Title: Riverland news
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100090/00018
 Material Information
Title: Riverland news
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Dunnellon FL
Dunnellon, FL
Publication Date: September 2, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Dunnellon (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Marion -- Dunnellon
 Notes
General Note: "The newspaper built on community pride."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 14, no. 36 (Apr. 11, 1996).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100090
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 34953283
lccn - sn 96027433

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

00009-02-2010 ( PDF )


Full Text









Riverland


SERVING DUNNELLON AND RAINBOW SPRINGS





News


Thursday, September 2, 2010


Vol 28 No. 46


KP Hole swim beach
temporarily closed
The Marion County
Health Department
notified the Marion
County Parks and
Recreation Depart-
ment that two consec-
utive water samples
taken from KP Hole,
9435 S.W 190th Ave.
Road, have higher
than recommended
levels of fecal col-
iform bacteria, neces-
sitating the temporary
closure of the swim
beach. However, the
area is still open for
access for tubing,
boating and scuba div-
ing activities. Parks
and Recreation staff
will post notice when
the area is open again
for swimming.
The Marion County
Health Department
conducts biweekly
water testing during
the summer. The
county conducts
monthly water testing
year-round at the
county's permitted
public swim beaches.
Christmas parade
themes sought
The Dunnellon
Chamber of Com-
merce is suggestions
for the theme to this
year's Dunnellon
Chamber of Com-
merce Annual Christ-
mas Parade.
Suggestions can be e-
mailed to Charlene
Williams at
gr8attd@yahoo.com or
to the chamber at
dunnelloncham-
ber@bellsouth. net.
The Chamber is look-
ing for registrations
from bands, youth
clubs, business, etc. to
enter the parade.
RES Advisory Council
to meet Tuesday
The first Romeo El-
ementary School Ad-
visory Council
meeting will be at
2:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 7, in the Media
Center. Officers will
be elected at this
meeting as organiza-
tion begins this year.
Plan to join us if you
are interested in
planning and charting
success for Romeo El-
ementary School.
PTO is also having
its beginning of the
year meeting Wednes-
day, Sept. 8, in the
Music room. Plans
need to begin for
Romeo Round-Up,
scheduled for Oct. 28.



g -1






Visit our website
for more stories
and photos
riverlandnews.com

Riverland

News
20441 E. Pennsylvania Ave.
Dunnellon, FL 34432


Riverland News

VISIT US:
www.riverlandnews.com
CALL US:
489-2731


City unveils budget proposal


Officials: Taxes not going up


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News

Taxpayers can take a deep
breath
Their taxes won't be going
up, even though the city is
seeking a nearly 39 percent
($3,281,073 to $4,554,066) in-
crease in its budget for next
year. The Dunnellon City


Council got its first look at the
2010-11 draft Monday after-
noon, as city officials made
their pitch.
"We're keeping the ad val-
orem the same," Mayor Fred
Ward reiterated. "Taxes are
not going up."
Leaders plan to use the ad-
ditional revenue generated
from the soon-to-be-installed


red-light cameras,
gas taxes, grants and
one loan that was re-
cently retired to off-
set the need for
additional budget ex-
penditures.
"I see you've come
up with creative Li
ways to keep the tax Litsa
rate the same," Ward City
told City Manager Lisa Al-
giere.
Officials, erring on the side


I



[:


of caution, expect the
city to generate close
to $800,000 in money
from the cameras,
which are expected
to be installed in late
October and fully op-
erational by late No-
gi vember. That figure
lgiere is the net amount
manager. after the city pays the
vendor maintaining the red-
light cameras. A study done by
the vendor projected the city


UNPLUGGED


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
Seventeen-year-old Caitlin Eadie of Lake City belts out a tune while Joe Brown, 17, of Ocala, ac-
companies her on the guitar.The pair competed recently in a preliminary round of the Acoustic Ris-
ing Star Competition at The Levee Music Bar and Grill. The competition will continue through Oct.
27, when the finalists will compete for the top spot.

Acoustic competition brings out contestants of all ages


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
There's no national follow-
ing, no exposure and a limited
fan base, but for the musicians
performing in the Acoustic Ris-
ing Star Competition, it's not
about those aforementioned
items.
What it is about is the music.
The competition just
wrapped up its seventh week at
The Levee Music Bar and Grill,
leaving just three weeks left in
regular competition before the
field is narrowed to five semifi-
nalists. From there, two final-
ists will be selected and
compete for the top spot on
Wednesday, Oct. 27.
"It's a lot of fun, it's just
bringing acoustic musicians to-
gether to have a good time,"
said Michelle Dalziel, event or-
ganizer.
An accomplished musician
herself, Dalziel said she got her
inspiration from when she com-
peted in a similar event in
Iowa, which she won, as well as
a bit of "American Idol."
The Illinois native said per-
formers can do three songs and
judges tell them what think of
their performance.
"I set it up a little different,


Joey Lazio, 17, of the Broken Home Children, plays the fiddle dur-
ing his group's performance at the Acoustic Rising Star Competi-
tion. Lazio started playing the fiddle a few weeks ago. His
performance with it in the competition was the first time he's
played it in public.


there's a lot of it that's similar,"
Dalziel said. "I took what I
liked about the competition and
used it here."
The response from the
crowds and musicians has been
overwhelming, she said.
"They exchange phone num-


Scout soars, earns highest honor


CHERI HARRIS
Special to the
Riverland News
A little encouragement
can go a long way
In Theodore Gangi's
case, having his mother
reinforce the value of
continuing in Boy Scouts
provided the little push
he needed to attain the
rank of Eagle Scout the
highest level of achieve-
ment in that organization.
Gangi, 17, said his
Eagle Scout project was


to build five starter li-
braries for five different
Dunnellon organizations:
The Boys & Girls Clubs of
Marion County, Dunnel-
lon Christian School,
Annie Johnson Senior
Citizen Center, Covenant
Children's Home and
Building Blocks Learning
Center.
He collected books
from fellow Boy Scouts,
other friends and neigh-
bors and his school li-
brary, as well as many
books donated by local


secondhand bookstores.
"I ended up collecting
over 4,000 books and
everyone went through
them," he said. With help
from Troop 452, Gangi
sorted books, tossing the
ones in bad condition and
sorting the others into a
number of categories
such as children's books,
young adult, adult and
learning books.
The books for adults
went to the Annie John-
See SCOUT page 2


bers, they get to know each
other," said Dalziel, noting com-
petitors have ranged in age
from 12 to 70. "All of them have
that common denominator...
music as a common conversa-
See UNPLUGGED page 10


could take in more than $1
million on the cameras.
"It's just my personality," Al-
giere said of keeping expected
revenues on the lower side.
Key proposals for next
year's budget include:
0 Hiring an additional
road crew for the Roads and
Streets Department. Leaders
are seeking a 33 percent in-
crease in budgetary expenses,
See BUDGET page 7


Securing


financing


for fiber


next step

Public demand
overwhelming
JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News

If they build it, they will
subscribe.
Now, city officials need
the funding. The city of
Dunnellon is in the process
of secur-
ing $7.5
million in
funding to
begin con- q
struction
for its
Fiber to
the Home
program. Jessie Mason
Jessie G.M.,
M a s o n, Greenlight
general Communications.
manager
of Greenlight Communica-
tions, said the loan is very
similar to a construction
loan in that the city will
only use the money it
needs. In addition to that,
whatever money is used is
what Greenlight Communi-
cations will have to repay
"We're only going to bor-
row the money that we
need," Mason said. "We can
start moving forward rap-
idly now."
In a recent citizens' sur-
vey, response has been
overwhelmingly positive,
Mason said. Officials be-
lieve they can achieve a
penetration rate of be-
tween 60 percent and 70
percent, much higher than
the 24 percent indicated in
an initial feasibility study
Key, though, is once con-
struction begins and an
area the city is targeting is
online, Greenlight Commu-
nications can sign up cus-
tomers and start providing
services, Mason said,
adding the city is confi-
dence the whole system
will be completed in nine
to 15 months.
Among the features that
will be provided in the
fiber system include televi-
sion, phone service, Inter-
net service and a security
system that automatically
notifies the Dunnellon Po-
lice Department. If the
emergency is outside of the
city limits, the police will
immediately notify county
authorities.
Mason said the feature is
very similar to ADT and if
See FIBER page 3


BRIAN LaPETER/Special to the Riverland News
John and Susan Gangi watch as their son, Theodore,
is awarded the Eagle Scout honor.


75 cents





2 Riverland News,Thursday, September2,2010



NRC slates meeting about CR nuke plant


Special to the
Riverland News
The Nuclear Regulatory
Commission staff has sched-
uled a meeting in Crystal River
to discuss the results of an NRC
special inspection looking into
the circumstances surrounding
a gap discovered in the con-
crete of the containment build-
ing at the Crystal River nuclear
power plant last fall. Progress


Energy operates the Crystal
River plant.
The meeting, scheduled for
10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 2, in
Room 150 of the Crystal River
nuclear plant training center,
8200 W Venable St., Crystal
River, will be open to members
of the public and the news
media. NRC team members will
also be available to answer
questions after the results are
presented.


The NRC inspection team has
continued its work since Octo-
ber, conducting multiple in-
spections and reviews of the
company's analyses and other
information. The Crystal River
plant staff first discovered the
containment separation during
a planned refueling outage,
which was also used to replace
the steam generators inside
containment. To move the large
steam generators inside the


containment building, workers
removed concrete to create the
necessary opening, and found a
gap in the concrete in that area.
The Crystal River containment
is about 42 inches thick and
contains both horizontal and
vertical tensioned steel ten-
dons. The separation was found
about 9 inches from the outer
surface of the concrete.
The plant will not restart
until the NRC is satisfied that


the analyses and repairs to the
containment building provide
the required safety margin. The
agency will schedule another
public meeting in the Crystal
River area prior to the restart
of the plant.
The NRC will also issue a
written report of the inspection
team's review in the next sev-
eral weeks and that report will
be available on the NRC's web-
site at www.nrc.gov


SCOUT
continued from page 1
son Center and the others
were divided up to best
suit the needs of the other
organizations.
Gangi said each starter
library contained at least
300 books. Gangi and his
helpers assembled the
bookshelves and painted
them with mold-resistant
paint, "and we put some
trimming on the sides to
make it look nicer."
The idea for the starter
library occurred to Gangi
in the 2008-09 school year.
"I was just thinking of
Eagle projects, and my
mind wanders, so it just
kind of popped in my
head," he said.
Gangi delivered the
starter libraries last fall.
"They've been very en-
thusiastic about receiving
it," Gangi said of the or-
ganizations that benefited
from his project.
"They liked seeing the
types of books that I had
for them and they were
just very happy to have
it."
Karen Errett, director
of development for
Covenant Children's
Home, said those living at
the home have used the
bookshelf and added
more books.
"It's a nice big book-
shelf, so they have plenty
of room to keep all their
stuff," she said.
When she learned of


what Gangi wanted to do
for the children's home,
she said she was very
happy
"The idea is kids help-
ing kids," Errett said. "He
could have done a lot of
different things."
Doug Piechowiak, the
scoutmaster for Troop
452, said it took Gangi
months to collect the
books, separate them,
build bookcases and de-
liver them.
"It was a very detailed,
ongoing great project," he
said.
Gangi's said when he
moved to this area five
years ago, he had lost in-
terest in scouting and had
decided to quit. His
mother encouraged him
to stick with it.
"After she pushed me
far into it, I kind of
started to enjoy it and I
liked doing it," Gangi
said.
The Crystal River High
School senior said he felt
good about doing his
Eagle project.
"I mean, if I ever go to
any of these places I
would probably see my
bookshelf there and I
could say, 'I did that.' It's
also kind of been, you
know, something that I've
gotten off of my back be-
cause I do a lot of things,
especially schoolwork,"
Gangi said. "It's been hec-
tic trying to get a sched-
ule with them so I could
deliver the stuff, but it
was worth it."


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
Firefighter/paramedic Vicky Constable of Marion County Fire Rescue collects money from a mo-
torist during the MCFRs "Fill the Boot" campaign. Money collected is sent to Jerry's Kids, the an-
nual LaborTelethon that raises funds for children with muscular dystrophy. Personnel from Rainbow
Springs Station 22 set up in front of Walmart on U.S. 41.



Health Department reopens Dunnellon Clinic


Special to the
Riverland News

The Marion County
Health Department re-
opened its Dunnellon
Health Clinic on Wednes-
day
"The Marion County
Health Department is
proud to reopen our
Dunnellon Health
Clinic," said Dr. Nathan
Grossman, director of
the Marion County
Health Department.
"Having accessible
healthcare in all areas of
Marion County is impor-
tant, so we are pleased to
afford citizens in Dun-
nellon and surrounding


areas that opportunity."
The new location of
the clinic is 12013 Mary
St.
The hours of operation
will be from 9:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. the first and
third Wednesday
monthly for Women, In-
fants and Children (WIC)
and Nutrition services.
Services are provided by
appointment only.
Clinic hours of opera-
tion for immunizations
services are 9:30 a.m. to
noon and 1 to 3:30 p.m.
the second Wednesday
monthly, and 10:30 a.m. to
noon and 1 to 3:30 p.m.
the fourth Wednesday
monthly. Services are


Special to the Riverland News
The American Legion Wall-Rives Post No. 58 re-
cently honored Theodore Gangi for achieving the
rank of Eagle Scout. Pictured with Gangi, from left,
are: Commander John Taylor, Gangi and First Vice-
Commander Bob Schmidt.

RAIBO: SRIGSBRDG


Results of play from
Aug. 24.
1. Ruth Brucker (4930),
2. Betty O'Neal (4330),
3. Gordon Quigley


(4120),
4. John Ghan (3890).
Slams: Buck Setzer
and Tomiko Vasey 6 D
made 7.


available as walk-in only. County Health Depart-
For more information ment at (352) 629-0137 or
about available services, visit www.doh.state.fl.us/
contact the Marion chdmarion.


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers
U9 1 0 O


Experience Hawaii in November
10 Nights November 11-21st
Downtown Waikiki at the Ohana West
$1395 per person
Double Occupancy
Includes insurance. $119 deposit,
$1063 per person, balance due Sept. 20th.
Includes flight from Orlando to Hawaii,
transportation to hotel and back to Orlando.


Attorney & Counselor at Law

Florida Estate Planning & Trust Seminar

Sept. 8th 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
No Cost or Obligation Lunch & Learn
The Truesdell Professional Buil,,ii;, 200 N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Florida 34482
(352) 873-4141 x 21 for Reservations


* ~ 0 0
*0@ *.


Answers to Sudoku on page 7







$89.
September 25 1 Night Ft Myers
$60. Slot Play $10. Food
Park & Ride from Stone Creek
Diana's Travel 800-373-8687




WE MAKE YOUR CONCRETE LOOK GOOD!





