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 Weathering Weather 2010














Title: South Marion citizen
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100091/00015
 Material Information
Title: South Marion citizen
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Ocala, Florida
Publication Date: July 30, 2010
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates: 29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100091
Volume ID: VID00015
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
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        Page 18
        Page 19
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        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Weathering Weather 2010
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
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Full Text

















Serving S.R. 200 Communities & Businesses


Wind speeds and direction can be checked by Ronald
Goodman of Ocala Pa Ims in his backyard weather sta-
tion. Goodman's story is in today's special section.

'Weathe ri ng Weather

in (Od ay's ed it ion
We are now into the hurricane season, and today the
South Marion Citizen, is publishing an annual special
section titled "Weathering Weather." There is informa-
tion about what to do before, during and after a major
storm, should our area be struck by one this year. In ad-
dition, there's a story about Ronald Goodman of Ocala
Palms, a former meteorologist who has made weather I*',l L
his hobby. It's all in a special section included with
today's paper.


I~~~ .,n~
Spc.Victor Wheeler of Ocala, medic and special weapons exploitation
team member, 663rd Ordinance Company, 3rd Brigade Combat Team,
4th Infantry Division, dusts for fingerprints during a criminal investi-
gation demonstration during a Rule of Law seminar, July 1.The objec-
tive of the seminar was to discuss the process of using evidence to
prosecute those suspected of using explosive devices.


kicks off nind ssonany

students in Marion County
will benefit from the ninth
annual "Operation: Stuff
the Bus" campaign, an
outreach program co-
sponsored by Marion
County Public Schools, the
Military Officers Associa-
tion, Kingdom of the Sun
Chapter and other veter-
ans organizations.
"Operation: Stuff the
Bus" affords local resi-
dents the opportunity to
make a true difference in
a homeless child's life by
donating new school sup-
plies, children and teen
clothing, sneakers, per-
sonal hygiene items, and
financial contributions.
To date, the campaign
has collected nearly
$340,000 in donations and
merchandise, which has
been distributed through
the school district's Home-
less Student program.
A decorated school bus
with ample room to "stuff"
donations inside will sit at
local retail stores from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. according to
the following schedule:
HSaturday, July 31, Wal-
mart State Road 200
aSaturday, Aug. 7,
Harley Davidson of Ocala,
N. 441, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
SSunday, Aug. 8, Mead-
owbrook Church 4741 S.
W. 20th Street
Su e day cuu 1Lv
ernment participation
day) Call Suzanne
McGuire 352-671-6847 for
location.
Checks benefitting "Op-
eration: Stuff the Bus"
should be indicated as
such and made payable to
Operation: Stuff the Bus '
c/o Homeless Children
Program, Marion County
Public Schools, 1517 S.E.
30hAve. #5, Ocala, FL,

For more information,
contact the school dis-
trict's Homeless Children
Program at 352-671-6847
or via email at
Suzanne. McGuire~imar-
ion.kl2.fl.us.



Cop Shop ..............................2
Doug Awad ..........................3
Herb Silverman.................1 9
Lend a Hand.........................6
Marion Landing................1 8
Most Wanted .......................2
Oak Run...............................1 4
OTOW...................................1 7
Out to Pastor.....................1 6
Pu le .............................1


ION


.. r
"r i


, a ,


Though most students and
teachers are on vacation this sum-
mer, several are capturing atten-
tion for their award-winning
efforts.
Despite state-wide concerns on
the 2010 FCAT, 22 Marion County
Public Schools students earned
perfect scores on at least two sec-


tions of the test. Last year, 14 stu-
dents earned similar honors, and
11 did so in 2008.
These 22 students attend the fol-
lowing elementary schools: Dr.
N.H. Jones, Emerald Shores, Ft.
McCoy, Greenway, Madison Street
Academy, Maplewood, Romeo,
Shady Hill, Stanton-Weirsdale,


Sunrise, and Ward-Highlands;
Howard and Osceola Middle
schools; and Belleview and Van-
guard High schools.
As well, 186 students earned
perfect scores in Writing, 145 in
Math, 122 in Reading, and 12 in
Science.
For the second time in four


years, West Port High received
statewide recognition for its com-
mitment to the visual and per-
forming arts. The magnet school
for visual and performing arts stu-
dents received accolades from the
Florida Alliance for Arts Educa-

PLEASE SEE SCHOOLS, PAGE 3


r
r;


:'.:
. g


PFC.KHORI JOHNSON
Special to the Citizen


this whole meeting was to discuss
the process of collecting evidence
and exploiting it, and also, how
that will lead to a warrant, a trial,
and then to a sentence," said Capt.
Tyrone Rankin, South Range,
Mich., native and explosive ordi-
nance disposal officer with the
special weapons exploitation
team of the 663rd Ordinance Com-
pany, 3rd Brigade Combat Team,
4th Infantry Division.
During the discussion, Rankin
and his team went over the steps
for approaching an explosive ord-
nance crime scene: site security,
photography, collecting finger
prints, evidence handling, and re-
porting information.
PLEASE SEE IRAQ, PAGE 3


Law professionals and govern-
ment officials from the Dhi Qar
province in Iraq attended a rule of
law seminar held at the Mittica
Training Center in Nasiriyah,
where they discussed the use of
evidence to prosecute suspects ac-
cused of employing explosive de-
vices.
The seminar was one of many to
stimulate discussion among the
Iraqi populace about a variety of
topics, ranging from federalism to
medical care.
Iraqi judges, lawyers, policemen
and soldiers were in attendance
for the event. "The main focus of


0


SOU T H


MAR


OTOW


features


TOStIVaIS

The next two Saturday evenings
give reason to put on one's danc-
ing shoes and head to the town
square at Circle Square Commons.
On July 31 it's a summer Splash
Party, 6 to 10 p.m. and Aug. 7 it is
the 3rd Annual Island Festival, 5
to 10 p.m.
This Saturday festival goers will
have the opportunity to enjoy sum-
mertime games such as water bal-
loon toss, a hula hoop contest and
more.
A fashion show of summer ap-
parel is also planned.
?Two different bands and special
performances are set to make this
year's Island Festival entertaining
on Saturday, Aug. 7.
From 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. it's sounds
from the islands as Tahiti and a
Latin band, Grupo Salsarengue
are on the stage in the outdoor
area for the On Top of the World
communities, Circle Square Com-
mons.
Island dance are part of the
repertoire for the group Tahiti.
G~rup Sal arehna e Bwil 0, 3

other rhythms to get you up and
Dr ng the free and open to the
public event, a special perform-
ance from the Extension Dance
Studio dancers is scheduled.
Circle Square Commons is at
8409 S.W 80th St.


It's storm? season


in Florida


Even in summer, schools'award-winning efforts recognized


CSI Iraql

Seminar encourages justice through evidence





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Ipm 3 pm


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were given trespass warn-
ings so they can't go back to
that sto ain
In otoe r a rts.
MA54-year-old local man
was accused of retail petit
theft after he allegedly
stole a digital camera and
two packs of rechargeable
batteries at Wal-Mart.
Gerald Barresi of South-
west 27th Avenue report-
edly told officials he
wanted to give the camera
to a friend as a gift.
MASummerfield woman
was accused of DUI after
being stopped on County
Road 484, west of State
Road 200. She told a de puty
she was headed home, but
was going west toward
Dunnellon when she was
stopped. Jessica Skye
Vansant, 35, recorded
breath tests of .182 and
.184. She had a previous
DUI conviction in 2000.








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Marion 's

flOst W~anted


The case of the missing
clams has been solved.
According to a report
from the Marion County
Sheriff's Office, Rande G.
Gavette, 59, ofMarion Oaks
Trail, was arrested for re-
tail grand theft after an in-
vestigation by the Publix in
Canopy Oak.
The report states that the
store was having a problem
with clams being ordered
in large numbers, arriving
at the store and then disap-
pearing. The clams never
showed up as being sold,
but were in the inventory
and were gone.
The assistant store man-
ager asked for help from


the seafood manager, and
got it when he got a report
that 100 pounds of clams
had been ordered again by
Gavette. When he came in
to pick up the clams, the
store official watched him.
He was there along with
his wife, but his wife went
out one door and he went
out the other, allegedly
without paying for them.
He was detained and was
brought back into the store.
When the deputy made
contact, the report states
that Gavette told him that
"he knows what he did was
wrong and he should have
paid for the groceries. The
defendant stated he is liv-


ing on Social Security and
times are tough."
The value was $357.26.
His wife told another
deputy that she had gone
ahead to their car and did-
n't know he wasn't paying
for the clams. The deputy
also noticed a tattoo on the
leg of Gavette and ques-
tioned him about when he
got it, and he allegedly said
that he just got it and paid
$50 for it. The deputy told
him that if he could pay for
the tattoo, he could pay for
the groceries, and the sus-
pect agreed.
He was arrested and
taken to the county 3ail.
Both he and his wife


Jared Lee Charland, 20, warrant, re-
tail petit theft, resisting a merchant,
possession of cannabis less than 20
grams.


Shannon David Duskey, 34, bench
warrant, failure to appear for jury se-
lection, possession of cannabis less
than 20 grams, arraignment possession
open co tainer.


Oris Benjamin Isham Jr., 36, bench
warrant, failure to appear for arraign-
ment, driving while license suspended.
Order to revoke bond.




Holly Keightley, 34, felony violation
of probation, evidence tampering.




Daquana Ermany Sims, 21, order to
take into custody, obtaining property
with worthless check.


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care, custodial care, long term care, etc. How do you
know when a service is needed, what type is best, and
who will cover the cost? Presented by Allison Metcalf,
President, Marion County Continuity of Care Council.

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This interactive program deals with the
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SCHOOLS
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

tion at its annual leader-
ship summit in Lakeland
recently, one of 14 schools
statewide to do so.
West Port retains its Arts
Achieve! designation for
three years and was first
recognized back in 2007.
The renewal certification
continues through 2013.
Arts Achieve! designation
recognizes exemplary
schools for outstanding ef.
forts in making the arts an
essential part of the educa-
tion curriculum.
Principal Jayne Ellsper-
mann, widely known for
supporting the arts, is pres-
ident-elect of FASA, the
Florida Association of
School Administrators, and
just completed a term as
president of FASSP the
Florida Association of Sec-
ondary School Principals.
A combination of team-
work between teachers and
the school library, support-
ive administrators, and a
dynamic program hallmark
North Marion Middle
School's library, one of 10
state-wide named this
month as "Florida Power-
Lib~ra~ry Schcoh s."ge to
schools where faculty
members work together to
develop and execute out-
standing library media
programs focused on stu-
dent achievement.
Following a rigorous re-
view and site visit process
which described the li-
brary as "well-staffed, well-
stocked, and
well-managed," North Mar-
ion Middle's library media
specialist, Belinda Vose,
received the prestigious
honor from the Florida As-


IRAQ
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Iraq already has a crime
scene investigation system
in place similar to the
United S ateswibu sst "E

American process and see
the differences, said Kamil
Rasa, utdhe chitehf inve -
tgatv juge f t Ivs
tigation Court in Dhi Qar.
The proper exploitation of
evidence is part of
strengthening the judicial
system, which protects the
people of Iraq and gains
their trust, said Capt. Dan
McAuliffe, deputy brigade

dgm Tring S hpoht D
vision-West, currently at-
tached to Headquarters
and Headquarters Troop,
3rd Special Troops Battal-
ion, 3rd BCT, 4th Inf. Div
"A crime is a crime,
whether it happens to an
Iraqi or an American," said
Jalil A'adnan, the deputy
chief judge with the Spe-
cialist Court in Nasiriyah.
"It's crucial that we have
enough evidence so that
these criminals can be
brought to justice."




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What is long-term
care? Long-term
care refers to the
ongoing services and support
needed by people who have
chronic health conditions or
disabilities. There are three
levels of long-term care:
Skilled care: Generally
round-the-clock care that's
given by professional health
care providers such as
nurses, therapists, or aides
under a doctor's supervision.
Intermediate care: Also
provided by professional
health care providers but on
a less frequent basis than
skilled care.
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Friday, July 30, 2010 3


nursing home stay is $68,255
(according to the National
Clearing House for Long-
term care information).In
many states it is much higher.
Long-term care is likely to be
even more expensive in the
future. If costs rise just 3 per-
cent a year, in 20 years a 1
year stay will cost $123,276.
Doesn't Medicare pay for
long-term care? Many people
mistakenly believe that
Medicare, the federal health
insurance program for older
Americans, will pay for long-
term care. But Medicare only
provides limited coverage for
long-term care services such
as skilled nursing care or
physical therapy. And al-
though Medicare provides
some home health care ben-
efits, it doesn't cover custo-
dial care, the type of care
most older individuals most
often need. Medicaid, which
is often confused with
Medicare, is the joint fed-
eral-state program that two-
thirds of nursing home
residents currently rely on to
pay some of their long-term
care expenses. But to qualify
for Medicaid, you must have
limited resources and assets,


with what are called "activi-
ties of daily living" such as
bathing, eating, and dressing.
Long-term care is not just
provided in nursing homes-
in fact, the most common
type of long-term care is
home-based care. Long-term
care services may also be
provided in a variety of other
settings, such as assisted liv-
ing facilities and adult day
care centers.
Why is it important to plan
for long-term care? No one
expects to need long-term
care, but it's important to
plan for it nonetheless:
Approximately 40 percent
of people will need long-term
care at some point during
their lifetimes after reaching
age 65.
Approximately 14 percent
of people age 71 and older
have Alzheimer's disease, a
disorder that often leads to
the need for nursing home
care.
Younger people may need
long-term care too, as a result
of a disabling accident or ill-
ness.
The cost of long-term care
is rising. Currently, the aver-
age annual cost of a 1 year










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and although Medicaid gen-
erally covers nursing hoe
care, it provides only limited
coverage for home health
care in certain states.
Can't I pay for care out of
pocket? The major advan-
tage to using savings, invest-
ments, and assets, such as
your home, to pay for long-
term care is that you have the
most control over where and
how you receive care. But be-
cause the cost of long-term
care is high, you may have
trouble affording extended
care if you need it. You may
be able to offset part of the
cost of long-term care insur-
ance by claiming a tax de-
duction on your federal
income tax return if your pol-
icy is tax qualified. The
amount you can deduct de-
pends on your age. This de-
duction is part of the medical
expense deduction so you
must itemize, and your unre-
imbursed medical expenses
(including your long-term
care premium) must be more
than 7.5 percent of your ad-
justed gross income.
Should I buy long-term

PLEASE SEE AWAD, PAGE 21


sociation of Supervisors of
Media and Florida's De-
partment of Education.
Over the next three years,
North Marion Middle will
serve as a mentor to other
schools
?Two high-profile projects
of the Public Relations of-
flee received state and na-
tional recognition.
"Class Acts," published
monthly in Ocala Style
magazine, garnered a
Medallion Award from
SUNSPRA, the Sunshine
State School Public Rela-
tions Association, in Or-
lando on Monday. The
magazine feature show-
cases student and staff ac-
complishments with short
narratives and color pho-
tos. The local magazine do-
nates one page each month
to promote these accom-
plishments at no cost to the
district.
Meantime, a seven-page
"Back to School" center-
piece story, also published
by Ocala Style in August
2009 and coordinated by
Public Relations Officer
Kevin Christian, captured
eHcoenoloe b nrttiin fr
NSPRA, the National
School Public Relations
Association.


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Community calendar


Saturday Julv31
Candidate forum at West Port

The Republican Business Council presents the North
Central Florida candidate forum on Saturday, July 31 at
West Port High School. Doors open at 11 a.m.

Share food orders set for pickup
Share food order pickup for Ocala West United
Methodist Church will be on Saturday, July 31 from 9
a.m. to 11 a.m. at 9330 S.W 105th St. You may also be able
to place orders for August. Additional sign-up days will
be in August on Saturday the 7th and Wednesday the
11th. Online ordering is now available at www.share-
florida.org or call 861-0904 for more information.
SPCA to hold used book sale

The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
(SPCA) of Marion County is holding a used book sale on
Saturday, July 31, from 8 to 11:30 a.m.
It will be in front of Winn Dixie at 8445 S.W Hwy 200
in Friendship Center (next to on Top of the World Com-
munities).
All books are only 25 cents.
You can't get a better bargain, so come on over and
stock up on all your favorites. Help us help the animals
of Marion County





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Sunday Aug. 1
Sunshine Quartet in concert
The Sunshine State Quartet from Tampa will help Liv-
ing Water Wesleyan Church celebrate its 20th anniver-
sary with a Southern Gospel music concert this Sunday,
Aug. 1, at 10:30 a.m. A fellowship meal will follow the
concert.
The public is cordially invited to join the church in this
special celebration.
Living Water Wesleyan Church is at 11120 S.W High-
way 484, one mile west of State Road 200. For further in-
formation or free transportation, call 352-489-2636 or
352-237-0103.

Satantag Aur. 7
Island Festival at Circle Square
Join the fun and get that tropical feeling from the Pa-
cific and Caribbean islands on Saturday, Aug. 7, when
The Town Square at Circle Square Commons hosts the
exciting third annual Island Festival.
The excitement begins with the pulsating drum beats
of Tahiti and beautiful Island dancers dressed in au-
thentic and colorful costumes. The diverse Latin band
Grupo Salsarengue will play Merengue, Bachata, Bolero,
and other rhythms to get you up and dancing. Plus enjoy
a special performance by Extensions Dance Studio
dancers.



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Wheel Teatment, Tire Shine
& Door Jams

Limited Tirne Offer
Gift Certificates Available With Copo



PC OWOOS Irrig ation
For all your sprinkler needs

Summer Special.... $39.95 --S
Adjust all zones for coverage, Reprogram Timer for proper
run time per zone and watering Days.
GET A FREE BATTERY for your timer.

Licensed 352-629-9300 Insured




C Tti H A RI

The South Marion Citizen is a free community newspaper coveting
news of communities in southwest Marion County including Oak Run,
Pine Run, Palm Cay, On Top of the Wodld, Kingsland Country Estates,
Countryside Farms, Marion Landing, Majestic Oaks, Hidden Lake,
Woods and Meadows Estates, Paddock Farms, Saddle Oak Club, Deer
Creek, Cherrywood Estates, Hardwood Trails, Candler Hills, Country
Oaks, and Harvest Meadows, among others.
Postmaster: Entered as Third Class Matter at the post office in Ocala,
Fla., 34477.
Problems getting the Citizen: If your community is listed above and
the Citizen is not delivered to your home and you are having trouble get-
ting the paper from boxes around the S.R. 200 Corridor, call 854-3986
CONTACT FORMATION
(352) 854-3986 Fax (352) 854-9277
8810 S.W. State Road 200, Suite 104, Ocala, FL 34481
*Editor- Jim Clark
*Citoulation Barbara Jaggers
*Inside Saled/Office Coord'inator- Pauline Moore
*Advertising Sales Tom Rapplean and Susie Mirabile
*General Manager- John Provost
Deadline for news:
Friday 1 p.m. the week before publication.
Deadline for classified ads: Deadline for dispay advertising:
Tuesday 4 p.m. before publication Monday 5 p.m. before publication
**('E Member of the Community Papers of Florida


I want to get news in the Citizen.
Call editor Jim Clark at
352-854- r86 or sen by e-mail to
Community news and photos must be received by Friday the week before
publication. Mail and photos may be left at the Citizen office in Kingsland
Plaza. All contributions are subject to editing for clarity, taste, and style.


Join the fun with an evening filled with live music,
dancing, and delicious food on Saturday, July 31 on The
Town Square at Circle Square Commons from 6 p.m. to
10 p.m. Enjoy classic summertime games like a water
balloon toss, a hula hoop contest and more. Catch a sum-
mer apparel fashion show and enter for prize giveaways
throughout the night!
For more information visit www.CircleSquareCom-
mons.com.

Fitness Center o en house
The Ranch Fitness Center and Spa invites you to at-
tend an open house for members, guests and visitors on
Saturday, July 31 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Attendees will
tour the state-of-the-art facility, enjoy exciting fitness
demonstrations, and meet personal trainers and
spa/salon service providers. Professional health screen-
ings will also be available. All attendees will receive a
free trial guest pass.
The Ranch Fitness Center and Spa open house is free
and open the public. Refreshments, healthy snacks, give-
aways and membership specials will be available
throughout the day!
The Ranch Fitness Center and Spa is open daily and
is a full service fitness facility, salon and spa at 8385 S.W
80th St., Ocala. For more information, call 352-861-8180
or visit www. TheRanchFitnessSpa. com.









ALL FAITHS
C RE MATlON SOCIETY

Serving Flonida Fanulles Since 1985.

$Q A C ~ @r-rag00

2 La Grande Blvd.*~ The Villages FL 32159
(352) 753-2612 or (800) 843-6253
www.floridacremation.com


4 Friday, July 30, 2010


More calendar on Page 5


Summer Splash at Circle Square


r:1:1:n-~ iiT;M r~1 i~T~


th TOatTfm'ent Of B0C I
and Leg Pain Due to:
* Failed Laser Spine
SSurgery


www.gulIfcoastspine.net


I nve rn ess
2300 E Norvell Br ant H y
32354 -4771 *





VaulaAP 7

Chess group to meet

The chess club that formed at the Freedom Public Li-
brary meets the first Saturday of the month, from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m.
Grab your board and chess pieces and come on down.
Interested persons are invited to attend for a rousing
game of chess.
It's your move! For more information, call Ron at 352-
873-2276.


