Riverland news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100090/00060
 Material Information
Title: Riverland news
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Dunnellon FL
Dunnellon, FL
Publication Date: 06-30-2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Dunnellon (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Marion -- Dunnellon
 Notes
General Note: "The newspaper built on community pride."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 14, no. 36 (Apr. 11, 1996).
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Riverland


SERVING DUNNELLON AND RAINBOW SPRINGS





News


Thursday, June 30, 2011


Vol 29 No. 37


Officials unveil space needs study


Report states police, fire stations grossly inadequate


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
With space at a premium at
the Dunnellon police and fire
departments, officials from
Kimley Horn & Associates and


Donahue Architecture Inc. un-
veiled its spatial needs study
for both departments Wednes-
day, June 22, at the Dunnellon
City Council's workshop.
According to the study pre-
pared by Donahue Architec-


ture Inc., it stated the Space
Needs Analysis was under-
taken with collaboration be-
tween the Dunnellon police
and fire department's chief
and staff and the planning and
design professionals from Don-


ahue Architecture Inc. While
this part of the process was ex-
tremely time-consuming, it has
a twofold benefit.
First, it introduced the team
to great ideas from other juris-
dictions, and, second, it allowed
staff members to participate
and gives them a feeling of own-
ership in the processes.


Underwater adventure


A group of snorklers make their way along the surface of the Rainbow River during a gui
booked, the state park offers a guided canoe/kayak tour the second Wednesday monthly.

Snorkel tour offers unique glimpse of spring


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
With summer in full swing,
temperatures rising and the
sun just above the horizon,
the crystal-clear waters of
the Rainbow River sparkle.
And for a select few, they
have the opportunity no oth-
ers have on this sweltering
Wednesday morning at Rain-
bow Springs State Park.
They get to explore a 1,700-
foot stretch of the pristine
river, plodding their away
along donning snorkel gear.
In the water, they see myriad
fish, turtles and plant life.
"Welcome to my office,"
joked Ralph Rodriguez, park
ranger, noting Rainbow
Springs is a first magnitude
spring, one of 32 throughout
the state.
The snorkel tours are only
offered in the summer, one
day a week for up to eight
people. Registration for the
tours begins in April and the
spots are reserved quickly.
Those not quick enough to
secure a spot, place their


Jtr BUHYAN/IIVerlanI News
ded tour. While the tours are


State park in need
of volunteers
Rainbow Springs State Park
is currently seeking volunteers
interested in a high-paced vol-
unteer position that will assist
Visitors and the Park If you
think you would like to start
training to become a Volunteer
Toll Booth Attendant, or other
various positions, contact Nicky
Aiken at Nicky.Aiken@dep.
state.fl.us or call 465-8539.
Toll Booth Attendant Volun-
teers are asked to volunteer a
minimum of four hours and
must be in uniform. The Toll
Booth is open from 8 a.m. to
sunset daily.
The Concession Stand at
Rainbow Springs State Park,
run by the Friends of Rainbow
Springs and volunteers, is in
need of volunteers, especially
on weekends. The hours of op-
eration are currently from 11
a.m. to 4 p.m. Interested Volun-
teers would receive training
and work two- or four-hour
shifts. Volunteers will need to
fill out a Volunteer Applica-
tions. If interested contactJoe
at 522-0396 and leave your
name and number


The space needs analysis
consisted of interviews with
the chiefs' of both depart-
ments. The fire department
conducted surveys of their staff
to supplement the interviews.
The interviews elicited identi-
fication of the problems faced
See STUDY page 7




BURN BAN


MAY FIZZLE


JULY 4


FESTIVITIES

Use of fireworks
prohibited by law

JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
Planning a big bang for the
Fourth of July?
Fire officials urge resi-
dents use caution when cel-
ebrating the nation's
birthday during the upcom-
ing weekend, despite recent
rainfall.
The mandatory burn ban
prohibits the use, ignition or
discharge of any type of ex-
plosive compounds, fire-
works, flares or sparklers. If
citizens are caught violating
the burn ban, they could face
fines and other conse-
quences.
Due to recent rainfall,
Wildland Task Force mem-
bers will discuss dry condi-
tions and wildfire danger in
Marion County. The Wild-
land Task Force will recom-
mend the commission
extend the burn ban for one
more week because of se-
vere drought conditions
across Marion County and
unpredictable weather pat-
terns. Wildland Task Force
members will meet today
and re-evaluate weather
conditions and discuss the
possibility of lifting the bur
ban.
The average drought
index, based on a scale from
0 to 800, is currently 507 in
Marion County. Any number
above 500 is considered a
wildfire danger zone. The
drought index coupled with
lack of rainfall, dry weather,
low humidity and gusting
wind prompted the task
force to take action. As an al-
ternative to outdoor burning,
Marion County residents
may take up to two cubic
yards of debris (leaves, scrub
clippings and small
branches) to the Marion
County landfill or recycling
centers for free.
See FIZZLE page 10


name on the waiting list,
hopeful for a spot to open.
On this day, there is no
such luck.
Numbers are limited, as
are the tours so the traffic
can be regulated.
Before the swimmers even
enter the water, they're given
a specific set of rules and
guidelines to follow. Rule No.
1, perhaps most important,


don't touch the bottom of the
river.
"If you see any trash, tell us
and we'll go down and get it,"
said Etta Ross, a park volun-
teer.
Among other information
about Rainbow Springs
shared with divers is about
the wildlife that can be seen,
as well as what has invaded
See ADVENTURE page 12


Rite of passage: WWII vet tours monument


Honor Flight makes trek to Washington, D.C.


MICHEL NORTHSEA
For the Riverland News
Two days before his
85th birthday, Sam
Fowler got to take a trip
he says that he "can't brag
about enough."


Riverland News

VISIT US:
www.riverlandnews.com
CALL US: 489-2731
E-MAIL:
editor@riverlandnews.com





6 14578 20035 4


Fowler was one of 104
veterans flown to the na-
tion's capitol last week as
part of the Honor Flight.
The trip was the third
Honor Flight leaving
from the Ocala Interna-
tional Airport in the past


two years taking veterans
of World War II to see the
memorial built in their
honor.
"I was so thrilled,
everything was well done,
so carefully conceived,"
he said about the day-


long trip.
The morning started
early for veterans,
around 5:30 a.m., as they
gathered at the airport,
went through security
and boarded the plane
for Baltimore. At Balti-
more, they boarded buses
See PASSAGE page 14


Pastor Russ
Randall, wife
Priscilla, of
the First
Baptist
Church and
other church
members
greet Sam
Fowler on
his return
home.
MICHEL NORTHSEA
Riverland News


WHAT'S HAPPENING


Friends Book Store
to host July sale
Beginning Friday, July 1, the
Friends of the Dunnellon Pub-
lic Library Book Store will
begin a store-wide half-price
sale throughout the month of
July. Store hours are from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through
Friday and 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday. The Friends Book
Store is at 20351 Robinson
Road. For more information,
call 438-2520.


Annie W. Johnson Center
to host Christmas in July
Annie Johnson Senior &
Family Service Center Inc. will
host Christmas from July 5 to
30. The event, which benefits
the Migrant Children's Camp,
is in need of donations of toys.
Items will be accepted at the
Annie Johnson Thrift Store,
Senior Center, Dunnellon
Chamber of Commerce and
Vernon Martin Salon. For more
information, call 489-8021.


Teen driver safety course
to be offered July 9
The Marion County Sheriff's
Office, in partnership with the
Florida Sheriff's Association,
will offer the Teen Driver chal-
lenge, a free, two-day driver's
safety course for teens ages 15
to 19 from 6 to 10 p.m. July 8
and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 9, with
classroom and road course in-
struction.
For more information, call
369-6765.


Artist to host painting
workshops at Chamber
Artist Sidney Ann Pitchford
will host a series of painting
workshops, Tuesday and Thurs-
day, July 5 and 7, at the at the
Dunnellon Chamber of Com-
merce at 20500 E. Pennsylvania
Ave. She will host an oil paint-
ing workshop from 2 to 4 p.m.
and a water-color workshop
from 6 to 8 p.m. For more infor-
mation or to sign up, call Pitch-
ford at 465-0702.


75 cents


� r
Ralph Rodriguez, a park ranger at Rainbow Springs State
Park, talks to divers during the tour of the springs and river
on a recent outing. For more photos, see page 13.





2 -- Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011


Seat-belt safe


Danielle Prinz surveys in the inside of what remains of her old car, a 2003 Nissan Altima. Prinz, a junior-
to-be at Dunnellon High School, was injured in a wreck early this month. She is going to become a spokes-
woman for seat-belt safety for the Dunnellon Police Department.

16-year-old understands value of seat belts after wreck


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
Danielle Prinz is an aca-
demic standout.
She's a gifted dancer,
who recently wrapped up
her career at Victoria'
School of Dance.
The junior-to-be at Dun-
nellon High School is also
the reigning Queen of the
Rainbow.
She's an advocate for ed-
ucation.
Most importantly,
though, she's a survivor of
a car wreck, thanks in
large part to seat-belt
usage.
The 16-year-old will soon
be a spokeswoman for
seat-belt safety through the
Dunnellon Police Depart-
ment. She will receive the
opportunity to share with
her friends, peers and oth-
ers at Dunnellon high and
middle schools about the
importance of wearing a
seat belt.
After a wreck June 2,
which left her with a bro-
ken pelvis, punctured lung,
cuts and bruises, Prinz un-
derstands the value of


Police Chief Joanne Black and Prinz discuss her ac-
cident, which occurred outside of the city limits,
while surveying the damage to the her old vehicle.


wearing her seat belt. She
was wearing it the day of
her accident; one in which
law enforcement officials
and medical personnel
told her if she hadn't had it
on, the ending would have
been different.
"I remember seeing the
truck coming toward me,"
she explained of the wreck
in Rainbow Lake Estates
in which she was cited for
failure to stop at a stop
sign. "I remember seeing


all of the broken glass and
blood, then blacking out
again. It was actually very
scary"
Add to that, she had a
friend, Madeline Tourne,
with her in the passenger
seat. Tourne, who was just
a "little sore" and escaped
any serious injuries, called
911 and provided direc-
tions. She then called
Prinz's parents to tell them
about the wreck.
Her father Michael ar-


rived on scene first, watch-
ing in horror as rescue per-
sonnel used the jaws of life
to remove his daughter
from the wreckage. He
wasn't allowed near the
car as they worked to re-
move her.
Prinz said she recalls
being in the ambulance
and the discussion among
paramedics about which
hospital to transport her
too. They eventually took
her to Munroe Regional
Medical Center in Ocala.
An active teenager, Prinz
was on crutches for six
weeks while her broken
pelvis healed. She ex-
plained she frequently
works out and was excited
about being a cheerleader
at Dunnellon High this fall.
For now, though, that's
on hold until she's cleared
by the doctors.
"It definitely could have
been a lot worse," Prinz
said. "I'm definitely going
to tell others about this.
Even if I can save one life,
I feel like I may make an
impact."


I DH HiONOR ROLL I


I









Ei~ I:


Dunnellon High School
Fourth Quarter Honor Roll
Ninth Grade
AUAs: Chloe Cook Kaitlynb
Hanley, Courtney Heinritz,
Jessica Jenner, Azalea Kemp,
Rylie Nonnemacher, Randy
Oram, Laura Riley, Serenity
Skillman, Bryce Thalacker,
Joshyan Waterman and Jody
Weber.
A/B: Beth Acevedo, Miranda
Banker, Deanna Barnes, Kari
Barnes, Michael Beach, Mag-
gie Blauser, Terri Brodell,
Michael Burnham, Gregory
Caldwell, Navita Chand,
Jonathan Coleman, Jacob
Conkel, Shaun DeJaynes, Ash-
ley Donaldson, Alissandre Eu-
gene, Lexie Forrester, Jason
Furino, Dejah Gardner,
Jasleen Herrera Alvarez, Ja-
clyn Hooker, Gabrielle Jones,
Roman Kolozsy, Joshua Lange,
Niki Leclerc, George Lucin,
Jan Malave Diago, Jesse
McMahan, Libby Medrano,
Taylor Morrison, Heather
Muller, Ana Nino, Carey Pat-
terson, Ruben Raban, Lauryn
Reddicak, Allen Richardson,
Brandon Riffle, Kelsey Ritli,
Kalyn Rodriguez, Lyle Savage,
Ashley Sines, Brandon Street,
Victoria Tassone, Cierra
Thompson, Nathan Thomp-
son, Paige Volker, Tyler Wal-
dron and Emily White.
10th Grade
All As: Steven Anderson,
Briana Casanova, Cassidy
Duff, Jenny Duran, Marcus
Jennings, Danielle Prinz, Ash-
ley Segarra, Connor Wentz and
Shayla Wright.
A/B: Danny Alejandro,
Danielle Blake, Derrek
Boykin, Jessie Brown, Ronald
Brown, Brandon Buxton,
Jared Byrd, Maria Cevallos,
Abigail Chester, Michael
Chung, Brianna Collier, Laura
Cordero, Bre'Anna Curtis,
Patricio Delgado, Ashley Ed-
monds, Alexis Ernst, Jonathan
Evans, Miriam Farouk,
Christopher Fortune, Jeremy
Gatch, Alexander Gonzalez,
Brandon Grant, Jesenia
Guillen, Codi Hart, Michelle
Hernandez, Gavin Honeysette,
Rachel Horne, Jacilyn Indelli-
cati, Shawna Jeroski, Richard
Litterine, Angel Lopez Car-
rasquillo, Tia Love, Leslie
Maddox, Brandon McCabe,
Roni McCoy, Jamilee McFar-
lane, Kaila McKee, Ryan Mol-
loy, Alex Nonnemacher, Omar
Novoa, Amanda Oram, Zahyri-
mar Otero Diaz, Daniel Pas-
tore, Dakota Pryor, Rajendra
Ram, Michael Roberson,
Nicholas Rodriguez, Drew
Rondeau, Mckenzie Rose, Jose
Sanchez, Lakiya Scott,
Roberto Segarra, Devis Small,
Quenton Smith, Alex Stetz,
Chandra Torres, Raquel
Umana, Glory Vazquez, Taylor
Whitaker, Rebecca Wilkerson,
Elizabeth Woodward and
Sarah Young.
11th Grade
All As: Stephanie Bach, Pa-


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tricia Barber, Brittany Ben-
nett, Richard Boivin, James
Hoyne, Audreyanna Kimball,
Essasani Kolack, Brittany
Lakhani, Tatiana Nales, Amy
O'Conner, Rashida Scantle-
bury, Madeline Tourne and
Casey Weber.
A/B: Julius Allen, Madrika
Allen, Shaqnique Bennett,
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Bonet Cartagena, Taylor
Bradley, James Brown,
Ayandee Colon, Eliza Cortez,
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ing, Omar Desrden, Chelsea
Dominey, Krystalyn Dugan,
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Echevarria, Erin Fitzgerald,
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bourne, Gissele Guerrero,
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field, Gage Honeysette, Angel
Illarraza Perez, Tara Jackson,
Kali Janosik, Ashley Johnson,
Kenton Kruger, Eneida Las-
anta, Alexandra Love, Kirsten
Lynn, Madegny Machin, Shan-
nie Marrero, Gabriel Martins,
Renee McBride, Lucia Nunez,
Amanda Ortman, Yeshka
Otero Chico, Maria Petroche-
Granda, Jordan Polanco, Don-
ald Quick, Dandria Ramirez,
Natalie Rodriguez, Brandon
Sanchez, Christopher Shields,
Gloria Solorzano, Irelis Tovar,
Johan Waterman and Saman-
tha Wilkinson.
12th Grade
All As: Debbie-Ann Brown,
Rebecca Conkel, Amanda Cor-
bitt, Monique Cruz, Shaynee
Ferguson, Aneisha Gooden,
Jiayi He, Oshane Hill, Joe-
vadrick Jackson, Mallory Lee,
Mayra Lorenzo, Caylyn May-
nard, Linda McAndrew, Hiram
Melendez Fuentes, Jillian
Morrow, Kaitlyn Nichols, In-
grid Nunez, Aleska Pellot,
Amanda Rodriguez, Shaina
Schille, Nilda Sepulveda Mar-
tinez, Yeon Song, Taylor Tha-
lacker, Samantha Velez,
Forrest Wheeler, Jessica
White and Ethan Wilson.
AB: TiffanyAlly Devin Bar-
ber, Aletha Beckford, Amber
Brown, Jordan Butler,
Domonique Chung, Dalenisha
Clark, Leymour Compass,
Jeroen Coombs, Brendon
Cooper, Rachelle Cote, Curtis
Cover, Raymond Davila,
Samantha Fagan, K'Twona
Frazier, Tiffany Goodman,
Demetry Grant, Jennifer
Grassmyer, Jonathan Guevara,
Curtis Harrod, Nathaniel Hib-
bert, Tyler Klocke, Jena Lolley,
Andrew Love, Jessica Luther,
Gavin McArdle, Kevin Miley,
Tamara Millan, David Miller,
Shawnee Monday, Ashely
Mori, Richard Norcross,
Aaron O'Conner, Kelsea
Owens, Eduardo Paredes-
Diago, Ashly Paz, Walter Peris-
sutti, Jesse Quillen, Hannah
Ratliff, Stephanie Reid,
Alexander Rivas, Sophia
Robinson, Antonio Sanchez,
Gavin Singh, Molly Sumners,
Rabecca Tyler and Debora Ve-
lazquez Aponte.


r _fll ~L~ _ or





Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011 - 3


Third in concert series

scheduled for July 9
The third concert in the in Panama City. The latest
Withlacoochee Area Resi- was filmed for Fox TV show-
dents Folk Artist Concert ings in the fall. Their fans
ll '~ ,. :.",~f . "~ Series is scheduled for Sat- rave aboutthe couples' soul-


Photos by MICHEL NORTHSEA/Riverland News
The look of the future in police cars were on display recently at the Marion County Sheriff's Office. Left is
a Chevrolet police car and to the right is a Ford offering.