NEW CONCRETE
We Itle o ea
Di veay -1rv1xtnin1-Pto -Wlwy


Filling the boot for Jerry's Kids


I *


I O


I





Riverland News,Thursday, September 2,2010 3


Police Department DUI campaign under way


Special to the
Riverland News

The Dunnellon Police De-
partment announced it will join
begin an intensive crackdown
on impaired driving now
through Sept. 6. The program, a
nationwide program, is called
"Drunk Driving. Over the Limit.
Under Arrest."
"All too often, innocent, law-
abiding people suffer tragic
consequences and the loss of
loved ones due to this careless


disregard for human life," said
Cpl. Jacob Gonzalez of the Dun-
nellon Police Department. "Be-
cause we're committed to
ending the carnage, we're in-
tensifying enforcement during
the crackdown. We'll be espe-
cially vigilant during high-risk
nighttime hours when impaired
drivers are most likely to be on
our roads."
The Dunnellon Police De-
partment said its officers will
be aggressively looking for all
impaired drivers during the


SO YOU KNOW
The Dunnellon Police De-
partment will conduct a
DUI Sobriety Checkpoint
on from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Saturday in the 19900 block
of East Pennsylvania Av-
enue.

crackdown and will arrest any-
one they find driving while im-
paired regardless of age,
vehicle type or time of day
"Our message is simple and


unwavering. If we find you driv-
ing impaired, we will arrest
you. No exceptions," said Chief
Joanne Black. "Even if you beat
the odds and walk away from
an impaired-driving crash
alive, motorists should be
aware that the consequences of
driving while impaired can still
virtually destroy your life."
According to police officials,
violators often face jail time,
loss of their driver licenses, or
being sentenced to use ignition
interlocks. Their insurance


rates go up. Other financial hits
include attorney fees, court
costs, lost time at work, and the
potential loss of job or job
prospects. When family, friends
and co-workers find out, viola-
tors can also face tremendous
personal embarrassment and
humiliation.
"Driving impaired is simply
not worth all the consequences.
So don't take the chance. Re-
member, if you are over the
limit, you're under arrest," said
Cpl. Gonzalez.


Sherif/Polic

Dunnellon Police
Department
Arrests
Thomas C. King Jr.,
26, Homosassa, on Aug.
29, on a charge of petit re-
tail theft.
Clyde Clark, 63,
Ocala, on Aug. 27, on a
charge of petit retail
theft.
Laurie L. Latshaw,
48, address unknown, on
Aug. 25, on charges of
simple domestic battery
and simple batter.
Jessie E. Cockream,
20, Inglis, on Aug. 24, on a
charge of retail petit
theft.
Edgar Rivera, 18,
Ocala, on Aug. 24, on
charges of burglary, sim-
ple domestic battery and
criminal mischief.
Jessica L. Soverns,
21, Dunnellon, on Aug. 21,
on a charge of petit retail
theft.
Marion County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Crystal Lynn Stapel-
ton, 26, Dunnellon, on
Aug. 30, on charges of res-
idential burglary, simple
battery and criminal
charges. According to the
arrest report, Stapelton
struck a woman 15 to 20
times and hit her with a
beer bottle, then left the
residence. Later that
evening, she returned
and broke a window to
the home before entering
the premises and broke
several other items, the
arrest report stated.
Then, the report stated,
she threw everything
from the refrigerator onto
the floor. Stapelton fled
when she heard the vic-
tims calling law enforce-
ment, the report stated,
but was caught during a
traffic stop. According to
the report, while at the
jail and asked if anyone
else was involved, Stapel-
ton said: "I should have
beat her explicativee),
next time I will."
Miguel Angel Perez,
21, Dunnellon, on Aug. 29,
on a charge of domestic
battery on a pregnant
person. According to the
arrest report, Perez
pushed the victim to the
ground, causing a scrape
marks on her right leg
from her upper thigh to
just below her knee.
When the victim at-
tempted to shut the car
doors, Perez grabbed the
victim by the wrists and
bent them back, causing
the victim to fall to the
ground again, the report
stated.
Felicito B. Vaquez,
46, Dunnellon, on Aug. 29,
on a charge of simple do-
mestic assault.
Angela M. Matthews,
40, Crystal River, on Aug.
29, on charges of simple
domestic battery and pos-
session of drug parapher-
nalia.
Michael Gene
Mount, 24, Dunnellon, on
Aug. 28, on a charge of
possession of oxycodone.
George Hill, 49,
Ocala, on Aug. 26, on
charges of simple domes-
tic battery and false im-
prisonment.
Tammy Jean
McBryer, 47, Ocala, on
Aug. 26, on a charge of re-
tail petit theft. According
to the arrest report, a
driver with "Dan the Taxi
Man," drove McBryer
from West Marion Hospi-
tal and drove her to Ock-
lawaha, where she exited
the vehicle and said she
would return with $44.25
in fare money. She en-
tered a residence and
never returned. When au-
thorities arrived, they
were given consent to
search the house and
found McBryer hiding


County opens new comm center


under a mattress.
Brandy Nicole Gar-
ner, 19, Frederick, Md.,
on Aug. 25, on a charge of
grand theft auto. Accord-
ing to the arrest report,
Garner took a vehicle
from her father without
permission and drove it
to Florida, where local
authorities apprehended
her.
Burglaries
Aburglary to a resi-
dence occurred between
Aug. 8 and Aug. 28 in the
20300 block of Southwest
59th Lane, Dunnellon.
A burglary to a con-
veyance occurred Aug. 29
in the 19100 block of
Southwest 81st Place
Road, Dunnellon.
A burglary to a resi-
dence occurred between
Aug. 19 and Aug. 27 in the
2600 block of Southwest
165th Avenue Road, Dun-
nellon.
A burglary occurred
between Aug. 24 and Aug.
26 in the 19100 block of
Southwest 108th Lane,
Dunnellon.
A burglary to a con-
veyance occurred be-
tween Aug. 23 and Aug. 25
in the 12600 block of
Southwest 98th Street,
Dunnellon.
A burglary to a resi-
dence occurred on Aug.
25 in the 19900 block of
19900 block of Southwest
Beach Boulevard, Dun-
nellon.
Thefts
Apreliminaryinves-
tigation revealed a petit
theft occurred between
Aug. 24 and Aug. 25 in the
9700 block of Southwest
122th Terrace, Dunnellon.


Calls trigger

response
MICHEL NORTHSEA
Riverland News

There are no sounds of
ringing phones in the county's
new 911 Communications
Center
Yes, calls are coming in -
some 30,000 monthly with
10,000 of those calls in need of
emergency services from law
enforcement, medical or fire
- but those calls now "come
to the ear," said Karl Oltz,
communications director of
public safety.
Prior to 5 a.m. Aug. 18, any
calls coming into the corn
center were answered with a
phone by the dispatchers in
their old 3,700-square-foot
quarters. With the completion
of the new 15,000-square-foot
communication center and
its state-of-the-art equipment,
calls were switched to the
new building at 5 a.m. Aug. 18.
Chief of Staff Dan Kuhn
said during the grand open-
ing celebration of the new fa-
cility on Aug. 25 that the
switchover was "seamless."
Calls coming into the cen-
ter are sent by computer to
the first available call taker
Without even taking seconds
to pick up a phone receiver,
the call comes to an earpiece,
the call taker is immediately
on the phone with the person
calling in to find out the
emergency
If necessary, the call is
switched to the appropriate
agency, Dunnellon Police,
Ocala Fire Rescue or Marion
County Public Safety Com-
munication, which handles
calls for fire and emergency
medical services.


A preliminary in-
vestigation revealed a
grand theft occurred be- FIBER
tween Aug. 14 and Aug. 23 continued f
in the 4900 block of
Northwest 150th Avenue,
Morriston. a current su
Morriston.
A preliminary inves- system wis
tigation revealed a grand that no n
theft occurred Aug. 28 in wouldben
the 11800 block of North- We'llbe
west 19th Lane, Ocala. wthat ste
without
Others Mason add
A suspicious inci- feature cost
dent was reported Aug. 26 than most
in the 20600 block of grams.
Southwest Oriole Drive, Forthose
Dunnellon. support and


rom page 1

bscriber to that
hes to change,
ew equipment
necessary
able to convert
1 to our parts
an upgrade,"
ed, noting the
s $10 to $20 less
security pro-

concerned with
Customer serv-


MICMEL NUHI MIA/Hiverland News
Mayor Fred Ward, right, was one of about 250 visi-
tors to Marion County's new 911 Communications
Center grand opening last week. Ward is watching a
call taker take a call coming into the center.


Calls coming in weekdays
to the com center for Dunnel-
lon are transferred to the dis-
patcher on duty at the police
department
The 911 operator tells the
dispatcher, we have a 911 call
on the line and then we take
the information, said Dunnel-
lon Police ChiefJoanne Black
Both agencies continue to
take information from the
caller as help is sent
Night and weekend calls,
even those coming in to the
police department's 465-8510
number, are dispatched from
the cor center to the officer
on the street, Black said,
adding that the two agencies
"work very well together"
In addition, Dunnellon and
the sheriff's office are on the
same computer system, she
said.
While the process of taking
the call at the corn center has-
n't changed significantly,
equipment changes have
made the job easier and
faster
Besides utilizing the ear-

ice, Mason said that will be
pivotal area Greenlight
Communications will focus
on. Greenlight Communica-
tions will move into the old
library building. Mason
said the facility will be
open five days a week, for
at least 12 hours a day Cus-
tomers will be given a local
phone number, not directed
to a call center elsewhere.
"Initially, I see it being
open seven days a week,"
he said. "Customer service
is the foundation. Without
it, it's not going to succeed."


^ ___ _^--------------------I
I Follow us: Facebook.com/youtoepiadayspa


BENT S





Ocala, FL D WEIGHT WATCHERS Meeting Every Tues. 6 pm
2-351-0 20372 E. Pennsylvania Ave. 00
12 Dunnellon 489-2100 F









-Saturday Night Famiy BBQ & Tales of Ol orida Storytelling
-Hall of Fame Artist Original Highwayman Robert Buler
Lecture & BulerFamilyArt Show & Sale
-Children's Crazs & Activities including "Ride a Paso
-Walk-in Antique Appraisal
-Enter to WIN: Pioneer Pasco's Idol: Singing and Line Dancing Competition
-Homemade Ice Cream Contest
-Regional Pasco History Presentations
-Enterto WIN: Fiddlin' Contest
3C.QE nITd II0n 92I9C UnIrI1 F n INR RlTF 9.


piece into of an actual phone,
a new mapping system at the
cor center shows where the
call is coming from, saving
call takers time since they
don't have to find the location
themselves.
Monitors located on the
walls throughout the com
center shows which staffers
are on the phone, how long
they've been on the call and
the number of active calls.
Supervisors stationed in the
middle of the room also have
access to the same informa-
tion on their computer
screens.
To reduce noise in the com-
munication centers, all work
stations face toward an outer
wall, Oltz said.
With the phones ringing
and voices muffled by work
station walls, Oltz said the
place can be "eerily quiet"
The new center was bud-
geted at $5 million and
funded through the half-cent
sales tax for capital improve-
ments, emergency manage-
ment fund and grants funded

The office will also allow
customers to pay their city
utility bills there.


the 911 system. The half-cent
sales tax for capital improve-
ments was collected for two
years, expiring in January
2004.
Actual cost of the project
came in under budget at $4.5
million.
Constructed by Moss Con-
struction the complex has
offices, a break room, a
quiet room and an exercise
room. The exercise room is
for employees' use before or
after their 12-hour shifts.
Architects for the project
were from Architecture Stu-
dio Inc., of Ocala.
In her comments during
the ribbon-cutting cere-
mony, Ocala Marion Cham-
ber of Commerce CEO Jaye
Baille noted that 75 percent
of the work on the project
was completed by local
companies, which in turn
fueled the local economy.
Besides helping the econ-
omy and providing more
room the building should
withstand a hurricane.
Sheriff Ed Dean said he
was very concerned in 2004
with the four hurricanes in
the state and wondered
what would have happened
if the cor center had been
wiped out, as it had been in
Hardee County.
The former cor center
was constructed in pre-An-
drew days when building
standards were not so strin-
gent.
The new center is built to
withstand winds of 160
miles per hour
"The first line for citizen
in an emergency is the 911
center. They are the com-
forting voice that's sending
help. It is only fitting they
have the facilities to do the
job," Kuhn said.

"It's one stop shopping
for everything," Mason
said.


A member of the Florida Press Association
352-489-2731
352-489-6593 (Fax)
The Riverland News serves Dunnellon and the surrounding areas: Blue
Cove, Chatmire, Hills of Ocala, Lake Tropicana, Rainbows End, Rainbow
Lakes Estates, All the Rainbow Springs Area, Rio Vista and Vogt Springs.
The Riverland News is delivered on Thursday to subscribers by our
carriers and mail. The newspaper is also available inside area stores
and at various boxes throughout the community. Local subscription rate
is $24 a year. Call for Florida and out-of-Florida rates.
The Riverland News is published in Dunnellon, FL by Citrus Publishing,
Inc., 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429-5760.
CALL 489-2731
For Information On Subscriptions,
Display Advertising And Business & Church Directory Ads.
TO SUBMIT NEWS ITEMS EMAIL TO:
editor@riverlandnews.com
NEWS DEADLINE IS NOON FRIDAY.
News items about happenings at area churches and clubs, school and
sporting activities, military promotions, announcement of births,
anniversaries, engagements, weddings, first and 90+ birthdays, and
similar community news items are accepted for publication.
PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT DUNNELLON, FL.
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #681-730
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to:
RIVERLAND NEWS,
20441 E. PENNSYLVANIA AVE.
DUNNELLON, FL 34432-6035





4 Riverland News,Thursday, September 2,2010


RIVERLAND NEWS
"The Newspaper built on Community Pride."
Publisher Gerry Mulligan
^iv er v iews -Regional Manager John Provost
Editor Jeff Bryan
Member of the Florida Press Association


OUR


VIEW


Need to redefine masculinity


f you know a child in a single-parent
home, that child is most likely being
raised by Mom.
According to the latest U.S. Census fig-
ures from November of 2009, 84 percent of
the custodial parents in the 13.7 million
single-parent households in the U.S. are
mothers. Only 16 percent of custodial par-
ents are dads. Many fathers blame the
court systems, which they believe favors
the mothers in most cases, but one expert
believes that men have more control over
that paradigm than they might think.
"When it comes to deciding who gets the
kids, it's natural for judges to want to
place them with the parent who is nurtur-
ing and sensitive," said Michael Taylor,
motivational speaker, life coach, and au-
thor of A New Conversation With Men


LETTERS


Abigail's top notch
Are there two cafes in Dunnellon
named "Abigail's?" Is the letter writer re-
ferring to the owner? If the answer to the
first question is "no" and to the second
"yes," then I find it difficult to believe the
writer is referring to the same Abigail's
that I have eaten in numerous times.
There are always groups having a good
time (laughing, etc.) as well as my two
friends and myself and no one has ever
been admonished.
Does she realize what a hard working,
talented and caring individual the owner
is? Recently, as I came out of Sweet Bay
with a cart full of groceries, the owner
saw me and placed all of them in the back
of my van then proceeded to give me a
hug and a kiss. If the writer was so
"turned off" after her first visit, why did
she go back a second time let alone even
think about returning again? Though I
feel it should be the letter writer and the
editor (why did you even publish the let-
ter?) who should apologize to the owner, I
am going to say I am sorry you and your
cafe were referred to in such a negative
manner. This will not keep my husband
and myself and my friends from return-
ing! See you soon.
Joan K Duggins
Dunnellon
Post Election.....
Good Run!
I just wanted to take a minute to thank
John Deakins and his team for running
an informative and refreshingly clean
campaign. Hopefully, you will run again
when we find out that our new represen-
tative doesn't keep his promises and
leaves Dunnellon behind. If 70 percent of
Dunnellon and Marion county voters had-
n't sat on their lazy "butts" our hometown
guy, the guy who served our country and
protected our freedom to vote, would
have won, which would have benefited
our area directly Shame on you lazy peo-
ple, you could have voted early or you
could have used an absentee ballot. I
guess you just don't care about our free-
doms and rights that our veterans fought
and died for. Even under the threat of
being shot or killed by roadside bombs
the Iraqi people walked to the polls, then
had to be marked by dipping their fingers
in indelible blue ink and then had to walk
home. The Iraqis had a 70 percent voter
turn out in their first free election. Even
in may of this year they are still carrying
a 62 percent voter turnout. So go play golf,
watch your soap operas, but don't sit in
the diners or the pubs and complain, be-
cause I am sure someone will ask you if
you voted. To the 70 percent of you who
thumbed their noses at our heroes God
Bless you and your consciences.
Jim McCarty
Open your ears
Shame on you Dunnellon residents
who say we have nothing to do. Tues-
day night we went to The Levee for
dinner and was surprised to find the
most wonderful Jazz musician playing
to a crowd of six, yes our party and two
others. He was better than any enter-
tainment on any cruise or any big
town. No cover charge, no minimum,
just pure enjoyment. Please, if you
want a great night out, support our
local businesses.
Curt and Linda Bond

OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in RiverlandNews
editorials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons,
columns or letters do not necessarily repre-
sent the opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to express
their opinions in a letter to the editor.
* All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including let-
ters sent via e-mail, Phone numbers will not
be printed or given out. We reserve the right
to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters to the editor must be no longer than
550 words, and writers will be limited to two
letters per month.