Yoga in Sholom Park

Yoga will be conducted on Saturday, Aug. 7, in Sholom
Park on Southwest 80th Avenue, 2%l/ miles north of State
Road 200.
Join us at 9 a.m. for a beautiful hour as we connect to
Mother Nature.
Our next session will be on Saturday, Sept. 4, at 9 a.m.

Sun aRs Aug. 8

Second Sunday Drum Circle

All are invited to a Drum Circle, Sunday Aug. 8 at 6
p.m., at the far end of Fort Island Trail Gulf Beach in
Crystal River.
We will drum until sunset. Bring a chair; we have a few
drums to share.
Dancers and children invited. Free.


Vod~AP 9

Diabetes nutrition management

Nancy Gal, Health Educator, Extension Agent IV with
University of Florida/IFAS and Marion County Exten-
sion, will present the second part to her presentation on
Type 2 Diabetes on Monday, Aug. 9, at 2 p.m. in Benson
Hall at St. Matthew's Lutheran Church. If you missed the
first session in June, you can still attend this next session
when Nancy will talk about the Diabetic Diet.
All interested persons are welcome to attend this free
seminar. To register and for further information call St.
Matthew's Lutheran Church at 352-629-5948. The church
is at 3453 N.E. Silver Spring Blvd, Ocala.



NARFE to meet

The monthly meeting of NARFE, Chapter 2279, National
Association of Retired Federal Employees, will be Thurs-
day, Aug. 12, at 2 p.m. at Ocala West United Methodist
Church, 9336 S.W 105th St.
Speaker will be Lee Deal, service officer from NARFE.
For information, call 352-854-1757.

Candidates to visit Palm Cay

County Commission candidates will speak at the Palm
Cay Republican on Thursday August 12 at the Palm Cay
Oasis Club House at 7:00 PM. Kathy Bryant, Christine
Dobkowski, Tony Mendola, Elicia Sanders and Les Smith
will be guest speakers and will provide answers to your
questions and concerns. This opportunity is presented for
you to become familiar with the candidates we will be vot-


ing for on the Primary Election Aug. 24. Refreshments will
be served following the meeting. For additional informa-
tion, contact James Pettus at 352-438-9662.

ElidaR Aug. 13

Shabbat Experience features singing

Congregation Beth Israel of Ocala presents a Shabbat
Experience on Friday, Aug. 13 at 6 p.m. at the Collins
Medical Resource Center, 9401 State Road 200, Building
300 in Ocala. The program will feature Jennifer Singer,
Educational Director of Congregation Kol HaNeshama
(Reconstructionist) in Sarasota who will lead in joyous
song and worship. Her daughter, Sarah, will enhance the
service with her beautiful soprano voice. There will be
a short service starting at 6 p.m. followed by a traditional
Shabbat meal. Special Shabbat songs and blessings after
the meal will conclude the program. There will be no 8
p.m. services on that evening. The cost is $18 per person.
Contact Estelle at 352-237-8277 for reservations by Aug.

Congregation Beth Israel is a liberal, inclusive, pro-
gressive Jewish congregation under the guidance of the
Jewish Reconstructionist Federation.

SaturdayAug. 14

Flea market at St. Jude

The annual flea market will take place at St. Jude
Catholic Community at 443 Marion Oaks Drive in Mar-
ion Oaks between the hours of 7 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Sat-
urday, Aug. 14. Items for sale include clothing, household
goods, etc. Tables to sell your own merchandise are
available at $20 each. Food is also being sold. For more
information please contact Blanca at 352-307-4028.


Serving Florida since 1955! And here tomorrow! r
Lecanto Showroom g 3 1
Hwy. 44 & S. Otis Ave. m
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* Door to door service
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* Luhxeur e~dn 1-4ride for
0CALA SMART TRANS PORTATION
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Friday, July 30, 2010 5


- -oo,
Air Conditioning Alignment $ 0 g
Batteries Brakes Computer Scan S1 0 O F
Shocks Struts Transmission i:4 Wheel
Service* Mufflers* Diagnostic Alignment
Tires Trailer Tires Custom Wheels Shm&PasExr
TIRES TIRES TIRES Callforappointinent
Ofegoust present c00o aton ol
Wel00wire-Dae t copar ,Not valid w/any other offer Expires 8/6/10


CaStrol GTX
Syntec Blend
.Lube-Oil-Filter
.Up to 5qtsi.o 5--20 5- 0 r 15-W-40

|FREE TIRE ROTATION
|I MostC'"",,i'see Sericeop MFluids
I Check rPressurelnMTres* Inspedselts&Hoses g
Not valid w/aan other of rseEx ies 86/10 .


Live happily ever after in this fantastic home located in
one of the most sought after 55+ communities in Ocala.
Villa has 2 spacious bedrooms & 2 baths, large faiy Some features include: formal dining room, eat-in kitchen.
& living rooms, open kitchen, dining area & Fl. room. Murphy bed plus built-in corner desk/computer cabinet in
The 35 ft long garage gives extra room for a workshops guest bedroom. This one is a MUST SEE!!!
or crafting. MLS#339558/BM/EME .................$57,500 MLS#343209/BH/HOW................................. $8,0


Shows better than a model!!! 2/2/1, dining room,l ,arsPps Y-~L1 iP One-owner 2/2/1.5 Free-standmng home featurir
vinyl enclosed lanai overlooking chain link fenced Fine 2/2/2 Villa. Newly painted & new carpets large kitchen, spacious great room/dining room, ar
back yard plus open patio. MUST SEE!!! throughout. Newer roof, dishwasher and dryer. This more. Retirement living at its best.
Adi CH??lndAGOIhDI.AAC CIon ann h okmn ic mrwn in mreestri MI QMQQOO70/DA/LICQ PW znn MI Innl sff7/flD~,nrinlM toA Gi





COMMU NITY


are needed to help at vari-
ous Habitat for Humanity
construction sites. During
these challenging economic
times, it's nice to know that
literally lending a hand can
help families achieve a
dream of owning a home!
Volunteers are involved
with all aspects of the
homebuilding process, in-
cluding framing, insulating,
siding, painting and even
putting up window blinds.
And, volunteers will work
side by side with the
prospective home-owner
who is also required to pro-
vide "sweat labor" as part


IA~l~tua-t~-Caib;bevLiv~~a-l


Automotive



-ceamri 854-6868



9055 SR 200 Between Oak Run & Pine Run, Ocala
Monday Thru Friday 8 A.M. to 5 P.M.

INDUCTION SERVICE A150
Over time dirt & carbon deposits
slowly build up in your engine's uW W
induction system robbing your car of Most Cars & Trucks
performance and fuel economy.


"SHI IER% SEtlAL- 1 -- -
Radiato rSesrtic Rpae colan t, prure
ofh tets andehoses test radiator and Most Cars & Trucks

AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE $ UI E
HERE'S WHAT WE DO: Performance & Leak Test Ac gg
System, Check Belt, Inspect Component Condition,
Check Coolant Level & Quality. Most Cars & Trucks

OIL, LUBE 5 FILTER 12 9
HERE'S WHAT WE DO: INCLUDES: 20 Point Safety
Inspection, up to 5 Qts. of 10W30 Castrol & Filter' Most Cars & Trucks
Complete Chassis Lube





,ASE Certified Master MechaniC
e MV-01243


THE BRIDGE

AT OCALA
AN ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITY

2800 SW 41st St., Bldg. 200
Ocala, FL 34474


r:1:1:n-~ iiT;M r~1 i~T~


Mark G. Karpoyck, D.M.D.
Oral &2 Maxillofacial Surgeon
Facial &2 Cosmetic Specialist


6 Friday, July 30, 2010


LEND


Central Florida Commu-
nity College Human
Resources Department
For the detail-oriented
person who is looking for a
pleasant volunteer work
environment, CFCC HR
Department needs people
who will help scan closed
files into computer data
bases. Since state law re-
quires that all records are
kept for a minimum of
twenty-five years, it is im-
portant that files are
scanned on a continuous
basis to address the reali-
ties of limited filing space.
Volunteers must have a


willingness to learn a new
technique, work with mini-
mal supervision once
trained, maintain confiden-
tiality and be able to make
good decisions. Training
and orientation will be pro-
vided and volunteers can
set their own schedules
within an acceptable work
week. For more informa-
tion on how to become in-
volved, contact Trish
Glennon at 352-854-2322
x1291 or e-mail her at glen-
nont~cf.edu.
Habitat for Humanity of
M~arion County
Handy men and women


of the homeowner agree-
ment. This is a great volun-
teer project for individuals
or groups looking for a way
to help in their community.
Join the hundreds of Habi-
tat volunteers across the
county who are making life
more meaningful for oth-
ers.
For the person or persons
who have a strong interest
in helping to eliminate
poverty housing and home-
lessness in Mlarion County,
Habitat has just the right
volunteer opportunity. For
more information on how to
get involved with Habitat of


Mlarion County, contact
Susan Hicks at 352-351-4663
or e-mail her at
shi cks~habitatoc ala. 0rg


This file is compiled by
Dian Booth, who can be
contacted at 291-4444 or via
e-mail to boothd~icf edu.


questions, get advice or
voice concerns?
Be sure to check out an
inclusive, "everyone is wel-
come" group that is very ac-
tive and always looking to
make new friends. Come
check us out! http://ocala-
homeschooling.com or call:
352-508-7465.


Homeschool help
available
Are you a Marion County
Homeschooler looking to
make more friends for trips,
projects, outings and play
dates? Are you thinking
about homeschooling and
would like a place to ask


Wil AO Tree
Sarah's Angel


Painted Ponies


Aromatique J "U P" UI aS
BaPosT OFFICE FLORIDA LOTTERY *FAX COPIES
STORE 352-854-1970 FAX 352-854-6186
8949 SW SR 200, FRIENDSHIP CENTER, OCALA


MONDAY, AUGUST 2ND 3 PM BIBLE STUDY WITH DAVE
Join The Bridge residents for an hour long Bible study discussion group.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 6TH 3 PM SOCIAL HOUR WITH
STEVE ROBINSON
come socialize with our residents and experience what enjoying life is
all about! Enjoy entertainment by Steve Robinson who plays various
instruments and performs vocal impersonations of the greats such as
Loute Armstrong. Beer, wine and fmnger foods will be served.


\4 ,
Tid


Plywood Drywall Shingles
We Also Carry Emergency Repair Items:
Tarps Rolled Felt Flashlights
Yard Clean-Up Supplies


Tours ... Tours ... Tours ... Tours
Call to make a reservation
for a lunch/tour. We would love to
share with yu whatlTahbeoBtridge

We look forward to hearing
from you soon.
Space is limited,
so make your
reservations today!!!

SRSVP (352) 873-2036


352-622-709


1432 SW 15th Ave., Ocala


*I.V. Sedation available for all procedures


WWW. TO ntierOTraSUTreCV. COm


~ Facial & Cosmetic Rejuvenation~
* NOn-Surgical Face-Lifting
* Botoxo
* Reverse Facial Agin
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www.newfro ntiersa.

Timber Ridge Medical P
9401 S.W. Hwy 200, Suite 302,
Insurance Assistance & Financing Available


Ca II to make an
Appointment today!

352-861 -1100


A HAND


1Q~~ C~-~C~~ C*l(l)'i*NI1Clll'i
r Unique dk Unusual Giftsfronr=


HoW
To MIake
Your


DISappear...


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in the
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-rOLL waRns
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LUliBE"R & SUPPLY Inc.
License #CBC1252465
We Stock A Complete Line of:


ORAL SURGERY &r SPA

We Care..... "/Your Comfort is Our Goal"
Dr. Karpoyck and his highly-trained staff offer the latest in oral

surgery and facial rejuvenation procedures including... /



* Dental Implants & Oral Surger
* Removal of Impacted Wisdom T'eeth
* Dentoalveolar Surgery for Loose Dentures &eFI




















The Star Realtors of Marion County





Lynn #1 Team Partners Lou John Louise JoAnn Sallie Dennis Witzgall Peggy The Doughertys Lois Stimmel Jim Dale Michelle &
Shirley-Shiflett Pat McCullough Serago Kapioski Pace Flickinger Saunders 615-8794 Simpson Patty 502-3096 Lane Brooks Team Petticrew Ravens Joe Gercie
286-217 299-6688 Broker/Associate 208-1635 361-4312 624-2775 425-9510 JaeAnn Witzgall 208-6554 Bill 425-8212 789-4516 Pat 895-5160 Broker/Manager 895-2355 425-5408
286-6217 harlie Takesian 804-0159 n _? Jr 2403 1-8 dffin


-I-Vr


This 2/2/2 wlDen is Located in Eagles
Point of Oak Run. Kitchen wlGranite
Countertops, Cherry Cabinets, Florida
Room overlooks Private Backyard.
$279,900 MLS# 340725
Peggy Simpson 352-208-6554


DOUBLE THE EFFORT

615-8794 JAEANN
615-8731 DENNIS
WITZGALL


Friday, July 30, 2010 7


____1


I *
DALE RAVENS
Realtor
Dale has been a realtor for
12 years and a repeat
member of the Multi Million
Dollar Club.
Dale and his wife Barb
have lived in this area for
15 years. Dale brings a
variety of listings with him
including horse property,
river property & great
listings in Rainbow Springs
Country Club in Dunnellon.
BUYING OR SELLING
CLL DLE

489-1486


Great 2/2 w/over 1100 sq. tt.
living area. New roof 04, A/C
08, newer refrigerator, range,
home warranty.
$119,000 MLS# 333914
Jo Ann Flickinger 624-2775


JOO & MICheiele
Gercle
Joe & Michelle relocated
from Pennsylvania to Ocala,
Florida in 2005. Joe &
Michelle are residents of Oak
Run & specialize in the Oak
Run community as well as
other 55 plus communities in
the area. They are here to
assist you in any of your real
eState needs.
NOw is a great time to
purchase a home!
Call JOe at 425-5409
Or Michelle at 425-5408


High Inventory-Low Rates
Let me help you navigate
this buyers market.

Call Sallie SaunderS
@ 425-9510


tPopular Uoral Gjreat Rm 2/2/2 + den,
many upgrades. Oversized master BR.
Distressed wood blinds,
French doors, laundry rm w/cabinets,
very clean & bright. Priced to sell.
fj4n4,0 ML k 61660 5


Now buy the best!
2/2/1.5 Villa OTOW Gorgeous!
$63,700 MLS #339306
Lois Lane 789-4516
Lou Serago 804-0159


un vL acre, lovely, c000 aizizL norne
w/detachwdrkmatchin~g 768dsbqaft. 1 cr
& irrigation well. Ready to close.
$164,000 MLS # 339194
Jim Petticrew 216-5852


"#1 TEAM Partners"
Pat & Charlie
299-6688
207-9588


8371 SW 114 Street Ngh 7 2/2/2+Den Gorgeous!
MI S #325284 $125.000 F Directions at aates Call Pat


W~e W~ant to

W~elcomne our

NEWV STARS!

Dale Ravens~

JOe & 1Michelle

)LGercie


JAEDEN
TEAM


e11~, ~I e IIII
GREATB UY! OWNER MOTIVATED. 2 /2/2, golf cart, glass lanai, patio,
CLOSE TO RECREATIONAL Iwood floors, picturesque landscaping.
FACILITIES. MLS #327121 Rent for $900/month
CALL Lynn Shirley Shiflett MLS# 325995
286-6217 Lois Lane 789-4516













C IT lZEN

ED ITOR A L



How's the beef?



should be studied locally. One such case was a report
on the sports television network, ESPN, on Tuesday.
The network did a story on the condition of food at Mlajor
League ballparks. Some of it centered on Tropicana Field,
home of the Tampa Bay Rays.

sio et nod at ia io tta ilumst was anu to mkne ue
you go to your next baseball game with a full stomach.
But it started us thinking about how thorough inspections
are of local concession stands. Think of the thousands of
people in Mlarion County who go to Friday night football
games, and how busy the concession stands are. Do you re-
ally know how safe the food is that you are eating? Does the
Health Department do an inspection at the beginning of the
season to make sure all is well, or does it pull surprise in-
spections during games to make sure what is being fed to
the public is in good condition?
People should find out before eating these foods.
An interesting sidelight was that on an ESPN talk show
Wednesday morning, one of the announcers said he really
"didn't want to know" and would go on eating at games just
as he always has.
That's not a good attitude to take with your family. We'd
like some reassurances from the county that all these con-
cessions are done properly, whether it's the preseason clas-
sic in August or the playoffs in November


L E T T E R S TO T H E E D ITO R

How does she know? staff always appreciate any help
Although I seldom read Wendy ted sa fet Tuhran ou siWhnldy
Binnie's column, the title of her ing ou ptsf find aou gfood hoe. -
column on Friday, July 16, caught ig od bless youd go me
my eye: "Obama neither socialist Gom Delane yu
or Muslim."i Oeala. y
Where does she get her infor- NOEAilsriecnbe
mation? His personal recordsrecdat327187.
are sealed, and people all over .
Our country know the true facts. Character bashing
Right above her column title it Do politicians not realize that
says: "People First, Not Govern- what voting citizens want to hear
ment." That is exactly what the is the platform they are running
Tea Parties are trying to do. They on and what steps they propose
do not want the same govern- to take to make it work? This is
ment as other countries. If some the type of information that I
people do not like our proven choose to use when deciding for
form of government, they should whom to vote.
return to their own country or I am so tired and disgusted
move. with the constant "character
Regardless of Obama's think- bashing"' that goes on in political
ing and Wendy's, we wish to re- campaigns. It makes me not want
main a Christian nation. I believe to vote at all. I know that is not an
in free enterprise and, unlike option if I am going to be a good
Wendy, I am not jealous of Bill citizen. So please, candidates,
O'Reilly, Glen Beck and Sean send us the right message.
Hannity, if they are millionaires liary Sanders
or not. Again, where does she get Del Webb Stone G~reek
her information?
L Emmons Send them all home
Oeala Inflation is the measure of the
Animal control thanks monthly rate of change in the
prices of the goods and services
We would like to extend our we buy in our economy. The Fed-
sincere thanks to Wendy and her eral Reserve calculates and pub-
staff at Animal Control services lishes this data. The Consumer
here in Marion County. Price Index, (CPI) is the average
This organization takes in monthly costs of what we pay for
many different kinds of animals these goods and services. The
in hope that each animal will Bureau of Labor Statistics calcu-
find loving home. However, this lates and publishes this data.
staff and organization faces The CPI values are based on a
many challenges, which include 1982 value of $100.
more than 700 animals at one The inflation rate for 2009 av-
time on less than two acres of eraged a minus 0.4 percent and
land. the CPI average for the year was
So whether it's time, love, food, $214.537. During the first 6
blankets, monetary or whatever months of 2010, (Jan, thru June)
your heart desires for our furry
loveable friends, Wendy and her PLEASE SEE LETTERS, PAGE 10






PUBLISHE R: GERR Y MULLIGAN .
REGIONAL MANAGE R: JOH NPRO VOST
EDI TO R: J IM CLARK
"In a free society a community newspaper must be a forum
for community opinion. "


S TO THE EDITOR


8 Friday, July 30, 2010 ( 0zr


and some cuts and bruises, but
was otherwise OK.
The three girls were fine and
walked away
So what's the purpose of
telling you all this? Simply put,
all four people were either in
seat belts or car seats.
I get accident reports regularly
from the Florida Highway Patrol.
They send out all the serious ac-
cidents and definitely all the fa-
talities. We get them from all
over Florida, from Jacksonville
down to Marion County
I always look for two things:
first, are the people involved
from our area? Even if the acci-
dent happened in Jacksonville,
I'll publish it if it involves local
folks. And, second, did they have
their seat belts on?
It amazes me how many people
don't. Most of the time, those who
are not elderly and are killed in a
wreck weren't wearing a seat
belt. There was a bad one on the
Interstate a little while back in-


volving a family traveling to their
home in Miami, coming from a
funeral. Several were thrown
from the vehicle.
Descriptions of single car acci-
dents are usually similar: The
driver was traveling at a high
rate of speed, lost control and
tried to over-correct. The vehicle
rolled over and the driver was
ejected and killed. "Ejected" is a
fancy word for thrown from the
car because there was no seat
belt to keep them in.
So please, use those seat belts,
whether you think you should or
not. As a family, we're grateful
that some of ours are walking
around today, even after a violent
collision.
Make sure you're around to tell
your family about your accident.
They'll be glad you buckled that
belt.
Jim Clark is the editor of the
South Marion Citizen. He can be
reached at editorcis~mcitizen. com
orat352-854-3986


J im
Clark


ne of our family members
the weekend. His daugh-
ter, his friend and his friend's
two daughters were in a car that
was smashed on the side in
Gainesville.
His description that he wrote
on Facebook was quite com-
pelling. It seems that he and his
son pulled up to the scene just
seconds after it happened.
The vehicle was struck on the
left front. The driver's door and
window were smashed, and the
driver suffered an injured leg

LETTER

Money talks
When the odds for a political
election victory are determined,
those who can raise the most
money for their campaigns are
usually favored.
We should not be so naive as to
believe that those who make
large contributions are making
them out of the goodness of their
heart and that payment on their
investment is secondary
Among the largest contributors
to the last campaign, the trial
lawyers and pharmaceutical
companies, are now realizing a
return on their investments. Nei-
ther had much, if any, mention
included in the health care law.
Yet outlandish settlements for
malpractice sits and the cost of
prescription drugs are major ex-
penses in the costs of health
care.
Funds for major campaign


contributors are a cost of doing
business. So any such expendi-
ture will be included in the price
of their service or product. Then
we as consumers pay for the
campaigns.
A law limiting campaigns to
about 30 days would spare us
programming that wastes our
time and all too often forces us to
hit the mute button or endure a
bunch of garbage. It would save
countless dollars for those con-
tributors that should eventually
trickle down to the consumer
Inasmuch as campaigning has
developed into a full-time
process even for elections years
away and is fraught with what
could realistically be deemed
useless costly information, it
seems reform is certainly in
order.
Don Pixley
Oeala


Last chance
On a "softball" interview be-
fore he was elected, Obama was
asked hledow people could come to
know who and what he is. He an-
swered that we could find that
out by recognizing who he sur-
rounds himself with.
Fair enough: progressive so-
cialists, avowed Marxists, self-
proclaimed communists,
ex-bomb throwers, ex-felons and
tax cheats.
If you're not a blind Bush
hater, you might want to think
about this.
Nov. 2 is a last chance to save
our republic and our personal
freedoms. It's our liberty, I
choose it or lose it. It's either
America USA or America DOA.
EdNoe
Oeala


R E A D E R O P IN IO N S

> The opinions expressed in South Marion Citizen number and
editorials are the opinions of the editorial board of the e-mnail. Nam
newspaper. nmesw
> Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns er
~fairness and
or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the
>) Letters
editorial board. ... clmsa
> Groups or individuals are invited to express their ers will be li
opinions in letters to the editor and guest columns. deadline is o
> Persons wishing to contact the editor should call > Send lI
854-3986. 8810 S.W. S
> All letters must be signed and include a phone or e-mail ed


IN V ITE D
community name, including letters sent via
res and communities will be printed; phone
ll not be published or given out.
:erve the right to edit letters for length, libel,
good taste. Not all contributions are printed.
Longer than 550 words may be regarded as
d printed on a space-available basis, and writ-
rmited to one contribution per week. The
,ne week prior to each Friday's issue.
otters to: The South Marion Citizen Editor,
Itate Road 200, suite 104, Ocala, FL 34481;
itor~smcitizen.com.


