veal Farm, Lasagna, Chicken Parm,ggplant Parm,
I 0 Shrimp Scampi. With Soup or Salad & 1 Dessert
SZeppolis or Cheesecake) w/Purchase of Beverage. Exp. 3/22/13
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Garlic Bread Sticks (4).......... .. .... ...... .. ......................... ... ........ ........... $1.99
Green Beans or Vegetable of the Day..................................................................$1.99
Loaded Red Skin Potatoes $2.99*
Parsley Garlic Red Potatoes.................................................................................. $1.99
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Soup of the Day.......................Small $2.99 L re $4.99
Caesar Salad or Garden Salad


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Topped with the following:
Shrimp $4 Chicken $3 Salmon 1 cc, I $5
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Maine Lobster Salad $7 '"
Soup and Salad (Cup Soup and Small S 1d $4.99 .
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Served with Salad, Green Beans or Vegetable of the Day, Parsley Red Potatoes
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Maine Lobster 1 1/4 Ib..........................*Single $19.99 *Double $34.99
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20 Friday, March 15, 2013


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Care where you need it,

when you need it. By design. I


Some residents need an extra boost. Some, a helping hand.
Others, an encouraging voice. So we made it all easier to
receive. We partnered with North Florida Regional Medical
Center to open a Senior Healthcare Center right on our
campus. It offers our residents convenient, comprehensive
primary care. Our partnerships with The Movement and
Balance Center and Comfort Keepers enhance our
residents' wellness.
Better living, by design. That's our approach.
How do we apply this kind of thinking all across our campus?
We'll show you. Call 1-877-752-8241 for your personal tour -
or visit www.TheVillageOnline.com.


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Better living, by design.


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Friday, March 15, 2013 21


Rho i-"-


42:








L


Celebrating the



FAMILY FEATURES


to enjoy a healthy meal any time of day. From
satisfying meat-and-cheese combos, to sandwiches
piled high with savory vegetables, to the many "PB and"
combinations, the possibilities for outstanding sandwich-
es are limitless. But all the deliciousness starts with one
key, wholesome ingredient- bread.
The complex carbohydrates in bread provide lasting
energy that busy adults and youngsters need on a daily
basis. A big key to maximizing your energy and health Bryan Voltaggio, chef
is taking a look at how you fill your plate in a balanced Photo courtesy of
way. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the UnderA Bushel Photography
USDA MyPlate program recommend eating six one-ounce servings of grain
foods each day, half of which should come from whole grain sources.
To help you and your family get your "daily fix of six," The Grain Foods
Foundation has partnered with celebrity chef and sandwich aficionado Bryan
Voltaggio to create these sensational sandwiches. To find more great sandwich
recipes, visit www.gowiththegrain.org or GoWithTheGrain on Facebook and
Twitter.

ir1......


The Pastrami Reuben

Makes 6 sandwiches
12 slices rye bread
24 ounces sliced beef pastrami
12 slices Muenster cheese, thin
1 1/2 cups sauerkraut, prepared
and drained
1/2 cup Thousand Island dressing
2 ounces butter, at room
temperature
Lay out two slices of rye bread on a cutting
board.
Top first piece of bread with one slice of
Muenster cheese, then about 2 ounces of
sauerkraut, 4 ounces (or roughly three to four
thin slices) of pastrami, and a second slice of
Muenster cheese. Set aside.
Spread second piece of bread with Thous-
and Island dressing, then place on top of the
other half of the sandwich.
Brush top and bottom of sandwich with
butter.
If you own an electric sandwich maker or
Panini press, place sandwich inside for 2 1/2
to 3 1/2 minutes. If you don't have a sand-
wich press, simply place sandwich in a saute
pan on top of your stove, set at medium heat.
Cook for 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 minutes on each side.
Remove sandwich and while still hot; cut
in half and serve.


The Pilgrim

Makes 6 sandwiches
12 slices seven-grain bread
24 ounces turkey, sliced
Orange Cranberry Compote, as
needed (see recipe)
Sage Cream Cheese, as
needed (see recipe)
4 tablespoons butter, at room
temperature
Seasoning salt, to taste (see recipe)
Lay out two slices of seven grain bread on a
cutting board.
Spread Orange Cranberry Compote evenly
across one slice of bread. Set aside.
Spread Sage Cream Cheese evenly across
second slice of bread, then top with about
four ounces of turkey.
Place slice of bread with the Orange Cran-
berry Compote on top of turkey.
Brush top and bottom of sandwich with
room temperature butter.
If you own an electric sandwich maker or
Panini press, place the sandwich inside for
2 1/2 to 3 1/2 minutes. If you do not have a
sandwich press, simply place the sandwich in
a saute pan on top of your stove, set at
medium heat, and cook the sandwich for
3 1/2 to 4 1/2 minutes on each side.
Remove sandwich and while still hot,
season liberally with seasoning salt.
. ." i ..., .I 11, ....1 .I . hd h. ,l


Orange Cranberry Compote
Yield 1 cup
1/2 pound cranberries
1 orange, quartered
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
Pepper, to taste
In medium sauce pot, cook cranberries, or-
ange and sugar for approximately 20 min-
utes at a low simmer, then stir in a pinch
of salt.
Remove pieces of orange, and pour into
blender or food processor. Puree until
smooth, then lightly season with pepper.

Sage Cream Cheese
Yield 2 cups
2 cups cream cheese, at room
temperature
15 sage leaves, finely chopped
1 garlic clove
1/2 teaspoon salt
In bowl, combine cream cheese and sage
using a rubber spatula, mixing well. Grate
(or very finely chop) garlic, adding to
bowl. Season to taste with salt.

Seasoning Salt
Yield 1 cup


The Banana, PB and Honey


Makes 6 sandwiches
12 slices enriched white bread
6 bananas, sliced
1 cup spiced peanut butter
(see recipe)
2 tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 ounces butter, at room
temperature
Lay out two slices of enriched white
bread on a cutting board.
Spread both slices of bread with
peanut butter. Set one aside.
Take one slice and top with sliced
bananas, then drizzle with honey.
Place the reserved slice of bread on
top.
Brush top and bottom of sandwich
with room temperature butter.
If you own an electric sandwich
maker or Panini press, place sand-
wich inside for 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 min-
utes. If you do not have a sandwich


press, place sandwich in a saute pan
on top of your stove, set at medium
heat; and cook for 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 min-
utes on each side.
While cooking, combine cinnamon
and the sugar in small bowl.
Remove sandwich and while still
hot, season liberally with cinnamon
and sugar.
Cut in half and serve while hot.

Spiced Peanut Butter
Yield 1 cup
1 cup peanut butter
1 teaspoon salt
1 3/4 teaspoons honey
1/8 teaspoon ginger powder
1/8 teaspoon cinnamon,
ground
Mix all ingredients together in a bowl
until well blended.
Place the peanut butter in an air-
tight container and store in the refrig-
erator for 6 to 8 weeks.


4ccTTmTzm^m






22 Friday, March 15, 2013


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LANDING
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19
as you try to solve the crime putting together clues
that are sure to puzzle and amuse you. The cost is $75
and includes round-trip motor coach; reserved seats;
complete luncheon with choice of Cornish hen,
lasagna, or prime rib and dessert, unlimited beer,
wine and soda and all taxes and gratuities. The bus
departs at about 10 a.m. and return at about 5 p.m.
Visit the Smoky Mountains and Pigeon Forge from
Oct. 6-12. Enjoy the fall foliage, great shows and meals
on this seven day, six night excursion which includes
ten meals, six breakfasts and four dinners. Tour the
Smoky Mountain National Park, visit downtown
Gatlinburg, see many of the shows in Pigeon Forge
such as Smoky Mountain Spry, Cirque de Chine, Smith
Family, Hatfield McCoy Dinner Show, and more.
Look forward to Pat's next trip to Hard Rock on Oct.
22 and 23. Pat always puts together a fun package, this
time it has a western theme, so keep your eye on this
column and on the Travel Board for information.
Mark your calendar for Jan. 19 to 26, 2014, for a
western Caribbean cruise on Freedom of the Seas.
You will visit ports in Labadee (Haiti), Jamaica, Grand
Cayman and Cozumel. More info on the Travel Board.
Our Travel Club has made plans for a terrific Euro-
pean riverboat cruise on the Elbe River. Enjoy time
in Berlin, Dresden, Wittenberg and Prague and in-
cludes 7 nights aboard the M/S River Allegro, which
was built specifically for cruising the Elbe, and was
recently refurbished with the travelers' needs and
comfort in mind. More details on this spectacular trip
are listed in the brochure posted on the Travel Board.
Diane Bress is Marion Landing's Activities Direc-
tor and an employee ofLeland Management, Inc.


II

Shown in this Rotary Club photo are President Beverly Wise, Anthony Williams,
Gary Lane, President-Elect Bonnie Clark.Williams and Lane were recently in-
ducted as new members in the club.

Southwest Rotary adds two members


The Rotary Club of
Ocala Southwest in-
ducted two new members
at its meeting on March 5:
Anthony Williams, spon-
sored by John Klopfer,
and Gary Lane, spon-
sored by W E. (Bucky)
Bishop Jr. Anthony, a


home remodeler and
Gary, a financial adviser
are examples of the di-
versity of occupations
that the Rotary Club at-
tracts.
The Rotary Club also
has a diverse age range
with Rotarians from their
20s to retirees in their
80s. They all have in com-
mon the desire to serve
their community and to
improve people's lives
around the world.
The Rotary Club re-
cently participated in the
cattle drive fundraiser for
the Discovery Center in
Tuscawilla Park and its
semiannual sale of fully
cooked and smoked baby


back ribs will take place
on Saturday, May 4 at the
Bank of the Ozarks on
State Route 200 in front of
On Top of the World.
The Rotary Club of
Ocala Southwest meets
on Tuesday at 7:45 a.m.
in Suite 240 of the Doc-
tors Office Building of
West Marion Community
Hospital, 4600 S.W State
Road 200. Members of the
community are invited to
attend a meeting to dis-
cover what Rotary is all
about. You may also visit
the club's tent at the
Relay for Life from April
19 at 6 p.m. to April 20 at
noon at the same hospi-
tal's parking lot.


