Title: Riverland news
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Title: Riverland news
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Citrus Pub.
Place of Publication: Dunnellon FL
Dunnellon FL
Publication Date: April 29, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Dunnellon (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Dunnellon
Coordinates: 29.05 x -82.455556 ( Place of Publication )
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General Note: "The newspaper built on community pride."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 14, no. 36 (Apr. 11, 1996).
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Volume ID: VID00001
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Riverland


SERVING DUNNELLON AND RAINBOW SPRINGS





News


Thursday, April 29, 2010


Vol 28 No. 28


River deal draws lawsuit


Little Miss
See Page 14


Arbor Day
celebration
The city of Dunnellon
will celebrate Arbor
Day on Friday, April 30
at 4 p.m. in Ernie Mills
Park.
The celebration will
include: A tree planting
ceremony by the Dun-
nellon City Council and
the Dunnellon Tree
Board; a tree give away
provided by Greg Bar-
ton, Marion County
Forester, Florida Divi-
sion of Forestry; and
the reading of the City
Council Proclamation
recognizing Arbor Day
The city will also be
partnering with the
Dunnellon Elementary
School to observe
Arbor Day, 2010
Our theme will be
"Planting the Seeds for
the Future." The pro-
gram will include a
Proclamation from
the Mayor recognizing
the schools celebration
of Arbor Day, and a tree
give away The students
will learn the impor-
tance of trees and how
to care for them.
Needs a
freezer
The Annie W John-
son Senior and Family
Service Center is in
desperate need of a
freezer. If anyone could
help the Center fill this
need Please Contact
the agency at 489-8021
and ask for Christine Or
Darlene.
City needs
a volunteer
The city of Dunnellon
has opening for a part-
time volunteer with of-
fice skills to help out at
City Hall. Call 465-8500.
Car cruise
There will be a car
cruise on Friday, April
30 from 6 to 8 p.m. at
the Big Lots Plaza lo-
cated at 8600 S.W State
Road 200. Music, door
prizes and 50/50 raffle.
Bring a can of food for
the Salvation Army
food pantry For more
info call Sid at 489-7379.

Visit our Web site
for more stories
and photos
riverlandnews.corn


Riverland

News
20441 E Pennsylvania Ave.
Dunnellon, FL 34432




Riverland News

VISIT US:
www.riverlandnews.com
CALL US:
489-2731





6 84578 20035 4


PAT FAHERTY
Editor
Rainbow River Conservation
Inc. and 15 individuals have
filed a lawsuit to block the set-
tlement agreement between the
city and Rainbow River
Ranch/Conservation Land
Group.
Rainbow River Conservation,
and Fredrick S. Johnson,
Michael G. Rausch, Max P Lynn,
John Dennis, Patricia M. Er-
matinger, Jean Tullis, Thelma B.
Dickinson, Margaret Longhill,
Nikki Connors, Roger Barth,
Emma Jean Painter, Leonard


3
I





TI
/


MICHEL NORTHSEA
Special to Riverland News
Caring for others is a
suggested commandment.
Volunteers at the First
United Methodist Church
follow that command-
ment with a special pro-
gram Tuesday afternoons
- it is the Forget-Me-Not
Elder Care Min-
istry
From 12:30 to
4:30 p.m. they
offer respite care FP
for elderly loved 12:3
ones.
Most visitors to 4:350
the adult day care they
program have t y
Alzheimer's dis- res
ease or the as vol-
unteer care car
givers refers to elM(
them as their
PAL, person with V0\
Alzheimer's. Fo
Once a hospice
nurse in the area,
Joey Weisbaum,
who also is the
parish nurse for the
church, learned some of
the families she was visit-
ing were using respite
care offered by other
churches, she thought
her church should offer a
similar program.
"Caregivers of elderly


Gane, Walter Johnson, Shirley E.
Dowling and Franklin W Roth
are plaintiffs on the action
against the city filed on April 15.
City Manager Lisa Algiere re-
ported that she was served with
lawsuit on April 20.
The individual plaintiffs are
identified as owning or residing
on property that is adjacent,
nearby or very close to the sub-
ject development. The docu-
ment includes aerial maps
showing the plaintiffs' property
locations. It also lists their dis-
tance from and proximity to the
proposed development.
The plaintiffs are seeking a


patients have the hardest
job of them all, since
their care is often needed
24 hours a day, leaving
them little time for per-
sonal time or relief," she
said. "This program gives
them a few hours off to
run personal errands, or
shop, or get away for a
much needed emotional
break."
W e i s b a u m
talked it over
with others in the
)M church and found
50 to out others were
interested in
p.m. helping.
offer "I asked for vol-
of unteers and I had
Dite 40 people volun-
Sfor teer," she said.
Thirty-eight of
early those volunteer-
ing went through
/ed the required
es. four-hour train-
ing course, cover-
ing privacy laws,
precautions on
infectious dis-
eases, emergency proce-
dures and Alzheimer's
itself The training was
developed by the Marion
County Senior Service in
partnership with Hospice
and RSVP of Marion
See CARE page 3


judgment declaring that the
March 19 settlement agreement
by city over the Rainbow River
property is inconsistent with
Dunnellon's comprehensive
plan.
The City Council had voted 5-0
to accept the settlement agree-
ment with Rainbow River
Ranch and Conservation Land
Group to resolve claims against
the city under the Bert Harris Jr.
Property Rights Protection Act.
If approved by the court, the de-
velopment known as the Pre-
serve at Blue Run could go
forward.
Rainbow River Conservation


had opposed that agreement.
The suit also describes some
of the river protection efforts by
Rainbow River Conservation
during the past 40 years and de-
scribes the possible harm to the
plaintiffs from the future devel-
opment.
The plaintiffs are requesting a
full trial on the issue and a court
ruling "reversing quashing and
vacating" the city's approval of
the agreement.
The council did not directly
discuss the lawsuit at its April 21
workshop, but it did begin dis-
See RIVER page 3


Photo by Julie Mancini
A new tradition started at Dunnellon High School this year with the 2010 Mr.
and Miss DHS Pageant. The winners were Carl Jackson and Caylee Underwood.
They were crowned at the school prom on April 3. See www.riverlandnews.com
for photos of all the contestants.


Grow house bust in Dunnellon

Just after noon on Tues-
day, April 20, the Multi-
Agency Drug Enforcement
i Team (MADET) busted mar-
ijuana grow house at 10920
-4 : SW 140th Ave., Dunnellon.
The property is located
Just east of Dunnellon/Mar-
po co s o ion Airport and north of
C.R. 484.
- Drug agents, following a
call from a Marion County
', Sheriff's Office deputy,
took Luis Cabrera Padron,
pln- 35, into custody and
charged him with:
-J4 Trafficking marijuana
Aof Renting for the Purpose
tf trafficking
Grand utility theft
Possession of parapher-
., t nalia
.... -.- Padron, who rented the
% 7home at the above address,
-a.. agreed to allow the MCSO
7f .deputy to search the prop-
.. ,, "erty. During the search, the
deputy discovered one of
-- two converted stalls in a
barn just west of the main
',-t'.X .'. ..j home, which housed mari-
.,,...juana plants. In total,
A." MADET agent found 39
. .b' 4 Vplants with an estimated
% ,* value of $100,000.
Padron is now in the Mar-
A. .ion County Jail.
& V6 tAccording to the sheriff's
V, office, the bust was the re-
A V sult of an anonymous tip.
WA On Thursday, April 22,
authorities reported an-
other possible cultivation
Photo courtesy of MCSO of marijuana investigation
PonoSouthwests165fAvenu
A Marion County Sheriff deputy removes marijuana on Southwest 165 Avenue
plants from a grow house in Dunnellon after last North. No arrests were re-
week's bust. porte.
ported.


Scene from the 2090 Dunnellon Relay for Life.



Relay for Life


Saturday at DHS


PAT FAHERTY
Editor
The American Cancer
Society 2010 Relay for
Life Dunnellon will be
held this weekend at the
high school football field.
"Make the Fairy Tale of
a Cure Come True" is the
theme this year as the
Relay shifts to a more
daytime format to attract
more people.
The Relay walk will
begin at 1 p.m. Saturday
with a full schedule of
events to follow. About 16
teams, ranging from one


to 35 members have
signed up to participate.
The event concludes Sun-
day morning.
The top fundraisers
going into the Relay are
last year's lead team the
Basketcases followed by
the Dunnellon High
School Staff and Team
Sweetbay
And as of early this
week, Jennifer Baker of
Team Walmart 960 was
the top single fundraiser.
As of Tuesday, the 2010
fundraising effort stood
See RELAY page 3


75 cents


Break away


Program offers


respite care


I AT A GLANCE I





2 -' Riverland News,Thursday,April 29,2010


Argenziano talks


PSC, campaign


finance reform


AMANDAMIMS
Special to Riverland News
Nancy Argenziano, for-
mer state legislator and
Dunnellon activist and
current chairwoman of
the Florida Public Serv-
ice Commission, paid a
visit to TOO FAR at the
group's monthly meeting
in Inverness last week.
In a one-hour talk, she
gave the audience of
about 70 people her
opinions on topics rang-
ing from the PSC to cam-
paign finance reform.
On partisan politics:
"When you're in Talla-
hassee you have to regu-
larly bathe in what I call
disinfectant," she said.
"Now I'm beyond cyni-
cal. I'm (ticked) off. And
all of you should be and I
mean it, because it is the
worst I've ever seen ...
partisanship is killing
everything because
when you can't vote your
conscience and you get
attacks from everybody
because you don't drink
the Kool-Aid not by
the gallon anymore, it's
by the vat if you don't
drink the Kool-Aid,
you're in big trouble."
On the PSC: "You don't
have to have a college
education to understand
that it's very important
that our utilities in the
state of Florida and our


regulators are fair, and I
can tell you that's all I've
ever been; but you also
don't have to have a col-
lege education to tell you
that some people just
don't want fair. Some
people want beyond
that."
On separating the PSC
from the Legislature:
"Three major organiza-
tions right now are
thinking about putting
an initiative on the bal-
lot in the near future to
separate the public serv-
ice commission from the
Legislature. It's so im-
portant."
On campaign finance
reform: "People don't
pay millions of dollars
for nothing," she said.
"The truth is if campaign
finance reform is not
done, it's the end of
America. If you think
your representative gov-
ernment is working
today, you're all fooled ...
You have to yell at the
top of your lungs be-
cause this is the most im-
portant thing you'll
probably have to do in
your life," she said.
"When you have legis-
lators, whether it's the
state government or the
federal government, who
think they own the
process, you've got to get
rid of them."


Marion County commissioners helped recognize the winning students. Above, the high school PSA "The
Beauty Outside" was produced by left to right, Matthew Backlund, Bret Durham, Arianna Shofield, and
Kelsey Lenz. "The Neighborhood Kids" produced by Dunnellon Middle School 6th graders, won the mid-
dle school division, and will appear this summer during previews at Marion County movie theaters. Pic-
tured are left to right, Rudohl Sinflorant, Roberto Webb, AlissiaWhalen, Shelby Webb,Taylor Futch, Autumn
Tier, and Sarah Lenz. Back Row, DMS Assistant Principal Reginald Rocker. Not pictured: Carly Saunders,
Thomas Gordon, Alexandria Bowers, and Angel DeCastro.


Dunnellon Garden Club News


The Dunnellon Garden
Club's spring tea will be
held May 4 at 1:30, located
at 11756 Cedar St. hosted by
Pat Barzano and commit-
tee.
The tea welcomes all
members, especially new
members joining the club
this year. A brief discussion
of upcoming events, pro-
grams and field trips
planned for 2010-2011. The
club encourages everyone
interested in learning more
about the clubs history, out-
reach to the community,
and membership to be our
guest at this social meeting.
The regular monthly
meeting will be Thursday,


May 20 beginning at noon.
Short business meeting,
buffet and social time. This
meeting concludes the
2009-2010 club year.
We have had great pro-
gram speakers and always
tasty buffet lunches pre-
pared by our hospitality
committee and members.
Thanks to our officers and
members who gave so much
of their time. The Dunnel-
lon Garden Club wishes all
members a happy and safe
summer vacation with fam-
ily and friends. Will see all
on Sept 16, 2010.
For information call
Shirley at 465-9037.
Happy Gardening!


Dunnellon sweeps county contest


Pick up after yourself
Be wise when you fertil-
ize. Those are some of the
messages a group of Dun-
nellon middle and high
school media production
students want Marion
County residents to re-
member when they watch
their public service an-
nouncements, or PSAs.
Last week, the Marion
County Board of County


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Commissioners recog-
nized these young pro-
ducers as winners of the
2010 Marion County
Stormwater PSA Contest
at the regularly sched-
uled board meeting.
Dunnellon Middle
School's sixth-grade class
won the middle school
category with "Neighbor
Kids," a 30-second com-
mercial describing the


harmful effects over-fer-
tilizing can have on water
resources and wildlife.
Meanwhile, Dunnellon
High School's junior and
senior class took home
the high school category
award for "The Beauty
Outside," a 30-second
production reminding
Marion's residents to
keep our waterways pol-
lution-free.


Grooming Baths ,A


S20491 The Granada Dunnellon


"We are impressed at
the creative talent of our
youth and their desire to
contribute to the protec-
tion of our water re-
sources," said county
stormwater engineer
Tracy Straub, PE. "Their
PSA creations will assist
us in increasing local
awareness about com-
mon causes of stormwa-
ter pollution, such as
littering and over-fertiliz-
ing."
The winning PSAs will
start airing on local tele-
vision and movie screens
in May as part of the
county's ongoing
stormwater pollution
prevention efforts. To
learn more, call 352-671-
8686, or visit www.mari-
oncountyfl.org.