OPINION


, A "Copy rig hted Material (14





Available from Co~mmnercial News Providers"


Saet fis:ri tim itpy f





STA N G


Friday, July 30, 2010 9


(30~z~n~


RIGHT DOWN THE CORRIDOR




Immigration is the big topic across America


holding hostage his plan
which is politics, instead
of doing his duty as called
for in our Constitution, "to
secure the borders."
Some people think the
president is afraid that if
he lets Arizona's law
stand, other states will fol-

12 tthhee tlate are in in .
Then others think it's just
to pander to his extreme
liberal base, or to gather
more Latino votes. Some
think it's to change Hillary
Clinton's inch nation into
thinking she'd be better
off not to run against him
in 2012. Then there is a
group who think it's to
gain more favor with fel-
low Mluslims they want a
strong person, which he
isn't.
The reason given that
fits the president most is
his previous pattern of di-
version of keeping the
public's attention on one
thing, and all the while
he's working hard with an-
other deceptive venture.
In this case he is simply
delaying closing the bor-
der as long as possible,
now by filing lawsuits, any
actions regarding the bor-
der or immigration is de-
layed until closer to the
elections. Then at his cho-
sen time, he will issue one
of his "executive orders,"
thereby providing every
illegal alien in America
with "comprehensive im-


are warned that if they are
off duty, they better look
away and ignore any traf-
ficking loads that are com-
ing across the border,
otherwise they will be tar-
geted.
Knowing all this, plus
the daily gang violence,
bmoum s, alk dntapping,
the border, so for the pres-
ident and his extremist al-
lies in Congress refuse to
decisively act to secure
our borders. These acts
are not mere rhetoric;
these cartels are crossing
our border daily without
fear of punishment. Amer-
ica is ceding parts of Ari-
zona to such gangsters.
Then we have our Sec-
retary of Labor, Hilda
Solis, who issues a public
service announcement
(PSA) just recently, ex-
tending an open invitation
to illegal aliens to report
any of their employers to
her department if they be-
lieve they are not being
paid fairly. To her every
worker in America has a
right to be paid fairly
whether "documented" or
not. The Department of
Labor is an agency of the
Executive Branch of our
government which is sup-
posed to "enforce" our na-
tion's laws, not to help
illegal aliens file griev-
ances against employers.
What are we coming to?
'Two Senators, Jim
Del~int (R-SC) and David
Vitter (R-LA) have just in-
troduced an amendment
that would expressly pro-
hibit the Justice Depart-
ment from participating in
lawsuits that seek to inval-
idate the Arizona immi-
gration law. Their action
would stop the govern-
ment's current lawsuit.
The government has
stated they are ready to


file a third lawsuit (to kill
more time), but it would
also stop taxpayer dollars
from being used for these
expensive lawsuits.
This information should
be out possibly by the time
this column is printed, it's
now known that a similar
law to Ari ona's hasatheen
Rhode Island for some-
time and the government
has chosen not to chal-
lenge them. Why haven't
the Feds investigated
Rhode Is1 nd?
Then we have the ques-
tion of "Sanctuary Cities,"
There are 64 of them and
their city laws have been
shown on Fox TV and they
very clearly show that
these city employees are
forbidden to aid or assist
ICE or any government
employee who is trying to
enforce federal immigra-
tion laws. Why go after
states and not cities?
Whatever their reason, it
is clearly in direct conflict
with the public's best in-
terest, all polls show this
statement.
There is so much more
such information that
should be known by the
public that is kept secretly
the very ones that should
be doing their job of ex-
posing such criminal acts
of our government. Let's
hope this upcoming elec-
tion that our constitu-
tional conservative voters
show up to vote the cur-
rent administration out of
office so we can save our
country.
Robert E Bedmer lives
in Majestic Oaks with his
wife, Sarah. He is a re-
tired private investigator
and insurance adjuster
He has also been a pho-
tographer and served with
the M~ilitary Police in the
Marine Corps.


Arizona's law was intended to help
them control their borders and stop
illegal aliens, a job the Executive
Branch of our government fails to
honor its constitutional responsibility.
This new law went into effect July 29.


RoetE. eke



what the whole United
States is discussing,
ever since the government
filed a very frivolous law-
suit to get Arizona's
SB1070 law dismissed
Arizona's law was in-
tended to help them con-
trol their borders and stop
illegal aliens, a job the Ex-
ecutive Branch of our gov-
ernment fails to honor its
constitutional responsibil-
ity. This new law went into
effect July 29.
The president's attempt
is just part of his grand
scheme to ram "amnesty"
for 12-20 million illegal
aliens down the throat of
the American people,
against the large majority,
just like they did with the
stimulus bill, health care
and other takeovers. The
president even has admit-
ted to Arizona Senator Jon
Kyle that, "the problem is,
if we secure the border,
then you all won't have a
reason to support compre-
hensive immigration re-
form." He's admitting he's


migration, amnesty and
citizenship" making possi-
ble some 20 million more
Democratic voters for the
next election. The timing
must be right; it must be
so close to the elections
the Republicans will not
have time or the numbers
to stop this unbelievable
plan. It would, in effect,
destroy the Republican
Party, especially later
when you add in possibly
50 million more relatives
of these new "Americans,"
citizens that are sure to
follow. They would be
thankful to our president
and grateful to be called
Democrats.
The Democratic Party
would never have to
worry about losing an-
other election. This makes
the Democratic president,
whoever it is, a "defacto"
dictator who would have
even more power then he
has now with his infamous
Senate and House total


control numbers. This
may seem far out but it is
being discussed in groups
worried about America's
future will you give it
some thought?
Today, we find along our
country's border states,
Mlexican cartels smug-
gling people, drugs, possi-
bly terrorists into America
across wide areas just
south of Phoenix and Tuc-
son. America is actually
being invaded by these
people; just listen to indi-
viduals living it daily, like
Sheriff Paul Babieu of
Spinal Country, Arizona.
He says his deputies are
outmanned and out-
gunned and the cartel
smugglers control a wide
corridor in his area. This
was also reported in the
newspaper Human
Events. To back this up,
our government recently
posted large signs, "80
miles" north of the border,
urging US citizens not to
camp or hike in the active
human smuggling area,
because visitors may en-
counter armed criminals.
Americans cannot go
where they want in our
own country. One report
by Reuters read that Ari-
zona police officers have
received warnings they
may be targeted, accord-
ing to Nogales Police
Chief Jeff Kirkham. They


all). Their families will in-
herit their wealth without
paying any taxes. How
quickly they forget that too
much too soon has been
the ruination of many a
son or daughter.
Meanwhile everyone
has seen millions of jobs
sent out of the country
until the middle class has
become decimated (that
literally means one-tenth.)
The actual count is much
more. The jobs have gone,
not likely to return, accu-
mulation of money is the
only game. Unfortunately
soon there will be only two
classes: the wealthy and
the poor.
Meanwhile, Republican
administrations have ac-
counted for more national
debt over the past 30 years
than all other administra-
tions in our history com-
bined. The whole world
will experience starvation
and wars will erupt be-
cause of fewer resources
dueeto globa narmngand
done to produce renew-


able energy and dare to
upset the oilmen before
oil becomes much more
expensive and pushes
global warming beyond
the point of no return; be-
cause alternate energy
sources might reduce the
income of corporate
America the ones who
care will be bad-mouthed,
laughed at and obviously
with Congress in their
pockets, ignored. As for
freedoms, they were lost
more during the previous
administration than in all
of this country's recorded
history.
Throw into the mix un-
justified and illegal wars
and you have all of the el-
ements required to de-
stroy any country. Nothing
more needs to be said.
This space can be filled
with a cartoon, for our
great country has become
something we see in the
funny papers.
Wendy England Binnie
aonow I stl andinopedk
Trace Villas.


W end,, yE


and the home of the
brave has gone or is
rapidly going the way of
other great civilizations
when the creed of greed
was allowed to dominate
the country and take it
away from the citizens.
Over the past three
decades corporations
were deregulated and be-
came more corrupt. The
taxes of the wealthiest cit-
izens were cut until they
paid fewer taxes than the
poor. They somehow feel
entitled to all they have
andicre not c twhit fir
they think about them at


OPINION


Oh say can you see


Te Chief CRUSe Of all CliVOTCe is matrimony.





WE MAKE YOUR CONCRETE LOOK GOOD! I


thing else, the prices keep
going up.
Theecreation of most of our
food requires materials
traded on our country's sev-
eral commodity markets.
Like oil and gasoline, the
trade of food, grains, fiber,
livestock and meat are sup-
posed to be conducted on a
supply and demand basis.
But hedge fund managers
have found a haven for use of
the leverage from their large
investment funds in manipu-
lating the prices of commod-
ity products. George Soros,
one of the largest hedge fund
managers was a lead finan-
cier for the Democrats 2006
and 2008 election campaigns.
President Obama has just
signed a new law that he

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Served dailyr rom 4 6 pm

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Bistmo Steak Mom ay
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Panko Crusted Chicken
Chicken breast lightly breaded with
Japanese bread crumbs and served
with rice pilaf, stir-fry vegetables
and s oyu sauce

Plank Roasted Sahnon Tzatziki
Plank roasted wild salmon
served with tzatziki sauce,
rice pilafand choice ofvegetable

Honey Garlic St.Louis Ribs
Slow braised pork spare ribs served
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Fried Shrimp and Fish Platter
Panko crusted pangasius fish,
popcorn shrimp, French fries'
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*lprics are plus tax an gratuity7/0
7/


10 Friday, July 30, 2010


holds in our country. The
$3.43 increase in our cost of
living over the last six
months says we spent
$391million more for goods
and services during that time
and some $65 million more
per month went into some-
one's profit column than it
did in 2009.
our consumer goods are
supplied by financiers, grow-
ers, manufacturers and mar-
keters. The cost of food is one
of our largest household
budget items and like every-


promises will protect con-
sumers and prevent banks
and investment firms from
creating another 'Great Re-
cession.' There are no re-
quirements in the new law to
improve the oversight, trans-
parency or control of the
commodity markets.
The minus 0.4 percent in-
terest rate in 2009 did not
stop profits for our busi-
nesses and industries, it just
slowed their rate of growth;
1955 was the last time we had
negative inflation and it was
also 0.4 percent.
Let's meet at the primary
polls on Aug. 24 and at the
general election polls on
Nov. 2 and turn back the
clock. Let's give Obama a
change he will remember


and all incumbent congres-
sional members a one way
ticket home.
Bill larthing
Ocala
An open letter
to Wendy Binnie
I read your article regard-
ing the man in the White
House, Barack Hussein
Obama. You feel he was un-
fairly maligned by the per-
son you call the Soap Man.
Now talking about a Soap
Box you declare that if you
knew more about Obama the
more you would come to re-
alize that he's an all Ameri-
can hero.
What planet do you live
on?
Obama has been groomed


to further the ambitions of
the far left, (that includes
you), from the very begin-
ning. He wrote books about
himself long before anyone
knew who he was. Great
leaders after they perform
their service to our nation
write of their experiences.
Talk about audacity. Self ag-
grandizement by an un-
known politician is beyond
the pale.
He was the head of the
Far left Education Agenda
for the Chicago schools and
administered funds pro-
vided by the notorious Tide
organization. He was in
partnership with Bill, (The
Terrorist), Ayres Wow what a
resume.
As a Community organ-
izer he was a complete fail-
ure. When he was named
head of the Harvard Law
Review he never wrote one
piece of material which was
contrary to every other indi-
vidual who held that post.
He seems to have become
wealthy despite never hold-
ing a job that paid more than
$50,ooo. It certainly wasn't
from the sale of his books
that no one ever bought or
read .
As for his birth certificate,
we will get to the bottom of
that before year end.
member h t he Jounom s
ters have been exposed, (Big
S nrseh), nthee n noalsonsge

presenting lies as the truth,

onedthbn cha moe Belkh
radical appointees, that was
untrue and unproven? This
is your opportunity to pres-
ent that information or even
better call the White House
phone on Glen's desk.



but f r hmeeltaomay down
life to ensure that my chil-
dren, grandchildren and fu-
ture great grandchildren
live in Freedom so be it!
God bless Aerica.Baa

11farion Landing





good time to

giVe blood
The next time you climb
into your car in the after-
noon and the seats and the
steering wheel are just
slightly cooler than a fully-
fired charcoal grill, think of
it as a reminder that it's a
good time to donate blood.
Summer, when school is
out and families hit the
road for vacations, is a time
when donors are in short
supply, but the need for
blood is as strong as ever. If
it's been a while since you
donated, there's no better
time than now.
In about the time it
would take to shop for gro-
ceries for a week or knock
out a crossword puzzle, a
blood donor can save a life.
Donors must be 17 or
older, or 16 with parental
consent, weigh a minimum
of 110 pounds and be in
good health. A photo ID is
also required. Donors get
cookies and a cso 1T-slurits

summer Life South really
needs your help.


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Purchase a gift card in
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(i.e. Purchase a $50 gift card for only $45.)


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SInC Udes 1 drink per person


be u~suT rih oher dsc utn ers.


LETTERS
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8
the inflation rate has in-
creased by an average of 2.05
percent per month and the
CPI for June was $217.965.
The $3.43 difference be-
tween the 2009 CPI and the
June CPI equates to a 57cent
monthly increase in our cost
of living since the start of
2010.
The 2010 Census estimates
there are 114 million house-












~a Pun Alley takes a vacation trip


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Reserve your seat today!

Saturday, Aug. 7, 2010
Citrus County Auditorium, 3610 S. Florida Ave., Inverness
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Friday, July 30, 2010 11


others go traveling while
the rest of us just think
about the adventures we
could find elsewhere. Pun
Alley brings some camp
stories and adventures to
your armchair.
Real camp
A counselor was helping
his kids put their stuff
away on their first morning
in summer camp. He was
surprised to see one of the
youngsters had an um-
brella. The counselor
asked, "Why did you bring
an umbrella to camp?"
The kid answered, "Did


you ever have a mother?
Political camp
Though it is little known,
Richard Nixon went to
summer camp as a boy
and, on his first evening
there, he got badly burned
while roasting marshmal-
lows. This became known
as Nixon's first camp pain,
Bare fats
At the nudist camp a
married couple broke up
because they were seeing
too much of each other.
Nudists peel first and get
sunburned afterward.
A lawyer joined a nudist


colony, and he hasn't had a
suit since.
A nudist was picked up
as a robbery suspect, but
the police had to let him go
because they couldn't pin
anything on him.
The first nudist conven-
tion received little cover-
age.
A hole was found in the
nudist camp wall. The po-
lice are looking into it.
At the nudist camp men
and women air their differ-
ences and bare with each
Other.
All women are invited to


join the local nudist camp;
just leave your name and
dress.
Something fishy
Two college seniors on a
camping trip found a great
trout brook that provided
excellent fishing. They
vowed they would meet
sometime in the future at
the same place and renew
the experience. ?Twenty
years later, they met and
traveled into the woods.
Before long, they came
upon a brook. One of the
men said to the other, "This
is the place!"


"No, it's not."
"Yes, I recognize the
clover growing on the bank
on the other side."
"Don't be silly. You can't
tell a brook by its clover."
Short trips
Summer vacation is
tough. Kids only have three
months to forget what it
took them nine months of
school to learn.
Honeymoon is the vaca-
tion a man takes before be-
ginning work for a new
boss.

PLEASE SEE PUNS, PAGE 13


PUN


August is almost upon
us with the high heat
that sends many of
us to cooler climates if we
can find them in this sum-
mer. Some go camping and


.


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Dic k
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New Merchandise Arriving Daily At

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12 Friday, July 30, 2010


r:1:1:n-~ iiT;M r~1 i~T~


s.-


_
r -~-s


r: ~r ~1


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team to clean it up.

Cleaning Up the Beaches
The number of people mobilized to clean up the beaches depends on the
size of the affected area. Individual teams can number in the hundreds,
and thousands of additional workers remain on-call. Working with the
Coast Guard, our teams continue cleaning up until the last bit of oil has
been removed. As a result, in most cases when oil reaches a beach, it is
even possible to keep it open.

Our Responsibility
Our beach cleanup operations will continue until the last of the oil has
been skimmed from the sea, the beaches and estuaries have been cleaned
up, and the region has been pronounced oil-free. And none of the costs
of our efforts will be paid by taxpayers.

Our commitment is that we'll be here for as long as it takes. We may not
always be perfect, but we will make this right.


For assistance, please call:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
www.floridagulfresponse.com


For information visit: bp.com
deepwaterhorizonresponse.com
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_america
youtube.com/bp


@ 2010 BFR E&P


Ma king This R eight

Beaches
Claims

Cleanup
Economic Investment

Environmental Restoration

Health and Safety
W iildlife


bp





1, _- _. _ 3


In 1902 the first gum fac-
tory opened. An employee
fell into a vat, and his boss
chewed him out.
When told she would need
a travel visa, she asked if her
Master Card was OK.
Good intentions
Having missed taking a va-
cation, John and Ruth made
plans for next year by buying
the last tent in the store at a
great price. Although it was a
demo and had several small
tears, they felt it would be
good enough. But next sum-
mer when they went camping
they experienced rain every-
day and got completely
soaked. Thinking back, they
will never forget it. It was the
summer oftheir discount tent.
Dick and his wife Jane live
in OakRun.







Oct. 1 St. Augustine Fla.
Motorcoach, tip, &
admission to San Sebastian
Winery Tour, "Up-Town
Friday Nite Artwalk" $45
Oct. 16 Cedar Key
Seafood Festival
Motor coach, tip $25
Oct. 25-26
Eat & Sleep Southern
Savannah Ga. I nightS285
Royal Caribbean
Cruise Specialist
4-Night
Western Caribbean Sailings
Starting at $429 + fees
Shelly's Travel and Tours
Specializing in
Goup Tours and Cruises
Michelle Simpkins
(352) 572-1219
shellystravel01 @aol.com
shellystravelandtours.net


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I
I SAL
|PRC
O
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I


.ON
IFESSIONAL
ADEM~Y

Farcial


0 L 1 5 oo


RE LIGION


St. Jude Catholic Community
The Bereavement Group for those
grieving the loss of a loved one will meet
on Tuesday Aug. 10 and Aug. 24 at 1 p.m.
Meetings are open to anyone in the
community with a need to share their
feelings of grief.
Creole Masses for the Haitians in our
community are celebrated every second
and fourth Sunday of the month at 5 p.m.