Looking to the future: What will replace the Crown Victoria?


MICHEL NORTHSEA
For the Riverland News
Law enforcement of-
ficers from several dif-
ferent agencies got a
first-hand glimpse of
some new police cars
last week.
And the Marion
County Sheriff's Office
may just be in the mar-
ket for at least 100 of
those patrol cars.
The department has
150 cars with more
than 150,000 miles on
the odometer. The vehi-
cle driven by the sher-
iff himself has more
than 185,000 miles on
it.
His vehicle isn't the
main concern.
Cars with high
mileage are not as sta-
ble in high-speed pur-
suits, said Judge
Cochran, public infor-
mation officer for the
sheriff's office.
In better financial
times, the department
budgeted to replace 60
cars per year, but for
the past four years that
hasn't happened. Sworn
personnel are assigned
319 vehicles and vehi-
cles are used by non-
sworn personnel.
This year "turn-back"
money of $2 million
could help the depart-
ment catch up on re-
placing some of those
cars.
Monies budgeted for
2011, but not used are
referred to as "turn-
back" money. The sav-
ings came from vacant
employee positions not
filled and a "lock-
down" on expenditures.
A change in the rates
for retirement also
added to the savings,
said Dan Kuhn, chief of
staff, adding the staff
positions not filled
were eliminated from
the 2012 proposed
budget.
On display were the
Ford Police Interceptor
and the Police Inter-
ceptor Utility Vehicle
and Chevrolet's police
vehicle - the Caprice,
Impala and Tahoe.
Nearby law enforce-
ment agencies - sher-
iff's departments from
Citrus, Lafayette and
Levy counties as well
as Ocala, Dunnellon
and Belleview police -
visited the operation
center to see the cars
on display.


ABOVE: Many off-duty deputies stopped by the operations center of the Marion
County Sheriff's Office to get a glimpse of the new police cars offered by Ford
and Chevrolet. Pictured is a Ford Police Interceptor. BELOW: Little Wiley Parker
finds he can't reach the gas pedal of a Ford Police Interceptor so he has a few
more years before he can drive a police car. He and his parents were at the op-
erations center of the Marion County Sheriff's Office looking at the new police
cars offered by Ford and Chevrolet. Wiley's dad is in law enforcement.


Dunnellon Police
Chief Joanne Black was
impressed with the new
vehicles.
"They're fuel-effi-
cient, but they've got
the power when you
need it," she explained.
Currently, the sher-
iff's office uses Ford
Crown Victoria's in its
law enforcement duties
but Ford has discontin-
ued production of the
model. The new Tau-
rus-based offering goes
into production at the
end of the year, offering
improved cooling radia-
tor, the ability to open
the back door wider
and better crash testing
ratings over the Crown
Vic if struck from the
rear.
Besides the cost of
the car, which is not yet
determined, it costs an-
other $8,000 to outfit
the cars with radios,
computers, cage and
light bar.
Purchasing the cars
under the state con-
tract could reduce the
cost of each vehicle and
the sheriff's office fleet
management office will
transfer much of the
equipment from the
older vehicles to save
money, said William
Boss, fleet management
director.
In choosing between
the Chevrolet and Ford
vehicles the opinions of
staff would be consid-
ered, but price points


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would be primary con-
cern, Boss said.
Sitting in the driver's
seat of the Ford Incep-
tor, Chris Kennedy, a
member of the sheriff's
office cadet program,
spoke of the possibili-
ties.
"In 2012, maybe I'll
be traveling in one of


these," he said.
Marion County
Deputy Luke Blackburn
had a different opinion.
"I like the Caprice,"
he noted.
Michel Northsea is
the editor of the West
Marion Messenger, a
sister newspaper of the
Riverland News.


urday, July 9, at me Historic
Train Depot, 11123 N.
Williams Ave., Dunnellon.
There will be homemade
desserts and beverages for
sale, all to help the Withla-
coochee Area Residents
with their ongoing initia-
tives to protect and preserve
the environmentally sensi-
tive lands of the Nature
Coast
Doors open at 6 p.m. for
dessert and coffee, and the
concert featuring Some-
thing Special with Doug
Purcell and Lucky Mud is
from 7 to 9 p.m.
Mike and Maggie McKin-
ney, better known to the
Florida music world as
Lucky Mud, love to tour, tak-
ing the main stages at the
Florida Folk and Will
McLean festivals. Most of
their long musical career,
however, has been spent in
little clubs and out-of-the-
way halls. They hosted three
great Americana series at
the art-deco Martin Theater


tfl connection and their
milk-and-honey harmonies
that wrap their sound up
into one neat package.
Carl Wade and Barbara
Shaffer, a popular duo from
Sarasota are best known as
Something Special. They
add guest artist Doug Pur-
cell's gentle vocals to make
a musical show with songs
that cut across several musi-
cal styles. A collection of ob-
scure songs, playful novelty
tunes and Florida songs
written by some of the
state's great songwriters
make up the band's unusual
repertoire.
Admission to the concert
is free, but donations are ac-
cepted. WAR Inc. is a non-
profit organization; all
donations are tax de-
ductible and can be mailed
to PO. Box 350, Inglis, FL
34449. For more informa-
tion, call Lee Paulet at (352)
795-4506, Jack Schofield at
(352) 447-6152 or visit
www.warinconline.com.


Rainbow Springs Country Club Bridge
Results from Tuesday, June 21
Winners: 1. Wilma Jester, 4,560; 2. Betsy Davis,
4,060; 3. Jean Reed, 3,970; 4. Betty O'Neal, 3,840. No
slams today
Results of play from June 14
Winners: 1. Millie Morales, 6,680; 2. Ruth Brucker,
5,860; 3. Billie Barnes, 5,000; 4. Betty Quigley, 4,780.
Slams: Billie Barnes and Debby Rodriguez, 6S
Made 7; Millie Morales and Luise Pellett, 6 NT






by Linda Thistle

5 8 9 3

9 7 2 1

1 7 4 2

5 8 6 9

7 1 2 3

6 3 8 5

4 5 1 6

9 1 4 7

3 8 2 4
Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way
that each row across, each column down and
each small 9-box square contains all of the
numbers from one to nine.



* Moderate ** Challenging
*** HOO BOY!
� 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.

Answers on pae 5


Riverland News
A member of the Florida Press Association
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352-489-6593 (Fax)
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Cove, Chatmire, Hills of Ocala, Lake Tropicana, Rainbows End, Rainbow
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For Information On Subscriptions,
Display Advertising And Business & Church Directory Ads.
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RIM


t
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4 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011


RIVERLAND NEWS
"The Newspaper built on Community Pride."
Publisher - Gerry Mulligan
^iv er v iews -Regional Manager - John Provost
Editor - Jeff Bryan
Member of the Florida Press Association


OUT


TO


PASTOR


On pledging my allegiance


Editor's note: While we generally re-
serve this column for the Church Page
in the Riverland News, we felt that with
the approaching Fourth ofJuly holiday,
it was appropriate to highlight
Rev James Snyder's column
this week. iF


The Gracious Mistress
of the Parsonage and
Yours Truly just fin-


ished supper and we were M
resting in the living room Re
watching the TV news. Actu- Rev
ally, my wife was watching
the news while I was perus-
ing a book. As far as I am con-
cerned, nothing equals the
relaxation of a good book after a
good supper. My definition of a


LETTERS

Here we go again!
Well, our prolific leftist letter writer
is at it again.
His most recent epistle covered
three columns defending our ineffec-
tual president.
As in the past, his letter was unadul-
terated nonsense.
Obama has certainly put forth count-
less signals that he is anti-Israel, anti-
Unites States, anti-business,
Pro-Muslim and pro-terrorists. If one
can read, one can find countless ex-
amples of this even in the liberal
press.
No point in pursuing this line. I do
not know if it is true or not, but I read
that a reporter noticed recently
Obama was not wearing a watch or
wedding band. Obama's aide said they
were out for repair. Fact is Muslim
men do not wear jewelry during their
high holy days.
Regarding our borders, the writer
said there is no imminent danger of in-
vasion from Mexico. Really? The inva-
sion is on. Obama and company are
letting them in, welcoming them.
Regarding the writer's sentiments
about settlements in Arab lands, I have
a comment and a question for him.
Probably every national border in
force at the present time is the result
of war and conquest. If the Arabs had
won the Arab/Israeli war several years
ago, how much of Israel would the
Arabs have given back? And what
would that high school debating club
called the U.N. have done about it?
Democrats love to bring up slavery
and this guy is no exception. He talks
of the United State's legacy of slavery.
However, it is not our country's legacy.
It is a legacy of the Democratic Party
Prior to and during our Civil War, the
Southern states were controlled by the
Democrats and they wanted to main-
tain slavery as a way of life for their
culture.
A Republican president, Abraham
Lincoln, said no, so the Democrats
went to war and over 600,000 lives
were lost. Several years after the Civil
War, the Democrats returned to power
in the South and instituted all those
laws that prevented the black people
from voting. They also instituted seg-
regation. Many years later, two Demo-
crat presidents, Kennedy and Johnson,
went against their Democratic Party
and started to clean this up.
So if you are going to discuss slavery,
be honest about it.
Richard E Mack
Dunnellon
How could you not see it coming?
What a surprise red-light cameras in
Williston, so Williston residents com-
plained about Dunnellon red-light
cameras and the city's greed and
promised never to return to Dunnellon
and spend their money in Dunnellon.
What happened?
Were you all too busy writing in your

See LETTERS page 5

OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in RiverlandNews
editorials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons,
columns or letters do not necessarily repre-
sent the opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to express
their opinions in a letter to the editor.
* All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including let-
ters sent via e-mail, Phone numbers will not
be printed or given out. We reserve the right
to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters to the editor must be no longer than
550 words, and writers will be limited to two
letters per month.


J
y


good book is the one I am reading
at the time.
I had just settled into my book
when I heard a groan coming
from the other side of the
room where my wife was sit-
ting. Thinking it was her just
winding down after a busy
i day, I paid no attention to it.
Then I heard it again fol-
lowed by, "I just cannot be-
lieve that!" Assuming she
rames was talking to herself and
der not addressing me in partic-
ular, I ignored her and con-
tinued in my book.
Then she said, "Do you believe
what they did?" When I looked at
her, I discovered she was looking at
me. The question was addressed to


me. Not knowing what she was talk-
ing about I responded with my typ-
ical, "Huh?" Huh, as most people
know, is short for "I have no idea
what in the world you're talking
about." This seems to be where I
am most of the time.
Then my wife explained to me the
story on the news. It seems, in some
school somewhere, someone was
objecting to standing and pledging
allegiance to the American flag. My
wife, and right she should be, was
irritated at these people refusing to
pledge their allegiance to the
American flag.
"What in the world is wrong with
these people?" she queried me.
Then she went into her typical dia-
tribe about how important it is to be


THE OTHER GUY


Disasters hit close



to home


Though it's been nearly 11 years
since I left Kansas in my
rearview mirror for a new life
and new job in Florida; I still pay close
attention to the news back home.
Of course, as the years con-
tinue to pass by, Kansas no
longer feels like home.
Sure my parents still live
there and a small amount of
family members, but most of my '
friends have moved to other
places around the United
States; some are even overseas,
serving in various branches of
the U.S. Armed Forces. Jeff
However, when tragedies Ed
strike close by, it's hard not to
pay attention to the news.
It's been more than a month since an
F5 tornado ripped through Joplin, Mo.,
leaving many in its wake without a
home. Businesses, the local hospital
and high school felt Mother Nature's
wrath as the twister destroyed liveli-
hoods, leaving families torn from the
death and destruction.
For 26 years I lived in a small, north-
eastern Kansas town, but never had to
endure what those folks went through.
Sure, there were many moments my


mother rounded us up like cattle and
we made a dash for the basement as
the tornado sirens blared from the
nearby Little League ballpark.
Midwestern storms are unique; you
can smell them coming from
miles away. You just know it's
going to rain. I haven't devel-
oped that sense of smell since
moving here 11 years ago.
I know - I'm not in Kansas
anymore.
j My former high school gov-
ernment teacher/wrestling
coach is now an administrator
Bryan at the high school that once
litor housed 2,200-plus students. His
family was spared; his home
still standing; their lives forever
changed.
Now a new disaster is rolling
through the Midwest.
Floodwaters are devastating farms,
towns and families.
Officials there say water levels in
the Mighty Missouri have eclipsed the
Flood of 1993. I recall that flood and
not with fondness. I had just graduated
high school; my buddies and I were
See DISASTERS page 5


I


a good citizen. "How can you call
yourself an American," she contin-
ued, "and not want to salute the
American flag?"
Well, I think she has a good point.
I tried to go back to my book and
she went back to watching the news
but I could not get back into my
book. I thought about all of these
people objecting to pledging their
allegiance to the American flag.
What is the big deal? What is
their objection? Why are some peo-
ple offended by the American flag?
I think the biggest question I might
ask, why do they want to live in
America?
I am a firm believer in the First

