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South Marion citizen
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100091/00084
 Material Information
Title: South Marion citizen
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Ocala, Florida
Publication Date: 12-02-2011
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00100091:00084

Full Text



I F ID AY, M 2 0 0 V 17 N 27 0 w I


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Serving S.R. 200 Communities & Businesses


Nostalgic photos
of Marion County
being sought for Web
Look Back and Smile is
a website of nostalgic pho-
tographs of places, things
and events from Marion
County
The National Alliance
on Mental Illness of Mar-
ion County is asking for
community help and in-
volvement in building this
new community resource.
Do you have photos or a
photo history of Ocala or
Marion County that trigger
fond memories of days
gone by? Imagine seeing a
photo of "the old swimming'
hole", or your favorite
burger joint just as you re-
membered it years ago!
We want to hear from you.
Please inform your
membership and anyone
else who may have a photo
archive of Marion County
or Ocala from "Back in the
Day".
To share your pictures
and stories please call
NAMI at 352-368-2405.
Your pictures will live for-
ever on Look-
BackAndSmile.com.

Furniture collection
Marion County Solid
Waste's monthly furniture
collection events are held
at varying recycling centers
throughout the county to
provide more convenient
locations for citizens to
bring their old furniture.
Solid Waste then transports
the furniture to the landfill.
December and January
furniture collection events
are as follows:
Dec. 3 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Canal recycling center
(457 SE 110 St., Ocala)
Dec. 10 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Scrambletown recycling
center (15810 NE Highway
314, Silver Springs).
Jan. 7 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Forest Corner recycling
center (950 S. Highway
314A, Ocklawaha.
Jan. 21 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Blichton recycling center
(13247 N. Highway 27,
Ocala)
Jan. 28 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Hog Valley recycling center
(23621 NE 160 Ave. Road,
Fort McCoy


Bookmark...................... 18
Cherrywood ......................15
Judi's Journal..................... 12
Oak Run............................ 16
O pinion.................................. 8
OTOW...................................31
Out to Pastor..................10
Pun A lley .............................30
Puzzles.......................... 2
Spruce Creek North'.......13


Peace Pole

dedication


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PHOTO AND STORY BY MIKE ROPPEL
The congregation gathers around the Peace Pole as Pastor Hal leads the dedication. More photos can be
found on Page 25

Peace Pole dedicated at First Congregational


After being fed spiritually by
Pastor Hal, the congregation of the
First Congregational Church went
outside to dedicate the new Peace
Pole and be fed Thanksgiving din-
ner.
No one went away hungry and
as usual there were plenty of
desserts for the approximately 150
guests.
The Peace Pole project is the of-
ficial project of the World Peace
Prayer Society
It started in Japan in 1955 by
Masahisa Goi, who decided to ded-
icate his life to spreading the mes-
sage, "May Peace Prevail on
Earth," in response to the bomb-
ings on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Peace Poles are handcrafted mon-
uments erected the world over as
international symbols of peace.
Their purpose is to spread the
message in the languages of the
world.
Goi believed that peace begins
in the heart and mind of each in-


dividual.
As war begins with thoughts of
war, peace begins with thoughts of
peace. The Peace Pole reminds us
to keep peace ever present in our
thoughts.
As we learn to honor one an-
other, our environment, plants, an-
imals and all creation on Earth,
the vision of global peace will
gradually become a natural way of
life, a true culture of peace.
Peace Poles can be found in
town squares, city halls, schools,
places of worship, parks and gar-
dens any place where the spirit
of peace is embraced by people of
good will. Since the beginning of
the project, more than 250,000
Peace Poles have been planted in
more than 200 countries around
the world.
Some of the extraordinary loca-
tions include the Pyramids of El
Giza in Egypt, the Magnetic North
Pole in Canada, Gorky Park in
Russia, and Angkor Wat in Cambo-


dia.
They are promoting healing of
conflict in places like Sarajevo,
the Atomic Bomb Dome in Hi-
roshima and the Allenby Bridge
on the border between Israel and
Jordan.
Many towns and municipalities
across the world have planted
Peace Poles to dedicate their
cities and towns to work for peace.
Both political leaders, such as for-
mer U.S. President Jimmy Carter,
and religious leaders, such as
Pope John Paul II, Mother Teresa
and the Dalai Lama, have dedi-
cated Peace Poles.
The Board of Deacons of our
church sponsored and funded our
Peace Pole project. The languages
inscribed on our Peace Pole are
Arabic, Chinese, English, Hebrew,
Hindu, Russian, Spanish and
Urdu.

Taken from the church bulletin
at First Congregational


D'Clowns visit Quiet Oaks
BY MIKE ROPPEL
Special to the Citizen
The Quiet Oaks Assisted Living facility on 95th Circle
had unusual entertainment on the morning of Nov 14.
D'Clowns from On Top of the World came to see the
residents and put on a show. Several skits were done by
D'Clowns with different groupings to make the residents
laugh and brighten their day
D'Clowns presented the residents with necklaces of
different colors and did a balloon toss with them before
putting on their show.
It was surprising how agile the residents were in send-
ing the balloons back without any balloons getting bro-
ken.
The staff at Quiet Oaks was happy that the residents


PLEASE SEE CLOWNS, PAGE 20


Schools


re-elect


Zanetti,


Crawford

The Marion County School
Board unanimously voted to keep
its current chair and vice-chair
leadership for the next year at a
reorganizational meeting last
week.
Judi Zanetti (District 1) contin-
ues as the board chair. She's also
served as vice-chair. Voters first
elected Zanetti to the School
Board in 2004 then re-elected her
for a second four-year term in
2008.
She recently decided not to run
for re-election next year.
Zanetti is a kindergarten
teacher on leave from the class-
room who joined the district in
1990 as an elementary teacher.
Her bachelor's degree in Elemen-
tary Education comes from the
University of Central Florida. She
is married and has two children in
local public schools. As board
chair, Zanetti will lead twice-
monthly School Board meetings
and year-round work sessions and
serve on various leadership
boards throughout the community
Ron Crawford (District 5), now
serving his fourth consecutive
term on the Marion County School
Board, reprises his role as vice-
chairman. He previously served
as both chair and vice-chair
Crawford joined the board in 1998
and has been re-elected by voters
three times.
His bachelor's degree comes
from the University of South
Florida, and he has over 25 years
of experience in the private busi-
ness world. Other members of the
Marion County School Board in-
clude Angie Boynton (District 4),
Bobby James (District 3), and
Jackie Porter (District 2). With
Boynton absent from the meeting,
the remaining four board mem-
bers also approved the same meet-
ing schedule as in years past -
holding board meetings on the
second and fourth Tuesdays
monthly at 5:30 p.m. at 512 S.E.
Third St. in Ocala.

Smiling resi-
dents are
shown after
the show by
D' Clowns.
From the left,
Paula Magen
(Sunflower),
.E* Ellie Richards
i (Ellie) and
Katherine
Anshewitz
; ?.__ (Skittles) are
Ss D'Clowns in
C this photo-
graph.

-p- PHOTO BY MIKE
I ROPPEL






2 Friday, December 2, 2011


Woman, 81, faces DUI charge


BYJIM CLARK
Editor


Three drivers were cited in the
past week in the southwest
area for driving under the in-
fluence, including an 81-year-old
woman and another woman whose
car almost rear-ended a deputy.
An 81-year-old woman was seen
driving after dark with no headlights
and failing to stay in a single lane.
When the deputy tried to stop
Roberta J. Irwin, 81, of Southwest
96th Avenue, she kept going, but
eventually had to stop when her car
was blocked by traffic.
She told the deputy she didn't
know he was behind her.
According to the report, the deputy
smelled a strong odor of an alcoholic
beverage and allegedly she said she
"probably had too much."
After failing the field sobriety test,
she was taken to jail and was given
two opportunities to complete a
breath test. Only one sample was
taken because she did not perform
the exercise properly, and her breath
was registered at .173, the report
said. The legal limit in Florida is .08.


COP


U Amanda Louise Gaunce, 29, of
Southeast 67th Place in Morriston,
was stopped after her vehicle almost
rear-ended a deputy. The deputy was
traveling about 55 mph on State
Road 200 west of County Road 484
when the vehicle came up behind
him at a high rate of speed, then
came to a sudden stop. He swerved
to avoid the collision and the car
sped past him eastbound, then
turned on 140th Street and then
turned onto 119th Court, where he
conducted a traffic stop.
He asked for her driver's license
and she allegedly said she had left it
at home. However, he was able to get
her Social Security number, and a
check showed that her license had
been suspended in June 2011 for fail-
ure to pay a traffic fine.
She reportedly failed the field so-
briety test and, at the jail, refused to
provide a breath sample.
She was charged with DUI and
driving while license suspended or


revoked.
Jonathan G. Browning, 25, of
Southwest 151st Place in Dunnellon,
was accused of DUI after being
stopped on Southwest 145th Street
and Southwest 85th Avenue for not
wearing a safety belt. After allegedly
failing the field sobriety test, he was
taken to the jail and his breath regis-
tered at.081 and .081 in two samples.
In other cases:
Stefano Albert Squartino, 19, of
110th Avenue in Dunnellon, Cody A
Cook, 19, of North Easter Terrace in
Citrus Springs, and a 17-year-old
were charged with loitering and
prowling after they were found at a
storage facility with gas cans and
hoses. They allegedly told an off-duty
deputy who was at the facility on per-
sonal business that they were going
to siphon gas from rental trucks.
Tishon D. Davis, 34, of Southwest
61st Place, was accused of residen-
tial burglary and petit theft after he
was caught in the enclosed carport of
a home on Southwest 64th Lane
Road in Bahia Oaks. He allegedly
had stolen tools from the home in a
backpack on his person. The owner
of the house was out of town.


Stay motivated and achieve your New Year's resolution


Set Realistic, Measurable Goals

We all like to see results. When you
decide on a resolution for the New
Year, it is important to set goals that
are realistic and measurable. If your
goal is big, such as losing 25 pounds
or completing a marathon, break
your goal into smaller and more
achievable segments. By tracking
your progress in this way, you'll have
a continuous source of motivation to
keep you moving toward fulfilling


your resolution.
Make it Official
Failure it not an option when
everyone is watching. Tell friends,
family members and coworkers and
about your resolution to add an extra
layer of accountability and keep you
motivated. Plus, your friends and
family may also have access to re-
sources or information that can help
you achieve your goals. You also can
make your resolution official by mak-


ing it a standard part of your daily
routine. Schedule time for it each
day and give it the same level of im-
portance as any other appointment
on your calendar. Remember it
takes six weeks of repetition to de-
velop a habit!
Have Fun
No one can do the same thing over
and over and over again without get-
PLEASE SEE RESOLVE, PAGE 3


Marion's Most Wanted

Johnica Floyd, 26, Felony violation of
probation count 1 driving while license
suspended revoked cancel prior of-
fense; count 2 possession of cannabis
less than 20 grams.


SCharles Mcneice, 42, Felony custody
order to revoke bond.




Adrian Mount, 44, Three active
felony warrants for felony count 1 sale
of crack cocaine; count 2 possession of
crack cocaine.



Alvin Overstreet, 30, Three active
felony warrants for felony count 1 sale
of crack cocaine; count 2 possession of
crack cocaine.



William Risley, 22, Felony violation
of probation burglary; felony warrant
count 1 possession of oxycodone.



Samantha Scott, 20, Felony warrant
count 1 grand theft; count 2 dealing in
stolen property.



..AOOS PPL- U
STOPPLRS
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Friday, December 2, 2011 3


SGentle chair yoga

planned in January

Gentle chair yoga at the Freedom Library will be from
10:15 to 11:15 a.m. and continuing on Jan. 14, Feb. 4 and
Feb. 11. For information, contact Ingrid Crane at 352-854-
7950.


4 1Donations of cars

sought by local church

First Congregational United Church of Christ is ac-
cepting vehicles of all types for donation. Vehicles do not
have to be in working condition.
..- All donations are tax-deductible based on book value.
Contact David Keith, 352-598-6272 or the church office at
1 352-237-3035.


In the top photo, JosephCortez,Aurclis Hansen, Grace
Betances, historian; Omar Jaber, vice president;
Ibrahun Jabir, president, Miranda Larkin and LouAnn
Boemio, adviser. Bottom photo, Grace Betances, Alexan
Johnson, adviser, in background; Miranda Larkin,
LouAnn Boemio, OMar Jaber and Aurelis Hansen.


RESOLVE
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2
ting burned out. Expand
your mix of activities in
order to stay on track. If
you get stuck, ask for help
from friends or family to
keep it interesting and
challenging.
Keep a Journal
For many people, jour-
nals are a great source of
motivation and can help
you track your progress. If
sticking to your resolution
gets too difficult, look
through the journal for
some extra motivation.
The hard work that got you
to this point will keep you
from calling it quits.
Get Back on Track
Don't stress if life gets in
the way of accomplishing
your resolution from time
to time. If a few days or
weeks pass you by with no
progress, just renew the
promise you made with
yourself. You can only fail if
you never get back on
track. Stay focused on your
long term goals, the resolu-
tion you have made is for
the entire year, not just the
first few months.
Source: YMCA ofCen-
tral Florida

Read the
classified


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& TREE SERVICE


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dangerous tree removal and rimming,
rock, mulch, paver stones, sod and more.
FREE ESTIMATES
Jeff Jamison 352-321-0404
licensed & insured


Liberty

Middle at

the park
The Kiwanis Builders Club
of Liberty Middle School
.- spent Saturday morning,
Nov. 19,at Liberty Park,
helping the park rangers
upgrade the exercise area.
They helped spread and
i ~'. fill the mulch,which cov-
errs the activity areas for
.. the safety of the players.
""i ""s:" The club adopted the park
and has been assisting
rangers n their work.



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BRIEFS

Tops meets on Fridays
We welcome you at, Tops Chapter 678. You will find our
members, friendly, caring and happy people. Visit with
us about healthy eating for a healthy life.
We meet at Joy Evangelical Lutheran Church, State
Road 200, on any Friday at 9 a.m.
First meeting is free. For more information, call Judy
at 291-7526 or Jan at 854-0775.

Once a Marine, always a Marine
The Marine Corps League Ocala West Detachment in-
vites Marines to join.
The group meets on the first Tuesday of each month at
Angela Santos VFW at 1900 hours.
For further information contact Commandant Don
Eckerdt at 732-0523 or 620-4055.
Former FMF Corpsmen are welcome to join, and the
league accepts associate members (non-Marines).



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4 Friday, December 2, 2011


Community calendar


Friday. Dec. 2 and Sat.. Dec. 3
Coventry Episcopal bazaar, craft sale
Coventry Episcopal Church will be having its second
annual Fall Bazaar and Craft Sale Friday, Dec. 2 (9 a.m.
to 4 p.m.) and Saturday, Dec. 3 (9 a.m. to 3 p.m.). Coven-
try is located on the southwest corner of CR 312 and 475
(20 S.W 87TH Place).

Saturday. Dec. 3

Chess Club to meet
The chess club that formed at the Freedom Public Li-
brary meets the first Saturday of the month, from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m.
Grab your board and chess pieces and come on down.
Interested persons are invited to attend for a rousing
game of chess.
It's your move! For more information, call Ron at 352-
873-2276.

AAUW schedules party
AAUW's 130th anniversary and holiday party will take
place on Dec. 3.
Dr. Diana Greene, assistant superintendent, will be
speaking about changes in education. The luncheon will
start at 11:30 at Horse and Hounds Restaurant, 6998 N.W
U.S. Highway 27. Call 352-465-2609 or 352-624-0007 for
reservations.

Historical Novel group meets
The Florida Chapter of the Historical Novel Society
meets at 1 p.m. on the first Saturday of every month in
the Community Room of the Central Ridge Library in
Beverly Hills.
On Dec. 3, Ben Edney will display and discuss many
of the historical dolls from his extensive collection.
Some of the dolls date from the 1830s and all are dressed
in authentic period costumes. Everyone is welcome to
attend the meeting. For information call Marian Fox 352-
726-0162.

Peripheral Neuropathy Support Group
The next meeting of the Ocala Peripheral Neuropathy
support group will be Saturday, Dec. 3, at 10 a.m. at the
Marion County Sheriff's substation Brian Litz Building,
9048 S.W State Road 200.
All who are interested in learning about the disease


DON'T LET THE FEET PASS YOU BY-

ADVERTISE!

Call 352-854-3986
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Thinking About

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FREE Seminar


plus those who suffer from it are invited. For informa-
tion, call Jack at 352-861-1630.

Marion Oaks event to close road
A temporary road closure will occur on Marion Oaks
Boulevard between the Southwest 148th Place and
Southwest 137th Place intersections on Saturday, Dec. 3,
for a special community event. The closure will take
place from 2 to 5 p.m.
Traffic will be detoured around the event zone. Crews
will place barricades and proper signage. Motorists
should expect delays and are encouraged to use alter-
nate routes when possible.

Sunday% Dec. 4
Christmas Concert by choir
The Central Florida Master Choir, conducted by Dr.
Harold W McSwain, Jr, will perform a Christmas con-
cert on Sunday, December 4, at 3pm at First United
Methodist Church, located at 1126 E. Silver Springs
Boulevard (which is State Road 40) in Ocala.
The program, titled Carols from around the World, will
include the Poulenc Christmas Motet(s), the premiere
of two original works, and carols from the Huron Nation,
Russia, Ukraine, France, Germany, Britain, America and
others.
Admission to the concert is free but an offering will
be taken to benefit the Tuesday Morning Ministry to help
the homeless, jobless, and others in need.
For further information about the concert, call 352-
537-0207.