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Riverland News,Thursday, April 29,2010 3


Photos by Michel Northsea
A regular visitor to respite care at the First United Methodist Church Nancy is
offered a drink of water from volunteer caregiver Nancy Remmele.


Respite care is offered on Tuesday afternoons at the First United Methodist
Church. Volunteer caregivers, left to right, Grace Burks, Miriam Lapham and
Barbara Martinez laugh with Lloyd Zink as they try to get him to dance a little.


CARE
continued from page 1
County
"We are the overseeing
agency," said Rosey
Moreno-Jones with Mar-
ion County Senior Serv-
ices. "The need for these
volunteers is so great and
the waiting list is so long,
we thought if we could
find faith based or resi-
dential communities to
train their own, we would
designate four pilot proj-
ects."
Funding to manage the
program was provided
with a grant from United
Way
"Dunnellon are like the
overachievers," said
Moreno-Jones. "We're
just astounded with their
success."
Each session starts
with prayer and the
Pledge of Allegiance.
"It really clicks with
them. That's how we all
started our school days
and they remember that,"
said volunteer Miriam
Lapham.
Then the dancing and
games begin. Music from
the big band era brings a
smile to Lloyd Zink's
face, a few volunteers
gather around him en-
couraging him dance.
Zink comes most Tues-
days and he gets lots of
attention from volun-
teers, Grace Burks, Mary
Gutekunst, Barbara Mar-
tinez and Lapham as they


]o staaent ideas that keep up with the ti es, please contact me today
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coax a smile or a few
dance steps from him.
His wife, Ellen, is
thankful for the attention
her husband gets during
his visits. The short break
allows her to keep a doc-
tor's appointment or go to
the grocery store.
"It's a wonderful pro-
gram. I know everyone so
I don't have to worry," she
said.
And to Weisbaum and
the many volunteers


RELAY
continued from page 1
at $12,174 according to
the Relay website. That is
about half the amount
they had raised by this
time last year.
The event will include
the annual cancer sur-
vivors' dinner, the sur-
vivors lap, the luminaria
ceremony and whatever
creative, innovative ac-
tivities the teams can
come up with for onsite
fundraising.
The Relay teams will
compete to attract to peo-
ple to their sites. From
food, games,
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that's what their program
is all about helping
others.
Weisbaum encourages
other churches to con-
sider offering respite
care saying the program
is very "reproducible."
She even goes as far as of-
fering to help with the
training.
Those wishing to bring
their loved ones for an af-
ternoon are encouraged
to visit on Tuesday after-


and more, the teams will
have plenty of ways for
participants and visi-
tors to support the fight
against cancer
According to event co-
ordinator Danielle Clark,
there will also be a full
schedule of musical en-
tertainment.
She said the scheduled
performers include
Grammy contest winner
Kayla
Dumon, vocalist Nicole
Walters, the Williston all
girls group, Ms. Kirby
Singers, third Grade
Vocalist Naomi Sammy,
vocalist Jenny Marvin
and
singer/songwriter
Wendy Wiseman.


noon and fill out an ap-
plication.
For more information
call Grace Burks at 489-
2580.
The church facility is
equipped to handle 10
visitors each week. It can-
not accept visitors who
are wanderers or combat-
ive.
Dunnellon First United
Methodist Church is lo-
cated at 21501 W High-
way 40, 489-4026.


With the daytime Satur-
day start, Clark said there
will be more opportunity
for families to enjoy
and participate in the
event.
With at least five Relay
teams coming out of Dun-
nellon High School this
year, the school was
holding a variety of pur-
ple the Relay color -
related activities this
week to promote student
awareness of the event.
In addition, Dunnellon
will celebrate its second
annual Paint the Town
Purple Day on Friday,
April 30.
Stop by the Riverland
News at 20441 E. Penn-
sylvania Ave. on Thurs-


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RIVER
continued from page 1

mantling the city's 2008
river protection ordi-
nance, which had consid-
erable Rainbow River
Conservation involve-
ment.
The council will also be
reviewing the tree ordi-
nance and the consis-
tency ordinance for
possible repeal. The lat-
ter deals with non-con-
forming uses and
consistency with the com-


day, April 29 from 9 a.m.
to noon or 2-5 p.m. and
pick up a purple ribbon
to display at your home
or business on Friday,
April 30 and help "Paint
Dunnellon Purple."
Get your purple ribbon
at the Riverland News
and your business will be
entered into a drawing to
win a FREE 1/4 page ad.
Winner will be drawn on
Monday, May 3.
The American Cancer
Society invites everyone
to join the fun and "Paint
Our Town Purple."
Everyone is encouraged
to spread hope in their
community by dressing in
purple, decorating homes


prehensive plan. The for-
mer has close ties to the
Rainbow River Ranch de-
velopment controversy
City Attorney Marsha
Segal-George said if the
settlement agreement is
approved by the court,
the lawsuit will be dis-
missed.
A complete copy of the
lawsuit is available on
the city website at
www.dunnellon.org. Click
on Services and Info on
the left side menu, and
then scroll down to
Rumor Control.


and businesses and rais-
ing money for the upcom-
ing relay
If you decorate your
home or business, take a
photo and e-mail it to ed-
itor@riverlandnews. com.
We will publish as many
as possible.
Purple has a special
meaning this year for res-
idents Betty and Jack
Crovato. Their nephew
Brad Rock was struck by
cancer and his hometown
has rallied to his support
through a unique effort
called "Rock the Purple."
To show support for Brad
or for more information,
visit Rock the Purple on
Facebook.


A member of the Florida Press Association
352-489-2731
352-489-6593 (Fax)
The Riverland News serves Dunnellon and the surrounding areas: Blue
Cove, Chatmire, Hills of Ocala, Lake Tropicana, Rainbows End, Rainbow
Lakes Estates, All the Rainbow Springs Area, Rio Vista and Vogt Springs.
The Riverland News is delivered on Thursday to subscribers by our
carriers and mail. The newspaper is also available inside area stores
and at various boxes throughout the community. Local subscription rate
is $24 a year. Call for Florida and out-of-Florida rates.
The Riverland News is published in Dunnellon, FL by Citrus Publishing,
Inc., 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429-5760.
CALL 489-2731
For Information On Subscriptions,
Display Advertising And Business & Church Directory Ads.
TO SUBMIT NEWS ITEMS EMAIL TO:
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NEWS DEADLINE IS NOON FRIDAY.
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sporting activities, military promotions, announcement of births,
anniversaries, engagements, weddings, first and 90+ birthdays, and
similar community news items are accepted for publication.
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4 c- Riverland News,Thursday,April 29,2010


Rie vies RIVERLAND NEWS
"The Newspaper built on Community Pride."
Publisher Gerry Mulligan
1?*...-v e r v ie w -^-General Manager Tricia Marks
Editor -' Pat Faherty
Member of the Florida Press Association


OUR


VIEW


Quality education should start at home


here's a popular game show
syndicated on television
called "Family Feud," in
which people are asked to give sev-
eral responses to a question. One
of the recent queries on the show
was, "Name something parents
teach their children before kinder-
garten."
Some of the answers included
potty training, ABC/alphabet/read-
ing, counting, how to write their
names, and tying their shoes.
It is hoped that parents all over
Florida were watching this show,
and absorbing the answers about
reading, writing and counting. Re-
member, this was how the public
felt about things a child should
learn before kindergarten.
Gov. Charlie Crist is coming

LETTERS

Sandhill cranes
no match
for airboats
Twenty-eight sandhill cranes call
my property "Home". Twenty-four of
the birds make up 12 active breeding
pairs. They all did their dance,
mated, and went to the Withla-
coochee backwaters to nest and raise
their young. You wouldn't normally
see them again until the young birds
could fly mid/late summer.
It's Monday, April 19, and 10 of the
birds are already back. They have
lost their investment (eggs/babies and
nest) and their biological clock has
run out for this year. Next Monday,
more birds will join them.
Sandhill cranes build their low-
profile grass and reed nests on the
shallows of the backwater. Every
weekend, day and night, I see and
hear airboats running all around the
backwaters, pancak-ing everything in
their way. The birds and animals can
contend with the natural perils, but
not human technology.
Of the 12 breeding pairs, only two
baby birds will survive the first year.
No more than that, based on my ob-
servations since 1999.
The answer for this debacle is very
simple: Only allow trolling motors,
paddles, poling, sail, etc. in the back-
waters. It's not just the cranes getting
whacked. If you're out of the river
channel, you have to shut down the
big horsepower.
There are several good environ-
mental groups around here who
could cause something to be done
about this- I'm just a tired old man.
Please no treehugging whack job
groups!
Joe D. Gilbreath
Dunnellon
Thanks support
and donations
Thank you from The Woman's Club
of Dunnellon:
The Woman's Club of Dunnellon,
the heart of the Community, wishes to
thank each and every merchant for
their generous donations for our
Fashion Show on April 17.
Also we thank all our guests for
coming and our loyal hard working
members who worked as a team to
support such a fine event. Belks at
Crystal River provided the latest
fashions and our own members so
beautifully modeled them.
May 13 will be our last meeting of
this business year. We will also be in-
stalling our new offi-cers of the ensu-
ing year, 2010-2011. Officers are:
President Susan Taylor, 1st Vice
President Jackie Adley, 2nd Vice
President Treva Mathews, Corre-
sponding Secreatry -Joanne
Schemery, Recording Secretary -
Kathi Garron, Treasurer Rosemary
Kunz, Assistant Treasurer Nancy
Homadue. We will also be celebrating
our 88th Birthday.
See LETTERS page 5

OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in RiverlandNews
editorials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons,
columns or letters do not necessarily repre-
sent the opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to express
their opinions in a letter to the editor.
* All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including let-
ters sent via e-mail, Phone numbers will not
be printed or given out. We reserve the right
to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters to the editor must be no longer than
550 words, and writers will be limited to two
letters per month.


under some fire for vetoing a bill
that would have, among other
things, put more pressure on
teachers and made it easier to dis-
miss some educators.
Is there any way we can pass a
bill to put more pressure on the
parents?
Any teacher in the early grades
can tell you horror stories of chil-
dren who know nothing about any
of these skills when they enter the
classroom for the first time. When
a child learns nothing at home, it's
a handicap that is going to follow
him all through his school years.
Blaming teachers for some of these
failures is easy ... it's also wrong.
The state wants each class to
show progress from the beginning
of the year to the end, and some of


our legislators want to blame the
teachers if it doesn't work. But
what if half the class has some of
the basic knowledge and the other
half doesn't? Is the teacher sup-
posed to ignore the lesser-trained
children and only emphasize
learning to the top half of the class-
room? Or is the teacher supposed
to concentrate on the lower half,
thereby depriving the better-
trained children the opportunity to
advance at an accelerated pace? If
the teacher is going to lose his/her
job because of test scores, there's
no easy answer
The obvious answer is to get rid
of the tests, and promote only
those pupils who have mastered
the work. It's far better to retain a
student in an early grade (many of


Making a difference. Joey Weisbaum, left, her dog and a friend took the op-
portunity at the first Boomtown Days Pet Parade to raise cancer awareness.


OTHER


VIEWS


May is physical fitness month


xercisers can't lose. Whether a
workout is a leisurely walk in
the park or flat-out wind sprints
up a hill, the benefits of both low-re-
sistance exercise and high-resistance
exercise are many
Just in time for National Physical
Fitness and Sports Month in May, here
are some tips from Amy Goldwater,
M.S., educator, former bodybuilding
champion, and physical fitness ex-pert
for TOPS Club, Inc. (Take Off Pounds
Sensibly), the nonprofit weight-loss
support organiza-tion.
"Exercising at the lower end of the
intensity zone has benefits, too," Gold-
water says. "Gen-tler exercise can de-
crease fatigue and increase energy
significantly, especially for those who
are older, under the weather, stressed,
or eat poorly"
In these situations, high-resistance
exercise creates more work for the
body at rest. The body says, for in-
stance, "I can't fight this cold and build
muscle at the same time" or "I can't
build the necessary muscle, repair tis-
sue, and do all the wonderful things
I'm supposed to on junk food's empty
calories." For this group of exercisers,
low-impact exercise becomes the bet-
ter choice.
Low-impact activities can be an en-
joyable break in the day, making it
more likely to stick with a routine. The
stretching and strengthening compo-
nents are performed using only body


weight as resistance.
Options are as plentiful as exercise
mats. Calisthenics, yoga, Pilates, and
low-impact aero-bics can produce
great results. Swimming is a good ex-
ample of a low-impact exercise that re-
quires a significant amount of energy
Cardio-boxing where the person deliv-
ers blows or punches to a heavy boxing
training bag, is a newer option that is
popular for the total body fitness it de-
livers.
On the other side of the gym, Gold-
water notes, high-intensity exercise
can yield the same or better results
than low-impact in just half the time,
because intensity is the exercise factor
that drives fitness levels up most
quickly "Since a vigorous workout
sometimes has the draw-back of being
a 'race against time,' and fewer people
can find the time to exercise for sev-
eral hours each week, an alternative is
to fit the workouts into less time by
adding intensity," she shares.
The downside of intense exercise is
that it may produce more injuries.
However, there are ways to avoid this:
Speed work, sometimes called wind
sprints, limits intensity to a very short
time.
Cross-training, or using muscles for
a different activity than usual, adds in-
tensity for the muscles.
Lift weights, especially with

See OTHER VIEWS page 5


Dunnellon has been know for its successful Relay for Life events and organ-
izers hope the community will turn out this weekend at Dunnellon High football
field to help make the 2010 another banner year. See related story.


us grew up in a time when it was
called being "left back") than to let
that youngster be socially pro-
moted, only to drop out of high
school when the work becomes too
difficult.
Education in this state is some-
what of a disaster, especially for
the slower students, but it's time to
stop blaming the teachers. The
state needs to back off from the
tests and rigid regulations, and it
needs to let teachers do what they
went to school to learn to do ...
teach.
Meanwhile, it would also be nice
if parents would learn to be par-
ents when it comes to educating
their young children. Too bad
there isn't a place to teach that,
too.