See PASTOR page 5


TIME TO SMILE



Cool


summer fun
he other day I saw something I
haven't seen in a long time. In fact,
I didn't know it still existed.
I saw an ice cream truck. It was called
Jack's Treats. If I didn't have a car full of
people with me I would have tracked it
down like a dog looking for a bone. The
ice cream truck was always the best part
of summer.
That prior statement was a strange
statement for me to make. As kids, when
the Good Humor man came along the
Wallace children were
S not in line salivating
over the Orange Cream-
cicles, Chocolate Eclairs
or Strawberry Short-
cakes.
f We were eating the
generic ice cream sand-
wiches my mother
Kathleen bought at the grocery
Wallace store. My mother was
into generic before
there was a generic. The
only brand name item we ever bought
was Tide laundry detergent and Crest
toothpaste.
We didn't get red Schwin bicycles for
Christmas. We got burnt orange no names.
Mom wasn't going to buy special ice
cream treats for seven children on a daily
basis. On a rare occasion, when there
were only two of us hanging around, we
would get to go to the ice cream truck. We
thought we were so cool when we rang
the bells of the truck when the driver
wasn't looking.
I can still hear those Good Humor truck
bells ringing in my head.
This was before they had the recorded
musical notes. Kids would run out of the
house yelling "Stop, stop!" Everyone in
the neighborhood would gather around
the truck waiting for their turn.
Bare feet would burn on the pebbled
pavement. The only time we wore shoes
in the summer was on Sunday when we
went to church.
The truck always seemed to stop in
front of our house. Was he taunting us
with sugary delights? Maybe it was be-
cause we lived across the street from the
neighborhood playground.
You would think that ice cream would
be a big hit in the hot states like Florida.
Nope! They sell more ice cream in the
northern states.
I think ice cream represents sun and
hot weather. In the middle of a winter
storm, sun and hot weather sound pretty
appetizing. Ice cream is one way of imag-
ining a sunny day at the beach when it is
15 degrees outside.
To be honest, I am not a big fan of ice
cream. The brain freeze and sensitive
teeth make it a bit uncomfortable to eat.
If I am going to get a cone, I prefer the
soft serve oozing with caramel and but-
terscotch. Yummy!
When I was young, the ice cream truck
represented wealth. It wasn't really about
the ice cream. Back then, treats were a
rare thing as opposed to today when kids
get treats on a minute-by-minute basis.
We appreciated a trip to McDonalds or
a treat from the Good Humor man. It was-
n't a daily occurrence, so it meant more
to us.
It has been fun going down zero-calorie
memory lane. I grew up in a small beach
neighborhood called Pine Creek. We
spent many hours swimming in Long Is-
land Sound and soaking up the sun while
we built sand castles. I have wrinkly skin
to prove the damages sun can do. I would-
n't trade it for all the gold in the world.
Summer was always my favorite time of
year. That is why I love Florida.
We have summer 365 days a year. That
sure is a lot of ice cream!





Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011 - 5


PASTOR
continued from page 4
Amendment and the
right of everybody to
express his or her opin-
ion. If people do not
want to pledge alle-
giance to the flag of the
United States of Amer-
ica, that is their right. I
just do not get it.
I would be the first to
admit our country is not
perfect. After all, we
have politicians run-
ning this country. Even
though there are things
about this country that
are not right and that I
do not agree with all
the time, I still pledge
allegiance to the Amer-
ican flag, I still pray for
our country and I pray
for the president of the
United States and all
those in leadership po-
sitions.
I have thought further
about these people re-
fusing to pledge alle-
giance to the American
flag and how inconsis-
tent they are in their
whole life.
For example, most of
these people refusing to
pledge allegiance to the
flag will pledge alle-
giance to some credit
card. They will sign up,
gladly pay the fee, will-
ingly accept a high in-
terest rate and then go
on a spending spree.
Every month they will
salute and pledge alle-
giance to that credit
card by sending in a
check.
Others will pledge
their allegiance to some
mortgage company for
their house. Month
after month, these peo-
ple pledge their alle-
giance to the mortgage
company or the bank by
writing out a hefty
check, including inter-
est and fees.
The same people will
pledge allegiance to
some car loan company
in order to buy a new
car. Month after month
as regular as the sun
rising in the morning,

LETTERS
continued from page 4
complaints to the River-
land News and making
your threats; that you did
not see the red-light cam-
eras being installed?
I must admit I was sur-
prised when there was
that sign "Photo En-
forced" and the circular
red, yellow and blue
above it. But we made it
through and on our way
home to Dunnellon with-
out one flash of the cam-
eras.
But who am I to criti-
cize Williston for follow-
ing in the steps of
Dunnellon and other
cities big and small or of
your elected officials or
police department?
From where I drive, I
see fewer accidents than
in previous months when

Answers to Sudoku on
page 3

245168937
963752184
817943652
354876291
781295463
629431875
472589316
596314728
138627549


Whether

you're a
subscriber or

you picked
up a copy
up a copy


these people will
pledge their allegiance
to the car loan institu-
tion by sending them a
check. By the time they
have paid for a $20,000
automobile they will
have given to the car
loan institution $60,000.
Of course, I could be a
little wrong on my
math, but not by much.
It seems a little amus-
ing to me that the same
people who object to
pledging their alle-
giance to the American
flag and who object to
prayer in any public
setting will pay their al-
legiance to the credit
card company, the
mortgage and loan com-
pany, and the auto loan
institution with money
that has printed on it in
bold type, "In God we
trust."
Let those who object
to these things object to
them but not in such a
way as to hinder me
from pledging my alle-
giance to the American
flag. If you do not be-
lieve in prayer, fine, but
do not force your unbe-
lief on me. If there is no
such thing as God, why
are some people so
upset when someone
like me prays to God?
I go by the scriptural
admonition, "I exhort
therefore, that, first of
all, supplications,
prayers, intercessions,
and giving of thanks, be
made for all men; For
kings, and for all that
are in authority; that
we may lead a quiet and
peaceable life in all
godliness and honesty"
(1 Timothy 2:1-2 KJV).
I pledge allegiance to
the flag of the United
States of America ...
The Rev James L Sny-
der is pastor of the Family
of God Fellowship, 1471
Pine Road, Ocala, FL
34472. He lives with his
wife, Martha, in Silver
Springs Shores. Call him at
352-6874240 or e-mail
jamessnyder2@attnet The
church website is
wwwwhatafellowship.com.

we did not have those red
light cameras.
Mary Hacker
Dunnellon
Editor's Note: Williston
city officials had red-light
cameras removed from
their town.


TO REGISTER FOR THE ROAD RALLY
OR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL
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CRYSTAL
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LOOK AR EVeU YE OTI:IM ONE.


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Scholarship recipients


Special to the Riverland News
The Dunnellon Moose Lodge 2308 presented $500 scholarships to five Dunnellon High School graduates.
Presenting the graduates with the scholarships, from left, are: Bob Giles, administrator, Dunnellon Moose
Lodge; Dillon Wright, Katie Jones, Antonio Sanchez, Brooke Martinez, and Jim Midnik, governor, Dunnel-
Ion Moose Lodge.


Annie Johnson in need
of volunteers
The Annie Johnson Thrift Store
is in need of volunteers Monday
through Saturday. For more infor-
mation, call Candy Craig at 465-
7957.

S. Dunnellon Civic
Association meets
The South Dunnellon Civic Asso-
ciation Inc. meets at 4:30 p.m. the
second Monday monthly at 1962 W
Test Court, South Dunnellon.
The facility is on the left side of
street just before The Annie W
Johnson Center. The public is in-


DISASTERS
continued from page 4
adults now, of course
looking back, I can say
that term should be used
very loosely Still, most of
us were 18 and would be
heading off for college or
military service soon. We
had a freedom like no
other.
Then the waters came.
It was unreal. While most
of the homes in my town
were spared; that wasn't
the case in many nearby
towns and cities where


vited to come help, and give ideas
to promote community improve-
ment and safety
For more details, contact Randy
Campbell at 465-7135 or e-mail
randolphcampbell@bellsouth.net

Retired Nurses plan meeting
The Citrus Chapter of the Regis-
tered Nurses Retired (RNR) will
meet at 1 p.m. June 27 at The
Sandwedge Restaurant in Spruce
Creek. We welcome all members as
we discuss speakers and events for
the upcoming year.
For more information, call
Gladys at (352) 854-2677 or Mary


the floodwaters simply
ravaged the region.
We used to make daily
treks across what is now
the Amelia Earhart Me-
morial Bridge for a vari-
ety of reasons; mainly
cheap gas and cigarettes.
It was weeks before we
could make those trips
across the bridge. There
were no summertime
jaunts to Kansas City to
catch a baseball game or
visit the nearby theme


Jane at (352) 726-6882.

Peripheral Neuropathy group
meets
The Ocala Peripheral Neuropa-
thy Support Group will meet at 10
a.m. Saturday, July 2, at the Marion
County Sheriff's Brian Litz Build-
ing, 9048 S.W State Road 200. Indi-
viduals afflicted with this disease,
their family members and friends
are encouraged to attend. Anyone
interested in learning about pe-
ripheral neuropathy is invited to
attend.
For more information, call Jack
Koehler at (352) 861-1630.


park.
We called the stretch
from the end of the
bridge to the split to take
Highway 45 to either
Kansas City or St. Joseph,
Mo., the four-mile run. It
was a straight shot, rarely
patrolled by law enforce-
ment. Use your imagina-
tion, but we let those
four-cylinder engines un-
wind.
All you could see from
the perch on Riverview


Drive was water covering
that four-mile stretch. It
was unbelievable.
Words cannot describe
the after-effects of that
flood.
Now, it appears as if
those folks along the Mis-
souri River are bracing
for another go-round 18
years later.
Here's hoping it's not
as severe, the Midwest
has already had a bad
year.


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6 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011


Riverland News




h iPon ti

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Name:
Day Phone:
Contestant Name as shown in paper:

VOTING IS 25 PER VOTE
$5.00 = 20 VOTES * $25.00 = 100 VOTES
$75.00 = 300 VOTES * $125.00 = 500 VOTES
Voting Donation Amount:
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BRING INTO THE OFFICE
OR MAIL TO:
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Dunnellon, FL 34432
Attn. Cheryl - Salon Competition
OR Call in your payment to
Cheryl Gaouette at
(352) 489-2731
All votes must be in by Thursday, July 14,2011
Winners will be published in the Thursday,
July 21, 2011 edition of Riverland News.


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Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011 - 7


Council OKs




opportunity



to seek grant


Deadline to

apply Aug. 15
JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
City officials are pursu-
ing a Community Devel-
opment Block Grant
(CDBG) grant to the tune
of $650,000. However, the
clock is ticking fast, as the
deadline to submit the
application is Aug. 15.
The grant money would
be used to connect the
city water system to two
wells at the Dunnellon-
Marion County Airport.
City Manager Lisa Al-
giere said the city and
county would enter into
an inter-local agreement
and pay for the water in a
bulk rate.
Because time is of the
essence, the Dunnellon
City Council on Monday
gave officials an OK to
spend up to $30,000 to
begin surveying of the
property from Dunnellon
Heights to the airport.
Also, Kimley-Horn & As-
sociates are beginning to
prepare preliminary
plans, which are critical
toward obtaining the
grant, said Louis Bryant,
with Kimley-Horn & As-
sociates, at the June 22
City Council Workshop.
The money to be used to
pay for the survey will
come from the capital re-
serves in the water dis-
trict.
The city must also host
a series of public work-
shops as well as put a
committee in place.
"We're going to go out
and do some surveys
about people's income,"
Algiere explained. "A
whole lot of work goes
into this between now
and Aug. 15."
The keys for pursuing
the grant and connecting
with the wells at the air-
port is to provide better
flow to those east of the
Rainbow River as well as
provide a backup in case
the primary system
breaks down.
"This will not be for
naught," Ward asked.
No, Algiere stressed.
"This will be a real
good opportunity for us,"
Algiere said.
The grant will not cover
any costs the city is oc-
curring now, which in-
cludes preliminary plans
and surveying, Algiere
said. The funds, if ob-
tained, will cover bid-
ding, construction
inspection and adminis-
trative costs.
In other action, the
council:
* Recognized the
Annie W Johnson Senior
Service Center for 25
years of service to Dun-
nellon residents as well
as those in Citrus County.
The center marked its an-
niversary in May
* Approved the final


S
United Way needs
volunteers for workshops
United Way of Marion
County is looking with vol-
unteers who are inter-
ested in being facilitators
for personal budgeting
workshops. Training will
be provided to all individ-
uals along with instructors
manual and materials. For
more information, cvon-
tact Chris Cotter at 732-
9696, ext. 209, or e-mail
ccotter@uwmc.org.
American Legion
slates activities
Regular meetings of the
Post only will be at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, July 6. Din-
ner will not be served.
Bingo will be at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4. Refreshments are
available.
The third Saturday Out-
door Flea Market and
Pancake Breakfast will
resume in September.


reading of the County Re-
development Area (CRA)
Redevelopment Trust
Fund ordinance on a 5-0
vote. The CRA will now
consist of areas east
along County Road 484,
near Nine Island Cove
and north on U.S. 41.
* Approved the pur-
chase of additional con-
duit for $13,954.96 from
Galloway Group.
* Approved the pur-
chase of a Kubota M59
Loader/Backhoe for
$45,478 from Agricon
Equipment Company. Ac-
cording to city officials,
this tractor is needed to
subsidize the JCB
Loader/Backhoe that the
city currently has. "The
JCB is a 1988 model and
is starting to have me-
chanical failures on a
regular basis. The JCB
tractor is needed and
used on a regular, if not
daily basis, by both the
Streets Department and
the Water and Sewer De-
partments," officials
wrote in their request to
the council. "We have re-
cently been caught with
water-line breaks at the
same time the JCB was
out of service causing us
to have to search out al-
ternative means of exca-
vation. The new tractor
will be used exclusively
by the Water and Sewer
Departments and the JCB
will remain in the Streets
Department where reli-
ability is not as critical."
If current year funds
are not available staff
will request a budget
amendment at the end of
the 2010-11 fiscal year.
The funding will then
come from the enterprise
fund capital replacement
reserve.


STUDY
continued from page 1

in the existing facility,
trends in demands for
service, needed adjacen-
cies to other operating
units, security needs,
needed technology appli-
cations, perceptions of in-
creasing or decreasing
staffing requirements in
the future, and facility sup-
port requests.
All told, the report
stated, is that the study
concluded a need for a fa-
cility up to 22,000 square
feet to accommodate fu-
ture growth. The study in-
dicated the city would
need up to 11 acres of land
to construct such a build-
ing(s).
"You want it constructed
for 10 to 20 years down the
road," said John Donahue
with Donahue Architec-
ture Inc. "It may seem ex-
cessive now, but you want
to plan for the future."
Currently, the police sta-
tion consists of approxi-
mately 3,500 square feet
under roof. The current
space was not designed
with a police station, the
report stated. The police
department has several
space deficiencies and se-
curity problems.
The existing fire station
consists of approximately
2,000 square feet under
roof, which includes the
apparatus bay that con-
sumes approximately 1,100
square feet. The remaining
900 square feet consists of
office, living, training,
kitchen, restroom, and
storage space for their
daily functions, the report
stated, and by code, this
space is considered "busi-
ness occupancy" and cal-
culated at 100 square feet
per person.
"They're strained," Don-
ahue said about the cur-
rent facilities.
Among the report's find-
ings is that future growth
will exceed 50 paid and
non-paid positions, respec-
tively, at each department.
The report's recommen-
dations for the future de-
sign of a station that would
meet the needs of the Dun-
nellon Police Department
include:
* A Crime Scene Investi-


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
The Dunnellon Fire Department, located in the Historic District, houses two
engines. The apparatus bay takes up 1,100 square feet, more than half of the
aging facility.


gation (CSI) Bay of approx-
imately 438 square feet.
* A Crime Scene Investi-
gation (CSI) Lab of approx-
imately 168 square feet.
* Three separate evi-
dence rooms, once each for
cash, drugs and guns.
* Offices for the police
chief, lieutenant, sergeant,
corporals, two training
rooms, as well as several
other offices and storage
spaces for uniforms and
equipment.
The report's recommen-
dations for the future de-
sign of a station that would
meet the needs of the Dun-
nellon Fire and Rescue
Department include:
* A fire inspector's of-
fice up to approximately
120 square feet.
* An apparatus bay ap-
proximately 3,000 square
feet, which could accom-
modate up to four trucks,
including an aerial.
* A community room ap-
proximately 3,000 square
feet.
* A gymnasium approxi-
mately 720 square feet, ac-
cessible to police and fire
department personnel as
well as city employees.
Mayor Fred Ward called
the study "a dream sheet."
"This is what we asked
them what they'd like to
have," he explained. "The
budget will dictate what
they get."
Vice Mayor FC. Stark
questioned the projections
about staffing and equip-
ment needs, such as an
aerial truck.