Wine and cuisine for Hospice benefit
In celebration of the holidays, experience fine wine
and elegant cuisine during a benefit for Hospice of Mar-
ion County at Cuvee Wine and Bistro on Sunday, Dec. 4
from 6 to 9 p.m.
This black-tie optional gala will feature distinctive
gourmet food stations, champagne sangria and other as-
sorted wines.
Entertainment includes music by solo guitarist Tom
LaVenia and silent auction.
Limited reservations are available for this elegant
event benefiting Hospice of Marion County's Children's
Program.
Donation is $75 per person. Tickets are available at
Cuvee and Hospice of Marion County For more infor-
mation, call 352-854-5218.
German American Club dinner dance
The German American Club of Marion County will
host a Christmas dinner dance on Sunday, Dec. 4, at Mar-
ion Oaks Community Center, from noon to 6 p.m. Tickets
are $20 per member and $25 per non-member. Formal
attire is requested.
Dinner will be served at 1 p.m. and includes Virginia





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baked ham with pineapples, slow roasted turkey with
gravy, homemade mashed potatoes with gravy, green
bean casserole, herb stuffing, cranberries, pumpkin pie
and apple pie. BYOB. For tickets, call Liz or Joe at 352-
732-6368.

Sunday= Dec. 4
Breakfast at the Moose
From 9 to 11 a.m., a full individual menu will be of-
fered, including eggs any style, potatoes, juice, coffee,
choices of meats, at a great price. Come before or after
church.
The lodge is at 10411 S.W 110th St. Phone is 352-854-
2200.

Wednesday Dec. 7
Bingo at the Moose
Bingo at the Moose, open to the public, on Wednesday
at 1 p.m. Big winnings are possible.
Variety of lunch specialties. Join us for fun and friend-
ship while supporting the lodge and it's charitable en-
deavors. Located just one mile north of the State Road
200 main entrance of Oak Run, 10411 S.W 110th St.
Phone is 352-854-2200.

ThursdaN Dec. 8
Palm Cay GOP plans party
On Dec. 8, the Palm Cay Republican Club will be hold-
ing its Christmas party at the Oasis Club. Dinner will be
for members and guests and will begin at 7 p.m. Every-
body is asked to bring a dish to pass or dessert and the
club will be providing the rest of the dinner and bever-
age.
This is always such a joyful time for all of us, please
plan to attend.
RSVPs are necessary, and notices will be arriving in
your mail soon.
For more information please contact James Pettus,
352-438-9662.

Get on board with literacy
United Way invites families for a fun evening of read-
ing and crafts, Thursday, Dec. 8 at the Marion County
Public Library Headquarters on Silver Springs Boule-
vard from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
United Way invites the community to "ride the polar
express" in support of the organization's education work
Join us for a free family event.
Crafts, light refreshments and the reading of the Polar
Express will take place.
For more information, contact Chris Cotter at 352-732-
9696.


C U T H M A R I 0 N

itlizenFA
The South Marion Citizen is a free community newspaper covering
news of communities in southwest Marion County including Oak Run,
Pine Run, Palm Cay, On Top of the World, Kingsland Country Estates,
Countryside Farms, Marion Landing, Majestic Oaks, Hidden Lake,
Woods and Meadows Estates, Paddock Farms, Saddle Oak Club, Deer
Creek, Cherywood Estates, Hardwood Trails, Candler Hills, Country
Oaks, and Harvest Meadows, among others.
Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala,
Fla., 34477.
Problems getting the Citizen: If your community is listed above and
the Citizen is not delivered to your home and you are having trouble get-
ting the paper from boxes around the S.R. 200 Corridor, call 854-3986
CONTACT INFORMATION
(352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 854-9277
8810 S.W. State Road 200, Suite 103, Ocala, FL 34481
*Editor- Jim Clark
SCirculation Barbara Jaggers
*Inside Sales/Office Coordinator- Michel Northsea
*Advertising Sales -Tom Rapplean and Susie Mirabile
*General Manager- John Provost
Deadline for news:
Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication.
Deadline for classified ads: Deadline for display advertising:
Tuesday 4 p.m. before publication Monday 5 p.m. before publication
"I'PF Member of the Community Papers of Florida


I want to get news in the Citizen.
Call editor Jim Clark at
352-854-3986 or send by e-mail to
editor@smcitizen.com
Community news and photos must be received by Friday the week before
publication. Mail and photos may be left at the Citizen office in Kingsland
Plaza. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.


Crossroads Country
Kitchen
Tuesday, Dec. 6 2:00 pm
Complimentary lunch will be provided


Bob Evans
(in front of Walmart SR 200
Wednesday, Dec. 7 2:00 pm
Complimentary Farmhouse lunch will be provided

352-728-0093
Please call for reservations Limited Seating

P n O s e. a

"Please, First-Time Attendees Only"
"Florida's Oldest and Largest"
NATIONAL CREMATION SOCIETY


u www:smcitizMencom I






Friday, December 2, 2011 5


Friday Dec. 9
Youth Symphony concert set
The Ocala Youth Symphony is excited to announce the
beginning of its 13th year.
The first concert will be on Friday, Dec. 9 at 7 p.m. on
the downtown Ocala square, where the group will be
playing Christmas music with the Ocala Symphony Or-
chestra.
The Ocala Youth Symphony is composed of amazing
musicians ranging in age from 8 to 18, and serves the ed-
ucation and professional development of young musi-
cians from the Ocala/Marion County and surrounding
areas.
The works selected range from the classics to contem-
porary, something for everyone's musical taste. All con-
certs are free and open to the public.
For information, call 352-873-6738.
Saturday Dec. 10
Methodist breakfast, cookie, craft sale
The Methodist Men will serve their famous and deli-
cious all-can-you-eat breakfast and the Methodist
Women will hold their Christmas Cookie and Craft Sale
together on Saturday, Dec. 10 from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.
Ocala West United Methodist Church 9330 S.W 105th
St., Ocala. Look for the signs.
A complete menu with a wide variety of breakfast fare
is offered for $5.
Make plans now to bring your friends and attend. All
proceeds help fund a variety of local charities.


Robert A. Stermer, LL.M (TAX)
Allorney At Law
Eslale Planning Wills Trusts Real Esdlae Probale
Corporations Medicaid Qualifing Tax law
7480 SW SR 200 Ocala, FL 34476


No Charge for Initial Consultation
The hinng ofa lawyer is an important decuion that should not be based solely upon


Holiday Cookie Walk set
First Congregational United Church of Christ will hold
its annual Holiday Cookie Walk on Saturday, Dec. 10
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Enrichment Center, 7171 S.W
State Road 200.
Members bake and beautifully decorate their favorite
holiday cookies -- the choices are endless (including
sugar-free and gluten-free). New this year -- Ginger-
bread Houses. Decorated bags provided; choose your
own cookies; $3.50/dozen or $6.00/2 dozen.
Vendors wanted for yard sale
The Crossroads Community Church is hosting a large
yard sale Dec. 10, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Spaces are $10 with tables available for an additional
$5.
The church is at 8070 S.W 60th Ave.
Call Ron, 352-598-2878, to save your space.
Christmas Dinner Dance
The Ladies Guild is hosting a traditional Christmas
Turkey Dinner at St. Jude Catholic Community, 443 Mar-
ion Oaks Drive in Marion Oaks, on Saturday Dec. 10 at
5:30 p.m. Tickets are only $12 per person for adults and
$6 for children under the age of 12 and can be obtained
from the St. Jude office or by calling 352-347-0154.
Sunday Dec. 11
Mega book sale set
A mega book sale to benefit Sheltering Hands Rescue,
featuring used books, CDs, videos and crafts, will be
Sunday, Dec. 11, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at



BED BUGS I DUnMELLON?
4 Yes, but we treat for them
and we have travel spray.
Call Today!

STAR (352) 489-8040
TERMITE & PEST 5185AW. Dunnellon Rd.
CONTROL Dunnellon


Kiefer Realty, Dillen Plaza at 8720 S.W Hwy 200,


Kiefer Realty, Dillen Plaza at 8720 S.W Hwy. 200,
Ocala. For information, call 352-291-1962.
Tuesday Dec. 13
Christmas Program at UCC
Enjoy an afternoon of holiday music and story-telling
at First Congregational United Church of Christ (7171
S.W State Road 200); Tuesday, Dec. 13 at 2 p.m., featuring
vocals, duets and instrumentals of traditional Christmas
music as well as a sing-a-long of your favorite Christmas
carols.
Refreshments will be served following the program.
All are welcome.
Thursday Dec. 15
Red Tail chapter to meet
The December meeting of the Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association (AFA) will be
Thursday, Dec. 15 at 7 p.m. at the Ocala Regional Airport
Administration Building 750 S.W 60th Ave., Ocala.
This is our annual food drive in conjunction with Mar-
ion County Vets Helping Vets.
Please bring your donation of non-perishable food to
this meeting.
Any questions call Mike Emig at 352-854-8328


More calendar

today on Page 6




SIT-N-PRETTY1
352-854-5654
S Jasmine Plaza SR 200 & Airport Rd. I
.C .-I Closed Sun. & Wed.
I THE HOLIDAYS ARE COMING! I
I HAVE YOUR PETS SIT-N-PRETTY I
S10% OFF FULL GROOM
NEW CUSTOMERS ONLY, W/COUPON
Walk-in's Welcome. Appointments appreciated.


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OPN






6 Friday, December 2, 2011


BREAKING NEWS: THE RESULTS ARE IN!







Munroe Regional

is not the only hospital

to win the Consumer Choice

Award as Most Preferred

Hospital nine years in a row.



There are a few others:



Mayo Clinic

Rochester, MN


Massachusetts General Hospital

Boston, MA


Cedars Sinai Medical Center

Los Angeles, CA


Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland, OH



Pretty good company,

don't you think?





We are very proud to have won the Consumer Choice Award as Marion
County's Most Preferred Hospital for the ninth year in a row-a distinction
that few other hospitals in America share. But we're even more proud that,
in those nine years, we've welcomed almost 23,000 babies into the world;
we have treated more than 828,000 people in our Emergency Department;
and we have cared for more than 1.5 million in-patients and outpatients.
Those are our real accomplishments. And tomorrow, just like every other
day, our physicians, nurses, employees and volunteers will go to work for
our 331,298 owners-our friends and neighbors in Marion County who
own Munroe Regional.

We do it because we have a responsibility to them and because we believe
everyone deserves a hospital this good.

Learn more at www.MunroeRegional.com.


2011 2012
NA-.TIuONAL RiTER-h
Corporation

Munroe Regional is proud to have won
the prestigious Consumer Choice Award
as Marion County's Most Preferred
Hospital for Overall Qualityand Image
and Best Doctors and Nurses for the
ninth consecutive year-one ofonly
nine hospitals in Florida to win nine or
more times consecutively.


Munroe
Regional
Medical Center


Find a Munroe Quality physician
close to home. CallMunroe Regional's
Health Resource Line at352-867-8181.


Ocala, FL 1


Thursday Dec. 15
Mandatory United Way orientation
United Way of Marion County invites
501 (3) non-profit human social service
agencies serving Marion County, to apply
for a two-year funding cycle that goes
from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2014.
Applications will be available on-line
beginning on Monday, Dec. 12 at
www.uwmc.org. Organizations interested
in applying must attend the mandatory
orientation session taking place on Thurs-
day, Dec. 15 from 10 a.m. to noon at the
United Way of Marion County's Bonnie
Health Community Room, at 1401 N.E.
2nd St., Ocala. Currently, United Way of
Marion County partners with 21 local pro-
grams that assist in supporting the needs
of the residents of Marion County.
Due to limited seating RSVPs are en-
couraged. RSVP to Barbara Bombara at
bbombara@uwmc.org or at 732-9696 ext.
204.
Friday Dec. 16
Pro-am golf to benefit Hospice
The 19th annual Hospice of Marion
County, Inc. Pro-am tournament is sched-
uled for Friday, Dec. 16 at Golden Hills
Country Club just off Highway 27, 4.3
miles west of 1-75.
Don't miss an opportunity to play this
fantastic course, which was the home of
the 2009 USGA Women's Mid-Amateur
Championship.
All teams consist of four amateurs and
one golf professional. The cost is $150/am-
ateur and $100/pro, which includes a buf-
fet breakfast, greens fees, cart and awards
dinner.
Proceeds from this tournament help to
provide care and support to patients and
families of Hospice of Marion County who
are facing a most difficult and challenging
time in their lives. For more information
and registration, please call the Pro Shop
at 352-629-7980.


Sunday Dec. 18
Breakfast at the Moose
From 9 to 11 a.m., a full individual menu
will be offered, including eggs any style,
potatoes, juice, coffee, choices of meats,
at a great price. Come before or after
church.
The lodge is at 10411 S.W 110th St.
Phone is 352-854-2200.
Monday Dec. 19
Retired Nurses to hold party
The RNR Christmas party will be on
Dec. 19 at the Inverness Golf & Country
Club.
The entertainment will be a barbershop
group called, "The Young & the Rest of Us"
and the charity unwrapped toys for the
Salvation Army
Cost for the luncheon is $15. Call Gladys
at 352-861-0261 or Mary Jane at 352-726-
6882 for reservations before Dec. 15.
Fiday Dec. 31
United Way Day of Caring deadline
United Way of Marion County will hold
the 19th annual Day of Caring on Satur-
day, Feb. 25, 2012.
Day of Caring offers businesses, indi-
viduals, organizations and civic clubs the
opportunity to help local nonprofit
human service agencies accomplish
much-needed projects during one day of
organized volunteerism.
Volunteer work teams who are inter-
ested in participating or community or-
ganizations that have projects that need
to be completed can fill out an application
at wwwuwmc.org.
The deadline for team and project ap-
plications is Friday, Dec. 31.
For more information, contact Tina
Banner at 352-732-9696 or
tbanner@uwmc.org.


u www:smcitizMencom I


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Friday, December 2, 2011 7


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10966 SW 86th Terrace
2/2/1, 1100 sq. ft.- Frame
Dogwood
Rarbara Carnra 8R12-0f626


10943 SW 83rd. Ave
2/2/2.5, 1,000 sq. ft. Frame
Savannah
I niLis Pare 361-d419


Homes are arranged by price
from (1) lowest to (24) highest.
The number in the lower, left hand
corner of the picture shows the
home's location on the man.


8110 SW 108th St. Road
2/1/1, 906 sq. ft. Frame
SCustom
Jerry Brooks 274-0930


8120 SW 117th Loop
2/2/2, 1,332 sq. ft. FrameNinyl
Custom Fairfax
Team #1
Pat McCullough 299-6688


Sloul


9U08 SW 115th LOOp
2/2/1, 1068 sq. ft. CBS
Sausalito
John Kapioski 208-1635


11460 SW 85th Court
2/2/2 w/Den, 1,528 sq. ft. Frame
Newport
Jim Petticrrw 216-5852


10967 SW 82nd Ave.
3/2/2,1,869 sq. ft. Frame/Alum.
Exp. Williamsburg
Team #1
Pat McCullough 299-6688
Charlie Takesian 207-9588


ou4V yW IUotn LOOP
2/2/2, 2002 sq. ft. Frame
St. Augustine
JaeDen Team
JaeAnn Witzgall 615-8794
n nnic Wi7 aml i4R_0731


670U9 SW 11th Street
2/2/1.5, 1,083 sq. ft. CBS
Dover
Peggy Simpson 208-6554


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7887 SW 115th Loop
2/2/2, 1,495 sq. ft. CBS
Chesapeake
John Kapioski 208-1635


11299 SW 78th Circle
2/2/2, w/DEN, 1,543 sq. ft. CBS
Montclair
John Kapioski 208-1635

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8802 SW 116th PI. Rd.
3/2/2, 1,736 sq. ft. Frame
Williamsburg
John Kapioski 208-1635
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11398 SW 69th Circle
2/2/2, 1,251 sq. ft.- CBS
Greenbriar
Patty Dougherty 502-3096


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11644 SW 70th Court
2/2/2, 1,541 sq. ft. -CBS
Exp. Yorkshire
Pat Stimmel 895-5160
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11478 SW 78th Circle
2/2/2, 1,300 sq. ft. CBS
Nantucket
Louise Pace 361-4312


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8UUI SW 115th Loop
3/2/2, 1,596 sq. ft. CBS
Biscayne Villa
Lou Serago 804-0159


11000 3 vW turn ,our
3/2/2, 1,597 sq. ft. CBS
Doral Great Room
Lois Lane 789-4516
Lou Serago 804-0159


11133 VV Iworo terrace
3/2/2, 1,580 sq. ft. CBS
Doral Great Room
Team #1
Pat McCullough 299-6688
Charlie Takesian 207-9588


11425 W 8ozna dt. Ka.
3/2.5/2, 2,414 sq. ft. CBS
St. Tropez
Jerry Brooks 274-0930


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11601 SW 70th Ct.
3/2/2, 1,752, sq. ft.- CBS
Augusta
Jim Petticrew 216-5852


I 11725 SW 72nd Circle
2/2/2, w/DEN 1,787 sq. ft. CBS
Tahiti
Lois Lane 789-4516
Lou Seraqo 804-0159


7094 SW 106th Place
3/2/2, 1,915, sq. ft.- CBS
Tuscany Model Home
Jim Petticrew 216-5852


11724 SW 72nd Circle
2/2/2, 2073 sq. ft. CBS
Monaco w/pool, 2 Fireplaces
JaeDen Team
JaeAnn Witzgall 615-8794
Dennis Witzaall 615-8731


11625 SW 72nd Circle
3/2/2, 2,301 sq. ft.- CBS
Palm Beach
Patty Dougherty 502-3096


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8 Friday, December 2, 2011


Opinion


S U T H M A R I O N

Citizen,
PUBLISHER: GERRY MULLIGAN
REGIONAL MANAGER: JOHN PROVOST
EDITOR: JIM CLARK
"In a free society a community newspaper must be aforum
for community opinion."