D~iscousat



"SUPER LOW" PRICES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY! u


Located 1/3 mile E of West Port High School (352) 237-1 177 11AM-6PM TUES-SAI


www.circlesquarecommonsfarmersmarket.com


Friday, July 30, 2010 1.3


because pride goeth before
the fall.
If you get a fruit basket
from your psychiatrist, it will
probably be shrink-wrapped.
There's no truth to the
rumor that a major hotel
chain is considering buying
the Leaning Tower of Pisa,
remodeling and redecorating
it and opening it as the Tiltin'
Hilton,
Joe: "Where are you going
on your vacation?
Bill: "Haven't decided yet.
I want to take a trip around
the world, but my wife wants
to go some place else."
I was sent home from sum-
mer camp because of poor
eyesight. I was the only
camper who didn't see the
skunk.
It helps to take a baseball
player with you when you go
camping so he can pitch the
tent.


The next dates are Aug. 8 and Aug. 22.
The special classes for English or
Spanish as a second language are in
summer recess.
The classes for our children partici-
pating in the LifeLong Learning Pro-
gram are in recess until September.
Registrations for the 2010-11 school year
are currently being accepted. Classes
will resume Sept. 12.
Parents who have children enrolled in
the program should note there is a
mandatory parent orientation meeting
on Saturday, Aug. 28, from 9 a.m. to noon.


Shampoo, Haircut &Style $14.00

(hild ren's H air cut $7.00


1
( (


Purchase tickets odlne~or
at the ticket office.
Shows begin at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m.

8395 SW 80th Street Ocala, FL. 34481 (352) 854-3670
Ticket Office Hours: Monday Satun/ay:11:00 a~m. 2:00 p~m.
Day of Showv: 11:00 a.m. Showtime
*Online tickets subject to a small convenience fee. Schedule and prices


Return of the King:
A Tribute to Elvis
Tickets startinol at $15


I


Not valid with any other offers. Expires July 31, 2010.

Allservies performed by supervised students.


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Licensed by the Florida Commission for Independent Education,


SPUN
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11
In Africa a herd of ele-
phants rushed toward a
tourist while he was in a tele-
phone booth. He quickly
made a collect call to reverse
the charges.
I finished my trigonometry
exam without a secant to
lose.
The guide said, Ladies
and gentlemen, we have
missed the view, but we can
view the mist."
If you stumble upon a good
price for a vacation you will
have a good trip.
Tony told me how he met
his wife. "We met at a travel
bureau. She was looking for
a vacation and I was the last
resort."
Groups of lions always
move on just before autumn


ACAD~EM~Y


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FEATURING AN EXTENSIVE MENU
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REDUGED Fresh Market Seafood Authentic Italian Grill
SUMMER
Gourmet Desserts Beer & Wine Served
PRICES.FLunch Specials from $5.95
REGULAR DINNER IVENU SERVED NIGHTLY
FESTA ITALIANA
Saturday July 31 4-9 pm
Italian Seafood & "Italian Tour" Combo Plates
Chicken Parmesan, Eggplant Rollatini & Three-Cheese Ravioli
Delicious Choice of Pastas, Sauces & Toppings
Gourmet Chicken, Veal, Eggplant & Seafood Entrees


SUNDAY DINNERS FEATURING ALL THE FAMILY-STYLE ENTRI-ES WE'RE FAMOUS FOR WITH EXTRA SIDES TO BOOT!
MONDAY EARLY BIRDS $6.95 3-5 PM PLATES SUCH AS BEEF STROGANOFF, POT ROAST & MEATLOAF
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14 Friday, July 30, 2010


younger residents. NAP is
now recruiting new mem-
bers. Won't you please help
keep eyes and ears out there
on the roads of Oak Run? You
would only have to patrol
once a month, usually for two
to three hours, and attend
one meeting per month.
Ca rolIA n n Each volunteer has to fill out
Wheeler an application for the Sher-
iff 's Office and a background
check is conducted. If ap-
OAK( proved, three hours of train-
e~,~ezing is provided before
patrolling can begin. If you
are interested in helping

Neighborhood Aware- community call Bette Crouse
ness Program began at 352-873-0871 for an appli-
more than 12 years ago. cation form or additional in-
Some of its volunteers have formation.
been with it all that time and Little Theatre
are ready to pass the torch to Oak Run Little Theatre's


next meeting will be on Aug.
2 in the Palm Grove Club at 7
p.m. We will be performing a
skit called the "Bank Loan."
The purpose of what we
hope will be a series of skits
we will put on over the next
few months is to encourage
people who have never been
on stage to try out for some of
the parts. This may lead to
our finding a new "star" for
the Oak Run stage. The skit
will be directed by Linda
Dalesandry, a first for her.
She was the stage manager
for "Senior Follies" and did
an excellent job. Joining
Linda will be Norma Morse,
Patti Waddell and Charlie
Takesian. "Bank Loan" is a
farce in which an unsuspect-
ing couple badly in need of a
loan but unemployed is put


through the wringer trying to
qualify. The performance
will be at the completion of
our normal meeting and re-
freshments will be served.
Guests are welcome and en-
couraged to attend. We think
you will find it to be a fun
night!
Do You Remember?
Tune in channel 12 for Len
Teitler's presentation of
Ralph Dragotto's "Can't Help
Singing"' from July 2009 with
master of ceremony Damian
Romano. The program airs
following "FYI" daily at 9
a.m. and 7 p.m. from July 30
to Aug. 6.
Blood pressure clinic
Oak Run volunteers from
the Medical Team will be at
the Island Club on Monday,
Aug. 2, from 2 to 3 p.m. to take


blood pressure readings. Do
you know what your numbers
are? Come find out.
Southern states Club
The club item in last
week's column kind of
blended into the item above
it. For any of you that missed
it, we want to make sure you
know that our next dinner
meeting will be Aug. 12 at 6
p.m. at Palm Grove. Erich
Neumann is back and will be
serving our favorite summer
menu, "The Deli Buffet,"
plus our very own Damian
Romano is the deejay for the
evening. If you have not
bought your tickets yet, it's
not too late. Stop by the Or-
chid Club on Aug. 2 from 9 to
11 a.m. Cost is $13 for mem-
bers and $15 for guests.


Oak Run Travel
Racing and poker fans
should call Bob and Maureen
Farulla to get on the trip to
the new dog racing facility in
St. Petersburg. In addition to
dog racing you can enjoy the
poker room and a simulcast
of other races while you are
there. Price includes lunch,
program, bus, and driver's
tip for only $30.
DeBary Hall Historic Site
on Wednesday, Oct. 20, has a
few seats available due to a
cancellation. Call Jan and
JoAnn Flickinger. DeBary
Hall was a winter retreat
which became a center for
hospitality in the 1870s. In-
cluded in the trip will be a
guide who will explain the

PLEASE SEE OAK, PAGE 15


_1~_1~11-111~


I


I


)--------
10%OFF :
LUNCH |
I AIIYou see a ~
ICan Eat over iso tems I
I 352-861-6688
1/3355 SW College Road I
I tick Ex as8/3O1/~10


$10FFE PrAdault} \
DINNER Kids50COff I
IAIIYou es*"rM ~
ICan Eat over so Items
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Taco Salad..............53.45
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Fajitas......................57.95
Chimichanga............6.45
Alambre..................56.45
Tacos Bistec...........56.45
Enchiladas...............56.45


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Tue
Wed
Thur
Fri


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Friday, July 30, 2010 15


Erika Radke. Closest to the
pin was won by Sue Mar-
entette and Donna Huffman
had the only chip in,
July 22nd: Flight A: Judy
Gerace, Connie Bingham;
Flight B: Donna Huffman,
Annette Carini; Flight C:
Olive Adler, Norma Erick-
son; Flight D: Ruby Shepard,
Ann Hurr. Sue Marentette
had the sole chip in and no
one won closest to the pin.
Royal Oaks Women's 18
Hole Golf
On Tuesday, July 20, the
game was low net. With a
heat index of 105 degrees,
most of our scores were
higher than usual. The win-
ners were group 1, first
place, Sylvia Zappia, 70; sec-
ond place, Noreen Salo, 73;
third place (tie), Carol
Dygert, Elsa Berbig and Pat
Blackbumn, 74. Group 2, first
place, Janet Tully, 75; second
place, Lynn Houghton, 76;
third place, Bea Terry, 78.
Group 3, first place Ilene
Simnowitz, 68; second place,
Sheila Adams, 75; third
place, Joanne Morris, 77.
Closest to the pin on hole #6
was Dianna Love.
Royal Oaks Lady Niners
The July 22 game was


"Low Net." It was a nice
morning to play golf, but for
some reason, everyone
struggled with their game.
Ilene Simnowitz took first
place and Eleanor Cerlenko
was second. Sally Grass, B. J.
Lassiter, and Joan Scholl
tied for third place.
All ladies living in Oak
Run are welcome to play
with the Lady Niners on
Monday mornings. The tee-
times are noted on the sign-
up sheet in the ladies' locker
room.
CarolAnn's Corner
Earlier this year I drove to
Orlando and seemed to have
a misadventure at almost
every toll both. A couple of
times I missed the basket
with the coins. The last straw
was when, having run out of
coins, I went to hand the per-
son in the toll both a $5 bill
and the wind blew it out of
my hand! On the way back I
stopped on the turnpike and
bought one of the inexpen-
sive SunPass stickers that
uses your windshield as an
antenna (as best as I could
figure out.) Nothing fancy
but I figured I wouldn't need
to deal with money any
more. I used it for a couple of


trips and everything went
very well as I zipped through
the SunPass lane with the
overhead thingyy" reading
my sticker and deducting the
tolls.
A couple of trips ago I
began to wonder if I needed
to put more money on the
SunPass. I tried to access my
account online but had my
usual problem trying to re-
member my password. Was it
four letters or six? Did it
have numbers in it or not?
Nothing worked solIdecided
to just keep using the pass
and figured it would tell me
when it was used up. After
all, the electronic signs at the
toll booths had been saying
"low balance" for some time.
I just didn't know how low.
on the fateful trip I de-
cided that all the money
must be gone, or at most I
had something like 10 cents
on it, so at the first toll booth
I went up to the toll taker
with money in hand. To my
surprise the gate opened be-
fore I could even hand her
the money. I said, "There
can't be any money on
there," but she just shrugged
and waved me through. The
same thing happened at


each toll both all the way
down and all the way back.
The only thing Icould figure
was that additional money
had been automatically put
On the pass from the credit
card I originally used, al-
though I hadn't been able to
find anything on any subse-
quent credit card state-
ments.
A few days after after my
return I received a postcard
in the mail stating that I had
been illegally using a Sun-
Pass that had no money on it!
I called the 800 number on
the postcard and told my tale
to a nice lady. She sounded
as though she had heard the
same story many times be-
fore. She assured me I was
not about to receive a ticket
and that all I had to do was
give her a credit card num-
ber and she would clear my
negative balance and put as
much money as I wanted on
the SunPass. She also gave
me a new password (and told
me to write it down) as well
as arranging for my credit
card to be debited for a set
amount any time the pass
went below a certain level.
She was very efficient in
every respect but one. She


could not give me an under-
stand able answer to my
question, "Why did the gates
keep opening for a SunPass
with nothing on it and why
couldn't the toll takers tell
there was nothing on it." I
can only surmise that an-
swer lies somewhere in the
area of computer program-
ming.
So those of you with the
$4.99 SunPass specials be
warned. You are apparently
on your own as far as keep-
ing track of the amount of
money on the pass.
Send all items for this col-
umn to CarolAnn Wheelerat
dem ocra tearol ~d eccaca -
ble. com no later than the af-
ternoon of the F~iday before
publication. Note there are
no hyphens in the address. If
you wish to call her the num-
ber is in the Oak Run direc-
tory You may send pictures
as jpg attachments. Typed
copy or hard copy photos can
be placed in Carol's cubby
across the street from her
house but should be submit-
ted earlier as they take
longer to process. The names
of the people in all photos
must be included.


' '


JoFn ai Boy tt, Jr.
"""nia Adio


1 1 am daily a~P Tuesday.
Night racing Wednesday Saturday.


OAK
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

unique amenities of DeBary
Hall's 140-year history. We
will eat ton your own) in San-
ford at the famous Willow
Tree Cafe which is noted for
its excellent German food.
There are still a few tick-
ets available for Celtic Thun-
der from Oak Run Travel.
The tickets at Ruth Eckerd
Hall are all sold out. The
show will be Tuesday, Nov
23, at 7:30 p.m. Call Joanne
Missener.
If you missed the sign-up
for "Fiddler on the Roof,"
call Connie Smith for this
wonderful trip to the
Phillips Center on Tuesday,
Dec. 7.
ORWGA Winners
The Oak Run Women
Golfers, who play at Spruce
Creek CC, held low net tour-
naments July 15 and July 22.
The following are the win-
ners of those competitions.
July 15th: Flight A: Marti
Babb, Connie Bingham;
Flight B: Joan Klier, Annette
Carini; Flight C: Marlena
Yaich, Norma Erickson;
Flight D: Ruby Shepard,













So you think you can pray?


The Reason to Behieve...


r:1:1:n-~ iiT;M r~1 i~T~


Our To




into my easy chair for
an evening of reading
and relaxation. I was read-
ing a book I had just pur-
chased and was quite
anxious to get into it. The
Gracious Mlistress of the
Parsonage was dutifully
going through the daily
newspaper. She tries to
keep up on the news while I
try to escape the news. She
is more successful than I
am.
All of a sudden, I heard
from her side of the room, "I
just can't believe this."
I tried to pretend I did
not hear it and went back to


16 Friday, July 30, 2010


my book.
"Of all the ridiculous
things in the world," she
said as though she were
talking to somebody other
than me. I pretended she
was and continued my
reading hoping that was the
last of her outbursts.
Then I heard, "Aren't you
listening to me?"
It was then I knew I had
to put my book down and
find out what all the con-
sternation on her side was
about. Some things you can
ignore and then some
things you better not ig-
nore. Mly wife comes under
the latter
"What's got you all riled
up?" I queried.
"It's this article in the
newspaper about forbid-
ding prayers and especially
prayers using the name
Jesus. Of all the stupid
things in the world, this has
to take the cake. I have a
good mind to...."
I must confess I was not
listening to her after this
point. With all the turmoil
and trouble in this world,
people are making an issue
about praying in public. A
little while back Franklin


Graham was disinvited to a
meeting where he was sup-
posed to have the opening
prayer.
Any person with any de-
gree of reason between
their ears should know that
humanity in general, our
country in particular, is up
to the chin in trouble. The
leaders in our country have
operated on the basic prin-
ciple that they can handle
the affairs of our country.
Well, how is that working
out?
The best and brightest
minds in our country have
caused everything they
touch to turn into a com-
plete disaster,
Never in our country
have we had so much trou-
ble and difficulty. Now, in
light of this ineptitude, peo-
ple are saying that we can-
not pray in public. In my
mind that is an oxymoron...
which is a nice way of say-
ing dumb bull.
Then drifting in the back-
ground, I heard my wife say,
"Why do you suppose
they're so afraid of prayer?"
Then it dawned me. She
was exactly right.
Why do people who do


not believe in God and do
not believe in prayer fight
so hard against them? Why
do they fear God? What are
they afraid about prayer?
As I mused on this, a
thought came tiptoeing
through the corridors of my
mind.
If those claiming to be
Christians feared God and
prayer as much as those
who are not Christians,
something would really
change in this country
There would be a new reli-
gious paradigm, I assure
you.
Take prayer for example.
I do not care who you are,
at some point in your life
you pray to something or
someone. As long as there
are algebra tests in the pub-
lic high school there will be
prayer in the public high
school.
I think I have figured out
why there is so much hulla-
baloo against public prayer
in our country. These peo-
ple making the uproar are
desperately fearful that
somebody who is praying in
public will really know how
to pray and make a connec-
tion.


Not everybody who prays
is really praying.
If these people really did
object to prayer, they would
keep their mouth shut.
Nine out of ten people who
pray are not really praying.
Sure, they are saying a few
words, maybe even quoting
some Scripture, but they
are really not praying and
their prayer never gets
above the ceiling.
If one tenth of the
prayers prayed on any
given Sunday were an-
swered, most of the people
praying would be sur-
prised. It seems, at least to
me, that the only people
who really believe in the
power of prayer are the
people who do not believe
in prayer.
I'm not too much con-
cerned about the people
who object to prayer. After
all, there is no way under
heaven they can stop me
from praying. What I am
concerned about are peo-
ple who say they believe in
prayer and yet have no evi-
dence to support that claim.
In many regards, I am a
very practical person. I do
not make too many de-


mands from anybody. All I
want to know is that you are
who you say you are and
you are doing what you say
you are doing. Now, that is
not too much to ask.
Here is my challenge. I
will show you what my life
is with God, if you show me
what your life is without
God. Tell me where you
came from and I will tell
you where I came from. I
think that is fair.
All we need in this coun-
try are just a few people
who really know how to get
a hold of God in prayer.
The Bible says..."Confess
your faults one to another,
and pray one for another,
that ye may be healed. The
effectual fervent prayer of
a righteous man availeth
much" (James 5:16).
Let's hear it for the right-
cous man who knows how
to pray.
The Rev James L. Snyder
is pastor ofthe Family ofGod
Fellowship, 1471 Pine Road.
He and his wife, M~artha,1live
in Silver Springs Shores.
Call him at 687-4240, or e-
mail jamessnyder2@att.net.
The church website is
www~wha tafellowship. comn.


Re v.
J ames L .
Snyder


ar tlMike Patton


~9 '1


Phone (352) 861-9080

Southwest







Sunday Services
10:30 a~m.- 6:00 p~m.
Sunday School 9:30 a~m.
Bible Studies Wednesday 7:00 p~m.
Minister Anthony Smith
Monday Morning
Christians


I


i1 as RESBYTERIAN
CNURCN
AT MARION OAKS
279 Marion Oaks Manor
347-1161
Email: PCMO@netzero.com
Itev. Brady Seeley
Pastor
Sunday Morning Worship
10:30 A.M.
Nursery Provided
Class for Youth 10:30 A.M.
Directions: From CR 484 W, make a
left On Marion Oaks Blvd. Travel
approx. 2 miles,then another left on
04V1MariOn Oaks Manor.


11120 S.W. Hwy. 484
(1 Mile West of S.R. 200)

Sunday School/Discipleship 9:50 AM
Morning Worship 10:50 AM
Clubhouse For Children 4:00 PM
Wesleyan Youth 4:00 PM
Evening Praise 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Adult Prayer & Bible Study 6:00 PM
Oasis For Women (Bi-Monthly)
1st Saturday 8:00 AM
Men's Prayer Breakfast
Pastor: Dale E. Travis, Sr.
Phone: 489-2636
lwwc~embarqspace~om ~


Marion Oaks
Assembly of God
...is alight shining
in the darlmess
showing people
efal n tos to

347-3001
Sunday Morning Worship

Sunday School 9:30 AM
Wednesday Family Night 7:oo PM
Friday Youth 7:oo PM
www.MarionOaksAG.org
Pastor Tim Molntyre
13977 SW 32nd Terrace Roadb
Marion Oaks Entrance
leftatKwikKing, righton32nd Ter. Rd.


Ou~h~n rr






13 4 Miles West of I-75
Worship Service
8:00 & 11:00 AM
Bible Class & Sunday School
9:30 AM

237-2233
si~,.* ,,,. the Joy of Jesus Christ!


Sunday Bible study 9:45am
Sunday Worship 10:45am & 6:00pm
Wednesday Bible study 7:00pm
Assistive Listening System
Nursery provided for all services
Watch Our Television Broadcast
Thursday at 5:30pm on Cox Channel 16


Oklanon County
fin Independent Chrinstian Chcurch

SUNDAY SERVICES
Sunday School...............................10:0 am
Worship Service..............................11 :00 am
All ages
Wednesday Bible Study. ... ........ 7:00 pm
Friday Youth Nights..........................6:00 pm
SENIOR PASTOR DAVID BELLOWS


Maranatha Baptist Church


Sunday School.. . ................9:30 A.M.
Sunday Services.....10:45 A.M. & 6:00 P.M.
Sunday AWANA.............................6:00 P.M. Pastor
Wednesday Prayer .......................6:45 P.M. Bill Fortune


A Place for You...
No matte what your age s no matter where

... .vyou at -p ~
ocala West nIIc OP o
Traditional Worship 8:00 &11:00 A.M.
Casual & Contemporary 9:30A1M.
Children & Youth Ministries


Ocala West

200 Umited Methodist Church
y OaM~annonaks 9330 SW 105th St., Ocala,FL 34481~
www.ocalawestume.com 854-9550


352-861-6182 a
www.ccomc.orq


6768 SW 80th Street
Ocala, FI 34476


CA L L


TO


WORSHIP










Big Red Bus will pay a visit on Monday for blood donations


The Reason to Believe...