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24 Friday, March 15, 2013


Comedy Night a hit at Cherrywood Clubhouse


Monday, March 4, Jim Moody, the
Crowd Teaser, took over the
Cherrywood Clubhouse for two
great shows of "Up the sleeve magic
and off the cuff comedy" His routine
was both amazing and hilariously funny
Jim has a way with people and inter-
acts with the audience throughout his
performance. The tricks he does are
dazzling and the jokes are fresh; new
and laugh out loud funny If you ever get
a chance to see him in person do it; you
won't be disappointed.
A special thanks to the Social Com-
mittee headed by Jay O'Hern; to Chris
Zacco and Cherrywood Property Man-
agement and Geri for putting on and
sponsoring this great show. It was well
worth the price of admission.
In addition to the snacks and the
world class entertainment, raffle prizes
and 50/50 drawings rewarded some of
our lucky residents. At the first show,
Gail Brafford won a gift certificate and
Marion O'Hern and Pia Dean won the
50/50 drawing. At the second show, the
winners were; Connie Neubaur, gift
certificate; Bill Mahar and Judy
Pniewski the 50/50 drawings.
Because of the cold weather, some
people stayed home and missed a ter-
rific performance. For those who at-
tended, it was truly a laughter filled
treat. See more about Jim Moody in the
Spotlight on Excellence article in this
column.

Veterans meeting a sub-sess
Bill Wood of the Submarine Veterans
of America was the guest speaker at this
months Cherrywood Veterans Club
meeting. The highlight of the meeting
was seeing a 24 foot replica of the Nau-
tilus submarine. Often featured at pa-
rades; at the Ocala Veterans Park and
other demonstrations, this working
model is definitely a conversation
piece.


Cherrywood
I H John Everlove



In addition to Bill, Ken Nichols and
Joe Hilchey were also on hand to an-
swer the many questions posed by our
members and guests. The Nautilus had
its keel laid in 1952 and was launched
in 1954. After 35 years of service, it was
formally retired with some major ac-
complishments to its credit.
Nautilus could travel at 23 knots mak-
ing it a fast submarine. It was the first
submarine to traverse under the North
Pole which was a strategic move for the
United States during the Cold War.
Under the pole, away from any threat of
detection or destruction by the Soviet
Union, the Nautilus could launch its
missiles in retaliation to any threat by
that country Limited only by the
amount of food that it could carry for its
crew, Nautilus was an awesome
weapon when it joined the fleet and the
forerunner for future submarines. It
proudly served and was proudly served
in by the men of its crew.
Business wise, the veterans club nom-
inated officers for the coming year. Bill
Mahar was nominated for president;
Joe Gignac for cice president; Rich
Hurley for treasurer; Marty Duesel, ser-
geant at arms/trustee; and John
Everlove, secretary Nominations will
be accepted at the next meeting imme-
diately followed by the elections.
Next month's meeting will be on
Thursday, April 4 at 2 p.m. Our guest
speaker will be from SECO giving tips
on saving money; saving your appli-
ances and other safety concerns.


Comedy Night with Midge Lee and John Fazio assisting comedian Jim Moody.


Cherrywood Veterans Club meetings
are open to all residents with an inter-
est in the work of our club to help vet-
erans and their families. Refreshments
served on the patio immediately fol-
lowing the business meeting.

Biloxi here we come
Ora's Travel is planning a stellar trip
to Biloxi for April 7-10 to the IP Casino
Resort and Spa. The package includes
four days and three nights at the luxu-
rious IP; Deluxe motor coach w/profes-
sional escort; $24 in food credits; $25 in
rewards play; $15 each at the IP and
Hard Rock for slot play and all for just
$159 per person.
Call Natalie at 352-854-4561 to re-
serve your place of fun and gaming.

St. Patty's Day Dance
Saturday, March 16, is this year's


Saint Patrick's Day celebration here at
Cherrywood. Join your friends and
neighbors for a gala night of dancing
and celebrating the traditions of Ire-
land at this 6 to 10 p.m. affair.
For just three bucks you can enjoy the
Irish and other music of Rich Becotte;
light snacks and of course, lemonade
and iced tea. Now if you don't consider
lemonade and iced tea traditional Irish
drinks, you are more than welcome to
bring your own libations that might be a
bit more appropriate.
Don your best green outfits; pick a
few shamrocks; chase a few rainbows
and watch out for the little people on
this night when we enjoy the good
things that Ireland has given to our tra-
ditions and society
See Geri for tickets today!

PLEASE SEE CHERRYWOOD, PAGE 25


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Friday, March 15, 2013 25


CHERRYWOOD
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24


Bocce Ball schedule change
Bocce Ball will be played at 8 p.m. on
Saturday due to the implementation of
Daylight Saving Time.
You'll see the same great people at
the Bocce courts; you'll enjoy the fun of
playing and the socializing that follows
just the same as you did before only an
hour later. Come out to play or watch;
you'll have fun.
If the weather doesn't cooperate,
come out anyway and sit around the
fireplace with your friends enjoying a
cold drink, warm conversation and
some laughs.

Cribbage Club
Tuesday at 12:30 in the library, a
gleeful group gathers to play and learn
how to play the game of Cribbage. You
will have a ball with this group, I know
from personal experience. If you want
to learn how to play or improve your
skills at this truly fun game with some
truly fun people, don't miss Cribbage
Club.

Blood for life
You've heard all the cliche's and you
know all the reasons we need your


blood so let us invite you to donate on
March 27 from 9 a.m. until noon at the
clubhouse. There is no substitute for
this life giving fluid and no other way of
obtaining it than from generous; un-
selfish and loving people like you.
Donating doesn't take long and the
professionals make the process easy
and convenient. Please call and make
an appointment or just stop by Either
way you will be a hero because you will
have saved a life.

CERT meeting
Our County Emergency Response
Team will meet on Wednesday, March
20, at 8:30 a.m. in the Clubhouse. These
dedicated county certified volunteers
are our first responders in the event of
a disaster.
Fully equipped with everything from
radios to generators these highly
trained individuals can mean the dif-
ference between life and death in the
event of a natural disaster like hurri-
canes; floods or other life threatening
event.
If you have special needs such as oxy-
gen; refrigerated medications; walkers
or wheel chairs etc. you should attend
this meeting to make sure our CERT


team is aware of your personal require-
ments. You will be among the first to re-
ceive attention should a situation arise.
Everyone is welcome to attend the
meetings of CERT and encouraged to
volunteer to become a member of this
team. We hope that they are never
needed but if they are, our CERT team
is ready, willing and more than able to
serve our community

Movie night returns
Tuesday, April 2 at 7 p.m. come and
enjoy the excitement of the James Bond
movie, Skyfall. David Craig stars as
agent James Bond and Naomie Harris
plays Eve Moneypenny in this thrilling
adventure that first premiered at the
Royal Albert Hall in London.
The movie is free with free popcorn
and lemonade and iced tea as an added
treat. You are welcome to bring your
own drinks and snacks of course. Sit
and enjoy a great night of cinematic en-
tertainment with your friends and
neighbors.
The price is right; the film first rate
and the atmosphere warm and friendly
You can't beat movie night at Cherry-
wood.


AARP driving classes
Once again the AARP is sponsoring
its safe driving for seniors classes here
at Cherrywood. This two day class is
open to the public so you need not be a
resident to register. You'll receive some
great information and you can lower
your insurance premiums too with a
Certificate of Completion.
The cost of the class is just $12 for
AARP members and only $14 for non-
members. Check with your insurance
agent and see if you don't save more
than the price of admission on your car
insurance rates.
Classes will be in session on April 8
and 10 from 9 a.m. until noon and stu-
dents must attend both classes to re-
ceive their certificate. Contact Geri at
352-237-1675 to sign up for this limited
seating opportunity

Wine tasting party
This free party is open to residents
that would like to learn more about se-
lecting wines for those special occa-
sions or special people in their lives.
PRP Wine International is the sponsor

PLEASE SEE CHERRYWOOD, PAGE 26


Munroe Orthopedics

is proud to welcome

Dr. Stephanie Silberberg.


Munroe Orthopedics is proud to welcome our newest orthopedic
surgeon, Dr. Stephanie Silberberg. A Fellowship-Trained orthopedic
surgeon with over 14 years of experience, Dr. Silberberg performs a variety of
general orthopedic surgeries including arthroscopic knee surgeries, arthroscopic
shoulder surgeries and hand surgeries. She has a special interest in athletics and
in treating the female athlete from the weekend warrior to elite athlete.
Dr. Silberberg treats sports injuries and fractures, performs athletic clearance
physical exams and participates in conditioning programs for athletes of all ages.

Now accepting patients at the following locations:


APPLEWOOD
Applewood Professional Park
2801 S.E. 1st Avenue
Building 300, Suite 302
Ocala, FL 34471
(352) 237-9298
TIMBERRIDGE
Munroe Regional Medical Center
Medical Park at TimberRidge
9401 S.W. State Road 200
Building 90
Ocala, FL 34480
(352) 237-9298


Life happens every day. Keep it moving.


Munroe Orthopedics
MUNROE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
Find a physician close to home. Call Munroe Regional's
Health Resource Line at 352-867-8181.

I Yaoum www.MunroeRegional.com


STEPHANIE SILBERBERG, MD
ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON
MUNROE ORTHOPEDICS


You love your active life. It's what makes you uniquely you. So don't let an
orthopedic problem slow you down. Munroe Orthopedics can help you get back
to the active life that you enjoy. With 12 of the most respected, board-certified
orthopedic surgeons, a dedicated orthopedics operating suite, patient floor and
care team, Munroe Regional is among the most capable and experienced that
you'll find anywhere. That's experience you can trust.

From pre-surgery education sessions on total hip and knee replacement
surgery, to the surgical care setting itself and post surgery follow-up with a
comprehensive rehabilitation program, Munroe Orthopedics will make sure
you get the attention you need. Around the clock. Every day of the year.
That's a commitment to quality that you can count on.

There is a real quality difference in the care at Munroe Regional. And it matters.
Diagnosis to treatment, rehab to wellness, we can help you get back to the life
you enjoy.

Learn more at www.MunroeRegional.com/orthopedics.


Life happens every day. Keep it moving.


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OCALA, FL


CHERRYzWOO


DE773






26 Friday, March 15, 2013


CHERRYWOOD
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

of this event consisting of two sessions. Session one
will feature sweet wines with a couple of dry wines
included while the second session will be mostly dry
wines with a few sweet wines included.
The first demonstration is at 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 will
be the second tasting event. Only 50 seats are avail-
able at each of these programs so register right away
with Geri. Your ticket will not only insure you a place
at the wine tasting table but will also make you eligi-
ble for a door prize.
Knowing my friends here at Cherrywood, I would
suggest you sign up right away if you plan to attend
this May 14 event. Call Geri at 352-237-1675 to make
reservations.

Trivia
Fred O'Hern returns as the quizmaster extraordi-
naire for this month's Trivia game. Supposedly the
questions will be related to Saint Patrick's Day but
Fred has a way of bringing in some other obscure sub-
jects like current events and sports. We are always
challenged and surprised by his imagination.
Trivia starts promptly at 7 p.m. in the clubhouse
where questions are shown on the big screen. Each
team has an answer sheet and at the end of the night,
the answers are tallied up to see what teams are the
winners.
Teams are made up of three to four people each. If
you don't have a full team, come out anyway and you'll
be put with one. This is a great way to meet people;
challenge your brain and have a super time too. The
competition is always friendly
It only costs a buck to play this game with your
neighbors and friends and all the proceeds go to the
Wounded Warrior Foundation. Bring along your own
refreshments and libations for a fun time.