OUR VIEW



Be generous


this holiday season

W we're now inside one month of the Christmas
holiday, and we have just passed the madden-
ing Thanksgiving weekend with all the stories
of shoppers trampling each other, even using pepper
spray, to get what they wanted in the stores for holiday
gifts.
Many people sit back and read all those stories and
wish they could be part of it ...but their finances won't
allow it. Some are struggling to put food on the table,
much less video games under the tree, if they have a
tree.
For many people, it's time to open up the wallets and
grab some of those extra toys and help those who can't
provide what they want for their families, and espe-
cially for the children.
We carry stories from time to time of various organi-
zations holding charity drives. The West Marion Busi-
ness Association is collecting items that will help keep
people warm: gloves, hats, etc. The Salvation Army ket-
tles are out in full force with the bells ringing as you
enter the various stores, especially the food stores.
The Toys for Tots boxes have been distributed through
the area, including in the South Marion Citizen and
WestMarion Messengeroffice, where you can drop new,
unwrapped toys for the Marine Corps League to
process and distribute for the kids at Christmas. Some
businesses usually have "angel trees" where people can
take a name off a tree and buy a gift for that child.
There are, of course, many food providers that are
helping get people something to eat for the holidays.
So no matter what your favorite charity is, do some-
thing to help. The folks in Marion County have always
been giving and caring, and we should all become a part
of that.
Christmas is much more gratifying when you know
you've made it better for someone you don't even know.
All of Marion County's needy thank you in advance for
your generosity.


It's been 70 years

Prior to Sept. 11, 2001, it was the worst sneak attack
against the U.S. in history It was 70 years ago next
Wednesday that the Japanese attacked Pearl Har-
bor, providing the impetus for the entrance of the
United States into World War II.
The war didn't end until nearly four years later when
atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Na-
gasaki, bringing Japan to its knees while the U.S. was
also winning in Europe.
Pearl Harbor is gradually fading into history. The
youngest people who were in the military then are
about 88 years old today, meaning that there are fewer
and fewer people left who remember that fateful "date
in infamy"
Most of us are now conditioned to remember Sept. 11,
because it occurred in the lifetime of many of us. But to
those who still are alive who were in Hawaii on Dec. 7,
1941, it probably doesn't fade from their memories at
all.
So if you know any of these people, let them know you
care on this 70th anniversary.
Ironically, on today's front page you'll find a "Peace
Pole" dedication from a local church. The project was
started by someone from Japan. They obviously haven't
forgotten how that war ended. We have to make sure we
remember how it began.


COMMENTARY


Does this team deserve a bowl game?


Sitting there Saturday night
watching the Florida-FSU
football game, I really got
tired of hearing the announcers
proclaim Florida bowl eligible.
Let me ask you: Does this team
really deserve to be invited to a
bowl game? Is a 6-6 record
enough to send a school on a
bowl trip?
The propaganda coming out of
Gainesville is that it will give the
Gators much more practice for
the young players to get ready for
next season. One announcer said
"It's like having an extra spring
practice."
Funny, I always thought a bowl
invitation was a reward for the
players for having a good season.
And if the bowl game is to be
used as plenty of practice for
next year, does that mean that all
the Gator seniors are done? Will
only underclassmen play the
bowl game and practice for the
next few weeks, since it's provid-


ing extra practice for next year?
Will the seniors even make the
trip?
Who am I kidding? It's all
about winning, and it's all about
the money.. nothing else. Forget
these lofty proclamations ...the
school won six games, became
bowl eligible, and will get an in-
vitation somewhere, probably
Jacksonville, because the Gators
"travel well" and the school will
get a good payout.
And that's all that anyone
cares about. The fans will go to
the game, the students will hold
up fingers proclaiming that
they're No. 1.


No. 1 belongs to the winner of
the national championship
game. Unfortunately, it's looking
more and more as if that will be
either LSU or Alabama, a game I
surely don't want to see again.
I'm lobbying for Oregon against
Houston if they both win their
conference titles. I know that
won't happen.
But the Gators? Let them stay
home and root for Billy Dono-
van's basketball team. A 6-6
record shouldn't qualify a team
to go bowling.
As for me, I'm a Notre Dame
fan ...you know, the school that
was smart enough to fire Charlie
Weis. The Irish finished 8-4 and
I'm anxious to see what bowl
they get to. With that record and
a number of close losses, they de-
serve it.
Jim Clark is the editor of the
South Marion Citizen. He can
be reached at editor@smciti-
zen. com or at 352-854-3986.


BY SHELDON RICHMAN
Special to the Citizen
resident Obama's refusal
to rule out military action
against Iran and GOP
contender Mitt Romney's recent
threat of war against Iran -
should appall anyone who be-
lieves, with the free-market lib-
eral Ludwig von Mises, that "not
war, but peace, is the father of all
things."
If the U.S. government or its
client state Israel were to attack
Iran, all hell would break loose.
Thousands of Iranians would
die. That country's infrastruc-
ture would be destroyed, bring-
ing even more death, disease,
and misery And the democratic
Iranian Green Movement, which
is against foreign intervention,
would be destroyed. Iran's gov-
ernment would retaliate by clos-
ing down the Strait of Hormuz,
through which much oil passes,
and launching attacks against
American ground and naval
forces in the region. In short, dis-
aster would follow a U.S. attack
or an Israeli attack which
would be seen, quite rationally,
as a U.S.-backed operation.
What would prompt the mili-
tary assault? The powers that be,
in maneuvers reminiscent of the
buildup to the Iraq war, are try-
ing to frighten the world into be-
lieving that Iran is building a
nuclear weapon. Recent head-
lines in the stenographic news
media would have us believe
that the International Atomic
Energy Agency has confirmed
that the Iranians are working
apace to build a bomb. We are
left with the suggestion that once
they succeed, a nuclear attack
will promptly follow.
This makes little sense. Why


would Iran launch a nuclear at-
tack that would mean certain
oblivion for itself? The U.S. gov-
ernment can destroy the world
with its nukes, and Israel, a nu-
clear power since the 1960s, has
a couple of hundred warheads
ready to go. Unlike Iran, Israel
does not submit to IAEA inspec-
tions. If Iran were developing a
nuclear weapon, it would clearly
be in order to deter the sort of
regime change that occurred in
Iraq and Libya. The difference
between how the U.S. treated
those countries and how it treats
North Korea, which has a nu-
clear weapon, is hard to miss.
But here's the bigger problem
for those ginning up war fever:
There is no evidence Iran is de-
veloping a nuclear weapon! Iran
is being threatened because it
can't prove it's not doing so.
Two U.S. National Intelligence
Estimates, one in 2007 and one in
2011, judged that Iran shut down
its nuclear weapons program in
2003. (NIEs represent the judg-
ment of America's dozen-and-a-
half intelligence agencies.)
But what about the most recent
IAEA report? According to the
Washington Post, intelligence
provided to U.N. nuclear offi-
cials shows that Iran's govern-
ment has mastered the critical
steps needed to build a nuclear
weapon, receiving assistance
from foreign scientists to over-
come key technical hurdles, ac-
cording to Western diplomats
and nuclear experts briefed on
the findings.
Yet if one digs below the sur-
face, one finds that the IAEA cer-
tified that Iran has not diverted
nuclear materials from peaceful
to military purposes. (Uranium
appropriate for medical or
power-generating purposes is


unsuitable for making bombs.)
While the report darkly alludes
to "undeclared nuclear materi-
als," it provides no evidence that
they exist.
Many experts have ridiculed
the politicized report as essen-
tially recycling old dubious alle-
gations. Flynt Leverett and
Hillary Mann Leverett, two Mid-
dle East authorities on President
George W Bush's National Secu-
rity Council, wrote, "The report...
does not in any way demonstrate
that Iran is "developing a nu-
clear weapon." Rather, it once
again affirms, as the IAEA has
for decades, Iran's "non-diver-
sion" of nuclear material. In
other words, even if the Islamic
Republic wanted to build nu-
clear weapons (and Tehran con-
tinues to deny, at the highest
levels of authority, that it wishes
to do so) it does not have the
weapons-grade material essen-
tial to the task...(The) report (fo-
cused) on unsubstantiated
intelligence reports, provided al-
most entirely by the United
States, Israel, and other Western
governments.. in fact, no one has
ever produced a shred of evi-
dence that Iran has ever actually
tried to build a nuclear weapon
or taken a decision to do so."
The Obama administration
says it prefers sanctions and
diplomacy, but as long as Iran is
required to prove a negative, the
chance of war is real. The Amer-
ican military opposes it Iran
would make Iraq look like a
schoolyard yet Obama, Rom-
ney, and other prominent politi-
cal figures rattle their sabers.
This is sheer madness.
Sheldon Richman is senior fel-
low at The Future of Freedom
Foundation (www.fff.org) and ed-
itor of The Freeman magazine.


READER OPINIONS INVITED


> The opinions expressed in South Marion Citizen
editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the
newspaper.
) Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns
or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the
editorial board.
) Groups or individuals are invited to express their
opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns.
) Persons wishing to contact the editor should call
854-3986.
) All letters must be signed and include a phone


number and community name, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and communities will be printed; phone
numbers will not be published or given out.
) We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel,
fairness and good taste. Not all contributions are printed.
) Letters longer than 550 words may be regarded as
columns and printed on a space-available basis, and writ-
ers will be limited to one contribution per week. The
deadline is one week prior to each Friday's issue.
) Send letters to: The South Marion Citizen Editor,
8810 S.W. State Road 200, suite 104, Ocala, FL 34481;
or e-mail editor@smcitizen.com.


GUEST COLUMN

Going to war with Iran would be madness


u www:smcitizMencom I







Friday, December 2, 2011 9


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


Combine dispatch offices
In the Oct. 26 issue of the West Marion
Messenger, one of the front page articles
was "Joint Emergency Dispatch Re-
jected."
After reading that article I was angry
and disappointed. Angry because the city
of Ocala and our county commissioners
let us down again and disappointed be-
cause they are so out of touch.
The agreement to combine the dispatch
service of the county and city makes per-
fect sense. Not only will it cut down on
multiple units showing up at the same
scene it will save the taxpayers a huge
amount of money
The city sent a letter to the commis-
sioners backing out of a previous agree-
ment. Was the reason because one of their
own was going to lose his or her job? If so,
shame on you for giving priority to one of
your own and totally disregarding the rest
of the community
I was not aware of the fact that working
for the city guaranteed you permanent
employment. If that is the case, where do
I go to sign up for that deal?
Three years ago the company that I
work for cut my hours from full-time (40
hours) to part-time (20 hours) per week. I
didn't complain. I felt blessed to still have
a job. My husband and I adjusted our
spending accordingly and learned to live
with our smaller income.
My situation has improved and I am
now working 25-30 hours per week. My
point is that things happen. No one can
guarantee that I will always have my job.
"That's life!" Why should a city employee
receive preferential treatment?
I hope that the city will reconsider its
position on this matter and honor its orig-
inal agreement. It's the right thing to do
for the community as a whole.
KathyJ. Hall
Oak Creek Village

Idle thoughts
During their up-coming 2012 session,
our governor and our state legislators are
considering a plan to create a state sales
tax on purchases made by Florida resi-
dents from out-of-state companies on the
Internet. The new tax is expected to gen-
erate some $450 million in income during
2012 and then increase yearly by sizable
amounts. They are then preparing to use
these new funds to further reduce the cor-
porate income tax on businesses inside
Florida. In the 2011 session they reduced
these business taxes by some $30 million.


Also in the 2011 session, the governor
and the legislators made large changes in
the membership of the Public Service
Commission. The commission has since
become a rubber stamp approval agency
for our public utilities instead of a moni-
toring and governing agency Check your
telephone and electric and water and
sewer bills for the first three months of
this year, compared to your current bills.
The small increases in the fees and
taxes on these bills that were passed on to
us, used to be part of the cost of doing
business for these companies.
That $450 million in increased state in-
come will come from us, the Florida resi-
dents who make Internet purchases. It is
an increase in our taxes. All of our state's
sales taxes are added after the sale and
are not part of the advertised price.
Governor Scott is a Republican, as are
the super majorities in both houses of our
legislative branch. Their dedication to the
continued wealth and profits of Florida's
businesses is obvious. Also obvious is
their knowledge on how to keep their
campaign chests and slush fund buckets
full.
Unfortunately, all of their success is
coming from an increased cost of living
for us, the Florida resident and consumer.
The 2012 elections will be a good oppor-
tunity to show the Republicans that pass-
ing on new taxes and fees to strapped
consumers, while giving tax breaks to
their profitable friends and donors, can
be hazardous to their livelihood.
Bill Farthing
Ocala

A holiday from Stimulus?
The administration and the Congress,
abetted by the press, are in a public de-
bate over whether to extend the 2 percent
tax holiday that was applied to Social Se-
curity last year. The line from the admin-
istration goes something like this: "To
quote Republicans, the last thing we
should do in a recession is to raise taxes.
This will take $1,000 away from every
working class family in America." The
line from some Republicans is: "We have
to find a way to pay for it. And it should
come from reductions in spending ...not
tax increases elsewhere. To do the latter
is merely redistributing the wealth."
We should have learned our lesson with
the original stimulus package in 2009.
Simply put: Keynesian economic theory
has not worked.
Additionally, to take an estimated $240B
from the Social Security trust fund, at a


time when the long-term viability of So-
cial Security is in question, seems ill ad-
vised.
Yes, we would all like to pay zero taxes
..and we are prone to support those in the
administration and the Congress who
want to "give us our money back." How-
ever, there are items in the federal budget
that we must support...and we must sup-
port with our taxes. One such item is de-
fense spending. We are on a track to cut
spending on defense by 20 percent. If the
defense cuts are not changed, we will be
at an all-time post World War II low in de-
fense spending-a mere 2.7 percent of GDP
This comes at a time when we are at war
in multiple places around the world. Fur-
ther, cutting defense by 20 percent would
throw several hundred thousand of our
troops out of work. It would decimate the
defense industrial base causing the loss
of over 1 million jobs.
The Preamble to the Constitution says:
"..provide for the common defense, pro-
mote the general welfare..'. It seems that
our leaders in Washington, D.C., have
mixed up the verbs in this phrase. Per-
haps Presidents Kennedy and Reagan
were not wrong in their decisions to stim-
ulate the economy by increasing defense
spending. Something to think about.
Mike Emig
Air Force Association
Ocala

Don't buy a wolf in sheep's clothing
In Iowa, riverboat casinos started along
the Mississippi River were touted as fam-
ily entertainment. "Bring the kids and
ride the steamboat on the Mississippi."
Historic entertainment they called it.
After much debate, gambling was legal,
but with many restrictions. The most you
could lose each cruise was $200 and the
maximum bet permitted was $5. Kids
could play video games free with an at-
tendant watching. Casino boats were re-
quired to cruise, weather permitting and


would bring in tourists who would spend
millions in the community
Soon after, the maximum bet was
raised, thus the amount one could lose
per trip was eliminated. The $5 kids were
now charged was later raised to $10 and
eventually no one under 21 was permitted
on board. In a short time, "historic enter-
tainment" was segued into hardcore gam-
bling. Cruising was no longer required.
The entertainment was limited to 'Jeff
and Sally," a duo who sang there for years.
Player VIP cards were issued and bus
tours came pouring in. If you lost enough
gambling, meals and benefits were free.
The buses that were to bring hordes of
tourists to town offered no transportation
to stores or restaurants so "tourism" was
non-existent. Casinos were now becoming
land based.
After a while came the restaurant and
store closings, the tales of remorse from
local losers, stories of theft, divorce, bank-
ruptcies and worse, due to the addiction
of gambling. The real losers were the
communities where casinos exist. The
funds previously spent in stores and
restaurants are now in the pockets of big
business and government, not with the
small business which make up the back-
bone of this country
How much coercion and/or bribery will
it take to legalize more gambling in
Florida? We won't know until it is too late.
Harold Imgrund
Oak Run

Urban Meyer to Ohio State a travesty
With the reporting by all the sports net-
works that Urban Meyer is going to Ohio
State. What a travesty My first thought is
to throw up and then to think Ohio people
aren't that stupid. Born and raised in Ohio
in the town of Barnesville, Ohio, my great,
great, great, great, grandfather Levin
Barnes founded, it sickens me to have

PLEASE SEE LETTERS, PAGE 10


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10 Friday, December 2, 2011


This is why I love the month of December


Rev.
James L.
Snyder


OUT



It was a wise person
who divided the year
into 12 months. I really
do not know who came up
with this idea but let me go
on record in saying that it
was a good one. Each
month seems to have its
own peculiar value. Some
months are better than oth-
ers.
For example, I am not a
member of January's fan
club. I am not sure if it is
the longest month of the
year but at times, it sure
seems to be. I mean, after
all of the excitement typi-
cally leading up to the
month of January, is it any
wonder it seems to be such
a dull month.
I could say many things
about some of the other
months of the year but I re-
ally have to say that my fa-
vorite month of the year
has to be December Maybe
this goes back to when I


was a youngster and
looked forward to the
Christmas holiday. I am not
sure because the Christ-
mas holiday does not hold
that much of a fascination
for me. I think it began to
wane when I had to foot
the bill for all of the Christ-
mas activity
I do not love December
because of the shopping.
Right after Thanksgiving
the shopping frenzy begins
and this year several peo-
ple lost their lives. Is it
crazy to go out shopping
like this when everybody
else is out there with the
fierce intent of buying
something and you had
better not get in his or her
way? On the other hand, do
all the crazy people go
shopping?
Well, I am one crazy per-
son that does not go out
and join the rest. I just do
not like shopping. The
month of December is one
of the high shopping
months of the year. It did
not get the reputation be-
cause of my shopping ac-
tivity.
This past week the Gra-
cious Mistress of the Par-
sonage asked me if I
wanted to join her in a
shopping spree. Without
thinking, which is my nor-
mal modus operandi, I
said, "I'd rather be
punched in the nose."
Whack!
When I came to, I pon-
dered the fact that my wife
is so literal when I am try-


ing to be metaphorical. My
nose is doing nicely, thank
you.
Therefore, I do not like
shopping. The month of
December is more than ex-
travagant shopping with
crazy people.
One of my favorite songs
of the season is, "Tis the
season to be jolly" I like
jolly During the Christmas
season, everybody enjoys
seeing jolly people. I like to
exploit the jolliness of my
nature.
I may not be Santa, but I
sure could pass as his twin
brother. Do not think I have
not exploited that part of
my character.
During the holiday sea-
son in the month of De-
cember, nobody bothers
about your weight. In fact,
everybody seems to enjoy
seeing the jolly old man
who is slightly overweight.
I cannot tell you how many
times when out in public
during the month of De-
cember the people come
up to me and said, "Here's
my list. Don't forget me." At
first, I did not quite under-
stand what they were
doing. Now as they place
that sacred list in my hand
I look at them and say, "Ho,
ho, ho." Everybody seems
to enjoy that.
Of course, it can go too
far. One time after my
Santa impression, I hap-
pened to sit down and be-
fore long, there was a line
of youngsters wanting to sit
on my lap. I have since re-


In depth, ongoing Bible Series


on the Life of Jesus Christ

Beginning Dec. 4

(fjJ3ER RIjD (

S Community
Church
Sunday Worship af 10 AM
Wednesday Nighf Bible 9fudy at 6:30 PM
Located one mile west of 9tate Road 200 at 10260 9W lOth street
(turn west across from the entrance to Oak Run)
881-7716
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conservativee,..