(www.coachmichaeltaylor.com).
"Let's face it. In most cases, it's difficult
to cast most fathers even the good ones
- in that light. But I don't think it's out of
reach for any man to become that person,
and to exude it in his daily life."
Taylor believes that the greatest chal-
lenge we have in our society right now is
to redefine masculinity
"Most men are tired and frustrated with
their lives and are looking for something
new and different," he said. "Men want to
learn to be genuinely happy with their
lives but most of them do not know how to
accomplish this. They are sold on the bill
of goods by the past generation that men
are aloof and authoritarian, and that's part
of being a man. The first thing we need to
do is discard all the media and culture
madness that has created the problem in


the first place. I believe that every man can
learn to be a great husband, a great father
and a trusted friend. To get there, we need
to break the bonds of a culture that has
taught us all the wrong things about what it
means to be masculine, and embrace a new
paradigm of masculinity that empowers
them to reach their full potential."
The cornerstone for this new paradigm,
according to Taylor, includes developing
stronger connections to the ideas of love,
compassion, understanding, acceptance
and forgiveness.
"These qualities are not signs of weak-
ness," Taylor said. "They are actually signs
of strength, and when men reject these as-
pects of themselves, it leads to all sorts of
dysfunction and unhappiness. We've
grown up in a culture that teaches men


f


Available from Commercial News Providers











THE OTHER GUY



Boys and their toys;


4-wheelin' adventure


Whoever said nothing in life is
free, never gave a pair of boys
a "new toy."
So when my friend pulled into the
driveway recently with a battery-oper-
ated 4-wheeler in the back of his truck,
my oldest son nearly ran me
over on his way outside. Sure,
it's not brand new, but what 3-
and 2-year-old really cares? It's
new to them.
So as I helped my buddy un-
load the ATV from the truck, he
explained to me that his son
was no longer using it and it
was just taking up space and
collecting dust in his garage. He Jeff
briefed me on how the batteries E(
are connected, handed me the
charger and headed home. The batter-
ies needed charging, so I immediately
plugged one in and headed back inside
where Jackson, the oldest, was busy
putting on his flip flops.
"Daddy, can I ride now," he quizzed
me.
No, I replied. The batteries are
dead, so daddy's charging them.
You would've thought it was the end
of the world by the reaction.
I did my best to calm him, so his
brother Jayden could get a nap. I told
him he could help me fix his 4-
wheeler. He grabbed his toolbox,
loaded it with his tools and sprung out
the door step. He inspected every inch
of his vehicle, grabbed his saw and
started the repair work.
I laughed.
"What's the saw for?" I asked.

I L-^ M1'


"I'm just fixing it Daddy," Jackson
said. "It broke down."
After his five-minute repair session,
he informed me he was ready to hit the
road.
Battery No. 1 wasn't even close to
being fully charged, but it was a
beautiful day outside and he'd
been a prisoner to the recent
rains. So I gave in. We hooked
the battery up as he bounced
from side to side of the 4-
wheeler.
Finally, it was road ready
Jackson bounced onto the
Bryan seat and hit the pedal. He shot
Bitor through the drive way and into
the yard and immediately
started doing a doughnut. Jack-
son steered out of it and headed for
the side of the house and the back
yard. He was doing pretty well.
A short time later his brother joined
him for the madness and together, with
Jayden holding on for dear life (the
look on his face indicated he wasn't so
sure he was trusting of his big
brother), and they were off. A few
smiles, a chorus of no's and a near col-
lision with the palm tree, they made
their way for the neighbors yard to
show off the new ride.
Six hours later, several battery
changes and repairs, they were back in
the house.
"Can we do it again tomorrow
Daddy?" Jackson asked.
"Right after Daddy gets his battery
recharged," I replied.


fCopyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


that marriage is a prison, and that being
monogamous is somehow not manly, when
in fact, the successful and happy husbands
and fathers out there know that to be the
opposite. If we can reverse these beliefs, I
believe we will begin to see a dramatic re-
duction of issues like high divorce rates,
high school dropouts, domestic abuse and
high incarceration rates."
About Coach Michael Taylor
A proud father of three grown children,
Coach Michael Taylor is happily married
and resides in Houston, Texas. He is also a
self educated entrepreneur, author, per-
sonal coach and radio show host. Taylor
has been facilitating workshops and semi-
nars for more than 15 years and has
reached thousands through his books,
seminars and radio show.

TIME TO SMILE


Finding Little


Debbie

M y mother's diet consists of
chocolate, chicken and Little
Debbie Orange Cranberry
Muffins. At 85, she has priorities so
her diet is eaten in that order with
more chocolate to top it off. She is a
diabetic and stubborn, so there isn't
any use telling her she can't have
chocolate. I am my mother's daugh-
ter. I will fight you to
the death for the last
piece of chocolate.
Like me, my mom is
allergic to all sorts of
food. We have nar-
rowed her diet down
to Little Debbie Or-
ange Cranberry
Muffins. They don't
Kathleen make her tongue
Wallace swell or cause her
head to blow up like
a balloon.
Any other flavor means a trip to
the hospital. As her caretaker one
of my duties is grocery shopping.
Finding her muffins has become
mission impossible! For some
strange reason, our local stores are
no longer carrying them. I don't
know if they consider it a seasonal
item.
In the past, I could find them at
Dollar General, Walmart and Sweet-
Bay. As far as I know, Winn Dixie
never carried them. I keep meaning
to check out Save-A-Lot but you
know how that goes. It gets added to
my never ending "To Do" list. The
price for the same box ran between
$2.35 and $2.99 depending on what
store I shopped in. Why is that?
It's the same dang box.
I wasn't too alarmed when Wal-
mart stopped carrying the elusive
Little Debbie. It is one of the many
reasons I am not a fan of Walmart.
The product you want is there one
week and gone the next.
It may show up again in a few
months. That drives me crazy. I
asked the woman at the front desk
if she could order more. She told
me they have no control over what
the delivery driver stocks the
shelves with (I find it hard to be-
lieve that Walmart has no control
over anything. I thought it ruled the
world.) I was told to contact Little
Debbie.
The next day I e-mailed Little
Debbie and they told me to hunt
down a driver and ask them to sup-
ply it. They have no control over
what is delivered. Well, who the
heck does have control over what
goes in our stores? You mean to tell
me all the money you spend on ad-
vertising doesn't matter because it
all boils down to the delivery
driver?
Back at Walmart, I was told the
driver didn't have a scheduled date
for delivery. I wasn't about to sleep
in the isles of Walmart waiting for
the driver. I have gotten to know
some of the workers at Sweet-Bay
so I asked them to keep an eye out
for the driver. That is another rea-
son why I don't like Walmart. It's too
big and impersonal. Josh and James
were in on my mission to find the
elusive Little Debbie. After a few
near misses, they were able to con-
tact the driver.
You know that saying ... be careful
what you wish for? If we want Or-
ange Cranberry Muffins, we have to
buy them by the carton. There are
16 boxes of muffins to each carton.
Forty-eight bucks for muffins, gulp!
That sure is a heck of a lot of
muffins. I hope my mom is hungry.


w &,


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content





Riverland News,Thursday, September 2,2010 5


DES news




Lots of changes for DES


RITA HUTTON
Special to Riverland News
We at Dunnellon Elemen-
tary School are back! We
have had a wonderful start
to our new school year,
even with rain on our very
first dismissal! We have lots
of changes with new teach-
ers and a new principal,
Ms. Fredna Wilkerson.
Ms. Burgess reports,
"Mrs. Fredna Wilkerson
comes to us with over 10
years of administrative ex-
perience in Marion
County." Mrs. Gina Dickey
is returning as assistant
principal, along with Helyn
Hollenbeck as dean and
Chris Flood as guidance
counselor.
Our campus recently un-
derwent an appearance up-
grade, thanks to Ms.
Wilkerson's generosity.
Now, our campus should be
in bloom all year long!
We would also like to
thank the Annie Johnson
Community Thrift store for
their generous donation.
They gave us several large
bags of stuffed animals for
our PBS (Positive Behavior
Support) program. We al-
ways gladly accept dona-
tions for this worthy
program.
We have several new
teachers added to our staff
this year also. Ms. Jennifer
Way and Ms. Rometha


Gilmore, kindergarten; Ms.
Delisia Walker, first grade;
Ms. Brittani Hooper, sec-
ond grade; Ms. Rachel
Monico, third grade; Ms.
Maria Gonzalez, Ms. Angela
Jewell, Ms. Sharon Foster
and Ms. Diana Glickman,
fourth grade; and Ms. Terry
Weber, fifth grade. We want
to welcome these new
teachers to our DES family!
Ms. Washington, who
headed our Black History
Month program last Febru-
ary, reports, "... Just wanted
to share some good news
with you, if you remember
Our Black History Program
last year, I submitted that
show in a contest with the
Positive Promotions prod-
uct company Our entry
won third place for the
2009-10 year. The third-
place winner receives a
$100 prize, our school name
will be published in the
Black History month issue
of the Positive Promotions
catalog and listed on the
company website as the
third-place winner." Kudos
to Ms. Washington for get-
ting such a wonderful pro-
gram together for our
learning and entertain-
ment.
Dunnellon Elementary
School is pleased to an-
nounce that it has received
a $50000 Sprint Foundation
grant through the Sprint
Character Education Grant


Education briefs


DHS starting
'Angel Books' program
The Dunnellon High
School yearbook staff is
starting a program called
"Angel Books" to the com-
munity. In the Angel Books
program, businesses and
community members can
purchase a yearbook for
$40 for a student who can-
not afford one. The pro-
gram runs through Sept. 10.
Anyone wishing to partici-
pate can drop by the Dun-
nellon High School front
office between 8:15 and
9:15 a.m. or send a check to
Dunnellon High School, at-
tention Yearbook Adviser,
10055 S.W 180th Avenue
Rd. Dunnellon, FL 34432.
Donors may indicate
whether or not they wish to
be recognized or remain
anonymous, and they may
specify if they prefer who
the book goes to (a senior,
for example). Teachers and
guidance counselors will
help determine which stu-
dents will be given the
books.
If any business would
like to purchase advertis-
ing, or for more informa-
tion on the Angel Book
program, call Julie Mancini
at 465-6745 ext. 58283.
Yoga class to be offered
Lisa Bubba, a yoga in-
structor for more than 35
years, will offer a class
from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 16 through Nov. 18.
The class is suitable for be-
ginners to the experienced.
Cost is $43 and is sponsored
by the Marion County
School Board's Community
Technical Adult Education
Program. Classes will be at
Dunnellon Elementary
School in the music room,
No. 509. Participants will
need an exercise mat and a
pair of light weights.
For more information,
call Marion County School
District at 671-7200 or Lisa
Bubba 489-8051.
Deadline for FAITC teacher
grants Oct. 1
General education teach-
ers who teach pre-kinder-
garten through 12th grade
in Florida are encouraged
to apply for Florida Agri-
culture in the Classroom
Inc.'s 2010-11 Teacher
Grant program.
The deadline for applica-
tions is Oct. 1. The applica-
tion and guidelines are on
the organization's web site
at http://www.agtag.org.
Projects that educate stu-
dents about Florida agri-
culture are required, and
can include school gardens,
alternative growing system


projects and other agricul-
ture-related programs. De-
scriptions of teacher grant
projects funded in the past
can also be found on
Florida Agriculture in the
Classroom's web site.


Program. The grant will
help fund a program based
on Sean Covey's book "The
7 Habits of Happy Kids" an
in-class program for the
2010-11 school year. Dickey
wrote the grant in January
2010. She is very excited to
have an opportunity to
bring this program to the
students, parents and staff
at Dunnellon Elementary
and looks forward to a
great year of "Happy Kids".
Last but not least, we are
looking for some wonderful
volunteers to help out our
teachers! If you or someone
you know would like to vol-
unteer, contact Ms. Helyn
Hollenbeck at 465-6710 for
more information.
DES Calendar of Events
Now through Sept. 13 -
PTO Fundraiser.
Thursday, Sept. 2 7
p.m., Boy Scout round-up.
Monday, Sept. 6 No
school, Labor Day
Thursday, Sept. 9 Pic-
ture Day; 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.,
Girl Scout round up.
Sept. 9 through 17 -
Book fair.
Wednesday, Sept. 15 -
early release day, 12:05
p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 16 -
open house, 6 to 7:15 p.m.
Sept. 20 through Oct. 11
- Coupons for Education.
Monday, Sept 27 No
School, teacher in-service.

Florida Agriculture in
the Classroom is a
Gainesville-based, non-
profit organization charged
with educating students
about where their food,
fiber and fuel comes from
and is funded by sales of
the agriculture specialty li-
cense plate called the "Ag
Tag."


Fighting for Accident Victim Justice Since 1976.
CAR ACCIDENTS WORK ACCIDENTS PERSONAL INJURY
WRONGFUL DEATH SOCIAL SECURITY BANKRUPTCY
0005T24 www.danhightower.com

To my friends and
patients.....Wednesday,
September 1, 2010 was
W Wmy last day of practice at
Rainbow Family Dentistry
(formerly Carolina Dentures).
I want to thank everyone for their
wonderful support over the past 9
years. I will never forget you...
0005TJ. Millie Russell



INSIDE NEXT WEEK'S


Riverland News


GETTING READY FOR THE GAME


Leroy Chesteen dumps
fries into a basket prior
to cooking them as he
helps prepare food for
the concession stand.


Jeff Dominui grills
hamburgers and hot
dogs prior to the start
of the Dunnellon High
School football team's
preseason classic
against Belleview at
Tigers Stadium.


Photos by
JeffBtyan


UNTIL 7 P.M.



SAccepting New Patients

Dr. Stephen H. Dunn, DDS
&
4 Dr. Maryam Hatefi, DMD

9401 SW S.R. 200, Suite 101
S Ocala, FL 34432

352-873-2000


05~UFO~


Riverland News


Your Best Source for

Local News Local Sports Community Events

School News And More!


We have four convenient ways
to start your subscription!
4A Call us at 489-2731
I Go to our website:
www.riverlandnews.com
I Visit our office at
20441 E. Pennsylvania Ave.
T 211 //r


iunneulon, FL 343z i 2044
Fill out this form and mail I
it in with your payment


" tD'


BUY A 12-MONTH
SSUBSCRIPTION AND
GET 4 WEEKS FREE!