Spotlight on excellence
Each week we feature an individual or couple who
have an interesting past; a promising future or who
have made a contribution to the quality of life here at
Cherrywood. This week I'm doing a slight deviation
from that theme but this article is definitely about a
person has all three of the prerequisites.
Last week we had the Cherrywood Comedy Night
and our guest was Jim Moody While not a resident of
our community, he certainly improved the quality of
life here at Cherrywood with his great performance
of comedy and magic. He is a consummate performing
artist with talent and timing that is impeccable.
Jim first became interested in magic at the age of 7.
His grandmother took him to the American Theatre
in St Louis, Missouri, for a performance of Blackstone
the Magician. He sat in awe of the tricks the man was
able to do and became hooked on magic at that very
early age.
Thirty years later, in a moment that will linger in
Jim's memory for as long as he lives; he too stepped
out onto the stage of the American Theatre and did
his act. His performance was warmly received and the
applause stirred emotions and memories in him that
are indescribable.
The American Theatre holds many memories of
days gone by Each entertainer who performs at the
venue signs his or her name on the back wall of the
dressing rooms. When Jim performed he had to have
a stage hand bring him a ladder because the only
space available for his name was high up in the corner


Spotlight on Excellence: Comedian Jim Moody with assistant Holly Bragdon.


of the wall.
As he gazed on that memorial to great stars he read
names like Frank Sinatra; Ike and Tina Turner; Ray
Charles; Crystal Gale and many others. All of the big
names from the forties; fifties and sixties came to the
American in Saint Louis.
In the seventies the theatre like most venues of its
time began to decline. For several years it was a bur-
lesque house and then sat empty for a while. In the
nineties, it was bought and turned into a super club
where performances take place to this day
To say that Jim has had a wide ranging career would
be an understatement of the first order. One day he
taped a show with Regis Philbin. It was to air on a Sat-
urday night in St. Louis and fate stepped in.
St. Louis is not noted for its wonderful weather and
on this particular Saturday night, a heavy ice and
snow storm hit the area. Roads were impassable and
walking just as treacherous so everyone in town; for
the most part, stayed home. Three million viewers
saw the program that night.
From that airing, Jim received acting parts playing
promotional roles like Ronald McDonald; Jack in the
Box for the famous restaurant chain and numerous
other offers to take his act on the road.
Recalling some of his more memorable gigs, Jim re-
lates an appearance at the Latin American Festival in
Miami, Florida.
He had been assured that everyone who attended
spoke English and he would be well received. You can
guess what happened next.
During his first performance, he didn't get a laugh
for any of his jokes. The sound man looked up from
the orchestra pit and told him, 'Jim you're dying up
there!" Dejected, he returned to his dressing room to-
tally bewildered until he was told that nobody in the
audience spoke English.
His next show, he did without speaking a word. "I
totally did magic tricks through the entire perform-
ance," he told me. "At the end, I received a standing
ovation and felt really good."
One of the many people that Jim has opened for was
Ricky Nelson.
He talks about the last time he saw Ricky It was the
week before the plane crash that took his life. They
were doing dinner theatre together and a week later,
Ricky was gone.
He spoke fondly of working with Charo also. He
agrees that she is as crazy in person as she is on stage
but also adds that "..she is one top ten flamenco gui-
tarists in the world."
For many years Jim played the St. Louis Playboy
Club. He was booked into the VIP lounge named
Magic One by the owner of the club who loved magic
and magicians. The capacity of the room was only





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about 80 seats and it was used to handle the overflow
while people were waiting for the next big acts on
stage. Jim loved to perform there however because he
enjoys working with the audience.
Laughingly he describes one evening when the club
and his room were getting ready to close early It was
a slow night and there was no use using up utilities
for no reason. Suddenly a couple of buses pulled up
and out came sixty or seventy Japanese businessmen.
Jim was able to put on his act across because each
table had an interpreter to translate the jokes to the
other guests. He said there was a lot of laughter but
the delay really threw his timing off.
Cruise ships; comedy clubs and river boat casinos
are just some of the venues where Jim has enter-
tained. He has worked with hundreds of stars and de-
veloped many characters to keep his act lively and
new. Flim-Flam Jim is one such unique character that
he used on the river boats.
Besides a storied professional career, Jim has led a
rewarding personal life as well. During the Cuban
missile crises, he served in the U.S. Navy and was sta-
tioned at Jacksonville's Mayport Naval Station. He
was on a destroyer that did picket duty as part of the
radar early warning system. It was while in port that
he met his wife, Linda.
It was Linda's mother who introduced them and
they soon fell in love and were married. Jim and
Linda just celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary
in August of last year.
The Moody's now live in central Florida enjoying
the warm weather and the opportunities for perform-
ing that this area offers. Jim is a humble, down to
earth person who loves people and performing. It was
another reporter, Dick Richmond, who gave Jim the
nick name, "The Crowd Teaser". It's a name that Jim
has certainly lived up to.
Jim has had an interesting past to say the least and
a more than promising future to be sure. Has he con-
tributed to the quality of life here at Cherrywood? For
those who caught his act last Monday, there can be no
doubt. If you want first class comedic and magical en-
tertainment for any occasion, you can contact Jim at
www.crowdteasercom or call 352-315-1100.

From your reporter
For the next few weeks, I will be taking a vacation
from my writing duties. My family is coming to town
and for some reason they expect me to spend some
time with them. Geri has been kind enough to volun-
teer to take over the writing obligations for me and I
am deeply appreciative of that. Come April, Lord will-
ing, I will be back at the computer and attending func-
tions to keep you up to date on the happenings at
Cherrywood.
If you have ideas or suggestions for items you would
like to see in this section of the Citizen please contact
me at urperssec@yahoo.com.
In closing, I take this opportunity to wish you all the
very richest of blessings at this Easter and Passover
season.



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Friday, March 15, 2013 27


'The Odd Couple Female Version'takes to the stage


Months of hard work will pay off
next week when the Performing
Arts Company of Oak Run pres-
ents "The Odd Couple Female Ver-
sion" for our entertainment.
Frank Porterfield says, "As one of the
cast members in The Performing Arts
Company's spring show, "The Odd Cou-
ple," and as the publicity director and
producer of the show, I have to say that
in some 15 years of being involved with
both of our former theatre groups and
now the new one, I've never had so
much fun. It's a grind, learning all the
lines in the script, the speech inflec-
tions, etc, but this time around it just
beats everything I think we've done in
the past. This show is so down to earth
and funny that being involved just
seems to take the work out of it. After a
while, it gets to be old hat insofar as the
humor is concerned but this humor is
so different than the norm that we just
can't stop laughing at ourselves and
particularly when we goof and miss a
line. If you don't take in this show you
are going to miss out on something re-
ally worthwhile. Hope to see your
beaming faces in the audience. If you've
missed the public ticket sales in the Or-
chid Club you can still secure seating at
the door on show dates."
Performances will be at 7 p.m. on Fri-
day, March 22, and Saturday, March 23,
and 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 24, at Palm
Grove.
Ambassadors Passport Show -
Tribute to Patsy Cline
The fourth passport show of the sea-
son,"'Tribute to Patsy Cline," will take
place on April 6 at at 7 p.m. at Palm
Grove. Barbara VanEycken is Patsy As
Barbara says, "Who would have thought
my New York roots would result in
singing country? But from the time I
first heard Patsy, I felt something I can't
explain." An extraordinary one-woman


Oak Run
Carol Wheeler



tribute show to country music legend
Patsy Cline, her interaction with the au-
dience is awesome. She has everyone
on their feet and has brought down the
house many times with her excellent
performance. A true professional, she
sings her heart out. You will begin to be-
lieve Patsy is really on stage.
Ticket sales will be Monday, March
25, 8 to 10 a.m. in the card room of the
Orchid Club. For all other ticket re-
quests, please call Carol Forgette, 352-
873-3074.The cost per person is $15.
Make your check payable to ORHA;
please no cash.
Garden Club Plant Sale
Tomorrow, Saturday, March 16, is our
annual plant sale and fund raiser with
proceeds going to College of Central
Florida Endowed Scholarship Fund for
Horticulture. Please join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. at the Orchid Club for a fun
and learning experience. We will have a
Master Gardner available to answer
your questions, a great selection of ven-
dors selling plants, fresh produce, jew-
elry, honey, pet biscuits, birdhouses,
and also a conservation expert. Our
club will be providing baked goods and
hot dogs. There will be a rummage sale
table. At 10 a.m. the Sheriff's bagpipers
will perform for us. March is the perfect
time to add a new plant to the yard.
Something new to spruce up and add
color makes us feel good. Please come
join us and for a fun learning event.


This was part of the crowd at the recent Oak Run book sale.


OMI-The Fun Club
We are getting ready for our second
event of the year to be held on Thurs-
day, April 4 at the Orchid Club. Our sec-
ond annual "Name That Tune" night
will be hosted by "Barry and Nancy", as
was done last year. Dancing will con-
tinue after the game, until the end.
Prizes will be awarded to the finalists,
1st, 2nd, and 3rd places. Come join us in
the fun as we did last year. Music will be
from 6 to 9 p.m. Menu will be pizza,
salad, garlic bread, and dessert. BYOB.
Tickets will be on sale at the Orchid
Club Lobby March 21 from 9 to 10:30
a.m. All tickets will be $13. For more
info, call Ron Kowalewski at 352-694-
3814. Keep abreast of changes and up-
dates in the Citizen and on the ORHA
Website, at www.orha-ocala.com, then
go to CH-12 Messages under the Quick
Click Menu on the left side of the home
page.
Note well: For this event for OMI, we


are inviting all Oak Run residents.
Please contact Ron or any executive
board members for tickets prior to the
event. We will try to accommodate all
requests. Think about becoming mem-
bers in the future. Thanks.
Lucky Charms Dance
Don't forget the Ambassadors' dance
with 'The Kreichers' tomorrow, Satur-
day, March 16, at 6:30 p.m. at Palm
Grove. Call Carol Forgette at 352-873-
3074 for ticket information.
Do You Remember?
Tune in channel 12 for Len Teitler's
presentation of the New York Club's
September 2012 "A Night at NASCAR,"
narrated by Anna Boodee. It will air fol-
lowing "FYI" daily at 9 a.m. and 7 p.m
from March 15 to 22.