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Dr. Harley Tow
Graduate ~U
Moody Bible In


tired my Santa impression,
especially when in public.
What I like about De-
cember is that nobody, and
when I say nobody I am ref-
erencing my wife, worries
about diets. All year long,
my wife is faithful in re-
minding me, "That's not on
your diet. Put it down." I
would say it is like a bro-
ken record but nobody
knows what a record is
anymore let alone a broken
one.
During the holiday in
December she is too busy
baking pies and cookies for
relatives and friends to
think about my diet. Oh,
how I love December.
Perchance somebody in
the course of a conversa-
tion brings up the subject
of diets; the month of De-
cember is a great ready-
made excuse for me.


"I start my diet," I say
with the upmost confi-
dence to anybody inquir-
ing, "next month."
It is amazing to me that
"next month" is never De-
cember. And so, during the
month of December I only
look forward to my diet. It
would be wrong, absolutely
wrong, to begin a diet in
December. If a person
would do that, what do they
do for a New Year's resolu-
tion?
The month of December
is a time to relax and just
enjoy the season. By enjoy-
ing the season, I am think-
ing of those delicious
Christmas cookies baking
in the oven, in the kitchen,
in my presence.
It would be a shame not
to taste one. After all, what
if they were no good? What
if this batch of cookies,


baking in the oven right
now, turned out to be bad?
It is my patriotic duty to en-
sure that those Christmas
cookies are delicious.
For me, December is a
very sacred purpose.
Solomon, the wisest man
who ever lived, said, "To
every thing there is a sea-
son, and a time to every
purpose under the heaven"
(Ecclesiastes 3:1 KJV).
My purpose is to exploit
the entire month of De-
cember

The Rev James L. Sny-
der is pastor of the Family
of God Fellowship, Ocala.
He lives with his wife,
Martha, in Silver Springs
Shores. Call him at 352-
687-4240 or e-mail jamess-
nyder2@att.net. The
church website is
www. whatafellowship. com


RELIGION


Christ's Church
of Marion County
Saturday, Dec. 3: Men's
Prayer Group, 9 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 4: Sunday
School, 9:30 a.m. Worship
Service, 10:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 6: Women's
Ministry Leadership Team
Meeting, 5:15 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 7: Bible
Study, "It's Not About Me", 7
p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 18: Christ-
mas Musical "Unspeakable
Joy," 10:30 a.m. Everyone is


invited to enjoy the beauti-
ful music of the Christmas
season.
Christ's Church of Mari-
onCounty, 6768 S.W 80th St.
(off State Road 200), Ocala.
Phone is 352-861-6182 or
www.ccomc.org.

Episcopal Church
of the Advent
Here are the following
dates and services for
Christmas and New Year's
Day:
Christmas Services


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Christmas Eve: 5 p.m. -
Family Service Holy Eu-
charist
Christmas Eve: 10 p.m. -
Solemn High Candlelight
Mass
Christmas Day: 8a.m.
and 10 a.m. Holy Eu-
charist
New Year's Day Sunday
Services: 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.

PLEASE SEE RELIGION, PAGE 11


LETTERS
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

Meyer be associated with
Ohio State. I even directed
band in the "0" in
Ohio/Buckeye Stadium.
But let Meyer get to Ohio
State and I will no longer
support one of the greatest
football programs ever. Just
think Woody Hayes and
Jim Tressel, he's not even
in their class. Wow!
People should remember
that Meyer won two na-
tional championships not
with his recruits but those
of Ron Zook, who was a
wining coach at Florida,
but Florida's president
wanted Meyer so out goes
the Zooker and doing right
well at Illinois. Meyer
feigned illness to leave
Florida, but he never
would say what his condi-
tion might be. He didn't re-
cruit Tim Tebow and when
Tebow graduated Florida
has been going downhill
ever since. Just think of
John Brantley one of
Meyer's recruits and we
can rest our case there.
The news media hypes
up a particular coach or
derides one of the finest
ever, being Joe Paterno,
and all at once Meyer has a
resume that tops all others
but it's on paper only, the
type that's black on white
and read all over which is
a joke.
Oh well, how long will it
take Meyer to claim illness
and have to leave Ohio
State. Let's say losing to
Michigan, Purdue, Michi-
gan State, Nebraska, Penn
State, Illinois and Iowa
should do it. Oh yes, let's
not forget Northwestern
and Minnesota, that should
do it. Poor baby
Bill Ford
Oak Run


u www:smcitizMencom I


0009Y2N






Friday, December 2, 2011 11


RELIGION
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10
- Holy Eucharist
Church of the Advent is
at 11251 S.W Hwy 484 (1.2
Miles west of State Road
200, Ocala)
Office number is 352-465-
7272. Please call for fur-
ther information.

Christian Life Assembly
avid Houck, Executive
Director of Help Agency of
the Forest, will be guest
speaker at Christian Life
Assembly of God on Sun-
day evening, Dec. 11 at 6
p.m. Help Agency of the
Forest serves tens of thou-
sands of underprivileged
and impoverished families
that live in the Ocala Na-
tional Forest. You are in-
vited to come and hear
Rev Houck tell about his
work with the families of
the Forest.
Christian Life Assembly
is currently collecting toys
for impoverished children
of the Forest. We will ac-
cept toys that are new, or in
good condition and work-
ing condition. Help Agency


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of the Forest will pick up
the toys on Sunday, Dec.r
11 and distribute them to
the children. You may
bring toys on Sunday
morning, Sunday evening,
Wednesday evening, or call
the church at 629-9176 to
make arrangements to
bring your toys. The
church is located at 9644
S.W Hwy 484 (near SR 200)
in Ocala.

First Congregational
United Church of Christ
A special program of
music will be presented by
the First Congregational
United Church of Christ
chancel choir on Sunday,
Dec. 11. The featured
scripture and accompany-
ing Christmas Carols will
deal life lessons learned
from the Christmas Story
Join us for this special wor-
ship service at 10:30 a.m.,
7171 S.W State Road 200.

Our Redeemer Lutheran
Midweek Advent serv-
ices will be held at Our Re-
deemer Lutheran Church
located at 5200 S.W State
Road 200. Continuing thru


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Dec. 21, there are two serv-
ices, one at 11 a.m. and
again at 7 p.m. Everyone is
invited to come and wor-
ship with us. For more in-
formation please call
352-237-2233.

Nature Coast Unitarian
Universalist Fellowship
Spinning the top, called
a dreidel, is a traditional
game played at Chanuka.
Judi Siegal, Jewish edu-
cator, and writer, will ex-
plain what the dreidel can
teach us. Judi is speaking
on this topic at the Nature
Coast Unitarian Universal-
ist Fellowship on Dec. 11 at
10:30 a.m., in anticipation
of the Chanukah holiday
later in the month. She is
the President of Congrega-
tion Beth Israel of Ocala,
and will be relating how
the Chanukah story has af-
fected world history This
will be followed by refresh-
ments and discussion at








Saturday, Dec. io
1o:oo am to 2:00 pm
A Variety of
Homemade Cookies
$3.50/dozen or
$6/two dozen
Gingerbread Houses too!
First Congregational United
Church of Christ
7171 SW SR 2oo, Ocala
286-5587


7633 N. Florida Ave. in Cit-
rus Springs. Information
352-465-4225, or nature-
coastuu.org. All are wel-
come.

St. Jude Catholic
Community
The Bereavement Group
for those grieving the loss
of a loved one will meet on
Tuesday Dec. 13 and Dec.
27 at 1 p.m. Meetings are
open to anyone in the com-
munity with a need to
share their feelings of
grief. Please call the
church office at 352-347-
0154 prior to each meeting
you plan to attend.
Creole Masses for the
Haitians in our community
are celebrated every sec-


ond and fourth Sunday of
the month at 5 p.m. The
next dates are Dec. 11 and
Dec. 25.
Every second Sunday,
following the Mass, Dr.
Myriame Vastey, a family
practice physician, pres-
ents a program on the pre-
vention of cholesterol,
diabetes, etc. These meet-
ings are open to all parish-
ioners.
Classes for Spanish as a
second language are of-
fered every Thursday at
11:30 a.m.
Several spiritual events
are being made available
to us as make our journey
through Advent to Christ-
mas. First is the Anointing
of the Sick Mass on Satur-
day, Dec. 3, at 10:30 a.m.


Lunch will be provided fol-
lowing the Mass. Next is
the Feast of the Immacu-
late Conception on Thurs-
day, Dec. 8. Masses will be
celebrated at 8 a.m. and 7
p.m.
Fr. Fernando Gil will
present an Advent Mission
in both English and Span-
ish. The English is set for
Saturday, Dec. 10, from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. The Spanish
is the following Saturday,
Dec. 17, from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. On Wednesday, Dec.
14, the Advent Penance
Service will be at 7 p.m.
with several priests in at-
tendance.
The Spanish Posada cel-
ebration will take place
every evening at 6:30 p.m.
Dec. 15 through Dec. 23.


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12 Friday, December 2, 2011


In honor of Jewish Book Month


JUDI'S


J ews have
the People
for century
we could be ca
pie of the boo
are forever p
with texts. In f;
is a text-bas


with its emphasis on the
Torah, Prophets, Writings,
Talmud and all the com-
mentaries.
With all the attention
given to books, it is no won-
der that Jews have set
aside a whole month to
highlight and promote
J u di writings of Jewish interest
S i e g a I and/or by Jewish authors.
Actually it was a librar-
ian at the Boston Public Li-
brary who came up with
the idea.
- In 1925, Fanny Goldstein
set up an exhibit at the li-
brary to promote Jewish
books, similar to the dis-
been called plays we have here in our
Sof the Book libraries that focus on
ies. Actually timely monthly topics. The
led the peo- display was to focus on
ks since we what she called Jewish
reoccupiedd Book Week. The idea
act, Judaism caught the attention of
ed religion Rabbi S. Felix Mendelsohn


of Chicago and in 1927,
with the rabbi's help, the
idea spread throughout
American communities.
For the first 15 years of its
existence, the festival coin-
cided with Lag B'Omer,
which is a holiday that fit-
tingly, honors scholars.
In 1940, the event date
was changed to the days
and weeks preceding
Chanukah so that people
would be encouraged to
buy books as gifts for the
holiday Jewish Book Week
became so popular that in
1943, the event was length-
ened to a whole month in-
stead of just one week
Today, the popular event
is celebrated with book
readings and signing by
authors, meet the author
teas and other events ded-
icated to books and Jewish
scholarship.
The festival is sponsored
by the Jewish Book Coun-
cil. (wwwjewishbookcoun-
cil.org)
The exact date varies be-
cause of the nature of the
Jewish calendar but it is al-
ways the month before
Chanukah, typically mid


Every Day


There's Something

Different To

Look Forward To.


Daily Dinner Features

Monday Fried Pork Chops with choice of two vegetables
Tuesday Butter Baked Chicken with choice of two vegetables
Wednesday Broccoli Cheddar Chicken with choice of two vegetables
Thursday Turkey n' Dressing with choice of two additional vegetables
All-Day Weekend Features
Friday Fish ry 11 am to Close
Choose from our farm raised catfish, cut thin and tossed in a blend of cornmeal and
seasonings. Or try our traditional Cod Fillets, hand dipped in our own special batter
and fried to a golden brown. Served with Steak Fries and Cole Slaw.
Saturday Chicken n' Rice 11 am to Close
Made from scratch. Our chicken tenderloin simmered in a hearty chicken gravy and
served atop a bed of seasoned rice along with two vegetables.
Sunday Homestyle Chicken 11 am to Close
Enjoy two chicken breast fillets dipped in fresh buttermilk and hand breaded in our
kitchen. Served with choice of two vegetables.


Old Country Store

1-75 & S.R. 200, Exit 350 (352) 854-7870
Hours: Sunday-Thursday 6am-10pm, Friday & Saturday 6am-llpm =::
We promise to provide quality service to everyone on an equal basis. 1-800-333-9566
S2007 CBOCS Properties, Inc.


November or so till the
middle of December.
There are many Jewish
books and authors to
choose from and I offer a
few that are classic in na-
ture:
Chaim Potok (The Cho-
sen) Elie Wiesel (Night)
Arthur Miller (Death of a
Salesman) Betty Friedan
(The Feminine Mystique)
Abraham Sacher (History
of the Jews) Theodore
White (won a Pulitzer for
general non-fiction) Den-
nis Prager (Nine Questions
People Ask About Judaism)
Herman Wouk (This Is My
God) Philip Roth (Good
bye, Columbus) Leon Uris
(Exodus) and I.B. Singer
and Saul Bellow who both
won Nobel prizes.
More recent novelists in-
clude Michael Chabon,
Nicole Krauss, Naomi
Ragen and Dara Horn
whose novel All Other
Nights concerned a Jewish
soldier during the Civil
War.
The themes of Jewish
novels are varied. Many
rail against their Jewish
backgrounds such as in


Marjorie M
while others
glimpse into the
very observant
Naomi Ragen's
Still others t
days of the
shetls and the
Jews in Easter
pre-World War I
topic of the Hc
well represent
novels and fic
real-life expert
Elie Wiesel.
Other topics i
similation into
can milieu,
religion, politics
issues.
And, of course
many books v
Jewish history, p
and traditions
most observant
liberal.
Whether you
visit the library
electronic read
bound to find
book to spark yo
And you have
month to enjoy!
(Jewish Book
observed in 2011
21 to s Dec. 21.)


TAILWINi
AFE M at Landmark
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orningstar
give us a
Life of the
such as in
works.


Chanukah


on the

Square


;ell of the Chanukah The Festival
European of Lights for many of us
life of the brings back fond memories
rn Europe of childhood years and
[I. And the serves to renew our sense
holocaust is of identity The Chanukah
d with the lights provide us with
action cum warmth, joy, strength and
riences of inspiration. Such is the
purpose of a community-
nclude as- wide celebration to be held
theAmeri- at the Ocala City Square
Zionism, this Chanukah.
; and social The Chabad Jewish Cen-
ter of Marion County and
e, there are The Villages is inviting the
written on entire community to cele-
)eoplehood brate the Festival of Lights
from the at a public Menorah kin-
to the very dling ceremony The grand
Chanukah celebration will
go on line, take place on Wednesday,
' or use an Dec. 21, at 6 p.m. at the
er, you are Ocala City Square in
a Jewish Downtown Ocala.
ur interest. Public dignitaries and
a whole community leaders will at-
tend the ceremony and will
Month is assist in kindling the giant
1 from Nov "Menorah of Freedom."
Following the kindling,
the program will feature
Chanukah gifts and treats,
music, clowns, balloons
and more.
Chanukah, a celebration
for all time is highlighted
by the kindling of the
Menorah each night of the
holiday "It is a holiday that
enriches our lives with the
light of tradition" said
Rabbi Yossi Hecht, direc-
tor of the Chabad Jewish
Center. "In ancient times
our ancestors rededicated
Sthe Temple in Jerusalem
with the Menorah. Today,
we rededicate ourselves to
making this world a better
and brighter place."
)1-0283 Chanukah also propa-
gates the universal mes-
sage that ultimately good
$1.0 will prevail over evil, free-
dom over oppression and
light over darkness.
In its Chanukah outreach
Expires 1216 campaign, Chabad of Mar-
ion County and The Vil-
lages joins thousands of
Chabad centers across the
globe that are staging simi-
lar public displays of the
Menorah and its symbolic
lights. From Australia to
4- + + Africa, Columbia to Hong
SKong, New York City's
Ground zero to the White
# House lawn, hundreds of
thousands will experience
the joy of Chanukah with
Chabad.
SJoin Chabad in a public
Display of unity at this ex-
citing Menorah Lighting
Ceremony Bring the kids
Sand make this your special
SChanukah celebration.
For more information,
contact Chabad of Marion
County and The Villages at
Sinfo@jewishmarion.org or
E call 352-291-2218 visit us at
AiC www.jewishmarion.org.


19~t~ie


Read the
classified


Please use our e-mail

editor@smcitizen.com


u www:smcitizMencom I


I






Friday, December 2, 2011 13


Garage sales a success in Spruce Creek North


Jan
S.Liberio


SPRUCE CREEK



Thanksgiving is over
and most of us ate
way too much. But!
Christmas is three weeks
away so you can diet until
then and be ready to "pig
out" all over again. Don't
forget it is Battle of the
Bulge day on Dec. 16.

Garage sales
It was Spruce Creek
North's community garage
sales on Nov 4 and 5. Barb
Turner is the organizer of
these sales and she re-
ported that the sales went
very well.
There was a steady flow
of vehicles down the
streets. As usual the resi-
dents that had the sales
were very friendly and


ready to offer some good
deals.
This is the first time that
SCN held two community
sales, one in the spring and
another one in the fall. If
all goes well there will be
two again next year.
Thanks to Barb Turner for
organizing these sales.
Turkey Trot dance
Cindy Hutchins reports
that the Turkey Trot dance
was held on Nov 12 and it
was a fun night for all. Dick
Santella was the D.J. and
50/50 tickets were avail-
able. Coffee and desserts
were served. Over 40 peo-
ple attended this dance.
Christmas dinner
The Christmas Dinner
dance tickets were sold
Nov. 30 and Dec. 1. This
event will be on Saturday,
Dec. 10.
If you didn't get your
tickets, call Cindy
Hutchins by Dec. 5 as this
IS the cut-off date.
Entertainment will be
provided by George Trum-
bull. Turkeys will be pre-
pared by Cindy Hutchins,
Norm Simard and Joan
McCarthy It looks to be a
very nice evening. Please
come and join the festivi-
ties.