TIME TO SMILE


Nefarious

fictional doings!
So what is up with that abandoned
green car in the Winn-Dixie park-
ing lot? Why would anyone aban-
don a car? Unless the owner died on his
way into the store, there's no reason to
leave the car sitting there.
If some one had died you would think
a family member would pick up the car.
Today there are many ways to get rid of
a car. You can donate it to charity. You
can sell it for parts. You could sell it on
eBay.
The only reason you would abandon
the car without its license plate is be-
cause of ne-farious do-
ings! I have always
wanted to use that word
in a sentence.
Okay, let's think of
some scenarios. I am
not good with fiction so
you may need to help
me. Maybe there is a
dead body in the trunk.
Kathleen Oh, a murder mystery.
Wallace Yeah, that sounds good.
The owner was a
wealthy man with lots of enemies.
Maybe he stepped on one too many toes.
No, no it can't be that. I am sure the po-
lice have checked on it already and
there would be a mighty big odor by now.
Maybe it was a stolen car used in a
bank heist. Can you tell I watch too
many episodes of crime shows? If some
one reported it stolen you would think
they could locate it by the VI.N. unless it
was scrapped off. Maybe the person it
was stolen from was happy to get rid of
it.
I know my Dad would have been
happy if some one stole a few of his
clunkers.
All right let's try this. The owner was a
drug dealer. The car does look a bit di-
sheveled in side. The cloth on the roof is
ripped. My Dad had an old Reliant K
that had a saggy roof like that. You had
to hold it up in certain parts. He was not
a car guy. He had the worst luck with
cars. He bought his first "new" car in his
70s. It was a lemon. The poor guy could
never win. I learned a new curse word
every time that car stalled. He used to
park the car by the meadows behind our
house. One year he passed the emissions
test without even going through the line.
They opened the hood and a whole fam-
ily of mice jumped out. All those grown
men running away from the mice. It was
so funny. They gave him the pass sticker
and told him to leave.
Okay, if our guy is a drug dealer it still
doesn't explain why he abandoned the
car. If the police were after him he
wouldn't have time to take the plate off.
So, what else can we come up with?
Maybe there is a simple explanation.
Sure, that's it. Nothing shady in-volved,
right?
I guess we will never know. I do won-
der how long it will sit there.
Do we have zoning laws on abandoned
cars? Don't they get towed and auc-
tioned off if no one claims them? That's
what they do in Connecticut. It reminds
me of this strange shopping center up
there.
I think it was in Orange or maybe West
Haven. Anyway, at the end of the lot
there are three cars that have been
tarred over. It's very odd looking, like
the La Brea Tar Pits.
If you think of a good story let me
know at daisyalsol@gmail.com. Are
there any budding authors out there?
Let your imagination run wild.
Make up a few characters and scenar-
ios. Would they be nefarious or is there
a simple explanation? I would like to
hear from you. Please feel free to tell me
about your car horror stories. I know it
would give my Dad a good laugh in
heaven.








Riverland News,Thursday, April 29,2010 5


Know and understand your Chamber of Commerce


Dear Readers:
As Executive Director of the
Dunnellon Area Chamber of
Commerce I hear questions
about; what is the chamber of
commerce for? What does it
do? How does it work? How
does it help? I put together
some questions and answers
that I hope will give you a bet-
ter understanding of your
chamber of commerce along
with a history of how the very
first chamber originated.
What is your Chamber?
Your Chamber of Commerce
is a voluntary partnership of
business and professional peo-
ple working together to build a
healthy economy and to im-
prove the quality of life in your
community
As your chamber works to ac-
complish these goals, it wears
many hats: economic devel-
oper and planner; tourist in-
formation center; business
spokesperson; economic coun-
selor and teacher; government
relations specialist; human re-
sources advisor; and public re-
lations practitioner.
Simply stated, your Chamber
is business's, professional's
and individual's working to-
gether to make your commu-
nity a better place for everyone


to live and work.
Who are your
Chamber members?
Dunnellon Area Chamber of
Commerce members are busi-
nesses, organizations and indi-
viduals concerned with the
social and economic climate of
your community
The Chamber is run by its
members. They elect a Board
of Directors that determines
policies and sets goals. A pres-
ident presides over all Board
meetings. Your Chamber's day-
to-day operations are handled
by an executive director who is
a paid employee. Members
often become involved in
chamber activities by working
on committees. These commit-
tees range from economic de-
velopment, education, tourism,
fundraisers, public affairs and
governmental relations.
What are the objectives of
your Chamber?
As it works to improve your
community's economy and
quality of life, your Chamber
keeps these objectives in mind:
1. To help businesses pros-
per and grow;
2. To help increase job op-
portunities;
3. To encourage an orderly


expansion and development of
all segments of the community;
4. To contribute to the over-
all economic stability of the
community;
5. To encourage and promote
and market your community
Chamber of Commerce activ-
ities reflect community needs.
They are undertaken by mem-
bers and staff to make the area
a better place in which to live.
Some of the most popular ac-
tivities of Chambers include:
1. Economic development:
Providing services and infor-
mation to members; promoting
re-tail activities; recruiting
new businesses and industries;
attracting tourists and conven-
tions.
2. Community development:
planning for growth; revitaliz-
ing the downtown retail area;
sponsoring cultural activities.
3. Quality of life: working to-
ward developing, evaluating
and applying quality of life and
well being with health related
research for the community
4. Public affairs/relations:
communicating business and
civic issues to our community
Chambers of Commerce usu-
ally accomplish their activities
by:
1. Having specific goals and


objectives designed to meet
the needs of the community;
2. Having an organizational
structure-with bylaws, policies
and procedures-for coordinat-
ing volunteers and programs of
work;
3. Having involved and dedi-
cated leaders that are well in-
formed and are willing to use
their time and talent to accom-
plish meaningful activities;
4. Having informed, inter-
ested and willing members to
work on committees.
Interesting facts on
Chamber history.
The modern chamber of com-
merce movement traces its ori-
gin to Marseilles, France,
where an independent volun-
tary organization was formed
in the early seventeenth cen-
tury to represent the commer-
cial of that Mediterranean
seaport
Nearly a century later, the
British formed the second
chamber of commerce at St.
Helier on the Channel Island
of Jersey as an independent
voluntary business organiza-
tion representing the interests
of that small island town. The
first American chamber of
commerce was established in
1770 in New York City By 1870,


chambers were operating in 40
major American cities. In 1986
approximately 5,000 local and
state chambers were operating
across the United States.
It was during the first half of
the twentieth century that the
United States Chamber of
Commerce dramatically in-
creased in numbers, growing
from 100 in 1901 to nearly 3,000
in 1950.
The U.S. Chamber of Com-
merce was founded on April
22,1912, at the suggestion of
President William Howard Taft
to develop a strong link be-
tween business and govern-
ment.
By 1986, the U.S. Chamber's
membership had grown to in-
clude more than 2,700 cham-
bers; 54 American Chambers of
Commerce Abroad; 1,200 trade
and professional associations
and 180,000 business members.
For over three centuries,
business and professional peo-
ple have joined together in
chambers of commerce to
shape the future of their com-
munities and the world.
Sincerely,
Beverly Leisure
Executive Director
Dunnellon Area Chamber of
Commerce


Letters
continued from page
Clinton and
Tea Party
The other day I read
where former President
Bill Clinton was attempting
to draw a compari-son be-
tween Timothy McVeigh,
the Oklahoma City bomber,
and the current Tea Party
folks. He did not go far
enough. When McVeigh's
anger was building, Clinton
was President and the De-
mocrats controlled both
houses of government.
When the Tea Party's anger
was building there was a
Democrat in the White
House and the Democrats
controlled both houses.
Richard PR Mack
Dunnellon
Little League team
out of control
On Tuesday night April
13,1 went to the Dunnellon
Little League Park to enjoy
a few hours of watching


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the young boys play the
game that they so dearly
love. What I witnessed was
no less than a slaughter by
one team upon another.
The spirit and policy of
Little League baseball
clearly states that
"Through proper guidance
and exemplary leadership,
the Little League program
assists youth in developing
the qualities of citizen-
ship, discipline, teamwork
and physical well-being."
Instead of watching a base-
ball game to be enjoyed by
all, we watched one team
relentlessly pound the
other team into the ground
by scoring 20+ in the first
inning.
Everyone realizes that
every team player wants to
win and obviously no one
knew that the team was
going to score so many
runs in the first, but as the
game went on it became
obvious the losing team
had nowhere near the tal-
ent of the winning team. It


was at this point the coach
should have taken over
and played a much more
placid style of baseball to
at least let the losers feel
that they had hopes in-
stead of the agony of de-
feat that was forced down
their throats.
Little League is an or-
ganized activity which
states it's goal for Man-
agers and Coaches as
"Managers and coaches
must be adults who are
sensitive to the mental and
physical limitations of
children of Little League
age and who recognize that
the game is a vehicle of
training and enjoy-ment,
not an end in itself. It has
been stated many times
that the program of Little
League can only be as good
as the quality of leader-
ship in the managing and
coaching personnel. New
leagues particularly,
should make a determined
effort to enlist the best
adults in the community to


serve as managers and
coaches."
I don't know any of the
coaches involved on Tues-
day night but I do know
that as the game continued
to get out of hand, the win-
ning coach had many op-
tions which he could have
employed to lessen the
severity of the beating but
instead continued to have
his players steal bases and
score almost at will like he
was attempting to torture
the other team. Finally it
got so bad that the score
board was turned off.
Dunnellon Little League
is obviously not supporting
or is blind to the purpose
and intent of the Little
League Regulations which
state, "Through proper
guidance and exemplary
leadership, the Little
League program assists
youth in developing the
qualities of citizenship,
discipline, teamwork and
physical well-being. By es-
pousing the virtues of char-


acter, courage and loyalty,
the Little League baseball
and softball program is de-
signed to develop superior
citizens rather than supe-
rior citizens rather than su-
perior athletes."
Let's all hope that the

Other Views
continued from page 4
machines.
Interval training adds
short bursts of intensity to a
typical workout. Consider
any of these examples:
Jogging, where a
slower pace is punctuated
with running
Swimming a slow lap
and then a race lap
Running with wind
sprints at intervals
Riding a stationary
bike with two-minute peri-
ods of high-resistance ped-
aling
Jumping rope at a mod-
erate pace, then adding a
fast minute or two periodi-


Dunnellon Little League
Board get this situation
quickly under control be-
fore the youngsters decide
they no longer love Amer-
ica's Favorite Pastime.
William C. Murray
Dunnellon

cally
"It's important to begin
interval training with a sin-
gle high-impact burst,"
Goldwater in-structs. "Also,
warm up and cool down to
transition into the highest
intensity phase. Take a day
or two off; even three times
a week is enough to see re-
sults with high-impact ex-
ercise." However, don't let
the intervals become easy
Once you conquer the pace,
step it up again, safely, and
expand your comfort zone.
Visitors are welcome to
attend their first TOPS
meeting free of charge. To
find a local chapter, view
www.tops.org or call (800)
932-8677.


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6 -' Riverland News,Thursday,April 29,2010


Community events


R.S. Garden Club
The Rainbow Springs
Garden Club held its regu-
lar monthly meeting on
Thursday, April 22, with a
full house in attendance.
Guest speaker Janet Fry-
man, owner of A Moment
in Time Nursery south of
Williston, brought a truck-
load of flowering plants to
demonstrate the many va-
rieties that will grow here
and are favored by hum-
mingbirds and butterflies.
From natives to non-inva-
sive exotic plants, there
were annuals, perennials,
vines, ever-greens, and
small trees. Some plants
were hummingbird-spe-
cific, such as Abutilon,
while many others ap-
pealed to both hummers
and butterflies. New and
unusual plants attracted
much attention from the
audience, as did the or-
chids and bromeliads. The
Plant of the Month was
American Wisteria, a
smaller-flowering variety
than the Chinese wisteria.
Three lucky people each
won a plant as a door
prize. We are grateful to
Janet Fryman for her mar-
velous program on attract-
ing butterflies and
humming birds to our
yards. As if on cue, a hum-
ming bird was spotted in a
member's yard that same
day!
Next month's meeting on
May 27 will be the last
meeting of this fiscal year.
Program details for the
meeting will be announced
at a later date. Regular
monthly meetings will re-
sume in September. For
more information, please
call Brenda Noah at 465-
0541.
Help for vets
So many veterans feel
confused about benefits
and services they've
earned. There's so much to
know...and so many
changes from one year to
the next. That's why the


nonprofit D-A-V and the
Harley-Davidson Founda-
tion have teamed up to
offer help. The DAV Mo-
bile Service Office will be
at the Harley-Davidson of
Crystal River, 1785 S. Sun-
coast Boulevard, Ho-
mosassa from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Saturday, May 1,
2010 and from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Sunday, May 2 to
personally provide the
best counseling and claim
filing assistance avail-
able. This event is part of
the nationwide Harley's
Heroes tour and is free to
all veterans and members
of their families. For fur-
ther information, please
contact NSO Andrew Mar-
shall at (727) 319-7444.
RSRO shredder day
The Rainbow Springs
Residents' Organization
will be having its annual
paper shredder day on Sat-
urday, May 1, 2010, from 10
a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Rain-
bow Springs sales office
parking lot located at the
corner of SW 88 Place
Road and US 41. This is an
opportunity to safely dis-
pose of unwanted docu-
ments and old tax returns
at no charge. Bring your
unwanted paper work and
old tax forms, and watch
your papers get shredded.
The shredder is available
to all Rainbow Springs res-
idents.
Reformers Unanimous
Reformers Unanimous
(RU) is a revolutionary ad-
dictions program devel-
oped from over a decade of
experience, and is the
fastest growing faith-based
addictions program in
America. Meetings are di-
rected not toward any spe-
cific addiction, but toward
overcoming any addiction
through the Higher Power
that is Jesus Christ. If you
know someone in need of a
program, for more infor-
mation as well as success
stories you may visit the
national website at