PLEASE SEE OAK RUN, PAGE 28


Hawthorne Estates March Events

At Hawthorne Estates we offer a variety of activities for our tenants, as well as the community.
Please join us for any of the following activities, and bring a friend. We look forward to meeting you.
R.S.V.P. @ (352) 237-7776 Ext: 255

Strawberry Shortcake Social Mix, Mingle, and Music Easter 'EGGS' travaganza
Fri., March 15, 2013 @ 2:00-4:00pm Thurs., March 21, 2013 @ 3:00-5:00pm Fri., March 29,2013 @ 10:00am-3:00pm


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HAWTHORNE ESTATES
-*-- RETIREMENT APARTMENTS -----
3211 SW 42nd St. Ocala, FL 34471 (352) 237-7776 Ext. 255


Like Strawberries, Hawthorne Estates
is "fresh for the picking."

Come and join us for some delicious
homemade strawberry shortcake
Courtesy of: Cake Creations by: Valen


It's always fun to come together.

Join us for refreshments
and live entertainment from
The Smith Brother's Band.


Bring your some-bunny special and
join us for our annual Easter egg hunt.
(10:00am-12noon)

There will also be a plant sale and bake sale.

FUN for the entire family.


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*0*






28 Friday, March 15, 2013


OAK RUN R N' A
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27 L. -.--. I


Upstate NewYork Club
Upstate New York
Club's last ticket sale date
for the March meeting is
at the Orchid Club on Sat-
urday, March 16, from 10
a.m. to noon. Cost for
members is $12, guests,
$14. This will be a com-
plete catered dinner with
entertainment by "The
Golden Troopers." You
won't want to miss this
fun March party on
March 25 at 6 p.m. at Palm
Grove. Coffee and tea will
be provided but you may
bring the beverage of
your choice. Any new res-
idents from upstate New
York, please join us to
meet other upstate New
Yorkers. For ticket infor-
mation call Steve at 352-
861-1223. For other
information call Carl at
215-778-0864

Troubadours
It's coming! The Trou-
badours' spring concert
will be Friday, April 12,
and Saturday, April 13 at
Palm Grove at 7 p.m.
Ticket sales have started.
We have had good sales
and many reserved seats
have already been pur-
chased. We are very ex-
cited and look forward to
having our best concert
ever. We say that every
year and it only gets bet-
ter. That's because our
Oak Run community is so
supportive of the special
activities that take place
here and we appreciate
every one of you. We have
been working diligently
on the beautiful music we
get to sing. And, we have
a few surprises in store
that you won't want to
miss. You will hear beau-
tiful music that will bring
back wonderful memo-
ries of times past and
present.
Just a reminder regard-
ing our ticket sales and


dates: Orchid Club 8 to
10:30 a.m. Monday,
March 18 and 25, Wednes-
day, March 20 and 27, Sat-
urday, March 23 (and also
5:30 to 7 p.m.; Palm Grove
1-3 p.m. every Thursday
April sales dates will be
published in this column
later in the month and
also on channel 12. Tick-
ets are $7 for reserved
and $5 for general admis-
sion. For more informa-
tion call Gus at
352-873-3630 or Barb at
352-897-1237. Hope to see
you there!

Renaissance Women
We will be meeting for
lunch at Chili's on March
25. Call Norma at 352-854-
1910 for more informa-
tion and a reservation.

Oak Run Travel
Please remember that
our trips are exclusively
for Oak Run residents
and their overnight
guests. This is a policy of
the homeowners associa-
tion (ORHA). Travel, a
standing committee of
ORHA, is run by resident
volunteers.
From our pink
brochure: We have six
seats remaining for our
Mid-Week Getaway on
May 1-2 (trip 26). The last
trip like this was a huge
success with casinos and
shows in one great
overnight trip.
We have a few tickets
still available for trip 23,
"Over the River and
Through the Woods," at
Ed Fletcher's Early Bird
Dinner Theatre on Satur-
day, May 4. This comedy is
about a young, single Ital-
ian-American guy from
New Jersey who an-
nounces to his close-knit
family that he is consider-
ing a job offer that will
take him to Seattle. His
meddling grandparents
stir up all manner of


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Things looked mighty tasty at the recent Oak Run Donut Drop-In,which drew a big Saturday crowd.


problems for him with
their schemes to keep
him near them, including
bringing young, attractive
girls in for the family Sun-
day dinners and making
him feel guilty about leav-
ing his family It is a great
deal at $58 per person
which includes trans-
portation, buffet, the
show and bus driver's tip.
The bus leaves at 8:45
a.m. with the wonderful
buffet at 11:30 a.m. fol-
lowed by the show at 1
p.m. Call Paul and Emily
Pike.
There are also a few
seats on trip 24 to Hard
Rock in Tampa on May 8.
This is a morning/after-
noon trip. Call Valerie
Oddo.
We had great sales on
Tuesday, March 12, for
some trips in the new
blue brochure.
'Menopause the Musical,'
the June 20 (trip 1) at the
David A Straz, Jr Center
in Tampa, has two buses
which are filling up.
Think about the mixture
of four women, black lace


bras, memory loss, hot
flashes and too little or
too much sex.
Added together they
give you laughs and great
music as this musical par-
ody has you dancing in
the aisles to classics of
the 60s through the 80s.
The bus leaves at 11:30
a.m. with the show at 2
p,m. Call Jim and Patty
Waddell before it's too
late.
The Hard Rock trip is
going on July 18 (trip 2).
There is a reason we have
these trips. Residents
love them!! Get your
ticket now and be sure to
have your player number
or driver's license when
you sign up. For $23 per
person you can't beat it
and you get $30 in free
play to get you started.
This is an
afternoon/evening trip.
Call Wayne and
Howardean Krueger
right away

Reading Volunteers
Love to read? Love
kids? Our reading volun-


teer group is looking for
enthusiastic people to
visit two of our local ele-
mentary schools and read
to the lower grades. It
would only take up about
an hour of your time, six
times a year (Tuesdays
and Wednesdays) at Sun-
rise and Marion Oaks ele-
mentary schools.
The books are selected
by the teacher at the
grade level you want, and
you are escorted by two of
the children to their
classroom. Having the
children around you en-
gaged and anticipating
the next page, discussing
the book, sharing the pic-
tures, and just being with
them is a truly rewarding
experience. Through our
efforts we hope to instill
in them a love of reading
while opening up new
horizons and adventures
of the wonderful world of
books
Call Addie Bambridge
at 352-533-8666 to sign up
or for more information.
Car pooling is available
for Oak Run residents, al-


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Tuesday Is Bingo Night
Come with your friends
and neighbors to check
out our new equipment
and new games for a fun
night of bingo. Doors open
at 3 p.m., card sales are
from 4 to 5:45 p.m. and
games begin at 6 p.m.
Here are two important
reminders. No one under
18 years of age is allowed
in the Orchid Club during
games and all residents
and overnight guests must
wear visible name or pool
tags. The snack bar will
be open.
Come and join the fun.
For information contact
Dee Spath at 352-237-
0502.

Royal Oaks Women's
18 Hole Golf
The weather forced a
cancellation but on
March 5 after a cool start
the day warmed up and
we played a low net game.
The winners were:
1st Flight 1st place (
tie), Sylvia Zappia and
Roseann Lavacca; 2nd
place ( tie), Diana Galla
and Judie Lavdas; 2nd
Flight 1st place, Bette
Johnson, 2nd place, Lynn
Houghton, 3rd place,
Chris Orndorff; 3rd Flight
1st place, Carolyn
Collins, 2nd place, Barb
Scozzafava, 3rd place,
Ginger Drake. Closest to
the pin Bette Johnson.
Congrats, winners

Royal Oaks Lady Niners
On March 7 it was cold
but we had a great turn
out.
We played par 4's only
In flight A 1st. BJ Lassiter,
tied in 2nd. Elsa Berbig
and Sam Timmermeyer;
Flight B 1st. Diana
Schmidt and tied in 2nd.
Cindy Kocher and Joyce
Madill. Chip in on #16
was BJ Lassiter.


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30 Friday, March 15, 2013


Entertainment is what's happening at OTOW


BY ELOISE HOLLYFIELD
h -J.'i .'. .tti t !,', t t/

OTOW certainly seems to be where
it's "happening" when it comes to en-
tertainment, which dominates this
week's OTOW Happenings column.

Lions Club
For some time now, the very exciting
upcoming Recycled "Trashy" Fashion
Show has been made available to read-
ers through this column. In addition to
basic information about this event,
there are new details now available in
regards to the judges and the hours
d'oeuvres.
The fashion show is, of course, a con-
test Each model will wear an outfit con-
sisting of at least 75 percent recycled
materials and must be designed by a
non-professional designer who is a
member of his or her group. When pre-
sented on the walkway by Master of
Ceremonies James Vincent Wynn, the
judges will make their decisions based
on the following criteria: (1) visual im-
pact, (2) design concept, (3) construction
technique, (4) creativity, and (5) best use
of materials.
Three winners will be chosen. The 1st
place winner will receive $1000, the
second place winner will receive $500,
and the 3rd place winner will receive
$300. Each winner will receive a check
made out to the charity of choice.
The judges for the show are Joan
Sterns, Vice President for Institutional
Advancement College of Central
Florida; Jeff Bailey, General Manager
of the Ocala Hilton Hotel, and Su Su
Sparkman, Director/Choreographer of
the Ocala Civic Theatre.
Chef Randal White (Ocala Hilton) is
well known in the area for his creations.
Fans everywhere look forward to his
"Dishin' It Out" show on the Ocala Cox
Cable Channel 21. His enthusiasm for
this event has sparked his imagination,
and he has created hors d'oeuvres
unique to this specific fashion show.


The hand-passed hors d'oeuvres in-
clude the following: Garbage Salad
Boats; Mini Port Cheese Balls with Nuts
on a Cracker; Medallion of chicken with
Plum Glaze on a Skewer; Swedish
Meatball on Garlic Mashed Potatoes in
Bamboo; Individual Nacho Cups with
Chili, Cheese, and Pico de Gallo in a
Paper Basket; and Tempura Vegetable
Baskets. To showcase the "Recycled
Trash" theme of the events, these offer-
ings will be served in paper, plastic, and
bamboo containers.
The Recycled "Trashy" Fashion Show
Presented by the OTOW Lions Club will
be held on April 12 at the Hilton Hotel
in Ocala. The cash bar will open at 5
p.m. Hors d'oeuvres will be served at 6
p.m., along with the silent auction. The
fashion show will begin at 6:30 p.m.
James Vincent Wynn is the director of
this event and will provide entertain-
ment and also conduct the silent auc-
tion. Ticket costs are as follows: $30 per
individual, $55 for a party of two, and
$275 for a party of 10. To purchase tick-
ets, contact Lion Wendy Phillips via e-
mail at wendypl946ad@aol.com.
Checks should be made out to the
OTOW Lions Club and sent to PO. Box
772733, Ocala, Florida 34477; tickets
will be picked up at the door.
This event is bound to be an event you
will enjoy and never forget, so get your
tickets early!
The OTOW Lions Club is pleased to
announce that it now has its own web-
site. Readers are invited to visit the
website to learn about the purpose of
the club, its many functions in support
of several charities, how to become a
member, and the latest and most thor-
ough details of upcoming major events.
The web address is wwwotowlion-
sclub.org. For Facebook fans, visit their
new Facebook Page at http://www.face-
book com/lions. club.52.