Pancake Breakfast news
The Nov 26 pancake
breakfast had a lot of new
residents attending. Pan-
cakes, French toast,
sausages, juice coffee or
tea. Price is $3 per person.
The next breakfast will
be Jan. 28.
Many volunteers donate
their time for these break-
fasts. It was so good to see
Tony Falso at the Novem-
ber breakfast. Tony was a
volunteer at these break-
fasts for many years and
we all enjoyed seeing him
there.
Unfortunately we have
to say good-bye to Bill Mi-
randa who was our pan-
cake flipper, also for many
years. He has moved back
up North. We wish him
good health and happiness
and thank him for his years
of devotion.
New Year's Eve dance
The New Year's Eve
dance will be held on Dec.
31. Come and join the fes-
tive residents and guests
who want to bring in the
New Year. Entertainment
will be provided.
Tickets will be sold Dec.
20 and 21. There will be ap-
petizers, finger foods,
desserts and beverages.
$12.50 per person. 50/50
tickets will be available.


BYOB Come and bring in
the New Year with friends
and neighbors.
Milestone birthday
SCN resident Fern
Eberly is celebrating her
90th birthday on Dec. 17.
Fern has been a very active
volunteer for many years
and still continues to do-
nate her time and bound-
less energy What a
wonderful life she has led
and all the residents wish
her many more happy,
healthy years.
Happy Birthday Fern!
Christmas and Hanukkah
Everywhere you look it
is Christmas time. It is all
over so fast so hope you
plan to enjoy it with family
and friends. Also Happy
Hanukkah to all who cele-
brate this occasion.


Dog walkers
It always seems this time
of the year is when I get
several e-mails about dog
walkers. So here goes folks.
If you walk your dog
please be considerate of
your neighbors' yards. If
you have had permission
to let your dog leave his or
her "calling cards," make
sure it is okay with them
(with the understanding it
will be picked up). If you
don't have this permission
it is more courteous not to
let your dog go in other
lawns as many residents do
not want these "deposits."
SCN Library
Our library has come a
long way in the past few
years.
There used to be a small
area in a corner of the
clubhouse for some books.
But it has grown to occupy


the card room with many
bookcases filled with dif-
ferent selections, which
are mostly donated to the
library from SCN resi-
dents. Joan Walsh does a
fantastic job organizing
these books plus Dee With-
erell has a section devoted
to puzzles. She has done a
wonderful job of keeping
these puzzles in order.
Thanks to both these ladies
for jobs well done. The li-
brary is open to all resi-
dents of SCN.
Pearl Harbor Day
Pearl Harbor Day is Dec.
7. Let us not forget this day
in history
Jan Liberio resides in
Spruce Creek North with
her hubby Jim. She can be
reached via e-mail at Jn-
Liber@aol.com or drop a
message at the clubhouse
in the mail slots.


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In|nnvan


liccepting goc 3mps -..a I




14 Friday, December 2, 2011


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I






Friday, December 2, 2011 15


Cherrywood holds successful celebration of Veterans Day


Fun-N-Sun games were
held in the afternoon with
fun-seeking residents par-
ticipating in bocce, horse-
shoes, shuffleboard and
putting. Brats, hotdogs and
hamburgers were served
in the afternoon. But ...
here is the best part of the
Nancy day It would not have been
SArche possible without all you
Arcer wonderful volunteers who
really made this celebra-
tion the success that we'd
OOD hoped for. There are too
many names to list
(kitchen, serving line, grill
master. clean up crew, etc.),
so thank you to each and
rywood Vet- everyone for lending a
ub celebra- hand to not only the Vets'
veterans Day Club but the community as
access. There well. It's a great feeling to
nt breakfast know so manywere willing
y Our cere- to say, "Can I help." We also
all veterans extend our deep apprecia-
1 a.m. with tion to all the residents


our own Color Guard
Marching (cold but proud).
Guest speaker was Mile
Curran, Past Commander
of VFW Post 4781.




Contribute
to Toys
for Tots
in our
office


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who came out and sup-
ported the Cherrywood
Veterans Club in this fund-
raising endeavor.
Ladies luncheon
We meet on the second
Wednesday, of each month
at noon in the clubhouse at
Cherrywood Estates. The
ladies are asked to bring a
special covered dish to
share. Don't forget to bring
your place setting and a
beverage too. We provide
hot coffee, and door prizes
and special guests and a
50/50 drawing.
Our mission is to give
back to the community as
best as we can. So far we
have collected candy for
the Marion County Sher-
iff's Office Halloween
Children's Party This
month we collected items
to be shipped to our sol-


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(352) 861-2088 HEAD




Adjacent to Quiet Oaks offRt. 200 next to Walmart


ders overseas.
Our speaker was Norel-
ren Pickell of "Support our
Soldiers." Her mission is to
collect, pack and send
these items to our soldiers.
We had a great response
and enjoyed Norelren's
special message.
Our holiday luncheon
will be Wednesday, Dec. 14
at noon. Christmas music
will be provided by our
own "Cherrywood Song-
birds." The ladies are
asked to bring stuffed ani-
mals, dolls and toys for the
Marion County Sheriff's
Office. These items will be
to comfort children in dis-
tress. A representative will


be on hand to speak to us
and to explain their proj-
ect and receive our gifts for
them.
Please join us to enjoy
the holiday's and sing with
our Cherrywood Song-
birds.
Thank you, Zoe Milnes.
Cherrywood Democrats
Just wanted to let you all
know that the president of
the Democrat Club Harri-
ett Scarpino has taken a
fall and had to spend a few
days at West Marion Hospi-
tal. She is now resting com-
fortably at TimberRidge in
room 307A Please feel free
to send her a get well card


or a note to let her know
you are thinking about her
during this holiday season.
I'm sure it would make her
feel better so much faster
to know she has many
friends in Cherrywood that
care.
Please send all your arti-
cles to me by Thursday of
each week so that I can
have time to get them into
the Citizen on time. I enjoy
writing for the Citizen with
mydaughter Christine, and
we have lived in Cherry-
wood for 13 years. Please
send them to my e-mail at
bluejayl0453@live. com.
Until next week, Nancy
and Christine.


Dial #DEP to report environmental crimes


CHERRY



The Cherr
erans Cl
tion of V
was a great sue
was an excelled
to start the da
mony to honor
was held at 1


will answer calls and for-
ward information to DEP
law enforcement person-
nel or emergency respon-
ders for investigation.
Last year, DEP's Bureau
of Emergency Response
responded to more than
2,100 incidents, with more
than 90 percent of those re-
ferred to DEP from State
Warning Point. DEP's Bu-
reau of Environmental In-
vestigations conducted
almost 350 criminal inves-
tigations in 2007, resulting
in 133 arrests.
To help educate and in-
form the public on envi-
ronmental crimes as well
as DEP's law enforcement
activities, the Division of
Law Enforcement this
week unveiled a new Web
site. The site highlights the
division's bureaus of Emer-
gency Response, Environ-
mental Investigations and
Park Police as well as the
Training Center.
Now available online is
emergency contact infor-
mation, tips on recognizing
and reporting environmen-
tal crimes, career profiles
of DEP law enforcement
employees and "notes from
the field" spotlighting real


on-the-job situations faced
by DEP officers.
DEP's Division of Law
Enforcement is responsi-
ble for statewide environ-
mental resource law
enforcement, providing
law enforcement services
to Florida's state parks and
greenways and trails. Divi-
sion personnel investigate
environmental resource
crimes and illegal dredge
and fill activities, and re-
spond to natural disasters,
civil unrest, hazardous ma-
terial incidents and oil
spills that can threaten the
environment.
To report environmental
crime, most wireless cus-
tomers can now dial #DEP
Callers can also report en-
vironmental crimes to the
Environmental Crimes
Hotline at the State Warn-
ing Point by calling 1-877-
272-8335 or
1-877-2-SAVE-FL. General
environmental inquiries
should be directed to DEP
district offices during busi-
ness hours.
For more information on
DEP's Division of Law En-
forcement, visit
www. dep. state.fl.us/law


2012 ENTERTAINMENT S SffE
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Sceuea nd riessujecttochng wthutno ice euce tckt rce ae o rsiensofOnTo fheWol


Special to the Citizen
Floridians now have a
new tool for protecting the
state's natural resources.
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
(DEP) recently announced
that most cell phone cus-
tomers in Florida can dial
#DEP to report environ-
mental crimes, including
illegal dumping of haz-
ardous materials, con-
struction debris, oil drums
and biological waste.
"#DEP helps officers re-
spond quickly and effi-
ciently to environmental
crimes and emergencies,"
said DEP Division of Law
Enforcement Director
Henry Barnet. "DEP's law
enforcement will now have
additional eyes on the
roadways and in the field
to help spot and easily re-
port major crimes against
the environment."
#DEP is an emergency
line for reporting environ-
mental crimes only The
program will allow for
statewide consistency in
the way Floridians, partic-
ularly motorists with cell
phone only access, report
environmental crimes.
State Warning Point staff


I


I www.smcitizen.com I


/ /4

fzt&6







16 Friday, December 2, 2011


Medical Team won't sponsor flu shots next year


clinics, attend our annual
health fair, come and learn
from our speakers bureau
presentations and join us
as we work to keep Oak
Run residents informed
and healthy If there are
specific events or needs
you'd like to see us in-
Ca ro I A n n volved with, please contact
Wheeler any member of the Medical
Team. Have a wonderful,
healthy holiday season!
Your friends from the
Oak Run Medical Team.


At a recent meeting of
the Oak Run Medical
Team it was decided
that in 2012 we will not
sponsor a Flu Shot Clinic
in Oak Run. This decision
was based on a number of
factors, most importantly
because flu shots are pro-
vided by doctors, walk in
clinics, pharmacies and
even discount and grocery
stores, all located within
easy reach of Oak Run.
Due to the wide distribu-
tion of flu shots, the num-
ber who have come to our
clinics has declined greatly
over the years. Sponsoring
a Flu Shot Clinic involves a
large commitment of time
and effort on the part of the
Medical Team volunteers
and sometimes even our
best efforts don't work out
as we planned. The Med-
ical Team has decided to
direct our energies to other
activities that will best
benefit the most people in
our community
The Medical Team says
"thank you" to the many
Oak Run residents who
have supported us in the
past. We appreciate you
and hope you will continue
to support the many activi-
ties the Medical Team pro-
vides in our community
Please continue to have
your blood pressure
checked at our monthly


Troubadours' Program
at the Tree Trim
Christmas is just around
the corner and the Trouba-
dours have been working
very hard on the music
they will be presenting at
Palm Grove on Sunday,
Dec. 4, at 1:30 p.m. for the
Tree Trim.
The music will be fun
and uplifting. Our first
piece "It's the Most Won-
derful Time of the Year"
will set the mood for the
season. Other familiar
arrangements on the pro-
gram are Mel Torme's
"Christmas Song" and the
spiritual "Sweet Little
Jesus Boy" We have a new
Chanukah piece this year
which features a clarinet
obbligato played by C.A
Woodall, guest clarinetist.
Mr. Woodall will also play a
solo entitled "Winter Folly"
accompanied by his wife,
Deanna Woodall. The pro-
gram will also contain a
comical piece called "The
Twelve Days After Christ-
mas" and a very beautiful
number by the popular
English composer John
Rutter.
We will end with an in-
novative medley of carols
called "Rejoice" and the
singing of "Silent Night."
The audience will have an
opportunity to join in a
sing-along of familiar
Christmas songs and to
enjoy a piano solo by our


accompanist, Margaret
Elder.

Veterans' Association
The Oak Run Veterans'
Association will not have a
formal meeting in Decem-
ber. However, let us not for-
get Dec. 7, 2011, will be the
70th anniversary of the
Japanese attack on Pearl
Harbor.
This surprise attack on
the U. S. will be a day
never to be forgotten in
American history Thou-
sands lost their lives, and
no one knew on that day
what was to come in the
following years of what be-
came known as World War
II.
On Dec. 7, 2010, a new
memorial was dedicated to
better serve the millions of
visitors that come to see
the grave yard of so many
brave men and women
who perished. Please be
sure to fly your American
flag on Dec. 7 in remem-
brance of Pearl Harbor
Day We thank all the veter-
ans of the ensuing war for
what they did to save this
country
We apologize that the
scheduled speaker for our
November meeting did not
show up and we hope you
understand. Thank you.

Jewish Social Club
Chanukah Party
The Jewish Social Club
will host a Member Appre-
ciation Chanukah Party on
Wednesday Dec. 21, at 6
p.m. at the Orchid Club.
This party will feature a
full course dinner (stuffed
chicken, latkes, challah,
veggies, dessert platter,
beverages, etc.) catered by
TooJays. Entertainment
will be provided by comedy
magician Mark Allen. Fes-
tive candle lighting and
songs will be led by Dale
Berman.
Ticket sales will be held


at the Orchid Club on Tues-
day, Dec. 6, and Thursday,
Dec. 8, from 9 to 11 a.m.
Members' cost for this
event is only $7. Cost for
friends is $20. Hope to see
you there. For further in-
formation contact Robb
Forman or Steve Lande.

Renaissance Women
The meeting on Nov, 27
produced lots of important
information about upcom-
ing activities. The early
dinner at Royal Oaks will
take place on Wednesday,
Dec. 7. Call Iris at 352-873-
9990 or Pat at 854-7549 to
make your reservation
There will be a luncheon
at Stone Creek on Tuesday,
Dec. 13, at 11:30 a.m., with
a set menu. Call Nancy at
352-237-6475 or Valerie at
352-873-1633 if you wish to
attend.
On the charitable contri-
bution front, Nancy also
wants to remind Renais-
sance Women that she is
collecting towels, bed
linens, etc., that can be
used by the Humane Soci-
ety. Please call her to make
arrangements to con-
tribute your goods. At the
recent meeting a collection
was taken up for Interfaith
Emergency Services.
The money collected will
be added to whatever
money remains in the
group treasury at this time
of the year to make up the
yearly charitable contribu-
tion. If you were unable to
attend the meeting and
wish to make a contribu-
tion to Interfaith through
Renaissance Women, con-
tact Valerie.
Renaissance Women's
fearless leader, Valerie
Oddo, is a host for Oak Run
Travel and will be leading
an evening trip to the Hard
Rock Casino in Tampa on
Jan. 18. The bus(es) will
leave the overflow parking
lot at 3 to 3:15 p.m. and re-
turn before 11 p.m. Cost is


$22 per person, which con-
sists of $20 to the casino, $1
tip to the driver and $1 to
ORHA In return, the
casino will give you $30
worth of play and $5 for
food. Call Valerie at 352-
873-1633 as soon as possi-
ble as she is filling a
second bus. This trip is
open to all Oak Run resi-
dents.
Nancy is planning a Ren-
aissance Women cruise for
early March. So far she has
found two 10 day trips from
Florida to the Panama
Canal, half way through
the canal, a lunch time
cruise around the lake in
the middle of the canal and
return.
These cruises include
stops in places such as
Costa Rica and Colon,
Panama. If you are inter-
ested in a Panama Canal
cruise in March, or if you
have suggestions regarding
other cruises in which you
are interested, get your
head together with Nancy
at 352-237-6475.
Please remember that
the activities of Renais-
sance Women are available
for all Oak Run women, re-
gardless of marital status.
However, if you have a
spouse or significant other,


sorry, they are not eligible
to participate in activities
which are run by the
group. (As stated above, Va-
lerie's trips through Oak
Run Travel are open to all
Oak Run residents.)
The next meeting of
Renaissance Women will
be on Sunday, Jan. 22, at 2
p.m. at Palm Grove.

Little Theatre
Those of you who re-
member Little Theatre's
presentations of "Who's In
Bed With The Butler?" and
"Whose Wives are they
Anyway?" know what great
writers Michael and Susan
Parker are. They are mas-
ters of farce and comedy
and this year's play "Sex
Please, We're Sixty" prom-
ises to be even more zany
Director Patty Waddell has
now concluded her audi-
tions for the play and we
are pleased to announce
that the following friends
and neighbors have been
chosen for roles: Lou
Winkelman as Bud Davis,
Lenny Klatt as Henry
Mitchell, Arline Raguso as
Mrs. Stancliffe, Bonnie
Kreider as Victoria Am-
brose, DiAnne Klatt as

PLEASE SEE OAK RUN, PAGE 17


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OAK RUN
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16


Hillary Hudson and Dee
Gragg as Charmaine Beau-
regard. They are all well
seasoned actors and will
bring their "A" game to the
parts they play
The first show will be
our dinner theatre presen-
tation on March 22, 2012,
with regular performances
on the 23rd through the
25th.
In charge of tickets again
this year is Linda Noel.
She's our angel in the han-
dling of this very time con-
suming job. Linda is now in
the process of picking
ticket sales dates which
will be announced in the
very near future.
Our next meeting date is
on Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. in the
Palm Grove Club and if
you're not a member yet,
please join us and let us
convince you to sign on.

Genealogy Club
The Genealogy Club will
meet on Friday Dec. 16, at
9:30 a.m. in the card room
of the Orchid Club We will
have a round table discus-
sion of family Christmas
traditions. Our meetings
are open to all Oak Run
Residents and their guests.
We always welcome new
people who just want to
visit and see what we are
all about
At this meeting we will
have a sign up sheet for the
holiday party to be held on
Jan. 20.
This party is for all paid
up members of the Club. If
you are not able to make
the meeting on Dec. 16 but


plan to attend the holiday
luncheon in January,
please contact Mary
Buerge at 352-854-7749, so
we can plan just how many
to expect.
Have a very Merry
Christmas.

