Title: Riverland news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100090/00021
 Material Information
Title: Riverland news
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Dunnellon FL
Dunnellon, FL
Publication Date: September 23, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Dunnellon (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Marion -- Dunnellon
 Notes
General Note: "The newspaper built on community pride."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 14, no. 36 (Apr. 11, 1996).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100090
Volume ID: VID00021
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 34953283
lccn - sn 96027433

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Riverland


SERVING DUNNELLON AND RAINBOW SPRINGS





N ews


Thursday, September 23, 2010


Vol 28 No. 49


Vets to be honored
in special edition
A special section of the
Nov. 11 Riverland News
will honor those who
served in active duty.
Veterans are invited to
send a photo of them-
selves in their uniform
along with what years
they served, a list of
medals, awards and cita-
tions earned, duties,
campaigns served in and
other pertinent informa-
tion. Please include your
name and contact phone
number. There is no
charge.
Information may be e-
mailed to editor@
riverlandnews.com or
mailed to Riverland
News, 20441 E. Pennsyl-
vania Ave., Dunnellon,
FL 34432.
For more information
or questions, call Jeff
Bryan, editor, at 489-
2731. Photos will be re-
turned.
City Tree Board
meeting cancelled
The city Tree Board
meeting slated for today
has been cancelled due
to a lack of a quorum.
The meeting has been
rescheduled for 5 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 28.
For more information
or questions, contact
Jeanette Rehberg at
465-8500, ext. 1010 or
email jrehberg@
dunnellon.org.
FFA fundraiser slated
for Saturday
The Dunnellon FFA
Chapter will host a
fundraiser from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday. The
group will sell sweet
teat at the livestock
swap meet and host a
car wash at Sonic.
City road work
slated to begin
The VE. Whitehurst
Company, under the su-
pervision of City's
Streets and roads De-
partment, will begin
roadway improvements
to McKinney and Illi-
nois Avenues. Road con-
struction is scheduled to
begin on or after Sept.
20 and will continue for
approximately 120 days.
Expect periodic lane
closures and/or delays
on McKinney and Illi-
nois and on the inter-
secting streets. Please
be patient while we im-
prove road conditions in
the city. For more infor-
mation or questions re-
garding the project, call
Anthony Santacross,
public services supervi-
sor, at 465-8590.

6 TTTSC


Visit our website
for more stories
and photos
riverlandnews.comrn

Riverland

News
20441 E. Pennsylvania Ave.
Dunnellon, FL 34432


Riverland News

VISIT US:
www.riverlandnews.com
CALL US:
489-2731





6 84578 20035 4


City to finalize budget

Council will also vote on increase for water, sewer rates citations. The use of red-light
stalled in late October and fully
JEFF BRYAN City officials are expecting to "It was one of the most profes- operational by late November,
Riverland News generate nearly $800,000 in sional yet. I feel that (City Man- was approved by the City Coun-
gross revenue from the red-light ager) Lisa (Algiere) really has a cil in August.
With revenues coming from cameras alone to offset the in- handle on what she is doing." "One of things I wanted from
red-light cameras, a boat patrol crease, which will see the city The city will have to pay a ven- Lisa was to find alternate rev-
unit and K-9 unit, the city of budget rise from it current fig- dor fee of $195,000. The vendor enue streams," Ward said. "She
Dunnellon will formally vote on ure of $3,281,073 to a little more will be in charge of monitoring has found ways. I'm so pleased
a roughly 40 percent budget at than $4.5 million, the cameras and providing in- she's come up with alternate
r in - N- A 1 + ,1*+ rr1 4- 4- ,4- A 4- 1_- 4*-- -- -1 1'%- -- n


5:30 p.m. Mivonaay nignt at City
Hall.


Thinis is my thira budget
cycle," Mayor Fred Ward said.


formation to the uunnellon Po-
lice Department to verify


BIRTHDAY BASH


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
John DeVries is presented with a birthday "cake" by Greg Zmud for DeVries' 100th birthday cele-
bration on Sept. 15 at Go For Donuts.The cake consisted of two doughnuts and a long john adorned
with candles.

Friends, family celebrate John DeVries' 100th birthday


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
For John DeVries, it was just
another regular day
To his friends and family,
Wednesday, Sept. 15, was not just
another average day, it was a mo-
ment to celebrate DeVries' 100th
birthday
Throughout the early party,
friends and regular customers of
Go For Donuts came over to
shake hands or present DeVries
with a card or small gift.
John Pollock with the Ameri-
can Legion presented DeVries
with a certificate and history of
the first USS Bushnell, which
DeVries served aboard during
his 2 1/2 years of duty with the
U.S. Navy in the late 1920s.
Greg Zmud had the honor of
bringing out the "cake," which
consisted of two doughnuts and
a long john, adorned with can-
dles.
"He's a great guy," Zmud said,
noting he's known DeVries for
about six years. "He's a good
God-fearing man. He's a wonder-
ful man."
"Do I deserve all of this?" De-
Vries asked Ron Lytle, his friend
and barber.
"Of course," Lytle responded,


DeVries kisses the hand of Lydia Lytle during his 100th birthday
celebration. Lytle and her father, Ron, sang happy birthday to De-
Vries in his native Dutch language.


as he and his daughter, Lydia,
sang Happy Birthday to DeVries
in his native Dutch language.
Lytle presented his American-
Dutch flag pin for the day, a me-
mento he obtained while
stationed in Holland during his
time spent in the U.S. Air Force.
Lytle said he met DeVries a few
years ago and they share that


bond. DeVries was born in Hol-
land and moved to the United
State when he was an infant.
"It's nice to see him," Lytle
said. "He's a good person to be
around, because he's always
very positive no matter what's
going on. He's always smiling."


See BIRTHDAY page 7


See BUDGET page 7


Prescription

'take back'

program

Saturday

Event will be
at Walmart
Riverland News
The Dunnellon Police
Department prefers giv-
ing back to the commu-
nity; however, on
Saturday, officers hope to
"take back" from resi-
dents.
As part of a joint opera-
tion with the Drug En-
f o r c e m e n t
Administration (DEA) as
well as other government,
community and public
health agencies, the po-
lice department is taking
part in a nationwide pre-
scription drug "Take-
Back" initiative that
seeks to prevent in-
creased pill abuse and
theft.
From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
officers with the police
department will collect
potentially dangerous ex-
pired, unused and un-
wanted prescription
drugs for destruction at
the Dunnellon Walmart.
The Marion County Sher-
iff's Office and Ocala Po-
lice Departments are also
offering the service at
their respective loca-
tions.
The service is free and
anonymous, no questions
asked.
"Because of our field,
we see a lot of people
who have old prescrip-
tions," said Dunnellon
Police Chief Joanna
Black. "They ask what
they can do with them,
but a lot of people cannot
afford to drive far to
other locations. We fig-
ured, if we can bring it
here, we can do our part
to take all the prescrip-
tions back that are out-
dates and dispose of them
correctly We're looking
for a good turnout."
This initiative ad-
dresses a vital public
safety and public health
issue. Many Americans
are not aware that medi-
cines that languish in
home cabinets are highly
susceptible to diversion,
misuse and abuse. Rates
of prescription drug
abuse in the United
States are increasing at
alarming rates, as are the
number of accidental poi-
sonings and overdoses
due to these drugs.
See PROGRAM page 3


DES welcomes physical ed. room


Room was finished this summer


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
Dunnellon Elementary
School opened its doors
in 1993, and since then
has sought a much-
needed room for its phys-
ical education classes.
Officials finally got
what it's been after the
past 17 years with the
completion of such a
classroom this past sum-


mer.
"It's great," said Dan
Werner, a physical educa-
tion teacher at Dunnellon
Elementary for the past
25 years. "Before, we did-
n't have that many open
classrooms if the weather
was bad. Now, we've got
our own spot."
And the kids are enjoy-
ing it too, Werner said.
"We are excited,"
Werner said as he led his


students to class on a re-
cent Thursday morning.
"We've got equipment
that is adaptable, so when
we're unable to go out-
side we can do what we
need to inside."
Werner added it's a
bonus for the younger
kids who have PE later in
the day
"When we've got the
younger kids, we've got a
place we can take them
See ROOM page 2


I v


JcErr Donim/niverIdIU Iuews
Fourth-grade students at Dunnellon Elementary
School warm up at the start of class last Thursday.


75 cents





2 Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010




DES Open House a rousing success


RITA HUTTON
Special to the Riverland News
Dunnellon Elementary School
had a very successful Open
House on Sept. 16. Parents met in
the cafeteria to hear our princi-
pal, Fredna Wilkerson, talk about
the evening's events. Parents
were able to sign up for a parent
portal where they can actually
view their child's grades online.
They visited their children's
classrooms to meet the teachers


and see some of the work that has
been accomplished since the be-
ginning of school. The media cen-
ter was open for parents and
students to visit our Book Fair.
PTO sold refreshments in the
courtyard. There were also rep-
resentatives from various after-
school tutoring companies to tell
about their programs.
The PTO will host our annual
Fall Festival/Safe Trick or Treat
Fundraiser on Friday, Oct. 22, at
Dunnellon Elementary School.


Grade levels and clubs will be
able to have their own games,
booths, etc. to raise money PTO
will sell all the food items.
There will be a "Silent Auction"
on baskets the different grade
levels assemble. One of the
highlights is the safe trick or
treating aspect. This is a fun
time and an excellent opportu-
nity for families to come have a
good time. More information as
the festival approaches.
Today is our annual Altrusa


Read In. People from the com-
munity came to read to every
classroom. Our students love
this each year.
Our PTO met and discussed
fall festival. They also started
their fund drive. Membership is
only $2 and is open to anyone in
the community interested in
participating in enhancing our
children's future. There is a
contest. The class with the most
members who sign up will re-
ceive an ice cream party


CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Now through Oct. 11
- Coupons for Education.
Monday No School
(Teacher in-service day).
Tuesday PTO meet-
ing at 2:30 p.m. in the media
center.
Oct. 5 Fire Truck
visits campus as part of
Fire Prevention Month.


Dunnellon High announces

AP Scholar Award winners


Special to the Riverland News
Eight students at Dun-
nellon High School have
earned AP Scholar
Awards in recognition of
their exceptional achieve-
ment on AP Exams.
The College Board's Ad-
vanced Placement Pro-
gram (AP) provides
willing and academically
prepared students with
the opportunity to take
rigorous college-level
courses while still in high
school and to earn college
credit, advanced place-
ment, or both for success-
ful performance on the
AP Exams. About 18 per-
cent of the more than 1.8
million students world-
wide who took AP Exams
performed at a suffi-
ciently high level to as
earn an AP Scholar
Award.
The College Board rec-
ognizes several levels of
achievement based on
students' performance on
AP Exams.
At Dunnellon High
School:
Three students qual-
ified for the AP Scholar
with Honor Award by
earning an average score
of at least 3.25 on all AP
Exams taken, and scores
of 3 or higher on four or
more of these exams.
These students are
Shelby Goicochea (DHS
Class of 2010), Jamison
Kirschenpfad (DHS Class
of 2010) and Yeon Song
(current 12th-grade stu-
dent).
Five Students quali-
fied for the AP Scholar
Award by completing
three or more AP Exams
with scores of 3 or higher.
The AP Scholars are Re-
becca Conkel (current


12th-grade student),
Kasey Fagan (DHS Class
of 2010), Ricardo Gamboa
(DHS Class of 2010),
Shawnee Monday (cur-
rent 12th-grade student)
and Isabel Sandoval (DHS
Class of 2010).
Through more than 30
different college-level
courses and exams, AP
provides willing and aca-
demically prepared stu-
dents with the
opportunity to earn col-
lege credit or advanced
placement and stand out
in the college admission
process.
Each exam is devel-
oped by a committee of
college and university
faculty and AP teachers,
ensuring that AP exams
are aligned with the same
high standards expected
by college faculty at some
of the nation's leading lib-
eral arts and research in-
stitutions. More than
3,800 colleges and univer-
sities annually receive AP
scores.
Most four-year colleges
in the United States pro-
vide credit and/or ad-
vanced placement for
qualifying exam scores.
Research consistently
shows that AP students
who score a 3 or higher on
AP Exams (based on a
scale from 1 to 5, with 5
being the highest) typi-
cally experience greater
academic success in col-
lege and have higher col-
lege graduation rates
than students who do not
participate inAP The Col-
lege Board is committed
to the principles of excel-
lence and equity, and the
commitment is embodied
in all of its programs,
services, activities and
concerns.


ROOM
continued from page 1
and not have to worry
about it being so hot," he
said.
The space will also
allow for Werner and
Jennifer Bostick, the
school's other physical
education instructor, to
allow students to com-
plete their FITNESS-
GRAM fitness test when
needed. FITNESSGRAM
is a national imitative to
encourage children to
exercise and evaluates
five different parts of
health-related fitness,
including aerobic capac-
ity, muscular strength,
muscular endurance,
flexibility and body com-
position.
On this recent morn-
ing, Werner and Bostick
had fourth-grade stu-
dents on the outdoor bas-
ketball court working on
their endurance skills.
Bostick, a 12-year em-
ployee at Dunnellon Ele-
mentary, is equally as
excited about the new
classroom. She said it
made a difference at the
beginning of school
when it was extremely
hot.
"I'm loving it," Bostick
said of the new room,
tucked into the southeast
corner of the campus.
"We've been trying to get
(a room) since I've been
here.
"It's nice to have a
place to go during in-
clement weather. It
helped to get us off to a
good start this year, we
had kids excited about
it."
Principal Fredna Wilk-
erson boosted about the
addition.
"It's definitely a nice
addition to our campus,"
said Wilkerson, in her
first year as principal at
Dunnellon Elementary.


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Florida Estate Planning & Trust Seminar
October 13 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
No Cost or Obligation Lunch & Learn
The Truesdell Professional '
200 N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Florida 34482
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A member of the Florida Press Association
352-489-2731
352-489-6593 (Fax)
The Riverland News serves Dunnellon and the surrounding areas: Blue
Cove, Chatmire, Hills of Ocala, Lake Tropicana, Rainbows End, Rainbow
Lakes Estates, All the Rainbow Springs Area, Rio Vista and Vogt Springs.
The Riverland News is delivered on Thursday to subscribers by our
carriers and mail. The newspaper is also available inside area stores
and at various boxes throughout the community. Local subscription rate
is $24 a year. Call for Florida and out-of-Florida rates.
The Riverland News is published in Dunnellon, FL by Citrus Publishing,
Inc., 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429-5760.
CALL 489-2731
For Information On Subscriptions,
Display Advertising And Business & Church Directory Ads.
TO SUBMIT NEWS ITEMS EMAIL TO:
editor@riverlandnews.com
NEWS DEADLINE IS NOON FRIDAY.
News items about happenings at area churches and clubs, school and
sporting activities, military promotions, announcement of births,
anniversaries, engagements, weddings, first and 90+ birthdays, and
similar community news items are accepted for publication.
PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT DUNNELLON, FL.
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #681-730
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to:
RIVERLAND NEWS,
20441 E. PENNSYLVANIA AVE.
DUNNELLON, FL 34432-6035


Who Will Be


Dunnellon's



1st



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(The Riverland News is not responsible for late or damaged mailed entries.)
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The Riverland News. Readers can then vote for their favorite pet photo by
submitting a voting ballot along with a 25-cent-per vote (.25) donation to the
NIE program. Voting ballots will be published in the newspaper or pick one
up at: The Riverland News office 20441 E. Pennsylvania Avenue, Dunnellon.
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Call for more information: 352-489-2731 or email cgaouette@riverlandnews.com


Giving math a solution


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
Dunnellon High School 10th-grader Richie Litterine, a volunteer at Dunnellon Elementary, paints a
math symbol and term on a walkway at Dunnellon Elementary. The program, funded through a Mar-
ion County Public Education Foundation Grant, was started last spring, said Gina Dickey, assistant
principal at Dunnellon Elementary. It took six weeks to implement the program, she added. "Math is
so abstract that we're trying to give the students some concrete visible items to see. We hope that
when they see the vocabulary, that it sticks in their minds."





Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010 3


NRC seeks public input on Levy County facility


Special to the Riverland News
The Nuclear Regulatory
Commission staff is seeking
public comments about its pre-
liminary finding that there are
no environmental impacts that
would preclude issuing Com-
bined Licenses (COL) for two
new reactors at the Levy
County site near Crystal River.
Staff from the NRC and the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Jacksonville District, will dis-
cuss their Draft Environmental
Impact Statement (DEIS) in
two meetings from 1:30 to 4:30
p.m. and from 7 to 10 p.m.,
today at Plantation Inn, 9301 W
Fort Island Trail, Crystal River.


Meetings scheduled today at Plantation


The NRC will transcribe the
meetings and post the tran-
script on the agency's website
at: http://www.nrc.gov/reac-
tors/new-reactors/col/levy.html.
NRC staff will be available for
informal discussions with
members of the public during
"open house" sessions from
12:30 to 1:30 p.m. and 6 to 7 p.m.
No formal comments about the
DEIS will be accepted during
these open houses.
The DEIS is available on the
agency website at:
http://www.nrc.gov/reactors/ne
w-reactors/col/levy html. The


DEIS is also available via the
NRC's electronic document
database, ADAMS, by entering
accession numbers
ML102140231 and
ML102140235 in the ADAMS
search engine at:
http://adamswebsearch.nrc.gov
/dologin.htm. In addition, a
hardbound copy of the DEIS
will be available for public in-
spection at four local libraries:
Citrus County Coastal Region
Library at 8619 W Crystal St.,
Crystal River; Dunnellon
Branch Library at 20351 Robin-
son Road in Dunnellon; the AF


Inn in Crystal River comments could be limited by
the time available and the
numhbr nf' npnnpl within ton


Knotts Public Library at 11
55th St. in Yankeetown; and the
Bronson Public Library at 600
Gilbert St. in Bronson.
Those wishing to register in
advance to present their com-
ments at the meeting, or with
special needs for attending or
presenting information at the
meeting, should contact Dou-
glas Bruner at (800) 368-5642,
ext. 2730, or via e-mail at
Levy.COLEIS@nrc.gov by Sept.
16. Those wishing to speak may
also register at each meeting
no later than 1:15 p.m. and 6:45
p.m., respectively. Individual


speak.
NRC staff will also consider
written comments on the DEIS
for 75 days following its publi-
cation in the Federal Register,
expected shortly. The public
may comment either by mail to
the Chief, Rules and Directives
Branch, Division of Adminis-
trative Services, Office of Ad-
ministration, Mailstop
TWB-05-B01M, U.S. Nuclear
Regulatory Commission, Wash-
ington, DC 20555-0001, via e-
mail at Levy.COLEIS@nrc.gov,
or via fax to (301) 492-3446.


PROGRAM
continued from page 1
Studies show that a ma-
jority of abused prescrip-
tion drugs are obtained
from family and friends,
including from the home
medicine cabinet.
In addition, many
Americans do not
know how to
properly dispose
of their unused
medicine, often
flushing them
down the toilet or
throwing them
away both po- Joann
tential safety and Police
health hazards.
Bring all expired, un-
used and outdated pre-
scription drugs to the
Dunnellon Walmart for
destruction. The Dunnel-
lon Police Department
will transfer all collected
prescription drugs to the
DEA, which will properly
dispose of the drugs.
Black said old pill bot-
tles can be brought, but


that she asks residents to
remove labels from the
bottles. She added that
only the pills themselves
will be placed in a con-
tainer provided by the
DEA. Black said there'll
be a tent outside and
there will be an officer on
hand to greet resi-
dents and provide
them with instruc-
tions on how to
dispose of the pre-
scriptions.
For more infor-
mation or ques-
tions, contact
Black at (352) 465-
Black 8510 or email
Chief jblack@dunnel-
lonpd.org.
Black said if the DEA
offers the program in the
future her department
would be glad to partici-
pate. However, she added,
her department would
like to be able to offer the
service on a regular basis.
"We just need to find
out legal aspects, then we
may doing it here," Black
said.


District invites public input on ranking water bodies


Special to the Riverland News
The Southwest Florida
Water Management District
is seeking public input
about the order in which
minimum flows and levels
(MFLs) for lakes, rivers,
streams and aquifers in the
district will be determined.
A minimum flow or level
is the limit at which further
water withdrawals will
cause significant harm to
the water resources and/or
environment. The District
Governing Board sets these


limits as part of achieving
the delicate balance be-
tween meeting human
water needs and those of
Florida's natural systems.
Four public meetings will
be held at the following
dates and locations:
Monday, Oct. 4, at the
District's Bartow Service
Office, 170 Century Blvd.
Monday, Oct. 4, at the
District's Brooksville Head-
quarters, 2379 Broad St.
Tuesday, Oct. 5, at the
District's Tampa Service
Office, 7601 U.S. 301 North.


20491 The Granada Dunnellon


Tuesday, Oct. 5, at the
District's Sarasota Service
Office, 6750 Fruitville
Road.
All meetings will begin at
6 p.m. and will be held in
the boardroom of each of-
fice.
The purpose of the meet-
ings is to receive public
input on a draft revised
priority schedule for estab-
lishing minimum flows and
levels. Legislation requires
the District to review and,
if necessary, revise the


schedule each year
Written comments are
also welcome and can be
submitted via mail or email
to Marty Kelly, the Dis-
trict's Minimum Flows and
Levels program director,
no later than Oct. 15. The
addresses are 2379 Broad
Street, Brooksville, FL
34604-6899 or
Marty. Kelly@watermat-
ters.org.
For more information,
contact Barbara Matrone
at (800) 423-1476, ext. 4233,


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**MINIMUM FEES ONLY, consult Florida statues 466 019 and Florida Administrative Code
64B5-4 002 for rules and laws regarding Dental advertising Thomas E Worster, D D S, P A


280-0923 RIV
BUDGET SUMMARY
CITY OF DUNNELLON FISCAL YEAR 2010-2011

THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF DUNNELLON
ARE 37.3% MORE THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES


REV. FUND
T.I.F.D.


GENERAL ENTERPRISE
FUND FUNDS


CASH BALANCES BROUGHT FORWARD

Total Cash Balances Brought Forward

ESTIMATED REVENUES:

TAXES: Millage Per $1000 = 6.9101
Ad Valorem
Delinquent Taxes
Transfer to T.I.F.D.
Gas Taxes
Franchise Fees
Utility Taxes
Licenses and Permits
Intergovernmental Revenue
Charges for Service
Fines and Forfeitures
Miscellaneous Revenue
Public Safety
Public Safety Grant -Federal
Stormwater Grant-State
Sewer Grant -SRF/CDBG
Physical Environment Sanitation revenue
Culture & Recreation
Transportation
Loan Proceeds
Total Revenues & Other Financing Sources

TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES & BALANCES

EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES:
Human Services
General Government Services
Public Safety
Physical Environment
Physical Environment-Grant
Transportation
Parks and Recreation
Debt Services
Total Expenditures/Expenses
Reserves
Total Appropriated Expenditures & Reserves


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE
ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD
00062BU


TOTAL
BUDGET


VOTKEN///




NADEAU
For Marion County Commission District 2


* Proven Leadership

* Trusted by Voters

* Fiscal Conservative

Ready to serve the

citizens of Marion County.


EMail us: Ken4Commissioner@yahoo.com
E Find us on
Facebook
Facebook.comKen Nadeau Candidate
Paid Political Advertisement Paid for and approved by Ken Nadeau, Candidate for Marion County
Commission District 2 (D). Marilyn Kaster. Campaign Treasurer.


604,856 544,417 124,745 1,274,018

604,856 544,417 124,745 1,274,018




945,015 154,179 1,099,194
49,738 49,738
(99,013) (99,013)
575,254 575,254
200,000 200,000
320,267 320,267
58,142 58,142
206,542 206,542
3,000 1,193,154 1,196,154
1,087,150 1,087,150
70,423 26,639 8,903 105,965
2,000 2,000
71,735 71,735
314,462 314,462
750,000 750,000
173,635 173,635
4,000 4,000
18,709 18,709
12,465,800 12,465,800
4,001,059 14,435,593 163,082 18,599,734

4,605,915 14,980,010 287,827 19,873,752


23,000 23,000
1,647,002 287,827 1,934,829
1,761,179 1,761,179
189,117 8,342,349 8,531,466
5,715,800 5,715,800
888,086 888,086
97,531 97,531
921,861 921,861
4,605,915 14,980,010 287,827 19,873,752

4,605,915 14,980,010 287,827 19,873,752


e





4 Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010


RIVERLAND NEWS
S"The Newspaper built on Community Pride."
Regional Manager-' John Provost
Editor Jeff Bryan
Member of the Florida Press Association


OUR


VIEW


Reduce the risk of children's injuries


Perhaps the most precious re-
source in our lifetime is our
children and grandchildren.
Many of you undoubtedly transport
younger children from place to
place, and nationally, officials worry
that not all grandparents are up to
speed on what's required for child
safety.
This week is National Child Pas-
senger Safety Week, and you should
learn all you can do to keep your
most precious cargo safe.
In 2008, the last year for which sta-
tistics are available, about four chil-
dren ages 14 or younger were killed
in motor vehicle crashes every day,
and many more were injured. But
parents and caregivers can make a
lifesaving difference.
Whenever you're on the road,
make sure your child passengers are
buckled into appropriate safety
seats. The safest place for children


LETTERS

Alternative views on
economic jumpstart
I want to offer an alternative view on
several of the issues addressed in the
Sept. 16 letter.
The relaxation of regulations on the
financial industry was one of the pri-
mary enablers of our current reces-
sion. The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act was
enacted in 1999, repealing many of the
post-Depression safeguards. This
cleared the way for financial institu-
tions to make speculative investments
in unstable financial market instru-
ments including sub-prime mortgages.
Full faith in the free market does not
always rescue us from economic woes.
Tax cuts are not a clear and simple
fix for the recession. Reagan's failed
"voodoo economics" tax cuts were
used twice by the prior presidential
administration. The economy never
reacted sufficiently to cover the more
than $1 billion dollars in tax cuts, and
this deficit remains embedded in our
current budget deficit. Most econo-
mists agree that stimulus spending
prevented a much deeper recession
than we are currently experiencing.
The rising cost of health care is a
critical issue. While the recently
passed health care reform bill is not
perfect, it culminates over 100 years of
American efforts to provide some form
of national health care to the citizenry.
The bill is the start of ensuring every
American the simple dignity of being
able to access medical care.
The issue of global warming and car-
bon emissions is a complex one. In
America, the overwhelming influence
of big oil is the major sticking point on
competently addressing carbon emis-
sions and the development of clean,
renewable energy resources. Globally,
humans are putting over 5 billion met-
ric tons of carbon emissions into our
atmosphere every year. It is an issue of
global warming and the quality of the
air we breathe. Industrially develop-
ment in China and India will continue
to greatly exacerbate this problem.
Cap and trade is not a perfect start to
address this issue, but it is a start.
President Obama was and is clear on
the issues. I feel he is, for the most
part, doing the job I expected him to
do. If you disagree, then vote for some-
one else in 2012. Just be sure you know
what your vote will get you. So far, op-
ponents are long on just saying no and
short on tangible alternate plans to ad-
dress our national issues.
Gerard Meyn
Dunnellon

Dinkins Service Store
wonderful, will be missed
I was just reminiscing about Dinkins
Service Store, which we frequented
during our 30 years of living in the
Dunnellon area.
The service was always warm and
See LETTERS page 5

OPINIONS INVITED
*The opinions expressed in RiverlandNews
editorials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons,
columns or letters do not necessarily repre-
sent the opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to express
their opinions in a letter to the editor.
* All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including let-
ters sent via e-mail, Phone numbers will not
be printed or given out. We reserve the right
to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters to the editor must be no longer than
550 words, and writers will be limited to two
letters per month.


of any age to ride is properly re-
strained in the back seat. Data shows
that:
In 2008, restraint use saved the
lives of 244 children ages 4 and
younger. Child safety seats reduce
the risk of death in car crashes by 71
percent for infants and 54 percent
for toddlers ages 1 to 4.
For children ages 4 to 7, booster
seats reduce injury risk by 59 per-
cent compared to safety belts alone.
Children ages 12 and younger
should always be buckled up and
seated in the rear seat of vehicles.
Infants in rear-facing car seats
should never ride in the front seat of
vehicles with airbags.
In an effort to raise parents'
awareness about the leading causes
of child injury in the United States
and how they can be prevented, The
Centers for Disease Control and Pre-
vention launched the "Protect the


Ones You Love" initiative. Parents
can play a life-saving role in protect-
ing children from injuries.
Follow these guidelines for child
passenger safety. If you do, you'll be
within Florida law.
1 Until age 1, 20 pounds For the
best possible protection keep infants
in the back seat, in rear-facing child
safety seats, as long as possible up to
the height or weight limit of their
particular seat. At a minimum, keep
infants rear-facing until at least age
1 year and at least 20 pounds.
1 Until age 4, 40 pounds When
children outgrow their rear-facing
seats (at least age 1 year and at least
20 pounds) they should ride in for-
ward-facing child safety seats, in the
back seat, until they reach the upper
weight or height limit of the particu-
lar seat (usually around age 4 and 40
pounds).
1 Until age 8 or 4-foott-9 tall -


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
Kathy Dewitt, right, and Jolene Jones of Patchwork, perform Saturday during
the annual Springs Festival at Rainbow Springs State Park. Patchwork was one
of several musical groups that performed during the annual event. For more
photos see page 15.