CALL TO






I RHI


ticket in Vegas. The Jersey
Boys.
This is a fully produced
and choreographed stage
show with a cast of eight in-
cluding a four-piece band.
The show is a tribute to the
1960's icons Frankie Valli
and The Four Seasons and
the sensational show, "The
Jersey Boys."
You will hear and sing
along to tunes such as
"Let's Hang On", the hit
songs of the Four Seasons
including "one of a kind"
Frankie Valli vocals.
You will hear "Big Girls
Don't Cry," "Walk Like a
Man," "Sherry," I've Got
You Under My Skin," "I
Can't Take My Eyes Off Of
You," "My Eyes Adored
You,") and many, many
more.
Advance Ticket Sale
Dates: Monday, Nov. 29,
Wednesday, Dec. 1, Friday,
Dec. 6, 8 and 10 resuming
on Jan. 3 and Monday,
Wednesday and Friday
thereafter 8:30 a.m. to 10
a.m. in the ballroom.
Ticket prices are $7 gen-
eral and $9 reserved with a
limit of four tickets per
purchase and are for the
residents in all OTOW
Communities.

PLEASE SEE OTOW, PAGE 18








Pastor Lynn Fonfara
Sunday Worship
8:00 a.m. & 10:45 a.m.
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.

Communion Every Sunday
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Citrus Springs
489-5511
Go to our Web page:
Hopelutheranelca~com

""" CHRISTIAN LIFE

ASSEMBLY
9644 SW HWY. 484, Ocala
(Near St. Rd. 200)
SERVICES
Sunday School
9:45 a.m*
Sun. Morning Service
10:45 a.m.
Sun. Evening Service
6:00 p.m"
Wednesday
7-00 p.m.
Thomas Markham, Pastor
Phone: 352-237-6950
EVERYONE WELCOME


'F~iried sl 'laptist


"Afa (WMc D~V M cw~if g ."
9524 S.W.315t~h St., 0cala

Sunday
Sunday School 9:30 am.
Morning Worship 10:45 a~m.
Evening Worship 6 pm.

Wednesday
Bible Study 7p.m,
Youth Alive 7p.m.
Randall Brown
PaStor 00VL


u rst con re st na


7171 SW SR 200

necocala@live.com
www.uccocala.org

Dr. Harold W. McSwain, Jr.,

Adult Bible astd r 1:oo Noon
Worship Io:3o am
A Progressive Community
of Faith~ in t~e
SHeart of Central Florida
Anl Open and
1'-I illll nnar Churvch


COmmunity
Church
CODserVatiV9 TraditiflOB S97VIO99
SundaU Worship at 10:00 AM
Located one m~ile west of 9tate Road 200 at
10280 SW IlOth street (tur wes aross from the entrance to Oak Run)

Dr. Harley Towler, pastor
Graduate of
Moody Bible Institute and
Antietam Biblical Seminary
& Graduate School


Friday, July 30, 2010 17


never have been a goal of
ours at any time and espe-
cially now in retirement.
This is an unhealthy way
to live causing much stress.
We need to make a deci-
sion to no longer be busy.
We just have to realize
some things are not neces-
sary and can be put on hold
for a while. This stops the
rushing around to get it all
done. Tackling our priori-
ties in a calm manner can
then be handled in such a
way that we don't feel
rushed.
The Big Red Bus
The Big Red Bus will be
at the Health and Recre-
ation parking lot on Aug. 2
from 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
With the snowbirds away,
it is especially important
that we have as many
donors as possible. All the
blood donated in Marion
County stays in Marion
County. Each donation can
save up to three lives,
Come one and all.
Master the Possibilities
August begins in full
force for our Master the
Possibilities lifelong learn-
ing program. There are 15
classes that start next week
and the variety continues
to amaze us. Join seasoned
and credentialed profes-
sionals for psychology, art,


computer and local ecol-
ogy presentations. There's
even a Healthy Living se-
ries and a Japanese film
series! These classes are
wonderful opportunities to
cultivate new interests,
renew past studies and
meet like minded individ-
uals. It really is a "cool way
to spend the summer."
I would suggest you stop
by the center (8415 S.W
80th St.) if you are new to
the program. Staff always
has time to chat with you
about their work. You can
also view the schedule on-
line at masterthepossibili-
ties.com. This center is
really a great addition to
Our region and remember
that everything they do is
open to the public.
Wellness Beyond Walls
Seminar
On July 17 from 10:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Live
Oak Hall there was a Mas-
ter the Possibilities class.
Cammie Dennis, Fitness
Director, gave a seminar on
Wellness Beyond Walls and
showed slides. As always,
she made the information
easy to understand. The
hour flew by and I came
away more informative on
the subject than when I ar-
rived. Hopefully, the atten-
dees will use the


information given to age
well.
The traditional method
of health is absence of dis-
ease. Cammie discussed
the multi dimensions of
wellness. They are physi-
cal, social, emotional, edu-
cational, spiritual,
environmental, and voca-
tional.
Optimal aging think-
ing positively about the
aging process. The main
thing is to eat nutrient den-
sity food and move.
The five biggest road
blocks for successful
lifestyle change are: Giving
up too soon, expecting im-
mediate results, doing the
same thing and expecting
different results, having
the wrong attitude self
efficacy, and having unre-
alistic expectations.
It's important to have 30
minutes of moderate exer-
cise most days. If a person
wants to lose weight, then
increase the minutes,
stronger exercise and
more days.
Interacting with others -
social connections are a
huge predictor of longevity
The state of your mind in-
fluences your state of well-
ness.
Optimal aging "I can" -
Identify challenges, create


an action plan, succeed,
contemplation, prepara-
tion, action.
We should live with
meaning and purpose. Pro-
vide inner peace by man-
aging stress, engaging the
brain, eliminate or control
stress.
The value of nature:
Among other things, it pro-
vides a calming effect, re-
duces stress, and is a
wonderful environment for
physical activity
Educational Lifelong
learning engages the brain
and builds self-esteem. We
can grow brain tissue our
entire life.
Physical activity -it has
a positive influence on
brain health. Vocational -
Maintaining or improving
skills.
The purpose of life is a
life with purpose. Em-
power yourself with a
strong body, mind and
spirit. Check out
www.icaa.0rg (Interna-
tional Council on Active
Aging)
Entertainment Group
Saturday, Jan. 30 at 7
p.m. in the ballroom your
Entertainment Group
presents the most expen-
sive show ever booked.
The Atlantic City Boys
pay tribute to the hottest


J une
Roberta


OTOW



cession of busy
nothings." -Jane
Austen
Most of us led busy lives,
even the stay at home
moms. Now that we're re-
tired, we all expected that
to be a thing of the past.
After all, isn't that what we
were told retirement is all
about? There would be
plenty of time to do what
we want or need to do in a
relaxed, unrushed manner
Instead, many of us are
still on that merry-go-
round. The work has di-
minished considerably. In
its place are outings of all
kinds. Being overbooked
seems to be a way of life
whether a person is young,
old, or elderly. It should


L


a
FELLOWSHIP 7

103459W2 1h Av nu
Ooala, FL 3447ene
Service Tirnes
Sunday
Bible Study 10:00 am
contemporay service ii:oo am
Eve. Worship 8:00 pm
Wednesday
Food & Fellowshi 8:00 m
Bible Study 7:00 pm
Youth Activities 7:00 pm
Pastors David & Theresa French
(352) 237-5011 0004V4E


"comeid t

Presbyterian
Church

"Your Spiritual Home"

Sunday Worship: 10:30 am
Sunday School 9:00 am
Nursery sh\ .1nkhk 1
Pastor Gary 0. Marshall

7768 SW Hwy. 200
(352) 837-4633
www.cpcocala.org


Feature Coasg
Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.MI.





wHERE REASON & RELIGION MVEET
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Rout 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG


FIRST CHRISTIAN

C "URC (

(Disciples of Christ)
Worship 10:30 AM
Sunday School: 9:30 AM

(352) 629-6485
www.firstchristianocala.org

)7i,1908 S.E. Ft. King St -
(Next to Marion
'YTechnical Institute) j
SNursery Provided ~


College Road

BaptiSt Church
5010 SW College Road,0cala, FL
(352) 237-5741
Rev. John Downing,Pastor
Rev. Jeff Rountree,Minister of Worship
Rev. obl. i. n.. .n l,
8:oo AM Worship Service
9:30 AM Worship Service
11:oo AM Worship Service
S9:30 &~ 11:00 Sunday School
5:30 PM Worship

6:30 PM Children/Student Ministries
7:oo PM Mid Week Worship s
Holding Forth the WordofLife...JESUS


SAVOR the ricd ess of

QUENCH your thirst
for knowledge 8 wisdom
TASTE th facoors of Jesh culture,

*Worship Education
*Social Action* Cemetery
*Social Choir Sisterhood
Reservations for FREE bus 873-3995
TEMPLE
BETH SHALOM
is all this and more
Erev Shabbat Services Fridays, 8 pm
1109 NE 8th Ave.,OclFL
Fostering Jewish life
in iMarion3 Cnty

wwwjewishocala.org


Evangelical
Lutheran Church
joyocala@embarqmail com
Sun y8 Wor hip 9*30 am

German Language Worship
1st. Sunday of each month
3:00 pm
Wednesday Evening
Worship 6:45 pm
Nursery Provided
Edward Holloway, Pastor
7045 SW 83rd Pl., Ocala
00AH (352) 854-4509


~ElrU ~



g











Lifestyle Center redecoration is on schedule


r:1:1:n-~ iiT;M r~1 i~T~


Ith1 CIf


Our commitment togpersonzalized eyecare.,,
No Technicians,
SNo Opticians,
SJust You and the Doctor
Dr. James A.Muse
Heath Brook Commons (next to publix) Board Certified
5400 SW College Rd/Highway 2010, Suite 106, Ocala, FL 34474 Optometric Physician


Eyecare hours are: 352-622-3937 Medicare and
MT TTH F 8:30 -5:00; W 1:00-6:00 Blue Cross
Select Sat. are available info~museumeyecare.com Blue Shield Provider

IVIAINTAIN THE HEALTH
OF 'YOUR BUSINESS -
Acivertise inr


/


--
I~I~I~I~I


Jan Sekurski and other keglers keep HarO OBY LnERSN
Bowling Center alleys busy while our Lifestyle Center's
great room is off limits during redecoration.


M~ARION



W Centeroi t

glorious mess
Raffony tells
can be confide
tion appearan
get better ...
You'll read
when your mi
municator ne
rives today.
Bill Wurst a


18 Friday, July 30, 2010


Welch agree the contrac-
tor's workmanship is both
right up to spec and right
on schedule.
Warm days means volley-
ball
This hot weather cer-
tainly has put our volley-
ball fans in the pool. You'll
Ro g find 'em splashing away
Patterson any afternoon from 2 to 3
p.m. and on Friday
evenings from 7 to 8 p.m. at
the west end of our
Lifestyle Center pool. Give
I it a try; there always seems
to be room for one or two
he Lifestyle more. And everyone who
r's great returns those out-of-
looking a bounds foul shots gets a
like it is, Joe rousing cheer.
me that we still bowling and..l
int redecora- During our unusual
ces can only "'warm spell," many resi-
lots better! dents have found the Mar-
his update ion Landing Bowling
monthly Com- Center as great place to
Iwsletter ar- keep cool, as long as they
Meanwhile, don't get too many 7-10
nd Deeann splits.
And, while we may not


have use of the Lifestyle
Center for a while longer,
there's still those water ex-
ercise classes, bocce, bil-
liards, pickle ball,
shuffleboard and tennis to
keep the joints limber and
attitudes youthful, all
listed on the back of your
monthly Communicator
calendar.
Did you know?
If you sneeze too hard
you can fracture a rib. If
you try to suppress
sneeze you can rupture a
blood vessel in your head
or neck and die. If you
keep your eyes open by
force they can pop out.
And if you absolutely
must try sneezing with
your eyes open, please
don't tell me about it ...call
911.
Rog Patterson is a Mar-
ion Landing resident and
1%iendship Kiwanis mem-
ber Contact him with news
for the column, he's in the
Landing phone directory


PHOTO BY ROG PATTERSON
Joh n Win n's sna ppy retu rn shot is ad mi red by Ha rold Heye a nd Greg Sutto n whi le
Dale Sutton readies his defense.


Better Health

St~art~s Here
For the diabe r ticoot,Tphrropue y fitted rshoesc ae
Sand well-fitted shoes and inserts,
people with diabetes find that
improved foot health means
Less risk for complications
that can lead to amputation.


PHOTO BY ROG PATTERSON
Connie Rowe talIks a bout redecoration prog ress with Bil I
Wurst while Deea nn Welch a nd Joe Raffony check out a
sample of material to be used for dance floor resurfac-
Ing.


f




I




f

*


will sing some selected
numbers for review.
Interviews and auditions
may be scheduled at the
conclusion of the work-
shop.
All those interest in
singing with the Chorus
should attend this work-
shop. Please contact
Suzanne Womack at 352-
873-4643 or Connie S11mm
at 352-598-2185 for further
information.
June Roberta is retired
and lives in OTO W She en-
joyed a diverse career, in-
cluding being a legal
secretary to theatrical at-
torney on Madison Aven ue.
Call her at 237-9208, or e-
mail OTOWnews to her at
jroberta~cfl.rrcom. Dead-
line is a week prior to 1%i-
day's public tion.


Dr. Lee Dr. Mostov Dr. Seifert Lorna Nichols
Accepting New Patients ARNP
Blue Cross & Blue Shield Tri Care Standard Tri Care For Life Medicare Assignment
Network Blue Blue Options BCBS Medicare Advantage Plans
On Site: Laboratory X-ray EKG Ultrasound Holter Monitors
Pulmonary Function Echocardiogram Stress Test* Bone Density


HRS: MON.-FRI. 8:00 A.M.- 5:00 P.Iv.
7860 SW 103RD ST. RD.
BLDG 100, SUITE 101 OCALA, FL 34476
8 www.cou ntrys idemed ical.org


I
I I I I 1


I


SBoard Certified Family Practice


OTOW
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17

Thanks to Dr. Stephen
Dunn DDS and his staff at
TimberRidge Medical Park
for making this show possi-
ble.
OTOW Concert Chorus
There will be a Choral
Workshop on Aug. 9 from 9
to noon in Suite H at the
ACC. Current members
and any OTOW resident in-
terested in learning more
about The Chorus are in-
vited to attend.
This workshop is to ac-
quaint prospective mem-
bers with this organization.
New members are ex-
pected to be able to singr
four-part music. The group





_ 111111


MEDICUS Family Healthar eriie
Michael D. Reilly, MSN, ARNP, NP-C
Family Nurse Practitioner -


Welcoming patients aged 6 & up
Walk-ins and appointments welcome
103rd Street Plaza (Next to Big Lots) q5 1276 J q; a
8602 SW Hwy 200 Suite A, Ocala JI*11ANP


L. all loalay for Appointment: 840-7077 so heel
Ivlsnl ~8750 SW Hwy 200, Suite 101 Ocala Espao
Up to 18 Months No Interest Payment Plans Red Roof Building Codes D0150, DO330, D1110, D9310


FINANCIAL


Fundraising is the
its. When the economy
is unsteady, as it has been for
a while, these organizations


Friday, July 30, 2010 19


residual value of the gift in
some cases, leaving no gift at
all for the non-profit.
Transferring the Risk
Reputable insurers like
New York Life are invaluable
for helping non-profits miti-
gate the risks of CGA pro-
grams. Through an
arrangement commonly
known as "reinsurance", the
non-profit can use a portion of
the donation to purchase a
Lifetime Income Annuity
from New York Life. The in-
come paid from the insurer on
the income annuity will cover
the non-profit's obligation to
the donor, and the non-profit
can put the remainder of the
donation to work immediately
(subjectto state insurance de-


apartment regulations).
Reinsurance helps non-
profits transfer risk to insurers
whose business it is to manage
precisely the risks associated
with income annuities. By pur-
chasing an income annuity
that matches the charity's
scheduled payments under its
CGA, the charity can ensure
that there will be funds avail-
able to support the charity's
payment obligations to donors,
regardless of market ups and
downs.
This educational third-party
article is being provided as a
courtesy by Herb Silverman.
Fbr additional information on
the information or topic(s) dis-
cussed, please contact Herb
Silverman at352-361-1325


must work harder than ever
to maintain and expand
donor contributions in order
to advance their mission.
The non-profits' search for
attractive ways to encourage
donations has led to the ris-
ing popularity of Charitable
Gift Annuities,
A "Win-Win"' Situation
Many altruistic individuals
express an interest in gifting
assets to a non-profit they sup-
port. Yet, a common concern is
that the donors themselves
may need the assets personally,
especially during retirement. A
Charitable Gift Annuity (CGA)


is an arrangement whereby the
donor gifts cash or other assets
to a non-profit in return for reg-
ular, guaranteed income pay-
ments for life. The contract is
mutually beneficial: the char-
ity gets a donation it may not
have otherwise received, and
the donor enjoys a tax deduc-
tion for a portion of the dona-
tion as well as guaranteed
lifetime income.
The Risk ofCGAs
As useful as they are for
fundraising purposes, CGAs
can be challenging for non-
profit organizations to ad-
minister. Since a CGA


promises to pay income to
the donor for life, the non-
profit must make sure there
are always enough funds to
meet its contractual obliga-
tions. Usually, the charity will
invest the entire gift and not
use any portion of the gift for
its charitable endeavors until
the payment obligation ends.
Market risk can threaten the
value ofthe organization's in-
vestments. This is certainly
happening now. And, the
longevity of donors (and,
hence, the number of years
the non-profit must pay in-
come to them) can erode the


by M. E lamptosn D.O.S.

COSMETIC
BENEFIT
OF DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Aside from restoring biting
and chewing capability to the
mouth, dental implants also
serve a cosmetic function. The
most obvious benefit to an
implant patient's appearance
is that the replacement tooth
fills in the gap left by the lost
tooth with a natural-looking
substitute. On a deeper level,
dental implants help patients
avert bone lose. Without
implants, missing teeth and
associated bone loss cause the
lower third of the face to
collapse and shrink inward.
As the anchoring portion of a
dental implant forms a strong
bond with the jaw, it
stimulates the surrounding
bone and preserves it. As a
result, the bone loss that
would otherwise be inevitable
with missing teeth is avoided.
If you have any questions
about your chances for
replacing lost teeth through
the latest techniques call the
office of MARK E.
HAMPTON, D.DS., at
352.489.5071. We can provide
you with implants, dentures.
bridges and crowns, as well as
general dental treatment for
the entire family. We offer
complete dental health
services for the whole family.
We want you to look and feel
your best. For a happy
healthy, and good-looking
smile, we urge you to have a
checkup soon. We're located
at 11902 Illinois Street.
Dunnellon. We're "Dedicated
to Excellent Dentistry."
P.S. One of the factors that
is used to assess a patient's
suitability for a dental implant
is the amount and density of
underlying bone in the jaw.


~n HR YS


Providing


* Motor Vehicle Accidents -for Facial Skin Care
* Immigration Physicals Using OBAGI Rx
* Diagnostic Ultrasound System
& X-ray ON PREMISES ADMISSIONS TO
* FAA Cert. Pilot Physicals OA SPTL
* DOT PhysicalsLOAHSPT S
* CT Scans Now Available New Patients
* Skin Rejuvenation Therapy-OBAGI Accepted
* Microvascular Bloodflow Therapy Walk-ins Welcome
FAMILY PRACTICE


* COmplete Physicals High Blood Pressure
* Heart and Lung Problems Arthritic Problems


* Diabetes
* Osteoporosis


* High Cholesterol
* Depression


*PreVentive Care and Immunizations
* AII aspects of Primary Care and Geriatrics


Monday-Thursday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
Friday 8:00 am to 1:00 pm
8296 SW 103rd Street Rd. Suite 1, Ocala, FL
Most insurance accepted


Charita ble gift an nuit les


A9t h


a C Ifu ,C~


YOUR DENTALL
HEALTH


Old-Fashioned, Attentive Service
8 61-5444





Smoke causes building evacuation

s,"""oyeer sofAccent In- ..
their building and called
911 after finding smokein
several offices.
Firefighters responded
at 3:56 Mlonday afternoon
and arrived three minutes
later. On arrival, firefight-
ers could see smoke com- I
ing from the roof.
Upon investigating, it
was determined that a
faulty air conditioner was
the cause.
After turning off the
electricity to the unit and
using fans to clear the
smoke from the building ,
lowed to re-enter the
suite.
Accent Insurance Group
is at 2210 S.E. 17th St.,
Suite 301.
Firefighters remained
on scene for 30 minutes.
There were no injuries.