Oak Run Travel
Passengers on the Emer-
ald Princess cruise in April
will have an informational
meeting on Dec. 12 in the
Orchid Club Card Room.
There will be an update on
the cruise status (almost
sold out) and information
about the ports of call and
shore excursions. At least
one person from each
cabin should plan to at-
tend. Please call Bob or
Cindy Kocher with any
questions.
Paul and Emily Pike still
have a few seats available
for the dinner theatre
show, "Lie, Cheat and Gen-
uflect," at Ed Fletcher's
Dinner Theatre on Sunday,
Jan. 15.
The bus leaves at 2 p.m.
The show is about two
brothers and one has a
gambling problem. He has
borrowed money from loan
shark Pizza Face Petrillo,
who now wants his money
back or else! You have the
recipe for a laugh packed
farce of twists, turns, puns
and pratfalls as Tom
strives mightily to compen-
sate for Billy's "habitual"
errors.
Fire up your sense of
wonder and get ready for
an amazing adventure
back to the time when


flight was a seat-of-the-
pants, moment-to-moment
adrenaline rush and join
us on our trip to Fantasy of
Flight on Wednesday, Jan.
11, in Polk City Call Don
and Carol Forgette for
more information.
"Million Dollar Quartet"
is the smash Broadway
musical, inspired by the
true story of the famed
recording session that
brought together rock 'n'
roll icons Elvis Presley,
Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee
Lewis and Carl Perkins for
the first and only time. This
thrilling musical brings
you inside the recording
studio with four major tal-
ents who came together as
a red-hot rock 'n' roll band
for one unforgettable night.
Call Amelia and Ron Fiore
to join this Sunday, Jan. 8,
trip to Straz Center in
Tampa.

Darts
Join our men and
women playing traditional
pub games (301, Cricket,
etc.) each week. All skill
levels are welcome and
equipment is provided. For
time and place, or for more
information, please call
352-586-1905.

Tennis Club
The month of December
will be busy one with holi-
day parties and families.
But this is also a great time
of year to play tennis now
that it is cooler. On Tues-
days and Thursday at 2:30
p.m. we have open tennis.


This time is open to all Oak
Run residents, and their
guests staying with the res-
idents.
So if your children or
grandchildren want to play,
come on down if they are
visiting you over the holi-
days. For any events com-
ing up please watch the
announcements on the bul-
letin board. Have a great
holiday

Hole In One
Henry Hanscom, well
known Oak Run resident,
had a hole in one with a 5-
iron on the par 3, 122 yard
11th hole at Spruce Creek
Preserve on Nov 21. Wit-
nesses were Bob Lammon,
Joe Woch and Carl Millard.
Henry went on to shoot a
great round of 79. Nice
going Henry!

Royal Oaks Lady Niners
Ladies, be sure to sign
up for the Dec. 15 Holiday
Scramble, meeting, lunch
and cookie exchange! Re-
member to bring your
checks for 2012 dues ($20)
made out to ROLN, if you
haven't given them to Patty
already At the meeting, we
will elect the officers for
2012 The proposed slate is:
Co-Presidents: Eleanor
Cerlenko and Cindy
Kocher
Vice-President: Ilene
Simnowitz
Secretary: Salita Tim-
mermeyer
Treasurer: Patty Waddell
Diana Schmidt won the
"Low Net" game played on


Nov 17. Cindy Kocher was
second, and Elsa Berbig
and Kerry Tims tied for
third. Kerry was also the
winner of the "closest to
the pin" contest.
All ladies living in Oak
Run are welcome to play
with the Lady Niners on
Monday mornings. The tee-
times are noted on the
sign-up sheet in the ladies'
locker room.

Royal Oaks Men's Golf
On Friday, Nov 25, the
game saw 33 men stuffed
with turkey turn out to play
a game of points. The
weather was once again a
plus for the game, and the
only thing that affected the
scores was the added
weight from Thanksgiving
Day
The winners with a score
of 149 were Bob Albright,
Londe Bracale, Paul Cola-
truglio, and Larry Soine.
Second with a score of 143
were Dave Dawson, Jan
Flickinger, and John
Foutty Third with a 139
were Emmett Dowling,
Tom Ducz, John O'Neill,
and Paul Valois. Closest to
the pin were Dale
Wurzburger, Dave Dawson,
Don Aubrey, and Virgil
Hein.
A reminder that the final
tournament of the year will
be the December Ender on
Dec. 9. Sign up sheets are
in the pro shop. It will be
followed by the par 3 "clos-
est to the pin" shootout.
Join the other members for
the last outing of the 2011.


Royal Oaks Women's
18 Hole Golf
On Tuesday, Nov 22, we
played a team event,
"Turkey in the Oven," in
honor of Thanksgiving.
After the 1st hole, the team
decided which player's net
score they would use. After
the 2nd hole the lowest net
of the remaining 3 players
was used. By the 4th hole,
the last player's score had
to be used, thus that player
was the "turkey". The same
routine started again on
holes 5 through 8, 9
through 12, etc. The win-
ners were: First Place -
Sylvia Zappia, Maureen
Edwards, Arlene Klann
and Barb Scozzafava. Sec-
ond Place Kerry Tims,
Salita Timmermeyer, Judy
Klein and Ginger Drake.
Joan O'Brien was "Closest
to the Pin."
Send all items for this
column to Carol Ann
Wheeler at democrat-
carol@deccacable.com no
later than the afternoon of
the Friday before publica-
tion. Note there are no hy-
phens in the address. If
you wish to call her, the
number is in the Oak Run
directory You may send
pictures as jpg attach-
ments. Typed copy or hard
copy photos can be placed
in Carol's cubby across the
street from her house but
should be submitted ear-
lier as they take longer to
process. The names of the
people in all photos must
be included.


Progress Energy offers money-saving tips for decking the halls


For many people, the
holidays mean decorating
fever Whether you put up
one strand of lights or are
in competition with your
neighbors, stringing hun-
dreds of small, colorful
lights is part of the season.
But, your festive displays of
twinkling lights don't have
to mean higher power bills
that put a damper on your
holiday cheer
"Many people get into
the spirit of the season by
hanging string upon string
of lights around their
homes," said Malcolm
Barnes, energy efficiency
manager for Progress En-
ergy Florida. "It is the sea-
son to be festive, and we
encourage people be en-
ergy-wise while decorat-
ing. A small investment in
more efficient lights and
timers can add up to more
jingle in your pocket."
While the blinking lights
and illuminated trees are
symbols of the season,
sometimes we don't realize
how much energy those
bulbs use. The traditional
bulb used for holiday light-
ing is 6 watts. A typical
strand of 50 lights utilizes
300 watts (.3 kilowatts).
That is approximately 3
cents per hour, per strand.
Running these lights just 5
hours a day for 30 days, and
the total cost for one strand
of holiday lights equals
about $4.50. Light up just
10 strands and your cost for
electricity jumps to $45.
Those with larger displays
can see lighting costs add
up quickly


Now, take a look at
LEDs, (Light Emitting
Diodes) and see how you
can save energy as well as
money, with your holiday
lighting. A strand of50 LED
lights uses 4 watts (.004
kilowatts). Using the same
formula as above, the total
cost to run a strand of LED
holiday bulbs for the sea-
son would be less than 6
cents. So, running 10
strands of these lights
would cost less than $6 for
the holiday season.
Remember the 1989
Christmas Vacation
movie? Clark Griswold, the
character who lit his house
with 25,000 bulbs, would
see his electric bill would
drop from about $2,200 to
$30 if he switched to en-
ergy-efficient C9 LED
bulbs.
LEDs are small light
sources that are illumi-
nated by the movement of
electrons through a semi-
conductor material. Ac-
cording to the U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency, the amount of elec-
tricity consumed by just
one 6-watt incandescent
bulb could power 140
LEDs enough to light
two 24-foot strings.
Here are some good rea-
sons why switching to
LEDs makes sense this hol-
iday season.
Energy Efficiency --
LEDs can save up to 98
percent of the electricity
needed to power incandes-
cent light strands. Environ-
mentally Friendly -- LEDs
use less electricity which


can help lower carbon
emissions. Manufacturing
LEDs is more environmen-
tally friendly as well.
Safety LEDs generate
much less heat when they
operate so they are cool to


lu Bird


the touch, and are less
likely to overload a circuit
and cause a fire. Durability
-- LEDs are encased in
hard-to-break plastic ver-
sus the more fragile glass
of incandescent lights and


can last for more than
100,000 hours.
Price The cost of LEDs
is dropping. Many manu-
facturers offer rebates on
qualified LED holiday
lights, so look for bargains


where you shop.
Progress Energy has
more energy saving tips to
keep the Grinch from your
door this holiday season:

PLEASE SEE ENERGY, PAGE 19


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This novel gives you something different to read


Pilot Chip Linton
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your airplane hits a
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you feel the jolting bangs,
and the aircraft rolls fif-
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But on this day the
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"Night Strangers" is a
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Acknowledging that now
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Friday, December 2, 2011 19


ENERGY
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17
Plug your indoor and outdoor lighting displays into a
timer set to run during the earlier evening hours. If you
don't use timers, unplug your lights when you retire for
the evening or leave home.
Instead of adding more lights to your tree, enhance it
with tinsel, mirrored ornaments or other reflective
items.
Plug holiday lights and other electronic decorations
into a power strip to make it convenient to turn them all
off before bedtime and boost energy savings.
Above all else, make safety a priority when decorating
with holiday lights.
Make sure all lights you purchase contain the Under-
writers Laboratories (UL) label, which means they meet
UL safety requirements.
Be sure to use the right type. All lights are labeled for
indoor use, outdoor use, or both.
Check all light sets for frayed wires, damaged sockets,
or cracked insulation. If you find any defects, replace the
entire set.
Ensure all outdoor cords, plugs and sockets are weath-
erproof
Keep electrical connections off the ground, and make
sure wiring is kept clear of drainpipes and railings to
prevent any risk of shock. It's also a good idea to use a
ground fault circuit interrupter on each circuit. If cur-
rent leaks through frayed or damaged wires, the inter-
rupter will shut off the lights.
Don't plug together more light sets than the manufac-
turer allows and only use one extension cord per string.
Watch that you don't overload your electrical circuits.
Circuits in older homes carry a maximum of 1800 watts
each. Most newer home circuits can handle 2400 watts
each.
Safely string your holiday lights; save energy and save
money.
Bright ideas for a festive holiday For more energy-sav-
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NATIONAL CREMATION SOCIETY


Alzheimer's caregivers
can join support group
If you are a caregiver of
a loved one with Dementia
or Alzheimer's disease, or
have been recently diag-
nosed with the disease,
Emeritus Ocala West
would like to invite you to
our monthly support


groups.
In addition to peer sup-
port, the groups will also
invite specialists in the
field who can answer ques-
tions about Dementia and
Alzheimer's disease, its
causes, how a diagnosis is
made and current re-
search, as well as coping
mechanisms for care-


givers.
Emeritus Ocala West
staff will be available to
discuss our unique Join
Their Journey Program.
There is no cost to attend
this group and everyone
who is living with a friend
or family member with De-
mentia or Alzheimer's is
encouraged to attend.


Support groups are the
second Tuesday of each
month from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
or the last Thursday of
every month from 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. Please contact Phyl-
lis Mullins, Memory Care
Director at 352-861-4444 for
more information. Emeri-
tus Ocala West is at 9070
S.W 80th Ave., Ocala.


gaJkes getting the things I need a lIdle easier.


At WellCare we'll help you and your money stay in
good health. Our Medicare Advantage plans give yoL
important things like...


MEDICARE ENROLLMENT ENDS DEC 7!


24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
www.WellCareNow.com


Find out more at an event in your area.


THE VILLAGES
More from your Medicare
GOLDEN CORRAL
3950 WEDGEWOOD LANE
Dec 6
11:00 AM


WellCare is a Coordinated Care plan with a Medicare Advantage contract. Benefits, limitations, co-payments and restrictions may vary by plan and by
county. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or co-payments/co-insurance may change on January 1, 2013. The benefit information
provided herein is a brief summary, not a comprehensive description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. You must continue to pay your
Medicare Part B premium. WellCare uses a formulary. A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with
special needs at sales meetings, call 1-866-829-4931 (TTY 711). A variety of Medicare Advantage, Part D and Special Needs plans may be discussed. Limit one
per person. There is no obligation to enroll Please contact WellCare for details.
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Y0070 NA015979 72675 WCM ADF ENG File and Use 09172011


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20 Friday, December 2, 2011


Moose Lodge activities
Friday, Dec. 2: Fish baked or fried / shrimp beginning
at 5 followed by entertainment.
Saturday, Dec. 3: show me the Money at 2, Queen of
Hearts at 5 followed by a pork chop dinner and karaoke
of Kenny Jackson.
Sunday, Dec. 4: Breakfast from 9 to 11 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 5: Shuffleboard at 12:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 6: Turkey dinner followed by karaoke
entertainment.
Wednesday, Dec. 7: Bingo, open to the public, Women's
Chapter meeting at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 8: cards and games at 1, Wii bowling
and shuffleboard at 6 p.m. -
Friday, Dec. 9: Fish baked or fried / Shrimp starting at
5 followed by Randy Stanley's karaoke.
Christmas Party on Dec. 18 with ham dinner
New Year's Party with N.Y Strip and Shrimp. -,
Tickets in advance at the social quarters. _
For members and signed in, qualified guests.




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PHOTO BY MIKE ROPPEL
In the background are three of D' Clowns posing with some residents after the
show. From the left, Paula Megan (Sunflower), Ellie Richards (Ellie), and Diane
Sistrunk (De De).The residents' smiles were a good indication that they enjoyed the
show very much.


CLOWNS
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
enjoyed the show One skit
with hats was an interac-
tive one after being
demonstrated by a clown.


D'Clowns are always look-
ing for more clowns and
skits.
For information about
D'Clowns call Paula Magen
at 352-873-3433. She has a
few clown outfits available
and information on


makeup.
A facepainting workshop is
scheduled in February so
the clowns can learn dif-
ferent techniques about
face painting when doing it
with kids and wannabe
kids.


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Friday, December 2, 2011 21


Port Citrus aligns itself with planned Ocala project


BY CHRIS VAN ORMER
Citrus County Chronicle

Marion County's plan for an in-
land port would work well with
Citrus County's project for Port
Citrus, the Citrus County Port
Authority Board heard Tuesday
"Yesterday, Nov. 28, we went to
Wildwood with Commissioner
(Rebecca) Bays, and we spoke to
the Ocala 489 Inland Port Proj-
ect," said Port Director Brad
Thorpe, county administrator.
Thorpe said Stonecrest Man-
agement was the developer of
the inland port, and its presi-
dent, Hall Robertson, was pres-
ent.
Thorpe presented an aerial
map of the proposed inland port,
which is composed of 489 acres
of land near Ocala north of U.S.
27 and east of 1-75.
"The inland port is almost to
the phase of construction,"
Thorpe said. "Marion County
and the city of Ocala are infusing
about $25 million in roads and
infrastructure into this port."
Stella Heath, manager of busi-
ness development for Florida
Central Railroad, also was pres-
ent to explain how the Florida
Central Railroad's parent com-
pany, the Pinsly Railroad, could
service the inland port.
"They're putting a rail spur
into this inland port that will
connect to the Pinsly Line, which
eventually connects to CSX Rail-
road that goes up to Jacksonville
and eventually to Waycross,
Georgia," Thorpe said.
Within the Pinsly Railroad, the
Florida Central Railroad oper-
ates 68 miles of track, the Florida
Midland Railroad operates 28


miles of track and the Florida
Northern Railroad operates 104
miles of track.
"We found out from Pinsly
Line, one railroad car equals
four semi trucks," Thorpe said.
"So you can see why railroad for
long haul is very important to the
economy"
Pinsly operates within Citrus
County
"The Pinsly Railroad line is
the current short line that runs
into the Progress Energy plant
right now," Thorpe said. "They
have a long-term lease with CSX
Railroad. They are intercon-
nected to the CSX system
throughout the state of Florida.
"That's why that is such a vital
component of the viability of this
port."
Companies that used Ocala's
inland port for transportation
also would want the option of
transporting products by water,
which would take business to
Port Citrus.
"This is a way for them to get
water access for this inland
port," Thorpe said. "This is a
huge project. They will work
with us to help us develop our
port."
Thorpe reported the presenta-
tions he and port authority mem-
bers have given in surrounding
counties.
On Oct. 11, Thorpe and Port
Authority Chairman Dennis
Damato gave a presentation to
Yankeetown and Inglis, the
towns north of Crystal River that
are in Levy County.
"They were excited about the
possibility of what the port could
do to that community as far as in-
frastructure is concerned and


job creation," Thorpe said.
On Oct 18, Damato and Thorpe
went before the Levy County
Board of County Commissioners.
"They as a group said they
would help in any way they
could," Thorpe said.
On Oct. 29, Port Authority
Board Member Joe Meek, Port
Attorney Richard Wesch and
Thorpe made a presentation to
the Marion County Manufactur-
ers Association.
"As manufacturers, they are al-
ways interested in transporta-
tion modes," Thorpe said.
On Nov 22, Thorpe and Meek
did a presentation before the Cit-
rus County Chamber of Com-
merce Crystal River Area
Council. "This was in response to
getting the word out in a better
way," Thorpe said.
Upcoming presentations will
be given to Marion County Board


of County Commissioners and
the City of Ocala on Dec. 9, to the
Citrus, Marion and Levy Work-
force Connection on Jan. 3, and
to the Marion County Economic
Development Council on Jan. 18.
Cathy Taylor, management and
budget director for the county,
presented a budget for Port Cit-
rus. The Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners (BOCC)
would transfer $28,510 from con-
tingency funds to the Port Citrus
account. Including all contribu-
tions to fund the feasibility study,
the total budget would be
$120,510.
Thorpe presented board mem-
bers the request for qualifica-
tions (RFQ) form to send out to
consultant firms who would want
to conduct the Port Citrus feasi-
bility study Thorpe said more
than 10 interested firms already
have contacted him. The board


accepted the RFQ. The submittal
deadline is Jan. 20.
Chris Lloyd, a Lecanto resi-
dent representing the Citrus
County Council, a consortium of
homeowner associations, civic
clubs, environmental groups and
interested citizens, asked about
the use of the BOCC's general
fund for advancing the Port Cit-
rus project, which would be de-
veloped on private property
Thorpe said the port authority
has no public property on the
site around the barge canal, but
would lease it from private own-
ership to make it public as all
Florida ports must be in public
ownership.
The feasibility study would de-
termine which property the port
authority should lease. The port
authority would then lease the
property to commercial inter-
ests.