SYes, sign me up for $19.50 -13 month subscription.
Name
I Address
II
City I
I State Zip
II
Phone I
I Email


Mail this coupon to:
Riverland News
1 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34432
*Must be local, in-county delivery
Special Expires 10/20/10

r'4-w. li





6 Riverland News,Thursday, September 2,2010


Special to the Riverland News
Walmart presented the Annie Johnson Center with a check for $500 and
donated a chest freezer toward the food pantry. Pictured, from left, are
Becky Mayes, Walmart store manager; Amanda Carrigan, ZMS supervisor
Walmart; Darlene Parker, executive director of the Annie Johnson Center;
Christine Avina, client service coordinator of the Annie Johnson Center;
Jessica O'Brien, Walmart department manager; and Jennifer Baker, ZMS
supervisor Walmart. The Annie Johnson Thrift Store, located in the His-
toric District, is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Saturday.


Friends of the Library book store open


The Friends of the Dun-
nellon Public Library
Book Store is inside the li-
brary, which is at 20351
Robinson Road, behind
Sweetbay
There are novels, bios,
cooking, gardening, inspi-


I
C


Citrus County
Presents its


rational, craft, self-help, fi-
nance, romance, children,
VHS videos (Some DVDs),
Books-On-Tape, history,
politics, westerns, maga-
zines and more. Daily
sales are ongoing with
books for as little as 10


Craft Council
21st Annual


HARVEST MOON

CRAFT SHOW
Proceeds to Benefit Humanitarians of FL
Saturday Sept. 4, 2010
9 AM 'Till 3 PM
Crystal River Armory
W. Venable St. Crystal River, FL
FREE PARKING & ADMISSION
Donations of pet food and supplies
will be accepted ad appreciated
Refrshments provided by Children's Medical
Network Homoessa Walmart volunteers.
jirOi E For More Information, call Ruth at 726-1991


'---~--~ I


cents. Store Hours are
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday and
from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday.
The Friends continue to
accept gently read book
donations daily at the
store.
For more information,
call the library at 438-4520.


Combating cancer


'Hospitality overwhelming'

in tight-knit community


I would like to introduce myself, as
the new community representative
for the American Cancer Society.
Residing in Ocala, I called Dunnel-
lon home throughout my first two
years of college. As my school-
ing continued, I moved to
Ocala to attend St. Leo Univer-
sity through its University Pro-
gram. Since then, I have
worked as a rental manager at
an apartment community,
worked in land development
with a local builder and was
the lifestyle director at a re-
tirement community, not to Jen
mention the countless hours I Bra
spent in the restaurant busi-
ness that put me through college. All
of these professions have put me in
contact with many Marion County resi-
dents, but not many of them Dunnel-
lon residents.
One of my many hats at the Ameri-
can Cancer Society is to inform the
community of our many programs and
services we offer. Hitting the pave-
ment in hopes to spread our mission,
help those battling cancer and remem-
bering the ones we have lost, I find all
of us having one thing in common, we
all know someone that has been


SDigital Hearing Aids
at Discount Prices
Se will beat all advertised prices!
Many brand names to choose from.
Stephen
Goldsmih FREE HEARING TEST
BC-HIS
40 Years Experience All major credit cards accepted.
ASSISTED LIVING FACILITIES
NURSING HOME VISITS AVAILABLE

ol I 'iA rl -d


touched by cancer. Visiting banks, gro-
cery stores, restaurants, schools, doc-
tors offices, hair saloons and local
events, all have been welcoming, giv-
ing me the opportunity to introduce
myself.
As I meet many of you, I hear
the same names and it seems
that this is a very tight-knit
community. I have been invited
to The Levee be the next Dun-
S nellon Idol, church on Sunday
and the Antique Road Show,
just to name a few. I've been
told that the Little League is
nifer something I won't want to miss,
nnon offered a karate lesson and
even asked to play golf.
The hospitality that the residents
have shown me is overwhelming.
Yet, I feel as if I have not even
touched half of the community
With schools back in session, I hope
to continue meeting more people and
thanks for all your hospitality.
Yours in the Fight Against Cancer,
Jennifer Brannon.
Contact Jennifer Brannon, the com-
munity representative for the Ameri-
can Cancer Society Marion County
Unit, at (352) 629-4727, ext. 5825 or e-
mail jennifer.brannon@cancer org.


Why Struggle With

GRUICIIES
When You Can Set Yourself
FREE
.No more sore armpits from using crutches
SNo more "stumbling" with unwieldy crutches
.bUq Designed to ensure that the affected lower
limb never touches the groundpn
Unlike wheelchairs, the Free Spirit"
Knee and Leg Walker enables you to
maintain your body strength while
your healing takes place

Quality Mobility.
Family Owned & Operated
609 SE Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River,
564-1414


DUNNELLON WINE & SPIRITS

11352 N. Williams St. #200, Rainbow Square Shopping Center, Dunnellon, FL 34432
(352) 489-9800


El.


Annie Johnson Center accepts donation


I





Riverland News,Thursday, September 2,2010 7


Council members retain seats BUDGE
continued from page


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
Dunnellon voters won't
have to worry about who to
cast their ballots for this
November, at least when it
comes to the City Council.
All three incumbents -
Dennis Evans, Lynne
McAndrew and FC. Stark-
qualified for the November
election. However, since
each candidate is unop-
posed, they were officially
qualified at Monday's
meeting.
If voters approve the
city's amendment in No-
vember's election regard-
ing council terms, the three
councilmembers will serve
four-year terms instead of
two.
In other action, the coun-
cil:
Voted 5-0 to begin
using United Health Care
as the city's new health
care provider The city was
partnering with the cities
of Ocala and Belleview, but
Ocala's decided in June to


c)

o
O..



S0


"- "s I

"l "- I
an a E0


opt out of the agreement
and switch to a partially
self-insured program.
Approved a $5,000
raise for City Manager Lisa
Algiere on a 5-0 vote. Al-
giere, who's been with the
city for more than a year
now, is currently making
$65,000. The city's pay
range for city manager is


between $62,400 and
$78,600.
"She's done an excellent
job," Mayor Fred Ward
said. "She's got her arms
around the city's situation.
I think we ought to reward
her.
"We ought to take care of
her. I really hope we can
keep her around."


going from $629,254 to
$837,139.
Adding four additional
police officers to the current
staff, a K-9 unit and a boat of-
ficer to patrol the river. Cur-
rently, the police department
is attempting to secure grants
to fund a K-9 and a new boat.
Overall, the police depart-
ment is asking for a nearly 61


Get more for your money
this summer when you buy a
gift card from Candler Hills
Restaurant between now and
September 30, 2010.
-~___


Purchase a gift card in
any amount $50 or more and
receive 10% off the cost.
(i.e. Purchase a $50 gift card for only $45.)


Monday 7 -10 p.m.
Starting September 13
Monday Night Football
Bar/Grill Room







Tuesday 4-7 p.m.
Fish House Specials







Friday & Saturdays 5-8 p.m.
Steak House Menu






*Food and drink prices vary by menu.
Call the restaurant for details.


percent increase in its budget,
from $746,053 to $1,119,229.
Purchasing 10 new sets
of bunker gear and 12 air
packs for the fire department.
The cost to add those items
adds up to slightly less than
$106,000.
"We're in a position that we
can fill the needs of the police
and fire department," Algiere
said. "We need to start catch-
ing up."
Also, the city will spend
$10,000 to fund a feasibility


study on new buildings for
the police and fire depart-
ment.
"We need to prepare for a
new building," Algiere said.
"See what size building
they're going to need, what
they could share during an
emergency, so that we can
identify our needs."
The city will meet at 5:30
p.m. Monday, Sept. 13, to dis-
cuss the budget again. The
budget will be approved on
Sept. 27.


1) Online:

2) By Mail:


By accessing the GCCF Website at: www.GulfCoastClaimsFacilitv.com.

Call our Toll-Free number to receive a copy of the Claim Form by U.S. Mail. Complete a
Claim Form and mail it to:


Gulf Coast Claims Facility
RO. Box 9658
Dublin, OH 43017-4958

3) By Fax: Complete your Claim Form and fax it to the GCCF at: 1.866.682.1772.

4) Visit one of our Claims Site Offices: Claims offices have been established in Alabama, Florida,
Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. Visit our website for a complete list of locations.
A Claims Evaluator will assist you with the filing process.


0 1 0 m 1 0t .1 -1
fqU9 MfigSUfIM 2t~b Blng


Contactenos para obtener
informaci6n en espafiol.


HTy lien he v6i chfing t6i de c6
thong tin bang tieng Viet.


:1 1. 3 -- A A
INO@ CC-CAISO I T. .866.68.15


candle H CHANDLER HILLS RESTAURANT
Restaurant 8139 SW 90th Terrace Rd., Ocala (352) 861-9720
Hours: Mon Thur: 11 a.m. 7 p.m., Fri & Sat: 11 a.m. 8 p.m., Sun: 8 a.m. 6 p.m.


Dinner Specials $9.95
Served daily from 4 6 pm
After 6 p.m. $12.95

Includes Soup or Salad and
Chef's Choice Dessert

Bistro Steak Mornay
Grilled tender steak served with
potato wedges, havarti, horseradish
sauce and choice of vegetable

Panko Crusted Chicken
Chicken breast lightly breaded with
Japanese bread crumbs and served
with rice pilaf, stir-fry vegetables
and shoyu sauce

Plank Roasted Salmon Tzatziki
Plank roasted wild salmon
served with tzatziki sauce,
rice pilaf and choice of vegetable

Honey Garlic St Louis Ribs
Slow braised pork spare ribs served
with honey garlic sauce,
potato wedges and baked beans

Fried Shrimp and Fish Platter
Panko crusted pangasius fish,
popcorn shrimp, French fries,
coleslaw and tartar sauce
*Allprices are plus tax andgratuity 7110


I0005VE












WE'RE HERE TO HELP YOU RECOVER.

New Contact Information and Procedures for Individuals and

Businesses to File Claims for Costs and Damages resulting from

the Deepwater Horizon Incident of April 20, 2010

The Gulf Coast Claims Facility (GCCF), administered by Kenneth R. Feinberg, has been established
to assist claimants in filing claims for costs and damages incurred as a result of the oil spill resulting
from the Deepwater Horizon Incident of April 20, 2010. Claims previously filed with the BP Claims
Process have been transitioned to the new GCCF Claims Facility for review, evaluation and determination
by the GCCF.

You Can Now File Your Claim In One Of The Following Ways:





8 Riverland News,Thursday, September 2,2010


Out to astor


Song from the heart


Can I get an 'Amen' for that?


I must admit that I am I did not fully understand
not always right. Of how this affected me per-
course, I did not under- sonally until an incident
stand these dynamics until happened this past week.
after entering the It's funny how one
world of marital little incident can
bliss. Although I bring your entire
may not always be world into sharp
right, I'm willing to perspective.
"fess up" to it when ) We were going
somebody gra- o'ut for a special oc-
ciously points this casion and just as
out to me. we were ready to
Fortunately, for a leave my wife
me, the Gracious Rev. James turned to me and
Mistress of the Par- Snyder said, "You're not
sonage has made going to wear that
this the supreme tie with that jacket,
priority of her life. More- are you?"
over, I must say, I am all the I take pride in the fact
better for it. I, on the other that I can match a tie to a
hand, have made fessingg suit or sport jacket. I've
up," the supreme priority been doing this all my life
of my life. This has made and at the time, I was not in
for a wonderful team. the mood of having some-
Most people do not know body adjust my apparel.
when they are wrong. No- "There is nothing wrong
body tells them about it so with this tie," I said rather
they just go their way in the smartly. When I am right, I
wrong direction doing the am right and I don't care
wrong thing. who knows it.
I take comfort in the un- "All I will say," she said
expressed fact that I may rather stiffly, "is that you
not always be right, but will regret wearing that
then, on the other hand, I tie."
am not always wrong either. There is nothing more


sporting, at least in a hus-
band's frame of mind, than
a good challenge. And, if I
say so myself, I was up for
it, which only goes to show
how wrong a person can be.
I had just bought this tie
a few weeks before and I
was anxious to show it off
to my friends that we were
going to meet. And, being
the sporting husband that I
am, I said as much to her.
"This is my favorite tie and
I'm going to wear it tonight
no matter what you say"
Can I get all the brothers
to give me a loud, "Amen,"
for that. We in the brother-
hood need to stick together
and there is no thicker
brotherhood than hus-
bands.
She gave me one of her
looks and then said, "Do
what you want to do, but
I'm just warning you."
I might mention that my
tie was a nice bright golden
tie with decorative silver
stars and moons sprinkled
See PASTOR page 9


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
Prayer comes from the
heart, but how it gets trans-
lated varies by person.
For 17-year-old Crysti
Dethlefs, her prayer be-
came a song. Writing a song
is nothing new for the Cit-
rus Springs resident who
attends First Assembly of
God Church in Dunnellon,
but composing it with
music was a first.
However, Dethlefs did
not keep the message to
herself. She's shared it, on
a national stage even. The
soon-to-be Clearwater Mas-
ters Commission student
entered a statewide compe-
tition through her church.
She placed first, earning a
trip to the national compe-
tition in Indiana.
There, she earned a su-
perior rating, placing her
in the top 10 in the Fine
Arts Song Writing category
for her song, "Carry Me."
She said she wrote when
she "was going through a
hard time" a couple of
years ago.
"It was a very personal
prayer that I put to music,"


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
Crysti Dethlefs practices playing the guitar recently
at First Assembly of God Church.The Citrus Springs
teen recently competed in a contest through her
church and earned a superior rating, placing her in
the top nationwide.


said Dethlefs, noting she's
written between 50 to 60
songs. "It worked out very
good. I felt like God wanted
me to share it with others. I
felt like every time I was on
stage, there was someone
out there who needed to
hear it."
Dethlefs plays the drums
and guitar, which is still
fairly new to her. She said
she's been learning to play
the guitar for eight months
now. She's played the
drums for five years and


plays for her church.
"It's not everyday you get
to beat on something," she
said, mentioning the Dave
Matthews Band, John
Mayer, Coldplay, Colbie
Caillet and Copeland as
musical influences.
For now, though, she's
preparing to focus on her
studies at Clearwater Mas-
ters Commission where she'll
begin attending Sept. 4. She
plans on majoring in music
and theology and hopes be a
worship leader one day.


Obituaries


Rainbow Springs

DENTAL


Adult-Focused Dentistry
Dentures Implants Bridges Partials Crowns
Extractions Denture Relines/Repairs Cleanings
**FULL DENTURE LAB**

(352) 489-0707
Toll Free (800) 242-0708
10710 South, U.S. Hwy US 41 North
Dunnellon, Florida 34432
(1 mile north of Super Wal-Mart)
NEW PATIENT SPECIAL NEW DENTURE SPECIAL
**ONLY** **10% OFF**
** $95.00 ** ** OUR USUAL LOW FEES **
!!CALL US TODAY FOR DETAILS!!

(352) 489-0707
**MINIMUM FEES ONLY, consult Florida statues 466 019 and Florida Administrative Code
64B5-4 002 for rules and laws regarding Dental advertising Thomas E Worster, D D S, PA


Scott Price, 45
Scott Edward Price, 45,
of Dunnellon, died Aug.
11, 2010, in the Legacy
Hospice House of Ocala,
Florida. He was born in
Hartford, Connecticut.
Memorial contributions
may be made to Hospice
of Marion County, PO.
Box 4860, Ocala FL 34478.
Services: A memorial
will be held at a later
time. Arrangements by


Florida Cremation Soci-
ety, Ocala.
Edward Vann, 68
Edward R. Vann, 68, of
Dunnellon, died on Aug.
26, 2010 at
the Hospice
of Citrus
County Care
Unit at Cit-
rus Memorial Hospital.
Graveside services were
conducted on Wednesday,
September 1, 2010 at the


Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell. Heinz
Funeral Home and Cre-
mation, Inverness, FL.
Edward Millen, 95
Edward Millen, 95 of
Dunnellon, died Aug. 22,
2010 in Crystal River.
Survivors include his
children, Angela R. Gun-
ther of Dunnellon, Donna
Somerville of Lancaster,
Pa. and Michael Millen of


Inglis.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home in Lecanto, with a
memorial service taking
place on Sept. 4, 2010 at
the First Baptist Church
at 11 a.m. in Inglis.
Donations may be
made in memory of his
granddaughter, Michelle,
online at www.michelle
catania.wordpress.com.