Visit out website at
www.smcitizen.com


~113fi~r~lli~


r:1:1:n-~ iiT;M r~1 i~T~


No Home Too Far
HOUSECLEANING BY
DIANA
"Military White Glove Cleaning"
Professional &
Guaranteed
Low Rates
Supplies Provided
SFirst Time Cleaning
No Extra Fee$$!
6~29-6071*207-3428
Licensed with references


WE FIX
SPRINKLERS




Accurate Underground
Systems LEC
(352) 445-1403
SLicensed #10719 & Insured


WILSON AIR SERVICE

A/C PROBLEMS?
* We Service All Brands
* Repairs

re Scj Opinions
* 24-HR. Service
352-208-4641 ;
LocLl nOwned & 0pe ated



L MN PA N HNGN9

Over 30Yas
Residential

*Inter E i
All Work Guaranteed
Free Estimates
Call Hank Lehman
S352-873-2037





Dryer taking
too long to dry?
Dryer getting hot?
Over 75,000
Frec est mate* ieo inspection
S352 503-8559


Patrick's A-1

FreeHE ti at s/ nor Dsounts
Driveway Cleaning & Painting
Powerwashing Gutters Cleaned
W~intdew rCleErog& Oatnobs
Buldrp~et C eanng an R pair
620-o05 oiet F u e s, ecW I t l

Of arik V gt Oner


16 Years E cerience
Wo iVuaranteed
SEEBER, JI
ROOFING
REROOFING REPAIRS
(352) 266-4935
(352) 615-0248

SEstimates




* Exterior & Interior Painting a
* Manufactured HornesRepainted
* White Waterproof Roof Coating
Stops Leaks & Keeps Interior Cooler
Trailers, Flat Decks & Metal Roofs
* Concrete & Wood Decks Stained, All Colors


352-21 6-9800
Licensed& Insured


LAWE ARE E
TRIMMING
WOWZ352-598-9063


Wowr per m':~onth c
Family Owned and Operated. LiclInsured.


i7~fC~m-r$1,~500p,

IT "PAYS" TO CONSERVE ENERGY.....
replace your old heating and cooling system with a high efficiency
system and you'll receive up to $1,500 in tax credits.
As always, our Comfort Club Maintenance Agreement
members receive additional discounts as well!
Ca8 US today for details and your free replacement estimate!
DUNNELLON* MARION* CITRUS 48@ @g1
Licensed & Insured #CAC 1813249 4 .@m


20 Friday, July 30, 2010


K.S.E
PRO-CUT

Basic, Premium, & Gold Lawncare Packages








T~~ IzR IRRIGATION

PToudly watering your lawns and
gardens for over 25 years!
FREE ESTIMATES
Service and elepairs
of sprin ler ys coms.s
Call JOhn
(352) 342-4850



PAINTING
St PRESSURE
I~bNG HOUSES
Interior Exterior
Exc. References
10% Discount 55+


Arthur Osberg, MD,
joined Ocala Health Sys-
tem as chief medical offi-
cer for both Ocala
Regional Medical Center
and West Marion Commu-
nity Hospital on July 19.
"Dr Osbergbrings many
years of applied clinical
experience and a compre-
hensive knowledge of our
healthcare system," said
H. Rex Etheredge, CEO
for Ocala Health System.
"We are excited to add

Osberg laoi our md
additional strategic lead-
ership throughout our fa-
cilities."
In addition to acting as
the administrative liaison
to the medical staff, Dr.
Osberg's duties include
credentialing and med-
ical staff Services, quality,
and utilization manage-
ment, where his extensive


Health Emergency De-
partment medical direc-
tor since starting in 1985,
most recently with Sheri-
dan Healthcare and prior
to that with the NES
Healthcare Group. He has
held various management
positions with NES, in-
cluding executive vice
president of the Southeast
Region, Southeast Re-
gional medical director
and national medical di-
rector for urgent care cen-
ters.
Br. i bper reeve
Wake Forest University in
Winston Salem, North
Carolina, and his medical
doctorate from the Uni-
versity of North Carolina
in Chapel Hill, North Car-
olina. He completed his
internship at U.S. Public
Health Service Hospital
in New Orleans,
Louisiana.


Arthur Osberg


experience on various
medical staff committees
at Ocala Health System
provides a valuable foun-
dation. Dr. Osberg has ex-
tensive experience in
emergency medicine, ac-
tively practicing in the
Ocala Health Emergency
Departments since 1985.
He has been the Ocala


Balentine's
Landscaping, Inc.




~352) 873-4888
sruce Balentine
AFL EEsE TII rE





by Steven
Serving the SW 200 Corridor
MOW, TRIM, EDGE, BLOW
Bush Trimming Mulching 8 Mor.


352-291-1213
ooosmo Free eStil77teS




Cabinet Installation
and Specialty Woodwork
REMODEL
KITCHEN & BATH
Also specializing

Ken a ot r352-266-6771
Licensed & Insured


Roy's Lawn
& Home Services
LOWn MOintenance
Handyman Services
Pressure Washing

*i ( n






GLADY9
CLEAN ING
bERVI CE


*MOVE IN/MOVE OUT
.sENIOR DISCOUNTs
FREEE ESTIMATEs
S352-861-0665
SLicensed Bonded Insured



IRStallati0HS b Brian

352-628-7519 '


I


Lord Appliance Service
Repair on All Mkesr Ex neS
REFRIGRATO &S FREEZERS
* RANGES/OVENs
* HATIERNGDIT IAB E DISPOSALS


CFC Ce d iec
& Insured
680*0206 mitas


Free Smnk with Every Makeover
* Showers Granite Countertops -
* Formica Cabinets Wilsonart -
*Cabinets Refaced Tile And much more ,


j
I
,~fi,' ~I
T~ II
L~rW ~- I
I


!j


All Types of5Rem delg Fr e5Estimate

All work :ena 0. ~I CRCl326520
SLic. & Ins. Enjoy Life~-Enjoy Your Home


'~i~l)

,r~m~in e r~riir~~~~ T~Xi:


Ocala Health System names Arthur

Osberg as chief medical officer


IaERR V MA1RTB%
IRR IGATION LLC. 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101,0Ocala
Seasonal Special
*49"5 *diu ^ Spa ds to Correct Spray Pattern ~
*Complete System Inspection
We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation.
Certified Irrigation Auditor Call for details. ~EB~~~
Member of Florida
3 b Irrigationlociety 352-237-5731
SComp #7085 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Licensed* Fully insured





instructors' manual and ma-
terials. Facilitators will
present to businesses and
organizations who are inter-
ested in hosting classes for
their employees or clients
or members at their facility.
For more information,
contact Krista Martin at 732-
9696 ext. 215 or
kmartineuwme. org.



HOWARD'S

RE PA I R
Garage door openers
Shelving/Storage systems
Roof gutters & downspouts
Trim carpentry Painting
Small furniture hauling
Flooring
AH your "Honey-Do" jobs
Howard Richardson
854-9136



Troy's
Computer Clinic
We Come To You

"I ~ " 1~~
(352) 817-2834
Repar aet d e onms tet.m s ize in:
Hardware and Software Repairs
Home se end cpyware Removal
ht im/w wtrosjsm te oclini o



WEBER'S
LAWN CARE
""eu We CareAboatYourLawnm
Once year driveway cleaning
withl1year signed contract
Complete Maintenance *Landscaping
*Res./Comm. *LicJIns.
serving sw area since 199s
SCOTTWEBER- Owner
(352) 732-0620




*iig Ski ong
Carports Soffit & Fascia
Decks*Screen Rooms
Windows Doors Murals


& Interiors
Laminate Tile Wood
Carpet Shutters & Blinds
Shop at home service available.
Mon.-Fri. 9-5* Sat. By Appointment

854-3939 aeG i
6715 S.W. Hwy. 200 ~2ao


STARTING
$1 195
~-~ Ince sPress r~sn,
caulking all windows & doors,
2 coats Sherwin Hiliam's
SDriveways Pavers
A ork g~u4arnt edk
Licensed Insured


BOB'S
SCREENING SERVICE
We Re-vinyl Soft Windows
Complete Rescreening of
Porch Eclsrs r ati Doors
Window Screens Screen Doors
serving senior
citizens

'Fre rE states
S3~52-586-8459



BC's Unlimited
LawNn Care
"A better cultfor a better Price"
CUTS $ =>>
monthly
starting at agreement
Referral Discounts Available
Fully insured
Family Ownedl0perated
SBrian: (352) 362-3030
Cell: (352) 875-0011








Mowing Trimming
Edging
Licensed + Insured
Residential + Commercial

352-274-2669


(ROOFING

JOHN S. ROOFING
W e specialize in
Re-roofing & Repairs.
State Registered #CCCO58187

625-1 8 64 ~


Residentiala

Appliances

Refrigerators
Water Heaters
vS Dryers
YOwaIves
!86-7887


,I____ __ _


Acrylic, Glass a -r Ci` RAGiE
Vinyl Windows ISC EEN DOOR
Custom Made for
Your Screen Room c Starting at
"9 R6
Includes: Deluxe Rubber Rollers, 8" kick-
NTRUCTION plate, double threshold. 18/14 charcoal
CRCO58138 S~een, handles, locks and corne-alongs.
HE & &Optional screen choices.
0@ 4642 Moiehne325





RELIABLE INSURED FREE ESTIMATES

aibout o KREC IKESSUKE nSilNG

352.454.8 598
* WITH 12 MONTH AGREEMENT. Upon completion of month 12, not to exceed 550 linear feet,
single story homes only, not to include any other structures, driveways, sidewalks, etc.


* Lawn Maintenance Mulching .."G,
Lndscaping P iV Work fT
* Lawn Spraying/Fertilizing BE @


Ec 866-218-5263
man www.ttlandscaping.com


KPW ENTERPRISES, INC.

YOUR liANDYNIAN CONNECTION .TR
FREE Estimates~- Go Green & Save Big $$$~
1 Year Warranty on All Labor No Job TOO B/G or TOO SM1ALL

: 2tchien l Bath Rerpeis/ r intinsig u ap nty Tite tunin tet rlooring

Ask boutourPay by the job -
Home Maintenance Contract No yth or
CALL KEVIN 352-250-1050 kpwenterprisesdembarqmail.com


Investments and strategies
mentioned may not be suit-
able for all investors. Past
performance may not be
indicative of future results.
Raymond James & Assoc.

COMMUNITY


Workshop volunteerS
needed
United Way of Marion
County is looking with vol-
unteers who are interested
in being facilitators for per-
sonal budgeting workshops.
Training will be provided to
all individuals along with


I


Castle Carpets 1 No Job Too Srnall


Friday, July 30, 2010 21


premiums before you pur-
chase the insurance.
The cost ofthe insurance
depends primarily on your
age, but it also depends on
the benefits you choose.
Key features to consider:
Benefit amount: The
daily benefit amount is the
maximum your policy will
pay for your care each day
and generally ranges from
$50-350/day
Benefit period: The
length of time your policy
will pay benefits: e.g. 2
years, 4 years, life time.
Elimination period: The
number of days you must
pay for your own care be-


fore the policy begins pay-
ing benefits (e.g. 20 days, 90
days).
Types of facilities in-
cluded: Many policies
cover care in a variety of
settings including your
own home, assisted living
facilities, adult day care
centers and nursing
homes.
Inflation protection:
With inflation protection,
your benefit will increase
by a certain percentage
each year. It is an optional
feature available at addi-
tional cost.
Your insurance agent or
financial professional can


help you compare long-
term care insurance poli-
cies and answer any
questions you might have.
Please contact me at 352-
854-6866 or my email at
Doug.Awad~raymond-
jaes.com if I can be of any
help.
This information was
partially developed by
Forefield, Inc., an inde-
pendent third party. It is
general in nature, is not a
complete statement of all
information necessary for
making an investment de-
cision, and is not a re com-
mendation or solicitation
to buy or sell any security.


Inc. does not provide ad-
vice on tax, legal, or mort-
gage issues. These matters
should be discussed with
an appropriate profes-
sional.


WINDOW ~I




FREE EX
ESTIMATES ~s


SINSURED* VETERAN OWNED



Thompson Painting
and Pressure Washing
Re paint specialists

SInteriOf nc
-'S~ EXterior

Call 352-598-3000
References Upon Request
SFree Estimates ~ Licensed and Insured





Exclusive Service/Repair Specialist
.23yearsof ***11FA
experience %'p", '
-Licensed and
Insured
comp #8715
Steve ShawT
352-624-2533


Experienced Licensed / Insured
R,A. Jarboe
Cer0mic Tile InC
Cerarnic Tile Kitchens
Bathrooms Entryways
Home: (352) 861-9698
Cell: (352) 620-4475


Stone *Rock
Sodding Mulchin
Mowing Borders
Landscaping
352-572-9488
LiclInsured Free Estimates


)I)I)1:


DECOR AT IVE CONCRETE COAT INGS
Any Color and Design
* Driveways Patios River Rock Cleaned
* Garage Floors Crack Repair & Sealed
* Walkways Rust Holes Repaired Pavers Cleaned &
* Pool Decks Rust Removed Sealed
COMPARE OUR RATES AND WORKMANSHIP
STARDECK COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS c-
SINCE 1978 ilq
NON-SKID CHEMICAL RESISTANT
552-875-6041 CELL 552-572-6192 ~
Licensed FREE ESTIMATES Insured I


35MPM


AWAD
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3

care insurance? Like other
types of insurance, long-
term care insurance pro-
tects you against a specif ic
financial risk- in this case
the chance that long-terni
care will cost more than
you can afford. In ex-
change for your premium
payments, the insurance
company promises to cover
part of your future long-
term care costs. It can help
you preserve your assets
but it can be expensive. Be
sure you can afford the


House


by Janet
Wee87ly 1110nhily
Your Hours
- Winl do heauy
creamno I
. Il','ffe,rcs c""-


SC& B Clock
*- Repair Sales -
AII Types of Clocks
AUTHH IZD SERVCE
HOUSE CALLS WATCH BATTERIES WaShe
-In Anything & Everything Antiques,
South of Jasmine Plaza MIC
CELL: 352-274-0941
352-2085868 3 2-
0il 6Muzqe & 352-


GARAGE DooR SQUEAKING N~EED REPAIRS?
1~ ~1 ~1 Tune Up Special

CI 1 0I $ 95 I



MaSter's Touch Garage Door Service


JTeff O'Cull Owner
















S U T H M A R IO N TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD, CANCELLATIONS Advertisements may be canceled as soon as
" "in the paper. Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the deadlines for plac-

tl 1Z eZ~ CALAL IIE F: 1m 8 761037ersutsae baie.o will bo ersosil o oe bille only focrr cth dates the ad actually appar
9:00 am 4:00 pm ing ads. except for specias
(DEDLNE4:0 p TES~gERRORS Be sure tocheck your advertisement the firsi day it appears. We




S S ~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ md S wll not be presonsil fo more adthan one incerorretisrin dutet r
NOTICE TO READERS: Publication of any ALLADS REQUIRE PAYMENT.
classifed does not constitute endorsement b WE ACCEPT:
South Madion Citizen. We make every effort t
screen out advertising that may not be legiti- LU
mt.However, sic ecnntguarantee th
legitimacy of our advertisers, you are adtvised to
he~ vaer aou msead ads an take caution ~


AUTO TECHNICIAN
Business is booming!
Experienced personnel needed in our
top of the line service department.
*MUSt have experience
eMUSt be Chrysler trained
*MUSt be motivated
*Benefits 401K plan


Chiefpl d C roysler-

Dodge-Jeep
2771 N. Young Blvd., Chief land
Be prepared for interview at tirne
of application. Drug-Free Workplace


r:1:1:n-~ iiT;M r~1 i~T~


""FRF D cument

with New Annual
Enrollment. LifeLock

Itin HT H Protec-

Now! Ds Prm e:
1-888-697-3188
*DIVORCE

Star in at U6P5.' sig-
n ture Divo ce 'Miss-

"We Com to you.


$99s9n5ceL RID CRP
$154.95 FLORIDA LLC
Complete & includes
State Fees. Company
book & seal.
Free information
packet:
www.amerilawyer.com
or cl Miami-6 de...
Broward... (954)
630-9800
Tampa... (813) 871-5400
St. Pete.3. (27)

Orlando... (407)

Toll free (0 63-3900
Spiegel & Utrera, PA
L. Spiegel, Esq., Miami
CPF
FORECLOSURE
ASSISTANCE

You don t have to
lose your homell Most
ALL mortgages fall
short of
a Forensic Audit and
ARE VOIDABLE under
law.



LOCALLY
SERVING
40 STATES

Divorce $50 $300*
Money Back Guaran-
teel Covers children,
etc.
*excludes gov't fees
1-800-522-6000 ext.
700 Baylor &
Associates, Est. 1973

VONAGE
Unlimited calls

World. I




Guarantee. Why Pay
More? 1-8s7tr8c m0d79


settlements,
insurance annuities,
lawsuit settlement
payments.mWhu wait?


1-87 d96 -669



m
COSe Mana Of
RN Home Health

We are currently
seeking FT Home
Health Case
Manager RNs. Ideal
candidates will have
FL RN license and
current FL driver s
license and automo-
bl edatbilt insurance.
current med/surg
experience, one
year of prior home
health experience
desired. CPR
certification. Provides

patinis n te h me
PTr ee romen
at
www.citrusmh.com.
CMHS is an EOE.


LET US WORK


SouT MARION


CLASSIFIED
GET RESULTS
0AL TOLF


Recruiting


Thner C is seeking


SRecruiting Mngr
din hih olume

p eouc Det.

Thsp s teen n vie
inecrvein scna n-
inhg, bakgolund
reriments jo ostng
hrirae proess. Qualfi- .
cations include abilty
totye aot a mine to
MSon sofwre (ie:
Gntrveat Plainsotware

a plus, hn. Ideal
Scanrdidateisg quait
fiepocussed wuaith
catttions to ldetabil

45writte cornica-n i
indeendet/sre ftaier,
hihwork. Exethi with
sek) nseof urgeny.

mra instsar twve p
zatius onreq. Sdalay
rangiae $10-$1.00/hr
Foullenefitspg
ate-maireum to HR il
The Cernt ers, In.,
tiobahcnteris.us
Formoe ito vi~tsit

wwwthecentrs p ufs ina

Portion losin Date y
is 8/6/10 S200h




The Centers~ is ekng

Lobc~hne susto
andc dorap rnovistes

lowmcatines i cl, u


PSign-on blosnus for
e3 es /1





SIGN ON BNS


ScolTherapist

The Centers is seeking
SMaster s Level orF
Th3 nsts tceais worin
Croitruas countywth
tchildren/ad olscents
inr proviigr individ-

thdIner pys. Travel.PY
SCALE t -Salary u o

rexpb rteignem


ZZ.30110. Fullbenefits
pkg DFWP/EOEFax
or e-mail resume to
HR, The Centers, Inc.,

iob ~h ceter us
wwo mec nes us
Position closing Date
is 7/30/10



Become a -


mhrpit to wok
Eathrn upton $30da.

Leopokei ing ized vd
SBl xrup 3 a ae3


HEAT & AIR Jobs
eayto Work?
3 week accelerated
program. Hands on
e vionmet saton-


JobA anclcement
1-877-9904




SEARS HOME
IMPROVEMENT

has openings for
inside marketing reps.
PT positions. Earn
great money
talking to customers.
call 1-800-379-8310.
Retirees always wel-
come. EOE/DFWP.




Movie Extras
Stand In The
Background For
Major Film Produc-
tion. Experience Not
Required, Earn Up To
$200/Day. All Looks
Needed. Talk To Live
Representative.
888-664-5279



Secure Your
Future. Call
your IOcal
Recruiters *

SSG RODNEY MEDINA
(352)795-9757
RODNEY.MEDINA

ww.a inal ard.c
om




$1380 Weekly
Guaranteed

hStuff erw lpes at
time. No exp~eeienste

required-refundable
888-870-7859
bintinvestmentsine





-URNUPnTO $150 PER
shoppers needed to
judge retail and dining
establishments,. Exp not
1-8 3-0C 4861



BURIED IN CREDIT
CARD DEBT over
$10,000. We can save
you thousands of dol-
lars. Call Credit Card
Relief for your Free
Consultation.
1-866-640-3315. (cpf)
FINANCIAL DSTRERSS?
BUREAU
"A" ated opn
can hep imme itey.
Credit cards? Bills?
m letoensdh rss

Call 8nc8 6eb~t os u


I am looking
for a $75,000
mortgage
On my
$150,000 recently
app aised hotre.
discuss rates
& terms
(352) 615-8357




HIGHPLS OOL

Fast Affordable &
Accredited PACE
Programalre~eoBrochure.

1-8 e e-6 46ext. 16


AIRLINE MECHANIC

-Train for high paying
Aviation Career. FAA
approved pr gram.

m2liie -ob pace
Maint nnc


NEED YOUR HIGH
S nHsOL M PLOMA
for $399 NatiEOnally ac-

Frd brochtur e.
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2 July 2010


SUPPLEMENT To WEST IMARION MESSENGER, RIVERIAND NEWS, SounT IMARION CITIZEN


M~richel Northsea
Staff Writer
Not everyone has a
small weather sta-
tion in their back-
yard. Not everyone takes
pictures of clouds when
they're on vacation.
Ronald Goodman of
Ocala Palms does.
Even in his retirement,
his long-standing love affair
with weather continues.
Goodman, after all, is a re-
tired meteorologist.
Born in Gary, Ind., Good-
man and his family moved
to Miami when he was a
youngster. He got interested
in hurricanes and would
stay up late to watch Bob
Weaver, aka, "Weaver the
Weatherman," give the
weather on a local televi-
sion station.
When a neighbor took
him to work at Miami Inter-
national Airport and
showed him the weather
radar, Goodman's interest


grew even more.
As a teenager, he saved
money from his paper route
and odd jobs to buy a mo-
torcycle, but when his
mother vetoed that pur-
chase he got a weather sta-
tion instead.
He kept daily logs of the
weather all through his high
school years.
After graduation he
joined the service during
the era of the Vietnam War,
primarily to avoid the draft
and going into the Army.
He had met and visited
with the Air Force recruiter
and told them of in his in-
terest in weather and went
back to sign on the dotted
line. The Air Force re-
cruiter was at lunch so he
talked with the Marine re-
cruiter. Learning of his in-
terest in weather, the
Marine recruiter told him of
the different opportunities
of working and learning
about the weather.