"In making the projec-
tions, what date did they
use?" he asked.
Lt. Troy Slattery of Dun-
nellon Fire and Rescue
said approximately 70 per-
cent of the total calls han-
dled by the department
this year have been for
medical emergencies.
"You're going to have to
justify why we need these
facilities," Stark ex-
plained. "What's an aerial
truck cost nowadays?"
Fire Chief Joe Camp-
field said the price tag for
such a truck is about $500
million.
"Show me the money,"
Stark replied. "Give m the
information on what the
projections are based on."
Stark noted he was not
being critical of the space
needs report; however, he
said additional informa-
tion is needed to accom-
pany the space needs
analysis.
"I want to see a needs as-
sessment," he said. "What
they need now and what
they are going to need.
That's my wish for tonight."
According to the report,
the police station building
was not designed for se-
cure prisoner/evidence
control and training or
equipment storage, which
is a real problem for the
Dunnellon Police Depart-
ment. The police station
lacks: interview space for
victims, witnesses, and ar-
restees, roll call, report
writing, and other support
spaces; lockers for sworn


and civilian personnel; in-
sufficient and scattered ev-
idence storage space; and
crowded working condi-
tions for staff and volun-
teers.
The restroom facilities
are insufficient and the fa-
cility in general does not
meet the requirements of
the ADA (Americans with
Disabilities Act).
The fire station deficien-
cies include: insufficient
garage bays for current
and planned equipment,
inadequate equipment
storage that does not meet
NFPA recommendations.
The office facility lacks ad-
equate office space, sleep-
ing quarters and kitchen
facilities for the current
and planned staff.
Both facilities continue
to operate well past the
planned life span. They
have become seriously
overcrowded, suffer from a
lack of sufficient infra-
structure (HVAC, electri-
cal, data,
telecommunication) and
are coping with outdated
security and safety sys-
tems.
These conditions con-
tinue to impair staff effi-
ciency and morale,
occupant safety, effective-
ness and public perception
of the departments, the re-
port stated.
To see the complete Po-
lice and Fire Needs Space
Assessment, visit
www.riverlandnews.com
and click on the link for
this story


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8 -' Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011


CvN hur chy bJune


Catholic church
launching new project
Judie Heesch, chair-
woman, along with mem-
bers of the Altar &
Rosary Society of St.
John the Baptist Catholic
Church in Dunnellon are
initiating a new program
called "Clothe the Chil-
dren."
Gently used clothing or
new clothing for children
1 year to 12 years old is
now being collected. The
church currently has a
food pantry and the Altar
& Rosary Society has set
aside a date to distribute
the clothing on the same
day the pantry is open.
This will be some time in
August.
If you would like to do-
nate clothing, you can
bring it to the church at
7525 U.S. 41 in Dunnel-
lon.
For more information,
call Heesch at 489-5954.
Church to host God and
Country celebration
Peace Lutheran
Church will host the 2011
God and Country Cele-
bration on Sunday, July 3.
The 9 a.m. Bible study
and 10 a.m., Worship
service will be followed
by a "Chicken & Potluck"
lunch and fellowship.
The community is wel-
come.
Peace Lutheran
Church, "The Church On
The Hill," is 5 miles north
of Dunnellon, at 7201 S.
U.S. 41. For more infor-
mation, call the church
office at 489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOn-
line.org.
Christmas in July craft
show planned
The annual Altar &
Rosary Society of St.


John the Baptist Catholic
Church Christmas in July
Craft Fair will be from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
July 9, in Father Stege-
man Hall. The church is
on the corner of U.S. 41
and State Road 40, north
of Dunnellon. For more
information, call Pat at
489-1984.
Church to host
health fair
The community is in-
vited to a free Health
Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
July 10 at Dunnellon Sev-
enth-day Adventist
Church at 7400 S. U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.
Among the items of-
fered will be a blood
drive, blood glucose test-
ing, blood pressure test-
ing, personal massage
therapy, cholesterol test-
ing, chiropractor, health
food samples and free
health brochures. There
will be a drawing for a
healthy foods cook book
and children's programs.
For more information,
call 465-6479.
Methodist church to
host VBS
First United Methodist
Church of Dunnellon will
host Vacation Bible
School from 9 a.m. to
noon July 11 to 15. Regis-
tration will be from 8 to 9
a.m. Monday and Tues-
day, July 11 and 12. Pre-
registration forms can be
picked up in the church
office. The church is on
State Road 40 West across
from Vogt Springs. Chil-


dren of all ages welcome.
For more information,
call 489-4026.
Church of the Advent
to host VBS
The Church of the Ad-
vent, 11251 County Road
484, will present its VBS
from Aug. to 12, for chil-
dren ages 4 to 11.
To register your child,
call the church at 465-
7272 or Mrs. Florence at
566-6934.
Methodist church to
offer Saturday service
The First United
Methodist Church, just
off of State Road 40 West,
will offer a Saturday Wor-
ship Service at 3 p.m. in
Friendship Hall. Casual
dress; coffee and tea will
be provided during the
month of June.
Church preps for annual
Trash to Treasure Sale
The Church of the Ad-
vent will present its an-
nual Trash to Treasure
Sale Saturday, Sept. 24.
(Rain Date will be Oct 1.)
Crafters, Flea Market
and Food Vendors are in-
vited to participate.
The church is at 11251
County Road 484, in front
of the new fire station.
For registration and in-
formation, call Al Sickle
at (352) 208-5664 or
Maryanne Brennan at
(352) 347-2428.
Joy Lutheran to host
Vacation Bible School
Joy Lutheran Church
will host its vacation


bible school from 9 a.m.
to noon Julyl8 to 22 for
children ages 5 through
fifth grade.
This year the theme for
vacation bible school is
"Hometown Nazareth."


AIRPORT

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Open Letter to the Community

Over the last several weeks, there has been a good deal of information shared in the
community regarding the affiliation of Family Care Specialists (FCS) with Ocala Health
System. As medical director, I want to clarify precisely why my colleagues and I chose to
become a part of Ocala Health late last year. Today, after six months of our affiliation, we
are proud to be contributing to its position as the leading healthcare provider for the
residents of greater Marion County.

We are affiliated with Ocala Health because of the quality of care that is consistently
delivered at every touch point throughout the system. It's that simple. While my fellow
physicians and I observe first-hand the exceptional treatment our patients are receiving at
Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital, it is reassuring to
know that publicly reported data available on the Hospital Compare website
(www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov) is reflecting that high caliber of care.

According to the most recent Hospital Compare Survey of Patients' Hospital Experiences (3Q09
- 2Q10), Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital lead in nine out
of ten categories that measure patient experience according to key quality topics. From how
well nurses and doctors communicate, to pain management and room cleanliness, to quietness
at night and responsiveness of staff, patients rank Ocala Health number one.

In addition, the survey results further strengthen my belief that Ocala Health is the region's
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measure and patient satisfaction scores for area hospitals as reported by the Centers for
Medicaid and Medicare Services. You do have choices. Publicly reported information like
this can help you as a patient and consumer make the most informed decisions about
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Kiwanis Club News






- ^.-----------











Pictured (left to right) Mike Pontius, club president, SamanthaVelez, Mayra
Lorenzo, Yeon Ji Song, John Pollock, Key Club advisor.

The Kiwanis Club of Dunnellon recently presented three $500 scholar-
ships to graduates from Dunnellon High School and Key leaders. This year's
recipients are Samantha Velez, Mayra Lorenzo and Yeon Ji Song. Present-
ing the awards at the regular Wednesday business meeting were Mike Pon-
tius, club president, and John Pollock, Key Club advisor.
The Kiwanis Club is planning its annual Duck Race for Saturday, Oct. 15,
on the Rainbow River near Victoria's Restaurant property More informa-
tion will be published at a later date.
In other club news, Joann Marhefki will assume the duties ofAktion Club
chairperson.
For more information about the Kiwanis Club or to become a member,
call Erin Widegren, Club secretary, at 489-2656.


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Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011 - 9


At Ocala Health System,


quality healthcare matters.

We know that there is a real difference in the quality of care provided by area hospitals - and that it matters. So when you
select a healthcare provider to treat you or a loved one, choose one that is committed to quality care ... and one that
consistently delivers on that quality care - Ocala Health.



Ocala Health ranks highest in all four hey quality measures.

Our advanced approach to quality patient care is confirmed in the most recent survey results posted on Hospital Compare
(www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov), a site created by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Hospital
Quality Alliance (HQA). Providing public access to these results makes it easier for patients and their families to make
informed healthcare decisions.


Pneumonia


OCALA
HEALTH
SYSTEM
ORMC.WMCH


MUNROE
REGIONAL
MFOICAi
CENTER


US Average
loi all
repon.ng
hospitals


FL Average
for all
reporting
hospirals


Pneumonia Patients
Assessed and Given 100% 93% 93% 96%
Pneumococcal Vaccination
Pneumonia Patients Whose
Initial Emergency Room Blood
Culture Was Performed Prior To 99% 95% 96% 97%
The AdministraLion OfThe First
Hospital Dose Of Antibiotics
Pneumonia Patients Given Smoking 1 % 9 9
Cessation Advice/Counseling 100% 96% 97% 99%
Pneumonia Patients Given
Initial Antibiotic(s) within 97% 90% 95% 95%
6 Hours After Arrival
Pneumonia Patients Given
the Most Appropriate 98% 91% 92% 94%
Initial Antibiotic(s)
Pneumonia Patients
Assessed and Given 99% 97% 91% 95%
Influenza Vaccination


Heart Attach/Chest Pain
OCALA
HEALTH
SYSTEM
ORMC,'MCH


MUNROE
REGIONAL
MEDICAL
CENTER


U S. Average
for all
repon.ng
hosp.tali


FL Average
for all
reporting
hosprials


Heart Attack Patients Given 100% 98% 99% 99%
Aspirin at Arrival
Heart Attack Patients Given 99% 98% 98% 99%
Aspirin at Discharge
Heart Attack Patients
Given ACE Inhibitor or 99 96% 96 97
ARB for Left Ventricular
Systolic Dysfunction (LVSD)
Heart Attack Patients Given
Smoking Cessation 100% 100% 99% 100%
Advice/Counseling
Heart Attack Patients Given 100% 98% 98% 99%
Beta Blocker at Discharge
Heart Attack Patients Given
Fibrinolytic Medication 0 t 0t 55% 67%
Within 30 Minutes Of Arrival
Heart Attack Patients
Given PCI Within 90 Minutes 96% 86% 90% 91%
Of Arrival


Surgical Care Improvement Project
OCALA
HEALTH
SYSTEM
ORMC/WMCH


MUNROE
REGIONAL
MEDICAL
CENTER


U.S. Average
for all
reporting
hospitals


FL Average
for all
reporting
hospitals


Outpatients having surgery who got an antibiotic at the
right time - within one hour before surgery (higher 97% 89% 92% 93%
numbers are better)
Outpatients having surgery who got the right kind of
antibiotic (higher numbers are better) 98% 89% 94% 94%
Surgery patients who were taking heart drugs called
beta blockers before coming to the hospital, who were 9 / O Q
kept on the beta blockers during the period just before 9 % 89% 93% 95%
and after their surgery
Surgery patients who were given an antibiotic at the
right time (within one hour before surgery) to help 100% 91% 97% 98%
prevent infection
Surgery patientswho were given the right kind of 9 / 94% 970/ 97
antibiotic to help prevent infection 98% 94% 97% 97%
Surgery patients whose preventive antibiotics were 90% Q O AO
stopped at the right time (within 24 hours after surgery) 99% 90% 94% 95%
Heart surgery patients whose blood sugar (blood
glucosi 's kp er under good conlrol in Ih~d.iy Ynphl 96% 88% 93% 94%
jli'e surgery
Surgery paiienis needing hair removed l'lrm the
.urgpcal area beicre surocrv %vh, had hair removed
urlng. sa fr meilhid lerie lC lipror ir hai remroi.al 100% 100% 99% 100%
Crei-m - nol a raziil
ll-',Surgerl- pariennl sniseC urinary Cheler 1 00% 87% 90% 9 1
rem',ed on Ihr rsI or iecnd jv aier urFerv 100% 87% 90% 91%
Surgery patients th,:,se d.:,rs ordered reatmenls 1,,c
prevent blood lots walker cerlain rvpes oir ur.eries 99% 90% 94% 95%
PaiienL, s hi goil [treatment al [he righ lmrne l(-i in 24
h.iur, before or aller their surgerY ,:,help prevent 98% 85% 92% 93%
blood i.:)E llecr cerainm ypes :l surgery


Heart Failure


OCALA
HEALTH
SYSTEM
ORMC/WMCH


MUNROE
REGIONAL
MEDICAL
CENTER


U.S. Average
for all
reporting
hospitals


FL Average
for all
reporting
hospitals


Heart Failure Patients Given 9% 6 8
Discharge Instructions

Heart Failure Patients Given an
Evaluation of LeftVentricular 100% 99% 98% 99%
Systolic (LVS) Function

Heart Failure Patients Given ACE
Inhibitor or ARB for LeftVentricular 99% 93% 94% 96%
Systolic Dysfunction (LVSD)

Heart Failure Patients Given
Smoking Cessation 100% 100% 98% 100%
Advice/Counseling


OCALA HEALTH SYSTEM


Ocala Regional Medical Center * West Marion Community Hospital

Family Care Specialists * Ocala Health Surgical Group

Advanced Imaging Centers

The information above is from the CMS web site: hospitalcompare.hhs.gov. This information was made available to the public on 4/10/11.
t No patients met the criteria for inclusion in this measure calculation.





10 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011


March 19 the Historic Village Shops of Dunnellon sponsored the Antique and Appraisal Fair with the pro-
ceeds donated to the Annie Johnson Center, which is a local charity organization that reaches out to our
local community. It was a great event and well received by the community thanks to the following ap-
praisers donating their time and knowledge: Diane and DickVose ,Judy Smutzer, Linda and Will Moore, and
Bob Miller. There were lots of interested items that came through to be appraised working motor, The His-
toric Merchants are already planning another event similar to this one but bigger and even better in Jan-
uary 2012. Pictured is Cheryl Lawson, President of the Dunnellon Historic Village Association, presenting
a check to Candy of the Annie Johnson Center.



Community brief


Police collecting used
cell phones
The Dunnellon Police
Department is collecting
cellular phones with
chargers for Domestic Vi-
olence victims. The col-
lected phones are turned
over to domestic violent
shelters and provided to
victims to use to call 911
for any emergency.
Please drop off all un-
used cellular phones
along with the chargers
to the police department,
12014 S. Williams St. Dun-
nellon or at Repeat Bou-
tique, 20491 The
Granada, Dunnellon.