"For where two or three gather together in My name, there am I with them -






GATHERINGS



A DIRECTORY OF AREA CHURCHES
11i80^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ _


nature Coast

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.





WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG

Deeper ie





Services
Sunday 2:00 pm
Wednesday 7:30pm
Meets at
Holy Faith Church
in Blue Cove
19924 W. Blue Cove Dr.
FW4 00 5R_--
.dI I IIM^^^^


HOPE

Evangelical Lutheran
Church, ELCA
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
489-5511
Pastfor Lynn Fonfara

Sunday Service:
Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sundae School
8:15 a.m.
Go oo our web page:
Hopelutheranelca.com

Calvary
Baptist Temple
21841 S.W. Marine Blvd.
Rainbow Lakes Estates
Sunday
Sunday School.............9:45 a.m.
Worship Service.........11:00 am.
Evening Service..........5:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting............7:00 p.m.
Every 4th Sunday......5:00 p.m.
"Share,Praise & Fellowship"
Pastor Jamie Parker
352-489-8962
"Please Join Us As We
Worship In His Name"


Catholic Community of
St. John the Baptist
Father Emmanuel Akalue, Pastor
MASSES
Saturday Reconciliation. .3:30 PM
Saturday Vigil...................4:30 PM
Sunday.......8:00 AM and 10:30 AM
Sunday- Spanish................Noon
Mon. Thru Fri....................8:00 AM
Holy Days.....8:00 AM and 5:00 PM
7525 S. Highway 41,Dunnellon
352-489-3166
wwwstjohncc.com

S Peace
Lutheran Church
Missouri Synod
Terry L. McKee, Pastor
Sunday
Adult Bible Class 9:00 A.M.
Sunday School 9:00 A.M.
Worship Service 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday
Bible Study 10:00 A.M.
Light Meal 6:30 P.M.
Bible Study 7:00 P.M.
The Church On The Hill
HWY 41,Just 5 miles
north of Dunnellon
489-5881


Dunnellon
Seventh-day
Adventist Church
Welcome To Our Services
Hwy. 41 & Hwy. 40
Saturday
Sabbath School...9:30 AM
Sermon................11:00 AM
Tuesday
Bible Study...........7:00 PM
For more information:
352-489-3455
www.dunnellonsdachurch .com





Pastor Shawn Cutshall
(352) 489-1788
Sunday
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Worship 11:00AM
Disciple Training 6:00 PM
(Nursery & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday


AWANA
Youth Group
Bible Study


6:30 PM
6:30 PM
7:00 PM


8'% Miles North of Dunnellon Off of
Highway 41 Left at Church Sign on
SW 5th Place


DUNNELLON
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
21501 W. Highway 40
Rev. Eddie Fulford, Pastor
Sunday
Traditional Worship 8:00 AM
With Communion Each Week
Contemporary Worship 9:30 AM
Traditional Worship 11:00 AM
Nursery At All Services
Sunday School 9:30 AM & 11:00 AM
i........ God's I.' i."
352-489-4026
www.SharingGodsLight.or


Episcopal
C church
19924 W. Blue Cove Dr.
Dunnellon
THE REV. J. JAMES GERHART

Sunday
Rite I
1st& 3rd Sunday 9 AM
Rite II
2nd & 4th Sunday 9 AM

489-2685
Hall Available For
Community Functions

Mission Possible
MINISTRIES
V. David Lucas, Jr.
Senior Pastor
9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays
W orship ....................10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
I Wednesday
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs..........7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am


Dunnellon Presbyterian Church
Jeffrey W. Welch, Pastor
20641 Chestnut Street
Corner of Chestnut & Ohio Streets
In The Historic District
489-2682
Sunday
Worship................. 8:30 AM /
Sunday School.........9:45 AM
Worship .................11:00 AM
Nursery Provided
For All Services
dunnpreschurch@bellsouth.net 0;00-- .0





Riverland News,Thursday, September 2,2010 9


Claire Hamilton named country fair chairwoman


Special to Riverland News

The Rev. Father Em-
manuel Akalue, pastor of
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Community, 7525
S. U.S. 41, Dunnellon, has
named Claire Hamilton
chairwoman of the Old
Fashioned Country Fair.
The fair's opening day
is from 4 to 10 p.m. Fri-
day, Oct. 1, and it will con-
tinue from 11 a.m. to 10
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2 and
from 1 to 6 p.m. Sunday,
Oct. 3
The approximately 16-
acres fair grounds will
house a car show, climb-
ing wall and field events
on Saturday, a horse-
drawn trolley ride on Sat-
urday and Sunday, and,
on all three days, a
bounce house, a dunk
tank, a quilt show, craft
booths, entertainment
tent, a cake walk and a lot


of food and games for
children and adults.
Special food offerings
include a Fish Fry from 4
to 7 p.m. Friday; on Sat-
urday, a chicken bar-
beque will be from 4 to 7
p.m., a tea party from 2 to
4 p.m. and a Mad Hatter's
Tea Party for children 5
and older from 2 to 4
p.m.; and from 1:30 to
3:30 p.m., a Spanish meal
will be served.
In addition, hamburg-
ers, hot dogs, homemade
sausage and peppers,
desserts, drinks and all
the trimmings will be
available at all times dur-
ing the fair.
Featured performances
at the fair include:
Friday: Holiday Travel
Resort Line Dancers, Fa-
ther Eric & the True
Blues Band and The Slow
Motion Killers Rock
Band;


Saturday: The Spirit of
Ocala Irish Dancers, The
Summer Springs Sweet
Adeline Chorus, Carolyn
Cairns' Tribute To the
Women of Country Music
and The Blind Driveway
Blues Band; and Sunday:
Carolyn Cairns Sings
Gospel, Clinton Burns &
the Touch of Faith Gospel
Singers and The One Way
Gospel Singers.
Admission and parking
are free. Tickets may be
obtained in advance after
all weekend Masses or at
the church office from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Meal
ticket donations are $7
per adult and $3.50 per
child. A free dessert
comes with advance tick-
ets. Special advance
ticket coupons are avail-
able as well. A $20 dona-
tion for a ticket coupon
nets $25 worth of 50 cent


Claire Hamilton


game and food coupons
when presented at the
ticket booth the day of
the fair.
For more information,
call the church office at
489-3166 or Claire Hamil-
ton at 465-4477.


Church events


Church to host
free movie night
The First United
Methodist Church of Dun-
nellon will present a free
family movie night, with
popcorn and drinks, at 6
p.m. Friday in its Friend-
ship Hall. The featured
movie will be "Rata-
touille." A love offering will
be taken for missions.
The church is at 21501 W
State Road 40, Dunnellon.
For information or ques-
tions, call 489-4026.
Catholic church
to host youth Mass
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will host a
monthly Mass for teens and
young adults at 5 p.m. the
first Sunday monthly, be-
ginning Sept. 5. The Mass
will feature contemporary
Christian hymns and hom-
ily messages.
Reformers Unanimous
meetings scheduled
Reformers Unanimous is
an addictions program de-
veloped from more than a
decade of experience, and
is the fastest growing faith-
based addictions program
in America. Meetings are
directed not toward a spe-
cific addiction, but toward


' NOW OPERATING A NEW LINE
OF MOTOR COACH BUSES


FANTASY FEST 2010
Key West Florida 3 Days 2 Nights
Key West's Largest Party ~ A Must See!
3 Meals $25 Free Play
15 Seats Available -Tour Date OCT. 29, 2010
s14900p.p double occupancy S 990single
OKTOBERFEST 2010
HELEN GEORGIA
AMERICA'S LARGEST GERMAN FESTIVAL
30 Seats Available Tour Date OCT. 17, 2010
s209p"p.p double occupancy S259asingle
3 DAY, 2 NIGHT GETAWAY TO
SAVANNAH/JEKYLL ISLAND, GA
BEST PACKAGE THE SOUTH HAS TO OFFER!
5 Meals, Lunch at the famous Lady & Sons Restaurant (Paula Dean) Trolley ride of historical Savannah 2 hou
Riverboat dinner cruise, dinner at e famous Miss Wilkes Boarding House, ghosttour of historical downtown
Tour Dates: Oct. 24th, 2010 $22900p.p. dbl occupancy $26900single


overcoming any addiction
through the Higher Power
that is Jesus Christ. For
more information, as well
as success testimonies, visit
the national website at
www.reformu.com. Local
meetings are at 7 p.m. Fri-
days at Riverland Baptist
Church, one mile north of
State Road 40 on U.S. 41.
Advent hosting
spaghetti dinner
The Church of the Ad-
vent will sponsor an all you
can eat spaghetti dinner
starting at 5:30 p.m. Satur-
day, Sept. 11. Donations are
$7 for adults, $5 for chil-
dren ages 6 to 12 and chil-


dren 6 and under are free.
The church is at 11251
S.W County Road 484, 1.3
miles west of State Road
200. For information or to
make reservations, call the
church at 465-7272 or Al
Sickle at (352) 208-5664.
First Baptist to host
live simulcast
First Baptist Church of
Dunnellon will host Beth
Moore's "Living Proof" live
simulcast at 10:30 a.m. Sat-
urday, Sept. 18, at the
church at 20831 Powell
Road.
Tickets are $25, which in-
cludes lunch. Doors open at
9:30 a.m. with the simulcast


IR R[PLACMEH[NT
Non-Surgical
100% Natural Human Hair!
Board Certified over 25 years
No Contracts Easy-Payment Plan






29TGad.I(tBih
w m t o vm ai lUon^cm A( 1
Sa i Hairf j ipa


4 DAY, 3 NIGHT GETAWAY TO
CHARLESTON/MYRTLE BEACH/BEAUFORT SOUTH CAROLINA
6 meals, hotel accommodations, 2 amazing shows, shopping, motor coach safari tour.
Guided tour of Charleston Historical Distnct. Optional tour Boon Plantation.
Tour Date Sept28,2010 s3390p.p. dbloccupancy $43900single
3 DAY, 2 NIGHT GETAWAY TO
HELEN/ASHVILLE N. CAROLINA
THE BILTMORE EXPERIENCE 4 meals, 2 nights
accommodations, shopping in downtown Helen, admission to
Biltmore Estates ($55 value) and much more.
Tour Date: Sept.12,2010 $249'0p.p. dbloccupancy $29900single
2 DAY, 1 NIGHT CASINO GETAWAY TO HOLLYWOOD, FL
4 Casinos, $105 Free Play, 6 Meals, 3 Buffets
This is the trip you don't want to miss'
LAST THURSDAY OF THE MONTH ONLY!
Join Thousands of Winners 105p.p. dbl occupancy $12500single
KEY WEST 3 DAY, 2 NIGHT
5 Meals $25 Free Play Tour Date: Oct. 3,2010
2 Casinos, arboalrde of Everglades,3 u hrruiseon
Jungle Queen boat with a stop on prvate island glass bottom b t rdeto 1st under after State Park & Barrer Reef
$179p.p. (dbl occupancy) $22900single


to begin at 10:30 and con-
clude at 5 p.m.
"We are so thankful to be
able to host this event at
our church and are prayer-
ful that through this venue,
we can light a fire among
the women of our commu-
nity for the Lord," said
Sarah Joe Thomas, FBCD
simulcast coordinator.
For information or to
purchase tickets, call 489-
2730 or visit www.fbcdun-
nellon.org.


Purchase tickets online*or
at the ticket office.
Shows begin at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m.
(unless noted otherwise)
8395 SW 80th Street Ocala, FL 34481 (352) 854-3670
Ticket Office Hours: Monday Satunray: 11:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.
Day of Show: 11:00 a.m. Showtime


FA RM
CIRCLE SQUARE

M A

--~ -
05 SW 80th St. t
cala, FL 34481


Herman's Hermits
starring Peter Noone
Tickets starting at $31


)nal produce and much more!
Every Thursday
IER'S 8 am- 12pm
COMMONS LIVE cooking
I [T demonstrations at 10 a.m.
(weather permitting)
www.circlesquarecommonsfarmersmarket.com


S u
Sjg


T v 6 i o- 7 onSI


PASTOR
continued from page 8
on it. The first time I saw
it in the men's clothing
store I fell in love with it.
Not often do I go gaga
over a piece of attire but
this one rather caught my
fancy.
When we got at the
restaurant all of my
friends admired my new
tie.
"That's a terrific tie,"
someone said.
"Where did you get a tie
like that?" Another per-
son chimed in.
I will not say I took ad-
vantage of the situation; I
did but if I have to say it,
you do not know me very
well. Occasionally I
glanced toward my wife
and raised my eyebrows
three times, which is a
sign of arrogance on my
part. I have earned this
moment and so I was
going to cash it in for all it
was worth.
But what I did not fig-
ure on was the fact that
we were at a restaurant
serving all-you-can-eat
spaghetti. I love
spaghetti, and so I was
planning to have a won-
derful evening.
All my friends were ad-
miring my tie, and I was
pigging out on all the
spaghetti I could eat.
Plus, and this was the real
plus, I had one over on my
wife. Husbands do not get
to this place in life very
often and so when it
comes, exploit it. And I
did.
Then it happened. I will
not say whose fault it was,
although I have some very


deep suspicious ideas. My
wife was sitting to my left
and somebody on my right
asked if we would pass
the spaghetti. I was so
busy gloating that I did
not realize what was de-
veloping.
"Here," my wife said,
"pass this on."
Whether she let go be-
fore I grabbed it, or, my
left hand went numb, I
will never know. I am not
one to pass judgment.
However, accidents do
happen.
The bowl of spaghetti
sauce slipped out of my
hand and attached itself
most ferociously to my
prized tie. All around the
table there was a gasp.
Then silence. Then out of
nowhere came a very dis-
tinct snicker. I have heard
this snicker many times
before and did not have to
turn to see who the proud
owner of that snicker was.
In fact, all the way
home I heard low-volume
editions of that snicker.
Being the man of the
house, I drove all the way
home in silence but I was
thinking of a verse of
Scripture in the book of
Proverbs. Proverbs 16:18
says: "Pride goeth before
destruction, and an
haughty spirit before a
fall."
Can I get an "Amen" for
that?
The Rev James L. Sny-
der pastor of the Family
of God Fellowship, 1471
Pine Road, Ocala, can be
reached at (352) 687-4240
or e-mail jamessny-
der2@att.net. The church
web site is www whatafel-
lowship.com.


DUNNELLON PODIATRY CENTER, P.A. W
/ Stacy ynn Witfill DP.M. Ble Cross
Board Certi y American Board of-Podiatric Surgery afni.
medical and Surgical Treatment of
bo NA le ns Hammertoes Fractures Infections
eePain t oscopic and Endoscopic Procedures
P'Diagn c U sound and X-ray on Premises
Podiatric Physician nurance Accept
& Surgeon Mostnsurance Accepted
SN1786 Cedar Street (CR 40)
Women's Club)




iuittYi't A m'sN

4000 S. FLORIDA AVE., (U.S. 41 S)
INVERNESS
1/2 mi. S. of the Fairgrounds



SEPT 2 OUTSIDE ONLY AUCTION
Preview 1 Auction 4 pm We will be setting up and
selling all sorts of Estate Adventure Merchandise starting at 2
pm. Table after table of household, garage, furniture, tools and
surprises.