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www.reformu.com. Local
meetings are held on Fri-
day evenings at 7 p.m. at
Riverland Baptist Church.
Town Hall Forum
Citrus Memorial CEO
Ryan Beaty will host an in-
teractive Town Hall Forum
on Tuesday, May 4 at 10
a.m. The program will in-
clude discussion of na-
tional and local healthcare
issues including Citrus
Memorial's latest projects
and how healthcare is
changing in Citrus County
Contact the Citrus Memo-
rial SHARE Club at 560-
6266 or email
jcurcuru@citrusmh.org to
reserve your seat. Light re-
freshments will be served.
Garage sale
Voices for Children of
North Central Florida (a
501c3) is holding a garage
sale tools, furniture, baby
and children items, house-
hold items, electronics,
etc. It will take place on
April 30 May 1, from 8
a.m. noon at 21675 SW
102 Street Road, Dunnel-
lon. Call 362.7938 or
274.8794 for information.
Library friends
The Friends of the Dun-
nellon Public Library will
hold their next monthly
meeting Tuesday, May 4 at
10 a.m. in the Library
Meeting Room located at
20351 Robinson Road,
Dunnellon.
The next meeting after
this will be in September
For additional informa-
tion contact the library at
438-2520.
Community Thrift Shop
The Dunnellon Commu-
nity Thrift Shop Inc. will
be having a '$3 a Bag Sale'
running through Friday,
April 30. There will be
some exceptions, but most
everything will be on sale.
A special thanks for all
your donations. Repeat
Boutique
The Repeat Boutique is
celebrating its second an-
niversary and moving to a
new location on May 1. The
shop will be at 20491 The
Granada, next to the Ver-


non Martin Salon. For
more information call 489-
0844.
Spanish Fiesta
St. John the Baptist
Spanish Fiesta will be
held on Saturday, May 15.
Doors open at 5:30 p.m.,
dinner served at 6:30 p.m.
There will be live enter-
tainment, door prizes and
a cash bar. Tickets $15
each. Proceeds go to char-
ity. St. John the Baptist
Parish Hall, 7525 S. U.S.
Hwy. 41, Dunnellon. For
additional information
contact Terry Booth 489-
6221.
T.O.P.S. moves
TO.PS. 443 of Dunnellon
has moved to a new loca-
tion and now meets at the
Dunnellon Women's Club,
11756 Cedar St., at the cor-
ner of McKinney. Weigh-in
is at 6 p.m. with business
meeting from 7 to 8 p.m.
each Thursday evening.
Visitors and new members
wel-come. For more infor-
mation call 489-5641 or
489-1960.
VFW activities
VF.W. Post 7991, 3107
West Dunnellon Road,
schedule:
Post Breakfast every 2nd
and 4th Sunday. Adults $6
and $4 for children 12 and
under. Full menu, eggs,
bacon, sausage, hash
browns, pancakes, bis-
cuits, sausage gravy, grits,
coffee, juice and toast .Great
meal. Public welcome, 489-
1772. Public welcome.
Toastmasters meet
Dunnellon Toastmasters
Club 1176 meets the sec-
ond and fourth Tuesday of
each month at the Dunnel-
lon Chamber of Com-
merce, 20500 E.
Pennsylvania Ave. Meet-
ings begin at 6:30 p.m.
Guests are invited to learn
how Toastmasters can help
them improve their public
speaking skills, boost their
confidence, and give them
an edge in their career or
as they compete for a job.
To learn more, visit
www.toastmasters.org, the
club Web site at http://dun-
nellon.freetoasthost.ws/ or
call Distinguished Toast-
master John Ryan at 489-
0959.


Farmers market
The Farmers Market
happens each Tuesday af-
ternoon from 2 to 6 p.m. at
Dunnellon's depot. It's an
eclectic mix of produce,
seafood, fresh baked
items, plants, organic pet
treats, soil treatment (fer-
tilizer), woodcrafts and
hot food to go. Also hand-
made soaps and lotions,
jams and honey, as well as
just picked sunflowers
and cornstalks for fall dec-
orating. For more infor-
mation call Nancy at
465-1460 or Bonnie at 465-
9200
AA meetings
Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting: Every Wednesday
and Saturday, at noon at
The First Methodist
Church in Dunnellon at
21501 W. County Road 40
(336 W and also Cedar
Street, Dunnellon).
TOPS in Rainbow Lakes
TOPS Chapter No. 375 in
Rainbow Lakes is proud to
announce the following of-
ficers for the coming year.
Leader Gail Kunkel, co-
leaders Rosemarie Hel-
legard and Perky
Carpenter, secretary -


Marge Walsh, treasurer-
Mariellen Connor, weight
recorders Beth Booth
and Debbie Sillane.
This local group has
been supporting healthy
weight loss efforts in our
community for almost 30
years. Visitors are wel-
come to attend their first
meeting free of charge.
Rainbow Lakes TOPS
meets weekly on Tuesday
at 9:30 a.m. at 4030 S.W.
Deepwater Court, Rain-
bow Lakes (from 41, west
on Rainbow Lakes Blvd.
4.5 miles to Rainbow
Lakes Community Center)
For information, call
489-7791 or 465-5807.
Genealogy Club meets
The Citrus Springs Ge-
nealogy Club meets at 10
a.m. on the first Tuesday of
every month at the Citrus
Springs Library, 1826 W.
Country Club Blvd. in Cit-
rus Springs.
The genealogy section of
the library is one of the
largest in this part of the
state and includes vital
records, passenger
records, plus how-to
books if you're just get-
ting started.


Public meetings on

possible hunting changes


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) is hold-
ing three public meetings
in the Northeast Region to
receive input from Florida
hunters on proposals af-
fecting deer hunting.
There are 14 meetings
statewide.
Two of the regional
meetings are to discuss
possible changes to hunt-
ing season dates on
wildlife management
areas (WMAs) to align
them with recent changes
to the state's hunt-ing
zones. They are May 4 in
Ocala at the Marion
County Extension Audito-
rium, 2232 N.E. Jack-
sonville Road and May 19
in Orlando at Bass Pro
Shops Outdoor World,
5156 International Drive.
The third meeting will


cover the possible imple-
mentation of a deer-har-
vest reporting system as a
tool to further develop fu-
ture harvest management
goals and will be in Ocala
on May 20 at the Marion
County Extension Audito-
rium, 2232 N.E. Jack-
sonville Road.
All meetings will be
from 6-8 p.m. They will fol-
low a "town hall" format,
with FWC staff making a
presentation, followed by
a public question-and-
answer session. After the
group discussion, the pub-
lic will be able to address
individual FWC staff
members on a one-on-one
basis.
For more information,
contact the FWC's state
deer coordinator, Cory
Morea, at 850-410-0656, ex-
tension 17256.


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Riverland News,Thursday, April 29,2010 7


Photo by Michel Northsea
First grades in Marion County had their "second touch" experience with the
Black Stallion Literacy program last week at the Marion County Livestock Pavil-
ion. Romeo Elementary first grader Tony Woodruff reads to Little Joe Kinnley
and his horse, Pretty Boy as his teacher, Alice Hauff listens.


Horses help young readers


MICHEL NORTHSEA
Special to Riverland News
Horses are part of life for
many Marion County resi-
dents and also for first
graders in the Marion
County school system.
In the fall, first graders
had their "first touch" with
horses when mounted units
of the Marion County Sher-
iff's Office visited each ele-
mentary school. During the
visit, first graders petted
the horse and were given
their own hardback copy of
Walter Farley's "Little
Black, A Pony"
The book was given out to
each of the county's 3,100
first graders at part of the
Black Stallion Literacy
Foundation.
Last week, first graders
from across the county had
a "second touch" visit with
horses and received a copy
of "Little Black Goes to the
Circle."
Besides getting their sec-
ond book, students rotated
between different stations
to learn about caring for
horses. They learned about
feed, different brushes and
combs used to groom a
horses and tack. At each
station, youngsters had the
opportunity to read to a
horse.


John Piffer was one of
the volunteers talking with
the first graders.
He has volunteered for
the last five years because
"the program is well worth
the time," he said. Over the
years, several teachers
have told him the program
sparks an interest in the
child for reading.
The literacy program was
co-founded in 1999 by two
childhood friends the son
of the late Water Farley,
Tim, and Mark Miller,
owner of the Arabian
Nights Dinner Attraction in
Kissimmee. Now the pro-
gram is available in 14 dif-
ferent states.
The goal of the program
is to inspire children to
read and discover the joy of
reading, said Glenda
Laveck, state director of
the program.
The foundation provides
not only the books for each
student in partnership lo-
cally with the Marion
County Education Founda-
tion, Florida Thoroughbred
Breeders' and Owners' As-
sociation and the Junior
League but also curricu-
lum for the teachers.
The curriculum includes
not only reading but also
math, science geography
and aligns with state stan-


dards and FCAT require-
ment as applicable, Laveck
said.
Recently, a summer camp
program was developed to
encourage reading even
more. Laveck expects the
summer camp to debut in
Marion County in 2011.
As Idiana Stout gathered
her first graders for the trip
back to Saddlewood Ele-
mentary School a few of
her students lingered be-
hind to pet a horse again.
"This is a great pro-
gram," Stout said.
Other teachers agree.
"It puts real life to the
story they have all read.
The visual brings it home
for them. Seeing Big Red
and Little Black is most im-
portant to them," said.
Mary Robinson, a Dunnel-
lon Elementary School
teacher.
As Donavan Butler, a first
grader at Dunnellon Ele-
mentary petted the small
black pony standing next to
a big red horse, he asked
the name of the horses.
Hearing the answers, he
said, "Hey, just like in the
book" as he ran off to catch
up with friends.


Get an FFA car wash Saturday


FFA members will host
a Car Wash Saturday, May
1 at Sonics' Restaurant,
Hwy 41, Dunnellon. Dona-
tions are accepted to help
with the cost of our trip to
the FFA State Convention.
The car wash begins at 11
a.m. and will continue
until the last car(s) is
washed.
Please mark your calen-
dar to come out and show
your support for the FFA.
Teacher's Appreciation
Week, May 3 through May
7, is to honor teachers for
their outstanding contri-
butions to our school and
community. This is an ex-
cellent opportunity for you
and your child to take a
moment to show your ap-
preciation to your child's
teachers for all the efforts
they have put forth to
guide and lead them into
becoming productive
young adults. We would
like to send a special
"Thank You" to teachers


for all you do each and
every day for our students.
FFA members will host
their annual Mother's Day
Plant Sale beginning on
Tuesday, May 4 through
Friday, May 7. The cost of
the plants will vary.
FFA meeting will be
held on Tuesday, May 4
from 3:40-4:30 p.m. Alumni
Parent meeting will follow
at 6 p.m. Please contact
Mrs. Newman at 465-6720
for information.
Friday, May 7, Junior
Achievement will have
volunteers working with
our 8th grade students.
This program gives stu-
dents a look at real-world
skills and applications for
school and the choices
they make for their fu-
tures.
Marion County Media
Festival Awards Ceremony
will be held on Friday
evening, May 7 at West
Port High School. Elemen-
tary schools will be hon-


DHS grad completes basic


Air Force Airman
Heather L. Silvernail grad-
uated from basic military
training at Lackland Air
Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed
an intensive, eight-week
program that included
training in military disci-


pline and studies, Air
Force core values, physical
fitness, and basic warfare
principles and skills.
She is the daughter of
Kelly Herbrechter of S.W
190th Court, Dunnellon.
Silvernail is a 2009 grad-
uate of Dunnellon High
School.


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ored beginning at 7 pm
and the second half of the
program will honor mid-
dle and high schools, for
their excellence in video
production. Admission is
free of charge.
Summer applications
for Camp Kiwanis are now
on-line. Camp Kiwanis is
for children ages 7
through 13 and applica-
tions are accepted on a
first come first serve basis
until camp is full.
Please go to www.Camp-
KiwanisOcala.com for
more information and to
download applications.
Applications can be found
under the Parent Informa-
tion Tab.
Dunnellon Middle
School After School Tutor-
ing program for the week
of May 3:
Monday May 3
Tuesday May 4
Wednesday May 5
Thursday May 6










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8 Riverland News,Thursday,April 29,2010






Church events


Riverland Baptist
We are currently look-
ing forward to celebrat-
ing a big day on Mother's
day, May 9. On that morn-
ing every mother who at-
tends services will be
honored. Additionally,
one mother will receive
a $250 gift card! We
would love for you to at-
tend. Pastor Carringer is
taking his Auditorium
Bible Class on a 26-week
Discipleship Journey
during the Sunday
School hour. Catching up
will take only a little
personal study time, as
the class is just four


weeks in. As students
participate in this jour-
ney, they build a per-
sonal notebook they may
keep for future refer-
ence and study. All are
welcome!
Riverland Christian
Academy is now accept-
ing enrollment and re-
enrollment for the
2010-2011 school year.
Please call our school of-
fice to set up an appoint-
ment, or you may stop in
sometime throughout
the week to fill out an
application. Riverland
Baptist Church is lo-
cated one mile north of


Carole Wagner was voted 2010 Woman of the Year by
Xi Nu Delta at the recent Founder's Day Luncheon
held at the Dunnellon Women's Club.