Grief Support available
to public
Hospice of Marion
County and The Windsor
of Ocala will offer a se-
ries of free lectures to
help attain resolution, re-
store healing, and inspire


hope among the commu-
nity's grieving individu-
als.
July 12 - Children &
Grief: Do they grieve like
adults?
Aug. 9 - Through the
Fog: How do you find
your way?
Attend one or all of the
lectures, which are open
to the public from 10 to 11
a.m. at The Windsor of
Ocala at 2650 S.E. 18th
Ave., Ocala.
Light refreshments will
be served. RSVP to (352)
854-5230 as seating is lim-
ited.

Boys and Girls Clubs
seek donations
Many Boys and Girls
Clubs are benefitting
from car donations. The
cars are sold at auction
and the funds generated
help support their many
programs. Now is the
time to donate for the up-


coming tax season. Peo-
ple wishing to donate
their cars or for more in-
formation call (800) 246-
0493.

DCF seeks volunteers
for program
The Department of
Children and Families in
your community has been
awarded a Food Stamp
Participation Grant. DCF
is looking for committed
volunteers with computer
experience to help our
food stamp customers
navigate the online appli-
cation process. For more
information, call (352)
330-5518.

Cub Scouts meet at
church
Cub Scout Pack 508
meets at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
days at Episcopal Church
of the Advent, 11251 S.W
Highway 484, Ocala. For


more information,
465-7272.


Annie W. Johnson
Center in need of items
The Annie W. Johnson
Senior & Family Service
Center is in need of the
following items:
Annie Special Care
Food Pantry: Food, water
and juices.
Sock It to 'Em Program:
socks for adults and chil-
dren.
Project Homeless: In
need of tents.
Stuff the Bus: in need
of basic school supplies.
Baby Steps Pantry: In
need of basic baby items
and food.
There is also a need for
volunteers at the thrift
store.
For more information,
call the Candy Craig at
the thrift store at 465-
7957 or Christina Avina at
489-8021.


FIZZLE
continued from page 1
Miranda Iglesias, Marion
Count Fire Rescue public in-
formation officer, said state
officials are comparing con-
ditions now to that of the
1998 firestorm, when "hun-
dreds of thousands of acres"
were on fire. More than half
a million acres burned that
year.
Currently in Marion
County, there are 13 active
wildfires consisting of more
than 600 acres, Iglesias said.
Statewide, more than
200,000 acres of wildfires
have been reported.
"We're doing well," she ex-
plained. "But that's not to
say we're not busy We're
dual-responding every grass
fire to make sure we can pro-
tect everything around it and
keep it small. Our resources
are spread very, very thin.
We don't have a lot of re-
sources right now, because
of the conditions throughout
the state."
That's why, Iglesias said,
the county is asking for the
support of its citizens come
this Fourth of July.
"We're looking for citizens
to help," she explained. "It's
a way they can be responsi-
ble. It takes one spark from
sparkler to start a fire.
Sparklers heat to almost
2000 degrees; it could light a
grass fire, everything is so
dry We're worse than where
we were before. Fireworks
are so dangerous."
Because fireworks are il-
legal during a mandatory
burn ban, those caught set-
ting them off can be charged
with a second-degree misde-
meanor and a fine up to
$500. However, if they were
to start a wildfire, causing
damage to homes and busi-
nesses, they would be re-
sponsible for those damages,
as well as suppression costs.
"It's a possibility you could
be arrested," Iglesias said.
However, she explained,
there has been several con-
cerns with firework stands
selling their wares. She said
it is not against state law for
fireworks to be sold; how-
ever, at this time, they can't
be used.
"There are alternatives to
people going out and shoot-
ing off fireworks," she said.


"I know it's not the most fun
thing in the world. However,
we're blessed to still be able
to view fireworks."
Firework displays to be of-
fered in Marion, Citrus and
Levy counties for the Fourth
of July include:
* The Williston Independ-
ence Day celebration will
begin at 5 p.m. Saturday, July
2, with its parade, followed
by a fireworks' display at
Horseman's Park. Gates will
open at 6, following the pa-
rade. Opening ceremonies
begin at 7. Admission is free;
a $2 donation will be ac-
cepted for parking atten-
dants. Remember to bring
lawn chairs or blankets. No
coolers or pets will be al-
lowed through the gates. For
more information, call City
Hall at (352) 528-3060 or the
Williston Chamber of Com-
merce at (352) 528-5552.
* The Rotary Club of Crys-
tal River will host the second
Uncle Sam Scallop Jam and
Road Rally from 4 to 11 p.m.
Saturday, July 2, at King's
Bay Park in Crystal River.
Admission is $5 with chil-
dren 16 and younger admit-
ted free. Fireworks will start
at about 9 p.m. There is no
charge to view the fireworks.
* The 2011 Patriotic
Evening in Inverness will
start at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 3,
with music, concessions, in-
formation booths and games
followed by opening cere-
monies at 7 p.m. including a
special patriotic perform-
ance by "Cooter Idol" win-
ner Jessica Jacobs and an
honor guard from the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office. At
7:30 p.m., Neon Truckers
will take the stage, deliver-
ing country rock to warm up
the crowd for the big fire-
works show at dusk The fes-
tivities will be at Liberty and
Wallace Brooks Parks.
* The 42nd annual God &
Country Day celebration will
be at 1 p.m. Monday, July 4,
at the Golden Ocala prop-
erty, near U.S. 27 and County
Road 225A. Fireworks will
begin between approxi-
mately 9 and 9:30. The event
is free. To get there, take
County Road 484 to U.S. 27
west. God & Country Day
will be 3 miles west of Inter-
state 75, near County Road
225A. Bring lawn chairs,
bathing suits and sunscreen.


VUPI











Riverland sports


Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011 - 11


SHOOT


G


Special to the Riverland News
The 10-11-year-old Dunnellon Little League District 15 Champions, first row from left, are: Devon
Potter, Matthew Webb, Colton Infinger, Dylan Roy, Jase Williams, Maurice Goolsby, Steven Penn
and Trevor Von Seggern; second row, Chandler Neal, Christian Rey and Keon Williams; last row,
coach Tim Tyson, coach Mike Roy and coach John Infinger.

Dunnellon 10-11-year-old squad wins All-Star tourney


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
Efficient and effective, the
Dunnellon 10 and 11 All-Star
Baseball team plowed its way
through the District 15 All-Star
Tournament, capturing the
championship Sunday with a
victory against Shady Hills, 7-2,
at Freedom Field in Spring
Hill.
"It's unbelievable," said Dun-
nellon coach Tim Tyson, who
won his first All-Star title in his
fourth all-star coaching experi-
ence. "We played and looked
like professionals the whole
tournament."
In three games, Dunnellon
piled up 40 runs, allowing just
four as its pitching staff tallied
more than 20 strikeouts against
Shady Hills, Inverness and
West Hernando.
"These guys been hitting the
ball phenomenally well," Tyson
explained. "The pitching staff
pitched extremely, extremely
well; their mechanics were
very good.
"They play very well to-
gether, they were communicat-
ing very well. They're letting
each other know what's going
on, it's just been unbelievable."
With the championship in
hand, Dunnellon advances to
the Sectional Tournament July
15 in Tampa. The three-day


tournament will consist of four
teams with the winner advanc-
ing to the regional state final.
"After they won that tourna-
ment, you could see how much
pride they had in their faces,"
Tyson said. "They had one of
the greatest moments in their
life. It's something they will
never forget. The parents have
been unbelievable, very great.
They've provided great sup-
port."
In the championship game,
Dunnellon's Chandler Neal
belted a run-scoring triple and
pitcher Maurice Goolsby won
the game with relief help from
Jase Williams. Dylan Roy
added an RBI single.
Dunnellon's Steven Penn was
named the MVP of the tourna-
ment. He had a three-run
homer in his team's 11-0 victory
against West Hernando on Sat-
urday, June 25. Dunnellon
thumped Inverness, 22-2, in the
tournament opener Friday,
June 24.
"I'm proud of our kids,"
Tyson said. "We definitely
played very hard. They put a lot
of heart into it. We have great
coaches. They did a great job.
I'm just happy for them."
In other action, the Dunnel-
lon Minors All-Star team
posted a 1-1 record through the
opening weekend. Dunnellon


dropped its opening game, 11-
4, to Crystal River on Friday,
June 24. Dunnellon rebounded
with a 16-6 victory against
Dixie County on Saturday, June
25. Dunnellon played at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday night against
Lady Lake. Results were un-
available at press time.
The Dunnellon Junior Boys
All-Star team opens play at 6:30
p.m. today against Lady Lake at
Bicentennial Field in Crystal
River. The eight-team division
has been divided into two four-
team pools. The winner of each
pool will competed for the
championship at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday, July 10, at Bicenten-
nial Field in Crystal River, bar-
ring any weather-related
delays.
The Dunnellon Major Boys
All-Star team won't begin play
until Tuesday, July 5. The
Major Boys will play at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday against Crystal
River at Bicentennial Field in
Crystal River. The eight-team
division has been divided into
two four-team pools. The win-
ner of each pool will compete
for the championship at 10 a.m.
Sunday, July 10, at Bicenten-
nial Field in Crystal River, bar-
ring any weather-related
delays.
Dunnellon does not field a
Senior Boys All-Star Team.


I BOWING SORES


Parkview Lanes
Weekly News
League and Tournament
scores for the week
ending June 26:
Closing: Parkview Lanes
will be closed Monday, July 4,
to celebrate Independence
Day.
League Meeting: The
Holder Hotshots league meet-
ing will be Thursday, July 14, at
7pm. The 12-week mixed
league begins July 21 and ends
Oct. 6.
Monday Night Summer Spe-
cial: Will Bemis 311, 831; Jake
Duncan 290; Chris Carr 822;


Saad Bouve 280; Katrina
Hamby 267,744; Janie Oakeson
766. Scratch: Will Bemis 278,
732; Chris Carr 269, 792; Kat-
rina Hamby 224, 615; Saad
Bouve 218; Janie Oakeson 511.
Suncoast Seniors NoTap:
Handicap: Brendan Dooley
356,881; John Mariani 340,850;
Reda Portnoy 342, 799; Marian
Steenstra 331, 799; Marylou
Halovich 812. Scratch: Bren-
dan Dooley 300; Jerry Ness 298,
796; Harry Mass Jr. 735; Reda
Portnoy 276, 601; Marian Steen-
stra 240; Anna Dooley 597.
Young & Restless: Handicap:
(adult) Brian Carney 288, 796;


Bryan Craig 266, 745; (youth)
Andrew Allen 230, 659; Megan
Allen 229,664; Nikki Craig 229.
Scratch: (adult) Brian Carney
277, 763; John Saltmarsh 236,
612; (youth) Michael Andriuolo
170,486; Andrew Allen 151,422.
Wednesday Night Special:
David Black 280, 731; Dave
Runion 269; Tim Lawrence
732; Debbe Chung 221, 593;
Stephanie Flory 214, 638;
Wanda Curry 214.
Hotshots NoTap Doubles:
Handicap: Shorty Williams 271,
643; Nick Waters 251,665; Ellen
Bowman 319; Andrea 315, 863;
Betty Wood 699. Scratch:


Shorty Williams 231, 523; Nick
Waters 170,422; Ellen Bowman
288; Andrea Kish 249,665; Saad
Bouve 605.
Summer Owls: Handicap:
Brendan Dooley 252; Ray
Colon 250, 683; Roy Bass 671;
Betty Rauch 254, 696; Peggy
Moore 240, 687. Scratch: Bren-
dan Dooley 202, 486; John
Ethridge 183, 535; Anna Dooley
164, 447; Betty Rauch 160, 414.
Bowlers of the Week: (youth)
Megan Allen, 25 pins over her
average; (adults) Janie Oake-
son, 76 pins over her average,
and Will Bemis, 141 pins over
his average.


Softball teams vying


for district crowns in


All-Stars tournament


PATRICK HEINRITZ
For the Riverland News
The rain came to Bicen-
tennial Field in Crystal
River; however, so did
Dunnellon Little League
softball.
Dunnellon, with three
teams competing in the
District 15 All-Star Tour-
nament, has post a re-
spectable 6-2 record with
two teams competing in
their respective champi-
onship game, while the
other one is still in the
running for a spot in the
title game.
Minor Girls (9-10)
The Minor softball
team so far is a re-
spectable 2-1, having
opened up district play
versus Dixie County, ral-
lying from a 6-0 deficit for
a lopsided 16-6 "mercy-
rule" victory on Friday,
June 24. Mandy Bernstein
collected the win for
Dunnellon, pitching the
final two innings of the
four-inning contest.
In their second game,
the Minor team rolled to
an easy 13-1 win against
Central Citrus.
However, Dunnellon fi-
nally hit a bump in the
road Sunday, June 26,
falling to Crystal River, 5-
1. Dunnellon, though,
played in the semifinals
of the tournament Tues-
day night against South
Sumter. The winner of
that contest was to play
Wednesday night against
Crystal River or Central
Citrus for the district
championship.
Major Girls (11-12)
The Dunnellon Major
softball team remains
unbeaten as they started
off district play versus a
very well-balanced In-
verness team on Satur-
day, June 24.
It was almost like a
pre-championship game
as all the championships
in Major softball have
featured Dunnellon or
Inverness as the top con-
tenders.
Gillian Heinritz was
the winning pitcher for
Dunnellon as she struck
out nine batters in six in-
nings as Dunnellon
posted a 5-4 victory
Brooke Saez paced the
offense, collecting three
hits, including a three-
run triple and a double.
She lead the team with
four RBI's.
On Saturday, June 25,
Dunnellon rolled to an
easy 20-4 win against
South Sumter. Cassandra
Lawler earned the win
for Dunnellon, throwing
two innings, allowing
two runs and collecting
four strikeouts. Kasey
Bernstein also pitched
two innings for Dunnel-
lon as she closed the
game out giving up two
runs and striking out one


batter.
On Monday, Dunnellon
cruised past Greater
Hudson/Shady Hills, 11-
2. Pitcher Gillian Hein-
ritz struck out 11 to earn
the victory.
Cassandra Lawler had
a bases-loaded triple,
three hits and two runs
for the Marion Coun-
tians. Cassandra Ches-
nut was 3-for-3 with a
run. Casey Bernstein sin-
gled and scored two
runs.
"Our pitching and hit-
ting has been very solid,"
said coach Pat Heinritz,
whose team is 3-0 and
will play at 6:30 p.m.
today against the winner
of Tuesday's Central Cit-
rus/Crystal River contest
for the district champi-
onship. "Everything
needs to get better if we
want a chance to win this
championship game. We
need to show up pre-
pared and in game mode
for the championship
game".
Junior Girls
In a best-of-three se-
ries, Dunnellon split the
first two contests with
South Sumter. The win-
ner-take-all champi-
onship game was Tuesday
night at Bicentennial
Field. Results were not
available at press time.
In the opening contest
Saturday, June 25, Dun-
nellon rolled to a 9-1 vic-
tory as South Sumter's
defense struggled and
Dunnellon appeared to
be the better team. Dania
Clark threw a complete
game for Dunnellon, as
she struck out two bat-
ters, but fielded five
comebackers to the
mound. Ashlyn Whucel
and Tiffany Murray led
the Dunnellon offense, as
Whucel was 3-for-3 with a
double and an RBI. Mur-
ray was 3-for-4 with two
RBIs.
On Sunday, June 26,
Dunnellon fell 9-7 to
South Sumter to force the
deciding Game 3 of the
series. Dunnellon outhit
South Sumter 14-3, but al-
lowed an uncharacteris-
tic 13 walks to South
Sumter batters. Addition-
ally, Dunnellon stranded
eight runners in scoring
position.
Vanessa Hernandez
and Kayla Reed both
pitched for Dunnellon as
Reed struck out six.
Courtney Pike and Ele
Goodloe led the offense
as both players went 3-
for-5. Pike also scored
two runs scored and an
RBI.
"(South Sumter's) de-
fense played solid today,"
said coach Steve Goodloe.
"We didn't play like we
should've today. We gave
them too many base run-
ners, and we left too
many runners on base."