SEPT 4 COIN & CURRENCY AUCTION
Preview 4 Auction 6 pm Huge lifelong collection of Coins
200+ silver dollars & many gold pieces from $2.50 to $25, couple 100+ proof & mint
sets and lots of collectible silver coins. Watch the website for the catalog.
SEPT 5 ANTIQUE & COLLECTIBLE AUCTION
Preview 10 am Auction 1pm Sunday Antique & Collectible Auctions are always
filled with a great variety of furniture, Estate Jewelry, Art Oriental Carpets, Sterling,
Sculptures, Glass and collectibles.
SEPT 9 ESTATE MERCHANDISE AUCTION
Preview 12 Auction 4pm At Thursday night Adventure Auctions. Household
furniture & goods, appliances, tools & equipment, new, nearly new merchandise and
often vehicles.
SEPT 10 RAINBOW REAL ESTATE AUCTION
429 NW Narcissus (Rainbow Lakes Estates) Dunnellon FI
SOLD REGARDLESS OF PRICE
Preview 8 an Auction 10 am This home is being sold by the guardian, in it's
ENTIRETY with the contents The thickly planted 143x141 lot is calling for someone
with a true love of seclusion and privacy. Can be an investment or handy man project.
Contents of the home include tools, furniture, Art, pottery and loads.
SEPT 16 ESTATE MERCHANDISE AUCTION
Thursday night adventure Auction
SEPT 17 2 ON-SITE REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS
BOTH WILL BE SOLD ABSOLUTE
Kensington Estate Home
712 E Rehill St Lecanto FI 34461
PREVIEW: 8 am AUCTION 9 am RE 10 am
3/2 Home and contents
BLACK DIAMOND HOMESITE
3065 W Heather Dunes Ct Lecanto
:- -. ...Ai PREVIEW: 2 pm AUCTION: 3pm
SEPT 23 ESTATE MERCHANDISE AUCTION

SEPT 28 HOSPITAL LIQUIDATION AUCTION
Port St Joe Entire Hospital & Contents see the web for more info.
Maine-Ly Real Estate Christine Dudley Lic.RE Broker.#381384
Maine-Ly Real Estate at Dudley's Auction 10% Buyers Premium
Absentee and phone bids always accepted 352-637-9588


RESERVATIONS CALL: 888-845-3111 HOLLYWOOD TOURS |
www.travelhollywood.info Pick up location Steeple Chase l
All Tours Include Hotel Accommodations. Prices and itinerary subject to change. Transportation provided by: Hollywood Tours, Spring Hill, FL FL Travel Lic. #ST37756


Si UPCOMING SHOWS:


Keturn or Ine King:
A Tribute to Elvis
Tickets starting at $15





10 Riverland News,Thursday, September 2,2010


Superior Bank hosting
United Way fundraiser
Superior Bank will
host a "fun"raiser from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday for
the United Way. There
will be cupcake chal-
lenge among the branch
team to see who can
make the best tasting and
best looking cupcakes.
The public is welcome to
come and try the treats
for a donation to the
United Way.
There will also be

UNPLUGGED
continued from page 1

tion piece.
"I haven't seen any of
them with a poor attitude,
no sore losers. All of them
are having a really good
time," she added. "The fans
listen and they applaud. It's
something very cool, some-
thing to look forward to.
Each night has been stand-
ing room only"
Bill Clark called the
event fantastic.
"She turned it into a
great event. It's continually
a surprise," said Clark, one
of the sponsors of the event
and a musician himself.
"There is a lot of real talent
in the area. The level of tal-
ent that comes in here,
you'd have to pay to see in
the bigger cities.
"It's something different
every week," he added.
"That's what's really great
about it."
During a recent competi-
tion, contestants traveled
from as far "the swamps of
Arrowhead" in nearby Her-
nando to Lake City
"It's about having fun
with friends," said 17-year-
old Joey Lazio, who played
the fiddle on a recent
Wednesday night, three
weeks after he started play-
ing the instrument. "It's
fun, we love Bluegrass
music."
Lazio's bandmates, An-
drew Kyurz, 16, and Jill
Isenberg, 15, had the crowd
clapping, tapping their toes
and "yee hawing," during
their three-song set. Their
performance was reviewed
well by the panel of judges.
"I think it's wonderful,"
judge Susan Mitchell, pres-
ident of the Friends of the
Nature Blues, said about
the event. "It gives every-
one an opportunity to


CARPET
CLEANING
$4 150o
Per
Room
(3 room minimum)
(Rooms Larger than 300 sq. ft.count as 2
r ....... I 1 ,11 1, i,,, I
S C 1 I '".. 1 1 '
areas, flea control and deodorizing at
NO EXTRA CHARGE!


COMMUNITY EVENTS


grilled hot dogs for you to
"build your own hot dog"
for a donation to the
United Way as well as a
dunk tank so that you can
dunk your banker.
Village Market
scheduled Saturday
Dunnellon's First Sat-
urday Village Market will
be from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday in the Historic
District, along West Penn-


sylvania Avenue and
Cedar and Walnut streets.
For more information,
call 465-9200.
Flea Markets to
resume at Depot
The Greater Dunnellon
Historical Society will re-
sume its monthly flea
markets on Sept. 11 at the
Dunnellon Depot. The
historical society will
partner with the Annie


SOFA &
LOVE SEAT
Cleaned
Deodorized
Scotchguard
$6500
Plus One Chair FREE


* Special Injection For Pet Odors Scotch Guarding
Free Estimates We Can Also Dry Clean Carpets
Now featuring the NEW RotoVAC System!
We Also Have Outdoor Pressure Cleaning Available. Call for pricing.
OWNER DOES THE WORK
Citrus&aServicing All Of21Years
489 48^ 44 citrus & Marion County For 21 Years


Our commitment toipersonalized eyecare...
No Technicians,
No Opticians,
Just You and the Doctor


Dr. James A.Muse
Heath Brook Commons (next to Eublix) Board Certified
5400 SW College Rd/Highway 200, Suite 106, Ocala, FL 34474 Optometric Physician
Y y S S eor a riece.


Eyecare hours are: 352-622-937
MT TH F 8:30 5:00; W 1:006:00 352-6U2-J 7
Select Sat. are available info@museumevecare.com


Medicare and
Blue Cross
Blue Shield Provider


GOL CUB
HUGE
ASOUEN O

akaeDel -FllSt


Johnson Senior Center
for a pancake breakfast
that morning. Spaces are
still $10 and tables are
provided. Set up begins at
7 a.m. and flea market
hours are 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Chair exercise class
slated at library
There will be a free
chair exercise class from
12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Tues-
days at the Dunnellon Li-
brary. For more
information, call 489-
6277.


ABOVE: The Broken Home Children featuring Andrew Kyurz, 16, center, Jill
Isenberg, 16, right, and Joey Lazio, 17, left, perform during their set in the
Acoustic Rising Star Competition. BOTTOM RIGHT: Michelle Dalziel adjusts the
soundboard during Alex Grote's performance.


* WHAT: Acoustic
Rising Star Competi-
tion.
* WHEN: 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday.
* WHERE: The
Levee Music Bar and
Grill.

showcase their talents. All
of the kids are great. The
receive critiques well."
Prizes for the competi-
tion were donated from
businesses and individuals
throughout the community
Contestants are not re-
quired to pay an entry fee
either, Dalziel said.
"Oh my gosh, it's been
tremendous," she said
about the response. "I've
had people tell me I'm
doing such a great thing for
this community I'm just
blessed to hear this come
back at me."
Dalziel said The Levee


-1 --
had three key interest
points in holding the com-
petition there it's a full
family restaurant and that
means kids and adults are
welcome alike, it was in-
doors so there was no need
to worry about weather and
it "has a really cool stage."
"It's a party," Dalziel said.


"It's a celebration of
acoustic musicians."
For more information
about competing in
Acoustic Rising Star, con-
tact Michelle Dalziel at
(563) 212-7761 or e-mail
michelledalziel@gmail.co
m. or visit www.leveemusic
bar.com.


Rainbow Springs LGA results


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
Corrianne Boos watches her tee shot recently
during the Rainbow Springs Ladies Golf As-
sociation 18-Hole League.The 18-Hole League
plays Thursdays at Rainbow Springs Golf and
Country Club.


On Thursday, Aug.
19, only 13 members
came out to play
"Low Gross/Low Net."
We expect our snow-
birds and those on va-
cation to return in
September. Also, in
case you haven't no-
ticed, it's been just a
"little" hot and humid
and the ball doesn't
want to fly as far.
Flight A: First low
gross, G. Kwak, 88;
first low net, T Bul-
son, 74; second low
net, J. Villa, 75.
Flight B: First low


gross, N. Redding, 96;
first low net, A.
Carter, 75; second low
net, C. Boos, 77.
Chip-in's: Hole 8, A.
Carter; hole 6, G.
Kwak.
Greenies: (2 shots)
Hole 4, J. Villa, "in
the hole;" hole 8, A.
Carter, "in the hole;"
hole 13, J. Villa, 3
feet, 1 inch; hole 16,
N. Redding, "in the
hole."
Birdies: Hole 4, J.
Villa; hole 8, A.
Carter; hole 16, N.
Redding.


Special to the
Riverland News

The Dunnellon
Branch of the Marion
County Public Library
will host the Master
Gardeners at 2 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 21.
The subject will be
organic and square-
foot gardening. Even if
you have never gar-
dened before, you will
learn some simple
techniques to get you
started. Experts have
ideas to share with
both amateurs and sea-
soned gardeners. Bring
your questions with
you. Several Master
Gardeners will be on
hand to solve your
problems.


"Fm


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Cmmercal News Providers
Available from Commercial News Providers


On Tuesday, Oct. 12, a
panel of Master Gar-
deners will bring in
some of their garden-
ing problems to show
you and describe what
went wrong and how to
cure the problem. This
is your chance to bring
in your problems.
On Tuesday, Nov. 16,
the Master Gardeners
will return with a pro-
gram, winterizing your
garden and landscape.



YOUR DENTAL
HEALTH
'- v'







byM. E Hampton,D.D.S.

SHARED
CONCERNS
Parents may want to take
note of the fact that they can
pass along cavity-causing
bacteria to their babies. This
information is provided in the
interest of raising awareness,
not causing alarm. What many
people do not know is that
Streptococcus mutans is a
bacterium that can be
transferred by saliva when
utensils are shared and even
when parents kiss their babies.
It's important to note that only
parents and caregivers with
active tooth decay can spread
Streptococcus mutans bacteria
when saliva is transferred.
Beyond that, tooth decay
develops as a result of a
combination of factors,
including genetics, oral
hygiene, and exposure to
sugary liquids. Good oral
health on the part of parents
helps minimize the bacteria-
transfer factor.
Streptococcus mutans is one
of the leading causes of dental
caries (tooth decay). At the
office of MARK E.
HAMPTON, D.D.S., we use
technology to help you
understand all your dental
options, so you can make
informed choices about your
own needs. We stress the
importance of preventative
dental care for the entire
family. When was the last time
you had your teeth checked by
a professional? Call us now at
352-489-5071 and schedule an
appointment. We will do what
is best for you and we will not
compromise. We're located at
11902 Illinois Street. We're
"Dedicated to Excellent
Dentistry."
P.S. Babies are particularly
vulnerable to tooth decay
during the time of tooth
eruption, when their tooth
enamel is relatively soft.


~ Slk I


Master Gardeners to meet

at Dunnellon public library


CLEANMASTER
CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
Hot Summer Specials


Answers to puzzle on page 7


Golf Bag
Sale
BAG BOY
AND MANY OTHERS
Red Tag Speciabs


S20OFF
Great Selection


----------- I


7 Museum
*j xic; p


m


W,





Riverland News,Thursday, September 2,2010 11


Mica Wood Residential *Commercial



Custom Cabinets
Wellborn Forest Dealer
1795 W. NW Lenox Lane
Dunnellon, FL 34434
352-489-2822
Since 1993 Mobile: 840-3703
DON ROBINSON Email:
Owner threedl@aol.com



SWE FIX
SPRINKLERS



Accurate Underground
Systems LLC
(352)445-1403
Licensed #10719 & Insured


GREG'S ALUMINUM
"Pleasing people in Marion County
since 1982"
Pool Enclosure Rescreens
Vinyl & Acrylic Windows
Garage Door Screens
* Vinyl Ceilings & Much More
465-0371
746-6663
Licensed & Insured Comp #2038


SFinish Carpentry
Painting
-interior/exterior
Pressure Cleaning
"Fro floors to ceilings and
everything in between"
*Kitchen, Baths Cabinets
Ceramic Tile Trims
SMolding Drywall Repairs
Licensed & Insured
S 489-3622


Changes of Life

Servicing
Dunnellon to Pine Ridge
SSenior Home Cleaning
* Weeding & Raking Il
I Windows 1 1
Bonded &Insuredw
-32 I0800
Cind ew


e 352-445-08145 5
--- State Cert MC14575"~,~ js15~ ~


PAUL GLENN'S
Complete Painting
& Pressure Cleaning
* Roof and Driveway Coatings
* Ranch & Farm Fences
* Wall & Ceiling Texture
* Gutter Cleaning i
* Popcorn Ceiling
Repairs
Quality Work for Less 489-5098
Free Estimates 41 Years Experience


LEE'S
PRESSURE WASHING
ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY
Homes *Pool Areas
Gutters Driveways
Gutter Cleaning
Quality Work
For Low Prices!
No Pressure
Roof Cleaning
489-6786 1s


* We Service All Brands
* Repairs
* Replacement
* Free Second Opinions
* 24-HR. Service
352-208-4641
Locally Owned & Operated
License # CAC1816140


* Exterior & Interior
* Wallpaper Removal
* Pressure Washing
* Free Estimates
United States
Painting
Rick 9
465-5068
322-0406 Cell
Licensed Insured





Cabinets
Counter Tops
Drywall
Painting
Tile
(352) 465-2631
License #L04000014330



Peewees
"- Irrigation
For all your sprinkler needs
Summer Special.... $39.95
Adjust all zones for coverage, Reprogram Timer
forproper run time per zone and wateringDays
GETA FREE BATTERYfor your timer
352-629-9300
licensed soured


; I; SI R iI
Ej.loN AIR



'Where Oualitv And Price Meet"


465- 5353
CAC035472- LIC.& INS.