OTHER


VIEWS


Jazz Up Dunnellon 2010


The 12th annual Jazz Up Dunnel-
lon Event is quickly approach-
ing. This annual Mardi-Gras
style music festival will be from 5 to
10 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16.
Jazz Up Dunnellon is hosted by the
Dunnellon Area Chamber of Com-
merce and sponsored by many busi-
nesses in Dunnellon.
As the years have gone by, we have
seen the Dunnellon Cham-
ber of Commerce fill the
streets with a lot of music,
food and beverages. Local
businesses have welcomed
festivalgoers by staying
open late and offering fes-
tivities within their shops.
This year will be no differ-
ent, well sort-of.
Jazz Up Dunnellon 2010 is
sure to make a great desti-
nation for everyone to
enjoy. The volunteers from
the chamber have part- Martha
nered with the city and po-
lice department with a renewed
commitment to safety, which has al-
lowed for the festival to return to
both East and West Pennsylvania av-
enues.
West Pennsylvania will be closed to
traffic and feature a Haunted
Fire House, live local
bands, food, antiques
and much more. We
haven't left out the
East Side, our
crossing guards
will help ensure
festivalgoers get
noticed as they
cross U.S. 41 to
the other side
where they will
find a carnival at
Ernie Mills Park
just for children.
Bostick Street will
be closed to through
traffic to allow for the
bounce houses, pony
rides, funnel cakes, hot
dogs and band to bring on the fun in
this alcohol-free environment of kid-
friendly entertainment.
Keep on going and you'll find Penn
Plaza a refreshing stop for some
music, a dance-or-two, karate and, of
course, food.


Street parking will be corded off to
help ensure those who wish to cross
over and visit Miriam's and the Red
Fox Gallery will be safe. (I heard a
band inside there too for those who
want to cool off for a minute before
they head on down to Crock's). In be-
tween, the bands, on both sides of
Pennsylvania Avenue, craft vendors
will be sprinkled to help
keep you moving to the
beat. Across from Crock's,
you will find an oasis of
food, dancing and music to
enjoy.
This year's event is
meant to bring the commu-
nity out and enjoy, there
will be no admission
charges, but since this is a
communitywide fundraiser,
you might find some paid
parking areas along the fes-
tival route.
Vaughn Community safety is a top
priority, so you will see
things like a designated driving serv-
ice, designated open containers, and
more volunteers out and about to
help keep this the musical destina-
tion that we all have loved for so
m a n y
years.
As an

safety
m measure,
speed will be
reduced to 20
mph for this night
only. Volunteers
are not limited to
chamber members,
this is a community
event, so roll up
your sleeves and let's
here you sing with us
...or at least give us a
call if you want to help.
We need help before and
after the event, too. You can
call Beverly Leisure at the
chamber at 489-2320 or
Martha at 489-2233. If your business
would like to be a sponsor for this
year's event, contact Patricia at 489-
4099.
Check out the chamber website for
more info, maps, bands and every-
thing else Jazz Up Dunnellon.


Once children outgrow their for-
ward-facing seats (usually around
age 4 and 40 pounds), they should
ride in booster seats, in the back
seat, until the vehicle seat belts fit
properly. Seat belts fit properly
when the lap belt lays across the
upper thighs and the shoulder belt
fits across the chest (usually at age 8
or when the children are 4-foot-9
tall).
1 After age 8 or 4-foot-9 tall -
When children outgrow their
booster seats (usually at age 8 or
when they are 4-foot-9 tall), they can
use the adult seat belts in the back
seat, if they fit properly (lap belt lays
across the upper thighs and the
shoulder belt fits across the chest).
Remember: All children younger
than 13 years should ride in the back
seat. Never place a child in the front
seat facing an airbag.


TIME TO SMILE



Fifty by fifty

I need your help. I could tell you I
can't do this alone. That would be
a lie. It is more along the lines of
"misery loves company."
I want to lose 50 pounds by the time
I turn 50. That gives me a year and
three months. I know what you are
thinking. You're wrong!
It is not plenty of time. You have to

age/time phenome-
non. The closer you
get to 50 the quicker
time flies. When I was
a teenager 24 hours
was an eternity. Now
it is a blink of an eye.
I am not a healthy
Kathleen eater. I don't eat a lot
Wallace but what I do eat is
junk. I wish I could
eat fruit without having an allergic
reaction.
I get wicked indigestion from
wheat. I can't eat the food that is good
for you. It doesn't leave me much
choice. My only saving grace is that I
eat small portions. Stop laughing! It's
true. You may find it hard to believe
but I only eat one meal a day.
When we go out to eat I can't get
over how much food other people eat.
There's no way I could eat soup,
salad and then an entrde. I order the
entree and if I can fit it a dessert. I
used to be able to eat four and a half
slices of pizza. If I finish two I have
eaten a lot. I no longer have the ap-
petite I used to have yet I am the
heaviest I have ever been. How did
that happen?
I do know one reason why. Actually,
I know two reasons why. First, I am
on medication. I have to be on it for
life. I think 30 pounds of the 50 1 need
to lose is from that. Personally, I don't
think the medication is working but I
listen to my doctor and do what I am
told.
Secondly, I hate exercise. Normally,
I don't like to use that type of lan-
guage. I get tired thinking about it.
Stamina is my downfall. I never had
any. I rarely exercised in my "skinny-
mini" days. When I see pictures of me
I don't recognize the skinny twig I am
looking at.
I remember being thrilled when I
finally weighed 110 pounds! I didn't
get heavy until my middle. One ill-
ness can change your life forever.
Stay healthy!
Let me set things straight. I will not
give up chocolate. You can't make me.
I will hurt you if you try. It's cruel and
unusual punishment and I will not
tolerate it. I just want to tell you that
up front. Other than not giving me
guff when you see me eat chocolate
you are allowed to remind me I am
supposed to be eating right and exer-
cising. If you see me out and about
ask me what I did that day to loose
weight. Yell at me if I give you an ex-
cuse. If I am out for a walk crack the
whip. Tell me you want to see me pick
it up. I won't drop and give you 20. I
draw the line on push-ups.
I am counting on you folks to be my
coach. I have zero will power when it
comes to exercise. If you need an ex-
cuse not to exercise call me. I have
volumes full of excuses. I never met a
couch I didn't like.
It is day one and I am already off to
a bad start. I ate a piece of chocolate
cake while I wrote this column. Seri-
ously, I did. You were right it's going
to be a very long year and three
months. Look out AARP here I come!


aV





Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010 5


LETTERS
continued from page 4
friendly. Mr. Chaplin
Dinkins and his sister,
Mary Virginia, were al-
ways so helpful and
pleasant to us. We sure
enjoyed the chicks we
would purchase and
raise.
Also, there were many
other specialty items that
we purchased such as the
bar soaps imported from
France and the bars of
soap to get those little
league uniforms per-
fectly white.
When our youngest son,
Rossi, was involved in
raising hogs for the Dun-
nellon Schools FFA the
Dinkins extended this
young man credit. They
opened his feed account
and let him pay his tab
once he sold his hog. How
many places would do
that for a youngster?
The Dinkins were al-
ways involved in helping
others. When I learned
that the store was closing,
it really saddened me. I
wish the family good
health and happiness.
Michele Sparano
Dunnellon

September is National
Sea Cadet Month
Manatee Division of
the US Naval Sea Cadet
Corps celebrated its fifth
anniversary in Septem-
ber, the same month as
National Sea Cadet
Month. These two events


were celebrated with an
"Open Ship" fun-day to
further acquaint the com-
munity with the program.
The Sea Cadets were
founded in 1958 by the
Navy League of the
United States who still
administers the program.
Cadets have an opportu-
nity to gain information
and experience about the
maritime services and
traditions. Training re-
volve around what some-
one would need to know
to succeed in the Navy,
Coast Guard, Marine
Corps, and Merchant
Marines. The Navy
League's mission of being
the civilian advocate of
the maritime services is
reinforced by familiariz-
ing America's youth with


these services.
Five years ago, LCDR
Myron Wambold, who had
been involved the Sea
Cadets in the Puget
Sound area of Washing-
ton state, saw a need to
reintroduce the program
to this part of Florida. A
few of those very first
cadets are still with the
division and are the
backbone of the youth
leadership. His vision
and commitment has in-
fluenced the lives of
dozens of young people.
He retired from the
Corps earlier this year.
With current bleak eco-
nomic conditions, par-
ents are contacting the
Sea Cadets because it
gives their children an
advantage. Participation
in Sea Cadets gives them


the opportunity to de-
velop leadership skills,
do hands-on advanced
training in various ca-
reer fields, and advanced
placement in the Navy,
Coast Guard and other
branches if they decide to
enlist. Sea Cadets can
compete to go to summer
orientations at the US
Naval Academy and the
Coast Guard Academy In-
ternational training op-
portunities exist as well
with most of the bill
being paid for.
Recent increased sup-
port by the Tampa Bay
Council of the Navy
League for Manatee Divi-


sion has enabled them to
offer more assistance
scholarships for enroll-
ment and training. Local
businesses this month
such as Black Diamond,
Plantation Inn, and Cap-
tain Dan Clymer have
partnered with the Navy
League to help even
more.
Happy Birthday Mana-
tee Division. Have a great
National Sea Cadet
Month. For more informa-
tion about Sea Cadets go
to www.manateedivorg.
LTJG Todd Dunn,
NSCC
Inverness


S 4 DAY 3 NIGHT GETAWAY to
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Package Includes 5 Casinos, $105 Free Play, 3 Buffets Tour date: Oct. 31,2010
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p209 p.p.double occupancy s259's,ngle
2 DAY, 1 NIGHT IN THE NATION'S
OLDEST CITY- ST. AUGUSTINE
3 Meals, Ocean Front Hotel, Narrated site seeing train ride. Tickets to
Off/Broadway Show. 2.1. Holidav Juke Box
TOUR DATE: Dec. 9,2010 70 tickets available
1 290p.p. dbl occupancy $1590single
2 DAY, 1 NIGHT CASINO GETAWAY TO HOLLYWOOD, FL
4 Casinos, $105 Free Play, 6 Meals, 3 Buffets
This is the trip you don't want to miss'
TOUR DATES: SEPT. 30, Oct. 7,14, & 21, 2010
Join Thousands of winne..s 1O500p.p. dbl occupancy $12500single


TRY YOUR LUCK WITH US!
WEEKEND GETAWAY TO s CASINO
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Package Includes: $60 Free Play, 3 Meals
Tour Date:Oct16,2010 S6500p.p. dbl occupancy $9500single
3 DAY, 2 NIGHT GETAWAY TO
HELEN, GEORGIA/ASHVILLE, N. CAROLINA
THE BILTMORE EXPERIENCE 4 meals, 2 nights
accommodations, shopping in downtown Helen, admission to
Biltmore Estates ($55 value) and much more.
Tour Date: Oct.10,2010 s24900p.p. dbl occupancy S29900single
3 DAY, 2 NIGHT GETAWAY TO
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BEST PACKAGE THE SOUTH HAS TO OFFER!
5 Meals, Lunch at the famous Lady & Sons Restaurant (Paula Dean) Trolley ride of historical Savannah 2 hour
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Tour Dates:Nov.14&21,2010$22900p.p. dbl occupancy $269single
KEY WEST 3 DAY, 2 NIGHT
5 Meals $25 Free Play Tour Dates: Oct. 3, Nov. 7, 2010
2 Casinos, airboat ride of Everglades, 3 hr. cruise on Jungle Queen river boat with a stop
on private island, glass bottom boat ride to 1st underwater State Park& Barrier Reef.
$1 7900p.p. (dbl occupancy) s229"0single


RESERVATIONS CALL: 888-845-3111 HOLLYWOOD TOURS
www.hollywoodtoursfl.com Pick up location: Steeple Chase
All Tours Include Hotel Accommodations. Prices and itinerary subject to change. Transportation provided by: Hollywood Tours, Spring Hill, FL FL Travel Lic. #ST37756


Purchase tickets online*or
at the ticket office.
Shows begin at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m.
(unless noted otherwise)
8395 SW 80th Street Ocala, FL 34481 (352) 854-3670
Ticket Office Hours: Monday Saturday: 11:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.
Day of Show: 11:00 a.m. Showtime


FARM
CIRCLE SQUJAR]

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Herman's Hermits
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Tickets starting at $31


nal produce and much more!
Every Thursday
E1R'S 8 am-l12pm
E COMMONS LIVE cooking

SETI demonstrations at 10 a.m.
--M (weather permitting)
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Dicoisws-7nIR0tgo
u otoS :8t* Aeue o1. ils tr lf wet ot S 0t.t


CALL NOW TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT


352-460-0957 or 877-294-0416


SO YOU
KNOW
The city has estab-
lished two public informa-
tion meetings at 5:30 p.m.
Oct. 5 and Oct. 26, at City
Hall.
Currently, we have
scheduled to attend the
next Blue Cove Home
Owners Association meet-
ing Sept. 28.
If anyone would like
for us to attend a local
meeting to explain the
charter referendum, con-
tact the City Clerk's office
at 465-8500 extension 1002.


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Hjisfla H


00062C5





6 -' Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010



Obituaries


Mary Elizabeth Woitkun,
86
Mary Elizabeth
Woitkun, 86, died Thurs-
day, Sept. 9, 2010 in
Ocala. A resident of Dun-
nellon, Mrs. Woitkun was
preceded in death by
her husband, John
Emile and husband, Wal-
ter Michael Woitkun.
Survivors include her
daughter, Nell Emile
Henderson (Bob); grand-
children, Emile H.
Harper (Nick) and
Robert L. Henderson Jr.,
MD (Kathy); five great
grandchildren; three de-
voted nieces, Terry Glan-
ette, Kim O'Melia an
Susie Collyer; special
friend, Artie Lanzer.
Mrs. Woitkun was a
member of First Baptist
Church of Dunnellon


and the Auxiliaries of
American Legion, VFW
Post 4781 and the Fleet
Reserve Association. A
memorial was at First
Baptist Church of Dun-
nellon on Sunday, Sept.
19, 2010.
In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that do-
nations be made to ei-
ther Dunnellon First
Baptist Church Senior
Fund or Hospice of Mar-
ion County, Florida.
Arrangements by
Roberts Funeral Home
of Dunnellon.
Minnie H. Kennedy, 91
Minnie H. Kennedy, 91,
died Sunday, Sept. 18,
2010 peacefully in her
sleep. Minnie was born
Oct. 19, 1918 to William
and Julia Murray Horn-
ing in Springfield, Pa.