The Theatre Group
In spite of having to postpone the
Group's original play for April due to


This is the cast for theTheatre Group's upcoming play "Ken McBride Himself."
From the left are: Anne Merrick, Annette Ware, Sue Veres, Bob Cowie, Jim Mer-
rick, Marilyn Bettinger, Dick Phillips,with Dottie Berkowitz at the keyboard.


illness, the Theatre Group Storyboard
Committee has produced a new show
for your enjoyment.
The show has been named the "Good
and Plenty" of music and laughter, with
skits, and jokes and songs based on the
life of the residents of On Top of the
World. Dick Phillips is the Master of
Ceremonies of the show and is also per-
forming in it. Dottie Berkowitz is the Di-
rector and Musical Accompanist.
The show occurs on April 12 and
April 13 at 7 p.m. and on April 14 at 3
p.m. All performances are held in the
Health and Recreation Ballroom. This
is a free show with general seating, al-
though a monetary offering is appreci-
ated to cover costs and contribute to the
scholarship the embers support at The
College of Central Florida.
Mark your calendars, come see the
show and be prepared to laugh through-
out the performance.
If you have any questions contact


Anne Merrick at 352-732-0706.

The Entertainment Group
On Saturday, March 23, at 7 p.m., The
Entertainment Group closes its 2012-
2013 Show Series with the "Ken
McBride Himself" show. He is a native
of Waterford, Ireland (remember, it is St
Patrick's month!).
Ken's expansive repertoire extends
from classical selections to the contem-
porary style of Sinatra to Billy Joel,
from the favorite songs of his native Ire-
land to Broadway Show Tunes, to the
music of today His acclaimed rendition
of the "Phantom of the Opera" is truly a
musical spectacular to be seen and
heard.
Ticket costs are $8 for general ad-
mission and $10 for reserved seating.
Tickets are on sale in the H&R ball-
room Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
from 8:30a.m. to 10 a.m.


Upcoming Events at VFW Post 4781


Annual celebration of St. Patrick's Day,
March 16, Saturday, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.
The menu will include corn beef and
cabbage with all the trimmings. After a
great dinner join us for music and enter-
tainment in the Canteen beginning at 6.
Donation is $10 per person. Tickets can
be purchased in the Canteen. No tickets
will be sold at the door.
The Men's Auxiliary will sponsor a
"Good Friday" fish and chips dinner on
March 29 from 4 to 6 p.m. Donation is $8
per person. Tickets can be purchased
both in the Canteen and at the door.
You loved the "low and slow" ribs now
try the "low and slow" chicken quarters.
Your choice of white or dark with tradi-
tional "fixins" for an $8 donation. Satur-


day, March 30 from 4:30 to 6:30. After din-
ner stay and enjoy entertainment in the
Canteen.
Saturday Breakfast is served from 8 to
10 a.m. Donation is $4.
The Men's Auxiliary serves shrimp and
wing baskets with coleslaw and fries on
the first and third Friday from 4 to 6 p.m.
A fish fry is held on the second and
fourth Friday from 4 to 6.
Bingo is open to the public each Mon-
day and Thursday with early bird specials
beginning at 11:30 a.m. Lunch is avail-
able.

Computer Classes
Do you want to become more computer
"savvy"? Do you have questions? If so,


mark your calendar for a great opportu-
nity for free computer lessons the fourth
Tuesday each month at 6. Classes are in-
structed by Robert from Lanshark. Join
us for an enjoyable learning experience
at VFW Post 4781!

Members and Guests (non-members
must be signed in by a VFW Post 4781
member)
Monday Night Bar Bingo is played in
the Canteen from 6 to 8.
Enjoy Karaoke on Friday, March 15 and
on Saturday, March 16.
Canteen lunches are served on
Wednesday and Friday from 11 a.m. to 2.
VFW Post 4781 is at 9401 S.W 110th St.
Phone is 352-873-4781.


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Hospice seeks singers
Hospice of Marion County in-
vites you to consider a unique
volunteer service. We have a
special choral group known as
the Journey Singers that sings
songs of healing and comfort at
the bedsides of the ill or dying
at the four Marion County Hos-
pice Houses, private homes,
and other selective venues. We
offer a wide choice of music, in-
cluding spiritual, secular and
patriotic selections.
If you can read music and
sing a cappella (that is, without
instrumental accompaniment),
and have a compassionate
heart, join us in this rewarding
journey Call 352-873-7441 for
more details.


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Friday, March 15, 2013 31


Wearin'o'the green in Pun Alley


Marion's Most Wanted

1iw


This coming Sunday is St.
Patrick's Day, a holiday first
celebrated in 1737 by Irish
immigrants in Boston. The most
well known celebration is the pa-
rade in New York City where the
parade route is painting with a
green line to guide the marchers.
Elsewhere almost everyone cel-
ebrates by wearing green, being
honorary Irish, drinking green
beer, and eating corned beef and
cabbage. Likewise, Pun Alley gets
painted green and has some Irish
fun.

Real green
A con artist, posing as a travel
agent, offered trips to the home-
land in Ireland to a number of un-
suspecting clients. After securing
sizable down payments, the con
artist disappeared. When the scam
was discovered, the story ran in the
local papers under the headline,
"Tour Allure A Lie."

Current events
Paddy was walking through a
graveyard when he came across a
headstone with the inscription
"Here lies a politician and an hon-
est man." "Faith now," exclaimed
Paddy, "I wonder how they got the
two of them in one grave."

It's all relative
Padraic Flaherty came home
drunk every evening toward ten.
Now, the Missus was never too
happy about it. So one night she
hid in the cemetery and figured to
scare the wits out of him by wear-
ing a red devil costume. As poor
Pat wandered by, from behind a
tombstone she jumped in front of
him screaming, "Padraic Sean Fla-
herty, sure and ya' don't give up
you're drinking' and it's to hell I'll
take ye"'.
Pat, undaunted, staggered back
and demanded, "Who are you?"
The Missus replied, "I'm the divil
ya' damned old fool."


Pun Alley
Dick Frank


I ,, I
Padraic answered, "Glad to meet
you sir, I'm married to yer sister."
Leprechaun tales
The first Irish National Steeple-
chase was finally abandoned. Not
one horse could get a decent foot-
ing on the cathedral roof.
The cross-eyed Irish teacher re-
signed because she had no control
over her pupils.
O'Toule was rather sad after
viewing the body of a dead atheist.
"There he was. All dressed up and
no place to go."
People wear shamrocks on St.
Patrick's Day because real rocks
are too heavy.
Finnegan: "My wife has a terri-
ble habit of staying up 'til two
o'clock in the morning. I can't
break her of it."
Keenan: "What on earth is she
doin' at that time?"
Finnegan: "Waitin' for me to
come home."
The Irish attempt at scaling
Mount Everest was a valiant effort,
but it failed: They ran out of scaf-
folding.
"I'll have fish and chips," an-
nounced O'Driscoll. "Very well,"
said the shopkeeper. "The fish
won't be long." O'Driscoll replied,
"Then they'd better be fat."

Pole poll
Two companies were competing
for a contract to put up telephone
poles. One of the companies was
Irish. The authorities decided to
test them, seeing which company
could put up the most poles in an
hour. The first company achieved


twenty but when the Irish com-
pany's tally came in it was only two.
"I'm afraid you lost the job," the
Irish company was told, "the other
boys managed twenty to your two."
"Ah," came the reply, "but they
cheated. Did you see how much
they left sticking out of the
ground?"
I swear!
They got jammed in the restau-
rant door and Peadar used some
very improper language that an-
noyed Liam. "How dare you swear
before my wife," Liam protested.
"I'm sorry," said Peadar with
contrition, "I didn't know she
wanted to swear first."
That's living
The Protestant minister was im-
pressed when he was shown Fa-
ther Quinn's new residence.
"You know," he said, "it is far bet-
ter than what my wife and I have at
the parsonage."
"That's logical," replied Father
Quinn. "Protestant ministers have
better halves and Catholic priests
have better quarters."
Shoot!
An armed hooded robber burst
into the Bank of Ireland and forced
the tellers to load a sack full of
cash. On his way out the door with
the loot one brave Irish customer
grabbed the hood and pulled it off
revealing the robber's face.
The robber immediately shot the
guy and looked around the bank to
see if anyone else had seen him.
One of the tellers was looking
straight at him, so the robber
calmly shot him too.
Everyone by now was very
scared and looking down at the
floor. "Did anyone else see my
face?" screamed the robber.
After a few moments of silence
one elderly Irish gent tentatively
raised his hand and said, "I think
me wife may have caught a
glimpse."


Serena K Clark, 37, felony viola-
tion of probation uttering forged in-
strument.

Amanda Gail Fallon, 32, felony
bench warrant failure to appear
drug court grand theft, felony fraud-
ulent use of credit card, dealing in
stolen property, uttering forged in-
strument grand theft from person
over 65 years of age, traffic in stolen
property

Freddie Garmon, 24, felony war-
rant possession of cocaine, intro-
duce/possess contraband in county
detention center.


Darrell McCray, 51, felony viola-
tion of probation warrant utter
forged counterfeit bill, grand theft,
three counts.



Jeffrey Stanley Stoliker Jr., 23,
felony violation of probation war-
rant burglary of a dwelling or occu-
pied conveyance.



John Paul Sturniolo, 46, felony
warrant burglary of a structure, non
dwelling type, grand theft.


ANONYMOUS UP TO $1000 REWARD




STOPPERS
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BCBS, Blue Options, Cigna, United Health Care, Aetna,
Tricare,Medicare and most insurances accepted/billed.


Thursday, March 21st @ 2:30 PM
VETERAN'S SEMINAR
Join us to learn how to qualify for the Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit
from the Veterans Administration. Presented by Gary Marriage, Jr.,
Operation: Veteran Aid. This is valuable information and a seminar you
will not want to miss.

Tuesday, March 26th @ 2:30 PM
CRIMES AGAINST THE ELDERLY
Learn how to protect yourself from property crimes, frauds and scams
targeted toward seniors. Presented by Mary Williams, District Service
Officer with the Ocala Police Department.


Tours ... Tours ... Tours ... Tours
Call to make a reservation
for a lunch/tour. We would love to
share with you what The Bridge
Community is all about! We look
forward to hearing from you soon.
Space is limited, so make your
reservations today!!!