Manatees heading for warmer water


BY CATHY KAPULKA
Citrus County Chronicle


HOMOSASSA With the arrival of cooler
weather, the Homosassa River wild manatees have
made the trek up the river seeking warmer water.
In their search, they have discovered the Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
has opened its gates beneath Long River Bridge,
which is inside the park across the spring run.
Susan Strawbridge, park services specialist, said
park staffers are pleased to see about 20 manatees
and manatee calves in the spring bowl Tuesday
morning before the park opened.
"When it gets cold, they are drawn to the spring,"
she said, as she explained the spring water is about
72 to 74 degrees year round. "It seems like the
mothers and the calves come first."
She said the park opened its gates last week


when the weather was still warm, anticipating
cooler weather.
Art Yerian, park manager, said a cold front came
in at about 3 p.m. Monday and by late Monday and
early Tuesday, the manatees started to enter the
spring bowl.
"There were five or six of them playing and
rolling around," he said. "Even with the boardwalk
construction noise, that didn't bother them one bit.
They were having a good time."
He said last year was the first year the gate be-
neath the bridge was opened and about 80 mana-
tees entered the bowl at one time during one of
Florida's cold snaps.
"I think they remembered that they had the ac-
cess last year," he said. "It's really neat when you
see that many up here."

PLEASE SEE MANATEES, PAGE 28


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I www.smcitizen.com I







22 Friday, December 2, 2011


Leisure


ARIES (March 21 to April
19) Your curiosity might not
be appreciated by everyone.
Expect some resistance in
getting answers to your
questions. But stay with it.
You need facts in order to
make important decisions.
TAURUS (April 20 to May
20) Some of the mystery sur-
rounding your recent fiscal
situation soon will be dis-
pelled with a clear explana-
tion. Use this new
knowledge to help you chart
a fresh financial course.
GEMINI (May 21 to June
20) Start your Hanukkah
and Christmas gift buying
now. This will help avoid
problems caused by possible
mid-December delays. A
family member has impor-
tant information.
CANCER (June 21 to July
22) Use a little more sense in
how you plan to spend your
end-of-the-year holiday dol-
lars. Meanwhile, you con-
tinue to gain support for
your stand on a workplace
issue.
LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22)
Wearing that big, loving
Lion's heart of yours on your
sleeve leaves it unprotected.
Let things develop a little
more before you allow your
emotions to spill over.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept
22) You might feel you're not
ready to patch up an unrav-
eled relationship. But the
longer you wait, the more
difficult it will be for all par-
ties to take the first healing
step.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22)
Your end-of-the-year holi-
day plans could be dis-
rupted by something out of
your control, but stay the
course. Ultimately, things
will settle back into a nor-
mal pace.
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov.
21) Your honest approach to
a workplace project earns
you both respect and credit
from those in charge. Mean-
while, that personal prob-
lem still needs to be dealt
with.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to
Dec. 21) Money could be a
little tight this month. This
means the usually bargain-
oblivious Sagittarian should
look for ways to save on end-
of- the-year holidays.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to
Jan. 19) Examine the facts,
and you might find that it's a
wiser move to shift gears
and redirect some of your
goals before the end of the
year. Someone close to you
offers good advice.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to
Feb. 18) Be careful that your
generosity is not abused.
Find out more, both about
the special favors you might
be asked to grant and who is
asking for them.
PISCES (Feb. 19 to March
20) You've come through a
recent rough time in great
shape. Congratulations.
Now go out and enjoy your
well-earned rewards. More
good news comes in mid-De-
cember
BORN THIS WEEK: You
aim for truth, and you usu-
ally find it. Your honesty
earns you the friendship
and respect of others.
2011 King Features
Synd., Inc.


I iOCUS-F


BY
HENRY BOLTINOFF


*euo6 si qeIBM "9 'luaJayip si dno
6uIABLeS 9 '6Bussiu si elppn d 17' "uejay!p s! qouJooc .
*>oelq eje saeoLsg "3 uJaJ!ip s! asJnd l. :saouajDa!(i



Wishing Well

3 5 7 6 3 5 3 6 4 2 4 5 3
I W U A N I I C B S E N T
2 5 4 7 4 5 3 4 8 5 6 7 3
K W D N E I I C I T H C A
6 5 3 2 3 8 5 2 3 2 6 7 3
A H T I E M W P N N N A E
6 7 2 3 4 8 5 2 3 6 4 8 7
G N O W I P I T L E S O N
6 7 5 3 5 4 5 8 6 2 3 6 5
O Y L O L I P R F H V H O


HERE IS A PLEASANT LITTLE GAME that will give you a
message every day. It's a numerical puzzle designed to spell
out your fortune. Count the letters in your first name. If the
number of letters is 6 or more, subtract 4. If the number is less
than 6, add 3. The result is your key number. Start at the up-
per left-hand corner and check one of your key numbers, left
to right. Then read the message the letters under the
checked figures give you.
@ 2011 King Features Synd Inc All rights reserved


SHOCK

Super Crossword TREATMENT


by Linda Thistle


7 6 2

8 9 3 7

9 7 1

4 1 7

5 8 3

2 5 9 4

2 4 6

1 2 5

6 7 3 4

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way
that each row across, each column down and
each small 9-box square contains all of the
numbers from one to nine.




Moderate ** Challenging
*** HOO BOY!
2011 King Features Synd., Inc.


ACROSS
1 Not quite
closed
5 Doris Day
refrain
9 Junket
13 Significance
19 Prepare a
pear
20 Author
Murdoch
21 Run the
show
22 Five iron
23 Electrician's
favorite
rockers?
26 Shorthand
inventor
27 Periwinkle,
e.g.
28 Primeval
upheaval
29 See
14 Down
31 Mil. policy
32 Lassie's
mother
34 Puzzled
37 Word with
song or dive
38 Question for
a tardy
electrician?
44 Figure
46 Nice time
of year
47 Genesis
name
48 Wordy
Webster
50 Eloquent
equine
52 Boa, but
not cobra


55 Raven
maven?
56 Dandy
58 Quick
snacks
60 Roller-
coaster
feeling
62 Apparel
66 Alaric, for
one
68 Buddies
70 South Seas
novel
71 Marie
Saint
72 TV's "-
Haw"
73 Part of
USSR
76 Electrician's
theme
song?
80 "-
Parkington"
('44 film)
81 Gl's
address
82 down
(destroy)
83 Melodious
McEntire
84 Galba's
garment
86 First state
89 Paradise
90 Sleeve type
94 nous
95 Cen.
segments
97 "- -Tiki"
100 Clear the
windshield
101 Loretta of
"M*A*S*H"


DOWN
1 Feigns
2 Dear
fellow?


102 Cuban
currency
105 Ladies of
the lea
107 Hosp. areas
108 "- luego"
111 Electrician's
teatime
treats?
115 Wading bird
117'65
Righteous
Brothers
hit
119 Capote, on
stage
120 "Unforget-
table"
name
121 Born
122 "- Gay"
126 One of the
Titans
130 Fleet
133 Electrician's
favorite
history
subject?
137 Tidy up
138 Relate
139 "So -You"
('77 song)
140 -friendly
141 Borgnine or
Gallo
142 Award for
101 Across
143 Chore
144 Work in the
lab


3 Surface
measure-
ment
4 Dwell
5 "- vous
plait"
6 Skater
Heiden
7 Loaded
8 Sailing
9 Wagner
hero
10 Capek
drama
11 Unwell
12 Italian
specialty
13 Mischievous
14 With 29
Across,
rum
cocktail
15 Washington
hrs.
16 Words
on an
electrician's
sampler?
17 Lasso
18 Mortise's
mate
24 Wilde work
25 Aim
30 Burro
33 Herd word
35 From Z
36 Page
37 Bit of
parsley
38 Singer
Dottie
39 Craving
40 Parent
41 Diamond
authority?


I G O0FIG U R E yLid Titl-


The idea of Go Figure is to arrive
at the figures given at the bot-
tom and right-hand columns of
the diagram by following the
arithmetic signs in the order
they are given (that is, from left
to right and top to bottom). Use
only the numbers below the
diagram to complete its blank
squares and use each of the
nine numbers only once.



Moderate ** Difficult
*** GO FIGURE!


2 3 4 5


6 7 8 9 9


0 2011 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


42 Paulo, 93 Stack
Brazil role
43 Sally 96 Splinter
Struthers' group
birthplace 98 Hold the
45 Both: deed
prefix 99 Safety -
49 Humble 103 "- generis"
house 104 Hospital
51 Prevent worker
53 Torn or 106 Fast way to
Taylor the UK
54 Defect 109 Lodger
57 Perform a 110 Lincoln or
pirouette Lyman
59 "-a Lady" 112 Betting
('71 hit) setting
61 Andes 113 Learn fast?
animal 114 End
63 Donizetti's product
"Lelisir d'-" 115 Cockamamie
64 Got a galley 116 Less
going adorned
65 Fancy 118 Ms. Midler
dessert 123 Leave out
67 Relish 124 Turner of
69 Bedtime "Peyton
reading Place"
73 Mean 125 Hill
Marquis dwellers
74 Removes 127 majesty
the cork 128 Belligerent
75 Poet turned deity
electrician? 129 Spanish
77 Nebbish artist
78 Maris or 131 Enjoyed
Mattingly Thanksgiving
79 "My word!" 132- Plaines,
85 Generation IL
87 La Scala 134 Clear one's
songs throat
88 Moistens 135 Common
91 Pride street name
papa 136 NASA
92 Lot size affirmative


Find at least six differences in details between panels.


u www:smcitizMencom I


,40 Ilk


I


x 24

X +




+ X


S+ 19

27 27






Friday, December 2, 2011 23


Green walls help filter air and water F


E- The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: I've heard of green
roofs, but what are "green walls?" -P.
Spencer, Alcoa, TN
Green walls (also known as biowalls,
vertical gardens or vertical vegetated
complex walls) are wall structures partly
composed of or filled in with growing
plant matter. More than just easy on the
eyes, green walls work like green roofs by
filtering air and water, soaking up carbon
dioxide and helping lessen the "heat is-
land" effect of urban areas while reduc-
ing air conditioning costs in their host
buildings.
The self-proclaimed creator of the ver-
tical garden concept, French botanist
Patrick Blanc, pioneered the use of hy-
droponic cultivation techniques-plants


grow in an irrigated mineral nutrient so-
lution without the need for a soil sub-
strate-to create large green wall
installations in both residential settings
and within larger public structures and
even office buildings from Singapore to
San Francisco and points in between.
Blanc's installations start by placing a
metal frame on a load-bearing wall or
structure.
The frame supports a 10-millimeter-
thick PVC plate, upon which are stapled
two 3-millimeter-thick layers of
polyamide felt. "These layers mimic cliff-
growing mosses and support the roots of
many plants," he says, adding that a net-
work of pipes and valves provides a nu-
trient solution of dissolved minerals
needed for plant growth. "The felt is


Beall's Fashion Show


On Nov. 19,the Beall's store on State Road 200 had a fashion show.There were re-
freshmens and snacks served to all the Beall's customers that attended.The names
of the fashion models shown are,from the left, Linda Sain, Frankie Reed, Betty
Thayer,Joan McCarthy,Joan Horst, Bianca Maysonet, Kathy Paquette and Laura
Ledo. All the fashions are recent and are available for Beall's customers to buy.


EARTH


soaked by capillary action with this nutri-
ent solution, which flows down the wall by
gravity"
"The roots of the plants take up the nu-
trients they need, and excess water is col-
lected at the bottom of the wall by a gutter
before being re-injected into the network
of pipes:
The system works in a closed circuit."
Plants are chosen for their ability to grow
in this type of environment and depend-
ing on available light.
"Each vertical garden is a unique wall
composition of various types of plants that
has to take into account the specific sur-
roundings of the place in which it is cre-
ated," says landscape architect Michael
Hellgren, who founded the firm Vertical
Garden Design in 2004. "It is not only the
colorful interplay between the plants on
a 'green wall' that is fascinating, but also
the appearance of the wall itself, which
changes daily"
Hellgren, who has designed and imple-
mented large green walls in his home
country of Sweden as well as in Spain,
Portugal and Italy, among other locales,
sources plants for his projects from vari-
ous climate zones around the world. His
favorites are so-called "lithophytes":
plants that can grow on rocks, branches
and tree trunks without necessarily being
rooted in soil.
"Among other things these climbing
plants have the enormous advantage of
their roots acting as excellent natural
drainage on the wall," he adds.
While large "vertical gardens" are
surely impressive, critics question the
sustainability of such endeavors, given
the energy inputs needed to run the
pumps and other equipment used to


PHOTO BY NIALL NAPIER, FLICKR
Green walls, or"vertical gardens,"are
walls partly composed of or filled in
with live plant matter.They filter air and
water, soak up carbon dioxide and help
lessen the"heat island"effect of urban
areas while reducing air conditioning
costs in their host buildings. Pictured: a
vertical garden at the Anataeum Hotel
in London.
maintain proper nutrient and air flows,
and the emissions caused by the manu-
facture and transport of specialized ma-
terials.
Also, larger green walls need more
water than rain alone can provide, and
thus don't necessarily save water. But as
the field matures, practitioners are find-
ing wider arrays of plants to choose from
that are better at taking care of them-
selves-and scaling back on inputs and
supporting machinery with the hope that
one day many of the walls will be self-sus-
taining gardens that cleanse our dirty air
and compromised storm water.
Contacts: Patrick Blanc, www.vertical-
gardenpatrickblanc.com; Vertical Garden
Design, www.verticalgardendesign.conm
EarthTalk is written and edited by
Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a
registered trademark ofE The Environ-
mental Magazine (www.emagazine. com).
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earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subscribe:
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24 Friday, December 2, 2011







Easy and Elegant





Recipes for










FAMILY FEATURES

time to pull out all the stops and dazzle your guests with delicious food
and drinks. To set a festive party tone, don't overlook the appetizers
consider them the opening act of your evening. Appetizers offer you the
opportunity to get creative, and crackers are the perfect canvas to show-
case your favorite toppings, spreads and dips during the holidays and year round.
Impress your guests with this sumptuous and easy-to-make Roasted Cremini
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enhance the earthy flavor of mushrooms.
Take your appetizers to new heights with the Spicy Horseradish Mustard and
Kielbasa topping just mix zesty brown mustard with caraway seeds and horse-
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For something a little sweeter, try topping Keebler Town House Original
crackers with a Caramelized Onion, Roasted Pepper and Cinnamon Cheese
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For more recipes and tips for holiday entertaining, visit
www.townhousecrackers.com.

Roasted Cremini Mushrooms with Ricotta-Parmesan Spread
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Total Time 35 minutes
Yield: 24 crackers; 12 servings (1 serving = 2 crackers, 2 teaspoons cheese mixture
plus 1 mushroom)
12 medium cremini mushrooms, halved (about 6 oz. total)
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 cloves garlic, peeled
1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
1/3 cup fresh ricotta cheese
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
24 Keebler Town House Flatbread Crisps Sea Salt and Olive Oil
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1/8 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
In 8 x 8 x 2-inch baking dish toss together mushrooms, oil, garlic and salt. Roast,
uncovered, at 450'F for 20 to 25 minutes or until browned and tender.
Remove garlic from baking dish. In medium bowl, use fork to mash garlic into
paste. Stir in ricotta cheese and Parmesan cheese. Spread on Keebler Town House
Flatbread Crisps Sea Salt and Olive Oil. Top each with mushroom piece. Sprinkle
with parsley and pepper. Serve warm or at room temperature.
Wine Pairing: The ripe red fruit flavors found in entwine Merlot balance the meaty
mushroom and rich cheese flavors of the spread.








Caramelized Onion, Roasted Pepper and Cinnamon Cheese Spread

Caramelized Onion, Roasted Pepper and Cinnamon Cheese Spread
". :.. Prep Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Yield: 24 crackers; 12 servings (1 serving = 2 crackers, 1 1/2 teaspoons cream cheese mixture
plus 1 tablespoon onion mixture)
1 large onion, thinly sliced
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/3 cup roasted red bell peppers, drained and coarsely chopped
J, 2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
1/8 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
1 package (3 oz.) cream cheese, softened
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
24 Keebler Town House Original crackers
In large skillet cook onion in oil, uncovered, over medium-high heat for 15 to 20 minutes or until golden brown, stirring
occasionally.
Stir in bell peppers, parsley, salt and black pepper. Cook over medium heat for 4 minutes more, stirring occasionally.
Meanwhile, in small bowl stir together cream cheese and cinnamon. Spread on Keebler Town House Original crackers.
Top with onion mixture. Serve warm or at room temperature.
Wine Pairing: The sweet onions and tangy red peppers used in this recipe bring out the spiced apple flavors found in
entwine Chardonnay.
Roasted Cremini Mushrooms with Ricotta-Parmesan Spread

Spicy Horseradish Mustard with Kielbasa
Prep Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Yield: 24 crackers; 12 servings (1 serving = 2 crackers, 2 teaspoons mustard i; .
mixture, 1/2 slice kielbasa plus 1 teaspoon pickle relish) 0. .
1 teaspoon caraway seeds
1/4 cup spicy brown mustard
2 tablespoons mayonnaise
2 tablespoons prepared horseradish
8 ounces fresh kielbasa, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices i:I'.
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
24 Keebler Town House Flipsides Original crackers
1/4 cup sweet pickle relish .
In large nonstick skillet heat caraway seeds over medium heat for 2 to 3 minutes
or until fragrant, stirring frequently. In small bowl combine caraway seeds, mustard,
mayonnaise and horseradish. Set aside.
In same skillet cook kielbasa slices in hot oil about 8 minutes or until no longer
pink, turning once halfway through cooking. Drain on paper towels. Cut each slice.
in half.
Spread mustard mixture on pretzel side of Keebler Town House Flipsides Original
crackers. Top with kielbasa piece and relish. Serve warm.
Wine Pairing: entwine Cabernet Sauvignon has a glorious mouthfeel that stands
up to the smoky kielbasa, while the mustard in the recipe makes the wine's rich .
raspberry notes shine.
Spicy Horseradish Mustard with Kielbasa





Friday, December 2, 2011 25


Peace Pole dedication pictures from First Congregational


Above,Thanksgiving dinner is being served by (left
to right) Earl Lovering, Don Fitch, Bob Lockwood,
and Al Brons.At left, Georgina Fitch is looking at
the rolls just before the hungry guests start picking
them up, hoping there will be enough for all the
guests.