Minnie married Roy W
Kennedy on June 10,
1940. She and Roy
owned and operated ap-
pliance and furniture
stores in upstate New
York for many years, but
her first love was making
a safe and loving home
for her family.
Survivors include her
daughter and son-in-law,
Dawn and Don Caverly
of Ocala; granddaugh-
ters, Polly Murphy of
Cazenovia, N.Y., Amy
(Lonnie) VanOrden of
Brockport, N.Y.; four
great-grandchildren; sis-
ters, Ester Kennedy of
Dunnellon, Irene Marks
(Alan) of Phoenix, Ariz.,
Marcia (Lewis) Chappell
of Tioga, Pa., Nancy Mer-
ritt of Troy, Pa.; brother,
Jason Horning of Troy,


Pa.; brother-in-law, Dale
Massman of Dunnellon;
many nieces and
nephews and her ex-
tended family at Timber-
Ridge Nursing Facility,
Ocala.
She was predeceased
by her husband, Roy
Kennedy and grandson,
Paul Murken.
Memorials may be
made to Minnie's
beloved church, the
First United Methodist
Church, 21501 West
Highway 40, Dunnellon,
FL 34431. Burial will be
at a future date in Troy,
Pa.
Roberts Funeral Home
of Dunnellon is in
charge of arrangements.
Beverly Breslin, 74
Beverly Carlyle Bres-
lin, 74, of Citrus Springs,


died on Thursday, Sept.
16, 2010 at her home
under the loving care of
her family and Hospice
of Citrus County.
Survivors include her
daughter, Linda Breslin-
Dourm (Andy) of Crystal
River, and her compan-
ion, George Field of Cit-
rus Springs.
A visitation will be
held on Thursday,
September 23, 2010
from 2 to 3 p.m. from the
Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River, FL where a fu-
neral service will be
conducted at 3 p.m.
Cora Williams, 86
Cora L. Williams, 86, of
Dunnellon, died on Sept.
16, 2010 peacefully in
her sleep.
Survivors include her


daughter, Sarah Glass
(Ronnie) of Dunnellon.
Arrangements by
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation.
Mary Ash, 80
Mary G. Ash, age 80, of
Dunnellon died Sept. 14,
2010 after a long battle
with cancer at the Citrus
Hospice Care Center
and her loving family.
She is survived by her
husband of 63 years,
George C. Ash, Jr.; four
daughters and three
sons and only God know
how many loving grand-
children.
A memorial service
will be held at River
Gardens Baptist Church
on Oct. 2, 2010 at 11 a.m.
with covered dish lunch
afterwards.


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Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010 7


mi F .lI


JI-I- UHYAN/IIVeriand News
DeVries and Ron Lytle share a laugh during DeVries' 100th birthday celebration.


BIRTHDAY
continued from page 1
DeVries' bride of 17
years, Gretchen, said it
was nice so many friends
and regular customers
who know her husband
stopped to say hello and
happy birthday.
"He just surprises
everyone," she said.
"He's got a good heart
and good lungs."
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7Vlla


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husband.
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she said.
DeVries' daughter,
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"He's been blessed with
good friends everywhere
he's been. He's got a lot
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was going to start. He
prepared me for that."
Store employee Pat
Hart said it turned out to
be a nice celebration.
"There was a lot of
people in here from his
friends to regular cus-
tomers," she said.
"(John) looks pretty
good."


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continued from page 1

revenue sources, and I
know there are some
against the red-light
cameras. If you're poor,
then don't break the law,
it won't cost you any-
thing. Why shouldn't we
get money from people
who are breaking the
law? If we can change
behavior, then fine. If we
have to get in their pock-
etbook to change their
behavior, then fine."
In addition to the for-
mal vote on the budget,
the City Council will de-
cide whether to raise
water and sewer rates 10
percent. A resident who
uses an average of 4,000
gallons for both water
and sewer would see
their monthly bill rise a
total of $4.77 a month,
said Jan Smith, city fi-
nance supervisor, at the
City Council's last budget
meeting. It's the second
time in three years the
city would raise rates.
Ward said two years ago,
the city OK'd a 5 percent
hike in rates.
"People howled," Ward


- BUDGET


said. "I haven't heard a
word yet about this one."
The Tax Increment Fi-
nancing District, or CRA,
will see a little
more than 14 per-
cent drop in its
proposal, going
from $335,298 the
past fiscal year to
$287,827 in the
new fiscal year,
which begins Oct.
1. i
Key proposals Fred'
for next year's Mayor
budget include: with
Hiring an addi- LisaA
tional road crew has f
for the Roads and reve
Streets Depart- sou
ment. Leaders
are seeking a 33 percent
increase in budgetary
expenses, going from
$629,254 to $837,139.
Adding four additional
police officers to the cur-
rent staff, a K-9 unit and
a boat officer to patrol
the river. Currently, the
police department is at-
tempting to secure
grants to fund a K-9 and
a new boat. Overall, the
police department is
asking for a nearly 61
percent increase in its
budget, from $746,053 to


$1,119,229.
Purchasing 10 new sets
of bunker gear and 12 air
packs for the fire depart-
ment. The cost to
add those items
adds up to
slightly less than
$106,000.
Also, the city
will spend $10,000
to fund a feasibil-
ity study on new
buildings for the
Ward police and fire de-
leased apartment.
how "Someway
igiere you've got to bite
rund the bullet," Ward
nue said. "Living in
ces. civilized society is
not free. There's a
lot of people on fixed in-
come or no income at all.
It's a real tough thing.
"If we can take and add
a boat and it pays for it-
self, guess what? It does-
n't cost the citizens and
we can clean up problems
on the river.
"That's the kind of
proactive thinking that
Lisa is coming up with,"
he added. "She's making
things happen, not dig-
ging deeper into the
pockets of the taxpayers.
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8 Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010


Riverland sports




Chicas-Aguilar paces Dunnellon cross country runners


LIZ WOODWARD
For the Riverland News
Gathering at the Univer-
sity of Florida golf course
on Saturday, hundreds of
high school and college en-
trants competed in the
Mountain Dew Invita-
tional, a race on a chal-
lenging course. The
starting gun sounded for
the first race, college
women, at 8a.m., followed
by the college men, varsity
women, varsity men and
then junior varsity races.
Victor Chicas-Aguilar, 17,
was the fastest of the Dun-


Tigers compete at Mountain Dew Invitational at UF


nellon varsity male run-
ners. Chicas-Aguilar fin-
ished with a time of 18:34
and placed 124th out of
317.
"When I was running I felt
like I was going to die, but I
never gave up, even though
my leg froze up," Chicas
said. "'Never give up' is my
message to everyone."
Chicas hopes to be run-
ning under 17 minutes by
the end of the season. His
personal record for last
season was 18:17.


Closely following Chicas
was Chad Whithead, Dun-
nellon's second-place run-
ner. Whitehead, 16, posted
a time of 19:04 and placed
155th.
"When I was running I
thought I was going to pass
out at the end," Whitehead
said. "I should have started
out more slowly and ended
up much faster."
Dunnellon's lone varsity
female, Brittany Lakhani,
finished the course with a
time of 23:47 placing


152nd.
"The season is early and
we still have a long way to
go. I foresee this being a
great year for boys cross
country," said Shawn Cuth-
sall, Dunnellon's boys
coach.
Victor Chicas-Aguilar com-
petes in the Mountain Dew
Invitational on Saturday at
the University of Florida.
Chicas-Aguilar finished
with a time of 18:34.
JULIE MANCINI/For the Riverland News


Colts top Tigers, 38-17


Big plays doom

Dunnellon in

first loss of year
JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
CITRA North Marion
proved it had plenty of thor-
oughbreds in its stable of play-
makers Friday night at Stan
Toole Memorial Stadium.
The Colts broke open a close
game, 21-17, with two big third-
quarter players, both coming
off turnovers to fend off Dun-
nellon and come away with a
38-17 victory
After forcing the Tigers to
punt on their first possession of
the second half, North Marion
running back Jamie Gilmore
burst down the sideline for a
78-yard score, giving the Colts a
28-17 lead. Gilmore finished
with 130 yards on 10 carries, in-
cluding first-half touchdown
runs of 3 and 17 yards, the lat-
ter of which proved to the dif-
ference for North Marion.
Two possessions later, North
Marion capitalized on a Dun-
nellon turnover as quarterback
Chase Tuten connected with
freshman Jake Rodenberry for
a 57-yard touchdown reception,
giving the Colts a 35-17 lead and
all of the momentum.
Despite a solid first half in
which the Tigers kept in stride
with the powerful Colts' of-
fense, Dunnellon couldn't an-
swer in the second half. The
Tigers were limited to 71 yards
of offense after gaining 166 in
the first two quarters. Dunnel-
lon fumbled twice and punted
five times on eight second-half
possessions. The Tigers eight
possession ended when the
horn sounded on the game
clock.
"Big plays, turnovers. Pe-
riod," said Dunnellon coach


JULIE MANCINI/For the Riverland News
Dunnellon High School's Deontae Rogers, a defensive back, and Jordan Butler, a linebacker,
wrap up North Marion's Jamie Gilmore on Friday night during the Tigers' loss to the Colts, 38-
17. Gilmore rushed for three touchdowns and 130 yards against Dunnellon.


Frank Beasley, whose team
dropped to 2-1 with the loss.
"We were moving, we just
couldn't convert on third downs
when we needed to. We'll be al-
right."
Beasley knew the challenges
and difficulties of trying to con-
tain the Colts' playmakers.
"It's hard man, it's hard," he
said. "It's just difficult to de-
fend."
The Tigers seemed to have
the answers in the first half to
keep the contest close. After
North Marion opened the game
with a 12-play, 64-yard drive,
but Dunnellon cut the lead to 7-
3 with a 23-yard field goal at-
tempt on the Tigers' second


possession of the game.
The Colts wasted little time
responding, scoring on a 6-play,
65-yard drive aided by a 28-yard
run by C.J. Richardson.
Gilmore capped that drive with
his second touchdown of the
opening half, giving North Mar-
ion a 14-3 lead.
Dunnellon, thanks to a 30-
yard kickoff return by Wesley
Beasley and an unsportsman-
like conduct penalty on the
Colts, drove 45 yards on nine
plays as Devin Barber's 1-yard
run cut the lead to 14-10.
Each squad traded touch-
downs to close out the half, in-
cluding the Tigers' four-play
drive with less than a minute


left in the second period. Dur-
ing the drive, Dunnellon's Jar-
ret Mitchell was intercepted
but the Tigers forced and re-
covered a fumble on the same
play as Mitchell connected with
Patrick Lavan for a 39-yard
scoring pass with eight seconds
left on the clock. The scored cut
the Colts lead to 21-17.
However, Dunnellon was
never able to recover from the
two big plays to start the second
half.
"It set the tone for the whole
half," Beasley said. "When
you're two scores down and
with what we're trying to do of-
fensively by controlling the
clock, it was tough."


PATRICK HEINRITZ
For the Riverland News
A special-teams miscue
proved costly last Thursday for
the Dunnellon High School jun-
ior varsity football team as the
Tigers lost to North Marion, 14-
13, at Ned Love Field.
The Tigers rolled to a 13-0
lead in the first half, thanks to
a 15-yard touchdown run from
Donte Lerma and a 20-yard
score from J'Von Swoll. How-
ever, Dunnellon's point after at-
tempt on Swoll's touchdown
was blocked, which would
prove costly in the second half.
Despite the miscue, it was the
Tigers' special teams prevail-
ing throughout the night. Tyler
Powell, Shane Williams and
Bryan Bolley each blocked a
punt in the first half. Dunnel-
lon's Michael Roberson inter-
cepted a North Marion pass in


the first half.
The first quarter went by fairly
quickly with the only highlight
coming from #17 of the Tigers
blocked the Colts punt with 53.4
seconds left in the first quarter.
Neither team scored in the
third quarter as the Tigers went
into the final period leading 13-
0.
The Colts finally found their
way onto the board when Aaron
Griner connected with Dom-
inque Brown for a 25-yard touch-
down, but their ensuing
two-point conversion failed as
Powell stopped North Marion's
attempt.
North Marion recovered the
following onside kick, but fum-
bled on its first possession of the
drive.
The Tigers, with a little more
than seven minutes remaining
in the contest, fumbled as the
Colts recovered the turnover in


JULit MANINI/I-or the HIverland News
Dunnellon High School junior varsity football player Chris
Smith squeezes past a group of North Marion defenders for a
gain of a couple of yards. The Tigers fell, 14-13, to the Colts.
Dunnellon plays Citrus at 7 p.m. today at Ned Love Field.


the end zone. North Marion took
the lead, 14-13, as Aaron Griner
connected with Dominque
Brown for the two-point conver-
sion.
"Disappointment," said Dun-


nellon coach Bob Abbatecola,
adding: "We lost the game."
Dunnellon will look to bounce
back at 7 p.m. tonight as the
Tigers host Citrus at Ned Love
Field.


MCYFL


results

Senior Wildcats 44,
Senior Tigers 7
Quarterback Dante
White went 4-of-10 passing
for 60 yards Saturday at
Jervey Ghantt Park as the
Senior Tigers fell to the
Senior Wildcats, 44-7.
Maxwell Smith had one
reception for 50 yards as
well as an extra point con-
version reception, while
Mark "Bo" Dewitz rushed
for 43 yards on four carries.
Kane Parks added 30 yards
rushing on three carries
and Chris Perez had 50
yards on the ground and
five tackles before an in-
jury knocked him out of the
game.
Defensively, Devin
"Bubba" Sims had one
fumble recovery and three
tackles for the Senior
Tigers. Kyle McMann
recorded two tackles.
"Inexperience and in-
juries played a major part
in our loss," said Coach A.J.
Sirolli, whose team
dropped to 0-2. "As a whole,
we played well. We made a
few crucial mistakes that
gave our opponent some
big plays. I'm extremely
proud of the team; they are
starting to play as a team."
The Senior Tigers play at
3:35 p.m. Saturday at Jer-
vey Ghantt Park in Ocala.
Junior Tigers 18,
Junior Eagles 12
Josh Williams rushed
for 152 yards and a pair of
touchdowns, leading the
Junior Tigers to an 18-12
victory over the Junior
Eagles on Saturday at
Jervey Ghantt Park in
Ocala.
Kobe Jones had a 33-
yard kick off return and
quarterback Frank
Williams was 4-for-9 for
45 yards passing as the
Junior Tigers racked up
282 yards on offense. De-
fensively, the Junior
Tigers (2-0) stopped the
Junior Eagles inside the
5-yard line eight times.
The Junior Tigers play
the Junior Canes at 8 a.m.
Saturday at Jervey
Ghantt Park in Ocala.
Pee Wee Tigers 18,
Pee Wee Rams 8
Dexter White scored
twice, while Jay Fraziars
scored on a 40-yard recep-
tion from quarterback Jay-
den Gary on Saturday as
the Pee Wee Tigers im-
proved to 2-0 with an 18-8
victory over the Pee Rams
at Jervey Ghantt Park.
Jase Williams led the
Tigers with 10 tackles.
"We are very good," said
Coach Maurice Jones. "We
work hard at all times. Our
defensive and offensive
lines are the key for us. We
have a goal and the only
way to reach it is to get bet-
ter each day."
The Pee Wee Tigers play
the Pee Wee Browns at 6:30
p.m. Saturday at Jervey
Ghantt Park.