RSVP (352) 873-2036


THE BRIDGE

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32 Friday, March 15, 2013


Dr. Ravi Chandra I on Endovascular Surgery Options


Surgeons at Munroe Regional are regional leaders in a wide
range of vascular and minimally invasive endovascular procedures,
including diagnosing and treating common, complex and even rare
vascular diseases.

For example, endovascular surgery is an innovative, less invasive
procedure used to treat problems affecting the blood vessels, such as an
aneurysm, which is a swelling or "ballooning" of the blood vessel. From
a small incision near each hip, our surgeons insert an endovascular
graft, which is a specialfabric tube device framed with stainless steel
selfexpanding stents via a catheter Once in place, the graft expands and
seals off the aneurysm, preventing blood from flowing into the aneurysm.

An alternative to traditional open surgery, endovascular surgery offers
many advantages, including a shorter recovery period, less discomfort,
local or regional anesthesia instead ofgeneral anesthesia, smaller
incisions, less stress on the heart andfewer risks for patients with other
medical conditions.

Is endovascular surgery an optionfor you? Thisprocedure may benefit
patients who need vascular surgery but are at a high-risk of complications
because of other conditions. Talk with a Munroe Surgical physician.
We will conduct a comprehensive evaluation to
determine whether endovascular surgery might
be an appropriate therapeutic option for you.


RAVI CHANDRA, MD :
VASCULAR SURGEON
MUNROE SURGICAL


Munroe Regional is widely regarded as
one of the best hospitals in the country,
recognized for quality and excellence
across the board. And nowhere is the
Munroe Regional commitment to clinical
excellence and innovation more evident
than in the many thousands of surgeries
we perform each year.
In 15 operating room suites, Munroe
surgeons use the latest technologies and
minimally invasive surgical techniques,
backed by decades of innovation and
experience and a genuine commitment
to exceptional, compassionate,
patient-focused care. That's experience
you can trust.
If you need surgery, remember that where
you choose to have your surgery is important.
There is a real quality difference in the care
at Munroe Regional, and it matters.
Learn more at
MunroeRegional.com/Surgery















Munroe
Surgical
Munroe Regional
Medical Center


Find a physician close to home. Call Munroe's Health Resource Line at 352-867-8181 or 800-575-3975 or visit www.MunroeRegional.com


11~/1


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I ASKTHE7DOCTOR IT^^


13 YouG 0 -







Friday, March 15, 2013 33


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) With your prac-
tical side dominant this
week, it's a good time to
reassess your finances to
see what expenses you
can cut. Aspects also favor
mending relationships.
TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) Your Bovine-in-
spired determination to
follow matters through
from beginning to end
pays off in a big way
Enjoy a well-earned
weekend of fun with a
special someone.
GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) Aspects favor re-
establishing business re-
lationships you might
have neglected. A family
member's request needs
to be given more thought
before you decide.
CANCER (June 21 to
July 22) While you might
appreciate the advice
coming from others, keep
in mind that the intuitive
Moon Child is best served
by listening to her or his
own inner voice.
LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22)
The Lion's social life
whirls at centrifugal
speed this week as you go
from function to function.
Things slow by week's
end, giving you a chance
to catch up on your
chores.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept
22) Don't let your stand on
an issue cause a rift with
a colleague. Insist on both
of you taking time to re-
assess your positions
while there's still room
for compromise.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct
22) An opportunity you'd
been hoping for finally
opens up. But read the
fine print before you
make a commitment, es-
pecially where a time fac-
tor might be involved.
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to
Nov. 21) Your need to
know what's going on be-
hind the scenes leads you
to make some bold moves.
Be prepared with a full
explanation of your ac-
tions if necessary
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22
to Dec. 21) A lot of details
need tending to during
the early part of the week.
The pressure eases, al-
lowing you to get back to
your major undertaking.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22
to Jan. 19) A friend asks
you to act on his or her be-
half in a dispute. Be care-
ful. You might not have all
the facts you need in
order to make a fair as-
sessment of the situation.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to
Feb. 18) A new develop-
ment might require you to
cancel some of your
plans. But you adapt eas-
ily, and by week's end, you
could receive welcome
"cheering-up" news.
PISCES (Feb. 19 to
March 20) Your recent
workplace accomplish-
ments boost your self-con-
fidence as you're about to
consider a potentially re-
warding, although possi-
bly risky, career move.
BORN THIS WEEK:
Your love of the arts is
equaled only by your
sense of justice. People
can depend on you to al-
ways try to do what's
right.


by Linda Thistle

3 4 6 9

9 1 6

2 3 5

8 7 1

6 1 5

2 9 3 7

5 6 4

1 4 8 2

3 2 7
Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way
that each row across, each column down and
each small 9-box square contains all of the
numbers from one to nine.



Moderate * Challenging
*** HOO BOY!
2013 King Features Synd., Inc.








by Linda Thistle


3 4 6 9

9 1 6

2 3 5

8 7 1

6 1 5

2 9 3 7

5 6 4

1 4 8 2

3 2 7

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way
that each row across, each column down and
each small 9-box square contains all of the
numbers from one to nine.




Moderate ** Challenging
*** HOO BOY!
2013 King Features Synd., Inc.




Wishing 9 Well

6 2 6 4 6 5 4 5 3 4 8 3 4
E B M F O B R E Y I F O E
5 8 3 6 3 2 3 5 4 3 5 2 4
SO U T C E O E N P L D D
8 6 3 4 8 2 8 4 6 7 5 7 4
C I E L U E S Y O S F E G
6 7 6 3 4 3 4 7 6 8 5 6 5
N E A B R E E K L E R T E
8 4 6 8 4 2 7 2 8 5 3 6 7
N E A E T C K I R L T L N
5 4 5 8 5 4 3 7 3 5 2 6 8
I I AG N N T OE TS K I
4 7 8 7 3 8 2 7 2 7 2 7 7
G W E L R S I E V D E G E
HERE IS A PLEASANT LITTLE GAME that will give you a
message every day. It's a numerical puzzle designed to spell
out your fortune. Count the letters in your first name. If the
number of letters is 6 or more, subtract 4. If the number is less
than 6, add 3. The result is your key number. Start at the up-
per left-hand corner and check one of your key numbers, left
to right. Then read the message the letters under the
checked figures give you.
2013 King Features Synd Inc. All rights reserved


ALPHABETICAL

Super Crossword ACTS A-TO-A


ACROSS 60 Big name in 112 Key near Alt
1 Wise to sportswear 116 Directed light
8 Raven calls 64 Like Smurfs rays at
12 Salve target 65 Justices' org. 118 Brynner
15 Vacation 66 Astor feeds divides a site
facilities her infant? into districts?
19 Sticky stuff 73 Lyric-writing 122 Slum digs
on a bat Gershwin 123 Its cap. is
20 Andy's radio 74 Ending for 97-Down
sidekick billion 124 Accustoming
21 Abnormal 75 Duncan of (to)
23 Curry does a dance 125 USMC NCO
patisserie 77 Shriver gets 126 "- gratias"
job? off her 127 Defendant's
25 Ripped open soapbox? answer
26 Olds 84 Tattered 128 Some
antiques cloth photocopies
27 Gains a lap? 85 -Wan
28 Big scuffle Kenobi DOWN
29 Petroleum 86 City map 1 On (equal
30 Hopper lifts 87 Suffix with in value)
weights? krypton 2 Chablis, e.g.
35 Lighter fuel 88 Llama's kin 3 Domini (in
38 Atop, to 91 Ostentatious the year of
poets display the Lord)
39 "Swinging on 93 Alito gets an 4 Graycoats
-" (1944 hit arena 5 Greek letter
song) worker's 6 Sturdy wood
40 Wilder picks attention? 7 lens
up a bug? 98 Lord of a (spotlight
46 Forget to manor component)
mention 101 Tillis of song 8 Prickly
48 Gain entry to 102 Really annoy desert
49 Lady of 103 Damone plants
Fatima plays a 9 Garner
50 Setback percussion 10 Asian pan
53 '- right?" instrument? 11 Tampa-to-Ft.
54 "Little Red 109 Alaskan Myers dir.
Book" writer lang. 12 Provide food
55 Carrey is 110 Dr. Seuss 13 Letter-
amorous title creature shaped iron
with gals? 111 Sour fruit bar


14 Mother with
a Nobel
15 Lanka
16 Sweeping
views
17 Against
lawbreaking
18 Embezzled
22 Scuba spots
24 Moral lapse
28 mortal
30 Morse bits
31 Space chimp
of 1961
32 Nearly an
eternity
33 Deletes, with
"out"
34 Platte River
tribe
35 "Stop
panicking!"
36 Old 7UP
nickname,
with "the"
37 No-frills shirt
40 Chess, e.g.
41 "- dare?"
42 Total amount
43 Rankle
44 Western
actor Lee
Van-
45 Lean- -
(hovels)
47 "- a pity..."
51 Stinging hits
52 Native
Israeli
55 de mots
(pun, in
Paris)


56 Henrik who
wrote "Peer
Gynt"
57 -mo
(replay
choice)
58 End-of-word
add-on:
Abbr.
59 Voiced
61 Actor La
Salle
62 Pancake
pour-on
63 Sluggish
sort
67 Jamaican
with
dreadlocks,
often
68 "Yes, -!"
69 Time chunk
70 Contract
need: Abbr
71 "Nick
and -
Infinite
Playlist"
72 Brings honor
to
76 Gel for a
petri dish
77 Explode
78 Eradicates
79 Aping
80 Prof's
aides
81 Shop you
drop
82 Addams
family
cousin


83 School lobby
gp.
88 Dumb ox
89 Attract
90 Free TV ad
92 Church seat
94 Tullius'
2,020
95 180, slangily
96 Right angle
97 City
northwest of
Tucson
99 Stupid,
clumsy sort
100 Wore away
103 Bodices, e.g.
104 Norwegian
currency
105 Brazil's
Espirito -
106 Colonel
North,
briefly
107 Cheesy pie
108 Medical care
gp.
112 Italian "dear"
113 Cereal that's
"for kids"
114 Lacoste of
tennis
115 Fails to keep
up
117 Bottom line
118 Sharp bark
119 Online
address
120 Ending for
phenyl
121 Prefix with
tax


The idea of Go Figure is to arrive
at the figures given at the bot-
tom and right-hand columns of
the diagram by following the
arithmetic signs in the order
they are given (that is, from left
to right and top to bottom). Use
only the numbers below the
diagram to complete its blank
squares and use each of the
nine numbers only once.



Moderate ** Difficult
*** GO FIGURE!


10


X X +

X i- 26

25 28 11

1 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
) 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


Average time of solution: 64 minutes.