~i~Yt;t~ ~im~iiTi

(I~~.III~I~II(I)BIII~I~IW~


PHOTO BY MICHEL NORTHSEA
RONALD GOODMAN STANDS WITH SOME OF THE CERTIFICATES AND SERVICE PINS HE COL-
LECTED DURING HIS SCHOOLING AND CAREER WITH THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE.


So Goodman became a
Marine.
After completing basic
training, it looked as if
Goodman would be as-
signed to aviation electron-


ics. He got a different as-
signment after he told his
sergeant that he was an as-
sociate member of the
American Meteorological
Society.
"Anybody can be an asso-
ciate member," he ex-



Lakehurst, N.J., for training
on weather issues, even en-
iuigtez weather itself
Even today, Goodman still
remembers the challenge of
his next assignment.
He was charged with the


task of estimating the wind
speed and its direction dur-
ing the predawn hours of a
morning in the desert in
Arizona. Pilots would use
his estimates to determine
when to drop their practice
bombs to land at the right
spot.


wen hit nam no e cno lc
ing the data. Data had to be
collected every two hours to

bo ter the service Good-
man earned his degree in
meteorology from Florida
State University. In 1978 he
married his wife, Vivian.


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His career in weather as
a civilian started where
Goodman enjoyed watching
the weather as a youngster.
He was even interviewed
for the job by Weaver the
Weatherman.
The next move was to
Tampa, where he worked

hu oLda was' nee
plied to and got a job with
the National Weather Serv-

When Goodman started
with the weather service, he
was already 35 years old,
but he still wanted to in-
crease his gri e by eventu-

forecaster at a facility.
To meet that goal about
every two years he would
apply for a better job and

movreehi 30-year career
the couple lived in Birming-
ham, Denver, Alaska,
Puerto Rico, Maryland and

Vivan was a nurse and
worked with Veterans Asso-
ciation, so finding a job
when they moved wasn't a
hardship for her
Those different venues
had him predicting rain or
snow for the nation from
Maryland, watching volca-

See HOME, Page 3


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July 2010 3


2010 WEATHERING WEATHER


HTURRICANIES:


20 10 expected to be busy


Goodmzan ,i dreams of being the lead
fOT8CaSter were realized in Puerto
Rico, Maryland and M~iami.


Storm Shelters

Concrete Steps

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~-~ Concrete Paver's

*Car ports & MORE
Shelter portion below ground.


storms, six of which
turn into hurricanes,
develop each year in the At-
lantic Ocean, Caribbean
Sea or Gulf of Mexico.* But,
according to a recently re-
leased forecast from Col-
orado State University, 2010
is expected to be a busier
than normal hurricane sea-
son in the Atlantic basin
and along the Gulf Coast
and Eastern Seaboard in
the United States. The In-
ternational Association of
Fire Chiefs (IAFC), Ener-
gizer and the American Me-
teorological Society (AMS)
are working together to
help encourage families in
hurricane-hazard areas to
take a few minutes to get
prepared ahead of the
storm and gather necessary
emergency supplies and
back-upispower itemssesn
is as busy as predicted, it is
so important for people to
p :""'" :" potential hazardous


tor of the American Meteor-
ological Society.
Power outages can put
families at risk for poten-
tially harmful and serious
outcomes. A simple way to
and unavolo abl noe noeunt
ages is to have an emery
agency power kit ready
before the blackout occurs.
Through the Energizer

pK lIc sfet ya pa gn EnE
ergizer, the AMS and the
IAFC, along with loca k r

together to provide tips for
building a complete emer-
gency power kit. In addi-
tion, they offer ways for
fanlie ton tesadu wered
rianesaanndd odird powiful
reminders about the impor-
tance of resisting the urge to


use candles as light sources
during power outages.
"Candles cause an aver-
age of nearly 15,000 home
fires each year, resulting in
significant numbers of pre-
ventable injuries and
deaths," said Chief Jeffrey
Johnson, EFO, CFO, MI-
FireE and president of the
International Association of
Fire Chiefs. "We cannot
stress enough the impor-
tance of having an emer-
gency power kit and using
flashlights and lanterns in-
stead of candles during
power outages. They can lit-
erally be a beacon of light in
a storm and help prevent
needless home fires caused
by candles."
What to Include in Your
Emergency Power Kit
Battery-powered radio or

See BUSY, Page 12


for Goodman. He had first
lived in Miami from 1953 to
1964, a time when there
were no expressways and
population was around
200,000 people.
Thirty- one years later he
moved back to a Miami that
had experienced a popula-
tion explosion to millions
of people and miles and
miles of expressways, he
said.
In the early days of
Goodman's career, weather
maps were drawn by hand;
now the weather service is
a paperless company. Com-
puter-generated maps, the
use of infrared on maps
and Doppler radar are the
reality
But Goodman still keeps
some throwbacks to those
early days in his career.


Just as he did as a young-
ster, he still keeps records
of lows and highs, wind
speed and direction and
the amount of rainfall.
Those records are kept
in notebooks.
several times a day he
goes online to look at a ail-
able radar maps to see if
there are systems in the
Gulf to watch.
Even now in his retire-
ment, one of his daily ac-
tivities is dependent on the
weather.
Goodman likes to take
daily walks around the
Ocala Palms community,
enjoying glimpses of hum-
tingbird fomn tme k
those walks, weather per-
mitting.
Some things never
change.


H 0ME

continued from Page 2

noes in Alaska for airplane
traffic, writing forecasts for
the public subscribers _
primarily news services -
of the weather service and
watching conditions
around the Rocky Moun-
tains.
Goodman's dreams of
being the lead forecaster
were realized in Puerto
Rico, Maryland and Miami.
In Miami at the hurri-
cane cen er, he worke in
the tropical analysis fore-
cast branch. Tasks in-
cluded making forecast
maps and writing narrative
on conditions on the high
seas, identifying tropical
systems and classifying the
strength and motion of
those systems every six
hours.
Being in Miami in 1995
was somewhat of a shock


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Safety tips for

Oa- -no w er ed

generators
Courtesy of the Occupational Safety
and Health Administra tion (OSHA)
Shock and Electrocution
Never attach a generator directly to
the electrical system of structure (home,
office, trailer, etc.) unless a qualified
electrician has properly installed the
generator with a transfer switch.
Always plug electrical appliances di-
rectly into the generator using the manu-
facturer's supplied cords or extension
cords that are grounded (3-pronged). In-
spect the cord to make sure they are
fully intact and not damaged.
Never use frayed or damaged exten-
sion cords.
Keep a generator dry; do not use it in
the rain or in wet conditions. If needed,
protect a generator with a canopy.
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Never use a generator indoors or in
enclosed spaces such as garages, crawl
spaces, and basements.
Make sure a generator has three to
four feet of clear space on all sides and
above it to ensure adequate ventilation.
Be cautious when using a generator
outdoors to ensure it is not placed near
doors, windows, and vents could allow
CO to enter and build up in occupied
spaces.
If you or others show symptoms of CO
poisoning, dizziness, headaches, nausea,
tired-ness, get to fresh air immediately
and seek medical attention. Do no re-
enter the area until it is determined to
be safe by trained and properly



~ dcusetz' IS t Just It


equipped personnel.
Fire Hazards
Generators become hot while running
and remain hot for long periods after
they are stopped. Generator fuels (gaso-
line, kerosene, etc.) can ignite when
spilled on hot engine parts.
Before refueling, shut down the gener-
ator and allow it to cool.
Gasoline and other generator fuels
should be stored and transported in ap-
proved con-tainers that are properly de-
signed and marked for their contents,
and vented.
Keep fuel containers away from flame
producing and heat generating devices
(such as the generator itself, water
heaters, cigarettes, lighters, and
matches). Do not smoke around fuel con-
tainers.
Noise and Vibration Hazards
Generator engines vibrate and create
noise.
Excessive noise and vibration could
cause hearing loss and fatigue that may
affect job performance.


lalian! WE WOKFO Y (7


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4 July 2010


SUPPLEMENT TO TVEST IMARION MESSENGER, RIVERIAND NEWs, SOUTH AIARION CITIZEN


By Kellie Parkin
Cedar Key Beacon
Generators can be useful
when a storm causes a
power outage, however it's
important to use extreme
caution when operating
one, said Tim Hastings, su-
pervisor of Member Serv-
ices for Central Florida
Electric Cooperative.
There are three main po-
tential dangers a generator
poses: fire hazard, electro-
cution, and carbon monox-
ide poisoning.
"Don't store gasoline in-
side the home," he said.
Fuel should be kept in a
safe location away from liv-
ing quarters.
Hastings said it's impor-
tant not exceed the rate of
capacity of the generator or
the extension cord. "People
do it all the time they plug
too many things into it and
it just won't handle it," he
said. "Generators were
never designed to run a
whole house well most
aren't designed to. But that


doesn't stop people from
trying."
"Make sure you always
turn it off when refueling,"
Hastings added. Generators
run hot, and the fuel can ig-
nite if it is not allowed to
cool down before adding
more fuel.
In inclement weather, it
can be tempting to bring the
generator indoors. But
keeping a generator in an
enclosed space can cause
carbon monoxide, or CO,
buildup. CO is a deadly
odorless gas. According the
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, CO poison-
ing symptoms include
headache, dizziness, weak-
ness, nausea, vomiting,
chest pain, and confusion.
"Always use generators in
well ventilated areas,"
Hastings said.
It is also important that
when using generators out-
side, they are not placed too
close to windows or doors so
that CO can enter a build-
ing.


When setting up your gen-
erator, follow the proper in-
stallation guidelines,
cautioned Chiefland Police
Chief Robert Douglas. "Peo-
ple need to know that
there's a right and a wrong
way to hook one up," he
said. "If they're not careful,
they can surge power back
in to the grid. It puts all
those utility workers at risk
if they're not hooked up
right."
Chief Douglas said gener-
ators are useful tools. "We
have a generator at the po-
lice department and fire de-
partment and it will also
run the water tower," he
said. "It's just good sense to
have one but make sure
it's hooked up right."
Hastings agreed.
"Never plug your genera-
tor into a wall outlet. This
can cause an electrocution
risk to utility workers,"
Hastings said.
If people have questions,
they should call their local
electric company.


PERK IN DENT IS TRY

J. CARTER PERKINS, JR. DMD
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# ~T he Ar t of

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NMost Insurance Plans Accepted "w'gg

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I1IIL-~(l






III ]II1l ~ W I'I I


July 2010 5


2010 WEATHERING WEATHER


'~ 01121EEE11R C OLL2.01I5 ',
* HAIR & NALS


:(


ravine, or other low area. A tent
offers no protection from lighting.
H Wet ropes can make excellent
conductors. This is bad news
when it comes to light-ning activ-
ity. If you are mountain climbing
and see lightning, and can do so
safely, remove unnecessary ropes
extended or attached to you. If a
rope is extended across a moun-
tain face and lightning makes con-
tact with it, the electrical current
will likely travel along the rope,
especially if it is wet.
a Stay away from metal objects,
such as fences, poles and back-
packs. Metal is an ex-cellent con-
ductor. The current from a
lightning flash will easily travel
for long distances. If lightning is in
the immediate area, and there is
no safe location nearby, stay at
least 15 feet apart from other
members of your group so the
lightning won't travel between you
if hit. Keep your feet together and
sit on the ground out in the open.
Sitting or crouching on the ground
is not safe and should be a last re-
sort if an enclosed building or ve-
hicle is not available.
Advice for motorcyclist
and bicyclist
Protect yourself when on a bi-
cycle, motorcycle or dirt bike.
Carry a portable Weather Radio
or listen to commercial radio.
n If you see threatening skies in
the distance and you are passing


SIf you're driving when a thun-
derstorm starts, pull off the road-
way. A lightning flash hitting the
vehicle could startle you and
cause temporary blindness, espe-
cially at night.
HDo not use electronic devices
such as HA1V radios during a
thunderstorm. Lightning striking
the vehicle, especially the anten-
nas, could cause serious injury if
you are talking on the radio or
holding the microphone at the
time of the flash. Emergency offi-
cials such as police officers, fire-
fighters, security officers, etc.,
should use extreme caution using
radio equipment when lightning
is in the area. Your vehicle and its
electronics may be damaged if hit
by lightning.
SVehicles struck by lightning


are known to have flat tires the
next day. This occurs because the
lightning punctures tiny holes in
the tires.
Stuck outside?
Don't kid yourself you are not
safe outside. Get to a safe building
or vehicle is the best way to pro-
tect yourself.
If you cannot, these are last-re-
sort tips. These tips will not pre-
vent you from being hit, but could
slightly lessen the odds.
SDo not seek shelter under tall
isolated trees. The tree may help
you stay dry but will significantly
increase your risk of being struck
by lightning. Rain will not kill you,
but the lightning can!
SDo not seek shelter under
partially enclosed buildings


SStay away from tall, isolated
objects. Lightning typically strikes
the tallest object. That may be you
in an open field or clearing.
HKnow the weather patterns of
the area. For example, in moun-
tainous areas, thun-derstorms typ-
ically develop in the early
afternoon, so plan to hike early in
the day and be home by noon.
HKnow the weather forecast. If
there is a high chance of thunder-
storms, curtail your outdoor activ-
ities.
HDo not place your campsite in
an open field on the top of a hill or
on a ridge top. Keep your site
away from tall isolated trees or
other tall objects. If you are in a
forest, stay near a lower stand of
trees. If you are camping in an
open area, set up camp in a valley,


See STORM, Page 6


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Beware of lightning in hurricanes or daily storms


Flash Facts:
a Lightning occurs in all thun-
derstorms; each year lightning
strikes the Earth 20 mil-lion times.
H The air near a lightning strike
is heated to 50,000o F hotter
than the surface of the sun!
Don't be a lightning rod
The safest location during light-
ning activity is a large enclosed
bIdding, not a picnic shelter or
The second safest location is an
enclosed metalvehicle, car, truck,
van, etc., as long as they are not
convertibles, topless or soft top
vehicles.
Enclosed buildings are safe be-
cause of wiring and plumbing. If

ultd g, or enouttsd etetl phso
pole, the electrical current from
the flash will typically travel
through the wiring or the plumb-
ing into the ground.
Even inside it is important to
stay away from showers, sinks, hot
t~us,t esc. ara el c-trroanico quinpd

coi ht ig can damage or de-
stroy electronics so it's important
to have a proper light-ning pro-
tection system connected to your
electronic equipment.
in a vehicle
If you seek shelter in your vehi-
cle, make sure all doors are closed
and windows rolled up.
a Do not touch any metal sur-
faces.












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Where Every Child Can L~earn


Hurricane Shelter Sites Host and Impact
1. Belieview High 10400 SE 36th Avenue Host/Impact Special Needs Only S.E.C.0
Belieview, FL 34420 generator

2. Belieview Middle 10607 E 360" Avenue Host/Impact Special Needs and GP S.E.C.0
BleI w, F3L534420 gener trn
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3. Dunnellon High 10055 SW 180' Ave. Road Host/Impact General Population No generator
Dunnellon, FL 34432 and not
PH: 465-6745 peie
4. Forest High 5000 SE Maricamp Road Host/Impact General Population Pre-wired for
Ocala, FL 34480 generator
PH: 671-4700
s. FL. Mccoy 1 cougar court Host/Impact General Population 60 KW
Ft. McCoy, FL 32134 generator
PH: 671-6325
6. Hammett Bowen 4397 SW 95" Street Host/Impact General Population 150 KW
Elementary Ocala, FL 34476 generator
PH: 291-7900 onsite
7. Horizon 365 Marion Oaks Drive Host/Impact General Population 300 KW
Academy Ocala, FL 34473 generator
PH: 671-6290
8. Lake Weir High 10351 SE Maricamp Road Host/Impact General Population 300 KW
Ocala, FL 34472 generator
PH: 671-4820
9. Liberty Middle 4773 SWV 95m Street Host/Impact General Population 300 KW
Ocala, FL 34476 generator
PH: 291-7930
10. Mladison Street 401 NW MLK Blvd. Host/Impact General Population Pre-wired for
Academy Ocala, FL 34475 generator
PH: 671-7250
11. North Marion 2085 W. Hwy. 329 Host/Impact General Population 250 KW
Middle Citra, FL 32113 generator
(Cafeeria) PH: 671-6035
12. Saddlewood 3700 SW 43" Court Host/Impact General Population Pre-wired for
Elementary Ocala, FL 34474 generator
PH: 291-4075 or 291-6020
13. Vanguard High 7 NW 28m Street Host/Impact General Population 600 KW
Ocala, FL 34475 and Pet Shelter generator
PH: 6714900
14. West Port High 3733 SW 80" Avenue Host/Impact Special Needs and S.E.C.O.
Ocala, FL34481 General Population generator
PH: 291-4000


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S OTRM

continued jiom Page 5

a safe location, pull over and
wait 30 minutes after the last
thunder crack.
SIf you can turn around
and get away from the storm,
do so!
SDo not ride into a light-
ing storm!
foThehseenare last resorthtti s

th od. oh may lght y

hi aii nut Ih storm below
an overpass. Do not touch
steel girders. Move away
from your bike. Remain on
dry surfaces if possible.
Overpasses are engineered
structures and are likely to
be properly grounded. Al-
though an overpass is likely
to be higher than the sur-
rounding landscape, if it is
struck by lightning, the elec-
trical current will likely be
channeled safely into the
ground
SLook for a bridge. Stay
away from water. Stay away
from any metal surfaces. Be
alert for rapidly rising water
if under a bridge.
SHigh tension wires: If
high voltage electrical ten-
sion wires cross the road, you
may want to seek shelter di-


SUPPLEMENT TO TVEST IMARION MESSENGER, RIVERIAND NEWS, SOUTH IMARION CITIZEN


rectly underneath these
wires. Do not get too close to
the large metal towers which
holdt u t ee wires ESta r
companies design these high
tension wires for lightning
strikes. If lighting should
strike the wires or towers,
the current is designed to
safely go deep into the
ground.
SIf you are caught in the
open and lightning is occur-
ring within five miles, STOP

cclei iccle, finF3 a coh o
other low spot and sit down.
SMotorcyclists should
move at least 50 feet away
from their bike. Bicyclist
should lay their bikes on the
ground.
On the Water
The vast majority of light-
ning injuries and deaths on
boats occur on small boats
with no cabin. It is crucial to
listen to the weather on a
small aquatic vessel without
a cabin. Ifthunderstorms are
forecast, don't go out. If you
are out on the water and
skies are threat-ening, get
back to land and find a safe
building or vehicle.
Boats with cabins offer a
safer but not perfect environ-
ment. .
Complied from the Na-
tional Weather Service


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July 2010 7


2010 WEATHERING WEATHER


knows how to re-
spond in the event of
a hurricane, you might want
to convene a family meeting
or meetings. Topics of dis-
cussion should include:
HWhat to do about power
outages.
HHow to deal with per-
sonal injuries.
SHow to turn off the
water, gas and electricity at
main switches.
MWhat to do if you have
to evacuate.
SWhere to meet and
whom to contact if you get
separated.
In addition, you should:
Post emergency tele-
phone numbers by the tele-
phones.
HTeach children how
and when to call 911 for
help.
STake a Red Cross first
aid and CPR class.
HMake arrangements for
your pets.
SGetting your food sup-
ply ready
Have at least a three-day
supply of nonperishable
food on hand. Focus on
high-nutrition foods that re-
quire no refrigeration,
preparation or cooking and
little or no water. Your food-
stuffs might include:
SReady-to-eat canned
meats, fruits, vegetables
HCanned juices, milk,
soup
HStaples, including
sugar, salt, pepper
SHigh energy foods, in-
cluding peanut butter, jelly,
crackers, granola bars, trail
mix
H Vitamins
H Foods for infants, the


elderly or people on special
diets
n Comfort/stress foods, in-
cluding cookies, hard candy,
instant coffee, tea
Optimally, a two-week
supply of nonperishable
food is recommended.
Though it is unlikely that an
emergency would cut off
your food supply for that
long, such a stockpile can
relieve a great deal of in-
convenience and uncer-
tainty until services are
restored. You don't need to
go out and buy unfamiliar
foods to prepare an emer-
gency food supply. You can
use the canned foods, dry
mixes and other staples on
your cupboard shelves.
Keep canned foods in a
dry place where the tem-
perature is fairly cool. To
protect boxed foods from
pests and extend their shelf
life, store the boxes in
tightly closed cans or metal
containers.
Rotate your food supply.
Use foods before they go
bad, and replace them with
fresh supplies, dated with
ink or marker. Place new
items at the back of the stor-
age area and older ones in
front.
Keep a supply of cooking
and eating implements that
can be used in the absence
of running water or elec-
tricity, including:
HPlastic utensils, paper
cups and plates
SManual can and bottle
openers
HA heating source, such
as a camp stove or canned
heat stove, and extra fuel
Securing your home
Board up windows or


an emergency. Discuss with
them your needs and make
sure they know how to oper-
ate any necessary equip-
ment.
If you live in an apart-
ment building, ask the man-
agement to clearly mark
accessible exits and to
make arrangements to help
you evacuate the building.
Keep a supply of extra
wheelchair batteries, Oxy-
gen, catheters, medication,
food for guide or hearing-
ear dogs. Also, keep a list of
the type and serial numbers
of medical devices.
Is your home safe? Stay
put
If you don't live in a mo-
bile home and your house is
structurally sound and in a
non-evacuated zone, you
should ride out the storm
there.
Leaving your home when
it isn't necessary adds to
traffic congestion and
makes it tougher on those
who must evacuate.
During the storm, it is
safest to use a battery-pow-
ered radio or television to