PHOTOS BY MIKE ROPPEL
Above, another view of the congregation gathered around the Peace Pole.


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26 Friday, December 2, 2011


Exotic fish boost angling success in Florida


BYBOBWATTENDORF
FWC writer

Florida is the Fishing
Capital of the World be-
cause of its native fishes,
but it also has a variety of
exotic fishes anglers may
pursue. An exotic fish is
one that is not native to the
area in which it is found.
Typically, this is because
people moved them from
one location to another, ei-
ther intentionally or acci-
dentally, resulting in their
illegal release.
To many ecologists, any
organism that is intro-
duced to a place it did not
historically and naturally
occur is a nuisance. How-
ever, when you look
around Florida you will
find many species that are
associated with the Sun-
shine State but were not
here 500 years ago when
the Spanish first landed. In
fact, Spaniards brought
many familiar edibles from
Europe, including oranges,
horses and pigs, which are


still here.
The first exotic fish
species documented in
Florida the common carp
- was stocked around 1877
by the U.S. Fish Commis-
sion. Carp came from Ger-
many and were stocked as
a food fish throughout the
United States. Today in
Florida, common carp are
most abundant in the Pan-
handle and support a small
but avid group of anglers
and bow fishermen.
In addition to common
carp, another 22 species of
fish are established, mean-
ing they have permanent
populations, and 11
species have reproduced
in Florida's fresh waters.
Most successful intruders
came from tropical or sub-
tropical climates. Typical
sources have been the
aquarium trade or individ-
ual pet-fish owners, and
aquaculture facilities that
inadvertently allowed
some stock to escape.
Florida fisheries biolo-
gists have studied nonna-
tive fishes and their
impacts since the late
1960s and established a
Nonnative Fish Research
Laboratory in Boca Raton.
Although laboratory staff
continue to study and be


concerned with nonnative
fishes, they have not docu-
mented measureable neg-
ative impacts on native
fishes or aquatic habitats.
During that time they have
exterminated from con-
fined areas several popula-
tions of exotic fishes that
were discovered early, in-
cluding redbelly piranha,
pirambeba and threespot
ciclid. Natural events, par-
ticularly cold spells, have
eliminated 14 species of
previously reproducing
nonnative fishes from our
waters.
Laboratory staff also
helped develop sterile
triploid grass carp, which
are used (under permit) as
an aquatic-plant-control
tool, and successfully in-
troduced peacock bass as a
biological control for un-
wanted exotic forage
species. Peacocks now sup-
port a sport fishery in
southeast Florida, with an
annual economic benefit of
nearly $11 million.
During the winter cold
snap of 2010, peacock bass,
and many other exotic
fishes, died in large num-
bers.
The exotic fishery on the
L-67A Canal is an excellent
example of how these ex-


otic fishes are being uti-
lized by anglers, and ef-
fects of the cold. The canal
is west of U.S. 27 and south
of Alligator Alley and is
known not only for great
largemouth bass fishing,
but also for a diverse array
of nonnative fish.
Mayan cichlid, oscar and
butterfly peacock bass are
the three most popular
nonnative species in the
canal, but the winter kill in
2010 nearly eliminated
them. Catch rates for
Mayan cichlid and oscar
averaged nine and four
fish per hour, respectively,
from 2000 to 2009, and but-
terfly peacock bass were
producing two fish per
hour of fishing. In the L-
67A Canal, in spite of nu-
merous nonnative fishes,
the average catch rate for
largemouth bass was more


than two bass per hour. For
comparison, a catch rate of
one harvestable large-
mouth bass per four hours
(0.25 fish per hour) is con-
sidered typical in the
southeastern United
States.
Expenditures by anglers
fishing for exotic fishes on
the L-67A Canal during the
past 17 years were esti-
mated at more than $3 mil-
lion.
During that period, an-
glers spent 22 percent of
their time seeking exotics.
When the exotic bite is on,
people travel long dis-
tances to fish the L-67A
Although the unusually
cold winter in 2010 took a
toll on exotics in the canal,
once their populations re-
bound, the amount of time
spent fishing will increase
along with success rates.


Meanwhile, urban canals
around the more southerly
Miami-Homestead area do
not get winter kills quite as
extreme as L-67A, so an-
glers fishing for exotics
have more consistent suc-
cess there.
Besides the entertain-
ment associated with fish-
ing for different and often
very colorful fish comes
the benefit that, except for
peacock bass and triploid
grass carp, nonnative
fishes do not have bag or
size limits.
Anglers are encouraged
to take as many as they can.
It is suggested they be im-
mediately placed on ice
and not released. Most are
good eating, including
Mayan cichlid and oscar, as
well as other exotics such
as brown hoplos and bulls-
eye snakehead.


Rodman Reservoir bass protected


Beginning Dec. 1, it became against the
law to keep any bass from Rodman Reser-
voir in Putnam and Marion counties at
least temporarily The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC)
is implementing the temporary ban on
possessing black bass, which includes
largemouth bass, during the 2011-12 Rod-


man Reservoir Drawdown Project.
The no-harvest rule went into effect at
12:01 a.m., Thursday, Dec. 1, and will end
at 12:01 a.m., on Thursday, March 15,2012.
However, the rule could be rescinded
sooner if conditions warrant.

PLEASE SEE RODMAN, PAGE 27


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Open to the public
December Events
2nd & 4th Fridays
Fish Fry 4:30-6;30 pm
$6 (2 for $10)
1st, 3rd & 5th Fridays
MAVFW Wings or
Shrimp Boats 4-6 pm
Last Tuesday
V Burger with chips
4-6 pm 2 for $2
Wednesday Lunch
11:30- 1:00 pm $4
Last Saturday
Surf & Turf Dinner $12
4:30-6:30
Monday Nite
Bar Bingo 6-8 pm
Friday & Saturday Nites
Karaoke In The Canteen
1st Tuesday
LAVFW Dinner
4:30-6:30 pm $7
Saturday Breakfast
8-10 am $4
Private New Year's Party
call post for details
All events subject to change
873-4781 '


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Friday, December 2, 2011 27


Hunting season a perfect time for conservation-minded gifts


BY KATHY BARCO
FWC writer

The holiday season is
here, bringing with it some
much-appreciated cooler
weather to the Sunshine
State. Many of us will be
taking time off from work,
and children will be out of
school on winter break
soon. For me, this much-
needed vacation provides a
wonderful opportunity to
take to the woods and go
hunting, now that hunting
season is in full swing.
It's also a perfect time to
give children supervised
hunting experiences with
you.
Hunting is a proven and
very necessary tool of
wildlife and habitat man-
agement, especially when
habitat is lost to urbaniza-
tion and wildlife gets dis-
placed because of our
state's ever-growing popu-
lation.
Scientific findings have
shown that those who hunt
and engage in outdoor
recreation with their fami-
lies develop a sense of
stewardship for nature and
a desire to conserve it.
In fact, hunters form a
foundation for wildlife con-
servation. Through the sale
of hunting licenses and
permits, and the excise tax
generated from hunting
equipment, hunters as a
whole pay most of the cost
of wildlife conservation
and research, public land
acquisitions, habitat pro-


RODMAN
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26
"What 'no-harvest' means
is that anyone who catches
a bass at Rodman Reser-
voir must immediately re-
lease it back into the lake,"
said Marty Hale, biological
administrator for the
FWC's Division of Fresh-
water Fisheries in Ocala.
"They may not put it in a
livewell or hang it on a
stringer. They must take it
off the hook and immedi-
ately put it back in the
water."
The area includes all wa-
ters from the County Road
316 Bridge to the George
Kirkpatrick Dam, the barge
canal to Buckman Locks,
Deep Creek to County
Road 310, and Orange
Creek to State Road 315.

Homeschool
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Are you a Marion County
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Read the
classified


tection, science-based fish
and wildlife management
and law enforcement. All
of us get to enjoy the bene-
fits of these efforts.
Even non-hunting
spouses and significant
others can share in the
spirit of stewardship with a
couple of good holiday gift
ideas. For the hunters (or
anglers) in your family or
circle, why not buy them a
five-year license, or make a
stocking-stuffer of a one-
year license? Licenses may
be purchased at
https://wwwl.fl.wildlifeli-
cense.com/start.php.
If they already have one
of those, consider getting


them a conservation li-
cense plate for their vehi-
cle. Not only will one of
them look great on their
truck, recreational vehicle
or car, but in purchasing
one, you will be helping to
conserve wildlife for gen-
erations to come. To order
online, go to
Buyaplate.com. You can
also purchase or renew
any plate at your local tax
collector's office.
Here's how hunters can
enjoy the many traditional
hunting seasons Florida of-
fers:
During general gun sea-
son, which coincides with
holiday-gift-shopping time,


most hunters are in pursuit
of deer, but they also can
bag wild hogs, rabbits, rac-
coons and coyotes. And
quail and gray squirrel sea-
son is in and runs through
March 4. Snipe season is
also in and runs through
Feb. 15 statewide.
Bird hunters wanting to
experience something dif-
ferent should try hunting
woodcock. Woodcock sea-
son runs Dec. 18 Jan. 31
statewide, and they make
excellent game birds be-
cause they provide a chal-
lenging shot when flushed.
Small-game hunting such
as this provides a great op-
portunity to introduce a


kid to the great sport of
hunting.
And for all the duck
hunters out there, the sec-
ond phase of the waterfowl
and coot season will last
through Jan. 29 and in-
cludes geese.
As you can see, the win-
ter holidays provide a
wealth of opportunities,
from sharing time with
family to giving a gift that is
both personal and conser-
vation-minded, to experi-
encing the heritage of
hunting in Florida's great
outdoors. For more infor-
mation on hunting in
Florida, go to
MyFWC.com/Hunting.


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28 Friday, December 2, 2011


MANATEES
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21
He said it was nice to see the mother manatees bring-
ing their calves into the spring bowl and nursing them.
"And this morning it was really cool, when you see the
babies playing," he said.
This year he is hoping for more manatees to seek
refuge in the park, as another gate has been added giv-
ing them more access. He said the "Save the Manatee
Club" paid for the gate, which would make it easier if an
injured manatee enters the park
"We can close that gate and do a rescue here," he said.


"Instead of chasing them down the river."
Yerian said he expects more manatees to enter the
park today with temperatures expected to drop.
The Fishbowl Underwater Observatory in the park is
located just above he main spring, the headwaters of the
Homosassa River.
"This is one of the only places you can see the mana-
tees close up and personal without getting wet," he
added.
He said manatee season runs between Nov 15 and
March 30. For more information on Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, visit wwwfloridas-
tateparks.org/homosassasprings or call 352-628-5343.


Plan now for the holidays.
Get your news to us early.
editor@smcitizen.com


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30 Friday, December 2, 2011


Looking for riches on the _ se'_


anniversary of the Gold Rush 8
y -+- ^F x ^^B-F-^


Dick
Frank


PUN




Polk triggered the
Gold Rush of 1848 by
confirming that gold had
been discovered in Califor-
nia. It actually started ear-
lier in that year but did not
have countrywide public-
ity Our own Ocala gold
rush also started slowly
with a few places buying
gold until now we have va-
























n I :. r// ['l[ lJI, l


cant storefronts, closed gas
stations and previous fast
food joints all open as gold-
buying business.
Gold is now worth about
$1,800 an ounce. In Califor-
nia there's a new gold rush
with gang members now
shooting each other over
control of river bends in-
stead of street corners. In
New York's Central Park
gold chain snatchers are
taking limos to work.
I once tried looking for
gold, but it didn't pan out.

Orator
Two miners struck pay
dirt with their latest claim
but began arguing over
who should get what part
of the treasure. Finally, the
first miner asked, "Do you
want the silver or the
gold?"
The second miner
shrugged his shoulders
and answered, "I don't
care, either ore."

Gold miners
Gold is now so valuable
that large piles of waste,
called tailings, from earlier


mining are being re-
processed. This requires
use of chemicals, including
cyanide, to leach out the
gold. Exposure to the
mineworkers can be quite
hazardous.
The federal government
and the mining industry
are working diligently to
resolve these potentially
unsafe and environmen-
tally unsound processing
practices because it has
been recognized that a
waste is a terrible thing to
mine.

Gold diggers
A gold digger is a woman
after all.
A chorus girl asked an-
other if she'd marry a rich
old man. The second cho-
rus girl said, "Honey, if
somebody offered you a
check for a million dollars,
would you stop to look at
the date?"
I knew she was a gold
digger, so I made her mine.
A great way for a girl to
get a mink is to find a wolf
and skin him.
He's got what it takes,


and she's taking what he's
got.
One day I told her about
my rich uncle. Now she's
my rich aunt.
Half of the women in the
country are working
women. The other half are
working men.

Mine, all mine
A gold miner had worked
hard accumulating a lot of
gold. Near death he prayed
that he could take his
wealth to heaven. After
much fervent prayer, an
angel appeared to him and
said that God will allow
him to take one suitcase
with him.
Just before he died, the
man filled his suitcase with
gold bars. When he arrived
at the pearly gates, St.
Peter said, "You can't bring
that suitcase in here"
The man said God gave
him permission. After
checking, Peter said,
"You're right. You are al-
lowed one carry-on bag,
but I'm supposed to check
its contents before letting it
through."
Peter opened the suit-
case to inspect the items
that the man found too pre-
cious to leave behind and
exclaimed, "You brought
paving blocks?"


editor@.smcitizen.com
editorsmctzencomDick and his wife Jane
live in Oak Run.


Super Crossword
Answers
A A RAMS IE I F I M A P1 E R E
5 3 l7 1 4 6 9L 8 2I I S
S L C S T8 5 4 1
D A M A T A LOS S SWA N
W IR E YOU S O L A T ESI AP E
R F 6 4 2
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P A L S O OO EV A H E
SOmV WA T T NO WMY LO V E M R S
A PO M O W R E B A T O G A
D E L A VVA R E E D E N R AG L AIN
EN S T .Y ES 1 WE C E
H D A R E N T S 0 N E S
BIS E B B TI D E T RU
NA A DN E H E R NMA N AAM P E R E
EIR N E S TIEMM YIT A S KT S


Weekly SUDOKU
Answer

5 3 7 1 4 6 9 8 2
1 8 4 9 3 2 7 6 5
9 2 6 7 8 5 4 1 3
3 4 8 2 9 1 6 5 7
7 9 5 8 6 4 3 2 1




6 7 9 5 1 3248


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Friday, December 2, 2011 31


Master the Possibilities running full early December schedule


BY ELOISE HOLLYFIELD
ejh2025@hotmail.com
Learning opportuni-
ties, entertainment,
and travel are noted
in this week's OTOW Hap-
penings.
Master the Possibilities
The Master the Possibili-
ties Life-Long Learning
Program is running a full
schedule of classes for the
first two weeks of Decem-
ber.
This is a first for them,
and enrollments have been
brisk. There's a variety of
presentations and a won-
derful holiday film series
that are free.
You should take another
look at the catalog because
you'll find some great op-
portunities.
As always, all programs
are open to the public. To
register, call 854-3699 or log
on to masterthepossibili-
ties.com.

Travel Toppers
The Show Palace in
Hudson has an extra spe-
cial show for Christmas
Day! Matthew McGee is
featuring classic numbers
and sketches from their
most popular 15 previous
Christmas shows.
The show and an out-
standing buffet are sure to


OTOW


please everyone. Call Pat
Hood between 9 a.m. and 1
p.m. for any opening or to
be placed on the waiting
list.
On Saturday, Feb. 4,
Travel Toppers is going to
the Show Palace Dinner
Theater to see the musical,
"Hairspray"
Set in 1960s Baltimore,
the musical follows plus
size Tracy Turnbald as she
wins a spot on the local TV
dance program.
Can she vanquish the
reigning princess and find
true love while singing and
dancing without mussing
hair?
Be sure to see the play to
find out!
Reservations begin on
Monday, Dec. 5. Call Au-
drey Mangan between the
hours of 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.
Linda Hein is taking
reservations for a brand
new 25th anniversary pro-
duction of Les Misdrables.
This fantastic play will be
at the Starz Center for the
Performing Arts in Tampa
on Saturday, Feb. 10.
Victor Hugo's class novel
is an epic story about the
survival of the human
spirit.


Thrill to the songs, which
include: I Dreamed a
Dream; On my Own; Bring
Him Home; and Stars.
President Inge Gaitch
has full details on the fol-


lowing extended day trips:
7-day Eastern Caribbean
Cruise on the Grand
Princess, Feb. 25 to March
3; partial transit of Panama
Canal on Zuiderdam,


qteed







The West Marion Business
Association is having a hat,
gloves and socks drive for
the needy in our community.
The drive runs through the
end of the year.



WEST MARION


March 9 to 19; Branson,
Missouri, by air, May 17 to
21; and a 13-day Alaskan
tour and cruise on the Is-
land Princess Aug. 31 to
Sept. 12. Call Inge Gaitch, 9


a.m. to 4 p.m., only

Ocala Youth Symphony
Many On Top of the
PLEASE SEE OTOW, PAGE 32


You can drop off your
donations at these locations:
FWH & Associates Blue Cross and Blue Shield
7651 S.W. State Road 200, Suite 108
Personal Care Medical
6035 S.W. 54 St., Suite 200 (Right off 60th Ave/Airport Rd.)
2nd Chance Consignment & Curves


< both in Jasmine Plaza at 6128 S.W. State Rd. 200
Yours Truly
8449 S.W. State Road 200 in Friendship Plaza
0009VCG


Check out our website

www.smcitizen.com


I www.smcitizen.com I