Attorney & Counselor at Law
Florida Estate Planning
& Trust Seminar
Wednesday, May 12 or June 9th
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
No Cost or Obligation Lunch & Learn
The TruesdellProfussional Building
200N.W. 52nd Avenue Ocala, Florida34482
(352) 873-4141 x 21 for Reservations


Mission Possible
MINISrRIES
V. David Lucas, Jr. i-
Senior Pastor .
Q 9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays
Worship .................... 10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
I Wednesday
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs..........7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am

f HolyFaith
Episcopal
SChurch
19924 W. Blue Cove Dr.
Dunnellon
THE REV. J. JAMES GERHART

Sunday
Rite I 8:00 AM
Bible Study 9:00 AM
Rite II 10:00 AM
489-2685
Hall Available For
kCommunity Functions


[HOPE
Evangelical Lutheran
Church, ELCA
9425 N. Citrus Oprings Blvd.
489-5511
Pastor Lyjnn Fonfara

sunday service:
Worship_
9:30 a.m.
9unda Qchool
8:15am
Go to our web page:
Hopelutheranelca.com j

Veeper Ld#

ad Vwd&do

P Stedt~

Services
Sunday 2:00 pm
Thursday 7:30 pm
Meets at
Holy Faith Church
in Blue Cove
19924 W. Blue Cove Dr.

465-0200II
4202I4N,


Hwy 40 on U.S. 41. Sun-
day services begin with
Sunday school at 9:45
a.m., followed by Wor-
ship at 10:45 a.m. and 6
p.m., and on Wednesday
evenings at 7:25 p.m. RU
meetings are held Fri-
days at 7 p.m. Trans-
portation is available in
much of our local area.
Nursery attendants and
translation for the deaf
is available at all serv-
ices. For more informa-
tion, contact 489-6171,
and visit us on the Web at
www.riverlandbaptist.com.
German service
The next German Lan-
guage Church Servics is
Sunday May 2 at Joy
Lutheran Church in
Ocala with Pastor Karl
Kaefer of Bradenton fol-
lowed by potluck coffee
and cake. The Interna-
tional Singers from the
Village will there. The
church is at 7045 S.W
83rd Place/Corner SR
200.
Fashion show and lunch
The Church of the Ad-
vent is having a Fashion
Show and Luncheon on
May 1 at noon. Fash-ions
will be by Belk. Tickets
are required and dona-
tion is $10 per person,
which includes lunch.
Please call Cora
Salmon at 352-307-8575
or Nancy Lillard at 352-
873-6110 for tickets.
Come and enjoy an af-
ternoon of fun. Church
of the Advent is located
at 11251 SW Hwy. 484,1.2
miles West of SR 200 in




F I


Dunnellon.
Bible study resumes
Peace Lutheran
Church has resumed
Wednesday evening
Bible study, preceded by
a light meal at 6:30 p.m.
The family of Peace wel-
comes residents of Dun-
nellon nd surrounding
commu-nities to join
them on Wednesdays for
dinner, fellowship and
Bible study. Other oppor-
tunities for Bible study
at Peace are Wednes-
days at 10 a.m. and Sun-
days at 9 a.m. Peace,
"The Church On The
Hill," is at 7201 S. Hwy.
41, five miles north of
Dunnellon. For more in-
formation contact the
church office at 489-
5881.
First Bethel Church
There will be a Com-
munity Noon Day Prayer
from noon to 1 p.m.
every Tuesday and
Thursday at First Bethel
Church, Hwy. 41 in Dun-
nellon. Bring your own
Bible, refreshments pro-
vided. For more infor-
mation contact
facilitator Nellie John-
son, 489-7583 or Maxine
Thomas at 498-1363.
St. Johns Bingo
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church is now
entering its 36th year of
continuous bingo to the
Dunnellon area with ex-
cellent no smoking facili-
ties in the Father
Stegeman Hall at the cor-
ner of U.S. Hwy 41. And
Hwy 40, Dunnellon.


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Catholic Community of

St. John the Baptist
Father Emmanuel Akalue, Pastor
MASSES
Saturday Reconciliation. .3:30 PM
Saturday Vigil...................4:30 PM
Sunday.......8:00 AM and 10:30 AM
Sunday- Spanish................Noon
Mon. Thru Fri.................... 8:00 AM
Holy Days.....8:00 AM and 5:00 PM
7525 S. Highway 41, Dunnellon
352-489-3166
Swww.stjohncc.com


I


Dunnellon Presbyterian Church
Jeffrey W. Welch, Pastor

20641 Chestnut Street \
Corner of Chestnut & Ohio Streets .'
In The Historic District
489-2682 -.
Sunday y
Worship..................8:30AM l
Sunday School.........9:45 AM
Worship.................11:00 AM Il'
Nursery Provided
For All Services
dunnpreschurch@bellsouth.net 020 9--.1? .


Games are held every
Tuesday at 11:30 a.m. and
Wednesday evening at
5:30 p.m. Doors open
early Jackpots are
changed weekly and sev-
eral different games are
offered. Cost is based on
how many cards you buy,
with a basic package
starting at $11.50.
Wednesday is a $2 off
price on your games and
1/2 price is given to play-
ers who attend 4 consec-
utive weeks. Gift
certificates are also
available. Food and
drinks are available at a
nominal fee. So come
join the fun!
Peace offers Bible study
Peace Lutheran
Church, Missouri Synod,
is again offering several
opportunities for adult
Bible Study. Soul Food


resumes at 6:30 p.m.
each Wednesday even-
ing, with a light supper
followed by Bible Study.
Another Bible Study
group meets each
Wednesday morning at
10 a.m. The Sunday
morning Bible Study,
prior to worship service,
meets at 9 a.m. The com-
munity is invited to at-
tend any, or all, of these
classes. Peace Lutheran
Church, the "church on
the hill," is on Hwy. 41
north of Dunnellon, just
northwest of the inter-
section of Hwy. 40.
Dunnellon food pantry
Dunnnellon Presbyte-
rian and Holy Faith
Episcopal food pantry
opens from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursdays at 19924
W Blue Cove Drive, Dun-
nellon.


Obituaries


Hilda M. Horton, 78,
Hilda M. Horton, 78, of
Dunnellon, died on Sun-
day, April 25, 2010. Sur-
vivors include her
husband, William H.
Horton; one son, William
T. Horton, of East
Stroudsburg, Pa. and one
daughter, Kathleen
Clement of Wantagh,
N.Y. Roberts Funeral
Home, Dunnellon, was
in charge of arrange-
ments.
Dorothy Janet Buck, 85
Dorothy Janet Buck,
85, of Dunnellon, died
Wednesday, April 21,
2010 at West Marion
Community Hospital in
Ocala.
Survivors include three
sons, John (Gale) New-
bold, David Newbold,
tim (Dana) Albury; three
daughters, Mary Barnes,
Ann (Ralph) hall,
Francesca Newbold.
Roberts Funeral
Home, Dunnellon, was
in charge of arrange-
ments.
David E. Roach, 68
David E. Roach, 68, of
Hernando, died Monday,
April 19, 2010, at his res-
idence.


SCalvary
Baptist Temple
21841 S.W Marine Blvd.
Rainbow Lakes Estates
Sunday
Sunday School.............9:45 am.
Worship Service.........11:00 a.m.
Evening Service.........5:00 pm.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting............7:00 p.m.
Every 4th Sunday.....5:00 pm.
"Share, Praise & Fellowship"
Pastor Jamie Parker
352-489-8962
"Please Join Us As We
Worship In His Name"

Peace
Lutheran Church
Missouri Synod
Terry L. McKee, Pastor
Sunday
Adult Bible Class 9:00 A.M.
Sunday School 9:00 A.M.
Worship Service 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday
Bible Study 10:00 A.M.
Light Meal 6:30 P.M.
Bible Study 7:00 P.M.
The Church On The Hill
HWY 41,Just 5 miles
north of Dunnellon
489-5881


He is survived by his
sister, Evelyn Ruth
Chapman of Hernando.
Private cremation
arrangements are under
the care of the Roberts
Funeral Home, Dunnel-
lon.
Cheryl L. Gore, 61
Cheryl L. "Sherry"
Gore, 61, of Dunnellon,
died Tuesday, April 20,
2010, at Munroe Re-
gional Medical Center in
Ocala.
She is survived by her
husband, Robert; and
step-daughter, Heidi Mc-
Carthy of Rye, N.Y
Roberts Funeral
Home, Dunnellon, was in
charge of arrangements.
Millard W."Bill" Hammon, 86
Millard W "Bill" Ham-
mon, 86, of Dunnellon,
died Tuesday, April 20,
2010, at his residence.
Survivors include his
wife, Dorothy; three
daughters, Norma Ham-
mon of LaCrosse, Wis.,
Laura Mol of Silver
Spring, Md., and Linda
Humphrey of Decatur,
Ga.
Roberts Funeral Home,
Dunnellon, was in charge
of arrangements.



Dunnellon
Seventh-day
Adventist Church
Welcome To Our Services
Hwy. 41 & Hwy. 40
Saturday
Sabbath School....9:30 AM
Sermon...............11:00 AM
Tuesday
Bible Study...........4:00 PM
For more information:
352-489-3455
www.dunnellonsdachurch.com





Pastor Shawn Cutshall
(352) 489-1788
Sunday
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Worship 11:00AM
Disciple Training 6:00 PM
(Nursery & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday


AWANA
Youth Group
Bible Study


6:30 PM
6:30 PM
7:00 PM


8/ Miles North of Dunnellon Off of
Highway 41, Left at Church Sign on
SW 5th Place

DUNNELLON
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
21501 W. Highway 40
Rev. Eddie Fulford, Pastor
Sunday
Traditional Worship 8:00 AM
With Communion Each Week
Contemporary Worship 9:30 AM
Traditional Worship 11:00 AM
Nursery At All Services
Sunday School 9:30 AM & 11:00 AM
S. God's I V "
352-489-4026
www.SharinGodsLiht .org,


"For where two or three gather together in My name, there am I with them0" -






GATHERINGS atthewl20



A DIRECTORY OF AREA CHURCHES
711181


nature Coast

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.





WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG






Riverland News,Thursday, April 29,2010 9


Sunflower Festival tradition continues


The Friends of Rain-
bow Springs volunteers,
the American Legion
Post 58, it's Auxiliary,
and park staff presented
the annual Sunflower
Festival on April 14 to
entertain residents of
five assisted living facili-
ties in Marion and Citrus
counties.
Many of these people
have been to this annual
event before and look
forward to it each year.
Barrington Place, Brent-
wood, Quiet Oaks, Cedar
Creek and Diamond
Ridge were among those
attending. Park Manager,
Joseph Smyth came in to
personally extend a
warm welcome.
The legion members
and volunteers assisted
the residents off the bus
with their wheel chairs,
walkers and with any as-
sistance they needed.
Other volunteers pre-
pared hot dogs, ham-
burgers, salad, baked
beans beverages and
cake and served them,
with the help of Nikkei,
Lola, Tooty Fruitty and
Muggie, our visiting
clowns.
The American Legion
Post 58 and Unit 58 Aux-
iliary presented the col-
ors of our great nation
and led us in the Pledge
of Allegiance. Everyone
joined in singing God
Bless America."
Back by popular de-
mand was George "Kelly"
Koper with his karaoke
equipment to entertain


The annual Sunflower
Festival was held on
April 14 at Rainbow
Springs State Park to en-
tertain residents of five
assisted living facilities
in Marion and Citrus
counties.


us all. Each resident took
home a cap, stuffed toy to
hug and a ditty bag filled
with useful and fun
items.
The day was a wonder-
ful experience for all
who participated and a
great big thank you to all
the wonderful volunteers
who made it possible, es-
pecially Clara Hicks and
Charles Bleier who did
so much to coordinate
this event for the past 12
years.


Circle Square

Cultural Center


YOUR DENTAL

HEALTH


byM. E Hampto D.D.S.

PREGNANCY
AND GUM
DISEASE
Dentists have long cautioned
women about "pregnancy
gingivitis," which is caused by
hormonal changes and affects
more than half of all pregnant
women. Usually the gum
inflammation associated with
pregnancy-related gum disease
occurs between the second and
eighth months of pregnancy,
and manifests itself in gums
that look red and bleed
somewhat during brushing.
Without conscientious attention
to good oral-hygiene habits and
professional dental care, this
mild form of gum disease
(gingivitis) can lead to a more
serious form of gum disease
(periodontitis). If left untreated,
gum disease poses risks to
babies' health such as
premature birth, low birth
weight, and even full-term
stillborn birth. Pregnant women
have more reason than their
own oral health to seek regular
dental care.
There are a variety of dental
problems that women are more
prone to experience during
pregnancy. These issues include
periodontal disease, pregnancy
tumors, and pregnancy
gingivitis. At the office of
MARK E. HAMPTON,
D.D.S., we are a highly
qualified and experienced team
of professionals who want you
to look and feel your best.
When is the last time you had a
complete dental exam? Call us
at 352-489-5071 and we will
gladly answer any questions
you may have. We're located at
11902 Illinois Street,
Dunnellon. We're "Dedicated
to Excellent Dentistry."
P.S. During pregnancy,
increased levels of progesterone
may encourage the growth of
certain gingivitis-causing
bacteria, render gum tissue
more sensitive to plaque, and
exaggerate the body's response
to the toxins that result from
plaque.