See PREPARE, Page 9


person.
SCheck flashlights and
radios. Make sure you have
batteries.
SCheck trees and shrub-
bery, and remove limbs that
could damage your house or
utility lines.
SSecure anything that
might tear loose or blow
away, including garbage
cans, grills, potted plants,
garden tools, toys, signs,
porch furniture, awnings.
SDo not lower the water
level in your swimming
pool, or it may pop out of the
ground. Remove pumps
from underground pits after
all valves have been closed
and the electricity has been
shut off. If the filter pump is
exposed, wrap it in a water-
proof material and tie it se-
curely. Add extra chlorine
to the pool to help prevent
contamination (3 gallons of
chlorine per 5,000 gallons of
water).
aFill your car's gas tank.
Getting special assistance
Find out about any spe-
cial assistance that may be
available in your commu-
nity. Create a network of
neighbors, relatives, friends
and co-workers to aid you in


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attach storm shutters. Tap-
ing windows will not pre-
vent breakage, but will help
reduce shattering.
SElectric power may be
off, so have a supply of extra
food, especially things that
can be eaten without cook-


ing, and a hand-operated
can opener
HThoroughly clean the
bathtub, jugs, bottles and
cooking utensils, and fill
containers with drinking
water. Allow a minimum of
3 gallons of water for each


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SUPPLEMENT TO TrEST IMARION MESSENGER, RIVERIAND NEWS, SounT IMARION CITIZEN


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Here's the
names selected
for this year's
Storms:
Alex
Bonnie
Colin
Danielle
Earl
Fiona
Gaston
Hermine
(her-MIEEN)
I or
Julia

Lisa
M~atthew
Nicole
Ott O
Paula


Richard
Shary
(SHA-ree)
Tomas
(to -MAS)
Virginle
(Vir-JIN-ee)
Walter
In the event that
more than 21
named tropical
cyclones occur in
the Atlantic basin
in a season, addi-
tional storms will
take nm fro
the Greek alpha-
bet: Alpha, Beta,
Gamma, Delta '
and so on.


Be Prepared
Get all your prescriptions
for medications & eyewear
egbefore the storms come.
Dr. James A.Muse
Heath Brook Commons (next to Publix) Board Certified
5400 SW College Rd/Highway 200, Suite 106, Ocala, FL 34474 Optometric Physician

Eyecare hours are: _Q 7 Mdcr n
MT TTH F 8:30 -5:00; W 1:00-6:00 35-2-'9 Blue Cross
Select Sat. are available info~museumeyecare.com Blue Shield Provider


July 2010 9


2010 WEATHERING WEATHER


See HISTORY, Page 10


changes, move to the new
downwind side.
If the storm center passes
over your area, there will be
a short period of calm. The
wind and rain may cease, but
do not go outside. Remem-
ber, at the other side of the
eye, the wind speed rapidly
increases to hurricane force
and will come from the oppo-
site direction.
Wait for official word be-
fore you leave your home.
During the storm
Monitor your radio or TV


for the latest weather advi-
sories and other emergency
information.
Do not use electrical ap-
pliances.
Stay inside and keep away
from windows. Stay on the
downwind side of the house.
If the wind direction
changes, move to the new
downwind side. Find a safe
area in your home an inte-
rior, reinforced room, closet


or bathroom on the lower
floor.
If the storm center passes
over your area, there will be
a short period of calm.
Do not go outside. At the
other side of the eye, the
wind speed rapidly increases
to hurricane force and will
come from the opposite di-
rection.
Wait for official word be-
fore you leave your home.


Some of the wor st hurricane s


in Florida's history
Greater Miami Hurricane 1926
Residents of South Florida had little time to evacuate when the hurricane
warning was issued on Sept. 18. Winds were thought to be 150 mph. as the storm
went over the Turks and then the Bahamas. In Florida it produced the highest
sustained winds ever recorded.
Not realizing the eye of the storm meant the storm was only half-over and not 'GRF
completely over many residents of the Miami area went outside only to be
caught in the second-half of the storm.
Buildings in downtown Miami were destroyed or at the every least damaged.
ne townmo kooeo Have was completely flooded, and hundreds died, by a
After Miami, the hurricane pounded the Gulf Coast until it moved inland
over Louisiana.
The death toll is uncertain from that storm but had the hurricane hit in mod-
ern times it would have a $90 billion price tag for the damage done.
San Felipe-Okeechobee
In 1928, again in September, tragedy hit with a lake surge from Lake Okee-
chobee put six to nine feet of water in the area. The surge is blamed for 1,836 deaths.
The Category 4 storm started in the Atlantic and moved over the Leeward Islands, hitting Puerto Rico on Sept. 13 and
Palm Beach on Sept. 16. An additional 340 people were killed in Puerto Rico and the Bahamas.


hNt amln th 8


2 01 0 tSO Tm S


* EAR

continued from Page 7
monitor developments. Ifyou
lose power, turn off major ap-
pliances such as the air con-
ditioner and water heater to
reduce damage.
Stay inside and keep away
from windows or glass doors.
Stay on the leeward, or
downwind, side of the house.
If the wind direction


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With the 2010 hurricane season under way, a new
Facebook group has been launched statewide to give
Floridians the most up to date information on develop-
ing tropical waves, storms and hurricanes. "Florida
Hurricane News and Information Center" group will be
a free resource for all Floridians with access to Face-
book on their home computers, laptops and mobile de-
vices. This new group will be updated daily by chief
meteorologists from various parts of Florida as well as
we hdo leontna p ied bye Nai i ItHultican Cn-
management divisions of each Florida county and many
other useful links to related websites.
"This is a great use of social networking" said group
creator Gregg Weiss of Delray Beach. "Millions of
Floridians spend so many hours on Facebook, I thought
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SUPPLEMENT TO TVEST IMARION MESSENGER, RIVERIAND NEWs, SOUTH IMARION CITIZEN


That pressure reading was
beaten by Hurricane
Gilbert in 1988 with 26.22
inches.
Moving along the west
coast the same storm hit
Cedar Key as a Category 2
storm.
Hurricane Donna
1960
Donna came off the
African coast in late August
and turned out to be the
fifth strongest hurricane of
record to hit the United
States. She produced hurri-

an otet h~urriieadn s be o
or since, in Florida, North
Carolina and Rhode Island.
Donna came west off the
Leeward Islands as a Cate-
gory 4 storm and hit the
Florida Keys on Sept 10.
Curving toward the north-
east she went over the
peninsula and on to the
North Carolina and Long Is-
land as a Category 3 storm.
Storm surges and heavy
rains followed in Donna's
path. The hurricane was re-


sponsible for 271 deaths,
with 107 of those in Puerto
Rico.
H Hurricane An rew
1992
A peak gust of wind was
measured at 164 mph by the
National Hurricane Center
when Andrew hit on Aug. 24
as a Category 4 storm.
The storm formed slowly
and almost fizzled at first
when it was first named on
Aug. 17. The winds changed
between Bermuda and
Puerto Rico and Andrew
strengthened, reaching a
Category 3 tatus bhy Aug. 23r
the Bahamas but gathered
strength again before hit-
ting South Florida and
Louisiana as a Category 3
storm.
Car ey, Prances,
Ivan and Jeanne _
2004
Aug. 13 Punta Gorda
and Port Charlotte took the
brunt of Hurricane
Charley's 150 mph winds.
The fast-moving hurricane


moved across Central
Florida moving out to the
Atlantic near Daytona
Beach.
In the Atlantic, Charley
continued moving northerly
and went ashore in South
Carolina. The hurricane
claimed 15 deaths.
Sept. 5 Landfall in
Florida for Hurricane
Frances was in Stuart. The
hurricane with 105 mph
winds was a Category 2
storm. Frances spawned
over 100 tornadoes and
brought heavy rains to the
area. There were eight
dea sl from she so~rnes

Hurricane Ivan was moving
northerly alone Florida's
west coast butngmade land-
fall on Sept. 16 at Gulf
Shores, Alabama, with 120
mph win s. Itvan trave led
across Ue sou hern po tion
into the Atlantior mn dit
ing south before crossing
South Florida. Damage by
Ivan, at $14.2 billion is the
third largest on record.
There were 92 deaths with


Ivan.
Stuart, Florida, wasn't
spared by Hurricane
Jeanne. It plowed into Stu-
art with 120 mph winds on
Sept. 26. Jeanne left three
dead in Florida and three
others in other states. In
Haiti flash floods because of
Jeanne claimed 3,000 lives.
Hurricane Wilma
2005
Wilma was in the weather
reports for weeks. First on
Oct. 14 as lower pressure
system near Jamaica, then a


named storm the next day.
on Oct. 23 it was a Category
2 storm and was headed to-
ward South Florida from
Mexico. Crossing South
Florida it exited Florida
just north of Palm Beach
and went northeast. It fiz-
zled near Nova Scotia.
There were 22 deaths
from the storm and five
were in Florida. Damage
from the hurricane in South
Florida was estimated at
$16.8 billion.
Source National Hurri-
cane Center


at Circle
Square Plaza


S H IST

continued from Page 9

The hurricane traveled
over North Carolina before
hitting a low over the east-
ern Great Lakes.
It wasn't until Hurricane
Katrina in 2005 that the
1928 hurricane took second
place as the deadliest in the
United States. Katrina is re-
sponsible for approximately
1,200 reported deaths.
Seven were killed in
Florida.
Florida KeyS
Labor D y
Hurricane 1935
Many World War I veter-
ans working in the Florida
Keys were among the 408
killed when a Category 5
hurricane hit on Sept. 2.
History left no reported
wind speeds but a baromet-
ric pressure of 26.35 was
taken at Long Key showing
the intensity of the storm.


Zop ~(cit~


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2010 WEATHERING WEATHER


and abilities are
unique, but every in-
dividual can take important
steps to prepare for all
kinds of emergencies and
put plans in place. By eval-
uating your own personal
need andnm~ao n anb er-
ter prepared for any
situation. A edomm tmentelto
you prepare for any emer-
gency situation. Preparing
makes sense. Get ready

no nsider how a disaster
might affect your individual
neP s. t kt
Pan t 1 mak ei on yo r
o ,e. It's possblaet toa you
will not have access to a
medical facility or even a
drugstore.
Identify what kind of re-
sources you use on a daily
basis and what you might do
if they are limited or not
available.
Get an emergency
supply kit
If you must evacuate,
take your pets with you, if
possible. However, if you


are going to a public shel-
ter, it is important to un-
derstand that animals may
not be allowed inside.
Plan in advance for shel-
ter alternatives that will
work for both you and your
pets; consider loved ones or

eedit oaure ho o ldi b
willing to host you and your
petsnin an emerged trnic
payments for federal bene-
fit recipients. Keep in mind
a disaster can disrupt mail
se ek Ffr t oserhoe den
pend on the mail for their
Social Security benefits, a
difficult situation can be-
comedwors i they r ev c
service as 85,000 check re-
ci ients learned after Hur-
riaeKatria Switchin t
1 ctonic paments in o e
simple, significant way peo-
ple can protect themselves
financially before disaster
strikes. It also eliminates
the risk of stolen checks.
The U.S. Department of
the Treasury recommends
two safer ways to get federal
benefits:


Additional Supplies and
Documents~:
Medical tions and M~edical
Supplies
If you take medicine or
use a medical treatment on
a daily basis, be sure you
have what you need to make
it on your ownofor at least a

Make a list of prescrip-
tion medicines ntncludin
1 osage, teaamen and a
lerTTI tnorm tonh t
or doctor 2"utp wharamalsse
you need to prepare. .

treatment amnsterou b
a clinic or hospital or if you
receive regular services
such as home health care,
treatment or transportation,
talk to your service provider
about their emergency
plans. Work with them to
identify back-up service
providers and incorporate
them into your personal
support network.
Consider other personal
needs such as eyeglasses,
hearing aids and hearing
aid batteries, wheelchair
batteries, and oxygen.


Emergency Documents
Include copies of impor-
tant documents in your
emergency supply kits such
as family records, medical
records, wills, deeds, social
security number, charge
and bank accounts informa-
tion and tax records.
Have copies of your med-
dicar insur ne ra Id
available.
Keep a list of the style and
serial number of medical
tdaiicnesd ic nohe lisu
rating information and
instructions.
Make sure that a friend or
family member has copies
of these documents.
Include the names and
contact information of your
support network, as well as
your medical providers.
If you have a communica-
tion disability, make sure
your emergency informa-
tion notes the best way to
communicate with you.
Keep these documents in
a water proof container for
quick and easy access.


Direct deposit to a check-
ing or savings account is the
best option for people with
bank accounts. Federalben-
efit recipients c~an si79n up

at ww.Go ire~ct.org.or
The Direct ExpressB pre-
paid debit card is designed
as eatsafe aend eso atrna-
ple who don't have a bank
account. sign up iseas 2-

9991 or sign up online at
www. US DirectExpress. com
.Signing up for direct de-
posit or the Direct Ex-
press@ card is a simple but
important step that can
help protect your family's
access to funds in case the
unthinkable were to hap-
pen. If you or those close to
you are still receiving So-
cial Security or other fed-
eral benefits by check,
please consider switching
to one of these safer, easier
options today


Support Network
If you anticipate needing
assistance during a disaster
talk to family, friends and
others who will be part of
your personal support net-

Write down and share
each aspect of your emer-
gency plan with everyone in
youraskupport network.
knowsehosuryouepery o
evacuate your home or
workplace and where you
will go in case of a disaster.
Make sure that someone
in your local network has an
extra key to your home and
knows where you keep your
emergency supplies.
Teach those who will help
you how to use any lifesay-
ing equipment, administer
medicine in case of an
emergency
Practice your plan with
those who have agreed to be
part of your network.


Friends pet er- xt to F iend plpBar ers

257-2240


Older Americans and the storms


Consider how a disaster might affect

your individual needs.


Patrii t Rca Lue
Gemologist AJP Goldsmith







12 July 2010


BU Y

continued from Page 3

crank radio, to keep your
family apprised of current
weather-related news.
Plenty of extra batteries
(AA, AAA, C, D and 9-volt).
Energizer@ Ultimate
Lithium batteries have a
long storage life, perform
well in extreme tempera-
tures and are perfect for
use in LED flashlights and
other high-tech devices,
while Energizer@ MAX@
batteries are an ideal power
source for standard flash-
lights and lanterns.
Specialty batteries. Your
health is your most impor-
tant asset. Don't forget the
specialty batteries that
power critical health de-
vices like hearing aids and
blood glucose and blood
pressure monitors.
Flashlight for every mem-
ber of the family. Use flash-
lights instead of candles
when the power goes out.
Energizer@ Weatheready'"
lights feature long-lasting
LED technology and are de-


SUPPLEMENT To WEST IMARION MESSENGER, RIVERIAND NEWs, SOUTH IMARION CITIZEN


signed to keep your family
out of the dark.
Battery-powered cell
phone charger, to help keep
the lines of communication
open. Energizer@ Energi To
Go@ power packs help keep
cell phones charged.
"Through the Energizer
Keep Safe. Keep Going@
program, we are encourag-
ing families in those areas
of the country that could see
hurricane activity to not be
caught in the dark but
rather to get ready for po-
tential blackouts by prepar-
ing their own back-up
power kits," said Jim Olsen
vice president of marketing
for Energizer North Amer-
ica. "It's a simple task that
can help families stay safe
and connected during the
storm "
In addition to back-up
power, it is important to
gather additional emer-
gency supplies, such as
water and nonperishable
food, and to be sure to have
copies of important docu-
ments, such as medical
records and insurance pa-
pers. For a complete list of
tips for preparingfor storms


development and dissemi-
nation of information and
education on the atmos-
pheric and related sciences,
technologies, applications,
and services for the benefit
of society Founded in 1919,
AMS has a membership of
more than 14,000 profes-
sionals, professors, stu-
dents, and weather
enthusiasts. The AMS pub-
lishes leading international
scientific journals, organ-
izes scientific conferences,
and promotes educational
outreach on weather and
climate.
About Energizer
Energizer Holdings, Inc.
(NYSE: ENR) headquar-
tered in St. Louis, Mo., is
one of the world's largest
manufacturers of primary
batteries, portable battery-
powered devices, and
portable flashlights and
lanterns. Energizer is a
global leader in the dy-
namic business of providing
power solutions with a full
portfolio of products includ-
ing Energizer@ brand bat-
tery products Energizer@
MJAX@ premium alkaline;
Energizer@ Ultimate


Lithium; Energizer@ Ad-
vanced Lithium; Recharge-
able batteries and charging
systems; and portable flash-
lights and lanterns.
Energizer continues to
fulfill its role as a technol-
ogy innovator by redefining
portable power solutions to
meet people's active
lifestyle needs for today and
tomorrow with Energizer@
Energi To Go@ chargers for
rechargeable portable de-
vices; charging systems for
wireless video game con-
trollers; and specialty bat-
teries for hearing aids,
health and fitness devices,
as well as for keyless re-
mote entry systems, toys
and watches. Energizer is
redefining where energy,
technology and freedom
meet to bring to market con-
sumer-focused products
that power the essential de-
vices that help people stay
connected and on the go at
work and at play. Visit
w w w. ener gi ze r. co m,
www.facebook.com/ener-
gizerbunny.
Sources: NOAA's Na-
tional WeatherService, Col-
orado State University
NFPA


- MSOErlf Licensed 7 32-5 2 26 Inue ,,,,,,,~~~~nue
City & County Laiiy&Wres op


and important home fire
safety tips, visit www~ener-
gizer. com/prepare dness.
International
Associa ion o
C hiefs
ThelIAFC, www.iafe.org,
represents the leadership
of over 1.2 million firefight-
ers and emergency respon-
ders. IAFC members are
the world's leading experts
in firefighting, emergency
medical services, terrorism
response, hazardous mate-
rials spills, natural disas-
ters, search and rescue, and


public safety legislation.
Since 1873, the IAFC has
provided a forum for educa-
tion, the exchange ideas,
and the promotion of com-
munity and firefighter
safety. The organization is
co-founder with Energizer
on the long-running Change
Your Clock Change Your
Battery@ campaign to pro-
mote working smoke alarms
and carbon dioxide detec-
tors.
About the AMS
The American Meteoro-
logical Society, www~amet-
soc.org, promotes the


oil water if you are
local authorities. Use
only bottled or disinfected
water for drinking and
cooking until the public
water supplies have been
declared safe. Properly


stored water should be safe
for up to six months.
Use water stored in the
bathtub, from the pool or
from the tap to flush the toi-
let.
Don't drink or cook with
water from the pool. Don't


drink water from wells, es-
pecially in areas of sewage
contamination. Use disin-
fected water for brushing
teeth.
Tap water is fine for
showering. Don't wash
dishes in tap water unless


you rinse them in extra-
chlorinated water (15 drops
of chlorine bleach per
quart). Don't let your pets
drink tap water. Contact
lens wearers should use
safe water to wash hands
before handling lenses.


Disinfecting Water
Boiling: Boil at rolling
boil for 10 minutes, let cool,
add a pinch of salt for taste
and then pour the water
back and forth between
clean containers to reduce
flat taste-


Chlorination: Use un-
scented liquid chloride
bleach, add 8 drops to each
gallon of water and then stir
and let stand for 30 minutes.
If water does not have slight
chlorine odor, repeat the
dosage and let stand for 15
minutes.
Chlorine or Iodine
Tablets: Follow directions
on the package, but if direc-
tions are not given use one
tablet for each quart of
water. Make sure the tablet
dissolves and mix thor-
oughly. Let stand for 30 min-
utes.
Liquid Iodine: Add 5
drops of 2 percent iodine to
each quart of clear water,
for cloudy water, add 10
drops of 2 percent iodine to
each quart of water. Mix
thoroughly and let stand for
30 minutes.
Of arionECoungy n e 2f'
agement


415000 S


Water caution during and after the storm




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