20359 E. Pennsylvania Ave.
Sparkling Clean Pool Care!
Weekly Pool Service
* Pool Babysitting
* Expert Repair Department
*Pool Cleans


I nsured & Lic #CPC1456699 I
LA I.DSRVCS


Service for A/C, Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator & More!
CallAnytime Same Day Service
46 Years Experience
One Man
'Low
Serving Citrus and Overhead
Marion Counties Low
352-445-0072 Prices
Doc Johnson #RA0067081

ML0005INGR

CEM =-ffff'


Small Engines, Generators
Tractors* Mowers* Compressors
Pressure Washers ATV Repairs
Two Whel Scooters


S489-5496 1


IERRVY .IAR T1
IRRIGATION LLC. 3398 S.W.74th Ave., Bay 101, Ocala
Seasonal Special v
$4995 :Reset Controller
499 Adjust Spray Heads to Correct Spray Pattern -
Complete System Inspection
We will beat any written estimate on irrigation repairs or installation.
Certified Irrigation Auditor Call for details.
S Member of Florida
A IrrigationSociety 352-237-5731
g Comp #7085 Serving Marion County Since 1982 Licensed Fully Insured


$1,500 =E =
," , IN TAX CREDITS ." .
IT "PAYS" TO CONSERVE ENERGY.....
replace your old heating and cooling system with a high efficiency
system and you'll receive up to $1,500 in tax credits.
As always, our Comfort Club Maintenance Agreement
members receive additional discounts as well!
Call us today for details and your free replacement estimate!
DUNNELLON-MARION -CITRUS 489-3 7
Licensed & Insured #CAC 1813249 489-3917


Acrylic, Glass a &7 6iTT"GARAGE
Vinyl Windows ISREEN DOOR
Custom Made for
Your Screen Room Starting at
*795
Includes: Deluxe Rubber Rollers, 8" kick-
NSTRUCTION plate, double threshold 18/14 charcoal
CRC058138 screen, handles, locks and come-alongs.
Optional screen choices.
i 465-4629 Mobile Phone 362-5277






12 Riverland News,Thursday, September 2,2010


MONDAY, 2:00 P.M.





Advertisements may be cancelled as soon as
results are obtained. You will be billed only for the
dates the ad actually appears in the paper.
Deadlines for cancellations are the same as the
deadlines for placing ads, except for specials.


TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD, CALL Toll Free 1-877-676-1403

MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M.








Riverland News


All ads require prepayment. We accept


I- M IZ a




Be sure to check your advertisement the first day
it appears. We will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion. Adjustments are
made only for the portion of the ad that is in error.


Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the Riverland News. We make every effort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate.
However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information.


I WANT YOUR JUNK
CARS! CALL MARK
NOW! (352)426-2334


Reward!
Chihuahua & Jack
Russell Mix. Female,
small reddish, brown,
wearing red collar.
Answers to Zippy.
Lost on Hwy 44 by
Dan's Clam Stand.
Owner heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
Small Dog
Lost In Citrus Springs
August 24th
2 heart broken children
(352) 302-0840




Advertise in Over 100
Papers throughout
Florida.
Advertising
Networks of Florida,
Put us to work for You!
(866)742-1373 or visit:
www.florida-classifieds.
com





WOUND NURSE
Life Care Center of
Citrus County
Full-time position
available for a
registered nurse with
a current Florida
nursing license.
Wound care
experience required;
certification
preferred. We offer
competitive pay and
benefits including
medical coverage.
401(k), continuing
educationand
paid vacation.
sick days and
holidays.

Apply in person to
Hannah Mand.
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
I Lecanto, 34461
Visit us online at
www.LCCA.com.
EOE/M/F/V/D -
Job #17623





a**CI


WOUND NURSE
Life Care Center of
Citrus County
Full-time position
available for a
registered nurse with
a current Florida
nursing license.
Wound care
experience required;
certification
preferred. We offer
competitive pay and
benefits including
medical coverage,
401(k), continuing
education, and
paid vacation,
sick days and
holidays.

Apply in person to
Hannah Mand.
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
I Lecanto, 34461
Visit us online at
www.LCCA.com.
EOE/M/F/V/D -
Job #17623




C tkr

9 4__

r^3]


You can list any single
item priced under $100
for sale for FREE!





Clean outyour closets, go
through your garage, attack
your attic and then use the

you no longer use.
And the FREE listing means
you have more money left over
after the sale


Just call ana see now easy it is to
make money with the classified.
TOLL FREE
1-877-676-1403

Riverland News


ADOPTION

Pregnant? Considering adoption?
A childless, successful, woman seeks
to adopt & needs your help!
Financially secure. Expenses paid.
Call Margie. (ask for michelle/adam).
(800)790-5260. FL Bar# 0150789


ARE YOU PREGNANT?
CONSIDERING ADOPTION?
Loving married couple seeks to adopt.
Will be Full-time Mom (age 36) and
Devoted Dad. Financial security.
EXPENSES PAID. Kim/Bill
(888)399-3255 FL Bar# 0150789

ANNOUNCEMENTS


Advertise in Over 100 Papers
throughout Florida. Advertising
Networks of Florida, Put us to work
for You! (866)742-1373
wwwflorida-classifieds .com.

AUTO DONATIONS

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY
COUPON UNITED BREAST
CANCER FOUNDATION Free
Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info
www.ubcf info FREE Towing, Tax
Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted,
(888)468-5964.

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE


NEW Norwood SAWMILLS-
LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34"
diameter, mills boards 28" wide.
Automated quick-cycle-sawing
increases efficiency up to 40%!
wwwNorwoodSawmills.com/300N
(800)661-7746 Ext 300N

FINANCIAL


CASH NOW! Get cash for your
structured settlement or annuity
payments. High payouts. Call J.G.
Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT
(1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the
Better Business Bureau.


$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH
NOW!!! $$$ As seen on TV$$$
Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-
$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates
APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call
Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321
wwwlawcapital.com


CUSTOMER
SERVICE/
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
The City of Dunnellon
is accepting applica-
tions for a City Hall
Customer Service
Assistant. This position
requires the ability to
pleasantly greet
customers both in
person and on the
telephone, profi-
ciency in handling
cash transactions &
payment posting
to software
applicationss,
business tax
administration, and
administrative
support to City Clerk.
Knowledge of
Windows Vista
Business/XP and
Microsoft 2007
applications. Must
obtain a job descrip-
tion and submit a
City of Dunnellon
Employment
Application to the
City Clerk at
20750 River Drive,
Dunnellon, FL 34431
(352) 465-8500.
Deadline for
submitting an
application is
09/10/10.
E.O.E., DFWP.






HEAT & AIR JOBS

READY TO WORK?
3 week accelerated
program. Hands on
environment. Nation-
wide certifications &
Local Job Placement
Assistance!
877-994-9904



GenSeral
HelpH


AIRLINES ARE
HIRING
Train for high paying
Aviation Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if qualified
Job placement assis-
tance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance (866) 314-3769


B
Drivers
FOOD TANKER DRIVERS
NEEDED OTR positions
available NOW! CDL-
A w/Tanker REQ'D.
Outstanding pay & Ben-
efits! TEAMS WELCOME!!
Call a recruiter TODAY!
(877)484-3042
www.oakley
transport.com




$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!!!
$$$ As seen on TV.
$$$ Injury Lawsuit
Dragging? Need
$50$-500000++within
48/hrs? Low rates AP-
PLY NOW BY PHONE!
Call Today! Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321
www.lawcapital.com
CASH NOW!
Get cash for your
structured settlement
or annuity payments.
High payouts. Call J.G.
Wentworth.
1-866-SETTLEMENT
(1-866-738-8536).
Rated A+ by the Better
Business Bureau.




Steve BeeBee
Tree Service
Professional
Tree Work at
Reasonable
Prices

"ASK YOUR
NEIGHBOR"
Call Steve Or Cindy
(352)465-4117
(352)425-0295




Dunnellon
Computer
Repair
Low Prices
Experienced,
Honest
Free Estimates
On Site Calls
(352) 533-2130




Quality Housekeeping
Honest & Dependable
Reasonable Prices
Free Est. (352) 563-0036


FOR SALE


CHERRY BEDROOM SET.
Solid Wood, never used, brand new
in factory boxes.English Dovetail.
Original cost $4500. Sell for $895.
Can deliver. Call Tom
(813)600-3653


HELP WANTED


Drivers FOOD TANKER
DRIVERS NEEDED OTR
positions available NOW! CDL-A w/
Tanker REQ'D. Outstanding pay &
Benefits! Call a recruiter TODAY!
(877)484-3042
www.oaklevtransport.com


Heat & Air JOBS Ready to
work? 3 week accelerated program.
Hands on environment. Nationwide
certifications and Local Job
Placement Assistance!
(877)994-9904


Driver- Average 2,400 miles/week.
NEW PAY PACKAGE! 98% No-
touch! Late model equipment.
Healthcare benefits! Daily or weekly
pay. CDL-A, w/ 6 months OTR
experience. (800)414-9569.
www.driveknight.com


DRIVERS--ASAP! New Pay
Increase! 37-43 cpm Fuel Bonus-up
to 4cpm! Need CDL-A & 3 mos
recent OTR (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com


WANTED: LIFE AGENTS. Earn
$500 a Day, Great Agent Benefits.
Commissions Paid Daily, Liberal
Underwriting. Leads, Leads, Leads.
LIFE INSURANCE, LICENSE
REQUIRED. Call (888)713-6020


MISC. ITEMS FOR SALE


STIMULUS REBATE $$$$ Sept/
Aug Electric Bill Paid $3,000.00
tax Credit-2011 Get your free home
gold star certified. 1st 25 people to
call, $35.00 gift card Offer Expires
11/1/2011: (877)791-6142


Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Rell able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201




Refrigerator
GE Side by side,
white, water & ice on
the door, $350. Obo.
(352) 465-5460




CHERRY BEDROOM SET.
Solid Wood, never
used, brand new in
factory boxes. English
Dovetail. Original cost
$4500. Sell for $895.
Can deliverCall Tom
(813) 600-3653




DUNNELLON
Lake Tropicana, Thurs.,
Fri. & Sat. 9A./6P.
Lots of items, something
for everyone. 5220
S.W. 176th Ave.
RAINBOW LAKE ESTATES
Fri 8am..LEGO MANIA
GARGE SALE 28 sets,
Star wars-City-Cstle
w/directions + more
Peach Blossom St




4/16" Wheels +
Hubacaps. Came off of
Toyota 06' Like new.
$50. (352) 489-0022

A-i LADY BUYER!
BUYING! Old Jewelry,
old customer Jewelry,
Items of value,
antiques, fishing
tackle,men's
watches, guns
352-344-3809





NEW Norwood
SAWMILLS
LumberMate-Pro hand-
les logs 34" diameter,
mills boards 28" wide.
Automated quick
cycle-sawing increases
efficiency up to 40%!
www.NorwoodSawmilkscom/
300N
(800)661-7746 Ext 300N


CA$H FOR GUNS &
GOLD, Concealed
Weapons Course
Gunslingers 341-4867
Pistol
Uzzi Baby Eagle, 40
cal., like new, $400.
Shotgun
Mossberg, 500 Per-
suader, 12 ga., new,
$300. (352) 382-7046




GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES
Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.

4x8 Open $490
5x8 End $1675
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES
Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
4x8 Open $490
5x8 End $1675
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto




DUNNELLON
Rainbow River
Access, 2-3 Bd.
$400.- $600. Mo.
(352) 286-2045




DUNNELLON
SQUARE
DW, 2/2 carport,
furnishedsunrmclose to
shopping352 489-6664




DUNNELLON
Rainbows End
2/1/1, $600.
(352)465-4201
(352) 489-5350

RAINBOW END
2/2, Non smoking
duplex/apt. Large
utility room & screened
porch, large lot, newly
remodeled, No Pets
$550 mo. Ist/Sec
(352) 854-9929


MISCELLANEOUS


AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train
for high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified Housing
available. CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769.

Did you lose contact with an old
friend? We will find them.
Guaranteed skip tracing. If we don't
succeed,there's no charge.
Call Stealth (877)658-5605

OUT OF AREA REAL ESTATE

BANK FORCED BID/OFFER
SALE! Smoky Mtn. Lake
Property,Tenn. Pick your lot, then
submit your offer! Gated w/
Amenities! Hurry, Register now, First
75 only! (877)644-4647 ext.# 302

BUY MOUNTAIN LAND NOW!
Lowest prices ever! N.C. Bryson City
2 acres, spectacular views, paved
road. High altitude. Easily accessible,
secluded. $45,000. Owner financing:
(800)810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com


Unbelievable Coastal Bargain!
Only $34 00 with FREE Boat Slip.
Adjoining lot sold for $99 900!
Beautifully wooded building lot in
premier gated waterfront community.
Enjoy direct access to Atlantic! All
amenities complete! Paved roads,
underground utilities, club house,
pool. Excellent financing. Call Now
(877)888-1415, x 2627

REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS

FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION
1400+ FL Homes I Auction: 9/18
Open House: Sept 4, 11 & 12 REDC I
View Full Listings wwwAuction.com
RE Brkr CQ1031187


A_-. --- \




ADVERTISINGNETWOR OF RIDA

Classried I Display | M O Daily





Week of August 30, 2010


DUNNELLON
1 BR cottage, nicely
furnished; no pets.
(352) 746-9304





Pool-Pool-Pool
2/2 Citrus Springs .Tile
firs, patio, pool service
3/4 acre. Pet ok. $ 825.
mo. (352)615-8293





PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it Ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, Ilmita-
tlon or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



..UAL HOUSIN4
OPPOfRTUNITY



RARE & UNIQUE
Completely Fenced
2.25 Acres, just blocks
from CR 466 & the Vil-
lages, Incl. Immaculate
3/2 1800 sf Home 20 x
40 enclosed pole barn,
16 x 24 Cattle Barn
Pasture, trees, & lots of
extras, Reduced Price
$219,000, 352-516-7808


256-0902 RIV
9/17 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
Tow Pro's of Ocala gives
Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles) on
09/17/2010, 9:00 am at
1914 N Magnolia Ave.,
Ocala, FL 34475, pursuant
to subsection 713.78 of
the Florida Statutes. Tow
Pro's of Ocala reserves
the right to accept or re-
ject any and/or all bids.
2FABP35FOCB211243
1982 FORD
Published in the Riverland
News, Sept. 2, 2010.
257-0902 RIV
9/17sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
AA JERRUS TOWING &
LOCKSMITH, INC. gives
Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles on
09/17/2010, 9:00 a.m. at
3620 NE 47th PL, Ocala, FL
34479, pursuant to
subsection 713.78 of the
Florida Statutes.
AA JERRUS TOWING &
LOCKSMITH, INC. reserves
the right to accept or re-
ject any and/or all bids.
1G1ND52T7W6207790
1998 CHEVROLET
Published in Riverland
News, Sept. 2, 2010.
258-0902 RIV
9/22 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice of Public Sale:
D & D TOWING OF OCALA
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Lien and intent to
sell these vehicles) at
4125 NE Jacksonville Rd.,
Ocala, FL 34479-2427,
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
ues. D & D TOWING OF
OCALA reserves the right


FORECLOSED HOME
AUCTION
1400 + FI Homes
Auction: 9/18
Open House:
Sept 411& 12
REDC/ View Full Listings_
@ www.Auction.com
RE Brkr CQ1031187




New Homes
$79,900
3/2/2 1880 sq. ft.
Includes Lot
352-897-4447
352-697-1384



HERNANDO
2 story on 10 acs- River
Lakes Manor, Priced to
sell $154,900 obo Call
Steve 352-726-4554



INV Golf & C.C.
across from driving
range 3/2/2, 3000 sf
needs work. $60,000.
(908) 322-6529



BANK FORCED
BID/OFFER SALE!
Smoky Mtn. Lake
Property Tenn. Pick
your lot, then submit
your offer! Gated
w/Amenities!
Hurry, Register now,
First 75 only!
(877)644-4647 ext.# 302
BUY MOUNTAIN
LAND NOW!!!
Lowest prices ever!
N.C. Bryson City 2.5
acres, spectacular
views, paved road,
High altitude. Easily
accessible, secluded
$45,000
Owner Financing
800-810-1590
www.wildcatknob
.corn


LET Us
WORK FOR
You!
Riverland
News
Classifieds
Get Results!