SI se. I


4ccTTmTzm^m


X







34 Friday, March 15, 2013


Family vet to speak


Our next meeting will take place on
Thursday, March 21, at 1 p.m. in the up-
stairs meeting room at the Bank of the
Ozarks and we are pleased to announce
that our guest speaker will be Dr. Ed
from A Family Veterinarian. His prac-
tice is located in Jasmine Plaza at 7466
S.W 60th Ave. For those of you who
work during the week, or have other
commitments, A Family Veterinarian is
open on weekends. Since our meetings
are always open to guests; this would be
a good opportunity for you to meet Dr.
Ed and hear about his new clinic.
Please give us a call at 352-362-0985 if
you would like more information about
our meetings or have any other ques-
tions for us.
At our last meeting everyone agreed
that we should meet all year round
since we work all year round. So start-
ing this summer, we will meet in July
and August.
We are still looking for individuals or
families willing to foster a dog or cat in
need from time to time. Please call us
at the above number and we will put
you on our list. Sometimes we only need
a foster for a few days while we reunite
a lost pet with their family Other times
it may be a few weeks to a few months
while we find an adoptive home. In ei-
ther case, you will be doing a wonder-
ful service for your community
Be on the lookout for the SPCAs used
book sale to be held at the Farmer's
Market at Circle Square Commons out-
side of On Top of the World Communi-
ties by Southwest 80th Avenue and
Southwest 80th Street. We're trying to
have one each month when the cooking
demo, "Flavors of the Season" takes
place. They are held on the first Thurs-
day of each month from 10 to 10:30 a.m.
The Farmers Market itself lasts from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. You can visit the website
at www.CircleSquareCommonsFarm-
ersMarket.com for more information.


Paws and Claws

Maria Devine


Our books are a bargain at .25 and .50
cents each for most of them. Please stop
by when you see us and help us help the
animals.

Adoption News
Who's afraid of a little black cat? Well,
many of us, it seems. According to shel-
ters and fosters around the country, the
most difficult animal to place for adop-
tion is a black cat. Whether from fear or
superstition, or from the fact that black
cats don't photograph as well as their
colorful brethren; the poor black feline
is the last to be adopted and the first to
be euthanized countrywide. Even our
wonderful cat expert Arlene, is having
trouble placing her black cats. All her
other cats of varying stripes and colors
have been placed. Sadly, she will get a
phone call to adopt a cat or kitten, and
as soon as the person hears the pet is jet
black, they hang up without even want-
ing to see them. Here is a picture of
nine year old Pumpkin, who looks mag-
nificent in her photograph. Her buddy
Kitten (not black) was recently adopted,
and now Pumpkin misses her terribly
Pumpkin needs a home of her own to
ease her distress. Please call Arlene at
352-875-9761 to meet Pumpkin or one of
the other black cats or kittens to see if
one is right for you. Don't let old wives
tales keep perfectly lovely and loving
cats from having the wonderful home
they deserve. Think of them as chic and
elegant companions that make you look
slim when they sit on your lap.


This is"Pumpkin."

Marion County Animal Center
Needs Foster Families
The Marion County Animal Center is
in continuous need of foster families for
young, sick, or injured animals. You
usually only need to foster for a short
period of time say up to four weeks -
until the animal is old enough or well
enough to go back to the shelter system.
You can find more information on fos-


tering at http://marioncountyfl.org/Ani-
malCenter/foster.aspx. You can also
contact the shelter at 352-671-8700 or
email them at animalservices@marion-
countyfl.org. The shelter is open Tues-
day through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5:30
p.m. and on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m.
Until next month remember: "Pets
are not our whole lives, but they make
our lives whole."


Guide Dog Foundation needs volunteers

to keep and train puppies


The Guide Dog Foundation, a non-
profit organization that provides
guide dogs to blind individuals with-
out cost, is seeking volunteers to raise
a puppy from seven weeks until one
year of age.
After this time the puppy will return
to the Foundation for formal training
as a guide dog for the blind or as a


service dog for a disabled veteran.
No previous dog training experi-
ence is needed, however, patience and
a love of dogs is required.
All veterinarian expenses are fully
covered.
For further information call Lillian
Pollice at 352-687-4335 or the Guide
Dog Foundation at 1-800-548-4337.


ii B


VINNY
The Painter

vinnybpainting@gmail corn
352-425-1503
Also on facebookl
Quality work at affordable
prices
Licensed and insured
Over 25 years experience
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Free estimates!



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Seniors 10% Discount
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Friday, March 15, 2013 35


Complex plot makes a so-so thriller EARTH TALK


Bookmark
Pat Wellington


TOUCH AND GO
By Lisa Gardner
In "Touch and Go" Lisa Gardner unfolds a highly
complex plot involving the mysterious disappearance
of a wealthy Boston family
Police know only that businessman Justin Denbe
and his wife Libby returned to their elegant brown-
stone after a night out to find their 15-year-old daugh-
ter Ashlyn being tased. Immediately after, they too are
victims of stun guns.
Law enforcement, including former cop Tessa
Leoni, wait anxiously for ransom demands but none is
forthcoming. So what is the motive behind the abduc-
tions?
So far Gardner's 15th novel is humming along. As
stymied police put together theories, secrets about the
"perfect" Denbes start spilling out. It seems that
Justin has been having an affair, Libby is addicted to
painkillers, and teenage Ashley has a lover who's not
even close to her own age.
In time a GPS reading reveals that a white cargo
van, believed to be the kidnappers' vehicle, is headed
north of Concord, New Hampshire, an area called the
Wild Wild West where there are so few police, cops
often conduct shoot-outs alone.
The family is being taken to a state-of-the-art peni-
tentiary built by Denbe's firm but never opened and
operated.
Here events seem to defy logic.
The sprawling empty facility has full electricity run-
ning day and night and an air-conditioning thermostat
set at 77 degrees. And no taxpayer is complaining
about this colossal waste of money? And when the kid-
nappers turn off the electricity the power company
doesn't notice a huge spike in output? Really? At this


juncture it's time to suspend disbelief here and go for-
ward.
The point of view shifts from an omniscient narra-
tor to Libby's personal flashbacks about her romance
and marriage to Justin: "The first time I met Justin I
was working at a friend's clothing boutique. I can tell
you everything about those first 15 minutes of our re-
lationship. And just like that, I was lost." The marriage
that follows is not as enthralling.
The characters are mildly interesting and the pace
is alternately brisk and dragging. Inside the prison,
time weighs heavily for victims and readers alike. Fi-
nally, the ending, for my money, is not believable. Bot-
tom line: this is a so-so thriller


Bees and butterflies
E- The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: I'd like to have a garden that en-
courages bees and butterflies. What's the best ap-
proach?
-Robert Miller, Bakersfield, CA
Attracting bees and butterflies to a garden is a noble
pursuit indeed, given that we all depend on these
species and others (beetles, wasps, flies, humming-
birds, etc.) to pollinate the plants that provide us with
so much of our food, shelter and other necessities of
life.
In fact, increased awareness of the essential role
pollinators play in ecosystem maintenance-along
with news about rapid declines in bee populations-
have led to a proliferation ofbackyard "pollinator gar-
dens" across the U.S. and beyond.
"Pollinators require two essential components in
their habitat: somewhere to nest and flowers from
which to gather nectar and pollen," reports the Xerces
Society, a Massachusetts-based non-profit that pro-
tects wildlife through the conservation of inverte-
brates and their habitat.
"Native plants are undoubtedly the best source of
food for pollinators, because plants and their pollina-
tors have coevolved." But, Xerces adds, many vari-
eties of garden plants can also attract pollinators.
Plant lists customized for different regions of the U.S.
can be found on the group's website.
Any garden, whether a window box on a balcony or
a multi-acre backyard, can be made friendlier to pol-
linators.
Xerces recommends providing a range of native
flowering plants that bloom throughout the growing
season to provide food and nesting for bees, butter-
flies and other pollinators.
Xerces also says that clustering flowering plants to-
gether in patches is preferable to spacing individual
plants apart. "Creating foraging habitat not only helps
the bees, butterflies and flies that pollinate these
plants, but also results in beautiful, appealing land-
scapes."
PLEASE SEE EARTH, PAGE 37


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36 Friday, March 15, 2013


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dcm


Iss






Friday, March 15, 2013 37


EARTH
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35


Along these lines, gardeners should
plant a variety of colors in a pollinator
garden, as color is one of the plant king-
dom's chief clues that pollen or nectar
is available.
Master gardener Marie lannotti, an
About.com gardening guide, reports
that blue, purple, violet, white and yel-
low flowers are particularly attractive
to bees.
She adds that different shapes also
attract different types of pollinators,
and that getting as much floral diversity
of any kind going is a sure way to maxi-
mize pollination.
Another way to attract pollinators is


to provide nest sites for bees-see how
on the xerces.org website.
The group also suggests cutting out
pesticides, as these harsh chemicals re-
duce the available nectar and pollen
sources in gardens while poisoning the
very insects that make growing plants
possible.
Those looking to go whole hog into
pollinator gardening might consider in-
vesting $30 in Xerces Society's recently
published book, Attracting Native Pol-
linators: Protecting North America's
Bees and Butterflies, which provides a
good deal of detailed information about
pollinators and the plants they love.


Gardeners who have already encour-
aged pollinators can join upwards of
1,000 others who have signed onto
Xerces' Pollinator Protection Pledge.
And the icing on the cake is a "Pollina-
tor Habitat" sign from Xerces stuck
firmly in the ground between two flow-
ering native plants so passersby can
learn about the importance of pollina-
tors and making them feel welcome.

CONTACTS: Xerces Society,
wwwxerces.org, About.com "Bee
Plants," gardening about.com/od/at-
tractingwildlife/a/Bee_Plants.htm.


EarthTalk@ is written and edited by
Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a
registered trademark of E The Envi-
ronmental Magazine
(www.emagazine.com). Send questions
to: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Sub-
scribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe.
Free Trial Issue:
www.emagazine.com/trial.