8 .A
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Shows begin at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m.

8395 SW 80th Street Ocala, FL 34481 (352) 854-3670
Ticket Office Hours: Moanay "a/4ra': 11:00 aLm. 2:00 p.m.
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201-0429 RIV
2009 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report
City ofDunnellon
PWS ID 6424073

This report will be mailed to customers only upon request and is also available at
Dunnellon Public Services 11924 Bostick St. upon request.
We're very pleased to provide you with this year's Annual Water Quality Report. We want to keep you
informed about the excellent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal
is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Our water
comes from two ground water wells whose source is the Floridan Aquifer.
The Department of Environmental Protection has performed a Source Water Assessment on our water
system. These assessments were conducted in 2009 to provide information about any potential sources
of contamination in the vicinity of our wells. Potential sources of contamination identified were
underground petroleum storage tanks with a susceptibility level of High to Moderate. The assessment
results are available on the FDEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program website at
www. dep.state.fl us/swapp
Our water is obtained from ground water sources and is chlorinated for disinfection purposes.

SWe are pleased to report that our drinking water meets all federal and state requirements.

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact the City of
Dunnellon Public Services Department at (352)465-8590. We encourage our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. Ifyou want to learn more, please contact our offices at normal
business hours. Monday thru Friday, 7:30 am 4:00pm.

The City ofDunnellon routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to
Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based
on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2009. Data obtained
before January 1, 2009, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in
accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations.

In the table below, you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand
these terms we've provided the following definitions:
Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking
water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below
which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.


Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
requirements that a water system must follow.

Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE): An important part of the Stage 2 Disinfection
Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is a one-time study conducted by water systems to identify
distribution system locations with high concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids
(HAAs). Water systems will use results from the IDSE, in conjunction with their Stage I DBPR
compliance monitoring data, to select compliance monitoring locations for the Stage 2 DBPR.
Maximum residual disinfectant level orMRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking
water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial
contaminants.

Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below
which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of
disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
"ND" means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis.

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (pg/l) one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts
by weight of the water sample.

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/) one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts
by weight of the water sample.

Picocurie per liter (pCi/L) measure of the radioactivity in water.

Treatment Technique (77): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in
drinking water.

Dates of LikeiolynSurofRo M
Contaminant and Unit of samplingte of MCL Violation Level Range of MCL Likely Source of
Measurement sampling Y/N Detected Results Contamination
I (mojyr.)
Radiological Contaminants
6o+b2dindi ) 8/09 N 02 0.1-0.2 0 5 Erosdo of nt

Contaminant and Unit of Dates of MCL Violation Level Range of MCLG MCL Likely Source of
Measurement I (metr.) Y/N Detected Results M Contamination
Inorganic Contaminants

Discharge from
petroleum refineries;
8. Antimony (ppb) 8/09 N 0.1 0.0-0.1 6 6 fire retardants;
ceramics; electronics;
solder
Erosion of natural
deposits; runoff from
Arsenic (pb) 8/09 N 0.4 0.32-0.4 N/A 10 orchards; rnofffrom
glass and electronics
production wastes
Discharge of drilling
0.002- wastes; discharge from
11. Barium (ppm) 8/09 N 0.0028 0 2 2 tes; discharge from
0.0028 metal refineries; erosion
of natural deposits
Corrosion of galvanized
pipes; erosion of natural
13. Cadmium (ppb) 8/09 N 0.32 0.26-0.32 5 5 deposits; discharge from
metal refineries; runoff
from waste batteries and
Saints
Erosion of natural
fertilizer and aluminum
16. Fluoride (ppm) 8/09 N 0.091 0.082-0.091 4 4.0 facts. Water
additive which promotes
strong teeth when at
optimum levels between
0.7 and 1.3 ppm
Residue from man-made
pollution such as auto
17. Lead (point of entry) (ppb) 8/09 N 3.5 0.44-3.5 n/a 15 emissions and paint;
lead pipe, casing, and
solder
Pollution from mining
19. Nickel (ppb) 8/09 N 3.5 3.2-3.5 N/A 100 Natural oecig ce r in
soil
Runofffrom fertilizer
20. Nitra(Nitrogen)use; leaching from
20. Nitrate (asNitrogen) 8/09 N 0.38 0-0.38 10 10 septic tanks, sewage;
(ppm) erosion of natural
deposits
Discharge from
petroleum and metal
22. Selenium (ppb) 8/09 N 1.1 0.65-1.1 50 50 refineries; erosion of
natural deposits;
discharge from mines
23. Sodium (ppm) 8/09 N 3.7 3.6-3.7 N/A 160 leaching from soil
Leaching from ore-
processing sites;
24. Thallium (ppb) 8/09 N 0.12 0-0.12 0.5 2 discharge from
electronics, glass, and
drug factories
Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products

Contaminant and Unit of Dates of MCL Violation Level Range of MCL MC Likely Source of
Measurement a(moplin Y/N Detected Results. Contamination
Disinfectant or MCL or
Contaminant and Dates of Range MCLG or MCL or
Unit of sling Viofon Leve of MRDLG MRDL Likely Source of Contamination
Measurement (oy. Y/N Results
78. Chlorine (ppm) 8/09 N 0.6 0.6 M 4 MRDL 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
7.?Hloctic 8/09 N 2.23 0-2.23 NA MCL =60 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(five) (HAA5) (ppb) _______ ________
80. TTHM [Total 8.37-
trihalomethanes] 8/09 N 17.52 1752 NA MCL 80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
Containmant and Dates of AL 90th No. of sampling AL
Unit of sampling Exceeded Percentile sits exceeding MCLG (Action Likely Source of Contamination
Mea.re.ent.. (mo.yr.) (Y/N) Result the AL Level) _______________________________
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
4. C r t Corrosion of household plumbing systems;
t (pp 8/09 N 0.47 0 1.3 1.3 erosion of natural deposits; leaching from
water) (ppm)_ wood preservatives
85. Lead (tap 8/09 N 36 0 0 15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems,
water) erosion of natural deposits


If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and
young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with
service lines and home plumbing. The City of Dunnellon is responsible for providing high quality
drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your
water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing


your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned
about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking
water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe
Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds,
reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it
dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up
substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment
plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result
from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas
production, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban
stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are
by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas
stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. 9212696


Seven Days A Week


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10 -' Riverland News, Thursday, April 29,2010


Towns' slam lei


Bessie Criscione


Criscione completes


in Boston marathon


LARRY BUGG
News Correspondent
Bessie Criscione over-
came some knee pain to
run in and complete the
Boston Marathon Monday
April 19 in Boston.
The Dunnellon High
track and field and cross
country coach ran the 26-
mile course in three hours
and 39 minutes and 30 sec-
onds. The time was good
enough to allow her to
qualify for next year's
race.
Criscione, who com-
peted in track and cross
country as a student at
Dunnellon High School,
said she suffered with me-
dial plica for 10 weeks.
"My knees held up bet-
ter than I thought they
would have," said
Criscione. "I felt very good
until the end of mile 15."
The coach said the tem-
perature was 50 degrees at
the start of the race and 58
when she finished.
The course is known not
only for being one of the
most famous marathons in
the world but for being
very hilly. Many distance


runners struggle with
"Heartbreak Hill."
"Because of my injury, I
was not able to do a lot of
hill training," she said.
"Hill training aggravated
my knee injury. Mile 15
was completely downhill.
From that point on, my
quadriceps muscles were
really burning. It was a lot
hillier than I expected.
"Overall, it was a great
experience. The specta-
tors were amazing."
Criscione finished
2414th out of the females.
Overall, she was 9,573 out
of the 27,000 runners par-
ticipating in the 114th an-
nual Boston Marathon.
According to race organ-
izers, the Boston Marathon
ranks second behind the
Super Bowl as the world's
largest single day sporting
event in terms of media
coverage.
She said she was going
to have some running-free
time.
The Tiger coach said she
qualified to run the
marathon last year but
chose to get married in-
stead.


LARRY BUGG
News Correspondent
The Lake Weir High
softball team may not
have planned it this way
but it turned out to be a
happy ending for Dallas
Towns.
Lake Weir starting
pitcher Melinda Geisel
walked Dunnellon's Sami
Fagan, Tori Williams and
Kasey Fagan to start the
game against Dunnellon
High (25-1).
The stage was set for
Towns, the Tigers
cleanup batter. Lake Weir
brought in Courtney
Keen to pitch to Towns.
Keen fired a fastball
that Towns then jacked
over the left center field
fence for a grand slam
home run.


Dunnellon then went
on to down Lake Weir (10-
16) 13-0 in five innings in
the second round of the
Class 4A-District 5 Soft-
ball Tournament Wednes-
day, April 21 at Venom
Field at Belleview High
School.
Dunnellon was recov-
ering from its first loss of
the season. The Tigers
lost 3-0 to Sarasota April
16 in a tournament game
in Naples. That loss
dropped the team from
1st to 5th in the nation in
the ESPN RISE rankings.
"It was the third grand
slam I have ever had,"
said Towns. "I have five
home runs. It seemed
like we needed to wake
up."
Sam Wright (5-0)
pitched the final three in-


ads Tigers

nings to take the victory run scon
Kasey Fagan pitched two The D
hitless and scoreless in- enjoyed
nings, striking out four "I was
before giving way to Tiger coa
Wright. "We have
The Tigers were in the gym f
playoff form with nine cause o.
hits in four innings. Lake played v
Weir had just one hit but The bats
their pitchers issued six think we
walks and their defense That v
committed two errors. nellon f
Sami Fagan singled in champion
the third inning to con- pr
tinue her 58-game hitting April 22
streak. She scored two view and
runs. Tori Williams sin- other dis
gled and scored three Dunne
runs. on to thE
Haley Fagan belted a terfinals
three-run triple in the Harmon'
seven-run third inning April 2'
and scored two runs. moves oi
Kristi Hanewinckel was semifina
2-for-3 with an RBI and a April 30.


win


ed.
unnellon coach
what he saw.
Pleasedd" said
ach Kevin Fagan.
Been playing in
for three days be-
f the rain. We
yell defensively
were working. I
are focused."
win set up Dun-
for the district
nship game
against Belle-
Sa victory for an-
strict title.
llon then went
e regional quar-
at home against
y on Tuesday,
7. The winner
i to the regional
ls on Friday,


Those C.A.T.S did it again


On Saturday, our home-
town C.AT.S. faced the
same stingy Crystal River
team that they faced in
the semi-finals of the
mid-season tournament.
It was a classic pitchers
duel that kept the fans on
the edge of the bleachers
throughout the entire
game. The blue-shirted
Mud Dogs from Crystal
River came to play, and
tried to exact revenge on
the one point loss in last
weekend's tournament. It
was everything you
would want for a day at
the ballpark. A warm
cloudless spring after-
noon with nail biting ac-
tion made for a perfect
Saturday
The ladies dressed in
pink were the home
team, and started the
game with the hard
throwing righty, Brittany
Enochs, on the mound. In
three Innings of work,
Enochs did not give up a
single hit, and only tossed


It was a classic pitchers duel that kept
the fans on the edge of the bleachers


31 pitches. For the Away
team, the blond in braids
named Morgan, equaled
Enochs with her effort
with one exception.
Mikayla Goins -Villon
stepped to the plate for
her second at bat in the
bottom of the third. Her
coach gave her the bunt
sign, but the confident
Goins called it off and
wanted to swing away
Morgan whipped an out-
side pitch, and Goins
found it with the sweet
spot of her pink bat and
sent the ball skyward.
The shot was estimated
at 120' in the air and
rolled to the 200' fence,
allowing the speedy
Goins an in the park
home run.
To start the top of the
fourth, Emily Bowne was
brought in to rest Enochs.
This was a strategic deci-


sion by the coach, and not
a reflection of the work
Enochs had done.
Bowne started off a bit
shaky, but came back
strong and did not allow a
run in her two innings of
work. In the bottom of the
5th, the quick Kaleil
Miller was walked. On a
steal to second, the
catcher overthrew the
second baseman, and
Miller came all the way
around to score.
This left the score at 2-
0 in favor of the C.AT.S.
In the top of the 6th,
Enochs returned to the
mound to close out the
game. Although she did
not finish as strong as she
started, she was still on
her game. The Mighty
Mud Dogs scored a run
on a fielders choice, but
could not add to it. This
left our C.AT.S. with a 2-1


victory over a district
rival that we are sure
we will see again down
the road.
Looking back at the
game, I can see a few
things more clearly now.
1. Those Mighty C.AT.S.
wore the Michelle-O-
Gram name proud. In our
hearts
we play for the memory
of a wonderful lady, and
strive to bring awareness
to something that she was
so passionate about.
2. Our Little C.AT.S.
are working hard to, one
day, be good enough to
play for the Tigers (their
big sisters).
And 3. Sportsmanship
trumps winning every
time. I am proud to say
that our C.AT.S. are
learning life lessons,
while having fun playing
softball.
Just my view from the
dugout
Jeff Bowne


C-


0 0 0


0 0 0


WHAT'S HAPPENING AT MUNROE ORTHOPEDICS:


FREE SEMINAR: Arthroscopic Surgery & Rotator
Cuff Repair


Tuesday, May 18
Dr. David EthierI Orthopedic Surgeon
Registration: 2:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Lecture/Q&A Session: 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Collins Health Resource Center
9401 SW Highway 200
Bldg. 300, Suite 303, Ocala, FL


Seating is limited.
Pre-registration is required
to attend this FREE event.
Call Munroe's Health Resource
Line at 352-867-8181, M- F,
830 a.m.-5 p.m.