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12 -- Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011







Collect as much rain water as you can


U sing and managing wasteful. Water that is used
water in your garden (transpired) by the plant, i.e.,
and on your allotment is taken up by the roots, into the
essential to grow healthy plants then released through
plants that better withstand the pores in the leaves, is benefi-
attacks of pest, disease and pe- cial. It is essential for many
riods of drought. processes in the plant
The soil canbe tlihu:iiht scll.h as taking up soil nu-
of like a sponge, co:nt.in- trients and plant growth
ing numerous p:tre 1lnd development.
spaces that can hi:ld, waterte r that evaporates
water. This acts as .a tromin the bare surface of
reservoir of water that is . thle -soil is a waste of
exploited by the plaIt . \water and can be re-
roots. The ability ut -I duced in many ways.
plants to exploit this Tracy When the soil reservoir
reservoir differs greatly Jenner can hold no more water,
between plant types: i.e., the pore spaces are
some plants have much deeper full, water will drain out of the
rooting systems than others so soil to lower depths. This is
can use water from greater wasteful and can wash soluble
depths. nutrients, especially nitrogen,
Also, some plants have a to lower depths where the
much greater ability to suck roots cannot reach it.
any remaining water out of dry Water can also drain out of
soil. The reservoir of water in the soil through cracks if the
the soil can lose water or gain soil is very dry When the water
water in different ways. The cannot be adsorbed by the soil
ways in which water is gained surface, it will run off into an-
are obvious: Rainfall, irriga- other location and cannot be
tion (e.g. sprinkler, watering used by the plant. This occurs
can etc.), and movement of when the rate that water ap-
water upward from the water plied is too much for the soil to
table. adsorb it. Very dry soil, or a cap
The ways in which water are or crust on the soil surface
lost from the soil can either be caused by poor cultivations can
beneficial to the plant or reduce the ability of the soil to


adsorb water.
If areas in the garden are
identified as particularly prone
to run off, establishing areas of
permanent vegetation can re-
duce this. The key to using
water more efficiently in the
garden is to target the water to
when the plant needs it and
minimize the wasteful
processes such as evaporation
from bare soil, drainage and
run off.
Many people water the very
surface of the soil, which will
then evaporate rapidly without
ever reaching the plant roots.
Check with a trowel that you
are actually soaking the soil be-
neath. It is better to give the
soil a good soaking every few
days rather than just wetting
the surface regularly. Target
the water at the soil rather than
wetting the foliage.
Water on the foliage will just
evaporate or remain on the
leaves encouraging fungal dis-
ease. Drip irrigation systems
are by far the most effective
way of delivering water to
plants, as water is targeted to
the plant roots rather than wet-
ting the soil surface. They take
a lot of setting up, but once in
place, watering takes very little
effort.


Special to the Riverland News
Three Dunnellon 4H Members were recently awarded ribbons from the
Marion Soil & Water Conservation Water Awards. Logan White, middle,
placed second while Matthew and Michael Livingston tied for third place
for their Conservation Trays, using at least three or more conservation
practices. The ceremony was May 20 at The Appleton Museum.



ON THE WEB: www.riverlandnews.com





"For where two or three gather together in My name, there am I ith them -







GATHERINGS



A DIRECTORY OF AREA CHURCHES
^~ i


SPeace ' Holy Faith
Lutheran Church Episcopal
Missouri Synod Church
Rv TC. v LIMrCK ,r P aatu


Iev. ierrlly L. ImcKree, asDLor
Sunday School & Adult Bible
Class 9:00 A.M
Sunday Worship Service
10:00 A.M
Wednesday Bible Study
10:00 A.M
Wednesday potluck & Bible
Study 6:30 PM
"The Church On The Hill"
5 miles North of Dunnellon
US Hwy 41 at Highway 40
489-5881
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org


19924 W. Blue Cove Dr.
Dunnellon
THE REV. J. JAMES GERHART

Sunday 9:00 AM
Rite I 2nd & 4th Sunday
Rite II 1st & 3rd Sunday

489-2685
Hall Available For
Community Functions


To ALdver-tise in t-he
Church Directory
Call s489-2r31
For 1Mvore Informration


RE CRE4

4 0





S :ist Churci o
OInnellon.�cot r
a


Mulching with compost or
straw has a huge effect on re-
ducing the amount of water that
evaporates from the soil sur-
face. It reduces the amount of
watering needed and will also
suppress weed growth. There
are many different materials
that are suitable for mulching
from newspaper and cardboard,
hay and straw to grass cuttings
and leaf mould. All are excel-
lent at retaining moisture in the
soil and reasonably cheap.
Gravel and grit on pots are
also useful but may not be quar-
ried in a sustainable way There
are critical stages when it is
most important to water plants.
For directly sown plants the soil
should be kept moist otherwise
the seeds won't germinate. Like-
wise after transplanting, plants
only have poorly developed
roots so will frequent watering.
After this critical period, the
water requirement of plants dif-
fers.
As a very general rule, more
leafy vegetables (i.e. spinach)
will require more continuous
water to allow leaf expansion.
For plants that produce fruits
(i.e., tomatoes, beans) watering
is most critical from fruit or pod
set onward.
Your next line of defense


ADVENTURE
continued from page 1

the river. Invasive items,
such as Hydrilla and the
exotic channel apple snail,
have been kept at bay
"We have an aggressive
group of biologists who go
after it," Rodriguez said of
Hydrilla.
According to Wikipedia.
com, Hydrilla is natural-
ized and invasive in the
United States following its
release in the 1960s from
aquariums into waterways
in Florida. It is now estab-
lished in the southeast
from Connecticut to Texas,
and also in California. By
the 1990s control and man-
agement were costing mil-
lions of dollars each year.
As an invasive species in
Florida, Hydrilla has be-
come the most serious
aquatic weed problem for
Florida and most of the
U.S.
Divers come from across
the region for one simple
reason.
"To snorkel an area
where no one else has

DUNNELLON
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
21501 W. Highway 40
Rev. Eddie Fulford, Pastor
Sunday
Traditional Worship 8:00 AM
With Communion Each Week
Contemporary Worship 9:30 AM
Traditional Worship 11:00 AM
Nursery At All Services
Sunday School 9:30 AM & 11:00 AM
:i....... God's ,'- i., "
352-489-4026
wwwSharingGodsLight.or


Dunnellon
Seventh-day
Adventist Church
Welcome To Our Services

Hwy. 41 & Hwy. 40
Saturday
Sabbath School...9:30 AM
Sermon.............11:00 AM
Tuesday
Bible Study...........7:00 PM
For more information:

352-489-3455
www.dunnellonsdachurch.com


been," said Gainesville res-
ident Lucy Teel, whose
husband George accompa-
nied her. "We've been
everywhere snorkeling, it's
just pristine here. There's
no comparison."
It was the first of two
trips they'll make this year,
having signed up for a spot
in August, too.
"We just love the
springs," George said. "It's
as beautiful as anything
you'll see around the
world. It's so beautiful, so
serene."
For Marion County resi-
dents, such as teenagers
Rebecka Kain and Eliza-
beth Mulford, seeing the
sights of the Rainbow
River from a new perspec-
tive, gave the young women
a new-found appreciation
of the natural wonder.
"I've swam in the river a
lot of times with my dad,"
Kain explained. "But I've
never gotten to see it like
this before. It's definitely a
new experience."
Added Mulford: "I liked,
it was really pretty. I want
to try and come back again,
it's definitely worth it."

nature Coas

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.




WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG

Catholic Community of
St. John the Baptist
Father Emmanuel Akalue, Pastor
MASSES
Saturday Reconciliation. .3:30 PM
Saturday Vigil................... 4:30 PM
Sunday.......8:00 AM and 10:30 AM
Sunday- Spanish................Noon
Mon. Thru Fri.................... 8:00 AM
Holy Days.....8:00 AM and 7:00 PM
7525 S. Highway 41,Dunnellon
352-489-3166
Swww.stjohncc.com




Bapis


In Citrus Springs
974 W. G. Martinelli Blvd.
On the corner ofW.G. Martinelli Blvd.
and Citrus Springs Blvd.

(352) 489-7515



Rev. F. Jess Burton, Pastor
Cell Phone
352-208-3055
Christ-Centered


against drought should be to
harvest as much rainwater as
possible. Make sure all water
butts are covered - this pre-
vents any nasty accidents to
children, wildlife and pets, it
stops the water becoming a
mosquito breeding ground in
the height of summer, it keeps
out leaves and other debris and
excluding the light prevents the
water from turning green.
Try to fit butts to every avail-
able down pipe, and fit gutter-
ing connected to butts onto
sheds and greenhouses. If rain
is forecast in a dry spell, pop
outside and fill up as many wa-
tering cans as possible from
your rainbutts.
If any are having yellowjacket
issues, a UF entomologist/ge-
neticist that is working on the
social organization of yellow
jackets will remove nests for
free for homeowners who may
be having this problem. Call Dr.
Gary Fritz for the removal of
yellow jackets at (866) 852-9317.
He states that although he
works out of Gainesville, he will
travel within all of north central
Florida to remove yellow jacket
nests.
TracyJenner, the Riverland
Gardener, can be reached at
tracyjenner@aol. com.


For Kain, seeing the var-
ious species offish and tur-
tles was amazing, but
knowing there's so many
potential threats to the
river is bothersome.
"It's sad to think people
are ruining this," she said.
While the snorkel tour is
booked, it's not the only op-
portunity officials at Rain-
bow Springs State Park are
offering this summer. At 10
a.m. the second Wednesday
monthly, a guided
canoe/kayak trip is avail-
able. Rentals are available
for $10 per hour and a
photo ID is required. Those
wishing to bring their own
canoe or kayak may do so,
but officials noted those
folks will have to carry
their equipment 1,800 feet
to the launch area.
The guided trip lasts 2.5
hours and is approximately
1-mile downriver and back
RSVP for this trip is re-
quired. For more informa-
tion, call 465-8555 or visit
www.floridastateparks.org/
rainbowsprings/default cfm.
Regular park admission
of $2 is still required to par-
ticipate in the events.


;G0a S'aftU


Pastor Shawn Cutshall
(352) 489-1788
Sunday
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Worship 11:00 AM
Disciple Training 6:00 PM
(Nursery & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday
AWANA 6:30 PM
Youth Group 6:30 PM
Bible Study 7:00 PM
8' Miles North of Dunnellon Off of
Highway 41, Left at Church Sign on
SW 5th Place

Calvary
Baptist Temple
21841 S.W. Marine Blvd.
Rainbow Lakes Estates
Sunday
Sunday School.............9:45 a.m.
Worship Service.........11:00 a.m.
Evening Service..........5:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting............7:00 p.m.
Every 4th Sunday.....5:00 p.m.
"Share,Praise & Fellowship"
Pastor Jamie Parker
352-489-8962
"Please Join Us As We
S Worship In His Name"


This is an informative
and prophetical look
at the Bible
and our times
SUNDAYS
10 am..........Bible Classes
11 am..........Worship Service
5:30 pm.......Evening Praise Service
WEDNESDAYS
5:30 pm....Music Rehearsal
7 pm.........Bible Study & Prayer
* Bible -Believing


4-H award winners recognized


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com


Dunnellon Presbyterian Church
Jeffrey W. Welch, Pastor

20641 Chestnut Street
Corner of Chestnut & Ohio Streets
In The Historic District
489-2682
Sunday
Worship...................8:30 AM
Sunday School.........9:45 AM
Worship...............11:00 AM
Nursery Provided
For All Services
dunnpreschurch@bellsouth.net 000-8--GM-


I




Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011 - 13


Underwater adventure


Rebecka Kain. right, and Elizabeth Mulford listen to Ralph Rodriguez prior to em-
barking on their snorkel tour. Mulford inflates her life-vest prior to the tour.


A group of snorklers observe a school of fish and other aquatic life recently during a guided snorkel tour along the Rainbow River.


Snorkel gear lies on the deck prior to the tour.


Vicki Mulford rubs the lense on
her facemask during the tour.
T: Etta Ross, park volunteer, shows
the group of divers what the shell of an
exotic channel applesnail looks like.


S Rebecka Kain adjust her facemask after observing
a turtle in the Rainbow River.


Photos by Jeff Bryan,
Riverland News


RPR M





14 -- Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011



District offers community education grants


Grant applications due Aug. 19


Specail to the Riverland News
Community members
who want to help protect
the water resources in
their area may apply on-
line for a Community Ed-
ucation Grant from the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District.


PASSAGE
continued from page 1
to take them to National
Monument Mall to see the
World War II Memorial
and Korean War Memo-
rial.
"We had time to walk
around and look at every-
thing and talk with others.
I introduced myself to
everyone," Fowler said
about the time spent at
the World War II Memo-
rial.
Visits to Lincoln memo-
rial, the Arlington Na-
tional Cemetery, the
Tomb of the Unknown
Soldier and seeing the
changing of the guards
was also included in the
day's activities.
The Pacific Pavilion
had special significance
to Fowler.
Fowler left his rural
Pennsylvania high school
in his senior year to join
the Marines because he
wanted to serve his coun-
try
After completing basic
training in San Diego, it
was on to Guam and Oki-
nawa. Fowler was part of
the artillery in the Sixth
Marine Division formed
on the Guadalcanal.
He was there until
Japan surrendered.
Shortly after the sur-
render, Fowler was out on
liberty and walking
around the community
when a small-frame older
woman, came out with a
small, glass-encased,
Samurai statue and gave
it to him as a thank-you
gift.
He doesn't have that lit-
tle statue anymore, the
glass case was broken in


The overall goal of the
Community Education
Grant program is to ac-
tively engage and edu-
cate adults about water
conservation, protection
and preservation. The
program is intended to
motivate communities to
get involved in protecting


MICHEL NORTHSEA/Riverland News
Sam Fowler of Dunnellon
was one of the 104 veter-
ans on the last Honor
Flight to see the World
War II Memorial at Wash-
ington D.C.
shipping, but he still has
the memory of the experi-
ence.
After the war, Fowler
returned home to Penn-
sylvania to help his father
with the farm and family
contracting business. The
day he got home, he got a
call from his high school
inviting him to attend the
graduation ceremony and
pick up his diploma.
The option of college
appealed to Fowler, but
then he was called to
serve in the Korean War.
Five days later, after be-
coming a sergeant, he was
called home to help with
the family business be-
cause of illness.
Fowler married "the
finest woman in Pennsyl-
vania" and continued to
run the family business.


their water resources
through various educa-
tional activities. These
grants offer reimburse-
ment up to $5,000 to help
fund projects that pro-
vide communities an op-
portunity to learn about
water resources.
To apply, visit the Dis-
trict's website at Water-
Matters. org/Community
Grants/. The electronic

A vacation to Florida
made them realize they
wanted to call the Sun-
shine state home, so they
moved to Sarasota and
then to St. Petersburg.
Fowler went to work for
the Mackle Brothers.
"It was a good life. We
worked hard and skimped
some," he said about life
in Florida with their one
son.
Twenty-five years ago,
Fowler and his wife,
Wilma Jean Rogers
Fowler, moved to Dunnel-
lon. They were married
for 55 years, before she
died two years ago.
The Fowlers made the
First Baptist Church their
church home and it was
men from the church that
got Fowler to the manda-
tory meetings associated
with the Honor Flight.
Fowler plans on work-
ing with other church
members to raise funds so
other veterans in the
church can go on an
Honor Flight.
World War II veterans
go on the flight at no cost
to them. Each flights costs
about $70,000 or $450 in-
dividually
Veterans in good health
can make their trip even
if they use a wheelchair.
Fowler noticed how
well those in wheelchairs
were cared for by those in
attendance.
"They accommodated
those in wheelchairs with
kindness," he said.
"It was a good time. My
mouth runs 5 miles a
minute and I can't brag
enough about the trip," he
said. "I met a lot of nice
people and hugged a
bunch of pretty girls."


application allows appli-
cants to save, review and
change portions of their
proposals before submit-
ting. Grant applications
are due Aug. 19, 2011.
Individuals, service
groups, volunteers, gov-
ernment agencies, non-
go v e r n m e n t
organiz-ations and others
are encouraged to apply
Potential projects


should provide education
on any or all of the fol-
lowing topics: water
quality, water conserva-
tion, flood protection,
natural systems and wa-
tersheds. Examples of
past projects include
pond restorations,
cleanup, watershed edu-
cation events, workshops
and exhibits.
Projects must take



A trip to remember


place between March 1
and July 31, 2012.
To discuss project
ideas, call Robin
Grantham at (800)423-
1476, ext. 4779.
In addition to grant
funding, a variety of free
materials are available
and can be ordered on
the District's website at
WaterMatters. org/
publications.


mmd r,:lE t


Flea & Ear Mite Control
s Next Dog
qune Obedience Clipping
De ss st Class 7/1611

Call Donna or Sherry
Country Club
Groomers
352-465032.