Golf scores


Rainbow Springs LGA
On Thursday Sept. 16,
there were 15 members of
the RSLGA who played
the tournament of "T"
and "F" holes only They
were divided into two
flights. The weather was


breezy and very nice.
First low gross: Toni Bul-
son in flight A; Shari Har-
ris in flight B. First low
net: M.A. Pletcher in
flight A; Rhea Raw in
flight B. Second low net:
Bette Hubbard in flight A;


Ann Carter and Audrey
Carey in flight B. Gree-
nies: Hole 4 M.A.
Pletcher; hole 8 Bette
Hubbard; hole 13 Janice
Botzenhart; hole 16 Terry
Herbert. Chip-Ins: Carol
Oman, hole 10.


Dunnellon JV football falls


to North Marion, 14-13


Mighty Mite power
Quarterback Peyton Sapp
prepares to hand the ball off
to running back Del Michaud
on Saturday at Crystal River
High School as Dunnellon
played Crystal River in the
Mighty Mite division of the Pop
Warner league. Dunnellon lost.
JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News






Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010 9


Tiger to tangle with Eustis


Dunnellon opens

district schedule

JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News

It's all or nothing beginning
this week for the Dunnellon
High School football team.
The Tigers begin their quest
to earn a second straight trip to
the state playoffs, as Dunnellon
hosts Eustis at 7:30 p.m. Friday
at Ned Love Field, the first of
seven straight district contests.
The top two finishers in each
district qualify for the playoffs.
Playoffs aside, Dunnellon
coach Frank Beasley has a bet-
ter idea of where his team
stands as the Tigers enter Week
Four of the regular season. The
longtime coach also knows what
his team has to do against Eu-
stis, winless under new coach
Jonathan Cannon.
"They're running completely
different stuff from last year,"
Beasley said. "It looks like he's
got more athletes, which is good
for them. They've got the ath-
letes to be competitive, but they
have yet to put it together. We're
hoping they don't do it against
us. They have the players to
beat you."
Key for his Tigers, Beasley
said, is limiting the big plays
such as the ones North Marion
made in its three-touchdown
victory, 38-17, over Dunnellon.
The Colts had four plays of 20
yards or more, including a 78-
yard touchdown run and a 57-
yard scoring pass.
"We can't give up big plays,"
Beasley said. "We're an offense
that's got to muster up first
downs, move the chains and
take our shots when we can."
Beasley credits the play of
quarterback Jarret Mitchell
with the ability to take those
shots when the opportunity
presents itself much like it did
against the Colts. Mitchell
eluded two North Marion de-


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
Quarterback Jarret Mitchell avoids a North Marion defender during second-half action Friday
night at Stan Toole Memorial Stadium. Mitchell drew praise from Dunnellon coach Frank
Beasley on his performance this season. "He's playing pretty well, he's doing things that we're
excited about," Beasley said of his senior signal-caller. "Jarret popped the ball out of there.
He's really throwing the ball well. ..."


fenders and found Patrick
Lavan in the end zone for a 39-
yard scoring strike toward the
end of the first half.
"He's playing pretty well, he's
doing things that we're excited
about," Beasley said of his sen-
ior signal-caller. "Jarret popped
the ball out of there. He's really
throwing the ball well. Obvi-
ously, it's one of the things we
were poking and prodding."
Dunnellon's loss against the
Colts wasn't wasted though. The
Tigers, in an attempt to control
the ball and chew time off the
clock, found two new potential
weapons in Devin Barber and
Jordan Butler, both linebackers.
"We found out some kids can
tote the ball," Beasley said. "We
ran some power stuff and it
gave them trouble. Devin and
Jordan pretty physical people.
Devin turned out to be a pretty
decent ball carrier. I think
Devin can be just as lethal as a


blocker and toting the ball on
offense."
A healthy squad will certainly
bolster making a run at a sec-
ond consecutive playoff. Cur-
rently, the Tigers are without
receiver Malaun Humbert,
who's recovering from a broken
foot he suffered in the spring.
Carl Jackson, a defensive
back/running back, and Dillion
Wright, defensive end, missed
last week's contest against the
Colts with injuries. Beasley said
he hopes to have all three back
in the coming weeks.
"Getting them back, maybe
we'll get a little charge," he
said.
In the meantime though, it'll
be business as usual, Beasley
said.
"We'll keep on keeping on
and continue to figure out what
we're really good at," Beasley
said. "Then maybe we can run
the table like we did last year."


DUNNELLON VS. EUSTIS
* WHEN/WHERE: 7:30 p.m.
Friday at Ned Love Field.
* RECORDS: Dunnellon 2-1,
lost to North Marion last week,
38-17; Eustis 0-3, lost to East
Lake, 49-7.
* WHO TO WATCH: Dunnellon
RB/DE Patrick Lavan had three
receptions for 57 yards, including
a 39-yard touchdown catch.
Lavan also forced a fumble on
QB Jarret Mitchell's lone inter-
ception. The pass was intended
for Lavan. Mitchell finished 8-for-
15 for 75 yards and one intercep-
tion. RB Dillan Dewitt rushed for
48 yards on 11 carries, while
sophomore RB Malcom Ross
added 60 yards on 15 carries. LB
Devin Barber, serving time in the
offensive backfield, rushed for 25
yards on six carries and scored
on a 1-yard run... Eustis' lone
score last week came on a touch-
down pass from Sophomore QB
Dustin Dunham to WR Ed Perry.


Inaugural golf tourney
planned for Oct. 2
The Tri-County Preg-
nancy Center will host the
first annual golf tourna-
ment at 8:30 a.m. Saturday,
Oct. 2, at Rainbow Springs
Golf & Country Club.
Entry fee is $65, which in-
cludes your cart, range
balls, green fees, lunch
and awards. The grand
prize for a hole-in-one will
be a new scooter. The pro-
ceeds from this fundrais-
ing event will support the
mission at the Tri-County
Pregnancy Center.
For more information
about the tournament or
to sign up, call (352)528-
0200.
Rails to Trails bike ride
slated for Sunday, Oct. 3
The 16th annual Rails to
Trails Bike Ride will
begin at 7 a.m. Sunday,
Oct. 3, on the Withla-
choochee State Trail at
the North Apopka Avenue
trail crossing.
The entry fee is $20 for
riders who pre-register by
Sept. 11. Those will regis-
ter after that day, the cost
will be $25 per rider.
Rides of varying length
will be offered.
For more information or
to register, visit www.rail-
stotrailsonline.com. For
more information about
the ride itself, call (352)
527-9535 or e-mail
wiltz@tampabay rr. com.
Rainbow's End to host
golf tourney Oct. 9
Rainbow's End Golf
Club will host the Strirups
'N Strides Therapeutic
Riding Center 18-hole golf
tournament on Saturday,
Oct. 9. Strirups 'N Strides
is a nonprofit organization
that provides therapeutic
horseback riding and car-
riage driving to people
with physical, mental or
emotional challenges.
For more information,
call Laney McGivern at
(352) 249-4484 or Jim Olson
at (352) 861-7185 or Stir-
rups 'N Strides at (352)
427-3569.


282-0923 RIV

BUDGET SUMMARY
Southwest Florida Water Management District Fiscal Year 2010-2011

THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT ARE 3.9% LOWER THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL
OPERATING EXPENDITURES.


I. REVENUES


CASH BALANCES BROUGHT FORWARD


AD VALOREM TAXES
Districtwide
Alafia River Basin
Coastal Rivers Basin
Hillsborough River Basin
Manasota Basin
Peace River Basin
Pinellas-Anclote River Basin
Withlacoochee River Basin


SPECIAL CAPITAL
MILLAGE GENERAL REVENUE PROJECTS
PER $1,000 FUND FUNDS FUNDS


TOTAL
BUDGET


0.3770 102,683,568
0.2163
0.1885
0.2300
0.1484
0.1827
0.2600
0.2308


OTHER REVENUES
Permit and License Fees
Intergovernmental Revenue
Interest Earnings
Other
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES


TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND BALANCES





II. EXPENDITURES


WATER RESOURCES PLANNING & MONITORING
ACQUISITION, RESTORATION & PUBLIC WORKS
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF LANDS & WORK
REGULATION
OUTREACH
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
ADMINISTRATIVE AND OPERATIONS SUPPORT
RESERVES FOR CONTINGENCIES
RESERVES FOR WATER SUPPLY & RESOURCE
DEVELOPMENT
COMMISSIONS FOR TAX COLLECTIONS

TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES
AND RESERVES
ESTIMATED ENCUMBRANCES





Southwest Florida
Water Management District

WATERMATTERS.ORG 1-800-423-1476


SPECIAL CAPITAL
GENERAL REVENUE PROJECTS
FUND FUNDS FUNDS


$31,293,358 $11,812,646
24,008,317 75,917,732
S 9,569,641 8,752,489
19,673,975
2,217,265 4,056,410
16,946,830 40,300
19,915,505 167,460
5,000,000 5,850,000
17,459,647


3,227,272


3,938,352
3,700,520
13,190,868
9,549,081
6,358,645
15,711,275
4,247,897


1,700,000
4,637,105 11,930,791
2,200,000 2,430,000
1,211,273


1,500,000 104,183,568
3,938,352
3,700,520
13,190,868
9,549,081
6,358,645
15,711,275
4,247,897



1,700,000
19,010,768 35,578,664
4,630,000
1,211,273


TOTAL
BUDGET


$43,106,004
$21,724,213 121,650,262
80,840 18,402,970
19,673,975
6,273,675
16,987,130
20,082,965
10,850,000
17,459,647


2,093,463


5,320,735


283-0923 RIV

NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING

The Southwest Florida Water Management District has tentatively
adopted a budget for fiscal year 2010-2011.

This notice is applicable to the following counties:


Charlotte
Hernando
Levy
Pinellas


Citrus
Highlands
Manatee
Polk


DeSoto
Hillsborough
Marion
Sarasota


A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the
TAXES will be held on:


Hardee
Lake
Pasco
Sumter

budget AND


Tuesday, September 28, 2010
5:01 p.m.
at
District Headquarters
2379 Broad Street
Brooksville, FL 34604-6899


The map below depicts the counties and basin board boundaries
within the Southwest Florida Water Management District.





L E V Y

MARION






SUMMER R SWFWMD
.H E R N N O portion of county
outside SWFWMD
"f .L--- I LAKE
county boundary
S pc-- S- basin boundary


HILLSBOROUGH
POL K





,," MANATEE )





ARASOTA

Southwest Florida
Water Maagement Disrict A R L T T E

WATERMATrERS.ORG 1-800-423-1476

00062M4


$19,420,217 $55,092,718 $1,294,285 $75,807,220


$112,431,946 $71,057,429 $20,510,768 $204,000,143

$131,852,163 $126,150,147 $21,805,053 $279,807,363


$131,852,163 $126,150,147 $21,805,053 $279,807,363

$268,448,048 $324,610,227 $4,028,064







THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE
ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED
TAXING AUTHORITYAS A PUBLIC RECORD.


OOOO62LXI





10 -' Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010


Out to pastor



Are you ready to grumble?


Normally, depend- grumbling. That area is
ing on which defi- simply the political
nition of normal arena. Every United
you are using, I am not States citizen has a free
given to much pass when it
grumbling. I do comes to com-
admit to every plaining about
now and then ex- politicians. After
ercising my right [^iF', all, we pay our
to complain a lit- I I taxes, usually on
tle, but it is not time.
anything to write This brings me
home about. to my first area of
If you would in- grumbling when it
quire with the Rev. James comes to politics.
Gracious Mistress Snyder Why is it that so


of the Parsonage,
she might have a differ-
ent opinion altogether. It
seems that the only thing
we really agree on is that
we do not agree on too
much. Our biggest dis-
agreement would be in
this area of grumbling.
Just the other day I was
exercising my First
Amendment right, when
my wife looked at me and
said, "Are you grumbling
again?"
What is a husband to
do? If I answer in the
negative, she gives me
one of those looks that
pierces asunder to the
soul. She has done this so
much that I can honestly
say that I have a holey
soul. Then again, if I an-
swer in the affirmative I
acknowledge that she is
right and I am grumbling.
So I do not know what
grumbling really is or, if
like my wife insists, I am
the all-time record hold-
ing champion of the art of
grumbling. As far as I am
concerned, I just have an
opinion and like sharing
that opinion with all and
sundry
To develop the fine art
of grumbling there are
rules. For example, some
things are off limit. I
never grumble about my
wife's cooking or keeping
the house clean for the
simple reason that she is
the immaculate concep-
tion of effectiveness
when it comes to those
household chores and du-
ties. After all, I never
complain about someone
who prepares my meals
and has control of the in-
gredients that go into my
meal.
There is one area that
is a completely free-for-
all when it comes to


many elected to
office forget about paying
their income tax? I know
it only comes once a year,
every year and the taxes
are deducted on our pay-
roll, but everyone knows
how easy it is to forget to
pay taxes. I am seriously
considering running for
some political office, any
office will do, just for the
benefits; huge salary,
enormous retirement
benefits, the rest of my
life healthcare and I can
forget to pay my income
tax. What other profes-
sion offers so much for so
little brainpower?
Another area of grum-
bling has to do with
telling the truth. What
other profession is built
upon lie after lie after


lie. Then when caught in
a downright lie, you ex-
plain it away by saying,
"That was taken out of
context." Or, "I did not
have sex with that
woman."
In just about every pro-
fession, as far as I can
think of, except used-car
salesmen and televange-
lists, there are penalties
to pay if you tell a lie.
However, in the area of
the professional politi-
cian you cannot climb the
ladder in politics unless
you are an expert Lies-
man. Moreover, you do
not have to be that good
of a liar. I am thinking
about writing a song enti-
tled, "The Washington
Liesman," and have Glen
Campbell sing it for us.
This, as far as I can un-
derstand, is a bipartisan
problem. Both sides of
the aisle have developed
unparalleled expertise in
this area. And the Ameri-
can taxpayer has paid
handsomely for this ac-
complishment.
That is exactly why this
is fertile area for profes-
sional grumbling. The
motto of the Professional
Political Grumbler Asso-
ciation is, "I am neither a
Republican nor a Democ-


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rat, I am simply against
anyone in office."
We are now encroach-
ing the new election
cycle. All these election
cycles have me in a dizzy
frame of mind. I am not
sure whom to vote for this
time. I am thinking about
starting a write in cam-
paign for Mr. Ed, the talk-
ing horse. He had more
sense in his left hoof than
any 97 politicians com-
bined. At least there were
periods when Mr. Ed
would not talk. Trying to
find time when a politi-
cian is not talking is
about as frustrating as
paying your taxes on
April 15. No wonder
politicians are concerned
about climate change. All
that hot air in Washing-
ton.
The only good thing
about any election cycle
is that it gives me oppor-
tunity to vent some grum-
bling not associated with
my wife.
Looking at my tally
sheet for the upcoming
midterm elections, my
mouth is watering. Never
has there been a time in
the history of the United
States of America when
See PASTOR page 11


I a


O %T
Copyrighted Material *

=. Syndicated Content .