Please use our e-mail
editor@smcitizen.com


This week's answers to puzzles


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Super Crossword
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STEEL CUTTER /
WELDER
INTER COUNTY
RECYCLING IS
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DRIVERS:
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EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Go Figure!
answers


6





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Super Crossword
Answers


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38 Friday, March 15, 2013


Citizen aassieds


HIRING
SEMINAR

In Ocala,
Tues, March 19th,
National Credit
Repair Company is
looking for Outside
Sales Rep's.
Sales experience
helpful but not
necessary.
Will train the right
people. Please call
for RSVP &
information.
Seating is limited
352-430-1675


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Chair and
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Paid $800
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(352) 854-5702



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Friday 3/22
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dcm


1*14 -WOOF







Friday, March 15, 2013 39


SNIrSARSONfC






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*499 0.00/o
FOR 39 MONTHS UP APR FOR 60 MONTHS
TO $,450 TOTAI. UP TO $7,950 TOTAL
S- deaalr f r effer d.alr-


2004 Nissan Sentra 1.8 S...#PL143A, 86,957 Miles, White................................................. ................ ,597
2004 Toyota Carnry LE... #F230A, 7,868 Miles, Gold.......................................................... ... .................... 9,995
2011 Nissan Versa S...#F1 85B, 29,719 Miles, Silver....................................... ... .................. .... 13,999
2012 Nissan Versa S...#F279A, Blue, 6,542 Miles, Blue.................................. .......................................15,939
201 1 Mitsubishi Outlander 2WD ES... #ET595A, 24,405 Miles, Gray............ ............................................... 15,955
2013 Nissan Versa SV...#E948A, 1,117 M iles, Silver ................................................ .........................1..,1 495
2012 Nissan Sentra 2.0... #E91 1A, 7,338 M iles,Blue Onyx.............................. .................................... s16,799
2009 Ford Escape XLT...#ET597A, 28,057 Miles, Blue........................................................ ....................... 16,993
2007 Ford F-150 XLT...#F464A, 70,895 Miles, Blue.............................................................. ............. 17,422
2011 Honda Civic LX...#TF198A, 28,309 Miles, Gray .............. ............................. ..................... 17,447
2008 Lincoln MKZ...#FT198A2, 41,331 Miles, Silver....................................................... .......................... 17,590
2012 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport... #F332A, 2WD ES, 4,795 Miles, White........................................................ '17,942
2010 Nissan Rogue SL... #PFT032, 30,075 Miles, Silver...................................................................17,964
2008 Honda CR-V EX-L... #ET403A, 80,274 Miles, Blue................. ........................................................... 17,999
2012 Hyundai Elantra Limited Sedan...#TF1 36A, 13,112 Miles, Silver........................................ ............ 1,699
2008 Nissan 350Z Touring... #F290B, 37,291 Miles, Red ...................................... ......... .....................18,954
2011 Nissan Rogue SV...#PFT050, 28,821 Miles Gray.............................................................................. 19,599
2011 Ford Escape XLT... #ET59A, 37,291 Miles, Black................................................................. 19,67
2012 Dodge Journey SE...#TFT187A, 7,782 Miles, Red....................................................... .......................19,750
2011 Honda CR-V... #F424A 2W SE, 34,833 M iles, Blue.......................................... .................................... 19,99








ISSAN


NOW .l


259 Nissan Rogue
259 MONTHS
$500 BONUS CASH



'289
FOR 39 MONTHS


Nissan JUKI
$6 00
TOTAL SAVINGS -


Nissan Titan
'229 O
5 0O BONUS c A-


II


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4ccTTmTzm^m





40 Friday, March 15, 2013


tflrtRUVj(Wt~flbflI


uto,


100's to Choose From


"13 BUICK Lacrosse
CXL, 6 Cyl., Chrome Pkg.

If 369 mo
M1385 AutoMax Price 24,880

'13,Chevrolet Cruze
LT RS, Leather, Turbo

s285mo
M138 u toMax Price 18,880
M1195 '12 Chevrolet Impala LT SPOILER .................................$13,500 $205/mo
M1153 '12 Chevrolet Colorado LT CREW................................$18,500 $279/mo
M1254 '12 Chevrolet Equinox LT LEATHER....................................$21,880 $329/mo
M1163 '12 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 CREWCAB, LT20 WHEELS $24,880 $369/mo
M1129 '12 Chevrolet Traverse LT .........................................$21,880 $329/mo
'12 Chevrolet Tahoe
Lt. Chrome Pkg., Sharp
AutoMax Price

'33M12,88035


"12 FOrd Taurus
Moonroof, Leather, Loaded, Pearl

$299 mo
AutoMax Pric19,880 M1351
M 1070 '12 Ford Fusion SEL,V6................................................$13,880 $209/mo
M1379 '12 Ford ExpeditionxLTv .......................................... $26,880 $405/mo
M1402 '13 Ford Explorer LEATHER, BLCKGRANITE......................$26,880 $405/mo
M1056 '11 Ford F150 PLATINUM, EVERY OPTION ............................$35,880

'12 GMC Acadia
SLT, Leather


AutoMax Price'27 ,880 M1337
M1177 '12 GMC Sierra 1500 DENALIAWD, LOADED ...................$36,880
M1336 '13 GMC TerrainSLESAVEONTHIS NE.......................... $23,380 $339/mo
M1248 '12 GMC YukonSLT, LEATHER, HTDSEATS.........................$31,880


10 Mercedes-Benz GK-Class
V6, Loaded


12 Chrysler Town & Country UUU me
-Touring, Pwr. Doors AutoMax Pri ce25 ,
2 69O m M1096 '09 Mercedes-Benz C-Class .................................$21,880 $329/mo

1295 utoMax Price 1,880 '12 Toyota Camrv
M1107 '12 Chrysler 200co ..................... ......................$14,880 $225/mo LE A uto M 1189
M1076 '12 Chrysler 300 LIMITED, LOADED..................................$21,880 $329/mo 2O

'12 Dodge Durango AutoMax Price
Crew, Pwr. Hatch M133388
AutoMax Price,23,880 m35 o9 M
'12 DolMge Grand caravan ~1288 '12 Toyota Corolla LE.AUTO ........................................$13,880 $209/mo
12 Dodge Grand Caravan M1290 '12Toyota Prius GREAT MPG GREATPRICE........................$18,880 $285/mo
M1372 '12 Toyota RAV4AUTo...................................... $17,880 $269/mo
SXT, Power Doors f C M1085A M1205 '11 Toyota TacomacREwcAB LEATHER SR5....................$22,880 $329/mo
AutoMax Prkel16.880 255 m


M1418 '10Acrua RDXLowMILES.................$22,880 $329/mo
M347BA '07 BMW 3-Series 3351 TURBO ..........$16,880 $255/mo
M1139A1 '12 CanAm SpyderRS990 ONLY1300MILES....$11,880 $179/mo


M1229 '12 Infiniti G37 Sedan 337 HP, SAVE HUGE.$24,880 $369/mo
M1279 '12 Jeep Grand CherokeeLAREDO......$23,880 $359/mo
M1184C '10 Kawasaki ZX-10 ONLY2800MILES....$4,880
M1127 '12 Kia Sorento 3RD ROW.............. $19,880 $299/mo


12 Hyunnal sonata
GLS, Auto

225 i0
M1264 AtoMax Price s14,880
M1345 '12 Hyundai Genesis Coupe TURBO, ONLY9K MILEs......$18,880 $285/mo
M 1218 '12 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS ..........................................$17,880 $269/mo
M1046 '12 Hyundai Veloster7KMILES,AUTO............................$15,880 $239/mo
12 Hyundai Tucson
GLS

2 5MO AutoMax Price 18,880


AIIAI


12 Nissan Altima
S, Automatic

1225 me


AutoMax Price-14,880
M 1172 '12 Nissan Armadasv,3RDRow..................................25,880 $389/mo
M1328 '12 Nisan Quest, GREATVAN....................................... $17,380 $269/mo
M1329 '12 Nissan Titan sv CREWCABV8..................................$20,880 $315/mo

12 Volkswagen Jetta Sedan
Leather, Nice Car

o 195mo
AutoMax Price12,88
M1291 '12 Volkswagen BeetleALL NEWBODYSTYLE................$14,880 $225/mo
M1249 '12 Volkswagen Passat Leather..................................$14,880 $225/mo
M1359 '12 Volkswagen Tiguan TURBO, NICECROSSOVER...........$16,880 $255/mo
'11 Mazda CX-7 Nice Crossover
I M1122 O 23
AutoMax Price, 15,8809 mo
'12 Mazda CX-9 Leather, Touring
SM1338 329O
AutoMax Prices21,880 .L9 me
M1286 '12 Mitsubishi Eclipse CONVERTIBLE.$13,980 $209/mo
M1287A '09 Suzuki Bandit 437 MILES ALMOST NEW.$4,880
M1015 '08 Volvo C70 CONVERTIBLE, LOADED......$19,980 $299/mo


':0Volkswagen PRE-AUCTIONVEHICLES 'o2Suzuki
I New Beetle XL-7W
S 1,580 WHOLESALE TO THE PUBLIC 63,880
SOLD AS-IS


'01 Dodge Ram 1500..........................$2,680
'95 Nissan Maxima...............................$879
'04 Chevrolet Classic.........................$2,669
'99 Chrysler Town & Country............$3,500
'00 Chrysler Concorde.......................$2,094
'00 Ford Ranger..................................$2,800
'05 Mitsubishi Endeavor...................$4,980
'04 Ford Explorer...........................$3,980
'95 Ford Taurus.................... ..........$995
'02 Kia Rio............................................ $1,850
'01 Buick Regal.................... ...........$2,280
'04 Saturn Vue...................................$3,980
'01 Ford Expedition............................$1,980


M1220A
M1222A
M1243A
M1246A
M1257A
M1260A
M1265A
M1265B
M1266A
M1274A
M1283A
M1294A
M1297B


'05 Kia Spectra...........................$5,980
'09 Chevrolet HHR..........................$7,880
'07 Chevrolet Cobalt..........................$3,500
'03 Mercury Grand Marquis.............$1,500
'06 Jeep Liberty..................................$7,480
'06 Nissan Sentra...............................$2,880
'95 Ford Aerostar Wagon..................$2,539
'03 Toyota Corolla...............................$1,480
'04 Cadillac CTS.................................$5,880
'04 Chevrolet Malibu.........................$3,700
'02 Dodge Neon..................................$1,980
'98 Ford Windstar Wagon.................$1,550
'05 Kia Sedona....................................$1,800


M1301
M1305A
M1309B
M1312A
M1317A
M1343A
M745C
M934C
M944B
M978C
M987C
M987C2
M993A


M1313A1


'07 Toyota FJ Cruiser.......................$19,715
'08 Pontiac G6.....................................$6,880
'98 Nissan Maxima...............................$998
'05 Nissan Titan.................................. $6,500
'04 Cadillac CTS.............................$5,880
'06 Dodge Durango........................$7,880
'03 Dodge Ram 1500....................... $7,880
'02 Mercury Grand Marquis.............$5,980
'99 Dodge Ram Van............................$2,880
'99 Dodge Durango............................$1,880
'04 Jeep Grand Cherokee.................$3,880
'02 Honda Accord Cpe......................$1,980
'03 Ford Focus....................................$3,980


... ..... r-', I '[ 'I W . . . I .... ..... I r-' r- '" .... rI ..... ....I II r-I' I I y I I. . . ... .. .....U I ..... I U I I"d rI-'LU LI ... .... U, )II I, I... .............. I I I I........ It. .I UI /J. ..I I U I ILI I .. .. ....III Ir-, U II I.. ... i


M1313A2
M1035A
M1052A
M1079A
M1086B
M1087C
M1120B
M1139A2
M1140B
M1186B
M1187C
M1192A
M1202A
M1203B


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