SPRINKLER SYSTEM
CHECK-UP

1 30
. . Complete check-up
S' of entire sprinkler
I . system!
Accurate Sprinklers
(352) 445-1403
Licensed #10719 & Insured


A Handyman Service
Finish Carpentry
*Painting
-interior/exterior
* Pressure Cleaning

& Kitchen, Baths *Cabinets
SCeramic Tile* Trims
SMolding* Drywall Repairs
Licensed & Insured
S 489-3622






Al Castano Riinting, Inc.
Interior & Exterior
* Painting
Wall Repairs& Textures --
SPopcorn Removal
& Repairs


AUI I.UM


Changes of Life
Home Services, Inc.
Servicing
Dunnellon to Pine Ridge
SSenior Home Cleaning
* Weeding & Raking
* Windows IrS l
Bonded &InsuI
(352 208080


"Repaint
Specialist"
Inlerlor & E.lerlor
/'P , . S. , 1 ,1 S ,,,4 .
- FREE ESTIMATES -
352-465-6631


1Hat & Air, Inc.

...rwating comfort
0 SPECIALIZING IN SYSTEM CHANGE-OUTS
0 WE SERVICE ALL BRANDS
0 MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS / COMFORT CLUB .0
0 COMFORT CLUB DISCOUNTS
0 24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE .
e IBBB
I�t� * CENTL FLRIDA489-3917A
DUNNELLON * MARION * CITRUS Licensed & Insured #CAC1813249


Mica Wood Residential *Commercial



Custom Cabinets
Wellborn Forest Dealer
1795 W. NW Lenox Lane
Dunnellon, FL 34434
352-489-2822
Since 1993 Mobile: 840-3703
DON ROBINSON Email:
Owner threedl@aol.com

A I A




* Cabinets
* Counter Tops
* Drywall
* Painting
* Tile
(352) 465-2631
License #L04000014330


JDH Services, LLC
"Your total home care specialists"
* General Repairs & Maintenance
SInterior & Exterior Painting
* Pressure Cleaning & Rescreening
Free Estimates
JDH Services, LLC.
S (352) 817-4992
Licensed & Insured

nI i S e

104WfAySevc


*Mobile Service AvaiTable
*Claims Processing For Insurance
SWarranty & Extended Warranty
352-401-7930
,,Ih, ' ". O. .


GREG'S ALUMINUM
"Pleasing people in Marion County
since 1982"
* Pool Enclosure Rescreens
* Vinyl & Acrylic Windows
* Garage Door Screens
* Vinyl Ceilings & Much More

465-0371
746-6663
Licensed & Insured Comp #2038


Roy's Lawn
& Home Services
* Full Property Maintenance
* Painting
* Sod Installations
* Pressure Washing
FREE ESTIMATES
Lic/Ins
S' I I I



WILSON AIR SERVICE


" We Service All Brands
Repairs
SReplacement
* Free Second Opinions
S24-HR. Service
352-208-4641
Locally Owned & Operated
License # CAC1816140


Rubber Roof
Special

I 999&up
Call us before you
accept any other offer.
We will beat
I their price!
L(ritten quote required.)


352-445-U844
wwwhudsonpoolsinc.com
..... State Cert # CPC1457535


* Exterior & Interior
* Wallpaper Removal
* Pressure Washing
* Free Estimates
United States
Painting
Rick - i
465-5068
322-0406 cell
Licensed Insured


16 Years Experience
Ins/L.c PCC-CO44879
Work Guaranteed
LES SEEBER, JR.
ROOFING
REROOFING * REPAIRS
Free
Estimates
(352) 266-4935
(352) 615-0248


World Class
Window Tinting
Reduce -Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO * HOME * OFFICE
Dunnellon Fee Estimates
352-465-6079 .-


16' x 7' starting
SLIDING GARAGE $S9
SCREEN DOOR
. .. . . .. .. f., P l--IPTI L S �EEi N


IERRY JWAlRTll
IRRIGATION LLC. 3398 S.W. 74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala
Seasonal Special
$4 " : Reset Controller
9 Adjust Spray Heads to Correct Spray Pattern (withthis ad)
$49 * Complete System Inspection
We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation.
Certified IrrigationAuditor Call for details Licensed. -
Fully Insured
MemberofFlorida 352-237-5731 Comp#7085 2010IR2008
Irr Serving Marion County Since 1982 CitiZentH-


MICHEL NORTHSEA/For the Riverland News
World War II Veteran Bill Blacklund of Dunnellon tips his hat Tuesday,
June 14, to fellow veterans and the crowd of approximately 1,500 people
gathered at the Ocala International Airport to greet the return of the third
Honor Flight home.


Send your community news and photos to
the Riverland News at
editor@riverlandnews.com.


I WELDIN I







Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011 - 15


Fun and games


PO-,5 _ 0PEYE

- -,_ - .- -- - __5
I_-- r - r -i PEA.i


Out on a Limb


I.�

K,


by Gary Kopervas


Super Crossword TAKE A HIKE!


ACROSS
1 Surrounded
by
7 Nimoy role
12 Clout a
cad
16 - Vicente,
Brazil
19 Stew
ingredient
20 - firma
21 Top-of-the-
line
22 Prom wear
23 Start of a
remark by
108 Across
25 Reserve
27 Rep.
opponent
28 Savor the
squid
29 Pin part
31 Powell or
Quinn
32 Orwell's
"Animal -"
34 Chastised,
with "out"
37 Nick of "I
Love
Trouble"
38 Archaic
affliction
41 Cotton cloth
42 - tape
43 Cognizant
44 Spoil
45 Part 2 of
remark
48 Deface
49 Bunch of
bees
51 Bulldog
feature
52 Shady


character? "Cheers"
54 English role
statesman 95 Greek poet
56 A deadly sin 96 Emerson's
57 Masters' "- middle
River name
Anthology" 98 Word in a
59 Cary of "Hot Hawthorne
Shots" title
61 Diva Renata 99 Sell
63 Tngger 100 Rock's -
Trigger? Trick
64 Game-show 101 A swan was
giveaways her swain
65 Part 3 of 102 "The Gold
remark Bug" author
69 With 6 Down, 103 "- been
John Cleese ages1"
sitcom 106 Notable
71 Grapefruit 108 Speaker of
serving remark
72 Tableland 114 Plastic-
74 Tex-Mex Band
favorite 115 Sausage
75 Sturdy fabric segment
77 Goes (for) 116 Proofreader's
78 556, to mark
Flavius 117 "Bewitched"
80 TV's"Top - role
118 Energy
81 Trunk, in 119 Signor
Tewkesbury Ferrari
82 "She - 120 Pound the
Yellow podium
Ribbon" ('49 121 Sheena of
film) song
84 Holidayless
mo. DOWN
85 End of 1 Copied
remark 2 Budge
88 Brewer or 3 List entry
Wright 4 - es
91 - Park, NJ Salaam
93 Birthday 5 Pig's digs
buy 6 See
94 Danson's 69 Across


ARIES (March 21 to April 19) You
clever Ewes and Rams love nothing
more than to rise to a challenge. So, by
all means, if you feel sure about your
facts, step right up and defend your
side of the issue.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
You've done some great work recently.
Now it's time to reward yourself with
something wonderful, perhaps a day at
a spa or a night out with someone very
special.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You
love to talk, but don't forget to make
time to do a little more listening; other-
wise, you could miss out on an impor-
tant message someone might be trying
to send to you.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
Your aspect indicates some uncer-
tainty about one of your goals. Use this
period of shifting attitudes to reassess
what you really want and what you're
ready to do to get it.
LEO (July 23 to August 22) Your
social life is picking up, and you'll
soon be mingling with old friends and
making new ones. But twixtt the fun
times, stay on top of changing work-
place conditions.
VIRGO (August 23 September 22)
A trusted friend offers understanding
as you vent some long-pent-up feel-
ings. Now, move on from there and
start making the changes you've put


Grant Chance
Owner

Blue Run

Bicycles

R3,nDo* Squxr. PI3z3
i,,,,hfilt J( in;.pp r,)i:.ri|rl H
Dunnellon

1(352) 465-7538


7 Dele dele
8 - diem
9 Galena,
e.g.
10 Dernier -
11 Disputed
territory
12 Bar food?
13 Burden
14 "- Day
Now"
('62 hit)
15 NBC logo
16 Circus prop
17 Heroic
Murphy
18 The yoke's
on them
24 Overdramatic
thespian
26 Maestro
Georg
30 Velvet
finish?
32 In place of
33 Olympic
hawk
34 Card game
35 Kreskin's
letters
36 Stout
relative
37 Worthless
38 Temptress
39 Watch for
40 Gave up
41 Pugilist
Hagler
42 Time to
crow?
44 Black and
white
delight
45 Wine and
dine
46 Hillary's


home
47 Mirth
50 Author
Eudora
51 Victor of
"Papillon"
53 Mag.
submis-
sions
55 Govt.
security
57 Slosh the
schnapps
58 Dragon of
song
59 Part of
Q.E.D.
60 Resided
62 -
Spumante
63 Circus
barker
64 Part of a
process
66 Voucher
67 Block
68 Marine
leader?
69 TV
watchdog
70 At the
drop of -
73 Soft-palate
extension
75 "Come
Softly -"
('59 song)
76 Distress
77 Buck or
Jesse
79 Violinist
Oistrakh
81 South
African
activist
83 Exiled


dictator
86 Renown
87 Frog-to-be
88 Hot stuff
89 Building
wing
90 Caviar
92 Gridiron
position
94 Beyond
balmy
95 Comic
Herman
96 Complain
97 Famed
fabulist
98 Little lizard
99 Harry -
Zell
100 Karate
blow'
101 City on the
Danube
102 Rose or
Rozelle
103 "- You
Babe" ('65
song)
104 Archaic
preposition
105 Cartoonist
Lee
107 - Tin Tin
109 Benzene
source
110 Significant
years
111 Donkey doc
112 Cell stuff
113 Drivers'
lies., e.g.


offall this time.
LIBRA (September 23 to October
22) You might well feel uneasy as you
face a difficult situation involving
someone close to you. But you know
you're doing the right thing, so stick
with your decision.
SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem-
ber 21) You're a good friend to oth-
ers. Now's the time to allow them to
be good friends to you. Rely on their
trusted advice to help you get through
an uncertain period.
SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to
December 21) Family and friends are
always important, but especially so at
this time. Despite your hectic work-
place schedule, make a real effort to
include them in your life.
CAPRICORN (December 22 to
January 19) That project you've been
working on is almost ready for presen-
tation. But you still need some infor-
mation from a colleague before you
can consider it done.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru-
ary 18) Don't let those negative atti-
tudes that have sprung up around you
drain your cncrgics. Shrug them off,
and move ahead with the confidence
that you can get the job done.
PISCES (February 19 to March 20)
Aspects favor some dedicated fun
time for the hardworking Piscean. A
nice, refreshing plunge into the social
swim can recharge your physical and
emotional batteries.
BORN THIS WEEK: You love to
travel and be with people. You prob-
ably would be happy as a social direc-
tor on a cruise ship.
C 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.


Acanthus mollis :
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OG I d n, 01 breeches" or "oyster plant' thi ' |. '" l'


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16 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011


MONDAY, 2:00 P.M.




Advertisements may be cancelled as soon as
results are obtained. You will be billed only for the
dates the ad actually appears in the paper.
Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the


TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD, CALL Toll Free 1-877-676-1403
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M.







Riverland News


All ads require prepayment. We accept

SB ^^4


Be sur
it appe
than a


deadlines for placing ads, except for specials. made c
Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the Riverland News. We make every effort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate.
However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information.


e to check your advertisement the first day
ars. We will not be responsible for more
ne incorrect insertion. Adjustments are
only for the portion of the ad that is in error.


B
NOW HIRING
- Multiple positions
available
- Must be able to
work with customers
on a daily basis
- Health benefits,
401k, Advancement
Opps.
- Make $400 - $500,
paid weekly
- Positive Attitude
Please call Sharon to
schedule interview @
352-307-0576





Make Money
From Home
PT or FT 10 yrs in busi-
ness & stock traded.
Over 3,000 contractual
agreements w/ biggest
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SUPPORT

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Move-n
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specials Assistant
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NOW Available
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Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
Recent Foreclosures Welcome

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S This Instution is an equal opportunity provider & employer





Attenti onA.




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ANNOUNCEMENTS
Advertise in Over 100 Papers
throughout Florida for One Low Rate.
Advertising Networks of Florida, Put us
to work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds .com.

AUTO DONATIONS
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Non-Runners Accepted, 24/7
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BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
Investors - Outstanding and
immediate returns in equipment
leasing for frac industry. Immediate
lease out. Tax benefits and high returns.
We need more equipment!
(800)491-9029

EDUCATION
ALLIED HEALTH career training-
Attend college 100% online. Job
placement assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline .com

EMPLOYMENT
JUST GRADUATE? Play in Vegas,
Hang in LA, Jet to New York! Hiring
18-24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid
expenses. Signing Bonus.
Call (877)259-6983

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
Movie Extras Earn up to $250 per day
To stand in the backgrounds for a major
film. Production experience not
required. All looks needed. Call NOW.
(877)435-5877

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE
SAWMILLS -Band/Chainsaw -
SPRING SALE - Cut lumber any
dimension, anytime. MAKE MONEY
and SAVE MONEY In stock ready to
ship. Starting at $995.00.
wwwJNorwoodSawmills .com/
300N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N


BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not �
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191




WHITE FEMALE
cat spayed declawed
shots UTD under 2 yr old
owner illness forces
finding a home
(352) 209-5593


212-0630 RIV PUBLIC NOTICE 7/8 Sale
NOTICE OF SALE
TO: Unit #22 Mary Jane Bynes/Idella Roberts 3366 NE 99th Ct Apt. 1, Silver Springs, FL
34488
Unit #42 Chauncey Miner/Paul Glenn 9791 N. Elcam, Citrus Springs, FL 34433
Unit # 57 Jimmy Mason/Amber Goodman 1700 NW 222nd Ter., Dunnellon, FL 34431
Unit # 80 Robert Petersen/Patty Shears 131 N Highway 19, Inglis, FL 34449
You are notified that the property stored by you with STOR-RIDGE, INC., P.O. Box
1107, 1807 W. Lockport Lane, Dunnellon, FL 34430-1107, 352-489-5858, believed to be
household goods will be sold to the highest bidder for cash, at the above address on
July 8, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. to satisfy the delinquent rentals.: We reserve
the right to refuse any and all bids.
Published in Riverland News, June 23 & 30,2011.


Steve BeeBee
Tree Service
Professional
Tree Work at
Reasonable
Prices

"ASK YOUR
NEIGHBOR"
Call Steve Or Cindy
(352)465-4117
(352)425-0295




Dunnellon
Computer Repair
20093 E. Penn. Ave.
Suite 6
NEXT TO DUNNELLON
CHIROPRATIC
(352) 533-2130




Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903




Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ns.
0256271 352-465-9201




2 AUCTION WEEK
THURS. ESTATE JUNE 30
Outside- Adventure
12 Prev: 12 Auction 3PM
Tools, household,
furniture, boxes of fun
SUN. JULY 3
Antique & Collectible
Auction 1998 Jaguar,
1971 Mercedes, Many
Clocks, Art from world
traveler, Estate firearms,
Lladros, Antique to Mid
Century Furniture inc full
rattan set, Great
assort, See website:
DudleysAuction.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc



Jon Deere Tractor
Brand New, 15hrs.
JDLA115 19.5HP,
42 Hyrdo $1,600.
352-382-3663

LET US WORK
FOR YOU!
RIVERLAND
NEWS
CLASSIFIED
GET RESULTS!
CALL TOLL FREE
1-877-676-1403


DUNNELLON
1 BR cottage, nicely
furnished; no pets.
(352)746-9304


FINANCIAL SERVICES
$$$ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH
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$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates
APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call
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www.lawcapital.com


HELP WANTED
Driver- Great Miles! Great Pay!
$1000 Sign-on for experienced CO's
& $1500 Incentives for O/O's. Driver
Academy Refresher Course available.
recruit@ffex.net. (855)356-7121


17 DRIVERS NEEDED! Top 5%
Pay! Excellent Benefits New Trucks
Ordered! Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck .com


CDL-A DRIVERS. Central Florida
company seeks Solo & Team Drivers.
Tank and Dry Van positions offering
some regional. lyr OTR/ Good MVR
required. (877)882-6537 or
www.oaklevtransport .com


Driver Start a New Career! 100%
Paid CDL Training! No Experience
Required. Recent Grads or Exp
Drivers: Sign On Bonus!CRST
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Drivers- 100% OWNER
OPERATORS. Paid Weekly. Practical
Miles. Unique Fuel Surcharge Program.
Own Truck or Lease Purchase. CDL-A
with Hazmat required. Call
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CYPRESS TRUCK LINES Home
Weekends! Southeast Regional, Top
Pay & Great Benefits! 6 Months TT
exp CDL with clean MVR. Call
(800)545-1351 www.cvpresstruck.com


Drivers Wanted: Class A-CDL O/O's.
T/T-53ft dry van. Our drivers say we
are easy to work for.
Call (877)893-9645


DUNNELLON
Rainbow Lakes
Estates, 2/1/5/1
Cute, Clean & Cozy
$550. mo. + dep.
Utilities & Lawncare
1 cat or sm. dog okay
(352)489-8000

RAINBOW LAKES
EST. POOL HOME 3/2/1
inside laund. all appls
Pool & Lawn Serv incl.
$800. 352-489-4949





Crystal River RV Lot
For Sale
Snowbird/InvestorNisitor
star gated com-
munity. Must sell.
Will take $39,900 if
close quickly.
GREAT LOT!!! Con-
tact at 860-841-8419
leave message or text


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




=',i ii1 IN !l


CUSTOM BUILT
HOMES
3/2/2 +Lanai
Starting @ $69,900
352-897-4447
352-697-1384
J. Cintula Builder




SALE 50% Off Mnf. Price
Pontoon Boat Reuphol.
Sale Tops & Covers
Repairs 352-563-0066



BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
We Buy Any Vehicle
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, Titled,
no title, no problem.
I will pay up to
$15,000 for Vehicles.
Any make, any model.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794


- - -

AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
June 5. 2011
1-800-438-8559

SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
NO SHOWS
JULY OR AUGUST
SEE YOU SEPT. 4
1-800-438-8559








S for a
, great
S buy
Sin the
Classifieds.
Riverland News
CALL
368-2235
LOCAL CALL


Drivers Wanted-OTR Food Grade
Tanker Drivers Needed Competitive
pay, Benefits, Guaranteed time off
Class A CDL-w/tanker endorsement
Prefer 2yrs experience (800)569-6816
otterytransportation .com


MISCELLANEOUS
AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train
for high paying Aviation Career.
FAA approved program. Financial aid
if qualified - Job placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (877)741-9260.


ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical, *Business, *
Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal
Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if
qualified. Call (888)203-3179,
www.CenturaOnline .com

REAL ESTATE
North Carolina Mountain Lakefront
lots. New gated waterfront
community. Dockable lots with up to
300' of shoreline, Low insurance, Low
property tax. Call Now. (800)709-5253

SCHOOLS & INSTRUCTION
Heat & Air JOBS - Ready to work?
3 week accelerated program. Hands on
environment. Nationwide
certifications and Local Job Placement
Assistance! (877)994-9904


ANF
ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA


Classified I Display I Metro Dally




Week of June 27, 2011


mi I


N t r o


Adinsr I


218-0707 RIV
Young, Anna M. 2011-CP-629 (F) Notice to Cred
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MARION COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2011 CP 629 (F)
IN RE: ESTATE OF ANNA M. YOUNG a/k/a ANN M. YOUNG,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of ANNA M. YOUNG a/k/a ANN M. YOUNG, de-
ceased, whose date of death was November 28, 2010, and whose Social Security
Number is 051-26-3895, File Number 2011 CP 629 (F), is pending in the Circuit Court
for Marion County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is P.O. Box 1030,
Ocala, Florida 34478. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and
the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, upon whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is June 30,2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ MARY E. YOUNG
Personal Representative of the Estate of ANNA M. YOUNG a/k/a ANN M. YOUNG
18 N. Durkee Lane, E. Patchogue, new York 11772
Attorney for Personal Representative:
BRETT & REYNOLDS, P.A. /s/ Joel O. Parker, Esq., Attny at Law, Florida Bar No.: 0070201
8810 S.W. Highway 200, Suite 122, Ocala, FL 34481
Published in Riverland News, June 30 & July 7, 2011.


Rainbow River
Club Membership
Available
For Transfer Fee
Exp.Nov.2017
Call (352) 489-7440











WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369




Looking for Fenced
Pasture for Goats
Call Mike
(352) 634-4237

I I!3 I H


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $450. mo. + Dep.
RV, $325 + electric
352-795-0061
INGLIS 2/1
furn 1 acre, wood firs.
87 Cove Rd $475
352-237-9481, 812-4228

OCALA
1.2 & 3 bedrooms
Low Rates, clean quite
park 352-732-0186




SMALL FARMS
MORRISTON
READ THIS ONLY
If you are you
interested in 2.67 acres,
keep horses, fenced.
spotless 3/2 furn'd 2001
MH, out bldg w/elect.
$80K. Owner financing.
Dale Ravens Rainbow
Springs Community
Realty Inc.
352-489-1486
Effciecie
Cotae


217-0630 RIV
PUBLIC NOTICE
The City of Dunnellon City Council will hold a Special Public Hearing on Wednesday,
July 13, 2011, at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall, 20750 River Dr., Dunnellon, FL 34431 to con-
sider the adoption of:
RESOLUTION #RES201 1-10
A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY OF DUNNELLON, FLORIDA, ADOPTING A FIVE-YEAR FINAN-
CIAL MANAGEMENT PLAN PROVIDING FOR REVISIONS TO THE WATER "BASE RATE"
(AVAILABILITY) CHARGE, THE WATER UTILITY RATES, THE SEWER "BASE RATE"
(AVAILABILITY) CHARGE, THE SEWER RATES FOR RESIDENTIAL,
COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, AND INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTS; PROVIDING
FOR CONFLICTS, SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
COPIES OF THIS RESOLUTION ARE AVAILABLE AT CITY HALL FREE OF CHARGE. THE PUB-
LIC IS ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND AND COMMENT.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, ANY PERSON REQUIR-
ING A SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION AT THIS HEARING BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY OR
PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE CITY CLERK AT (352) 465-8500 AT LEAST
THREE CALENDAR DAYS PRIOR TO THE PROCEEDING. IF A PERSON DESIRES TO APPEAL
ANY DECISION WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THE ABOVE MEETING
OR HEARING, HE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING, AND FOR SUCH PUR-
POSE, HE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE
APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. THE CITY IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY MECHANICAL FAILURE
OF RECORDING EQUIPMENT.
Published in Riverland News. June 30. 2011.


214-0630 RIV
7/14 Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
Superior Towing/C&M
Towing gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and
intent to sell these
vehicles) on 07/14/2011,
9:00 am at 36 NE 8th St.,

215-0630 RIV
7/14 & 7/19 sales
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice of Public Sale:
D & D TOWING OF OCALA
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Lien and intent to
sell these vehicles) at
4125 NE Jacksonville Rd.,




213-0630 RIV
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under


Ocala, FL 34470, pursuant
to subsection 713.78 of
the Florida Statutes.
Superior Towing/C&M
Towing reserves the right
to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
1N4ALI ID96C233004
2006 NISSAN
2C3JA43R25H668148

Ocala, FL 34479-2427,
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
ues. D & D TOWING OF
OCALA reserves the right
to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
SaleDate:7/14/2011 9AM




the fictitious name of:
CMG PRO SECURITY
SCHOOL
located at 3530 SW 36th
Ave., Ocala, FL 34474, in
the County of Marion, in-
tends to register the said
name with the Division of
Corporations of the Flor-


2005 CHRYSLER
2FABP43F8GX211136
1986 FORD
3D6WG46DX8G190009
2008 DODGE
3N1CB51D91L460450
2001 NISSAN
Published in the Riverland
News, June 30, 2011.


1998 WEL VIN #
WELFUA97G798
SaleDate:7/19/2011 9AM
1990 CHEV VIN#
1GNCS18Z8L8147938
Published in the Riverland
News, June 30, 2011.






ida Department of State,
Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Daytona
Beach, FL, this 22 day of
June,2011.
/s/ Russell Faber
Owner
Published in Citrus County
Chronicle, June 30, 2011.


219-0707 RIV
To: Robert M. Hawkins Jr. 11-1337-CA-B Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR MARION COUNTY CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 11-1337-CA-B
GREEN TREE SERVICING, L.L.C.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CONNIE J. HAWKINS; ROBERT M. HAWKINS, JR; ARROW FINANCIAL SERVICES, LLC, as
assignee of Conseco; JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, Unknown Tenant(s).
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Robert M. Hawkins, Jr.
3060 SW 95th Place, Ocala, Florida 34476
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Mortgage Foreclosure and Damages has
been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to:
Sean V. Donnelly, Esq., 3708 W. Euclid Avenue, Tampa, FL 33629
on or before a date which is within (30) days after the first publication of the notice
and file the original with the Clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs) at-
torney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
The property proceeded against is described as follows:
Lot 10, Block K, of LEIGHTON ESTATES, as per plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book "H,"
Pages 28 through 28A, of the Public Records of Marion County, Florida
Together with that certain manufactured home more specifically described as:
2002 Skyline/Oak Haven (32 x 80) with Serial Number G2620310 PA & PB.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on June 17, 2011
David R. Ellspermann, Clerk of the Court
(SEAL)
By: N. Hernandez, Deputy Clerk
Published in Riverland News, June 30 & July 7, 2011.

220-0707 RIV
To: Connie J. Hawkins 11-1337-CA-B Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR MARION COUNTY CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 11-1337-CA-B
GREEN TREE SERVICING, L.L.C.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CONNIE J. HAWKINS; ROBERT M. HAWKINS, JR; ARROW FINANCIAL SERVICES, LLC, as
assignee of Conseco; JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, Unknown Tenant(s).
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Connie J. Hawkins
3060 SW 95th Place, Ocala, Florida 34476
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Mortgage Foreclosure and Damages has
been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to:
Sean V. Donnelly, Esq., 3708 W. Euclid Avenue, Tampa, FL 33629
on or before a date which is within (30) days after the first publication of the notice
and file the original with the Clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs) at-
torney or immediately thereafter otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
The property proceeded against is described as follows:
Lot 10, Block K, of LEIGHTON ESTATES, as per plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book "H,"
Pages 28 through 28A, of the Public Records of Marion County, Florida
Together with that certain manufactured home more specifically described as:
2002 Skyline/Oak Haven (32 x 80) with Serial Number G2620310 PA & PB.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on June 17, 2011
David R. Ellspermann, Clerk of the Court
(SEAL)
By: N. Hernandez, Deputy Clerk
Published in Riverland News, June 30 & July 7, 2011.


MATURE TEEN GIRL
Babysit her home.
10hrs/$20 per child.
(352)489-9144


oDsuEE


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Noce


Sl oa


Sl oa


Foc ur ae


Focour ae


Foclsura le/
Acdon odcesI


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. Nod




Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011 - 17


S4m:=


HND OUT THE VALUE OF YOUR TRADE!
NO MATTER WHERE YOU
PLAN TO BUY!
CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:

800440=9054


'11 ALTIMA
RE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE nWr INO AND SPECIALPRICG
1-800-584-8755 Ext 11329
$16,999,281 M


'11 CAMARO
FRE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE W INF) AND SPECIAL PRICG
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11317
21, 999 AP364ER



'10 CR-V
RE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WIm IN) AND SPECIAL PRICG
1-800-584-8755 Ext11132
15,999^ o265


'10 SONATA
FREE 24 HR RECORMDB MESSAGE W Ii INMO AND SPECIAL P
1-800-584-8755 Ext16829
'11,999ol19 9^P



'10 ELANTRA
RE 24 HR RECORDBE MESAGE Win IN) AND SPECI PRICIG
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16841
*1 0,999^ 182M


A


'11 SONATA
RHE 24 HR RECORDED IN AiE WmII IN) AND SEIAL PIi
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16828
$16,999 P281ER



'10 CHARGER
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WIIN FO AND SPECIAL PIRNG
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16821
16,999^ 281^APER
16.99S912SMs


'10 AVENGER
FREE 24 R RECORDED MESSAGE WMM MFO AND SPECIAL PICKING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16794
$15,999 ^265AP


'10 RAM
FREE 24 R RECORDED MESSAGE WMI MFO AD SPECIAL PRNG
1-800-584-8755 Ext11147
$11,999 199 PER.


I=


'11 CRUZE
FRH 24 IR RECODDB IMISAGE WH INI AND SPECIAL PRICG
1-800-584-8755 Ext 11266
$15,999R265M.


'10 EXPLORER
RE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE MI NFO AND SPECIAL PRICIN
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16717
*15,999 '265 5


'10 CALIBER
RE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE W I MFO AND SPECIAL PIING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16681
*12999 521 5P



'10 JOURNEY
REE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE W MFO ND SPECIAL PRIING
1-800-584-8755 Ext11266
$13,999 232O.



'10 COBALT
FREE 24 HR RECORD MESSAGE Wi INFO AND SPIIAL PRICIN
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16672
9,999 ^ O1P66ER
$9,9999 ORl 66MO.


[0


^All prices and payment exclude, tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. Prices and payments include $2999.00
down cash or trade equity. Payments are for 6 years at 5.99% APR with approved credit.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock


'10 EQUINOX
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WII MFR AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.10267
$18,999o31 5 AP
189 OR' 1


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18 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 30,2011


llNJl


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2011 NITRO


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2077 Highway 44W Inverness, FL
14358 Cortez Blvd Brooksville, FL


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