Available from Commercial News Providers


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Answers on page 12


005UFO


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Cases Cleared by lips 143 3,843
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Blanchard, Merriam, Adel & Real Oldies 104.7
Kirkland, Attorneys PA Regions Bank
Bradford Builders Signature Brands LLC
Joseph E. Brannon, CPA Signs Unlimited
Brown & Brown Insurance of Florida Silver Springs Shores Reflection
Center State Bank South Marion Citizen
CenturyLink Stentiford Construction Services
Clear Channel Outdoor Steven Bird Insurance Agency, Inc.
Community Bank & Trust of Florida Sumter Electric Co-op
Concord Print SunTrust Bank
Cone Distributing Svinga Brothers
Creative Vinyl Systems Townley Engineering & Manufacturing
DeLuca Toyota Trademark Metals Recycling LLC
ESPN Sports Radio 900 Unite Publications
J. Neil Fisher, Builder Wal*Mart Supercenter/Silver Springs
Florida Thorobred Fillies Wal*Mart Supercenter/Easy Street
Graphics Plus Wal*Mart Supercenter/Top of the World
Hennessey Arabians Wal*Mart Supercenter/Dunnellon
Heritage Bank of the South Webster University
Humana MarketPOINT Windstream Utilities
K Country 93.7/WIND 95.5 FM WCJB TV-20
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Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010 11


Church events


Church slates fall
activities
Fall activities will begin
Sunday at Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church in Citrus
Springs. Sunday School
classes begin for all ages
under the direction of Sun-
day school superintendent,
Donna Wilker. Choir re-
hearsals are at 7 p.m. Thurs-
days. Sunday school classes
will not meet at 8 AM. The
Confirmation Class taught
by Pastor Lynn Fonfara will
also begin at 8 a.m. For
more information, call the
church at (352) 489-5511 be-
tween 9 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Monday through Friday
Women's Ministry to
host garage sale
The Women's Ministry of
the Rainbow Springs Vil-
lage Church will host a


Garage Sale from 8 a.m. to
3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 24, in
the church parking lot,
20222 S.W 102nd St. Road,
Dunnellon, south of Winn
Dixie and west of U.S. 41).
In case of rain, the sale
will be held inside the Fel-
lowship Hall. For garage
sale information, call Carol
Garceau at 489-6116.
For Church information,
call 489-0249 or visit
www.caringpeople.org.
Methodist church to
host bazaar
Rainbow Lakes United
Methodist Church will host
a flea market and bazaar
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Satur-
day, Sept. 25. The church is
at 19656 S.W Beach Blvd.
First Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church will host a
dual day at 11 a.m. Satur-
day, Sept. 26.


Sister Hazetta Churchwell
from Columbus, Ga., will be
the guest speaker. The
church is at 11840 N.
Williams St. For more infor-
mation, call 465-0064 or e-
mail
firstbethmissi@bellsouth.net.
Church to offer
flu shot clinic
The First United
Methodist Church of Dun-
nellon will have its annual
flu shot clinic from 9 a.m. to
noon Saturday, Oct. 2, at the
church at 21501 W State
Road 40. The clinic is open
to the public. No appoint-
ment is needed. Flu shots
are $30 and pneumonia
vaccines are $50. Bring
your Medicare-B card,
checks or cash. For more
information, call 489-4024.
'Blessing of the
Animals' set for Oct. 3
The Holy Faith Episco-
pal Church in Blue Cove
will host its second annual
"Blessing of the Animals"
at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 3.


All pet owners in the
area are invited to bring
their beloved animals,
large or small to this spe-
cial event. At the same
event, Father James Ger-
hart will also consecrate
the area of church prop-
erty, which has been set
aside for the "Holy Faith
Pet Memorial Garden."
Plans for this lovely setting
are being made and will be
announced soon. Place-
ment of pet ashes will be
available at no cost to any-

PASTOR
continued from page 10
there was more to grum-
ble about in the area pol-
itics. This has to be a
grumbler's haven.
This time it is like try-
ing to pick through a bar-
rel of rotten apples.
There has to be a good
apple somewhere, but
Lands 0 Liberty, by the


one in the community
St. John's to
host country fair
St. John's Church will
host an old-fashioned coun-
try fair Oct. 1 to 3 at its
church fairgrounds, at the
junction of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40.
The three-day event will
be from 4 to 10 p.m. Oct.
with a fish fry; 11 a.m. to 10
p.m. Oct. 2 with a chicken
barbeque; and from 1 to 6
p.m. Oct. 3 with a Spanish
meal. Festivites will also
time you find one it has
begun to rot.
I had been thinking
about how blessed our
nation has been and
thought of what the
Scripture says. "Blessed
is the nation whose God
is the LORD; and the
people whom he hath
chosen for his own inher-
itance." (Psalms 33:12
KJV).
God's blessing on our


include live music, car
show, quilt show, horse
drawn trolley rides,
crafters, games, bounce
house, climbing will and
dunking booth.
Pro-life group
to host event
National Life Chain will
host an event from 2 to 3
p.m. Sunday, Oct. 3, at the
Dunnellon Plaza parking
lot between Checkers and
Walgreens. Life Chain is a
pro-life group. For more in-
formation, call 489-2642.
nation is in danger of be-
coming a footnote in
some history book.
The Rev. James L. Snyder
is pastor of the Family of
God Fellowship, 1471 Pine
Road, Ocala, FL 34472. He
lives with his wife, Martha,
in Silver Springs Shores.
Contact him at (352) 687-
4240 or e-mail jamessny-
der2@att.net. The church
website is wwwwhatafel-
lowship.com.


rics/Gynecology

Meet Dr. Joseph Miller


Dr. Joseph Miller specializes in obstetrics, gynecology,
gynecologic surgeries (including minimally invasive
laparoscopic surgery) and urogynecology, which
addresses urinary incontinence and bladder prolapse.
He also is trained in infertility treatment and has a
special interest in the treatment of pelvic pain.
Dr. Miller received his medical degree from University
of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Stratford.
He completed a general surgery internship at Staten
Island University Hospital; and his OB/GYN residency at
Jersey Shore University Medical Center in Neptune, NJ.
Dr. Miller's practice focuses on a wide range of women's
health issues as well as comprehensive annual
examinations and preventative medicine practices.


Comprehensive Women's HealthCare
of Citrus County
700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Ste. 6
Crystal River, FL
352.794.6060

He is now accepting new patients.
Call to schedule an appointment today.


&SEVEN RIVERS


w REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
Your Life. Our Story.


Riverland News


Your Best Source for

Local News Local Sports Community Events

School News And More!


-_ Copyrighted Material

* Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers
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4& Call us at 489-2731
& Go to our website:
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Visit our office at
20441 E. Pennsylvania Ave.
Dunnellon, FL 34432
44 Fill out this form and mail
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12 --' Riverland News,Thursday,September 23,2010


Community events


Resident selected for
basin board
Dunnellon resident Bur-
ton "Burt" Eno was re-
cently appointed to the
Withlacoochee River Basin
Board by Gov. Charlie Crist.
Senate confirmation is re-
quired for the term, which
began Sept. 15 and will end
March 1, 2013.
Burton, 73, is a retired
University of Central
Florida professor and is
president of Rainbow
River Conservation.
Wall-Rives Post slates
activities
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post No. 58 and
Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon, hold its regular
meetings at 7 p.m. the first
Wednesday monthly. Din-
ner is served from 5:30 to
6:30 for members, wives
and prospective members.
The Dunnellon Young
Marines meet from 6 to 9
p.m. Tuesday.
Bingo is at 6 p.m. Thurs-
days. Doors open at 4. Re-
freshments are available.
The Saturday Outdoor
Flea Market is the third
Saturday monthly. Vendors
fee are $10.
The all-you-can-eat Pan-
cake Breakfast is from 7:30
to 10 a.m. the third Satur-
day monthly for $5 dona-
tion.
Eastern Star to host
fashion show
The Dunnellon Chapter
No. 235 of the Eastern
Star will host a Fashion
Show from 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 9, at
the Masonic Lodge on
Powell Road in Dunnel-
lon.
The models will be
wearing outfits by Bon-
worth Fashions. Tickets
are $15 and includes
lunch. Tickets can be
bought from members of
the chapter.
For more information
and tickets, call Joan Lin-
dell, worthy matron, at
465-3249, or Joan Coth-
ern, secretary, at 465-
0782.
Just Hands CPR training
to be offered
The Dunnellon Fire
Department, in conjunc-
tion with Munroe Re-
gional Medical Center,
will offer Just Hands CPR
training from 5 to 10 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 16, during
the annual Jazz Up Dun-
nellon festival. Everyone
who attends the class will
receive a free pass to the
fire department's
haunted house.
'Trail of Treaters' set for
Oct. 29
The Dunnellon Cham-
ber of Commerce's an-
nual "Trail of Treaters"
will be from 5 to 7 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 29. Business
that would like to be in-
cluded on the map should
call the chamber at 489-
2320.
Flea Markets to resume
at Depot
The Greater Dunnellon
Historical Society will re-
sume its monthly flea
markets on Sept. 11 at the
Dunnellon Depot. The
historical society will
partner with the Annie
Johnson Senior Center
for a pancake breakfast
that morning. Spaces are
still $10 and tables are
provided. Set up begins
at 7 a.m. and flea market



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. 0 -=?
-g o "


hours are 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Christmas parade
themes sought
The Dunnellon Cham-
ber of Commerce is sug-
gestions for the theme to
this year's Dunnellon
Chamber of Commerce
Annual Christmas Pa-
rade. Suggestions can be
e-mailed to Charlene
Williams at
gr8attd@yahoo.com or to
the chamber at dunnel-
1 o n c h a m -
ber@bellsouth.net. The
Chamber is looking for
registrations from bands,
youth clubs, business,
etc. to enter the parade.
Master Gardeners return
to Dunnellon Library
The Dunnellon Branch
of the Marion County
Public Library will host
the Master Gardeners on
Tuesday, Oct. 12. a panel
of Master Gardeners will
bring in some of their
gardening problems to
show you and describe
what went wrong and
how to cure the problem.
This is your chance to
bring in your own prob-
lems.
On Tuesday, Nov. 16,
the Master Gardeners
will return with a pro-
gram, winterizing your
garden and landscape.
Rainbow Springs
Garden Club to meet
The Rainbow Springs
Garden Club will meet at
1:30 p.m. today at the
American Legion Post 58,
N. U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Guda Taylor will give a
presentation on land-
scaping for Marion
County. As usual, she will
have plenty of plants on
display to reinforce her
program, and these may
be purchased during the
break.


Come early to register
or renew your member-
ship. Annual dues are
$10, and a visitor's fee is
$5, applicable toward
membership. Tickets for
the Fall Garden Tour and
Picnic will be on advance
sale for $10 for the Tour
and Picnic, and $5 for the
Tour only. On the day of
the tour, Tour only tickets
will be $7. The Fall Tour
and Picnic will be from 9
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thurs-
day, Oct. 28, with the pic-
nic beginning at 1 p.m. at
the Residents Park on the
Rainbow River.


Sign-in at the door to
be included in the Plant
of the Month door prize
drawings at the end of
the meeting. Grow and
Share plants will be
available during break
and refreshments will be
available for a small do-
nation. For additional in-
formation, call President
Barbara Roberts at 489-
9680.
Dunnellon Toastmasters
to have open house
The Dunnellon Toast-
masters Club 1176 will have
an open house on Tuesday,
Sept. 28. Guests will have
an opportunity to visit with
members and learn about a
typical meeting of Toast-
masters, the international
organization focused on


public speaking and lead-
ership skills.
The meeting will be held
at the Dunnellon Chamber
of Commerce, 20500 E.
Pennsylvania Ave. Doors
will open at 6:15 p.m. for re-
freshments and introduc-
tions, and an abbreviated
meeting will begin at 6:30.
"The Dunnellon Toast-
masters group is comprised
of longtime members with
years of experience, as well
as young professionals who
are working to improve
their careers," said Club
President Michelle Nav-
ickas. "Together we form a
great support group for
speakers of all levels.
"Whether you want to
brush up your skills for
your current career, would


like to get an edge as you
compete for a job, or would
just like to have fun, we en-
courage you to visit and see
what Toastmasters can
offer you," Navickas added.
During a typical meeting,
there are two or three pre-
pared speeches, evalua-
tions, and table topics,
during which members
practice impromptu speak-
ing. The Dunnellon club
meets the second and
fourth Tuesday of each
month at the Dunnellon
Chamber.
To learn more, visit
www.toastmasters. org, the
club Web site at http://dun-
nellon.freetoasthost.ws/ or
call Distinguished Toast-
master John Ryan at 489-
0959.


. When There's NOTime For PA

Dunnellon Chiropractic Also Treating

489-2995
| Pennsylvania Ave. (484) ',
|Cheryl Stanley-Brown D.C. Next to Charlie Horse Lauri SanleD. nc


1I2 '7 23% IL


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:00 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com

Catholic Community of
St. John the Baptist
Father Emmanuel Akalue, Pastor
MASSES
Saturday Reconciliation. .3:30 PM
Saturday Vigil............... 4:30 PM
Sunday.......8:00 AM and 10:30 AM
Sunday- Spanish................Noon
Mon. Thru Fri................ 8:00 AM
Holy Days.....8:00 AM and 5:00 PM
7525 S. Highway 41, Dunnellon
352-489-3166
k wwwstjohncc.com


DUNNELLON
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
21501 W. Highway 40
Rev. Eddie Fulford, Pastor
Sunday
Traditional Worship 8:00 AM
With Communion Each Week
Contemporary Worship 9:30 AM
Traditional Worship 11:00 AM
Nursery At All Services
Sunday School 9:30 AM & 11:00 AM
'i........ G od's l '.- i "
352-489-4026
wwwSharingGodsLight.or .


Dunnellon
Seventh-day
Adventist Church
Welcome To Our Services

Hwy. 41 & Hwy. 40
Saturday
Sabbath School...9:30 AM
Sermon............11:00 AM
Tuesday
Bible Study ...........4:00 PM
For more information:

352-489-3455
www.dunnellonsdachurch.con


Calvary
Baptist Temple
21841 S.W. Marine Blvd.
Rainbow Lakes Estates
Sunday
Sunday School ........9:45 a.m.
Worship Service.........11:00 a.m.
Evening Service..........5:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting............7:00 p.m.
Every 4th Sunday......5:00 pm.
"Share, Praise & Fellowship"
Pastor Jamie Parker
352-489-8962
"Please Join Us As We
Worship In His Name"

W Holy Faith
Episcopal
Church

19924 W. Blue Cove Dr.
Dunnellon
THE REV. J. JAMES GERHART


Rite I


Sunday
8:00 AM


Bible Study 9:00 AM
Rite II 10:00 AM
489-2685
Hall Available For
,Community Functions!