Munroe a Orthopedics
MUNROE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
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Riverland News,Thursday, April 29,2010 11


Trophy-size bass at local lake


DAN HERMES
Special to the Riverland News
When Florida anglers
talk about their top desti-
nations for trophy bass,
waterways such as Okee-
chobee, Kissimmee, Toho
and Rodman are often
mentioned. And while
these waters definitely
offer great opportunities
for big largemouth, a Cen-
tral Florida diamond in
the rough often over-
looked is Lake Rousseau.
Located on the Marion,
Levy and Citrus County
lines, Rousseau is a man-
made reservoir which
formed when an electric
dam was installed back in
the 1920s on the Withla-
coochee River. The 3,700-
acre, stump-filled
impoundment is fed by
freshwater springs from
the Rainbow and Withla-
coochee Rivers in Dun-
nellon, creating what
many local anglers have
known for years as a bass
fisherman's "heaven."
Every spring, egg-filled
female bass in the pre-
spawn stage are caught,
tipping the scales at an in-
credible 12 to 14 pounds
and up. Many anglers
have even been able to
catch two or more 10-
pound fish in the same
day (No, this is not a mis-
print.)
Five fish stringers of 25
pounds and more can be
the norm, as a pair of
tournament anglers found
out during a charity event
last year. The pair had
two 10-pound fish in the
live well and had to throw
back an 8-pounder be-
cause Florida Game and
Fish rules allow only one


bass per angler longer
than 22 inches. (The pair
did not file for an exemp-
tion to this rule, sadly.) It
was reported they also
saw another big bass in
the 10-pound class on a
bed and passed. Despite
having two 10-pound hogs
in their bag, they did not
win the tournament.
This is an example of
another day on Lake
Rousseau.
"This place is on fire,"
said Jimbo Denton, a vet-
eran bass fishing tourna-
ment angler about Lake
Rousseau. "The fish pop-
ulation is up and they can
be found if you know what
to look for. We've been on
them for a while now, and
we're winning tourna-
ments."
Schooling fish in the
summer can see anglers
having 100-plus fish days
on artificial baits with
many of the schoolers
being in the 3- to 5-pound
class and up.
Another favorite tech-
nique during the summer
is throwing a buzzbait
after dark, which is not
for the faint hearted.
When a 7- or 8-pound bass
explodes on a buzzbait, it
seems like a bowling ball
has been dropped from
the heavens. A night tour-
nament on the lake in
2009 saw six boats weigh-
ing an incredible 126
pounds of fish. That is an
amazing feat for any lake.
Besides dealing with
stumps and huge bass,
Rousseau also boasts a
large population of alliga-
tors, making for an excit-
ing adventure after the
sun sets.


The waterway is heavy
with hydrilla, milfoil and
other aquatic weeds, pro-
viding a perfect habitat
for game fish and deter-
rent to jet skis, water
skiers and speedboats.
Idle speed is the name of
the game on Rousseau be-
cause of stumps, although
you can run faster in the
channel markers.
This hasn't always been
the case though. For many
years, anglers used plas-
tic milk jugs, styrofoam
floats and rebar to mark
hazards. High winds and
currents would wreak
havoc on the first floating
channel markers. Hence,
the bottom of Rousseau
easily holds more rusting
lower end units and props
than any waterway in the
state.
Wild shiners
One of the favorite tech-
niques used by fishing
guides on Rousseau to put
clients on that fish of a
lifetime is by using wild
shiners. The native baits
are a must when live bait-
ing, as domestic shiners
don't exhibit the gump-
tion of their wild brethren
when a bass lurks close. It
is not unusual for a large
shiner to come clean out
of the water in an attempt
to evade its No. 1 preda-
tor. Wild shiners also last
much longer in the water,
making them the top baits
to use, despite the cost
which runs around $17.50
per dozen.
Trolling shiners is usu-
ally the norm down near
the dam area while the
backwaters, where the
lake and Withlacoochee
River meet, are a prime


place to free-line shiners
up under cover.
Strong current flow and
plenty of heavy cover
equals prime ambush
points for big bass, so an-
glers can plan on leaving
the light gear at home.
Seven-foot rods teamed
with Ambassadeur reels
featuring the fish alarm
work the best. You'll need
to spool your reel with 30-
pound test or stronger
line. Braided line works
extremely well, as do fluo-
rocarbon lines. Circle
hooks in the 4/0 to 5/0 size
work great for trolling,
but you'll need to use a
weed-less hook in the
same size for free-lining
baits under the weed
beds.
Heavy tackle ensures
big bass can be landed
quickly, photographed
and promptly re-leased. It
takes years for a bass to
grow to trophy size, and
today's reproductive
mounts done by taxider-
mists are incredibly life-
like. Just take length and
girth measurements, and
release the bass to spawn
and ensure a healthy pop-
ulation for years to come.
If you've always
dreamed of catching a 10-
pound-plus bass, Lake
Rousseau is the place to
go. Bass start going into a
pre-spawn mode in No-
vember and will spawn
through-out the winter
and spring. The post-
spawn action can be wild
and furious as well. So
put a trip to Rousseau on
your calendar, and maybe,
just maybe, you'll be able
to put a trophy on the
wall.


[CONNECT 14


with youri


community


I I'


KEN HAND







12 -' Riverland News,Thursday, April 29,2010


MONDAY, 2:00 P.M.





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Beware: Publication of any classified advertisement does not constitute endorsement by the Riverland News. We make every effort to screen out advertising that may not be legitimate.
However, since we can not guarantee the legitimacy of our advertisers, you are advised to be careful of misleading ads and take caution when giving out personal information.


Male Dog
Small, brown and white,
neutered. Found in
Rainbow Lake Estates,
close to Romeo.
(352) 465-4009




Gal Friday
For Hire
Exp.'d Trustworthy,
Companion.
Will do shopping,
driving, cooking,
housekeeping,
packing & Odd Jobs
(352) 409-4650





Licensed
Clinical
Supervisor

The Centers is seeking a
Licensed Clinical
Supervisor. This is a
highly responsible
position that will
coordinate the care
& program operations
for our Adolescent
Substance Abuse
Residential program in
Lecanto, FL. Florida
LCSW preferred, CAP
desired. Must have a
minimum of 2 yrs
exp with the
SA/co-occurring popu-
lation and be knowl-
edgeable in the area
of FL Administrative
Code 65D-30.
Full benefits pkg.
For more info visit
www. thecenters. us
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
The Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters.us
Position Closing Date is
5/7/10

Physical Thera-
pist
Full or Part time

Fit for Life Physical
Therapy is seeking a
qualified applicant
for our Inverness
and/or Ocala Clinic.
Call Roberta
352-514-4565 or
email:
roberta@fitforlifept.
corn

RN / LPN
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center
of Citrus County

Full-time, 3pm-11 pm,
Must have a current
Florida nursing
license. Long-term
care experience
preferred.

We offer competitive
pay and benefits,
including continuing
education and career
growth opportunities,
in a mission-driven
environment.

Apply in person to
Hannah Mand.
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us online at
www.LCCA.com.
EOE/M/F/V/D
Job #15046




.1






Cook

The Centers is seeking a
Cook to work in
residential setting.
Duties include prepar-
ing & serving nutritious
food, which meets
Nutritional Standards
recommended by
Chapter 65D-13, FL
Administrative Codes.
HS/equiv with 1 yr
related exp or special-
ized training & Current
ServeSafe Certification
reqd. Salary is
$7.50-$8.50/hr.
Acceptable driving
record and clean
background reqd.
Full benefits pkg.
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
The Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters.us
Position Closing Date is
5/7/10
Residential
SA Tech

The Centers is seeking
Substance Abuse Techs
for our Adolescent
Residential program in
Lecanto, FL. Duties
focus on reducing or
minimizing the effects
of substance abuse, a
12-Step recovery
process, assisting the
professional staff in the
assurance of quality
client care, and trans-
porting clients. Exp
with troubled adoles-
cents reqd. Must be
available to work all
shifts & weekends.
Acceptable driving
record and clean
background reqd.
$8.25-$8.75/hr plus 10%
shift diff for 2nd/3rd
shifts. Full benefits pkg.
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
The Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters.us
Position Closing Date is
5/7/10


Crystal River
Pool Supply Store, like
new, great invest., w/or
without property. Call
Pat (813) 230-7177




UPSCALE COFFEE SHOP
CRYSTAL RIVER
$155,00.Turn key
318-245-4565
352-503-7965, bfr 7:30p




Steve BeeBee
Tree Service

Professional
Tree Work at
Reasonable
Prices

"ASK YOUR
NEIGHBOR"
Call Steve Or Cindy

(352)465-4117
(352)425-0295


Computers


FERRARO'S
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleaning..352 465-6631




CNA/HHA
Experienced in
Alzheimer & Diamentia
Excellent references
(352) 465-3915
*HOUSEKEEPING
*PRIVATE DUTY CARE
*ERRANDS
RELIABLE, EXP.
& REASONABLE.
(603) 661-9054




CLEANING LADY
AVAILABLE.
Weekly Bi Weekly,
25 Yrs. Exp. Local
References.
(352) 489-0102




Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,Ins.
0256271 352-465-9201




Washer & Dryer
Use not abused,
Maytag, white. $100.
each.(352) 489-3108




THURS. April 29
Estate Merchandise
AUCTION
STARTING EARLY
2PM- Outside Only
BIG VARIETY
4000 S. 41, Inverness
dudleysauction.com
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246 12%BP




14" Band Saw
Craftsman Professional.
Used once.
Jointer/Plainer
Craftsman Professional.
Both 09' & $200. each.
(352) 489-2907
Craftmen's
Circular Skill Saw $35.
Work Table Drawers/
Doors $25.
352-489-1335




DUNNELLON
Friday 7th
Saturday 8th
8am-5pm.
Large variety
household goods,
electronics,
Some FREE Items
36th Street
Across from
Romeo School

DUNNELLON
HISTORIC VILLAGE
Sat. May 1st.,
9am-2pm
Village Market
W. Pennsylvania Ave.
(484) & Cedar St.
Antiques, Vegetables,
Jewelry, Plants
Flea Market,
Arts Crafts
Produce Needed
Call (352) 465-9200


DUNNELLON
Sat. May 1st.8A./3P.
Corner of Ohio &
Pennsylvania, behind
Turner House Florist.




A-I LADY BUYER!
20 YRS. IN AREA
HIGHEST PRICES
PAID ALWAYS
BUYING!
JEWELRY
GOLD & SILVER
VINTAGE COSTUME
JEWELRY
STERLING SILVERWARE
MILITARY ITEMS
MEN'S WATCHES
GUNS, VINTAGE
FISHING TACKLE
POTTERY, PAINTINGS
ANTIQUES &
COLLECTIBLES
352-344-3809





GUN & KNIFE

Brooksville
HSC Club
Sat. May Ist 9-5pm
Sun. May 2nd 9-4pm
Hernando County
Fairgrounds
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-4446





PET CARE
Personalized. Ur Place
or My Non-Kennel
Dennis Koch
In Absentia
Pet Care
352-465-5025

ShihTzu Puppies
Reg ACA Sale All colors
Males $400, Fem. $500
home raised & loved h/c
shots New Viewing
Hours Mon 11-2p
Wed & Fri 4-6:30pm
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
cell (305) 872-8099
Standard Poodles
2 Red, & 1 apricot,
9 wks. old. Health certs.
$650. Ask for Dawn
(352) 489-2187
(352) 528-9307






SWAP/HORSEY
YARD SALE

Join The Fun At
Ricks Performance
Equine Supplies
Dunnellon Store
W. Hwy 40

Sat. May 8th. 8A./3P.
Bring Your
Animals.
Empty Your Tack
Rooms.
Free Raffles
And Giveaways. I
In Store And Feed
Specials.
Rent Your Space
For A Cash Donation
To The Marion
County
Humane Society. I
Call Gail At
(352) 489-9222 Or
Come By The Store
For More Info.
---iii-iJI




Spring is In The Air
Great Deals!
2 and 3 Bedroom
Mobile Homes
Starting at $300 mo
(352) 208-2967





$650 Mo. Assume
mortgage or low
down payment, 4/2
DW, new carpet,
W/D ceiling fans,
stove refrigerator,
Hernando off 486
(352) 568-2500





DUNNELLON
2/1 laundry Rm.
Good neighborhood.
$550 mthly, lst/L/Sec.
352-465-4201
352-274-2917

RAINBOW END
2/2, Non smoking
duplex/apt. Large
utility room & screened
porch, large lot, newly
remodeled, No Pets
$585 mo. Ist/Sec
(352) 854-9929




DUNNELLON



(352) 489-3108


Move-In

Specials
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am 5:00pm
Foreclosures Accepted.
(352) 489-1021 1


Rainbow Sprgs Villa
3/2/2 Spotless cond.!
$900/mo. No pets/
smoking. Available 05/1
(352) 465-1595




DUNNELLON
WATERFRONT
RENTALS
WHERE THE RAINBOW
& WITHLACOOCHEE
RIVERS MEET.