--TOcLL FREE
1-877-676-1403


to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
Sale date: 9/22/2010 9AM
2004 CHEV VIN#
1G1JC12FX47306258
Published in the Riverland
News, Sept. 2, 2010.
260-0902 RIV
9/16 C&M Towing sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
C&M Towing & Recovery
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Lien and intent to
sell these vehicles) on
09/16/2010, 9:00 am at 36
NE 8th St., Ocala, FL
34470, pursuant to sub-
section 713.78 of the
Florida Statutes. C&M
Towing & Recovery re-
serves the right to accept
or reject any and/or all
bids.
1HGCE6642SA004433
1995 HONDA
Published in the Riverland
News, Sept. 2,2010.
261-0902 RIV
9/16 Superior Towing sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
Superior Towing &
Recovery gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and
intent to sell these
vehicles) on 09/16/2010,
9:00 am at 36 NE 8th St.,
Ocala, FL 34470, pursuant
to subsection 713.78 of
the Florida Statutes.
Superior Towing & Recov-
ery reserves the right to
accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
1G3GR62C7S4128858
1995 OLDSMOBILE
1ZWFT61 L3Y5634133
2000 MERCURY
JYA56E002FA008942
1985 YAMAHA
Published in the Riverland
News, Sept. 2,2010.
263-0902 RIV
9/21 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
The following vehicle will


Unbelievable
Coastal Bargain!
Only $34,900 with
FREE boat slip.
Adjoining lot sold for
$99,000! Beautiful
wooded building lot
in premier gated wa-
terfront community.
Enjoy direct access
to Atlantic! All
amenities complete!
Paved roads, under-
ground utilities, club
house, pool.
Excellent Financing.
Call Now
877-888-1415 x 2627




3/2/2 Canal Home
Crystal River, New roof,
Septic, AC & appl's in-
cluded wood & tile firs..
FP priv. dock, fncd yrd.
$299K(352) 586-7128



I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Portable Sheds
Glenn (352) 302-0778



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $150 & UP
(352) 771-6191
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPON
UNITED BREAST CANCER
FOUNDATION Free
Mammograms. Breast
Cancer Info
www.ubcf.info FREE




AUTO/SWAPICAR
CORRAL SHOW
Sumter Co.
Fairgrounds
Sumter
Swap Meets
Sept. 5, 2010
1-800-438-8559


TOLL FREE
1-877-676-1403
Riverland News




be sold at public auction,
per FI Stat 713.585 at
10:00 AM on September
21, 2010 at Lienor's ad-
dress to satisfy a lien
against said vehicle for
labor, services and stor-
age charges. No titles, as
is, cash only.
2002 Mercury
Mountaineer Utility
VIN 4M2ZU86E82ZJ30789
Cash sum to redeem
vehicle $3217.02
Lienor: Autobahn Inc.,
8716 SW 27th Ave, Ocala
FL 34476
Phone: 352-237-8300
Notice to owner or
lienholder as to right to a
hearing prior to sale date
by filing with the clerk of
court. Owner has the right
to recover vehicle by
posting bond in accord-
ance with FI Stat 559.917.
Proceeds from sale in ex-
cess of lien amount will
be deposited with the
clerk of court. Interested
parties, contact State
FilingService 772-595-9555
Published in Riverland
News, September 2, 2010.

264-0902 RIV
9/10 Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Early Learning Coali-
tion of the Nature Coast
will be facilitating the
Bi-Monthly Tri County Ad-
visory Council Meeting on
Friday, September 10,
2010. The meeting will
begin at 9:30a.m. at the
Coalition's Chiefland Of-
fice located at 212 N.
Main Street, Chiefland, Fl.
32626. Please contact
Coalition staff at Toll Free
877-480-KIDS or
352-490-5855 ext. 410 if
you have any questions.
Public participation is wel-
come.
Published in Riverland
News, Sept. 2,2010.


262-0902 RIV PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
FEDERAL LIEN CORP. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy
lien pursuant to Chapter 713.585 of the Florida Statutes on Sept. 23, 2010 at 10 A.M.
LOT # A27423 1976 Beige GMC MH VIN# TZE166V100964
Located at: JOE AMODEO INC. 5209 NE Jacksonville Rd, Ocala, FL 34479 (352)
622-4734 Owner: Tony James Durbin or Rachel Elizabeth Kron 2206 Chaney Dr.,
Ruskin, FL 33570 Customer: Greg & Jackie Doutt, 2707 S. Slaughter Road, Grain
Valley, MO 64029 Lineholder: None Lien Amount: $4,165.75
Pursuant to Florida Statute 713.585 the proceeding claims a lien on vehicle shown for
storage, labor and/ or services. Unless charges shown are paid in cash, said vehicles
will be sold for cash by public auction on date at time shown where vehicle located.
Owners or anyone claiming an interest have a right to a hearing prior to the sched-
uled auction which can be set by filing demand with Clerk of the Circuit Court in this
County and mailing copies of demand to all other owners and lienholders. Owner
can recover possession without judicial proceeding by posting bond per Florida
Statute 559.917. Auction proceeds in excess of charges due will be deposited with
Clerk of the Circuit Court.
Any persons) claiming any interests) in the above vehicles contact: FEDERAL LIEN
CORP. (954)384-7171 25% Buyers Premium *ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE *
LIC #AB0000288
Published in Riverland News, Sept. 2, 2010


Ask About

Move-In

Special
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am 5:00pm
Recent Foreclosures Welcome

(352) 489-1021 1


PUTTH PWE







Friday night preview


Riverland News,Thursday, September 2,2010 13


Tigers rout Belleview

in preseason classic


JULIE MANCINI/For the Riverland News
Dillian Dewitt stiff arms Belleview's Gabe McGann during fourth-quarter action Friday night at Tiger Sta-
dium. The senior running back rushed for 29 yards on six carries, including a 9-yard score in the third
quarter to cap a 10-play, 43-yard drive that chewed up slightly more than 4 minutes of time




Dunnellon awaits Panthers


Tigers host Lecanto
in season opener
JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News

And so it begins.
Dunnellon High School kicks off
its regular season at 7:30 p.m. Fri-
day against Lecanto High School at
Tiger Stadium.
For the Tigers, they could have an
edge entering their season opener.
Dunnellon pasted Belleview, 21-6,
in its preseason classic in two quar-
ters of action. The Tigers also par-
ticipated in an officials training
session against South Sumter.
For the Panthers, it'll be their
first live action against an oppo-
nent. The Panthers preseason tilt
against was scrubbed after light-
ning cancelled the second half of
their game last Friday
"It may put us head of the curve a
little bit," Dunnellon coach Frank


DUNNELLON VS. LECANTO
WHEN/WHERE: 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Tiger Stadium.
RECORDS: Regular sea-
son-opener for both teams.
WHO TO WATCH: Sopho-
more RB Malcom Ross rushed
for 77 yards on nine carries. Dil-
lian Dewitt, a senior running
back, added 29 yards on six car-
ries, including a 9-yard score.
QB Jarret Mitchell was 1-for-6
passing for 34 yards. His one
completion did account for a
touchdown in the third quarter.
...For Lecanto, QB Addison Hol-
stein and OL/LB Doug Shumate,
as well as OL/DL Danny Allan
and OL/DL Nick Pagnozzi.

Beasely said. "You never know until
you get out there. I'd like to think it
does."
But Beasley knows the Panthers
will provide a challenge.
"They've got good team speed,
something they've been lacking in


the past," Beasley added. "They are
very physical up front."
Dunnellon will have to eliminate
the mistakes it made against Belle-
view in the Tigers' preseason clas-
sic. Dunnellon was flagged nine
times for a total of 95 yards, com-
mitted two turnovers a fumble
and an interception and was a
paltry 1-for-6 passing for 34
yards.
"We've got to execute better,
we've got to make some plays, catch
the ball when it's there," Beasely
said. "We can't put ball on ground."
Defensively, Beasely wants to see
his team limit the big plays, like the
69-yard touchdown reception it
allowed the Rattlers last Friday.
"The run defense was good, we
can't give up the big plays," said
Beasley, whose team limited the
Rattlers' rushing attack to minus 3
yards. "We need to get better at the
little things. Fundamentally, we
just need to continue to improve.
The kids have got stay hungry and
want to get better."


Rushing game
powers DHS
JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News

Dunnellon High School
knows where its at, now
the Tigers know where
they need to be as they'll
spend the next week
preparing for their regu-
lar-season opener against
Lecanto High School.
Dunnellon rolled past
Belleview, 21-6, in its pre-
season tune-up Friday
night at Tiger Stadium,
thanks in large part to a
stifling defense and solid
rushing attack. However,
Tigers coach Frank
Beasley saw plenty of
room for improvement in
the passing game and, in
particular, the mental
miscues.
Behind a veteran offen-
sive line, Dunnellon
amassed 191 yards on 22
carries. Paving the way
for the Tigers' attack was
running back Malcom
Ross. The sophomore
rushed for 77 yards on
nine carries, accounting
for Dunnellon's final
score with 2:56 remaining
in the final quarter.
Dillian Dewitt, a senior
running back, added 29
yards on six carries, in-
cluding a 9-yard score in
the third quarter to cap a
10-play, 43-yard drive that
chewed up slightly more
than 4 minutes of time.
"Absolutely, we did
some good things out
there," Beasley said.
"Belleview is a very phys-
ical football team."


But Beasley was quick
to point out the ineffec-
tiveness of the passing
game the penalties. The
Tigers were just 1-for-6
passing for 34 yards and
an interception, though
the one completion did
account for Dunnellon's
second touchdown of the
third quarter that sealed
the Rattlers' fate.
Quarterback Jarret
Mitchell connected with
tight end Connor Wentz
on a quick slant as Wentz
slipped past the Belle-
view secondary with no
time left on the clock to
end the period.
"We need to catch the
ball a little bit better,"
Beasley said.
Then there was the
penalties. The Tigers
were flagged nine times
for a total of 95 yards.
"We need to clean some
of the messy stuff up,"
Beasley said.
The longtime Dunnel-
lon coach was pleased
with his team's defensive
efforts, despite giving up
a 69-yard touchdown re-
ception to the rattlers on
the second play of the
fourth quarter that cut
the Tigers' lead to 14-6.
"We got caught there,"
Beasley said of the play.
"I called for a blitz. We
need to get better there."
Overall Beasley said
he's happy the progress
team has made in the
past few weeks.
"We'll get better as we
go along," he said.
In the first half of play,
the Tigers' junior varsity
squad easily handled
their counterparts from
Belleview, 20-0.


Parkview Lanes


League and Tournament
scores for the week
ending Aug. 29:
Holder Hotshots: Handi-
cap: Jim Van Gilder
277,702; Lyle Ternes 251;
Les Burdick 682; Betty
Rauch 268,687; Saad
Bouve 259,751. Scratch:
Jim Van Gilder 224,543;
Christopher Carr 222,560;


Betty Rauch 190; Saad
Bouve 187,535; Julie Smith
481.
Bowlers Of The Week:
Jim Van Gilder, 42 pins
over his average, and Saad
Bouve, 91 pins over her av-
erage.
Fall Leagues: All of our
fall leagues will be looking
for substitutes, and some of


the leagues have openings
for teams or individuals.
We have seniors, mixed,
women's, men's and youth
leagues. Contact the Cen-
ter at 352-489-6933 to regis-
ter or for more details.
Mixed Doubles 7-9-8
Notap Tourney: Sunday,
Sept. 12, is the date of the
next Mixed Doubles


NoTap tourney, beginning
with a luncheon between 1
and 1:30 p.m., followed by
three games of bowling
and Krazy Eights (op-
tional). There are individ-
ual awards in addition to
the team prizes, and op-
tional pots. Reservations
must be made by Friday,
Sept. 10.


JULIE MANCINI/For the Riverland News
J'Von Swoll bursts into the end zone for an 8-yard
touchdown run in the opening quarter of the Tigers'
preseason classic Friday night at Tigers Stadium.
Dunnellon's junior varsity squad shutout the Rattlers,
20-0, in its tune up for the regular season. The junior
varsity squad opens its regular season against Na-
ture Coast at 7 p.m. today at Tiger Stadium.


II


i0ay
-uC aoc kli~


-Coffee Shop
We will be glad to plan your next
special event, club meeting or reception!


^sssm^


U


.ietd t'fct ,kit',1t
Cm'- n t mu art' to rt't.
Monday through Saturday 1 law 4pm









SUPPORT
^m aaH



\


PRIME RIB DINNER Only
On Sept. 6 Labor Day $ 1 J9
(3:30pm-9:45pm) $1
Serving All-You-Can-Eat Per Person
Prime Rib, Mussels, 'h.. 1j/', Spare Ribs On Bnff, r
11352 N. Williams St.* #101*Dunnellon, FL
352) 489-9763






YOUR HOMETOWN FISH MARKET
CALL WTH ANY SPECIAL ORDER.

I I
,-- -- -- -- -- -- -
Cedar Key Live MAINE
I LITTLE NECK CLAMS LOBSTERS
I I I i
S 100 ct Bag starting at LB.

*i Yellowfin
TUNA OR SWORD STEAKS
I r 1 S#


, Hometown Favorites Cooked Daily!
SERVING BREAKFAST LUNCH & DINNER
Breakfast Lunch Special Early Bird

Mon.-Fri. 7:30AM-7:30 PM Sat. & Sun. 7r30AM 200 PM
Corner of 41/Pennsylvania Ave. by Railroad Tracks Dunnellon


rnks


Live Entertainment 7 Days
Great New

-I~Llunch Sper
& Dinner


$5 BBQlates
Blues, Bi1es
&BBQ

Sat. 2-6pu
Jininy Spal
www.LeveeMusicBar.com
US 41/PENNSYLVANIA AVE. DUNNELLON 352-465-3890





14 Riverland News,Thursday, September 2,2010


-t5~



d \A
) *


II


'I


I11T


1r
|#


Making This Right


Beaches

Claims


Cleanup

Economic Investment

Environmental
Restoration

Health and Safety

Wildlife


I was born in New Orleans. My family still lives here. We have
to restore the Gulf communities for the shrimpers, fishermen,
hotel and restaurant owners who live and work here.
Iris Cross, BP Community Outreach


No oil has flowed into the Gulf for weeks. But we know this is just the
beginning of our work. BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup
in the Gulf and that includes keeping you informed.

Restoring Gulf Communities
We can't undo this tragedy. But we can help people get back on their feet.
We have been working with impacted communities since day one.

Partnering with local governments and community organizations, my job is
to listen to people's needs and frustrations and find ways to help. We have
19 community centers and teams in four states, listening and helping.

Restoring The Economy
BP is here in Gulf communities with shrimpers, fishermen, hotel and
restaurant owners, helping to make them whole.

More than 120,000 claim payments totaling over $375 million have
already gone to people affected by the spill. We have committed a
$20 billion independent fund to pay all legitimate claims, including lost
incomes until people impacted can go back to work. And none of this
will be paid by taxpayers.

BP has also given grants of $87 million to the states to help tourism
recover and bring people back to the Gulf beaches.

Restoring The Environment
We're going to keep looking for oil and cleaning it up if we find it. Teams
will remain in place for as long as it takes to restore the Gulf Coast.

And we've dedicated $500 million to work with local and national scientific
experts on the impact of the spill and to restore environmental damage.

Thousands of BP employees have their roots in the Gulf. We support
over 10,000 jobs in the region and people here are our neighbors. We
know we haven't always been perfect, but we will be here until the oil
is gone and the people and businesses are back to normal. We will do
everything we can to make this right.


For general information visit: bp.com
For help or information: (866) 448-5816

restorethegulf.gov
Facebook: BP America
Twitter: @BP_America
YouTube: BP

For claims information visit: bp.com/claims
floridagulfresponse.com


0 2010 BP, E&P


bp




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs