Riverland news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100090/00059
 Material Information
Title: Riverland news
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Dunnellon FL
Dunnellon, FL
Publication Date: 06-23-2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Dunnellon (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Marion -- Dunnellon
 Notes
General Note: "The newspaper built on community pride."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 14, no. 36 (Apr. 11, 1996).
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 34953283
lccn - sn 96027433
System ID: UF00100090:00059

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Riverland


SERVING DUNNELLON AND RAINBOW SPRINGS





News


Thursday, June 23, 2011


Vol 29 No. 36


Seafood Jam and
Festival Saturday
The fifth annual
Seafood Jam and Festi-
val of Dunnellon will
be from noon until
dark Saturday June 25,
at Gene Martin Park in
Dunnellon on West
Gene Martin Lane. For
more information, call
(352) 286-9090.
Friends Book Store
to host July sale
Beginning Friday,
July 1, the Friends of
the Dunnellon Public
Library Book Store will
begin a store-wide half-
price sale throughout
the month of July. Store
hours are from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday and
10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sat-
urdays. The Friends
Book Store (inside the
Library), is at 20351
Robinson Road (just
behind Sweetbay) in
Dunnellon. For more
information, call 489-
2520.
Summer Programs
available at the library
The Dunnellon Pub-
lic Library invites stu-
dents in kindergarten
through fifth grade to
join the "One World,
Many Stories" summer
reading club. Partici-
pates can keep track of
the books they have
read and have the op-
portunity to win free
books throughout the
summer.
The first special
guest program, 9th Pe-
riod Show, will be at 2
p.m. Friday, June 24.
The library will also
offer teen programs. A
calendar of events is
available at the library.
For further informa-
tion, call the Youth
Services Department at
438-2526.
Sheriff's office
in need of volunteers
The Marion County
Sheriff's Office is in
need of clerical volun-
teers to answer the
phone for lunch
breaks.
If you are interested,
stop in the Dunnellon
District Office at 19995
S.W 86th St., the com-
plex with the DMV and
Fire Station at the
blinking light on U.S.
41, and pick up a volun-
teer application.
For more informa-
tion, call Debbie Pollic
at 402-6050 from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Annie Johnson
to host July event
Annie Johnson Sen-
ior & Family Service
Center Inc. will host
Christmas from July 5
to 30. The event, which
benefits the Migrant
Children's Camp, is in
need of donations of
toys. Items will be ac-
cepted at the Annie
Johnson Thrift Store,
Senior Center, Dunnel-
lon Chamber of Com-
merce and Vernon
Martin Salon.


Riverland

News
20441 E Pennsylvania Ave.
Dunnellon, FL 34432


Riverland News

VISIT US:
www.riverlandnews.com
CALL US:
489-2731


II II II II I I


6 I U11845 3 !11 4


Man charged with sex crime


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News

An 18-year-old Dunnellon
man was charged Thursday,
June 16, with lewd and las-
civious battery on a child
younger than 16, but older
than 12 years old Thursday,


Cody Cooke's bond set at $20k


June 16, when Citrus County
Sheriff's Office deputies
served a warrant issued by
the Dunnellon Police De-
partment.
According to the arrest re-
port, Cody Alan Cooke said


he met the victim through
Facebook a year and half
ago.
On May 9, the girl told au-
thorities she and Cooke had
consensual sex three to four
months ago in the woods be-


Rising in rank


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
Sgt. Jacob Gonzalez is all smiles during his swearing-in ceremony, signifying his recent pro-
motion. The Dunnellon High graduate will celebrate his six-year anniversary with the depart-
ment in July.

Gonzalez receives promotion; earns countywide award


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
For Jacob Gonzalez, his ca-
reer with the Dunnellon Police
Department has witnessed a
steady rise through the ranks
and well-deserved accolades
and recognition from peers and
the community
He can add two more to his
list of achievements.
Gonzalez, a Dunnellon High
graduate, recently passed both
his written and oral boards,
earning the promotion to ser-
geant.
"The opportunities have
come; I wasn't expecting it to
be this quick," he said of reach-
ing the rank of sergeant. "I've
definitely proven myself. I'd
say working with Chief
(Joanne) Black has helped and,
in the short time, working with
Lt. (Sue) Webb has helped too."
Gonzalez, who had been act-
ing sergeant since 2010, said he
looks forward to the challenge,
knowing his co-workers will
help in the transition.
"They're a great group of
people; they follow me, I have
no problems," he explained.
"They've been supportive of
the promotion. I've actually
had the opportunity of training
each officer individually.
"This position carries a lot of


special to me Hiverlana News
Sgt. Gonzalez pauses for a
photo opportunity after win-
ning the Bill Rutherford Award.
responsibility, which Chief
Black has been preparing me
for. I'd like to thank her and the
city of Dunnellon for giving me
this opportunity"
Black, who has worked with
Gonzalez since he joined the
department, said she's proud of
his accomplishments and rise
through the ranks. Most impor-
tantly, she said, is his growth as
a person.
"Sergeant is a very demand-
ing position," she explained.
"It's the backbone of the de-


apartment, because there is so
much responsibility. I believe
he's ready for the challenge;
I've really seen him grow so
much as a person since he's
first come here."
In addition to the newest
stripe on his uniform, Gonzalez
earned another impressive dis-
tinction.
The almost 6-year veteran of
the Dunnellon Police Depart-
ment was named the inaugural
Bill Rutherford Award winner
at the Impaired Driving Educa-
tion and Victims Services
(IDEAVS) second annual DUI
Law Enforcement Apprecia-
tion and Volunteer Recognition
Dinner.
As part of the criteria for con-
sideration was the amount of
DUI arrests were made and
their community involvement.
During 2010, Gonzalez made 14
arrests for DUIs and was heav-
ily involved in a variety of com-
munity activities, including the
Special Olympics Torch Run.
"It meant a great deal to me,
because I dedicated myself last
year to preventing and arrest-
ing as many DUI suspects as I
could," he explained. "I have
worked a few DUI crashes in
the city of Dunnellon. I've also
spoke to victims or family mem-
See RANK page 3


hind Dunnellon Middle
School (Nine Island Cove),
which is within the city lim-
its, the report stated.
The report stated the vic-
tim told her relative that she
and Cooke were going to
hang out at the McDonald's
See CRIME page 13



Y'Town,


WAR aim


to stop


Tarmac

Residents want
mine decision
overtured
LOU ELLIOTT JONES
For the Riverland News
YANKEETOWN - The
town of Yankeetown and
the Withlacoochee Area
Residents are separately
asking a judge to overturn
the Levy County Commis-
sion's approval of a con-
ditional special
exception permit for the
proposed Tarmac King
Road mining project near
Inglis.
Yankeetown is petition-
ing for a writ of certiorari,
basically a review of the
commissioners' decision
to grant the exception,
while the Withlacoochee
group is asking for an in-
junction on the grounds
the approval is inconsis-
tent with the county's own
Comprehensive Plan on
environmentally sensitive
lands.
A hearing has been set
on the Yankeetown peti-
tion for July 20 by 8th Ju-
dicial Circuit Judge
Robert Rountree Jr. No
date has been set for the
WAR suit.
The County Commis-
sion voted 3-1 to approve
a special exception per-
mit May 17, allowing min-
ing of hard limerock on
2,757 acres of a 4,750-acre
site for 110 years. The
rock will be mined to
depths of 120 feet by
blasting and water-dredg-
ing. About 6 million tons
of rock per year will be
removed, leaving behind
more than 20 lakes sur-
rounded by berms.
The public hearing and
approval came even
though the proposal has
yet to receive a permit
from the Army Corps of
Engineers. The mining
company applied for the
permit in 2007 and the
Corps is expected to re-
lease a draft Environmen-
tal Impact Statement
later this year.
In the petition, Yankee-
town claims the county
commission violated its
own ordinances:
* that require all fed-
eral, state and local per-
mits be obtained before
See TARMAC page 12


GET THE SCOOP, OR TWO, AT FLAVORS


New ice cream parlor opens in Historic District


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
Dunnellon has a little
flavor.
To be more precise,
it's getting 16 as Flavors
Ice Cream Parlor is now
in the business of serv-
ing up ice cream at
20600 W Pennsylvania
Ave.
And for 18-year-old
Ashley Popp, it means


she'll be getting an edu-
cation in real-world
business before she
starts her collegiate
studies in the fall at the
College of Central
Florida.
This is no ordinary
business venture for the
recent Dunnellon High
School graduate, in part
because it is a part of
her 18th birthday and
graduation presents as


her parents, Chris and
Candace Johnson, pur-
chased the necessary
business licenses and
equipment she needed
to start her career.
At first, she thought
she was getting a new
car for her birthday,
prior to her parents un-
veiling the surprise at
her birthday party.
"Actually, I never
thought I would open a


business at this age,"
said Popp, who will at-
tend classes at the Col-
lege of Central Florida
with hopes to pursue a
career as a nuclear x-
ray technician. "I was
pretty excited when they
told me, so I got up and
See SCOOP page 2

Ashley Popp serves up
an ice cream cone dur-
ing the opening of Fla-
vors Ice Cream Parlor.
JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News


75 cents





2 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011


Feathered friends


Good deed

helps owls

MICHEL NORTHSEA
For the Riverland News
Country Club Estates
resident Jim Van Gilder
knows how to talk to
owls.
It's a talent he mas-
tered when he found
their nest on the ground
near his home in April.
Wanting the best out-
come for the young
birds still in the nest,
he contacted an owl
rescue group and they
suggested he build a
platform and move the
nest to the platform.
So Van Gilder went to
work and quickly built a
12-foot-high platform to
accommodate the nest.
The theory was that
the mother of the young
great horned owls
would find her off-
spring and resume car-
ing for them.
And that's what hap-
pened during the first
night the nest was back
in the air. Van Gilder
and his wife, Carol,
could hear the young
shriek for their mother
and her answering
sounds.
Once the mother
found her offspring, the
father came back, too.
"During the day, one
of the parents was al-
ways there," Van Gilder
said referring to the re-
located nest.
The owl's presence
didn't keep Van Gilder
from climbing a ladder
to get a first-hand peak
into the nest. One time
he saw a half-eaten
snake. Another time it
was a squirrel the
young ones were demol-
ishing.
With the great horned
owl, the bird has the
ability to take prey two
or three times bigger
than themselves.
Van Gilder got used to
hearing the owls talk to
each other with their
"eh-eh-eh-eh" and
"hooh-hooh-hooh's"
until one of the owls
left the nest.
An owlet will leave
the nest to "roam"
around some when it is
6 to 7 weeks old. It isn't


Special to the Riverland News
ABOVE: Two juvenile great horned owls look up from their relocated nest.
BELOW RIGHT: The great horned owl spends time jumping around from branch
to branch nears its nest in preparation for flying. Rainbow Springs resident Jim
Van Gilder built a platform to accommodate a nest with two owlets. The young
ones got used to Van Gilder's presence.


until the young one is
almost 10 weeks old be-
fore they fly well. Even
when they first leave
the nest as "branchers"
- because they are
roaming from branch to
branch in preparation
for flying - they are fed
for another week or two
by the parents before
they are weaned.
Although one of the
two owlets jumped out
on what Van Gilder said
he thought was the
right time, one didn't.
Owls have the ability
to lay eggs a week
apart, Van Gilder
learned. He suspects
the one that left the
nest earlier was the
older of the two.
Still, when the second
owl started moving
around the branches,
Van Gilder realized he
wasn't moving far or as
progressing as fast as
his sibling had in its de-
velopment, so he made
another phone call to
the owl rescue group.
He was concerned the
owlet had injured a
wing when the nest fell.
The owl rescue peo-
ple offered assurances
that the owl was fine.
Had it not been, the


owls themselves would
have killed the one with
the defect, he was told.
Noticing the owl hop-
ping around on the
ground days later, Van
Gilder decided to place
a ladder against one of
the of the trees in
hopes the owl would fly
from one of the rungs.
Van Gilder then saw the
bird climbing up a few
rungs of the ladder.
Early one morning,
Van Gilder heard the
mother owl clicking the
beak of her young one.
"It seems she was try-
ing to get it to move,"
Van Gilder said.
It must have worked,


because the last young
one is gone from the
nest.
The Van Gilders may
never see the young
ones again. Juvenile
great horned owls may
travel as far as 150
miles before they find a
new home.
However, the parents
the Van Gilders may see
again. The owls don't
build their own nest, but
take over an unoccupied
nest. Once they use a
nest, they often return
to the same nest for as
many as eight years.
Van Gilder plans on
leaving up the platform
and the nest to see what
happens next year.
In the meantime, he
and Carol are empty
nesters - again.
Michel Northsea is
the editor of the West
Marion Messanger, a sis-
ter newspaper of the
Riverland News.


'Operation Dry Water'


slated this weekend


Special to the
Riverland News
Last year, 17 people died
from boating accidents re-
lated to alcohol and drug
use in Florida.
"Alcohol- and drug-re-
lated boating accidents are
preventable," said Capt.
Tom Shipp, of the FWC's
Boating and Waterways
Section. "Even one death is
too many."
That is why law enforce-
ment agencies around the
state and country are par-
ticipating in "Operation
Dry Water" this weekend.
This nationwide public-ed-
ucation effort is designed
to prevent alcohol-related
accidents and fatalities.
FWC officers, along with
local law enforcement and
the U.S. Coast Guard, will
crack down on boating
under the influence (BUI)
violations.
"While our officers al-
ways look for BUIs," Shipp
said, "this weekend, they
are making a special effort
to stop this dangerous ac-
tivity."
2009 was the inaugural
year for this effort, and the
program's effectiveness
made repeating it worth-
while. Last year, agencies
in all 50 states and six U.S.
territories participated, in-
teracting with more than
60,000 boaters and taking
322 impaired operators off
the water before they could
kill or injure themselves or
someone else. The FWC
alone arrested 12 boaters
for BUI.
"We know that increased
officer effort reduces boat-
ing accidents and saves
lives. Saving lives is what

SCOOP
continued from page 1
sang a song - "I Hope You
Dance" - for my mom dur-
ing karaoke and then she
got up and sang with me. At
the end, we were both cry-
ing."
The shop is open from 10
a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. The
store takes cash only. It
also plans on hosting Kids
Night on Tuesdays. For
more information about
Kids Night, call (352) 229-
7916.
She said throughout the
summer months, she'll be
manning the store. When
school starts in August, her
mom will take over daily
duties so Popp can focus on
her studies. However, on
the weekends, she'll return
to serve up the frozen
treats.
Of course, Popp said
she's nervous about her
first business venture.
"I don't know how well
we'll do," she explained. "I


'Operation Dry Water' is
really all about," Shipp
said.
The FWC reminds
boaters to be careful this
weekend. Boaters who
have had too much to
drink or who are impaired
by drugs are a great dan-
ger to the boating public.
"Being under the influ-
ence of alcohol or drugs
impairs a boat operator's
vision and reaction time,"
Shipp said. "Sun, wind, fa-
tigue and other conditions
can intensify the effects
alcohol or drugs have on a
boater."
Intoxicated boaters are
also susceptible to in-
juries or falling overboard
because of impaired coor-
dination and balance.
"If you're caught boat-
ing under the influence,
you may be fined and
jailed, your boat may
seized, and you could lose
your boating privileges,"
Shipp said. "But most im-
portantly, you are risking
your life, the lives of your
passengers and the lives
of other people out on the
water."
The FWC reminds
boaters that they are re-
sponsible for making deci-
sions that keep themselves
and others safe.
"We want everyone to
have a great time and stay
safe on the water," Shipp
said. "Carelessly choosing
to operate a boat while im-
paired is a decision that
can result in a tragic end-
ing to an otherwise won-
derful day on the water."
For more information,
visit www.operationdry
waterorg or MyFWC.com/
Boating.

have to worry about how
customers react to the
place."
If business is strong,
Popp said, plans would be
to add 16 additional flavors
of ice cream and perhaps
add a bakery so they can
offer more homemade
treats. Not only does Fla-
vors offer the traditional
ice cream cones or dishes
of it, but they offer shakes
and banana splits.
"Our prices are pretty
good," Popp said, adding
coffee and muffins are also
available.
The vibrant teen isn't
worried about not being
able to enjoy the summer
with her friends. She said
her mom has offered to give
her a weekend off here and
there to catch a break.
"My dedication is to my
business," she explained.
"My friends actually think
me running my own busi-
ness is pretty cool."
Just as cool as the treats
she's serving customers.


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Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011 - 3


Sheriff's office seeks


re-accredited status


Special to the
Riverland News
OCALA -A team of as-
sessors from the Commis-
sion for Florida Law
Enforcement Accredita-
tion (CFA) will arrive July
21 (at MCSO Central Op-
erations) to examine spe-
cific aspects of the
Marion County Sheriff's
Office policies and proce-
dures, management, op-
erations and support
services, Sheriff Ed Dean
announced.
Since the agency is al-
ready nationally accred-
ited through the
Commission on Accredi-
tation for Law Enforce-
ment Agencies (CALEA),
it only has to comply with
84 additional Florida-
based standards in order
to receive state re-ac-
credited status. A copy of
the standards is available
through the Performance
Imperative's Unit at (352)
369-6831.
For more information
regarding CFA or for per-
sons wishing to offer writ-
ten comments about the
Marion County Sheriff's
Office's ability to meet
the standards of accredi-
tation, write: CFA, 3504
Lake Lynda Drive, Suite
380, Orlando, FL, 32817.
The Accreditation Pro-
gram Manager for the
Marion County Sheriff's


Office is Lt. Jeff Owens.
He said the assessment
team is composed of law
enforcement practition-
ers from similar agen-
cies. The assessors will
review written materials;
interview individuals;
and visit offices and
other places where com-
pliance can be wit-
nessed. The CFA
Assessment is comprised
of Team Leader Chief
Ron Cave of the Florida
Department of Environ-
mental Protection and
team members Marc
Beaulieu of the Oviedo
Police Department and
Nicholas Haupt of the
Boca Raton Police De-
partment.
Once the Commission's
assessors complete their
review of the agency, they
report back to the full
Commission, which will
then decide if the agency
is to receive re-accred-
ited status. The Marion
County Sheriff's Office's
re-accreditation is for
three years. Verification
by the team that the Mar-
ion County Sheriff's Of-
fice meets the
Commission's standards
is part of a voluntary
process to gain or main-
tain accreditation - a
highly prized recognition
of law enforcement pro-
fessional excellence,
Sheriff Ed Dean said.


Marion County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
* Silias E Deaton, 18,
Ocala, on June 18, on a
charge of simple domestic
battery.
* Brad Gary Vankesteren,
34, Ocala, on a charge of pos-
session of marijuana, less
than 20 grams.
* Jamison Tyler
Youngstrom, 19, Ocala, on
charges of possession of mar-
ijuana, less than 20 grams,
and tampering with evi-
dence.
* Robert Edward Penrose,
46, Ocala, on June 13, on a
charge of resisting arrest
without violence.
* Larry Dale Sanders, 55,
Dunnellon, on June 5, on a
charge of aggravated domes-
tic battery.
* Crispin Martinez Her-
nandez, 29, Ocala, on June 4,
on charges of fleeing and
eluding, driving while li-
cense suspended or revoked
and resisting arrest without
violence.
* Jarrett Allen Vining, 35,
Dunnellon, on June 3, on a
charge of driving while li-
cense suspended or revoked.
* Alferd Christian
Howard, 59, Ocala, on May
28, on a charge of driving
under the influence.
* Georgia Ann Hamilton,
27, Ocala, on May 27, on a
charge of driving under the
influence.
Burglaries
* An investigation on June
19 revealed a burglary oc-
curred between June 17 and
18 in the 13400 block of
Southwest 95th Street, Dun-
nellon.
* An investigation on June
17 revealed a burglary oc-
curred in the 5900 block of
Southwest 121st Terrace,
Ocala.
* An investigation on June
17 revealed a burglary oc-
curred in the 13900 block of
Southwest 85th Place, Dun-
nellon.
* An investigation on June
17 revealed a burglary oc-
curred in the 5400 block of
Southwest 138th Terrace,


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Dunnellon.
*An investigation on June
16 revealed a burglary oc
curred June 16 in the 12800
block of Southwest 91st
Lane, Dunnellon.
*An investigation on June
15 revealed a burglary oc-
curred June 15 in the 2300
block of North U.S. 41, Dun-
nellon.
*An investigation on June
15 revealed a burglary oc-
curred June 15 in the 10100
block of Southwest 135th
Court, Dunnellon.
*An investigation on June
15 revealed a burglary oc-
curred between May 30 and
June 15 in the 4100 block of
Southwest 178th Terrace,
Dunnellon.
*An investigation on June
11 revealed a burglary oc-
curred June 11 in the 8600
block of Southwest 190th Av-
enue Road, Dunnellon.
* An investigation on June
11 revealed a burglary oc-
curred between June 9 and
10 in the 11400 block of
Southwest 61st Place Road,
Ocala.
SAn investigation on June
9 revealed a burglary oc-
curred in the 5200 block of
Southwest 181st Court, Dun-
nellon.
* An investigation on June
8 revealed a burglary oc-
curred in the 2200 block of
Southwest Moines Court,
Dunnellon.
* An investigation on June
8 revealed a burglary oc-
curred in the 14100 block of
Southwest 20th Place, Ocala.
* An investigation on June
6 revealed a burglary oc-
curred in the 12100 block of
Southwest 66th Street,
Ocala.


RANK
continued from page 1

bers of victims whose
family members have
died as a result of DUI
crashes."
Gonzalez said the
agency's role in educat-
ing the public about the
severity of such offenses
is important, as noted by
a part of the criteria.
"We try to prevent them
before they even occur,
by speaking to local
schools, giving promo-
tional material to the
bars and tell people what
the consequences of driv-
ing under the influence
are."
In addition to educa-
tional aspect, the Dun-
nellon Police
Department has also
ramped up its check-
points or its participation
in area checkpoints. In
2010, Dunnellon con-
ducted five DUI check-
points and participated
in another three outside
of city limits.
Black, who nominated
Gonzalez for the distinc-
tion, said she knew he
had a chance to win, but
also realized the compe-
tition was tough.
"It's an honor for him
and our agency," she
said.
IDEAVS, which was
founded in 2009 and
sponsored the Bill
Rutherford Award, works
with the Belleview, Dun-


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
Sgt. Jacob Gonzalez takes the oath of office during his swearing-in promotion
while his daughter, Bella, and his fiance, Monica Barr, watch as Chief Joanne
Black guides Gonzalez through the oath.


nellon and Ocala police
departments, along with
the Florida Highway Pa-
trol, Marion County Sher-
iffs Office, Florida
Department of Trans-
portation and the Florida
Department of Fish &
Wildlife.
"We take it upon our-
selves to spread the
word, so that Marion
County knows that reck-
lessness is not tolerated
on our roadways," said
Anita Kinsler, Chairman
of IDEAVS. "We will re-
main dedicated to the
many families whose
lives are affected, and
provide them the support
they need to pick up the
pieces."
During the apprecia-
tion dinner the following
law enforcement profes-


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sionals were acknowl-
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Representing Marion
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Gary Miller, Micah
Moore, Alan Jones,
Yobanny Valdez, Crystal
Sollazzo, Steve Simpson,
Nicholas Frost and Peter
Casey
Representing Ocala Po-
lice Department -
William Joedicke, Dan
Wright and Ryan Holland.
Representing Florida
Highway Patrol - Shaun
Lattinville.


During 2010, the above
law enforcement pros ar-
rested a total of 424 peo-
ple for driving under the
influence.
This nonprofit organi-
zation is constantly work-
ing with local law
enforcement in identify-
ing impaired drivers on
our neighborhood streets.
"Our volunteers are
moms, dads, sisters,
brothers, aunts, uncles,
cousins and concerned
citizens, who work dili-
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Riverland News
A member of the Florida Press Association
352-489-2731
352-489-6593 (Fax)
The Riverland News serves Dunnellon and the surrounding areas: Blue
Cove, Chatmire, Hills of Ocala, Lake Tropicana, Rainbows End, Rainbow
Lakes Estates, All the Rainbow Springs Area, Rio Vista and Vogt Springs.
The Riverland News is delivered on Thursday to subscribers by our
carriers and mail. The newspaper is also available inside area stores
and at various boxes throughout the community. Local subscription rate
is $27 a year. Call for Florida and out-of-Florida rates.
The Riverland News is published in Dunnellon, FL by Citrus Publishing,
Inc., 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429-5760.
CALL 489-2731
For Information On Subscriptions,
Display Advertising And Business & Church Directory Ads.
TO SUBMIT NEWS ITEMS EMAIL TO:
editor@riverlandnews.com
NEWS DEADLINE IS NOON FRIDAY.
News items about happenings at area churches and clubs, school and
sporting activities, military promotions, announcement of births,
anniversaries, engagements, weddings, first and 90+ birthdays, and
similar community news items are accepted for publication.
PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT DUNNELLON, FL.
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #681-730
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to:
RIVERLAND NEWS,
20441 E. PENNSYLVANIA AVE.
DUNNELLON, FL 34432-6035


Swearing-in


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
Alexis Williams, left, is sworn in by Police Chief Joanne Black as a evidence custodian/dispatcher
for the Dunnellon Police Department. Black said Williams' role is temporary as she fills in for Lori
Shettleroe, who is fighting lung cancer. At center is Michael Anger.


ImOIE REPORTS.


Whether
you're a
subscriber or
you picked
up a copy
from your
local
newsstand,
we just want

to say ...


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4 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011


RIVERLAND NEWS

"The Newspaper built on Community Pride."
Publisher - Gerry Mulligan
^iv er v iews -Regional Manager - John Provost
Editor - Jeff Bryan
Member of the Florida Press Association


GUEST


COLUMN


Recent letter to the editor contained inaccuracies


There has been so many letters to
the editor in reference to red-
light cameras in Dunnellon.
Every person has the right to
voice their opinion, which we,
as a city have always encour-
aged.
I read one of the recent let-
ters submitted, and I noticed
several incorrect statements
and would like to provide the
citizens of Dunnellon with the
correct information.
On June 10, six officers, not Joann
eight officers, were scheduled Chief
for traffic court and the officers
decided to ride together in order to
save fuel and four vehicles were driven
to the courthouse. One officer left im-
mediately after court in order to return
to the city and another officer went to
the state attorney's office to file for an
arrest warrant on a case they were
working.
During traffic court, each officer tes-
tified on each violation that they re-

LETTERS

Support of Lori Shettleroe, Dunnellon
Police Department employee
I would like to thank Norm Gazaille
and Haydee Seidel from Norm's Clean
Cut for supporting one of our employ-
ees while she continues her fight
against cancer. Lori began to lose her
hair at a rapid pace and the officers
decided to shave their heads to show
Lori that she was not alone. Norm and
Haydee opened their doors and
shaved anyone who wanted to support
Lori without cost as long as they do-
nated the cost of the haircut to Lori.
Officer Miley, Officer Arnold, Officer
German, Officer Yox and Sgt. Gonzalez
along with Julio Granados and Shawn
Houle from Superior bank, Gregg
Spafford from Green Light Dunnellon
Communications and Jeff Bryan of
Riverland News met at Norms Clean
Cut and one by one their heads were
shaved. Lori who was present at the
time appreciated everyone's support
and had the opportunity to shave sev-
eral of the men's head. She said that
she felt honored to belong to such a
great community who always seems to
take care of their own.
All the guys had a great time and en-
joyed watching Lori smile and laugh
as their hair fell to the ground.
Lori received so many hugs and
kisses that she felt like a superstar.
Lori will always be a shining star in
our eyes.
Lori has recently been in and out of
the hospital and her vehicle is unable
to be repaired, therefore an account
has been opened in Lori's name at Su-
perior bank for anyone who would like
to donate to assist with medical bills
and for a replacement vehicle.
The police department has ordered
and will be selling gel bracelets for
Lung Cancer Awareness for a donation
and all proceeds will benefit Lori. The
bracelets can be picked up at the po-
lice department, Abigail's and Supe-
rior bank.
Thank you for all your support,
ChiefJoanne M. Black
Dunnellon Police Department
Greenlight comes
to Rainbow Springs
Greenlight Communications is in-
stalling fiber-optic cable at Rainbow
Springs. Greenlight Communications
is a utility owned and operated by the
city of Dunnellon. As a utility, they
have the right to access all right of
ways in the community
The Association has no authority
over the utility companies or the right
of ways. The Association did attempt
to communicate with Greenlight and
to give the members ample warning
prior to the start of the project in the
community
We have not received any communi-
cations regarding the installation of
fiber optics in the community We did
realize that at some point in time this
process would take place. If you have

See LETTERS page 8

OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in RiverlandNews
editorials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons,
columns or letters do not necessarily repre-
sent the opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to express
their opinions in a letter to the editor.
* All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including let-
ters sent via e-mail, Phone numbers will not
be printed or given out. We reserve the right
to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters to the editor must be no longer than
550 words, and writers will be limited to two
letters per month.


e
of


viewed. The city attorney is not present
to represent the city during these court
proceedings unless needed, which
would be an additional cost to
the city.
I can assure the citizens that
while these officers were in
Ocala at traffic court, the streets
of Dunnellon had continuous
police presence as the chief of
police was working the road
and handling calls for service.
Another officer was scheduled
Black for duty in the afternoon and
fPolice was available to provide assis-
tance if needed.
The department is in need of addi-
tional officers, but the Dunnellon Po-
lice Department always provides the
best professional service to the citizens
of Dunnellon and its visitors.
When the court proceedings begin,
the Hearing Officer advised every one
of their options and what fines could be
assessed. This provides the people a
better understanding of what is to be


THE OTHER


here I was laughing as Jacob Gon-
zalez lost his hair. Aaron German
wasn't so sure about how this was
unfolding, so Jacob and I did what
any red-blooded American male
would do in this situation. We bul-
lied him into it, told him it was
just hair and it would grow back.
After Norm Gazaille and Hayee
Seidel at Norm's Barbershop had
plowed their way through most of
the male officers at the Dunnellon .
Police Department and Julio Jeff
Granados and Shawn Houle from Ef
Superior Bank, my number was
up and there was no escaping it.
I handed the camera off, glanced in the
direction of Bruce "Robbie" Arnold and
asked Norm to pass the clippers off to
him.
Funny, I consider Robbie to be a friend.
However, even this Marine was taking
way too much pleasure in buzzing my
locks off. Thankfully, Norm finished the
job. I'm not quite sure if allowing Robbie
to finish the job, what message he would


expected if the violation is not dis-
missed.
The Hearing Officer called several
names and their citations were dis-
missed prior to the beginning of the
court proceedings. Only two of the
names that were called were from the
Dunnellon city limits and the rest lived
in Georgia, Morriston, north of the Dun-
nellon city limits, Ocala and Chiefland,
to name a few.
Some of the violations were dis-
missed at the request of American Traf-
fic Solutions (ATS) due to the citation
being sent to the owner even after the
owner paid the fine for the Notice of Vi-
olation, and some of the other citations
were dismissed because the officer that
issued the citation no longer works at
the police department.
We do not have a policy in place to
dismiss all city resident violations, if
the officer observes a violation the vio-
lation is accepted and ATS will issue a
Notice of Violation to the owner.
If you receive a Notice of Violation


GUY


have engraved into my noggin.
Needless to say, there was quite a bit of
hair on the floor once the job was nearly
complete. There was constant
laughter as the phrase, "Let's see
what he's going to look like when
he's older."
There sure was a lot of laughter.
Most importantly was the ear-
to-ear smile on the face of Lori
Shettleroe, a 20-year employee of
the city of Dunnellon. If you
Bryan missed last week's edition of the
editor Riverland News, then you missed
out on the exact reason several
guys gathered to buzz their heads.
Lori is fighting lung cancer. She faces a
daunting task in her road to recovery.
Most importantly, she needs our help,
the community's help.
Lori is without a vehicle, dependent on
friends to drive her to and from her med-
ical appointments on a weekly basis. If
you or someone you know is selling a re-


See CUT page 8


Norm Gazaille finishes my hair cut after providing folks with a glimpse of my
future hair style.


and you were not the driver, you have
the opportunity to complete an affi-
davit and you must indicate who the
driver was during the violation. Once
ATS receives the affidavit, the Notice of
Violation is removed from the owners
name and issued to the driver.
Remember, there is only a 30-day
window for the Notice of Violation fine
to be paid, after the 30 days the Notice
of Violation is changed to a Uniform
Traffic Citation and the fine is in-
creased.
If someone receives a Notice of Vio-
lation, we suggest that you review the
still pictures and video of the violation,
the website is listed on the violation no-
tice. After reviewing the video and pic-
tures, if you feel that you did not violate
any traffic laws, you do have the right
to request a court hearing at which
time a court date will be scheduled.
While in court you have the right to be
heard in court.

See GUEST page 12

TIME TO SMILE



Two for two
One more strike and I am out. My
last two Do-It-Yourself (DIY) proj-
ects have been a disaster.
When will I ever learn? I think that is
my problem.
My lust for learning is what gets me in
trouble. I am a happy girl when I learn
how to use a new tool or get to take some-
thing apart. I won't be getting any Girl
Scout badge for the mess I got myself into
this time.
My dishwasher died. You wouldn't
think that would matter to someone who
never cooks. Somehow my sink still ends
up with a lot of glasses, spoons and bowls.
I popped into our local
Sears and ordered a no
S frills washer. The bells
and whistles only mean
one more thing that will
break in the future. Why
pay extra for something
V I will never use? Satis-
fied with my purchase I
headed home.
Kathleen Normally at this point
Wallace I would call my "dear
brother Tim." He has the
unfortunate skill of being talented in
everything (electronics, carpentry, tiling,
plumbing, music, etc.)
My "dear brother Tim" is the handiest
of the handy. I didn't want to bother him
for this simple project. I have watched
enough HGTV to know you turn off the
water source and unhook the hoses. How
hard can it be to uninstall the old dish-
washer?
It was twilight when I began. This was
my first mistake. I have no lights in my
kitchen. They need to be replaced and is
on the to-do list for my "dear brother
Tim."
I looked under the sink for the valves
that need to be shut off. There are three
valves that don't have valve caps. Ding,
ding, ding! This is the warning signal I
dismissed.
I pulled out all the junk and found five
valve caps. The valve cap is what allows
you to move the valve. Okay, five caps and
only three valves. Huh? Can someone
turn that bell off I can't think.
I turned off two valves. The third one
wouldn't budge. This is the one that goes
to the dishwasher. This sucker wasn't
going to move. Huh, maybe it isn't sup-
posed to turn? WRONG!
I pulled the dishwasher out and un-
plugged it. I placed a small bowl under
the first hose that I disconnected. A
trickle of water came out. That's a good
sign, right?
The second hose was harder to get off.
Using my wrench I got that small spray of
water in the face that you see on every
sitcom. One more turn and it was a vol-
cano of scalding hot water.
Instead of grabbing the hose and facing
it into the sink I ran like a girl screaming.
Idiot, idiot, idiot. At this point you should
hear the sound of me banging my head
against the wall!
I had no clue where the main shut off
valve was. I called my neighbor Jack. He
came running over and told me to look
outside the house. By now I am the only
entrant and, therefore, the winner of a
wet T-shirt contest (a la my pink
bathrobe).
Thankfully, Jack was a gentleman and
he did not tell me I looked like a drowned
rat. Jack had out-of-state company arrive
earlier that day, so I didn't want to give
him a plumbing job.
I broke down and called my "dear
brother Tim." Mr. Fixit fixed it! I dragged
out the mop and began cleaning the flood.
This ordeal won't deter me from trying
another DIY project. I need to install a
new ceiling fan and some light fixtures.
Electrical work, how hard can that be?
What could possibly go wrong?
Did you just hear that bell go off or was
that a ringing in my ear?


If you cut it,




it will grow back




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6 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011


CHURCH EjVENTS


Catholic church launch-
ing community project
Judie Heesch, chair-
woman, along with mem-
bers of the Altar &
Rosary Society of St.
John the Baptist Catholic
Church in Dunnellon are
initiating a new program
called "Clothe the Chil-
dren."
Gently used clothing or
new clothing for children
1 year to 12 years old is
now being collected. The
church currently has a
food pantry and the Altar
& Rosary Society has set
aside a date to distribute
the clothing on the same
day the pantry is open.
This will be some time in
August.
If you would like to do-
nate clothing, you can
bring it to the church at
7525 U.S. 41 in Dunnel-
lon.


For more information,
call Heesch at 489-5954.
Baptist church to host
Wet Field Day
North Oak Baptist
Church will host a Wet
Field Day from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Saturday at its
church at the corner of
North Elkcam Boulevard
and North Citrus Springs
Boulevard in Citrus
Springs.
The event, open to chil-
dren 10 and younger, is
free. Water slides, slip
and slide, kiddie pools
and much more will be
available. Children must
be accompanied by an
adult, wearing appropri-
ate swimming attire and
bring a towel.
For more information,
call 489-1688 or 746-1500.
Christmas in July craft
show planned
The annual Altar &
Rosary Society of St.


John the Baptist Catholic
Church Christmas in July
Craft Fair will be from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
July 9, from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sunday, July 10, in
the Father Stegeman
Hall. The church is on
the corner of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40, north of
Dunnellon. For more in-
formation, call Pat at 489-
1984.
Church to host
health fair
The community is in-
vited to a free Health
Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
July 10 at Dunnellon Sev-
enth-day Adventist
Church at 7400 S. U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.
Among the items of-
fered will be a blood
drive, blood glucose test-
ing, blood pressure test-
ing, personal massage
therapy, cholesterol test-
ing, chiropractor, health


f


food samples and free
health brochures. There
will be a drawing for a
healthy foods cook book
and children's programs.
For more information,
call 465-6479.
Church of the Advent
to host VBS
The Church of the Ad-
vent, 11251 County Road
484, will present its VBS
from Aug. to 12, for chil-
dren ages 4 to 11.
To register your child,
call the church at 465-
7272 or Mrs. Florence at
566-6934.
Methodist church to
offer Saturday service
The First United
Methodist Church, just
off of State Road 40 West,


will offer a Saturday Sat-
urday Worship Service at
3 p.m. in Friendship Hall.
Casual dress; coffee and
tea will be provided dur-
ing the month of June.
Joy Lutheran to host
Vacation Bible School
Joy Lutheran Church
will host its vacation
bible school from 9 a.m.
to noon Julyl8 to 22 for
children ages 5 through
fifth grade.
This year the theme for
vacation bible school is
"Hometown Nazareth."
Registration for VBS is
available during June at
the church office. For
more information, call
the church office at 854-
4509, ext. 221. Joy


Lutheran Church is at
7045 S.W 83rd Place on
State Road 200, Ocala.
Church preps for annual
Trash to Treasure Sale
The Church of the Ad-
vent will present its an-
nual Trash to Treasure
Sale Saturday, Sept. 24.
(Rain Date will be Oct 1.)
Crafters, Flea Market
and Food Vendors are in-
vited to participate.
The church is at 11251
County Road 484, in front
of the new fire station.
For registration and in-
formation, call Al Sickle
at (352) 208-5664 or
Maryanne Brennan at
(352) 347-2428.


Anniversary announcements


65th anniversary

Mr. and Mrs. Willard "Bill and Stella" Whitacre of River Retreat in Dun-
nellon will celebrate their 65th anniversary July 6. They were married in
Newport, Ky., July 6, 1946. They lived in Dayton, Ohio, for one year and spent
the next 45 years in Galesburg and Alexis, Ill., area and moved to Florida in
1992. They had three daughters, one died in 2008, six grandchildren and six
great-grandchildren. No special celebrations planned.



50th

Anniversary

Penny and Sam
Calloway celebrated
their 50th wedding
anniversary June 10.
They were married at
the Riverside Baptist
Church in
Jacksonville, Fla., in
1961. They retired to
Rainbow Springs
after 30 years in
Naples where they
raised their two
daughters.
The Calloways have
six grandchildren -
all in south Florida
except for one grand-
son who is stationed
at Fort Riley, Kan.



Annie Johnson's Thrift Store is hosting an



ersary Celeb
Saturday,

June 25, 2011
9am - 3pm





Ai





Come in for cake
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Dinner

for Two
Prix-Fixe
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$44.95
(Sales tax and Gratuity not
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Appetizer - Choose One
Crab Stuffed Mushrooms, Mozzarella Bread Sticks,
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8 ounce Prime Rib, Beer Battered Shrimp, Grilled Ahi Tuna,
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. k .� - I . . . 7 �- - - 1 . . . - - - - - -


I





Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011 - 7


Churh aena


Lutheran church resumes
Bible study
Peace Lutheran Church
has resumed Wednesday
evening Bible study, pre-
ceded by a pot-luck meal, at
6:30 p.m.
Other opportunities for
Bible study at Peace are at
10 a.m. Wednesday and 9
a.m. Sunday.
Peace, "The Church On
The Hill," is at 7201 S. U.S.
41, 5 miles north of Dunnel-
lon.
For more information,
call the church office at
489-5881.


Hope Evangelical church
programs slated
Sunday School at Hope
Evangelical Lutheran
Church in Citrus Springs is
at 11 a.m. The adult Bible
Study is at 8 a.m. with the
worship service at 9:30. An
adult supervised nursery is
provided during the time of
worship services. Confir-
mation classes are held at
11 a.m. at the same time as
youth Sunday school.
For information, call the
Church at (352) 489-5511
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday.


Rainbow Springs church
to host LIFT ministry
Join the ladies at the
Rainbow Springs Village
Church for Ladies in Fel-
lowship Together (LIFT)
fellowship. The goal is to
LIFT one another in en-
couragement, LIFT our
missionaries in prayer and
LIFT the name of Jesus
Christ.
If childcare is desired,
call the church office for
arrangements. LIFT meets
at 7 p.m. the first Wednes-
day monthly.


For more information
about this ministry, e-mail
Cindy Greaves at
women@caringpeople.org.
Rainbow Springs Village
Church is at 20222 S.W
102nd St. Road, Dunnellon,
south of Winn Dixie and
west of U.S. 41). For more
information, contact the
church at 489-0249 or at
www.caringpeople.org.
Catholic church to host
youth Mass
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will host a
monthly Mass for teens and
young adults at 5 p.m. the
first Sunday monthly. The
Mass will feature contem-
porary Christian hymns
and homily messages.
'Forget-Me-Not' program
open to public
The First United
Methodist Church is open-
ing its "Forget-Me-Not"
Program to the community.
This is a program provided
by the church to offer four
hours of respite care for
caregivers of early demen-
tia and Alzheimer's pa-
tients. The program is also
including seniors who just
need to get out of the house
for a few hours and social-
ize with other seniors. This
program is free and meets


from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday at the church
Friendship Hall. Trained
volunteers provide activi-
ties and refreshments.
For more information,
call Grace Burks at 489-
2580 or Joey Weisbaum at
489-6963.
Church hosting Reformers
Unanimous meetings
Reformers Unanimous is
an addictions program de-
veloped from more than a
decade of experience, and
is the fastest growing faith-
based addictions program
in America. Meetings are
directed not toward a spe-
cific addiction, but toward
overcoming any addiction
through the Higher Power
that is Jesus Christ. For
more information, as well
as success testimonies, visit


the national website at
www.reformu.com. Local
meetings are at 7 p.m. Fri-
days at Riverland Baptist
Church, one mile north of
State Road 40 on U.S. 41.
Lutheran Church part of
Angel Food Ministries
Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church, 9425 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd. Citrus
Springs is part of Angel
Food Ministries. To sign up
or learn more about Angel
Food, current menu, order
food or learn of pick up
dates and time, call the
church office at 489-5511 or
Victor Kahler at 465-4182.
All orders are prepaid by
check, cash or money order.
To learn how to order using
the internet and a credit or
debit cad, call Victor
Kahler.


oJpect al lu ILU I iverlandu I wsb
FUMC Harmony Preschool had its first VPK Graduation on Saturday, June 4, at
the First United Methodist Church of Dunnellon. Pictured here are the 16 stu-
dents who graduated and their teachers


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Bldg. 500, Ste. 502 * Ocala
352-732-9844 * 854-9991
Dunnellon * 4840 S US Hwy. 41
352-732-9844 * 489-5152

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Presents Top Name Entertainment for 2011!