2/1 V2 Townhome
completely furnished
with dock (2 month.
Min.) FURNISHED
EFFICIENCY APT.
with dock. Call
(352) 400-0301 for
information and rates.
Website: flahomes
andland.com





PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertising
in this newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any prefer-
ence, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination.
Familial status includes
children under the age of
18 living with parents or
legal custodians, preg-
nant women and people
securing custody of chil-
dren under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD toll-free
at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPOflTUNITV




5/4'/2/3, Game Room,
Den, 3,960 sq ft. Only
$12K down, Bal. $200K
Assume Mortg.
Great Buy!
(352) 503-3676





Sale/Rent
Rainbow Springs
2/2 Golfview Condo
LR, DR, Kitchen.
Fully furnished,
all appliances,
one level.
Immaculate, $68,000
(352) 465-2200




FLOATING DOCK
& Kit for 16 FT.,
will deliver
352-343-4108




I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778

I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not .
CASH PAID -$150 & UP
(352) 771-6191




AUTO/SWAP/CAR
CORRAL SHOW
Sumter Co.
Fairgrounds
Sumter
Swap Meets
May 2, 2010
1-800-438-8559




JEEP
'99, Wrangler, 6 cyl., 5
spd. alum. wheels, 79k
mi. Never off Rd. excel.
cond. 352-422-3033




MANCO
'07 2X4, 260 CC,
good shape, front
& rear racks. $1,250.
(352) 489-2907


LET US WORK
FOR YOU!
RIVERLAND
NEWS
CLASSIFIED
GET RESULTS!
CALL TOLL FREE
1-877-676-1403


221-0429 RIV
5/13 sales
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
Superior Towing &
Recovery gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and
intent to sell these
vehicles) on 05/13/2010,
9:00 am at 36 NE 8th St.,
Ocala, FL 34470, pursuant
to subsection 713.78 of
the Florida Statutes. Supe-
rior Towing & Recovery
reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any and/or
all bids.
1FTEF15Y3NNA57912
1992 FORD
2FALP74W7SX204465
1995 FORD
2HGEJ8648TH528138
1996 HONDA
Published one (1) time in
Riverland News, April 29,
2010.


224-0429 RIV
5/4 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
The following vehicle will
be sold at public auction,
per Fl Stat 713.585 at
10:00 AM on May 18,2010
at Lienor's address to sat-
isfy a lien against said ve-
hicle for labor, services
and storage charges.
No titles, as is, cash only.
2001 Isuzu Trooper Utility
VIN JACDJ58X417J12191
Cash sum to redeem
vehicle $3308.00 Lienor:
Turner's Transmission
Service Inc., 531 NW 10th
St, Ocala FL 34475 Phone:
352-732-3355
Notice to owner or
lienholder as to right to a
hearing prior to sale date
by filing with the clerk of
court. Owner has the right
to recover vehicle by
posting bond in accord-
ance with Fl Stat 559.917.
Proceeds from sale in ex-
cess of lien amount will
be deposited with the
clerk of court. Interested
parties, contact State
FilingService 772-595-9555
Published one (1) time in
Riverland News, April 29,
2010.


223-0429 RIV
5/14 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
BIG JOE'S TOWING
SERVICE INC. gives Notice
of Foreclosure of Uen and
intent to sell these vehi-
cles on 05/14/2010, 09:00
am at 1901 NW MARTIN
LUTHER KING JR AVE,
OCALA, FL 34475-5007,
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
utes. BIG JOE'S TOWING
SERVICE INC reserves the
right to accept or reject
any and/or all bids.
1 HGCB7557NA232070
1992 HONDA
1J4FT68S5SL575328
1995 JEEP
Published one (1) time in
the Riverland News, April
29, 2010.


219-0429 RIV
5/11 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
Tow Pro's of Ocala gives
Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles) on
05/11/2010, 9:00 am at
1914 N Magnolia Ave.,
Ocala, FL 34475, pursuant
to subsection 713.78 of
the Florida Statutes. Tow
Pro's of Ocala reserves
the right to accept or re-
ject any and/or all bids.
1N4AL11D86N428046
2006 NISSAN
Published one (1) time in
the Riverland News, April
29,2010.
222-0429 RIV
5/13 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
BIG JOE'S TOWING
SERVICE INC. gives Notice
of Foreclosure of Lien and
intent to sell these vehi-
cles on 05/13/2010, 09:00
am at 1901 NW MARTIN
LUTHER KING JR AVE,
OCALA, FL 34475-5007,
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
utes. BIG JOE'S TOWING
SERVICE INC reserves the
right to accept or reject
any and/or all bids.
1G1BN81Y2KA126590
1989 CHEVROLET
Published one (1) time in
the Riverland News, April
29,2010.
220-0429 RIV
5/17 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice of Public Sale:
D & D TOWING OF OCALA
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Uen and intent to
sell these vehicles) at
4125 NE Jacksonville Rd.,
Ocala, FL 34479-2427,
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
ues. D & D TOWIING OF
OCALA reserves the right
to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
Sale date: 05/17/10, 9AM
2002 FORD VIN #
1IFMRU 15L82LA13497
Published one (1) time in
Riverland News, April 29,
2010.
218-0429 RIV
5/14 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNCLAIMED
VEHICLE AUCTION
The following vehicles)
will be sold for charges
due on 05/14/2010 at
8:00AM
1999 MERCURY VIN#
1IMEFM 10P3XW605038
Address where vehicles)
are stored and will be
sold: Scrambletown
Wrecker Service, 15679
NE Hwy. 314, Silver
Springs, FL 34488
352-625-2444
Scrambletown Wrecker
Service reserves the right
to except or reject any
and all bids.
Published one (1) time in
the Riverland News, April
29,2010.


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225-0429 RIV
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Action is approval of the Blue Cove
Lake Emergency Overflow Phase II on 0.18 acres to serve the Blue Cove Lake Subdi-
vision known as Blue Cove. The project is located in Marion County, Section(s) 36
Township 16 South, Range 18 East. The permit number is 44030966.001.
The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Mon-
day through Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest
Florida Water Management District, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899.
NOTICE OF RIGHTS
Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding
this permit may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections
120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative
Code (F.A.C.), of the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) ex-
plain how the substantial interests of each person requesting the hearing will be af-
fected by the District's action, or final action; (2) state all material facts disputed by
each person requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts; and
(3) otherwise comply with Chapter 28-106, F.A.C. A request for hearing must be filed
with and received by the Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksville ad-
dress, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of
this notice (or within 14 days for an Environmental Resource Permit with Proprietary
Authorization for the use of Sovereign Submerged Lands). Failure to file a request for
hearing within this time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may
have to request a hearing under Sections 120-569 and 120.57 F.S.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency
action, the filing of a petition means that the District's final action may be different
from the position taken by it in this notice of final agency action. Persons whose sub-
stantial interests will be affected by any such final decision of the District on the ap-
plication have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accord-
ance with the requirements set forth above.
Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an administrative dispute re-
garding the District's final action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a
request for hearing.
Published one (1) time in Riverland News, April 29, 2010.


216-0429 RIV
2010 CP-340 Notice to Cred
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MARION COUNTY FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2010 CP-340 Division: Judge Lambert
IN RE: ESTATE OF DOROTHY P MEADE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Dorothy P. Meade, deceased, whose date of
death was Feb. 13, 2010, is pending in the the Circuit Court for Marion County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 NW 1st Avenue, Ocala, FL 34475.
The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal repre-
sentatives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 22, 2010.
Personal Representatives:
D Janice Meade
8842 E SW 91st Street, Ocala, Florida 34481
Patricia M. Churchill
123 Valley Stream Circle, Wayne, PA 19087
R Craig Meade
255 Minorca Beach Way #704, New Smyrna Beach, Florida 32169
Lorenzo Ramunno, Esq., Florida Bar No. 765813 Attny. for Personal Representatives
Ramunno Law Firm, PA, 7500 SW 61st Avenue, Suite 100, Ocala, FL 34476
Telephone: (352) 854-5570 Fax: (352) 854-9267 www.flprobate.net
Published two (2) times in Riverland News, April 22 & 29, 2010.


226-0506 RIV
Zimniewicz, Edna M, 2010-386 CP (G) Notice to Cred,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MARION COUNTY FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2010-386 CP (G) Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF EDNA M. ZIMNIEWICZ a/k/a EDNA PEARL ZIMNIEWICZ
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of EDNA M. ZIMNIEWICZ, deceased, whose date
of death was Feb. 19, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Marion County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 NW 1st Avenue, Ocala, Florida 34475.
The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is April 29, 2010
Personal Representative:
/s/ STEVEN C. ZIMNIEWICZ
1469 Gumwood Drive, The Villages, Florida 32162
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Mary F. Trotter Florida Bar No. 0377600 Attorney for Personal Representative
13940 N. U.S. Hwy 441, Suite 210, The Villages, FL 32159
Telephone: (352) 205-7245 Facsimile: (352) 205-7305
Published two (2) times in Riverland News, April 29 & May 6, 2010.


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Riverland News,Thursday, April 29,2010 13


Warm days

makes gators

more active
The onset of warm
weather in the spring is
when Florida's native
crocodilians start getting
active.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission is urging
Floridians and visitors
to be cautious when hav-
ing fun in and around
water.
Florida is home to two
native crocodilians -
the American alligator,
which is found in all 67
counties, and the Ameri-
can crocodile, which
may be found in coastal
areas of the Keys, South-
east and Southwest
Florida. Both species
have shared Florida's
waters with people for
centuries.
The commission rec-
ommends keeping pets
away from the water.
There are other pre-
cautionary measures
people should take to re-
duce potential conflicts
with alligators and croc-
odiles, and they are
available in the "Living
with Alligators" brochure
at MyFWC. com/Alligator
and the "Living with
Crocodiles" brochure at
MyFWC.com/Crocodile.
The commission ad-
vises, if you have con-
cerns with an alligator or
crocodile that poses a
threat to you, your pets
or property, call the
FWC's toll-free Nuisance
Alligator Hotline at 866-
FWC-GATOR (392-4286).


The Ladies Auxiliary to Edward W. Penno Post 4864 in Citrus Springs held its annual Coloring Contest at Dunnellon Christian Acad-
emy. The theme for this years coloring contest was "Explorer Discovers America." Students were given a picture of a sailing ship and
were to do the following: Kindergarten through second grade, color the sailing ship and write name on bow. Third and fourth grade,
draw what you think the settlers saw or did when they landed in the new country. Fifth and sixth grades write a 175 200 work essay
titled "My Journey to the New Land" and pretend that you and your family are on that sailing ship, why you are leaving your home-
land, describe the journey, and what are your dreams and hopes for the new land. Kindergarten, first and second grade winners: First
place, Sissy Elliot, Second place, Dawsyn Hoover, Third place, Nichole Schwarzkopf.Third and fourth grade winners: First place, Car-
los Gonzalez, Second place, Catherine Owens, Third place, Levi Suarez. Fifth and sixth grade winners: First place, Luke Tidwell, Sec-
ond place, Jonathan Blomberg,Third place, Kacy Scherer. Ladies Auxiliary of Post 4864 are, left, Fay Ziech, Coloring Contest Chairman,
far right, President Donna Ryll-Powell, in back row, Treasurer Carole Wagner. Not pictured is Terri Williams, art teacher.




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14 -' Riverland News,Thursday, April 29,2010


CDC urges caution

with sun exposure


The Centers for disease
Control and Prevention re-
minds everyone that pro-
tection from sun exposure
is important all year round,
not just during the summer
or at the beach.
Ultraviolet (UV) rays can
reach you on cloudy and
hazy days, as well as bright
and sunny days. UV rays
also reflect off of surfaces
like water, cement, sand,
and snow.
The hours between 10
a.m. and 4 p.m. daylight
savings time (9 a.m. to 3
p.m. standard time) are the
most hazardous for UV ex-
posure in the continental
United States.
CDC recommends easy
options for sun protec-
tionl-
Use sunscreen with sun
protective factor (SPF) 15
or higher, and both UVA
and UVB protection.
Wear clothing to protect
exposed skin.
Wear a hat with a wide
brim to shade the face,
head, ears, and neck.
Wear sunglasses that
wrap around and block as
close to 100% of both UVA
and UVB rays as possible.
Seek shade, especially
during midday hours.
Sunscreen
The sun's UV rays can
damage your skin in as lit-
tle as 15 minutes. Put on
sunscreen before you go
outside, even on slightly
cloudy or cool days. Don't
forget to put a thick layer
on all parts of exposed skin.
Get help for hard-to-reach


places like your back.
SPF. Sunscreens are as-
signed a sun protection fac-
tor (SPF) number that rates
their effectiveness in block-
ing UV rays. Higher num-
bers indicate more
protection. You should use
a sunscreen with at least
SPF 15.
Reapplication. Sun-
screen wears off. Put it on
again if you stay out in the
sun for more than two
hours, and after you swim
or do things that make you
sweat.
Clothing
Loose-fitting long-
sleeved shirts and long
pants made from tightly
woven fabric offer the best
protection from the sun's
UV rays. A wet T-shirt of-
fers much less UV protec-
tion than a dry one. Darker
colors may offer more pro-
tection than lighter colors.
Keep in mind that a typical
T-shirt has an SPF rating
lower than 15, so use other
types of protection as well.
Hats
For the most protection,
wear a hat with a brim all
the way around that shades
your face, ears, and the
back of your neck. A tightly
woven fabric, such as can-
vas, works best to protect
your skin from UV rays.
Avoid straw hats with holes
that let sunlight through. A
darker hat may offer more
UV protection.
If you wear a baseball
cap, you should also protect
your ears and the back of
your neck.


Photos by Pat Faherty
Above, Little Miss and
Little Mr. Dunnellon were
crowned Saturday, April
17 at Boomtown Days.
Amia Evans was named
Little Miss Dunnellon and
Adam Fontaine was
crowned Little Mr. Dun-
nellon for 2010. At left, all
the contestants per-
formed a crowd-pleasing
routine on stage before
the judges selected the
winners.


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