SDesep4er





Services
Sunday 2:00 pm
Wednesday 7:30 pm
Meets at
Holy Faith Church
in Blue Cove
19924 W. Blue Cove Dr.
PasorEdwrdThopsn^^^
465-1211 jlim^^


Mission Possible
MINISTRIES
V. David Lucas, Jr. / '
Senior Pastor
9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays
Worship ................. 10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
I Wednesday
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs..........7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am

Peace
Lutheran Church
Missouri Synod
Terry L. McKee, Pastor
Sunday
Adult Bible Class 9:00 A.M.
Sunday School 9:00 A.M.
Worship Service 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday
Bible Study 10:00 A.M.
Light Meal 6:30 P.M.
Bible Study 7:00 P.M.
The Church On The Hill
HWY 41,Just 5 miles
north of Dunnellon
489-5881


nature Coast

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.





WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG





Pastor Shawn Cutshall
(352)489-1788
Sunday
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Worship 11:00 AM
Disciple Training 6:00 PM
(Nursery & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday
AWANA 6:30 PM
Youth Group 6:30 PM
Bible Study 7:00 PM
81/2 Miles North of Dunnellon Off of
Highway 41, Left at Church Sign on
\ SW 5th Place


281-0923 RIV
NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING

The City of Dunnellon has tentatively adopted a
budget for 2010-2011. A public hearing to make
a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND
TAXES will be held on

September 27,2010

5:30 pm.
At
Dunnellon City Hall
20750 River Drive
Dunnellon, Florida 34431


"For where two or three gather together in My name, there am I with them." -




I GATHERINGS Ma"ew8:20


A DIRECTORY OF AREA CHURCHES


Dunnellon Presbyterian Church
Jeffrey W. Welch, Pastor

20641 Chestnut Street
Corner of Chestnut & Ohio Streets
In The Historic District
489-2682
Sunday D
Worship.................8:30 AM
Sunday School.........9:45 AM
Worship...............11:00 AM
Nursery Provided
For All Services
dunnpreschurch@bellsouth.net 00011--


E



cc





Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010 13


50th Anniversary



Richard "bones" and
Yvonne Crile of Dunnel-
Ion will celebrate their
50th wedding anniver-
sary on Sept. 30, 2010.
They were married in
Largo, Florida and have
two sons, Ronnie Crile
of Dunnellon and Richie
Crile of Anthony.
Bones is a retired police
sergeant from Largo.
Yvonne retired from the
Pinellas County School
System as a personnel
director.
Bones and Yvonne have
six grandchildren,
Brandy, Cody, Josh,
_Travis, Ryan and Con-
nor.


OvER 80 Anniversary Special
ITEMS Bring This Ad To Receive
Ice Cream All You Can Eat
& Salad Bar
Included Lunch Special $5.55 Per Person
Good For 2 People Exp. 9130110
IMo.- Sat
11352 N. Williams St. H
(352) 489-9763 (Reservations Welcome)




Learn while you

L Play Bridge


ENTER THE EXCITING WORLD OF CONTRACT BRIDGE!
OCALA DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB is starting a series of
"Learn While You Play" Bridge Games every Tuesday
at 9.30 a.m. at 516 NW Sanchez Avenue in Ocala.
There will be a short lesson before each session.
First Session: October 5
Accredited Instructor: Gerry Kuttas
Cost: $4.00 per session
SPartners will be available
For more information and preregistration
00060K call MARY HILL at 237-8221


I MWEMAKE YOUR CONCRETE LOOK GOOD!


ByR-Sufain YurCocrte


NEW CONCRETE


e nsal eworRelaeOldSlb
Driewas.-Div xtnios.Pais alwy


If you have Medicare and a supplement
insurance you may be eligible to
receive a power wheelchair with -n


I NO
Out-Of Pocket Cost*
If you qualify


Quality Mobility..
Home Medical Equipment Hospital Beds Wheelchairs
609 SE U.S. Highway 19, Crystal River
564-1414


Service for A/C, Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator & More!
* CallAnytime Same Day Service
46 Years Experience


Serving Citrus and
Marion Counties
352-445-0072
Doc Johnson
300636G


One Man
Low
Overhead
Low
Prices
#RA0067081


GREG'S ALUMINUM
"Pleasing people in Marion County
since 1982"
Pool Enclosure Rescreens
Vinyl & Acrylic Windows
Garage Door Screens
Vinyl Ceilings & Much More
465-0371
746-6663
Licensed & Insured Comp #2038


$1,500o
IT "PAYS" TO CONSERVE ENERGY.....
replace your old heating and cooling system with a high efficiency
system and you'll receive up to $1,500 in tax credits.
As always, our Comfort Club Maintenance Agreement
members receive additional discounts as well!
Call us today for details and your free replacement estimate!
DUNNELLONs- MARION CITRUS 4897
Licensed & Insured #CAC 1813249 489-3917


Roy's Lawn
& Home Services
Lawn Maintenance
Handyman Services
Pressure Washing
S(No-Prssure) Singlel ClDaning






f Peewees
^ Irrigation
For all your sprinkler needs
Summer Special.... $39.95
Adjust all zones for coverage, Reprogram Timer
for proper run time per zone and watering Days.
GET A FREE BATTERY for your timer
352-629-9300
licensed insured


Handyman Service WE
Finish Carpentry WE FIX
-interior/exterior ( SPRINKLERS
Pressure Cleaning
S"From floors to ceilings and
everything in between"
*Kitchen, Baths* Cabinets
SCeramic Tile Trims
SMolding-Drywall Repairs Accurate Underground
Licensed & Insured Systems LLC
L 489-3622 (352) 445-1403
489-3 2'-- Licensed #10719 & Insured


VERRV Y4JWARTlI
IRRIGATION LLC. 3398S.W. 74thAve., Bay 101, Ocala
Seasonal Special
$g 4 95 : Reset Controller
4 9 Adjust Spray Heads to Correct Spray Pattern
Complete System Inspection
We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation.
Certified Irrigation Auditor Call for details Licensed* 90
Fully Insured WINE
Member of Florida 352-237-5731 co.mp#7085 2010,2009,200
I- irrigation Society .'/jl-
Serving Marion County Since 1982 Citil~I


Marion County
352-489-5350= t
1-800-343-2578
AQUA WELL
& SEPTIC TANKS
PUMP SERVICE WA7TR CONDITIONING
SEPTIC CLEANING S REPAIR

Clean Your Septic Tank Every
3 Years to Avoid Problems



PAUL GLENN'S
Complete Painting
& Pressure Cleaning
Roof and Driveway Coatings
Ranch & Farm Fences
Wall & Ceiling Texture
Gutter Cleaning
Repairs
Quality Work for Less 489-5098
-Free Estimates 41 Years Experience


Mica Wood Residential Commercial


Custom Cabinets
Wellborn Forest Dealer
1795 W. NW Lenox Lane
Dunnellon, FL 34434
352-489-2822
Since 1993 Mobile: 840-3703
DON ROBINSON Email:
Owner threedl@aol.com

AIRCONITIONING


S465-5353
CAC035472-LIC.& INS


Cabinets
Counter Tops
Drywall
Painting
STile
(352) 465-2631
License #L04000014330


* Exterior & Interior
* Wallpaper Removal
* Pressure Washing
* Free Estimates
United States
Painting
Rick _
465-5068 ~
322-0406 Cell
Licensed Insured


Acrylic, Glass & Ia 7 6 T"GARAGE
Vinyl Windows SCREEN DOOR
Custom Made for
your Screen Room Starting at
s795
y t IIncludes: Deluxe Rubber Rollers, 8" kick-
NSTRUCTION plate, double threshold. 18/14 charcoal
CRC058138 screen, handles, locks and come-alongs.
Optional screen choices.
465-4629 Mobile Phone 362-5277


Drama Group variety


show slated


The Greater Dunnellon Historical Society will partner with the Drama
Group of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church for a "Laugh Until You Cry"
variety show on Saturday.
The show will be at 7:30 p.m. at the historic depot, 12061 S. Williams St. in
Dunnellon. Doors will open at 7. Tickets are $10 at the depot Refreshments
will be available at the variety show for a donation.
The show will be presented in two acts and will feature members of St.
John's Drama Group in about a dozen acts, including "Liberace," "The Dun-
nellon Belly Dancers," "Late Night Date," "Village People," "The Nuns of
St. Johns" and many more.
Ticket sales will benefit the Greater Dunnellon Historical Society
"The partnership was formed to share the talents of the diverse groups
with greater audiences," said Jon Sharkey, president of the Historical Soci-
ety "We also hope to spark the interest of community members who might
want to get involved with our organizations."
For information, visit the depot Tuesdays or call 465-5005 and leave a mes-
sage.


Follow us: Facebook.com/youtoepiadayspa
COUPON
Bay Sipa 5.00
THINKING Any Service:
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A CHANGE? New Clients Only ,
JOIN OUR--------..
WINNING Facials
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Changes of Life
Home Services, Inc.
Servicing
Dunnellon to Pine Ridge
Senior Home Cleaning
Weeding & Raking
Windows chS.
Bonded & Insured W




Southern Lawn & Farm
Services, LLC
Commercial/Residential
Complete Tractor & Bobcat
Services
Full Service Lawn Care
Debris Cleanup
Barn & Fence Install/Repair

(352) 572-45571

HOME IMROVEMEN


Small Engines, Generators
fTractors Mowers Compressors
Pressure Washers ATV Repairs
Two Wheel Scooters


489-54961


LEE'S
PRESSURE WASHING
ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY
Homes Pool Areas
Gutters Driveways
Gutter Cleaning
Quality Work s 1I
For Low Prices! mI
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Sparkling Clean Pool Care!
* Weekly Pool Service ,
* Pool Babysitting
* Expert Repair Department
BA WW


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I SPRINKLER REPAIRS


=:j


II






14 --' Riverland News,Thursday,September 23,2010


MONDAY, 2:00 P.M.




Advertisements may be cancelled as soon as
results are obtained. You will be billed only for the
dates the ad actually appears in the paper.
Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the


All ads require prepayment. We accept


rn ^_ -^^g |^


TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD, CALL Toll Free 1-877-676-1403
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M.







Riverland News


deadlines for placing ads, except for specials. made (
Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the Riverland News. We make every effort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate.
However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information.


e to check your advertisement the first day
iars. We will not be responsible for more
ne incorrect insertion. Adjustments are
only for the portion of the ad that is in error.


Males Bike
15" Blue frame,
Found in Rainbow
Lakes 352-489-4070



Caregiver/Companion
Keep your loved one
at home. Exp'd in
Alzheimers, total
personal care exc. refs.
352-489-9412/489-1980
HONEST RELIABLE
STUDENT
Available For Baby
Sitting, Errands,
& House Cleaning.
Call Ms. Jennings
(352) 445-5653







You can list any single
item priced under $100
for sale for FREE!



I y
Clean outyour closets go
throughyourgarage, attack
your attic and then use the
classified to get ndof stuff
younolonger use.
Andthe FREE lsting means
you have more money left over
afterthe sale


Just call and see how easy it is to
make money with the classifieds.
TOLL FREE
1-877-676-1403

Riverland News


Immediate
opening
for Client Services
Counselor
located in Crystal
River, Florida. Position
includes performing
child care eligibility/
case management.
Must be detail
oriented, have
computer skills, ability
to multi-task, learn
quickly, and work
independently.
Medical record and
client case manage-
ment experience,
and bilingual
(English/ Spanish)
preferred. Qualified
individuals should
submit a resume to
The Early Learning
Coalition of the
Nature Coast, Inc.
1564 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL.
34429, or fax resume
to 352-563-5933
by September 24th
at 5:00 PM.
Cover page must
include "Applying for:
Client Services
Counselor". Please
call 352-563-9939,
ext. 263 if you have
any questions.









Heat & Air Jobs
Ready to Work?
3 week accelerated
program. Hands on
environment. Nation
wide certifications
and Local Job Place-
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877-994-9904


ANNOUNCEMENTS


NOTICE: Calling this

number will subject you to

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work for You! (866)742-1373

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AUTO DONATIONS


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Towing, Tax Deductible, Non-

Runners Accepted,

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EQUIPMENT FOR SALE



NEW Norwood SAWMILLS-

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logs 34" diameter, mills boards

28" wide. Automated quick-

cycle-sawing increases

efficiency up to 40%!

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300N (800)661-7746 Ext 300N



FINANCIAL



IT'S YOUR MONEY! Lump

sums paid for structured

settlement or fixed annuity

payments. Rapid, high payouts.

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$Lawsuit Cash$ Advances.

Waiting for a legal settlement?

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Fast Approval! (888)495-8931


B
AIRLINES ARE
HIRING -
Train for high paying
Aviation Career. FAA
approved program. Fi-
nancial aid if qualified -
Job placement assis-
tance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance (866) 314-3769

Drivers
FOOD GRADE TANKER
DRIVERS NEEDED
OTR positions available
NOW! CDL-
A w/Tanker REQ'D.
Outstanding pay &
Benefits!
Call a recruiter TODAY!
(877)484-3042
www.oaklev
transport.com

DRIVERS-ASAP!

New Pay Increase!
37-43 cpm Fuel Bonus
-up to 4cpm! Need
CDL-A & 3 mos recent
OTR (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com

OTR Drivers
Wanted Food grade
Tanker Drivers Needed.
Class A-CDL w/tanker
endorsement
Competitive pay,
Benefits, Guaranteed
time off Prefer 2yrs
experience.
(800)569-6816
www.ottery
transportation.com





$Lawsuit Cash$
Advances. Waiting
or a legal settlement?
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Lowest Fees! Fast
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(888)495-8931


Buried in Debt?
Want to Save
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tation! (888)496-3167
Rated "A" with the BBB!

IT'S YOUR MONEY!
Lump sums paid for
structured settlement
or fixed annuity
payments. Rapid,
high payouts.
Call J.G. Wentworth.
(866)294-8772. A+ by
the Better
Business Bureau rating.





Steve BeeBee
Tree Service
Professional
Tree Work at
Reasonable
Prices
"ASK YOUR
NEIGHBOR"
Call Steve Or Cindy
(352)465-4117
(352)425-0295



Computers


Buried in Debt? Want to Save

Thousands & Eliminate Your

Debt up to 60%? We Can HELP!

Call NOW for a FREE

Consultation! (888)496-3167

Rated "A" with the BBB!



HELP WANTED



DRIVERS--ASAP! New Pay

Increase! 37-43 cpm Fuel Bonus

-up to 4cpm! Need CDL-A & 3

mos recent OTR (877)258-8782

www.meltontruck.com


Drivers FOOD TANKER
DRIVERS NEEDED OTR

positions available NOW! CDL-

A w/ Tanker REQ'D.

Outstanding pay & Benefits!

Call a recruiter TODAY!

(877)484-3042

www.oakleytransport.com



Drivers-CDL-A drivers. No

experience, no problem! Need

more training? We can help.

Must be 23. (888)632-5230.

wwwJoinWiltrans.com



OTR Drivers Wanted Food

grade Tanker Drivers Needed.

Class A-CDL w/tanker

endorsement Competitive pay,

Benefits, Guaranteed time off

Prefer 2yrs experience.

(800)569-6816

www.otterytransportation.com



MISCELLANEOUS



AIRLINES ARE HIRING -

Train for high paying Aviation

Maintenance Career. FAA

approved program. Financial aid

if qualified Housing available.

CALL Aviation Institute of

Maintenance (866)314-3769.


Quality Housekeeping
Honest & Dependable
Reasonable Prices
Free Est. (352) 563-0036



Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Rel able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201




TORE
CLOSING
I ANTIQUE BOUTIQUE I
Crystal River Mall
Outside Belks
I COME AND GETIr! I
EVERYTHING Will Go!




Refrigerator
LG 20 Cu. Ft. White,
bottom freezer w/
icemaker. 2 yrs. old.
$300.(352) 860-2098



CRYSTAL RIVER
Trash and Treasure Sale
Cry. Riv. Women's Club
Sun. Sept. 26th, 8a-2p
Collectibles, clothing,
Hshold, jewelry, crafts,
boutique, bike & lots
more! 320 N. Citrus Ave.
DUNNELLON
Sept 27th -Oct 2nd
8am to 2pm Daily
Ginat Flea Market &
Bake Sale.
Chili & hot Dogs
served for lunch
Ist United Metodist
Church W. Hwy 40
352-489-4026


RAINBOW
SPRINGS
WOODLANDS
Fri. Sept. 24th, 8-3
Alliance Women's
Yard Sale
At the Village
Church
20222 SW 102nd
St. Rd.





A-1 LADY BUYER!
BUYING! Old Jewelry,
old customer Jewelry,
Items of value,
antiques, fishing
tackle,men's
watches, guns
352-344-3809


DRIVER'S
CDL A DRIVERS
No experience, no
problem! Need more
training? We can
help. Must be 23
888-632-5230
www.JoinWiltrans
.corn


Government
Sponsored
Program
Subject:
Your Electric Bill
Must Be
A Home Owner,
(No Renters) Get a
$3,000.00 tax credit -
2011
Call 1(877)791-6142

Moblile Home Steps
2 sets, cost $400.
Asking $200. Obo.
(352) 795-3710


Government Sponsored

Program Subject payment Of

Your Electric Bill Must Be A

Home Owner, (No Renters) Up

to a 1,000.00 Utility Credit Get

a 3,000.00 tax credit for 2011

Call to see if you Qualify

(877)791-6142


OUT OF AREA REAL

ESTATE


BUY N.C. MOUNTAIN

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spectacular views, paved road.

High altitude. Easily accessible,

secluded. $45,000. Owner

financing: (800)810-1590

www.wildcatknob .com


SCHOOLS & EDUCATION


Heat & Air JOBS Ready to

work? 3 week accelerated

program. Hands on

environment. Nationwide

certifications and Local Job

Placement Assistance!

(877)994-9904


SPORTING GOODS


NATIONAL ARMS SHOW

GUN SHOW SEPT. 25-26

SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-5

ATLANTA EXPO CENTER

(3650 JONESBORO RD SE)

EXIT #55 OFF 1-285 BUY-

SELL-TRADE INFO:

(563)927-8176







ADVERTISING NETWORK^ OF FtoRIDA

Classified I Display | M 0o Dally

(' 2


(Week of September 20, 2010)


YOU'LL THIS!
ROMANCE FOREVER
Passion Parties
GIRLS NIGHT OUT
Are you interested in
hosting a Passion
Party. Have a great
time with friends in your
home. Call Cheryl
352-422-5907




NEW Norwood
SAWMILLS
LumberMate-Pro hand-
les logs 34" diameter,
mills boards 28" wide.
Automated quick
cycle-sawing increases
efficiency up to 40%!
www.NorwoodSawmilkcom/
300N
(800)661-7746 Ext 300N



-II
CA$H FOR GUNS &
GOLD, Concealed
Weapons Course
Gunslingers 341-4867

NATIONAL ARMS SHOW
GUN SHOW Sept 25-26
SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-5
ATLANTA EXPO CENTER
(3650 JONESBORO RD
SE) BUY-SELL-TRADE
INFO: (563)927-8176




GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES
Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
4x8 Open $490
5x8 Encl $1675
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto




Outstanding
English Bulldogs
Purebred, 9wks w/
health certificates
2 male, 1 female, white
$850 (352) 445-0554
POMERANIAN
PUPPIES
From 3 months up to 20
months. (352) 621-7731





4/2, DW, MH,
Wooded Lot, OWNER
FINANCEw/ qualified
buyer, $650. mo.
(352) 568-2500


BRAND NEW
RETAIL/MEDICAL
STORES,
1000 sf./$1000/mo. First/
last month, immediate
occupancy. 9755 N
Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs.
Call Jim Morton
Century 21 JW Morton
Real Estate Inc
800-543-9163
Jcenturv@tampabav
.rrcom





DUNNELLON
Rainbows End
2/1/1, $600.
(352) 465-4201
(352) 489-5350





DUNNELLON R.L.E.
2/1 /2/1,Newly remod.,
$650. + Fst/Sec. 20717
S.W. Beach Blvd.
(352) 572-2993






PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EOUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Ask About

Move-In

Special
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am 5:00pm
Recent Foreclosures Welcome

(352) 489-1021 l


CRYSTAL RIVER
20+ Open Houses
55+ gated Comm.
9/25/10 11-3pm
1601 SE 8th Ave
crvstalrivervillaae
hoa.com




HERNANDO Cit. Co.
1,284 sf, Clean, US 41 N.
Sabina's Plaza 586-4168




New Homes
$79,900







INV Golf & C.C.
across from driving
range 3/2/2, 3000 sf
needs work. $60,000.
(908) 322-6529




BUY MOUNTAIN
LAND NOW!!!
Lowest prices ever!
N.C. Bryson City 2.5
acres, spectacular
views, paved road,
High altitude. Easily
accessible, secluded
$45,000
Owner Financing
800-810-1590
www.wildcatknob
.com




3/2/2 Canal Home
Crystal River New roof,
Septic AC & appl's in-
cluded wood & tile firs.,
FP priv. dock fncd yrd,
$299K(352) 586-7128




I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Portable Sheds
Glenn (352) 302-0778




BUYING JUNK CARS
O Running or Not *
CASH PAID $150 & UP
(352) 771-6191

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPON
UNITED BREAST CANCER
FOUNDATION Free
Mammograms, Breast
Cancer rIno
www.ubcf.info FREE




FORD
'96, Ranger, Runs Good,
parts under warranty
$2,500
(352)489-9241 Ile mess


278-0923 RIV PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
TO: Unit #98 VERNA EDWARDS, 30 S. Desota St., Beverly Hills, FL 34465
You are notified that the property stored by you with STOR-RIDGE, INC., P.O. Box
1107, Dunnellon, FL 34430-1107, believed to be household goods will be sold to the
highest bidder for cash, at the above address on Oct. 1, 2010, at the hour of 10:00
A.M. to satisfy the delinquent rentals.: We reserve the right to refuse any and all bids.
Published in Riverland News, Sept. 16 & 23, 2010.

276-0923 RIV PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
FEDERAL LIEN CORP. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy
lien pursuant to Chapter 713.585 of the Florida Statutes on Sept. 30, 2010 at 10 A.M.
LOT # B27367 1996 BANDI Reg# FL0273JK Hull ID# BDM17103C696
Located at: CHESTER'S BOAT REPAIR 3101 S.W. 3RD STREET, Ocala, FL 34474 (352)
895-0011 Owner: WALTER CARL RAY IV 5520 SE 2ND PLACE, OCALA, FL 34471
Customer: MARK SWARBRICK 3340 NE 31 AVE., OCALA, FL 34474
Lienholder: None Lien Amount: $5A31.00
Pursuant to Florida Statute 713.585 the proceeding claims a lien on vehicle shown for
storage, labor and/ or services. Unless charges shown are paid in cash, said vehicles
will be sold for cash by public auction on date at time shown where vehicle located.
Owners or anyone claiming an interest have a right to a hearing prior to the sched-
uled auction which can be set by filing demand with Clerk of the Circuit Court in this
County and mailing copies of demand to all other owners and lienholders. Owner
can recover possession without judicial proceeding by posting bond per Florida
Statute 559.917. Auction proceeds in excess of charges due will be deposited with
Clerk of the Circuit Court.
Any persons) claiming any interests) in the above vehicles contact: FEDERAL LIEN
CORP. (954)384-7171 25% Buyers Premium *ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE *
LIC #AB0000288
Published in Riverland News, Sept. 16 & 23, 2010.

279-0923 RIV
Kelloway, Joyce C. 2010 CP 877 (B) Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MARION COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File Number.: 2010-CP-877 (B)
IN RE: ESTATE OF JOYCE C. KELLOWAY a/k/a JOYCE CAROLYN KELLOWAY
a/k/a JOYCE KELLOWAY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of JOYCE C. KELLOWAY a/k/a JOYCE CAROLYN
KELLOWAY a/k/a JOYCE KELLOWAY, deceased, whose date of death was July 1,
2010, and whose Social Security Number is 013-28-2759 is pending in the Circuit Court
for Marion County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post Office Box
1030, Ocala, Florida 34478-1030. The names and addresses of the Personal Repre-
sentative and the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, upon whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is Sept. 23, 2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/ CAROL RANIERI
6025 S.W. 57th Avenue, Ocala, Florida 34474
Attorneys for Personal Representative:
BRETT & REYNOLDS, P.A. /s/ Robert J. Reynolds, Esquire Florida Bar No.: 0021415
8810 S.W. Highway 200, Suite 122, Ocala, FL 34481
Published in Riverland News, Sept. 16 & 23, 2010.


Be sun
it appe
than


I Legals


I Legals






Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010 15


JEFF BRYANWRiverland News


ABOVE: Two-year-old Serenity Cohn sneaks up on her unsuspecting sister, Kaitlin, 12, not pictured, who was standing on the side of the dock Sat
ABOVE: Two-year-old Serenity Cohn sneaks up on her unrshp nos t iK In nwonurd gea f romdher sister. TOP L.EFT a~gno
urday at Rainbow Springs State Park. Serenity got the upper hand on her older sibling, who got a playful nudge from her sister.TOP LEFT: Magno-
lia Demers claps along to the music of Patchwork as her mother, Julie Anne, listens to the group's performance Saturday at Rainbow Springs State
Park as part of the annual Springs Festival.TOP RIGHT: Brandi Shickert reaches out to catch a Frisbee her father, Richard, tosses to her. The Shick-
erts were visiting Rainbow Springs State Park during the annual Springs Festival. BOTTOM RIGHT: Clint Cable, left, Beau Carnley, middle, and Alex
Carnley spot a fish in the water. The state park hosted part of the annual Springs Festival.The event comes to a conclusion this weekend. BOTTOM
LEFT: Eight-year-old Kaitlyn Robison emerges from the water while taking in underwater sights at Rainbow Springs State Park.


SPRINGS FESTIVAL EVENTS
Friday- 10 a.m. to noon, Juniper Springs Recreation Area Ocala National Forest.
10 a.m. to noon, symposium: Considerations for incorporating ecotourism and recreation into
a fragile aquatic ecosystem. At noon is the grand re-opening ofJuniper Springs Recreation Area;
refreshments will be served.
1:30 p.m.- Field Studies and Walking Tour. For all three events, RSVPto Rosie Burlock, Lake
George District Ranger Station, at (352) 625-2520, ext. 2562 or email; rburlock@fs.fed.us
6:30 p.m. full-moon guided canoe, kayaktour, Silver River State Park. Meet at the park at 6:30
p.m. We will transport your boat to the water, drive your car to Ray Wayside Park (Ocala Boat
Basin) and we will drive you backto SRSP Everyone must wear PFD. $10 per person. Limit of 25
boats. Guided by Mickey Summers and Capt. Vince Druding. Reservations are required; contact
Capt. Vince Druding at (352) 671-7140.
Saturday 9 a.m. -Florida Native Plant Society field trip -The September FNPS field trip
will be on Indian Lake State Forest Meet at the gate east of Baseline Road a half mile south of
Anthony-Burbank road. For information, contact Charlie Pedersen at dersc@doacs.state.fl.us or
call (352) 955-2253.
Saturday, Wrap-up event for the ninth annual Marion County Springs Festival, Ocala's
Downtown Square. Contact Nicky Aiken at (352) 465-8555 or e-mail i,, ,,l:., ,.i..1.. h "l,1,1i. i1 .,,
Saturdayand Sunday- Free Admission to select Marion County Parks, Carney Island Recre-
ation & Conservation Area, K.P Hole Park, Horseshoe Lake Park and Ray Wayside Park (Ocala
Boat Basin) with a coupon from the website. Contact Dan Burleigh at (352) 671-8560 or e-mail
daniel.burleigh@marioncountyfl.org





16 Riverland News,Thursday, September 23,2010


low 2"--


If il


Making This Right

Beaches


Claims
Cleanup

Economic Investment

Environmental
Restoration

Health and Safety

Wildlife


I was born in New Orleans. My family still lives here. We have
to restore the Gulf communities for the shrimpers, fishermen,
hotel and restaurant owners who live and work here.
Iris Cross, BP Community Outreach


No oil has flowed into the Gulf for weeks. But we know this is just the
beginning of our work. BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup
in the Gulf and that includes keeping you informed.

Restoring Gulf Communities
We can't undo this tragedy. But we can help people get back on their feet.
We have been working with impacted communities since day one.

Partnering with local governments and community organizations, my job is
to listen to people's needs and frustrations and find ways to help. We have
19 community centers and teams in four states, listening and helping.

Restoring The Economy
BP is here in Gulf communities with shrimpers, fishermen, hotel and
restaurant owners, helping to make them whole.

More than 120,000 claim payments totaling over $375 million have
already gone to people affected by the spill. We have committed a
$20 billion independent fund to pay all legitimate claims, including lost
incomes until people impacted can go back to work. And none of this
will be paid by taxpayers.

BP has also given grants of $87 million to the states to help tourism
recover and bring people back to the Gulf beaches.

Restoring The Environment
We're going to keep looking for oil and cleaning it up if we find it. Teams
will remain in place for as long as it takes to restore the Gulf Coast.

And we've dedicated $500 million to work with local and national scientific
experts on the impact of the spill and to restore environmental damage.

Thousands of BP employees have their roots in the Gulf. We support
over 10,000 jobs in the region and people here are our neighbors. We
know we haven't always been perfect, but we will be here until the oil
is gone and the people and businesses are back to normal. We will do
everything we can to make this right.


For general information visit: bp.com
For help or information: (866) 448-5816


restorethegulf.gov
Facebook: BP America
Twitter: @BP_America
YouTube: BP


For claims information visit: bp.com/claims
floridagulfresponse.com


0 2010 BP, E&P


bp


I. '




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