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The Alabama Blues Brothers
Tickets: $15-17
August 27
Goosepockets Comedy Show
Tickets: $13-15
September 6
"A Decade of Remembrance"
Honoring 9111 -
Today and Always
Tickets: $12


Tickets: $13-17
October 8
Lenny Wilson Quartet
featuring Janice Swartz
Tickets: $12
Benefitting Florida Center
for the Blind
October 22
9th Annual Craft Fair
10 a.m. - 3 p.m. * FREE EVENT
November 19


al
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Family Singers
FREE EVENT
(ticket needed for admission)
December 31
New Year's Eve Party
with Norman Lee
and Band
Champagne toast at
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DUNNELLON
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
21501 W. Highway 40
Rev. Eddie Fulford, Pastor
Sunday
Traditional Worship 8:00 AM
With Communion Each Week
Contemporary Worship 9:30 AM
Traditional Worship 11:00 AM
Nursery At All Services
Sunday School 9:30 AM & 11:00 AM
o... .. . God's .' . "i
352-489-4026
www.SharingGodsLight.org


Dunnellon
Seventh-day
Adventist Church
Welcome To Our Services

Hwy. 41 & Hwy. 40
Saturday
Sabbath School...9:30 AM
Sermon...............11:00 AM
Tuesday
Bible Study...........7:00 PM
For more information:

352-489-3455
wwwdunnellonsdachurch .cor


f Holy Faith Peace
E ikonl


I . Epicupw
Church

19924 W. Blue Cove Dr.
Dunnellon
THE REV. J. JAMES GERHART

Sunday 9:00 AM
Rite I 2nd & 4th Sunday
Rite II 1st & 3rd Sunday

489-2685
Hall Available For
\Community Functions

Nature Coast

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.




WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG


Lutheran Church
Missouri Synod
Rev. Terry L. McKee, Pastor
Sunday School & Adult Bible
Class 9:00 A.M
Sunday Worship Service
10:00 A.M
Wednesday Bible Study
10:00 A.M
Wednesday potluck & Bible
Study 6:30 PM
"The Church On The Hill"
5 miles North of Dunnellon
US Hwy 41 at Highway 40
489-5881
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org

Calvary
Baptist Temple
21841 S.W. Marine Blvd.
Rainbow Lakes Estates
Sunday
Sunday School.............9:45 a.m.
Worship Service.........11:00 a.m.
Evening Service.........5:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting...........7:00 p.m.
Every 4th Sunday......5:00 pm.
"Share, Praise & Fellowship"
Pastor Jamie Parker
352-489-8962
"Please Join Us As We
SWorship In His Name"


Pastor Shawn Cutshall
(352) 489-1788
Sunday
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Worship 11:00AM
Disciple Training 6:00 PM
(Nursery & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday


AWANA
Youth Group
Bible Study


6:30 PM
6:30 PM
7:00 PM


8'% Miles North of Dunnellon Off of
Highway 41, Left at Church Sign on
SW 5th Place

Catholic Community of
St. John the Baptist
Father Emmanuel Akalue, Pastor
MASSES
Saturday Reconciliation. .3:30 PM
Saturday Vigil................... 4:30 PM
Sunday.......8:00 AM and 10:30 AM
Sunday- Spanish................Noon
Mon. Thru Fri....................8:00 AM
Holy Days.....8:00 AM and 7:00 PM
7525 S. Highway 41, Dunnellon
352-489-3166
wwwstjohncc.com


To Advertise in the
Church Directory
Call 489-2731
For More Information


FUMC Harmony Preschool graduation


C lvs rely ntrpies Ic.EVI, LTMTEELISTIBTECO TSTan LG
ar taemrs f lisPeseyEtepissIc.Al igt rsrvd
Sceul ndpiessbjc o hng itotnoie.Rdce ice pie aefo eidns fOnTpofteSol


"For where two or three gather together in My name, there am I with them." -

GATHERINGS Matthew 18:20


GATHERINGS "'


A DIRECTORY OF AREA CHURCHES
711180


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com


Dunnellon Presbyterian Church
Jeffrey W. Welch, Pastor

20641 Chestnut Street
Corner of Chestnut & Ohio Streets
In The Historic District
489-2682
Sunday Duo
Worship ..................8:30 AM 2
Sunday School.........9:45 AM
Worship...............11:00 AM
Nursery Provided
For All Services
dunnpreschurch@bellsouth.net ---


WSfc
i.-s





8 -- Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011


LETTERS
continued from page 4
any problems with the in-
stallation around your
property, I recommend you
contact the mayor's office
or the business manager's
office of the city of Dunnel-
lon.
You will find after the or-
ange paint arrives in your
neighborhood, that early
one morning a project crew
will arrive digging holes,
stretching out orange con-
duits and all the activity of
a construction site.
I recommend you not to
get too excited because by
six o'clock the holes will be
filled in and the crews will
be doing a final cleanup.
The next day you will find a
crew repairing sod and
doing finishing touches. At
this point in time, water
any sod that was disturbed.
If you have a specific prob-
lem, you should then report
it to the city of Dunnellon.
I have been questioned
whether it is mandatory to
use this service. It is not.
The service will be compet-
ing with other communica-
tion utilities that serve the
area. Let's hope this proj-
ect goes with minimal prob-


lems for residents.
Bob Frankenfeld,
president
RSPOA
Paper has improved; story
was informative
I grew up in a small New
England town that had a
weekly newspaper, and
have been a subscriber of
the Riverland News since
moving here 12 years ago.
I just wanted to let you
know that I think the paper
has improved so much over
the past 12 years. This
week's story about Green-
light was especially well
written and most informa-
tive.
Mr. Bryan seems to be
doing a good job of staying
on top of local events and
news and is able to clearly
convey what he finds out.
Jan Salter
Dunnellon
Former lawmaker's article
straight to the point
My husband and I are
registered Democrats but
have voted for honorable
and qualified Republicans
in the past. We were totally
blown away by Nancy Ar-
genziano's write-up in Sun-
day's Citrus County
Chronicle. What a to-the-
point, straight from the
shoulder observation on


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what is wrong with today's
politics, or more accu-
rately, politicians.
We have been impressed
by Nancy's good works
since our move from Penn-
sylvania to Florida many
years ago and can honestly
say she is a true asset to the
Republican Party and our
country. We'd like to see
her go much farther in pol-
itics and, perhaps, become
our first honest, qualified
female president in the fu-
ture.
Keep up the good work
Nancy! We need more hon-
est people like you in gov-
ernment and run out of
office those politicians who
do nothing more than pro-
mote themselves and forget
that they are put in office to
do the work of the people,
not line their pockets and
pay back those who con-
tributed to their cam-
paigns.
Sincerely,
Patricia C. Hess
Dunnellon
Let's get this straight
RE: Liberals need to get
their facts straight, June 16
letter
The June 16 letter sought
to re-support the con-
tention that President
Obama is pro-Muslim, anti-
Israel and anti-American.
Several facts were offered
to support these con-
tentions, and I will assume
they were gleaned from
right-leaning sources. My
points were challenged as


factually incorrect. Let's
examine the facts offered
and see if they are accu-
rate, fair and balanced.
Obama was pronounced
pro-Muslim based on a sen-
tence in his book, "The Au-
dacity of Hope", which
reads "I will stand with the
Muslims should the politi-
cal winds shift in an ugly
direction." The sentence is
taken out of context and al-
tered from the original sen-
tence. The actual sentence
relates to immigrants who
are U.S. citizens and reads:
"They have been reminded
that the history of immigra-
tion in this country has a
dark underbelly; they need
specific assurances that
their citizenship really
means something, that
America has learned the
right lessons from the
Japanese internments dur-
ing World War II, and that I
will stand with them should
the political winds shift in
an ugly direction." The
word "Muslim" does not ap-
pear in the sentence or
even in the paragraph.
Obama was pronounced
anti-Israel for making Ne-
tanyahu wait "for hours."
One account of the March
2010 Obama and Ne-
tanyahu meeting appeared
in the Telegraph. Prior to
that meeting it was clear
that President Obama had
long wanted Israel to place
a moratorium on building
new settlements to facili-
tate a start to peace negoti-
ations.


FRIEE 6
DIAGNOSI
I^�f we on'tf~ix ou


Obama met with Ne-
tanyahu and immediately
gave him a list of 13 de-
mands to quell current
U.S.-Israeli disagreements,
including the settlement
issue. The article states
"When the Israeli prime
minister stalled, Mr. Obama
rose from his seat declar-
ing, 'I'm going to the resi-
dential wing to have dinner
with Michelle and the
girls."'
Obama stated: "I'm still
around" and "Let me know
if there is anything new."
Netanyahu then met with
his aides there in the White
House for a little over an
hour to consider a re-
sponse. Obama and Ne-
tanyahu met again that
evening and did not reach
any agreement, resulting in
no photo op or joint state-
ment.
Additionally, the Israeli
decision to pursue con-
struction of a contentious
settlement in East
Jerusalem was sprung by
Netanyahu shortly before
the meeting drawing the
president's ire.
The article also noted, "It
is not the first time that Mr.
Netanyahu has been in-
volved in a dinner-time
snub, although he is ar-
guably more used to deliv-
ering, rather than
receiving, them."
The issue of the condi-
tion of U.S. support for Is-
rael is far too complex to
discuss here, but let's note
that Israel signed the
Geneva Convention.
Article 49 forbids an oc-
cupying nation from mov-
ing its civilian population
permanently into occupied
lands - something Israel
has been doing for more
than 40 years, providing
some historical validation
for Obama's position.
In August 2010, the U.S.
agreed to an Israeli pur-
chase of 20 F-35's costing
$2.75 billion dollars, which
will be paid with U.S. mili-


IHEAj

, I Family Care
- L - Specialists

a member of OCALA HEALTH SYSTEM


June 5, 2011


Open Letter to the Community

Over the last several weeks, there has been a good deal of information shared in the
community regarding the affiliation of Family Care Specialists (FCS) with Ocala Health
System. As medical director, I want to clarify precisely why my colleagues and I chose to
become a part of Ocala Health late last year. Today, after six months of our affiliation, we
are proud to be contributing to its position as the leading healthcare provider for the
residents of greater Marion County.

We are affiliated with Ocala Health because of the quality of care that is consistently
delivered at every touch point throughout the system. It's that simple. While my fellow
physicians and I observe first-hand the exceptional treatment our patients are receiving at
Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital, it is reassuring to
know that publicly reported data available on the Hospital Compare website
(www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov) is reflecting that high caliber of care.

According to the most recent Hospital Compare Survey of Patients' Hospital Experiences (3Q09
- 2Q10), Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital lead in nine out
of ten categories that measure patient experience according to key quality topics. From how
well nurses and doctors communicate, to pain management and room cleanliness, to quietness
at night and responsiveness of staff, patients rank Ocala Health number one.

In addition, the survey results further strengthen my belief that Ocala Health is the region's
leading healthcare provider for more complex conditions including pneumonia, heart failure,
heart attack, chest pain, and surgical care. In fact, Ocala Health surpasses averages
reported statewide and nationally.

At Family Care Specialists, we recommend with confidence the services of Ocala Regional
Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital. Quality care was a driving force in
our efforts initially to join Ocala Health and continues to be today, as we work together in
treating patients and their families.

I encourage you to take a moment to visit the Hospital Compare website. Review the core
measure and patient satisfaction scores for area hospitals as reported by the Centers for
Medicaid and Medicare Services. You do have choices. Publicly reported information like
this can help you as a patient and consumer make the most informed decisions about
healthcare for you and your loved ones.

Yours in good health,



Sidney E. Clevinger, MD
Medical Director
Family Care Specialists




Ocala Regional Medical Center * West Marion Community Hospital
Family Care Specialists * Ocala Surgical Group * Advanced Imaging Centers


tary grants to Israel.
Obama's Fiscal Year 2011
budget requested $3 billion
in military aid to Israel,
continuing our $3 billion
per year in military aid to
Israel. I see Obama's ac-
tions as pro-peace and not
anti-Israel, and I am pretty
sure Netanyahu will not be
returning the aid or the F-
35's.
It is not valid to compare
a domestic border issue
like Mexico with the inter-
national border issue of Is-
rael and the Palestinians.
The Mexican border issue
orbits around the resolu-
tion of illegal immigration
and drug trafficking. The
unresolved Israeli-Pales-
tinian border issue re-
mains a long-standing
potential threat to peace in
the Middle East and the
world.
I think we are in no im-
minent danger of invasion
by Mexico. Since the end of
World War II and our as-
cent to becoming the lead-
ing world power, our
foreign policy became in-
exorably entrenched in
global affairs and will con-
tinue to be necessary due
to a world being shrunk by
communications, technol-
ogy, economics, energy and
ecological concerns.
America has assumed a
global leadership position
we cannot abrogate.
Finally, it does not make
sense to brand President
Obama anti-American on
any level. His April 6, 2009,
speech to the Turkish Par-
liament is a good illustra-
tion of his foreign policy
stance. The president's re-
marks espoused repairing
our long-standing relation-
ship with Turkey, a demo-
cratic ally in the Middle
East; seeking peace and se-
curity for Israel and Pales-
tine; resolving the current
worldwide economic crisis;
fighting extremism; and
curtailing the proliferation
of nuclear weapons.
The president stated that
"no one nation can con-
front these challenges
alone, and all nations have
a stake in overcoming
them."
The speech did acknowl-
edge our legacies of slav-
ery, the treatment of Native
Americans, the prison at
Guantanamo Bay; and our
post-9/11 use of torture.
Surely, one must agree
these are part of our his-
tory and not proud lega-
cies.
Gerard G. Meyn
Dunnellon


CUT
continued from page 4
liable vehicle at an inex-
pensive cost, please con-
tact the city or police
department and let them
know.
While I've only been in
Dunnellon for a short
time, one thing is for sure:
When it comes to one of
the town's own people, res-
idents' band together to
help pick those in need up.
This one of those times
when someone needs our
help.
If you don't personally
know Lori, you're missing
out. She's that person that
if you're having a bad day,
can lift your spirits.
Though, she's been
knocked down so to speak.
She's still positive about
her ordeal.
She's a fighter.
I say we all get in her
corner and help her fight
back.
Now, you might not be
able to contribute much,
but if you want to have
some fun while helping
her out, Norm and his co-
worker are willing to as-
sist. They've said that
anyone wanting a buzz cut
or a very short cut, no mat-
ter if you're man or
woman, they'll do it as long
as you contribute to Lori's
fund.
So I say, shave those
locks off. After all, its sum-
mertime and it's hot out


there, and it'll grow back.

Answers to Sudoku on
page 11

7 3 5 2 8 4 1 6 9
124967835
986315274
517843692
6 9 3 5 7 2 4 1 8
8 4 2 6 9 1 7 5 3
693572418
842691753
269758341
371429586
458136927





Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011 - 9


At Ocala Health System,



quality healthcare matters.

We know that there is a real difference in the quality of care provided by area hospitals - and that it matters. So when you
select a healthcare provider to treat you or a loved one, choose one that is committed to quality care ... and one that
consistently delivers on that quality care - Ocala Health.



Ocala Health ranks highest in all four hey quality measures.

Our advanced approach to quality patient care is confirmed in the most recent survey results posted on Hospital Compare
(www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov), a site created by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Hospital
Quality Alliance (HQA). Providing public access to these results makes it easier for patients and their families to make
informed healthcare decisions.


Pneumonia


OCALA
HEALTH
SYSTEM
ORMC WMCH


MUNROE
REGiONAL
MEOICAi.
CENTER


U S Average
for all
reporTing
hospitals


FL Average
lor all
repo nng
hosp-Tals


Pneumonia Patients
Assessed and Given 100% 93% 93% 96%
Pneumococcal VaccinaTion
Pneumonia Patients Whose
Iniial Emergency Room Blood
Culture Was Performed Prior To 99% 95% 96% 97%
The Administration Of The First
Hospital Dose Of Antibiotics
Pneumonia Patients Given Smoking 1 % 9 9
Cessation Advice/Counseling 100% 96% 97% 99%
Pneumonia Patients Given
Initial Antibiotic(s) within 97% 90% 95% 95%
6 Hours After Arrival
Pneumonia Patients Given
the Most Appropriate 98% 91% 92% 94%
Initial Antibiotic(s)
Pneumonia Patients
Assessed and Given 99% 97% 91% 95%
Influenza Vaccination


Heart Attack/Chest Pain
OCALA
HEALTH
SYSTEM
ORhIMC'MCH


MUNROE
REGIONAL
MEDICAL
CENTER


uS Average
for all
reporting
hosprials


FL Average
for all
reporn.ng
hospitals


Heart Attack Patients Given 100% 98% 99% 99%
Aspirin at Arrival
Heart Attack Patients Given 99% 98% 98% 99%
Aspirin at Discharge
Heart Attack Patients
Given ACE Inhibitor or 99% 96% 96% 97%
ARB for Left Ventricular
Systolic Dysfunction (LVSD)
Heart Attack Patients Given
Smoking Cessation 100% 100% 99% 100%
Advice/Counseling
Heart AttackPatients Given 100% 98 98% 99%
Beta Blocker at Discharge
Heart Attack Patients Given
Fibrinolytic Medication 0 t 0t 55% 67%
Within 30 Minutes Of Arrival
Heart Attack Patients
Given PCI Within 90 Minutes 96% 86% 90% 91%
Of Arrival


Surgical Care Improvement Project
OCALA
HEALTH
SYSTEM
ORMC/WMCH


MUNROE
REGIONAL
MEDICAL
CENTER


U.S. Average
for all
reporting
hospitals


FL Average
for all
reporting
hospitals


Outpatients having surgery who got an antibiotic at the
right time- within one hour before surgery (higher 97% 89% 92% 93%
numbers are better)
Outpatients having surgery who got the right kind of
antibiotic (higher numbers are better) 98 % 89 O 94 % 94 %
Surgery patients who were taking heart drugs called
beta blockers before coming to the hospital, who were
kept on the beta blockers during the period just before 99% 89% 93% 95%
and after their surgery
Surgery patients who were given an antibiotic at the
right time (within one hour before surgery) to help 100% 91% 97% 98%
prevent infection
Surgery patientswho were given the right kind of O/ 9 970% 7
antibiotic to help prevent infection 98% 94% 97% 97
Surgery patients whose preventive antibiotics were
stopped at the right time (within 24 hours after surgery) 99% 90% 94% 95%
Heart surgery patients whose blood sugar (blood
glucoscil krpl under g::d contil in lhe djS nh[ 96% 88% 93% 94%
a'ler surgery
surgery palierila needing hair removed from ihe
surical area bei.re surgery who had hair removed
using 'r ai 'cr ed e c n clipper hjlrremovaEl 1 00% 100% 99% 100%
CTeam - oi j ra2or
ri rtSurge'r pajr I ilSe . vh- unnjary jluler e i 100% 87% 90% 91%
r.mo .ed n Ihe firsl ir .eci:nd dV alter surgery 100% 87% 90% 9 1%
Surgery pal[ents i.h,. dlc,.rs ordered d Iral meni, 10
prewni blood clois aJlr cc n ris 1 surge nes 99% 90% 94% 95%
PdainLS n ho gol [re[lmen[ at [he nh[l Ime within ,4
hours betire or aler [heir surger\l 1 help prevent 98% 85% 92% 93%
tblood cloLs aller craijn rvpi. :iI surgery


Heart Failure


OCALA
HEALTH
SYSTEM
ORMCOWMCH


MUNROE
REGIONAL
MEDICAL
CENTER


U.S. Average
for all
reporting
hospitals


FL Average
for all
reporting
hospitals


Heart Failure Patients Given 9% 6 8
Discharge Instructions

Heart Failure Patients Given an
Evaluation of Left Ventricular 100% 99% 98% 99%
Systolic (LVS) Function

Heart Failure Patients Given ACE
Inhibitor orARB for LeftVentricular 99% 93% 94% 96%
Systolic Dysfunction (LVSD)

Heart Failure Patients Given
Smoking Cessation 100% 100% 98% 100%
Advice/Counseling


OCALA HEALTH SYSTEM


Ocala Regional Medical Center * West Marion Community Hospital

Family Care Specialists * Ocala Health Surgical Group

Advanced Imaging Centers

The information above is from the CMS web site: hospitalcompare.hhs.gov. This information was made available to the public on 4/10/11.
t No patients met the criteria for inclusion in this measure calculation.





10 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011

COMMUNITY EVENTcss s


United Way needs volunteers for
workshops
United Way of Marion County is
looking with volunteers who are
interested in being facilitators for
personal budgeting workshops.
Training will be provided to all
individuals along with instructors
manual and materials. Facilita-
tors will present to businesses
and organizations who are inter-
ested in hosting classes for their
employees or clients or members
at their facility.
For more information, contact
Chris Cotter at 732-9696, ext. 209,
or e-mail ccotter@uwmc.org.
Retired Nurses plan meeting
The Citrus Chapter of the Reg-
istered Nurses Retired (RNR)
will meet at 1 p.m. June 27 at The
Sandwedge Restaurant in Spruce
Creek. We welcome all members
as we discuss speakers and
events for the upcoming year.
For more information, call
Gladys at (352) 854-2677 or Mary
Jane at (352) 726-6882.
Folk artist concert
series scheduled
The Withlacoochee Area Resi-
dents Inc. will sponsor a series of
Florida Folk Artist concerts in
Yankeetown, Dunnellon and
Crystal River to support efforts to
protect and preserve the Nature
Coast.
From 7 to 9 p.m. June 25 at the
Yankeetown-Inglis Woman's Club,
renowned Florida Folk Musician
Frank Thomas and Starbird with
Val McQueen and Jay Wood will
perform.


Doors open at 6 p.m. Refresh-
ments will be sold.
Donations to the concert will be
used for the legal fund and ongo-
ing initiatives of the Withla-
coochee Area Residents Inc.
Donations can also be sent to PO.


Box 350 Inglis, FL 34449.
Concert dates, performers,
times and locations for the Crys-
tal River and Dunnellon Summer
Concert series will be an-
nounced.
For more information, call Lee


Paulet at (352) 795-4506 or Jack
Schofield at (352) 447-6152.
Registration open for
4-H Camp Ocala
Give your children a summer of
exploration and educational ex-


Painting workshops scheduled


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).I IIIuritanc'e Accepled
11786 Cedar Street (CR 40)
(Next to the Women's Club)


*e R Art Workshops
0 Oil and Watercolor



Sidney Ann Pitchford
Over 20 years teaching experience
(352) 465-0702



DUNNELLON
MULCH & STONE
RETAIL & WHOLESALE * LANDSCAPERS WELCOME
* Mulches & Pine Bark Nuggets
* Top Soil, Fill Dirt & Sand
* Decorative Stones
* Drainfield Rock & Lime Stone

Courteous & Knowledgeable Staff - Pick Up or Delivery Available


Blue Run Bicycles
*Sales *Service & Repair Let us fit you to your new bike.
"Isn't it time for a real bike?"
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ploits by registering them for 4-H
Camp Ocala. This July, Marion
County 4-H is offering four days
of adventure, including archery,
kayaking, orienteering, swim-
ming, crafts and nature programs.
The camp is held in the Ocala Na-
tional Forest, but features mod-
ern sleeping, dining and meeting
facilities.
The camp is open to all chil-
dren, both 4-H members and non-
members, ages 8 to 13 and will be
July 5 to 8. Deadline to register is
June 24. The camp fee of $185 in-
cludes activities, meals, lodging,
supplies, a camp T-shirt and can-
teen.
For more information or to reg-
ister, contact Marion County Ex-
tension Service at (352) 671-8413
or margaret.gleason@marion-
countyfl.org.
Grief Support available to public
Hospice of Marion County and
The Windsor of Ocala will offer a
series of free lectures to help at-
tain resolution, restore healing,
and inspire hope among the com-
munity's grieving individuals.
June 14 - Living with Loss:
What is a normal response?
July 12 - Children & Grief: Do
they grieve like adults?
Aug. 9 - Through the Fog: How
do you find your way?
Attend one or all of the lec-
tures, which are open to the pub-
lic from 10 to 11 a.m. at The
Windsor of Ocala at 2650 S.E. 18th
Ave., Ocala.
Light refreshments will be
served. RSVP to (352) 854-5230 as
seating is limited.


Special to the Riverland News
Artist Sidney Ann Pitchford recently had her ribbon cutting at the Dunnellon Area Cham-
ber of Commerce. Pictured, front row from left, are: Jane Keele, Chamber vice president;
Sidney Ann Picthford, local artist and Sherry Levine; back row, Annabelle Dobbs, Cham-
ber director; Pete Dobbs, Chamber ambassador; Shane Yox, Dunnellon Police Depart-
ment; Viola Soffe, treasurer Dunnellon Chamber; Beverly Leisure, Chamber executive
director; and Jeanie Self. Pitchford will host a series of workshops, beginning Tuesday,
July 5, at the at the Dunnellon Chamber of Commerce at 20500 E. Pennsylvania Ave. She
will host an oil painting workshop from 2 to 4 p.m. and a water-color workshop from 6 to
8 p.m. Pitchford has also scheduled a workshop Thursday, July 7. Workshops and times
are the same as July 5. For more information or to sign up, call Pitchford at 465-0702.


Call Skipper

489-2731

to Advertise On
this Special
Riverland News
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Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011 - 11


Special to the Riverland News
Imagination Station, an after-school and summer camp for children, recently
had its ribbon-cutting ceremony. Pictured, front row sitting in beanbags from
left, are: Anthony Irizarry, Christian Irizarry and Raquelle Irizarry; second row,
Jose Acevedo, Amanda Acevedo, Sara Acevedo, Luz Irizarry, Patricia and
Joseph Irizarry, owners Imagination Station, Ramon Travieso, Norma Travieso
and Dylan Spinelli; back row, Beverly Leisure, executive director Dunnellon
Chamber; Nancy Myers, Chamber Director; Mathew Baillargeon, Chamber pres-
ident; Yvette Rohena, Sandra Almonte, Viola Soffe, treasurer Dunnellon Cham-
ber; and Carol Spinelli. Imagination Station is at 20781 Chestnut St.



Obituary


Faust Capobianco, 92 ical Center in Ocala. may be made to robert-
Faust Capobianco, 92 Survivors include his sofdunnellon.com.
unneondied Tues' 'wife, Lillian; son, Philip Roberts Funeral
of Dunnellon, apobianco; daughter, Home, Dunnellon, was
day, June 14, 2011 at Faustina Sindall. in charge of arrange-
Munroe Regional Med- Online condolences ments.


by Linda Thistle


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that each row across, each column down and
each small 9-box square contains all of the
numbers from one to nine.




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O 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.


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201-0623 RIV
2010
Annual Drinking Water Quality Report
Rainbow Springs Utilities, L.C.
PWS 6422679
We're very pleased to provide you with this year's Annual Water Quality Report. We want to keep you informed about the excellent
water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and
dependable supply of drinking water. Our water source is ground water from 3 wells. The wells draw from the Floridan Aquifer. The
water is disinfected by injecting chlorine gas and held for a detention time of 640 minutes before entering the water distribution
system.
We are pleased to report that our drinking water meets all federal and state requirements
If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Rainbow Springs Utilities,
L.C. at 352-489-9153. We encourage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to
learn more, please contact the utility office Monday through Friday, between the hours of 7:00am to 3:30pm.
Rainbow Springs Utilities, L.C., routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules,
and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January l' to
December 31' 2010. Data obtained before January 1, 2010, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in
accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations.
In the table below you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviation. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the
following definitions:
Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level ofa contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to
the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to
health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Maximum ResidualDisinfection Level or MRDL
Means a level ofa disinfectant addedfor water treatment that may not be exceeded at the consumer's tap without an unacceptable
possibility ofadverse effects.
Maximum ResidualDisinfection Level Goal or MRDLG: Equals 0.6ppm disinfectant.
Action Level (AL): The concentration ofa contaminant that, ifexceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system
mustfollow.
Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE): An important part of the Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The DSE isa
one-time study conducted by water systems to identify distribution system locations with high concentrations oftrihalomethanes
(THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Water systems will use resultsfrom the IDSE, in conjunction with their Stage 1DBPR
compliance monitoring data, to select compliance monitoring locations for the Stage 2 DBPR.
Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level ofa disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing
evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control ofmicrobial contaminants.
Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or
expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use ofdisinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
Million fibers per liter (MFL) - measure of the presence ofasbestos fibers that are longer than 10 micrometers.
Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) - measure of the clarity ofwater. Turbidity is excess of 5NTUisjust noticeable to the average
person.
"ND" means not detectedand indicates that the substance was notfound by laboratory analysis.
Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ig/) - one part by weight of analyte to I billion parts by weight of the water sample.

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligramsper liter (mg/l) -one part by weight ofanalyte to I million parts by weight of the water sample
Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (picograms/l) - one part by weight of analyte to I quadrillion parts by weight of the
water sample.
Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (nanograms/l) - one part by weight ofanalyte to 1 trillion parts by weight of the water
sample.
Picocurieper liter (pCi/L) - measure ofthe radioactivity in water.
Treatment Technique (IT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

TEST RESULTS TABLE
** Results in the Level Detected column for radiological contaminants, inorganic contaminants, synthetic organic contaminants
including pesticides and herbicides, and volatile organic contaminants are the highest average at any of the sampling points or
the highest detected level at any sampling point, depending on the sampling frequency.
Contaminant and Unit Dates of sampling MCL Level Range MCLG MCL Likely Source of
of Measurement (mo./yr.) ViolationY/N Detected of Contamination
Results
Inorganic Contaminants
Nitrate (as Nitrogen) 05/10 N .82 N/A 10 10 Runofffrom fertilizer
(ppm) use; leaching from
septic tanks, sewage;
erosion of natural
deposits
Barium (ppm) N .0019 N/A 2 2 Discharge of drilling
04/09 wastes; discharge from
metal refineries; erosion
of natural deposits
Selenium (ppb) N 1.7 N/A 50 50 Discharge from
04/09 petroleum and metal
refineries; erosion of
natural deposits;
discharge from mines
Sodium (ppm) N 3.0 N/A N/A 160 Saltwater intrusion,
04/09 leaching from soil

Contaminant and Dates of AL 90th No. of MCLG AL Likely Source of Contamination
Unit of sampling Violation Percentile sampling (Action
Measurement (mo/yr.) Y/N Result sites Level)
exceeding
the AL
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
Copper (tap water) 09/09 N 0.25 0 1.3 1.3 Corrosion of household
(ppm) plumbing systems; erosion of
natural deposits; leaching from
wood preservatives
Lead (tap water) 09/09 N 2.1 0 0 15 Corrosion of household
(ppb) plumbing systems, erosion of
natural deposits
Synthetic Organic Contaminants including Pesticides & Herbicides

Contaminant and Dates of MCL Level Range MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination
Unit of sampling Violation Detected of
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N * Results
Di(2-ethylhexyl) 3/03 N 2.4** 0-2.4 0 6 Discharge from Rubber and
chemicals Factories
5/03 N <0.50 0-2.4 0 6
** This was retested on 5/20/03 and was not detected.


Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products
For bromate, chloramines, or chlorine, the level detected is the highest running annual average (RAA), computed quarterly, of
monthly averages of all samples collected. For haloacetic acids or TIHM, the level detected is the highest RAA, computed quarterly,
of quarterly averages of all samples collected if the system is monitoring quarterly or is the average of all samples taken during the
year if the system monitors less frequently than quarterly. Range of Results is the range of individual sample results(lowest to
highest) for all monitoring locations, including Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE) results as well as Stage 1 compliance
results.
Disinfectant or Dates of MCL or
Contaminant and Sampling MRDL Level Range MCLG or MCL or Likely Source of Contamination
Unit of (mo/yr) Violation Detected of MRDLG MRDL
Measurement Y/N Results
TTHM [Total By-product of drinking water
Trihalomethanes] 7/09 N 1.64 N/A NA MCL=80 disinfection
(ppb)
Haloacetic Acids 8/09 N 0.677 N/A NA MCL=60 By-product of drinking water
(five)(HAA5)(ppb) disinfection

Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in
drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or
agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant you should ask advice from your health care provider.
TTHMs [Total Trihalomethanes]. Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years
may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous systems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immune-compromised persons
such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice
about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in
drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Rainbow Springs
Utilities, LC is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing
components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your
tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may
wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure
is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.
As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases,
radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural
livestock operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff,
industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential
uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes
and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water
provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled
water, which must provide the same protection for public health.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The


presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and
potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-
4791.
Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this year. In order to maintain a safe and
dependable water supply, we sometimes need to make improvements that will benefit all of our customers. These improvements are
sometimes reflected as rate structure adjustments. Thank you for understanding.
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons
such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice
about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
In 2009 the Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system. The assessment was
conducted to provide information about any potential sources of contamination in the vicinity of our wells (or surface water intakes).
There is one potential source of contamination identified for this system with a moderate susceptibility level. The assessment results
are available on the FDEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program websight at www.deo.state.fl.us/swaop or they can be
obtained from Rainbow Springs Utilities. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by
calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.
We at Rainbow Springs Utilities, L.C., would like for you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water
treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to insuring the quality of your water. If you have any questions
or concerns about the information provided, please feel free to call any of the numbers listed. (352) 489-9153. Meetings can also be
arranged by calling the same number. nnnacF


2ND TIME ROUND
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12 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011


New KOPS graduates
Special to the Riverland News
.:~ Tops Chapter 375 Rainbow
Lakes recently welcomed
two new members to the
elite KOPS (Keeping Off
Pounds Sensibly) status
during a graduation cere-
mony. Tops 375 meets at
9:30 a.m. Tuesday in the
Rainbow Lakes Commu-
nity Center. For more infor-
mation, call 465-5807 or
489-7791. Dunnellon Tops
443 meets at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday at the Woman's
Club on Cedar Street. For
more information, call 489-
5641. Pictured, from left,
are: Joan Arndt, chapter
treasurer, and Marge
Walsh, secretary. Both
KOPS graduates have at-
tained a doctor prescribed
weight-loss goal.


District begins recruitment for


executive director position


Special to the
Riverland News
The Southwest Florida
Water Management District
has begun a nationwide
search for a new executive
director today following the
resignation of David L.
Moore last month.
The District's Governing
Board accepted Moore's res-
ignation on Friday and ap-
pointed the District's General
Counsel William S. Bilenkyto
serve as interim executive di-
rector, while authorizing Dis-


trict Human Resources staff
to begin the recruitment
process for a new executive
director immediately
The executive director
functions as the chief exec-
utive officer of the District,
which includes daily direc-
tion and operating respon-
sibility for more than 700
full-time staff members, the
District's $280 million
budget and all organization
assets. The executive direc-
tor is also responsible for
recommending and imple-


SW MAKE YOUR CONCRFT LOOK GOOD!
IWe SeilznRpiigYu ConceeNoRtEJstCloringOOD!r I


- eIntlNewoRepae'OdSlb


meeting policies adopted
by the District's 13-member
Governing Board.
The executive director
will be appointed by the
District's Governing Board.
However, the appointment
is subject to approval by
the Governor and confirma-
tion by the Florida Senate
upon employment.
The position is posted on
the District's website at Wa-
terMatters.org/jobs. The
deadline to apply is Friday,
July 15 at 5 p.m.


TARMAC
continued from page 1

the application for a spe-
cial exception is made;
and
* that the project is lo-
cated in environmentally
sensitive lands - a coastal
zone and a coastal high
hazard area, and contains
listed species, both of
which are protected from
mining.
Yankeetown Mayor
Dawn Clary said the town
filed the suit because of
concern about the impact
the mine will have on
water wells and for an-
other important reason.
"I think Yankeetown is a
very, very environmentally
sensitive area and we are
just a town of environmen-
talists," she said.
Clary said some resi-
dents are still concerned
by Tarmac's refusal to per-
form a dye test on the


GUEST
continued from page 4
The Hearing Officer
will hear from the officer
then you will have the op-
portunity to tell your side
of the story and the Hear-
ing Officer will make a
determination on your
case.
Since the cameras have
been installed, driving
patterns have changed
and traffic is moving at a
safer pace through the


groundwater to see if the
flow of groundwater
would go from the mines
to wells used by residents.
"You never really know
until you do the test," she
said.
"We do live kind of on
the edge here," she con-
tinued. "We're in a very
hard spot and we went
through a lot for our water
plant."
The town dedicated a
new water plant about two
years ago.
The Withlacoochee
group said 121 of its mem-
bers live in Levy County
and make use of its natu-
ral resources. The suit
states:
* Surrounding lands
"could be adversely im-
pacted by the long-term
impacts of the proposed
Tarmac mine," including
wildlife and wetlands;
n Residents could suffer
adverse effects to the
Comprehensive Plan, in-

streets of Dunnellon. We
have received numerous
positive comments about
the use of the red-light
cameras and would like
to see a reduction of red-
light violations.
Since the installation
of the red-light cameras,
there have been more
than 6,600 violations is-
sued.
Recently, our depart-
ment responded to a traf-
fic crash at the corner of
Southwest 180th and
County Road 484, which
is in the city limits, where
the driver of a Ford vehi-
cle ran the red light while
making a right turn onto
C.R. 484.
The vehicle pulled into
the path of the motorcy-


eluding health and safety,
and environmental or nat-
ural resources which ex-
ceed the interest held by
all county residents;
* Residents' ability to
engage in educational, sci-
entific, recreational and
advocacy activities would
be harmed by the county's
failure to comply with its
Comprehensive Plan for
the Withlacoochee ecosys-
tem;
* It fails to protect the
"Florida Outstanding Wa-
ters" of the nearby Wac-
casassa Preserve State
Park - a national natural
landmark, as required by
the environmentally sensi-
tive lands policy element;
* It could endanger the
nearby 945,000-acre Big
Bend Seagrass Aquatic
Preserve, the sealife
within, and commercial
seafood harvesting.
Lou Elliott Jones is the
editor of the Chiefland
Citizen.

cle; the rider did not
have time to react and
collided into the left rear
quarter panel of the vehi-
cle. The rider was thrown
off their motorcycle and
was later transported to
Shands Hospital for ex-
tensive leg injuries. The
motorcycle was totaled.
The driver of the Ford ve-
hicle admitted fault for
the crash.
Whether making a
right-hand turn or driving
straight through, or
whether there is a red-
light camera in place,
please drive defensively
and follow all rules of the
road. Together we will
make our streets even
safer for all to enjoy


VOUM PRCN


Riverland News


says


Ace Hardware and Scally's for
your monetary donation to the
Newspapers in Education Program. -
,tnr





Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011 - 13


Fresh
fish

Tommy
Sutton
loads up a
tray with
freshly fried
fish Friday
at Ernie
Mills Park.
The Boys &
Girls Club of
Dunnellon
hosted its
inaugural
fish fry, with
proceeds
benefitting
the local fa-
cility on
Bostwick
Street.
The Boys &
Girls Club of
Dunnellon is
in full swing
with its
summer
program.
JEFF BRYAN/
Riverland News


I


CRIME
continued from page 1

lot, however, when Cooke
picked her up, they in-
stead went to the Woods
where they had sexual
intercourse.
According to the arrest
report, during an initial
interview May 10 with
Cooke, he said he picked
up the victim at a rela-
tives house to hang out in
the McDonald's parking
lot approximately five
months ago. Cooke stated
he felt uncomfortable
there because he was not
attracted to the victim
and drove her home be-
fore anybody arrived at
the McDonald's parking
lot, the report stated.
Cook advised that he
never had sexual inter-
course when asked by
Cpl. Jacob Gonzalez, the
report stated, but that he


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did kiss her on the cheek
while returning her to
her residence. During
the interview, Cooke con-
sented to a polygraph
exam.
On June 8, Cooke ar-
rived at the Ocala Police
Department to take a
polygraph, the report
stated. Sgt. Chaz Maier of
the Ocala Police Depart-
ment conducted the
exam, while Office Shane
Yox of the Dunnellon Po-
lice Department waited
outside, the report
stated.
According to the re-
port, Sgt. Maier advised
that Cooke was showing
signs of deception to-
ward the question re-
garding having sexual
intercourse with the vic-
tim.
On June 10, authorities
contacted Cooke in refer-
ence to scheduling an in-
terview June 11 at the


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Dunnellon Police De-
partment, the report
stated, in which Cooke
agreed to meet with offi-
cers regarding the case.
According to the report,
Cooke missed the as-
signed interview and
when contacted advised
authorities he could not
make it because his
grandfather was not
"doing well." He did tell
authorities he could meet
June 12, the report
stated.
During their meeting
June 12, Cook stated he
did not have sexual inter-
course with the victim,
the report stated, adding
he did not know why the
polygraph would show
that he was showing de-
ception when asked
about having sexual in-
tercourse with the victim.
Cooke was taken to the
Citrus County Jail. His
bond was set at $20,000.


I




14 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011



STAYING COOL IS A BLAST


Children run through a bounce house set up in the back of the Sonic Drive-In parking lot. Sonic and First Baptist Church recently sponsored a Family
Fun Day. Patrons were provided with a free sample of ice cream, while children were able to enjoy face paintings, the bounce house and balloons.


Sonic's Katie Stichter offers a free balloon to 2-year-
old Annabelle Gaines.


RRRRMw


1-











Riverland sports


Riverland News,Thursday,June 16,2011 - 15


Tiger standout signs


to play football at


Waldorf College


Delgado rea

for transition

to Iowa schc

JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News

Steven Delgado, a
way threat for the Dun
ion High School fool
team the past two years
cently signed a national.
ter of intent to play fool
at Waldorf College in
est City, Iowa.
Waldorf competes in
Mid-States Football Asi
ation, an NAIA affili;
conference, slated to b
its 17th MSFA gridiron
son with 16 schools in
Midwestern states.
Waldorf was one of
schools seeking Delga
services for football, h(
plained, adding he had
offers to wrestle at the
legiate level. A two-i
state qualifier in wrest
he opted to pursue his
long dream of playing 1
ball at the next le
because he preferred(
not cut weight.
"Since I was a little
I've been wanting to :
college football," he ,
"I'm definitely going
take advantage of (the
portunity)."
Delgado said Wal
was the best attraction
him, because of head co
Greg Youngblood, who
be entering his sixth
son this August when
gado arrives on campu
"He's really into the
gram; he wants to get to
know you as a per-
son," Delgado ex-
plained. "It's not
about getting you
there just to play,
he wants to know you
as a person."
"Obviously, watching
on film, we like his ath
cism," explained Yo
blood, whose team finis
3-8 in 2010. "He's a guy
could develop and play
high level. Academic
we felt he could do
here. That's all criteria
look for. We definitely
like he was worth havil
our program."
As to where Delgado
fit in with Waldorf's
gram, Youngblood said
will have to wait until c
opens in August. Of
sively, Delgado ama:


more than 700 total yards
from scrimmage and scored
seven touchdowns a year
ago. On the defensive side
of the ball, he had 43 tack-
les and three interceptions.
"We'll see how that
evolves," he explained.
"He did a couple of things
out of the backfield we
liked, he can run and he
can also catch the ball com-
ing out of the back field or
as slot type player. Where
he fits for us will depend
on the personnel we have,
how he fits into our
scheme. We adjust our
scheme to the people we
have around us. He's that
kind of guy that has that
flexibility. We certainly like
the ball in his hands, we
believe he can develop to
be a good playmaker."
Delgado said he'd prefer
to play defense as opposed
to offense, but he said the
team comes first.
"I'd rather pla. i.jet\.
said Delgado, who lih.: 4:3
tackles and three interc ep-
tions during his senior
campaign. "I've .l1 .1i
loved hitting people Yo:ii
always get more ai ti:in .1n:
a chance to be in e\eri\
play. Whatever helps tie
team, I'm willing to o it
However, playing in tlie
brutal Midwestern LillI
weather will be .1 nek e\-
perience.
"I'm from Nei Jerse\.
I've been around tile snil:.
he explained. "]'\e lne\er
had to play in it. it' , leti-
nitely going to be .1 nek e\-
perience. I'm excited: .1boiilt
it."


D II I" -
ing thie si\-
year tenure ot
Dunnellon coach Fri.nk
Beasley, Delgado is tie 21st
player the Tigers I1.\ e lii.:I
sign a football schol.irslip )
"Steven is a self-inl.:le
athlete that desenes ithe
chance to compete .it the
collegiate level, Be.isle.
wrote in an e-mail He :.n
play several different posi-
tions which makes hiii
such a valuable asset t,, .111
football program \\e .1re
very proud of Ste\ enl .imn
all of his accomplish-
ments."


IB O WI N G


Parkview Lanes
Weekly News
League and Tournament
scores for the week
endingJune 19:
Congratulations: Dorine
Fugere is the first woman to
roll a perfect game at Parkview
Lanes. She accomplished the
feat in the third game of the
Wednesday Night Scratch
league. Her first two games
were 225 and 257, giving her a
782 series, the highest known
series ever scored by a woman
in Citrus County
Mixed Doubles 7-98 NoTap
Tourney Results: Two of our
recent perfect game bowlers
teamed up to win the June
Mixed Doubles NoTap tourney
Dorine Fugere and David
Black had a 1,725 series, with
Dorine rolling two 300 games
and David one. Katrina Hamby
and Mark Kinser finished sec-
ond with 1,595 pins, followed
by June and Shorty Williams
(1,543) and Marilyn Seymour
and Ken Sprague (1,536).
Dorine had the high series for
the women (886) and Mark was
high for the men (843), who also
outlasted eight competitors for
the Krazy Eights title. The next
Mixed Doubles 7-9-8 NoTap
will be July 17.
MondayNight Summer Spe-
cial: Jake Duncan 303, 769;
Chris Carr 288, 835; Janie
Oakeson 284; Saad Bouve 273,
722; Katrina Hamby 725.
Scratch: Chris Carr 266, 769;
Jake Duncan 263,729; Katrina
Hamby 225, 587; Saad Bouve
208; Dee Smith 528.
Suncoast Seniors NoTap:
Handicap: Allan Gobbi 357;
Brendan Dooley 341,896; Jack
Trafalski 901; Jerry Konecky


896; Ginny Belle-*:illd.l\ 316.
880; Marylou Hal:i.t:li 3161.
853; June Willh.ill 30:i
Scratch: Jerry Ne;- 3.1:11: 721.
Murphy Combs 278. 74-. All.i
Gobbi 278; Diana Stelrteni.iii.
218,573; June Willia i ii 218. P.it
Combs 212,552.
Young & Restless: H.indl-
cap: (adult) Bryan ICr.i'. 287.
766; Charlie Stein 2S7. Bri-.m
Carney 251; (youth, Am.Irell
Allen 264, 713; Tate T.:.i nsenI.l
242; Chandler Crliier\ if8i
Scratch: (adult) Ch.irlie Stein
258; Brian Carney 237, 684;
John Saltmarsh 237; (youth)
Michael Andriuolo 192, 491;
Andrew Allen 180,461.
Wednesday Night Scratch:
Dorine Fugere 300, 782;
Stephanie Flory 208; Debbe
Chung 562; Chuck Clouse 276;
Chris Carr 275, 710; Tom Dan-
toni 729.
Hotshots NoTap Doubles:
Handicap: Joe Markham 250,
640; Nick Waters 242,671; Betty
Rauch 282,731; Ellen Bowman
269; Betty Wood 747. Scratch:
Shorty Williams 187, 504; Nick
Waters 161, 428; Saad Bouve
242; Ellen Bowman 236, 607;
Betty Rauch 581.
Summer Owls: Handicap:
John Ethridge 294, 851; Roy
Bass 268; Shorty Williams 731;
Betty Rauch 247, 722; Linda
Ethridge 238, 683; June
Williams 238. Scratch: John
Ethridge 234, 671; Roy Bass
199; Brendan Dooley 487;
Anna Dooley 165, 452; June
Williams 153; Betty Rauch 431.
Bowlers ofthe Week: (youth)
Andrew Allen, 53 pins over his
average; (adults) Dorine
Fugere, 140 pins over her aver-
age, and John Ethridge, 161
pins over his average.


Growing


Fagan calls freshman campaign


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
Success came easy for Kasey
Fagan during her four-year
stint at Dunnellon High School.
Fagan and the Lady Tigers
won, a lot, whether it was lop-
sided victories or nail-bitters
such as their second straight
Class 4A Championship, a 3-1
win over Naples. In addition to
the back-to-back state titles,
Dunnellon clinched the No. 1
ranking and national title in
the ESPN Rise poll.
Accolades piled up for Fagan,
the star of the team. She was
the Gatorade State Player of
the Year twice, winning na-
tional honors, attending the
ESPY Awards Ceremony in
Hollywood.
Her freshman campaign as a
member of the University of
Florida soi ttb ll tii tllt as - al t\-
thin'2 but eas.i tor talent-laden
FaRanm E\ enl thouIIh Sihe started
all 68 '2anlles ait third base tor
the Lad\ Gat,:,'rs. \%ho e\ entu-
all.\ reea led the \o C.en's Col-
le'2e W\orld Series


Brombacher from its poN
packed lineup.
In addition to Fagan, t
Lady Gators will have M
Moultrie and Brittany Sc
both of whom were select
Team USA, back in the 1
"During the offseason
going to work on everytl
she said. "There's not ju
thing I can pinpoint. I'm
ing on getting faster, str
and just better physically
mentally."
Having reached the pi
of her prep career, reach
the College World Serie,
playing for a national ch
onship was "honestly ...
a doubt the best time of
life," she said.
"The feeling
I got walk-
ing into
that sold-
out stia-

aid ie l
lille
that
. 01I a


i: hallipionship ,aaIIne. F Iaf n aid-
initted she strull. ed to: aidlllst
to: the college ,aallie
"- .i\ tirst seas:lln \\a s a
hit ,:,t a d isa :pp:int-
llel t tl':ii 11 1 Indl-
\ id .al
stand- /
:int." --
ex-

1*~


pla ned
Fa2an. \ i': bat-
ted 247 with ti\e homers
and 22 RBIs "I was able
to learn .1 lot and iniatulre
as a player both otten-
si\el.i and detensi\el.
bec:aU e t iil.\ sitalrtin'
role i0n the team. . lbut 1
tailed to, d ( uist tlhr,:,.i'2h-
oi.t the season
"\\liat I mean b.* tail-
1in to adilust is that I
Iust iimade thie same mis-i
takes b:thl hlttin, and
tieldin . o\ er .and (\ er
a.ail." said Faan. \\iwho
inade ti\e errl' rs in 147
:lhan-c ,es "'in hoping
to: learn 1tr,11in those
t[Iallures alnd toI mole e
t:l'wraird and keel)
I plllli|)l' M\ 1 11 1 a e. ?,
becal.use I klno,\
whlat I'l i capable I'
oat " \
She lhas plenty \ :t o
IIIotilatil 0:n trlo i her-
selt to: improle as a 1
s,:, lh,:,i,:,lo re. buI t tlhe
Lad. G ,to:rs \\% ill cer-
tainl need lier t, a im-
pro, e oi her il-llnumbers
Flo,,ida. losers to Arizon.a
State in the national al title
,ailne. ill lose lKelse\
frudel. tle SEC PlI\er' ot
thle \ear. Tittan\ DeFelice.
AlM P anilba and Ste)lhnile


pains


at UF 'disappointment'
wer- soon as the first pitch is thrown
- there are no words. It was
:he an experience I'll never for-
ichelle get," she recalled.
chutte, Returning will certainly be a
acted for challenge next year after losing
ineup. the aforementioned seniors, but
I'm Fagan knows the talent will be
thing " there for a run at the College
Ist one World Series. The Lady Gators
Swork- return a solid corps of experi-
onger, enced players; however, will
ly and add a top-notch recruiting class
led by Fagan's sister, Sami, the
innacle Gatorade State Player of the
thing Year for the Lady Tigers.
s and "To return to the WCWS will
lampi- be tough, especially with our
without great senior class leaving, but
my with the incoming freshman
there are some really tal-
-- ented ladies and I'm
sure we'll be fine in
\ every aspect of the
game." Fagan ex-


Slith iile this
Icn imn. \ear.
Patlt \ because I
lJu1st Ilness my sis-
tel and partly
betal.Sie I know
how\ Iu.hli she's

t2a tlll -
Ha'\ in'devel-
oped a de-
v\l.lt fan
base
(luring
her
ca-
reer
S at






Dun-
nellon,
Fagan
said
she re-
ceived
plenty
.ot en-
courage-
Iiment from
th,-seo t'olks.
I dk:o teat the-
IIi, Ils. messages

texts. 0alls. \-)ice-
makells htl every-
toward third base
DIninell,,n." she
prouIdI.i noted. "So
d knowg th they're
waters appeared
root In1111_, ,lr' us,
and [lI) S' thank-
tll t\:,l' that!"

Kasey Fagan
makes herdway
toward third base
during the Lady
Gators' appear-
ance in the College
World Series in
Oklahoma City, Okla.
JIM BURGESS
UF Communicallons


Martial students medal at competition


BILL MITCHELL/Special to the Riverland News
Sepulveda's ATA Martial Arts had an inner-school tournament in St. Cloud, between Dunnellon, St.
Cloud and Lake City. Pictured are the medal winners for the Dunnellon school. Medal winners, front
row from left, are: Bradley Rush, Donevon Ferrell,Tyler Metta, Anastasia Ryder, Hailey Rush, Darrien
Gates, Heath Ritchie, Andrew Allen; middle row, Jake Pelton; back row, Instructor Michael Joiner, In-
structor Bruce Wright, Matthew Allen, Jessica Torres, Kacy Scherer, Kelly Mitchell, Tiffany Jones,
Jessica Norcross, Ruth Norcross, Matthew Torres and Instructor Alisia Norcross.


~.~c~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~�i~!~S


!'T\


II ; ii



c






16 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011


Fun and games


work's I'M NOT'
SOIN' TALKING,
ON? ToYOU'







V r'- r


MAMA'S BOYZ


The Spats


OLIVEE,\ 7 YOU'RE
SWEET EYA WASTING YOUR)
CAN'T E BREATH y
SERIOUS



J"'


WOT T [ I'LLTELL'YU WHAT
OI 1 oO Y vOU DI WRONG
WRONG

0'-
'-.1


WWW.MAMASBOYZ.COM JERRY CRAFT


by Jeff Pickering


Super Crossword IN REVERSE


ACROSS
1 Israel's
Barak
5 "Fie!"
10 Traffic
sound
14 Beer
ingredient
18 It's nothing
19 "From the
Terrace"
author
20 Fusillade
21 Not quite
closed
22 KINGLY
BREW
24 Start
25 Actor
Andrews
26 Parrot
27 Charity
28 Party
animal?
30 Formicary
denizen
31 Final
32 Loose
33 Like
opposites
35 Pitch
37 Dump on
40 Can opener
42 Harp part
45 Crop up
46 Part of
EEC
47 Golden -
49 Merchandise
51 Navel
store?
52 Disseminate
54 Flat hats
56 Relocate


57 Rock's - 98 Find out
Zeppelin 100 Did
58 Ubiquitous business
songbird 102 He had
60 Faultless a lot
62 Clarke or of Gaul
Questel 103 Angler's
63 HURT anglers
FRIENDS 105 Fear
65 "GIDDYUP!" 106 "You -
OR Hurry Love"
"HOOCHIE ('66 hit)
MAMA!" 107 Society
68 Fumble 110 Sweater
69 Net type letter
70 "Jurassic 112 Gumshoe
Park" stuff 113 Toil
71 RODMAN 114 August one
FELL 117 "Damn
FROM Yankees"
GRACE siren
76 ENTHUSI- 118 Electronic
ASTIC device
SINGER 120 SWEATERS
81 Japanese ARE
statesman OFFENSIVE
82 Category 123 "Kismet"
83 Gets back character
85 Relative of 124 - fell swoop
un- 125 Government
86 Sporting game
saddles 126 Where to
88 Autumn find a zebu
implement 127 Man the bar
89 Distribute 128 Dweeb
the donuts 129 Producer
90 Word with Coen
camp or 130 Chatterley
tree or
91 Artist Windermere
Rousseau
93 Intrinsically DOWN
96 Mauna - 1 Biblical
97 "Greetings!" book


ARIES (March 21 to April 19) You
feel ready to face up to a major change,
although it might involve some risks.
A once-dubious family member comes
around and offers support and encour-
agement.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
Move forward with your plans, despite
discouraging words from those who
underestimate the Bovine's strong
will. Your keen instincts will guide
you well.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A
misunderstanding is easily cleared up.
Then go ahead and enjoy some fun and
games this week. A Libra might have
ideas that merit serious consideration
for the future.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You
might feel as if you're in an emotional
pressure cooker, but the situation is
about to change in your favor. Take
time out for some well-earned fun.
LEO (July 23 to August 22) A shift
in your workplace responsibilities cre-
ates resentment among some co-work-
ers. Deal with it before it becomes a
threat to your success on the job.
VIRGO (August 23 to September
22) Expect some surprises in what
you thought was one of your typically
well-planned schedules. Deal with
them, and then enjoy some lightheart-
ed entertainment.


2 Dickens
villain
3 Prod
4 '50 film noir
classic
5 It's on the
bee's knees
6 "It's a -"
('70 song)
7 Witches
8 Live and
breathe
9 Pop Art
pioneer
10 Outlaw
11 Lohengrin's
love
12 Happening
13 KETTLE
COVER
14 PRO-
DUCED
CHEESE
15 Trojan War
hero
16 Turner or
Wood
17 Soho
streetcar
20 Beethoven
creation
23 Sweatshirt
size
29 Parisian
pronoun
32 '78 Stallone
flick
33 More
theoretical
34 Doctorow
novel
36 Fresh
37 Shopping
sites


38 Historian Elvis
Durant 79 Stringed
39 Hunt or instrument
Hamilton 80 Philan-
40 Acts catty? thropist
41 Blender part Brooke
43 Fragrance 84 Very cold
44 Actor 87 BORING
Burton POET
46 And more of 90 Exemplar of
the same redness
48 Part of 92 Private
ER pension
50 Go after 94 French
52 Less philosopher
plentiful 95 Gen. Robt.
53 Roused
55 Food fish 97 "Big" star
58 Bit of 99 SWIPE
parsley BROOCH
59 More ironic 101 Undertake
61 - a hand 102 "The Silent
(aids) Spring"
64 Grunter's author
grounds 104 Macbeth,
66 Llama turf for one
67 Deranged 106 Terra -
69 Looked like 107 Thicken
Hook? 108 Capital of
71 Word with Togo
side or 109 - Bator
satellite 111 Borodin's
72 Lucy's "Prince -"
landlady 113 Using
73 Peter of 114 Hartman or
Herman's Kudrow
Hermits 115 Geraint's
74 Cinch lady
75 Vexed 116 Adequate
76 Hitter Hank 119 Purpose
77 "- Las 121 '- again!"
Vegas" 122 Chess
('64 film) champion
78 Baal and Mikhail


LIBRA (September 23 to October
22) Be careful: What appears to be a
solid financial opportunity might have
some hidden risks attached. A hazy
personal matter needs to be cleared
up.
SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem-
ber 21) It's a good time to strengthen
ties with family and friends. You might
feel unsure about a recent workplace
decision, but time will prove you did
the right thing.
SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to
December 21) Just when you thought
your relationship was comfortable
and even predictable, your partner or
spouse could spring a potentially life-
changing surprise on you.
CAPRICORN (December 22 to
January 19) Your usually generous
self is overshadowed by your equally
strong suspicious nature. You might
be judging things too harshly. Keep an
open mind.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru-
ary 18) Love and romance dominate
the week. Married Aquarians enjoy
domestic harmony, while singles
could soon be welcoming overtures
from loving Leos.
PISCES (February 19 to March 20)
An old health problem recurs, but it
is soon dealt with, leaving you eager
to get back into the swing of things.
A favorable travel period starts this
week.
BORN THIS WEEK: You have an
independent spirit that resists being
told what to do. But you're also wise
enough to appreciate good advice.
( 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.


>l I SI N VH I�] G IU N (I D
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1 l 7 3 H IV 0 O-1i 3 d7 N 3 H


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s 1 0 0 1 E l3A nN 3 slI sl3

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As N so 3 0 H 0 -A
3 1 H s d VOll E ~?I F 3t
vi r v 0 v v d vll V 0 0 8t 3 z
S-I v N ld 9 AA VI H S d (I n H 9
siamsuv
piomssai:).i.-dnS --


Amber Waves


BY 1
DON
TRACHTE Lv


by Gary Kopervas


Out on a Limb


Birds may reject a birdhouse placed near
food or water, as these attract creatures like
raccoons or rats thaL will eat birds and
their eggs. Claw marks on the house's
,, ... '-,, . ,,,- ,: ,,' 1,- , ,1 1 , l,,l i' 1 , ,,, 1.. I
entrance will show you these predators are
around and can easily reach the birdhouse,
Try mounting the house away from food
and on a metal pole, rather than on a tree
t ,,,,1 ,,, 1,, ,, .,, . . , 1,,,,,.1 , , : ,,, ,, l,,
pole with a petroleum jelly/hot pepper
mixture and spread sharp gravel around
the base to discourage intruders.
Source: wrvwall-brds.com


I


I






Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011 - 17


MONDAY, 2:00 P.M.




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results are obtained. You will be billed only for the
dates the ad actually appears in the paper.
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However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information.


ill DUll
Female light brown
last seen 6/15 in Citrus
Springs (352) 470-7663


MATURE TEEN GIRL
Babysit her home.
10hrs/$20 per child.
(352)489-9144


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- Multiple positions
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- Make $400 - $500,
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Please call Sharon to
schedule interview @
352-307-0576


B
Make Money
From Home
PT or FT 10 yrs in busi-
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Over 3,000 contractual
agreements w/ biggest
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Steve BeeBee
Tree Service
Professional
Tree Work at
Reasonable
Prices

"ASK YOUR
NEIGHBOR"
Call Steve Or Cindy
(352)465-4117
(352)425-0295






Dunnellon
Computer Repair
20093 E. Penn. Ave.
Suite 6
NEXT TO DUNNELLON
CHIROPRATIC
(352) 533-2130


Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903


2 AUCTION WEEK
THURS. ESTATE JUNE 23
Adventure Auction
3PM Outside filled with
value & variety. Orchid
supplies, cactus collec-
tion, tools, household &
more. 6PM Insid
Quality High end turn.,
Oriental Bedrm Set, art,
sm. appl., jewelry, etc!
FRI. JUNE 24
ON SITE AUCTION
Prev. 8AM Sale 9AM
2845 E. Hayes St.,
Inverness. Complete
living estate Farm house
workshop & barn. 1986
Fleetwood Eagle
motorhome, Nascar,
sword/knife. Doll col-
lection, country style
furn. & decor & 2 shops
w/hand tools, parts,
pieces, power tools, etc
DudleysAuction.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc


DUNNELLON
23rd, 24th, & 25th
8AM-5PM
ANTIQUES
& MORE!
3500 W. Cyrpess Drive
2 miles west
on Dunnellon Road
watch for signs,





Rainbow River
Club Membership
Available
For Transfer Fee
Exp. Nov. 2017
Call (352) 489-7440










WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369





OCALA
1.2 & 3 bedrooms
Low Rates, clean quite
park 352-732-0186


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ANNOUNCEMENTS

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ATTORNEYS

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Attorney at Law, Gainesville, Florida.
Free no obligation consultation. Serving
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AUCTIONS

NC Mountain Property Auctions,
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EDUCATION

ALLIED HEALTH career training-
Attend college 100% online. Job
placement assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409
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EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

CLAIMS ADJUSTERS NEEDED due
to active Storm Season. JEL's 5-day
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Movie Extras Earn up to $250 per day
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EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

SAWMILLS -Band/Chainsaw -
SPRING SALE - Cut lumber any
dimension, anytime. MAKE MONEY
and SAVE MONEY In stock ready to
ship. Starting at $995.00.
www.NorwoodSawmills .com/300N
(800)578-1363 Ext.300N

FINANCIAL

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HELP WANTED

Driver- Recession Proof Freight.
Plenty of miles. Need refresher? No
out-of-pocket tuition at FFE. $1000
Bonus for CO's & $1500 Incentive for
O/O's. recruit@ffex.net. (855)356-7121

ACT NOW! New Pay Increase! 37-46
cpm. New Trucks in 2011. Need 2 months
CDL-A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782
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Driver- Not getting enough miles?
Join Knight Transportation and increase
your income with our steady freight.
New Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months recent
experience. (800)414-9569.
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Frac Sand Haulers with complete
bulk pneumatic rigs only. Relocate to
Texas for Tons of work. Great
company/pay. Gas cards/Quick Pay
available. (800)491-9029

CDL-A DRIVERS. Central Florida
company seeks Solo & Team Drivers.
Tank and Dry Van positions offering
some regional. lyr OTR/ Good MVR
required. (877)882-6537 or
www.oakleytransport.com

Need CDL Drivers A or B with 2 yrs
recent commerical experience to
transfer motor homes, straight trucks,
tractors, and buses.
wwwmamotransportation .com
(800)501-3783

CYPRESS TRUCK LINES Home
Weekends! Southeast Regional, Top
Pay & Great Benefits! 6 Months TT
exp CDL with clean MVR. Call
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SMALL FARMS
MORRISTON
READ THIS ONLY
If you are you
interested in 2.67 acres,
keep horses, fenced,
spotless 3/2 furn'd 2001
MH, out bldg w/elect.
$80K, Owner financing.
Dale Ravens Rainbow
Springs Community
Realty Inc.
352-489-1486




TOP OF THE WORLD
2/2/1.5, $850 per mo+
electric (352) 615-4542




RAINBOW LAKES
EST. POOL HOME 3/2/1
inside laund. all appls
Pool & Lawn Serv incl.
$800. 352-489-4949




Crystal River RV Lot
For Sale
Snowbird/InvestorNisitor
5slargated com-
munity. Must sell.
Will take $39,900 if
close quickly.
GREAT LOT!!! Con-
tact at 860-841-8419
leave message or text


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
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ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
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ANF

ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA


Claiified I Display | Merro Daily





Week of June 20, 2011


CUSTOM BUILT
HOMES
3/2/2 +Lanai
Starting @ $69,900
352-897-4447
352-697-1384
J. Cintula Builder




SALE 50% Off Mnf. Price
Pontoon Boat Reuphol.
Sale Tops & Covers
Repairs 352-563-0066




I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945


We Buy Any Vehicle
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, titled,
no title, no problem.
I will pay up to
$15,000 for Vehicles.
Any make, any model.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794


JEEP 94
GRAND CHEROKEE,
352 V8 4x4, well maint
(records) hvy hitch pkg
kayak rack $2,800.
(352) 465-5271


212-0630 RIV PUBLIC NOTICE 7/8 Sale
NOTICE OF SALE
TO: Unit #22 Mary Jane Bynes/Idella Roberts 3366 NE 99th Ct Apt. 1, Silver Springs, FL
34488
Unit # 42 Chauncey Miner/Paul Glenn 9791 N. Elcam, Citrus Springs, FL 34433
Unit # 57 Jimmy Mason/Amber Goodman 1700 NW 222nd Ter., Dunnellon, FL 34431
Unit # 80 Robert Petersen/Patty Shears 131 N Highway 19, Inglis, FL 34449
You are notified that the property stored by you with STOR-RIDGE, INC., P.O. Box
1107, 1807 W. Lockport Lane, Dunnellon, FL 34430-1107, 352-489-5858, believed to be
household goods will be sold to the highest bidder for cash, at the above address on
July 8, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. to satisfy the delinquent rentals.: We reserve
the right to refuse any and all bids.
Published in Riverland News, June 23 & 30, 2011.


Noce t Cedtos


Notic i


I 1


205-0623 RIV
Martin, Johnny Lee 2011-CP-0644 Notice to Creditors (Summ. Admin)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MARION COUNTY FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2011-CP-0644 Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHNNY LEE MARTIN
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the Estate of Johnny Lee Martin, deceased, File Number 2011-CP-0644, by
the Circuit Court for Marion County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
110 NW First Avenue, Ocala, FL 34475; that the decedent's date of death was
February 5, 2011; that the total value of the estate is none and that the names and
addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:
Name: Address:
Mary Klug 10071 SE 125th Place, Belleview, FL 34420
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED
The date of first publication of this Notice is June 16, 2011.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Mary Klug
10071 SE 125th Place, Belleview, Florida 34420
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Lorenzo Ramunno, Esq. Florida Bar No. 0765813 RAMUNNO LAW FIRM PA
7500 SW 61 Avenue, Ocala, FL 34476 Telephone: (352) 854-5570 Fax: (352) 854-9267
Published in Riverland News, June 16 & 23, 2011.


206-0623 RIV
Vs. Curtis Sr., John M. 42-10-03888 CA B Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MARION COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 42-10-03888 CA B DIVISION:
MERCHANTS & SOUTHERN BANK, organized and existing under the laws of Florida,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN M. CURTIS, SR., as Trustee of that certain Land Trust Agreement dated January
8, 2004, JOHN M. CURTIS, SR., GAIL W. CURTIS, HOUSING ASSISTANCE CORPORATION
OF NASSAU COUNTY, INC., a Florida corporation, and MARION COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated May 20, 2011 and in Case No. 42-10-CA-03888 in the Circuit Court of the
Fifth Judicial Circuit, in and for Marion County, Florida, in which MERCHANTS &
SOUTHERN BANK, is the Plaintiff and JOHN M. CURTIS SR., as Trustee of that certain
Land Trust Agreement dated January 8, 2004, JOHN M. CURTIS, SR., GAIL W. CURTIS,
HOUSING ASSISTANCE CORPORATION OF NASSAU COUNTY, INC., a Florida corpora-
tion, and MARION COUNTY, FLORIDA and are the Defendants. I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the Marion County Courthouse, 110 NW 1st Avenue,
Ocala, Marion County, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on June 30, 2011, the following de-
scribed property set forth in the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure:
SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTION EXHIBIT A
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.


Dated this 3rd day of June, 2011.
(Court Seal)


DAVID R. ELLSPERMANN, Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ E. Bridges, Deputy Clerk


DAVID P. SALTER- SALTER FEIBER, PA. Post Office Box 357399, Gainesville, Florida
32635-7399 (352) 376-8201 Attorney for Plaintiff Florida Bar No. 0095435
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT Marion County Clerk
of Court, 110 NW 1st Avenue, Ocala, Florida, (352) 671-5621 WITHIN TWO (2) WORK-
ING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE.
EXHIBIT "A"
A portion of the NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 23, Township 15 South, Range 21 East,
Marion County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the NE corner of the NE 1/4 of Section 23, Township 15 South, Range
21 East, thence N. 89 degrees 26'08" W. 40.15 feet along the North line of said Section
23 to the Westerly right-of-way line of S.W. 27th Avenue (right-of-way) width varies);
proceed thence S. 01 degree 54'06" E. along said right-of-way, 70.06 feet; thence
continue along said right-of-way line, S. 00 degrees 23'29" feet; thence departing
said right-of-way line, proceed S. 45 degrees 38'57" W. 56.31 feet; thence S. 00
degrees 21'57" W. 98.00 feet; thence S. 37 degrees 28'06" E. 31.07 feet to a point on
the Northerly right-of-way line of S.W. 13th Street as described in Official Records
Book 2339, Pages 552 through 556 (right-of-way width varies) and the Point of Begin-
ning; proceed thence N. 89 degrees 05'35" W. along said right-of-way line 132.17
feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave Southerly, having as its elements a
central angle of 08 degrees 04'55" and a radius of 320.00 feet; thence continue
along said right-of-way line and along the arc of said curve in a Westerly direction,
45.14 feet (chord bearing and distance of S. 86 degrees 51'57" W. 45.10 feet); thence
N. 07 degrees 10'32" W. along said right-of-way line, 10.00 feet to a point on a
non-tangent curve concave Southeasterly, having as its elements a central angle of
35 degrees 48'36" and a radius of 330.00 feet; proceed thence along said
right-of-way and along the arc of said curve in a Southwesterly direction, 206.25 feet
(chord bearing and distance of S. 64 degrees 55'10" W. 202.91 feet; thence N. 42 de-
grees 59'08" W. along said right-of-way line, 10.00 feet to a point on a non-tangent
curve concave Southeasterly, having as its elements a central angle of 09 degrees
15'24" and a radius of 340.00 feet; continue thence along said right-of-way line and
along the arc of said curve in a Southwesterly direction, 54.93 feet (chord bearing
and distance of S. 42 degrees 23'11" W. 54.87 feet); thence S. 37 degrees 45'30" W.
along said right-of-way line 85.38 feet; thence N. 52 degrees 14'30" W. along said
right-of-way line, 10.00 feet; thence continue along said right-of-way line, S. 37 de-
grees 55'24" W. 357.68 feet; thence, departing said right-of-way line, proceed S. 89
degrees 23'36" E. 711.76 feet to a point on the aforementioned Westerly right-of-way
line of S.W: 27th Avenue; thence N. 00 degrees 52'54" W. along said right-of-way line,
391.66 feet; thence N. 00 degrees 25'05" E. along said right-of-way line 43.07 feet;
thence N. 37 degrees 28'06" W. 32.83 feet to the Point of Beginning.
Published in Riverland News, June 16 & 23, 2011.


210-0623 RIV
7/8 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice of Public Sale:
D & D TOWING OF OCALA
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Lien and intent to
sell these vehicles) at

211-0623 RIV
7/7 Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
Superior Towing/C&M
Towing gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and
intent to sell these


4125 NE Jacksonville Rd.,
Ocala, FL 34479-2427,
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
ues. D & D TOWING OF
OCALA reserves the right
to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.

vehicles) on 07/07/2011,
9:00 am at 36 NE 8th St.,
Ocala, FL 34470, pursuant
to subsection 713.78 of
the Florida Statutes.
Superior Towing/C&M
Towing reserves the right
to accept or reject any


Sale date: 7/8/2011 9AM
2001 FORD VIN#
3FAFP113X1R134204
Published in the Riverland
News, June 23,2011.



and/or all bids.
1B3ES42C9TD512563
1996 DODGE
JN6ND1lS7GW040094
1986 NISSAN
Published in the Riverland
News June 23 2011.


AttenL�-tion

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18 - Riverland News,Thursday,June 23,2011


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